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Vol. 122 No. 6

THE BACK MOUNTAIN’S NEWSPAPER SINCE 1889

SUNDAY APRIL 14-20, 2013

The

DALLAS POST

50¢

WILKES-BARRE, PA.

www.mydallaspost.com

AN EDITION OF THE TIMES LEADER

JACKSON TOWNSHIP

End of tax collection woes for Jackson Township

By SUSAN DENNEY Dallas Post Correspondent

tions that things are improving in the township and started by reporting that recycling is going well in the township.

Malak announced at the April 8 su- The township’s recycling center is open

pervisor ’s meeting othat township rev- enues are finally caught up after diffi- culties caused by the Don Wilkinson/ Centax agency. Supervisor Allen Fox added, “Since Berkheimer took over, there’s been a big improvement.” Fox pointed out three other indica-

from 8 a.m to 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday. Fox said compost is available at no cost to residents and that many are tak- ing advantage of this resource. He also reported that the construc- tion of the township playground will resume and that a soccer field will be

Jackson Township solicitor Jeffrey

created at no cost to taxpayers as the cost of creating the field has been do- nated by a township resident. Jackson Township supervisors an- nounced the winning of a gaming grant

they applied for in conjunction with authorized the township engineer to Lake-Lehman School District has been advertise for bids for a stormwater

awarded. The grant will provide for improvement project on Timbergrove

Road. The supervisors also approved the

improvements to district’s sports facili- ties, including a walking trail and new turf for the district’s football field. Fox pointed out to residents that

skillful grant writing ensured the proj- ect would be completed at no cost to township residents and that all fees had been included in the grant. In regular business, supervisors

See COLLECTION, Page 9

Teammate to some, friend to all

Teammate to some, friend to all CHARLOT TE BART IZEK pHO TOs/ FO R THE DA

CHARLOTTE BARTIZEK pHOTOs/ FOR THE DALLAs pOsT

Susan and Jim Schilling, of Dallas, receive a framed baseball shirt (#31) from Dylan Pilger and members of the Dallas baseball team. The Schillings’ son, Jason, a former member of the team, was killed in a car accident in December.

REMEMBERING JASON

By DOTTY MARTIN dmartin@mydallaspost.com

J ason Schilling had such an impact on his Dallas High School baseball teammates that his memory is guiding them through their

current season. Schilling was an outfielder for the Dallas High School baseball team for three years. His jersey - No. 31 - was not issued to any player for this season and his teammates will hang the jersey in the dugout every time it plays a game. A 2012 graduate of Dallas High School, Schil- ling died Dec. 1, 2012, when the automobile he was driving crashed into a tree on Carpenter Road in Dallas. His friends have created a living memorial at the tree. Prior to the Mountaineers’ game against Lake- Lehman last week, members of the team invited Schilling ’s family to be part of a sideline cere- mony where they were presented with a framed t-shirt made to look like a Dallas High School baseball jersey with the No. 31 on it. The jersey has Schilling ’s initials and the initials of Ron Noyalis on the sleeve. Noyalis, father of former DHS baseball standout Marc Noyalis, was killed last year while clearing trees. Jim and Susan Schilling and their son, Ste-

trees. Jim and Susa n Schilling and their son, Ste- The tree on Carpente r Ro

The tree on Carpenter Road in Harveys Lake that Jason Schilling crashed into has been made into a living memorial by his friends.

phen, were all on hand at the informal ceremony. “It was very emotional,” Jim Schilling said a few days later. “To me, it’s clearly a testament to the kids and the coaching staff. The gesture speaks to the goodness in their hearts and the compassion they have for Jason.” Schilling admitted that being present at the Lake-Lehman baseball field was difficult for him and his family but couldn’t say enough about his son’s baseball teammates. “They all gathered around us and patted us on the back,” he remembered. “It was very moving, very memorable. “The reality of it is that he is no longer with us,” Schilling continued, fighting back tears. “But these kids have made it their cause to keep him with them and they have brought some sun- shine into our lives.” Schilling also reported that team members sold stickers with his son’s inititals on them to players who wanted to wear them on their bat- ting helmets. The more than $100 raised was do- nated to the St. Vincent de Paul Soup Kitchen, an organization near and dear to Jason Schil- ling ’s heart .

See JASON, Page 9

Ashbridge remembered as Prince of BMT Library Auction, advocate for public good

By CHARLOTTE BARTIZEK Dallas Post Correspondent

If the red sliding door to the auction barn behind the Back Mountain Library was open, more than likely Ernie Ash- bridge was in there - moving furniture, dusting and care- fully arranging the over 600 antiques the library planned to sell in July. Ashbridge would wave guests in, gently and jovially in- viting them to look around and ogle at the treasures he found during the year. All were wel- comed, strangers and friends. “Just be careful not to bump into anything,” he would say.

This will be the first time in more than 57 years Ashbridge

will miss the event to which he devoted so much of his life.

ting a high enough price. He

knew the value of the antiques he had bought and would wince when the price was too

Ashbridge died Tuesday, low.

April 12 at the age of 82. Ashbridge was passionate about helping the library make as much money as possible from the sale of the antiques. Though a registered profes- sional auctioneer since 1978, he cared little for the limelight on stage, preferring to work behind the scenes, “gathering things” as he called it. He would sometimes bid on an item himself if he didn’t think the auctioneers were get-

Ashbridge served on the board of directors of the Back Mountain Memorial Library and several times as its presi- dent since the early 1980s. “Ernie was a person that made everything run smooth- ly,” said Martha Butler, direc- tor of the Back Mountain Me- morial Library. “He took care of all the details but was not afraid of big decisions either

See ASHBRIDgE, Page 4

i s i o n s e i t h e r See ASHBRIDgE, Page 4

CHARLOTTE BARTIZEK/ FOR THE DALLAs pOsT

Ernie Ashbridge, a long-time volunteer for the Back Mountain Memorial Library Auction, died this week.

LAKE-LEHMAN SCHOOL DISTRICT

LL board to increase energy efficiency

By SUSAN DENNEY Dallas Post Correspondent

The Lake-Lehman School Board will enter into a win-win contract to increase energy effi- ciency at the district’s buildings. At its April 8 meeting, the board of education approved the execution of an agreement with CM3 Building Solutions for a guaranteed energy performance contract. This type of contract provides energy-saving equipment. Under the contract, the equipment is guaranteed by the state to pro- duce savings equal to or greater than the amount of the amortiza- tion payment on the loan. Energy efficient boilers, windows and lighting might be part of the en- ergy savings package. The board hired Stevens & Lee, P.C. as bond counsel for the project and PNC Capital Markets LLC as project underwriter. The board also accepted the $65,000 bid of All American Tracks of Amherst , Ohio for re - surfacing of the athletic field’s running track. Superintendent James McGov- ern had lots to brag about in his remarks. He honored three stu- dents from Ross Elementary who were state winners of the Zaner- Bloser writing contest. Sarah Bednarek, Andrew Jubis and Kar- lee Kreller received certificates from the district. In a special moment, McGovern called board member Bo Kreller up to present his daughter Karlee with her cer- tificate. McGovern also acknowledged the winning History Day team at the high school. The superintendent also gave credit to a number of Lake-Lehm- an school district employees and volunteers for pulling off a minor miracle in gaining a $500,000 gaming grant for improved sports facilities. McGovern said the district’s grant writing process was only begun on Dec. 10, 2012 with a deadline of Dec. 31 of the same year. He praised Lori Bednarek, special projects coordinator for the district, for the success of the grant. According to McGovern, the district is committed to provid- ing all new facilities and improve- ments asked for in the grant even though the district had requested more than $800,000. McGovern announced that Sat- urday community work days will help make up the discrepancy in funds. He also said the district’s large fundraiser, the Knight of Mayhem, will still take place on June 1 even though the cost of the new turf is being provided by the grant. The board also accepted, with regret, the resignation of Mary Slaby, a language arts teacher; Nancy Walters, elementary/ remedial reading teacher; and Catherine Wolfe, a language arts teacher. The teachers were praised for their contributions to the district. The board’s next regular meet- ing will be held at 7 p.m. on Mon- day, May 13 in the library of the Junior-Senior High School.

next regular meet- ing will be held at 7 p.m. on Mon- day, May 13 in

PAGE 2

THE

DALLAS

POST

SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013

See ANSWERS, Page 5
See ANSWERS, Page 5

PROPERTY TRANSFERS

The following Back Mountain real estate transactions have been recorded in the Luzerne County Office of the Recorder of Deeds for the week of April 1, 2012:

BAC Home Loans Serving, LP (at- torney in fact) and Bank of New York Mellon (trustee) to Charles W. Gordon

Jr., 37 Weslend Ave. , Lot 10, Ross Town- ship; $105,100 Sidney Slody to Greogry and Nancy

A. Clark, Lots 1 and 2, Mount Airy Te r-

ra ce, Kingsto n Township; $139,000

Ro ber t A. Jr. and Debr a T. Ba ye r to Edward F. and Nancy H. Burke, Dallas Township; $199,9 00 Benjamin and Kathleen A. Gont- kowski to Kristin M. Kirchner, Lot 82, Oa k Hill, Le hman Township; $138,150 Landview Properties Inc. to Russell

E. II and Ann P. James, Lot 33, Goodle-

igh Manor, Dallas Township; $76,000 Landview Properties Inc. to Mat- thew D. Hale, Dallas Township; $115,0 00 Michael W. (administrator) and Kar-

en Robin (estate) to Sherri Kaskey, Harveys Lake Borough; $60,000 Marguerite M. Creek (trustee) and Marguerite M. Creel Trust to ENS Real Esta te LLC, Dallas Township;

$157,000

Raymond M. and Lu cy V. Chin to Randy James Stark, Lot 367, Marina Point, Harveys Lake Borough; $193,000 Wi llis Fa mily Living Tr ust, Michael R. and Lynda Willis (trustees) to Kevin J. and Lori L. Dillon, Lot 19, Dal- las Township; $440,0 00 William B., Bonnie M., Kenneth B. and Carrie Bauer to Timothy J. and Kelly J. Shoemaker, .56 acres, Dallas Township; $100,0 00 Slocum Development Group, LLC to Presidential Land Co., LTD, Lot 18, Slocum Esta tes, Kingsto n Township;

$87,500

Thomas J. and Alice McGrory to Si- mon M. Silver, Harveys Lake Borough;

$79,780

Ian T. Lisno w to Jonathan H. and Sa brina Showe, Lot 35, Dallas Town- ship; $161,140

Sa brina Showe , Lo t 35 , Dallas To wn- ship; $161,140 Meet Ca rMel

Meet CarMel

Carmel truly is the cat’s meow! He is a 2-year-old declawed sweet guy. Car- mel loves attention and is very sweet. As with all Blue Chip Farm’s adopt- able cats, he is an indoor only guy. Yo u ca n visit Ca rmel and his friends at

BLUE CHIP FA RMS ANIMAL REFUGE 974 Lockville Road Dallas

VISITING HOURS Tuesday, Thursday, Sat- urday and Sunday - Noon to 5 p.m. Other hours by appoint- ment Phone: 333-5265 Email: questions@bcfani- malrefuge.org

NEWS WA NT A PHOTO? You can now purchase any photo that appears in The

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CIRCULATION

Orders for subscriptions received by Friday at noon will begin the follow- ing week. Please inform us of dam- age or delay, call 829-5000. The Dallas Post is published weekly by Impressions Media, $25 per year in Luzerne, Lackawanna & Wyoming Counties (PA), $29 in NJ, NY and all other PA counties, $32 all other states. Periodicals postage paid at Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701-9996 POSTMASTER: Send address change to The Dallas Post, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711

The Dallas Post

Coverage Area: The Dallas Post covers the Back Mountain community which includes the Dallas and Lake-Lehman School Districts. We try to get to as many events as possible, but staff and space limitations make it impossible to cover everything. If you have news about your family, town or organization please send it to us and we’ll try to get it in. Photographs are welcome. Send them two ways, by mail to

15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711 or by e-mail to news@mydallaspost.com. E-mail is the best and most timely method for submis- sion. E-mailed photos should be in JPEG format with a resolution of at least 200 dpi. The deadline for all copy is Tuesday at noon. prior to publication. Corrections, clarifications? The Dallas Post will correct errors of fact or clarify any misunderstandings, call 675-5211. Have a story idea? Please call, we’d like to hear about it. Letters: The Dallas Post prints letters of local interest. Send letters to: Editor, The Dallas Post, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711. All letters must be signed and include a daytime phone number for verification.

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Display Advertising Deadline: Tuesdays at 12 noon Contact Diane McGee at 970-7153 The Dallas Post has a variety of advertising rates and programs. The Dallas Post satisfies most co-op ad programs and offers creative services at no charge. Combination rates with The Abington Journal, Clarks Summit and the Sunday Dispatch, Pittston are available.

SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013

THE

DALLAS

POST

PAGE 3

Dallas Borough announces clean up and street sweeping

side yard waste collection program. Residents may visit the Dallas Borough Building during normal business hours from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday to obtain the required permit. Call the Dallas Borough Administra- tive Office at675-1389 with any ques- tions pertaining to the curbside yard waste recycling program. Street sweeping program

The Dallas Borough Road Department will begin weekly curbside yard waste collection the week of May 13. The week- ly collection schedule will follow the Dal- las Borough Spring Cleanup scheduled for the week of May 6-11. Residents are asked not to place yard waste recycling containers curbside prior to the begin- ning of the collection season. As in previous years, borough road department employees will collect up to the equivalent of two 25-gallon re-

cycling containers weekly throughout Street Sweeping Program. The pro-

ment will begin the annual Spring

in excess of 20-25 pounds. Heavy con- tainers will not be picked-up. • Do not include rocks, tree limbs, yard or animal waste with the street cinders. After April 26, cinders must be placed in containers for pick up. Questions pertaining to this an- nouncement should be directed to the Dallas Borough Administrative Office

Spring cleanup Dallas Borough Council announces the schedule for the annual spring cleanup to be held from May 6 to 11 at the Dallas Borough Municipal Build- ing, 25 Main St., Dallas. Hours of op- eration will be from 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday and 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday. Spring cleanup is only available to Dallas Borough resi- dents. Regulations will be enforced for the 2013 spring cleanup. Dallas Borough will require all residents to obtain an admission permit for the cleanup and

The Dallas Borough Road Depart- at 675-1389.

gram is expected to begin within the next week, weather permitting. The Road Department requests that borough residents follow a few simple instructions to assist in the collection of road cinders and materials deposited

• Rake cinders out to the side of the road in even layers and avoid large piles. Under no circumstances should cinders be swept into the stormwater catch basins. • Do not fill containers with cinders

the season. Residents are to have yard waste containers curbside by Monday morning fo r collection. Ya rd wa ste vo l- umes exceeding the two 25-gallon con- tainer limit will not be collected. Yard waste containing or including rocks,

road cinders, ashes or animal waste throughout the winter driving season.

will not be collected. In the interest of public safety, residents are reminded not to place containers or bundled yard waste within the road right of way. There is a $25 annual permit required for residents to participate in the curb-

the following fee schedule will be im- plemented:

• Cars, small SUVs, midsize SUVs

a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday. at the Dallas Borough Municipal Build-

ing. No refunds will be issued. Residents are reminded that the borough will not accept household gar- bage, recyclables including yard waste, toxic or hazardous materials, asbestos, large construction debris, paint/paint cans, batteries, electronics and ashes. The borough will accept a limited number of non-commercial vehicle tires at a fee of $3 for each tire. Bulky furniture items and large ap-

pliances require an additional fee of $5 per item. All refrigerators, freezers, air conditioners, and dehumidifiers must have documentation that all Freon and other gases have been removed. Acceptance or rejection of any items is at the discretion of Dallas Borough Road Department personnel and Dallas Borough administration. Questions about spring cleanup should be directed to the Dallas Bor- ough Administrative Office at 675-

and mini-vans will require a $10 permit (unlimited entry). Small pick-up trucks and full-size/ large SUVs will require a $15 permit (one trip per permit / three permit maximum).

• Full size pick-up trucks, utility

trailers and cargo vans of less than one ton will require $25 permit (one trip per permit / three permit maximum).

• Large vehicles over one ton will

require a $90 permit (one trip per per- mit/ one permit maximum). Proof of residency such as a tax bill or driver ’s license will be required to purchase the necessary permit. Admis- sion permits will be issued to the oc- cupants, not owners of Dallas Borough rental units.

In an effort to avoid delays at the dro- off site during cleanup week, residents are asked to pre-purchase their permits

during borough office hours from 9 1389.

Spring cleanup in Franklin Township

Spring cleanup for Franklin Township residents will be held from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, May 4. Residents are asked to bring items they wish to discard to the Franklin Township Municipal Building during the above hours. The township’s road department employees, along with volun-

teers, will be available to assist in emptying vehicles. Proof of residency will be required. The following conditions and limitations will apply:

• FEES – A charge of $20

will be assessed for the first pickup load. A second load will be charged $25. Trailers will be charged additional

fees. In all caes, residents are asked to have either the exact amount of cash or a check.

• TIRES – Each household

will be limited to discard up to four tires with a $3 charge per tire. Tires must be re- moved from rims. Tires must be clean, not cut or busted off rims. Must be normal automo- bile tires. No truck tires and no small tires. • NON ACCEPTABLE ITEMS – Hazardous waste, chemicals, any type of wire or cable, coils of any kind, propane tanks or bottles, com- pressed cylinders or closed cylinders of any kind, drums with any liquids, containers with any liquids, batteries, brush, trees, stumps, leaves, grass, animal or human waste, household garbage, cinder blocks, shingles, sheet rock, or other building materials chain link fence, wire, filled or partially filled paint cans. NOTE - Computers, computer monitors, computer peripher- als and televisions will not be accepted.

• APPLIANCES – A charge

of $5 each for refrigerators, stoves, freezers, air condition- ers and dehumidifiers. Must have documentation that all freon and other gases have been removed. In addition, all doors must be removed from refrigerators and freezers. • OTHER – Small items and broken glass must be placed in cardboard boxes. Metal must be separated from landfill items. Accepance of rejection of any items not listed above is at the discretion of the Franklin Township supervisors.

Paul Miller, founder of Flow Circus, will bring his juggling act to the Back Mountain

Paul Miller, founder of Flow Circus, will bring his juggling act to the Back Mountain Memorial Library on Thursday, April 25.

Flow Circus comes to library

“Juggling Money ” isn’t just for grown ups. Pre-school children are invited to the Back Mounain Memorial Library at 10 a.m. on Thursday, April 25 for a fun- filled program sponsored by PNC Bank. Join Paul Miller as he tells the story of how a trip to the library led him on

an adventure filled with high-flying jug- gling, amazing magic and the wonders of circus. In the end, he learns that hard work and smart choices lead to reward- ing results. The program reinforces ba- sic financial concepts in a memorable and playful way. Call the library at 675-1182 to regis-

ter. Paul Miller is a nationally touring va- riety entertainer. He has performed on Disney Cruise Lines, off Broadway and everywhere in between. He founded Flow Circus in 1999 to promote active learning and play through the juggling arts.

‘Caring for Cops’ set for April 27 at Checkerboard

Jordan Joseph, of baseball game.

Mountain Top, an

eighth-grade student and for adults and children

ages 11 and up and $12 for children age 10 and under which includes pizza, wings and soda. Eat in only; walk-ins wel- come. For tickets or to make a donation, call 406- 6123. Proceeds will be used to purchase bul- letproof vests for law

Meal price is $15

volunteer, will host “Car- ing F.O.R. Cops” from 1 to 5 p.m. on Saturday, April 27 at the Checker- board Inn at 385 Carver- ton Road, Trucksville. There will be food, raffle baskets, arts and crafts for children, music and a disc jockey. There will also be a silent auc-

tion to win the oppor- enforcement officers to

help make our neighbor- hoods safer.

tunity to throw the first pitch at a RailRiders

sa fer. tunity to throw the first pitch at a RailRiders Officer Jude Allen, of Wi

Officer Jude Allen, of Wilkes-Barre Township and Jordan Joseph, an eighth- grade student and volunteer, plan “Caring F.O.R. Cops” from 1 to 5 p.m. on Sa tu rd ay, April 27 at the Checkerboard Inn at 385 Ca rver to n Road, Tr ucks- ville.

Tupper to run for Dallas Twp. supervisor seat

Craig A. Tupper, a long-time resi- dent of Dallas Township, recently an- nounced that he will vie for a Dallas Township supervisor seat in the May 21 Primary Election. A 1972 Dallas High School graduate, Tupper is employed by PSBank as assis- tant vice president of its new Tunkhan- nock office. Prior to working in the banking industry, he was the owner of Tupper Sales & Service, based in the Back Mountain, for 26 years. Tupper previously served on Dallas

Borough Council and Dallas Town- ship’s Zoning Hearing Board and cur- rently serves as chairman of the board for Dallas Area Municipal Author- ity, where he has represented Dallas Township since 2004. The candidate also previously served as treasurer of the Back Moun- tain Business Association Board of Di- rectors and is an active member of the Dallas Lions Club. Tupper will run on the Republican ticket for a six-year term.

Dallas Twp. seeks input from towers

The Dallas Township Board of Super- visors is seeking input from area towing service providers in an effort to consoli- date the municipality ’s present towing response system. A proposal and supporting documents, compiled by Dallas Township Police Chief Robert Jolley, was presented at the super- visors’ April 2 work session. Towing contractors interested in taking part in future towing operations within Dallas Township are invited to pick up a

copy of the proposal to examine and pro- vide input at the next board of supervisors work session on at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, May 7 in the Dallas Township Municipal Building conference room. Packets are available at the Dallas Township Administrative Offices, located at 2919 SR 309 Highway, Dallas, during normal business hours of 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. Interested parties can also contact the office by call- ing 674-2007.

Cast your vote today for the Lemmond Award

Nominations for the Charles

D. Lemmond Jr. Community

Spirit award will be accepted by The Dallas Post until 5 p.m. on Friday, May 3. The award, established by The Dallas Post and named after the former senator who passed away in 2012, will rec- ognize a resident of the Back

Mountain for his or her leader- ship and advancement of com- munity spirit. Readers of The Dallas Post will vote for the person they believe would be an appropri- ate recipient of this award.

A ballot appears in today’s

newspaper.

The Charles D. Lemmond

Jr. Community Spirit Award

honors those who endeavor to improve the lives of Back Mountain residents through outstanding communtiy ser- vice, public service or philan- throphy and embody Senator Lemmond’s commitment to doing the right thing, in the right way, for the right rea- sons. Charles D. Lemmond Jr. (1929-2012) called the Back Mountain home for more than 50 years. Through his con- stant and active involvement in a wide range of community groups, he touched many lives, gave a sense of direction and responsibility to numerous im- provement projects and served as an inspiration to countless individuals. As a soldier, solicitor, pros- ecutor, judge and legislator, Lemmond demonstrated a strong devotion to civic duty. His 21 years as a well-respect- ed state Senator were marked by his standard of integrity, his pursuit of justice and his desire to do what was right for the people and the community he served.

Seminar will discuss small games of chance

Rep. Karen Boback (R-Co- lumbia/Luzerne/Wyoming) will host a Small Games of Chance Seminar from 6 to 9 p.m. on Thursday, April 18 at the Lemmond Theater at

Walsh Hall on the campus of Misericordia University in Dallas.

A representative from the

Pennsylvania State Police’s Bureau of Liquor Control En- forcement Unit will be in at- tendance to discuss the chang- es to the law and how it will be enforced. Those interesting in attend- ing this seminar should RSVP by contacting one of Boback’s district offices in Tunkhan- nock at 836-4777 or Hunlock Creek at 477-3752.

PAGE 4

THE

DALLAS

POST

SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013

CIVIC BRIEFS

ALL-DAY BINGO SET An all-day Bingo will be held today, April 14 at the North- moreland Twp. Fire Hall in Centermoreland. Doors open at 12:01 p.m. and

early birds begin at 1:30 p.m.

A dinner will be served at ap-

proximately 4:30 p.m. For reservations, call Jim or Carol at 333-4906.

AUDITIONS SLATED Auditions for “The Misad- ventures of Little Red Riding Hood” will be held at 7 p.m. on Monday, April 15 at the Music Box Dinner Playhouse, Hughes Street, Swoyersville, 196 Hughes St., Swoyersville. All roles are open to men and women. Participants must bring sheet music of a song of their choice and an accompanist will be pro-

vided. All will be asked to read from the script. Show dates are May 17, 18, 19 with schoolday performances on May 15 and

17.

For more information, call

283-2195.

BOBACK HOURS LISTED A member of Rep. Karen Boback’s staff will be available from 9 a.m. to noon on Wednes- day, April 17 at the Benton Senior Center in the Northern Columbia Community and Cultural Center, 42 Community Drive in Benton. Individuals who cannot attend the satellite hours can contact either of Boback’s full- time district offices, located in Sweet Valley at 477-3752 or in

Tunkhannock at 836-4777.

BREAKFAST SERVED Dallas Odd Fellows Oneida Lodge 371 will hold its annual breakfast from 7:30 to 10:30 a.m. on Saturday, April 20 at St.

Paul’s Lutheran Church, Dallas, Route 309 to 415. A donation of $7 is requested.

HARMONY CHORUS SLATES CONCERT “Celebrate Harmony 75 Ye ars,” the annual concert of the Wyoming Valley Barber- shop Harmony Chorus will be held at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday, April 20 at Wyoming Area High School, Exeter. Tickets, at $20 and $15 and all reserved seating, are avail- able from any member of the chorus, by calling 287-2476 or 696-3385 and at the door the night of the performance.

BREAKFAST BUFFET The Noxen Volunteer Fire Comp0amy will hold a break- fast buffet from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Sunday, April 21 at the fire hall on Stull Road, Noxen. Ticket prices are $8 for adults and $4 for children under 12 years of age.

BINGO SLATED Bingo will be held on Mon- day, April 22 at Northmoreland Fire Hall in Centermoreland. Doors open at 5 p.m. and early birds start at 6:30 p.m. Food and beverage will be available. For more informa- tion, call Jim at 333-4906.

AUDITIONS SLATED

Auditions for “The 25th An- nual Putnam County Spelling Bee” will be held at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, April 23 and Thurs- day, April 25 at the Music Box Dinner Playhouse, 196 Hughes St., Swoyersville. Five men’s roles and four women’s roles are open to those ages 16 and older. Participants must bring sheet music of a

song of their choice and an ac- companist will be provided. All will be asked to read from the script. Performances are June

13 to 16 and June 20 to 23.

For more information, call

283-2195.

LIBRARY FUNDRAISER Friends of the Back Mountain Memorial Library and Leggio’s

Italian Restaurant, 64 E. Center Hill Road, Dallas will join together to host a fundraising event at the restaurant from 5 to 8 p.m. on Wednesday, April

24 to support activities of the

Children’s Summer Reading Program.

A percentage of the total

sales (bar not included) taken in during that time, includ- ing eat-in, take out and gift certificates purchased, will be donated to the library.

ROAST BEEF DINNER

A roast beef dinner will be

held from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. on We dnesday, April 24 at the Northmoreland Fire Hall in Centermoreland. Cost is $8 for adults and $4 for children under 12 years of age. Tickets will be available at the door. Ta ke outs ava ilable.

ASHBRIDGE

Continued from Page 1 and was interested in and en-

couraging to the library staff.” Ashbridge and his wife, Betty,

of Shavertown, became involved

in volunteering at the auction in 1959 when Betty was the antiques chairman. Ernie took over the position and volun-

teered for the next 50 years until 2009 when he stepped down for health reasons. The pair was inseparable - Er- nie moving the heavy furniture while Betty cleaned and cata- logued it all. They ran an estate sale business together, suggest- ing to families to donate left- overs from a sale to the auction. In addition to his wife, Ernie leaves behind a son, Ernie III, daughter Robyn Carson and three grandchildren, Ernest Anew Ashbridge, A.J. Carson and Amanda Carson. During the 2009 library auc- tion, Sue Hand, an area artist and yearly contributor to the auction, painted a tribute to Ashbridge. The painting was bought by a group of about 40 individuals from the commu- nity, some contributing as much as $1,000, netting thousands of dollars for the library. The picture was then given to Ash- bridge as a token of his 50 years

of service to the auction.

Ashbridge’s largesse and com- forting spirit extended to the greater Back Mountain com- munity, as well. The retired Ha- nover Bank executive served on the Dallas School Board for 32

years, 15 years as its president, and represented Dallas on the West Si de Vo -Tech board. “He was the man behind the scenes of so many successful Back Mountain community en- deavors that today make such

a difference in our community.

We rode on his expertise,” said State Rep. Karen Boback, who

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served on the library board of directors with Ashbridge “I can’t look at a piece of glass without thinking what he taught me about antiques,” she added.

here today,” said Joe Stager, who co-chaired the auction with Ashbridge in 2000. “He gave his whole life to this community, had good ideas, would listen and respected your position, as well.” Steve Traver, an area auc- tioneer, credits Ashbridge with helping him in his career. “Er- nie helped me grow, gain my confidence back and got me

into some high-end estate sales. He was my buddy and got me involved in volunteering at the library auction.” In 2009, the last year he was

“I’m missing a true friend antiques chairman, Ashbridge

was quoted in an article in The Dallas Post. “Even if I’m not a chairman next year, I’ll always be here helping them. I’ll never go away. They can’t get rid of me,” he chuckled. “ I do enjoy auctions.” Friends are invited to call from 6 to 8 p.m. on Friday, April 19 at the Disque Funeral Home, 672 Memorial Highway, Dallas. Funeral services will be private.

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Boz Scaggs coming to Misericordia

Grammy Award-winner Boz Scaggs will bring the unmis- takable blend of his blues, rock and jazz music to the Wells Far- go Amphitheater as he head- lines the annual Misericordia University Under the Stars Summer Arts Festival at 8 p.m. on Saturday, July 13. The festival also includes the Jazz in July concert featuring the Emily Asher’s Garden Par- ty with guest Bria Skonberg at 8 p.m. on Monday, July 8. “The Memphis Tour’’ is in support of Scaggs’ new studio album, “Memphis,’’ his first in five years. His 32 show dates take him throughout the country from California to Connecticut and from Texas to Florida, as well as Canada. He puts a distinc- tive touch on classic hits like “Rainy Night in Georgia,’’ “Corinna Corinna’’ and “Mixed Up, Shook Up Girl,’’ as well as

on a couple of originals. The 13-tracks were recorded in Memphis, Te nn., in three da ys at the city ’s landmark Royal Studios. Tickets for the Under the Stars Summer Arts Festival go on sale Wednesday, May 1

exclusively through the Miseri- cordia University Box Office at

674-6719.

the Miseri- cordia University Box Office at 674-6719. Grammy Aw ard-winner Bo z Sc aggs will

Grammy Award-winner Boz Scaggs will headline the annual Misericordia University Under the Stars Summer Ar ts Festi- val at 8 p.m. on Saturday, July 13.

Tickets for the Starlight concert featuring Emily Ash-

Concert featuring Boz Scaggs are $380 for festival tables that seat six, $30 for amphitheater

tickets and $20 for lawn seats. for amphitheater tickets and

er ’s Garden Party with guest Bria Skonberg are $120 for festival tables that seat six, $15

Tickets for the Jazz in July $8 for lawn seats.

Senior MenuS

Senior citizens centers spon- sored by the Area Agency on Aging for Luzerne and Wyoming Counties offer hot noon meals Monday through Friday to people 60 years of age or older. Donations from participants are gratefully accepted and needed in order to expand this program. The following is the menu for the week of April 15:

MONDAY: Hamburger, cu cu m-

ber and beet salad, cream of broccoli soup, whole wheat sandwich roll, crackers, ketchup, mustard, ice cream cup, marga- rine, milk and coffee.

TUE SDAY: Ro se mary ro as t tu r- key, gravy, bread stuffing, peas and pearl onions, whole wheat bread, cranberry sauce, choco- late chip cookie, margarine, milk and coffee.

WEDNE SDAY: Honey mus ta rd chicken, oven-browned potatoes,

chuckwagon corn, whole wheat dinner roll, fruit and yogurt, margarine, milk and coffee.

THURSDAY: Ba ke d ham with fruit sauce, gravy, sweet pota- toes, lima beans, whole wheat dinner roll, strawberry short- cake, margarine, milk and coffee.

FRIDAY: Sa lisbury stea k, noodles, parsley buttered car- rots, peas, whole wheat bread, birthday cake, margarine, milk and coffee.

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SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013

THE

DALLAS

POST

PAGE 5

CHURCH BRIEFS

MISSION FA IR SET The Lehman-Idetown United Methodist Church will hold a mission and ministry fair from 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. on Sunday, April 21 at the church, 1011 Mountain View Drive, Lehman. Participants will be given the opportunity to hear about many upcoming missions and ministries that are open to our church and the wider com- munity. Some upcoming events featured will be a Ladies Te a, Night at WBS Railriders, Kingdom Rock Vacation Bible School for children, as well as family camping and outdoor worship at Frances Slocum.

YARD SALE The Huntsville United Meth-

odist Church, 2355 Huntsville Road, Shavertown, will hold a community yard sale from

8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday,

April 27. Vendor space is avail- able at $10 each. The kitchen will also be open with homemade foods and desserts. Call 477-3748 for more information. Trucksville United Meth- odist Church Chicken BBQ, May 3 & May 4, 2013, a Back Mountain Tradition!

BARBEQUE SLATED The annual spring barbeque will be held from 5 to 7 p.m. on Friday, May 3 and Satur- day, May 4 at the Trucksville United Methodist Church, 40 Knob Hill Road, Trucksville. Ta ke outs begin at 4:30 p.m. The meny includes a half chicken, baked potato with all the fixings, homeamde des- serts and beverages. Ticket prices are $8 for adults and $4 for children. Reservations can be made by calling 696-3897.

RUMMAGE SALE The deacons of Trinity Pres- byterian Church in Dallas have set May 31 and June 1 for their gigantic rummage sale in the fellowship hall of the church, 105 Irem Road, Dallas, across from the Country Club Shop- ping Center. The sale will take place from

9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Friday, May

31 and from 9 a.m. to noon on Saturday, June 1. Saturday will be Bag Day - all you can stuff into a large brown grocery bag for only $2. Items available are clothing in good condition for men, women and children, cos- tume jewelry, household items, knickknacks, collectibles, toys, books, holiday items and more.

Seminary honor roll announced

Dr. Claire Hornung, Dean of Wyoming Seminary Lower School, has announced the Back Mountain students named to the Academic High Honor Roll and Academic Honor Roll for the second trimester of the 2012-2013 academic year. HIGH HONOR ROLL Grade 6: Michael Doggett, Shavertown; Kyle Hromisin, Dallas; Zane Nardone, Shaver- town; Benjamin Paglia, Shaver- town; Mia Raineri, Shavertown. Grade 7: Bobby Austin, Dal- las; Duncan Lumia, Dallas; Ol- ivia Meuser, Shavertown; Dan- iel Paglia, Shavertown; Samuel Sweitzer, Dallas. Grade 8: Avery Conyngham, Shavertown; Andrew Kim, Dal- las; Michael Kim, Dallas; Nicole Lukesh, Wyoming; David Nape, Shavertown; AndrewSchukraft, Dallas; Gabriella Soper, Shaver- town; Dominic Wright , Dallas. HONOR ROLL Grade 6: Nicolas Bufalino, Dallas; Robert deLuna, Dallas; Tristram Ravenscroft, Shaver- town. Grade 7: Madeline Arthur, Wyoming; Arianna Bufalino, Dallas; Olivia Ostrowski, Dallas; Levi Sunday-Lefkowitz, Shaver- town. Grade 8: Carly Clemente, Dallas; Payton McCormick, Dal- las; Mei Snow, Dallas; Spencer Stirewalt, Shavertown.

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Ross Students of the Building announced

Nominees for the Ross Elementy School Students of the Building Program for the month of March demonstrated the value of being responsible during the month and were nominated by their teachers. From left, first row, are Dana Post, Meagan Judge, Elizabeth Blaski, Adora Shannon, Dustin Heinrich, Kayla Lettieri, Cortney Guastella, Hunter Lee. Second row, Mrs. Costello, fifth-grade teacher; Bryant Bidding, Derrick Lanning, Brianna Hodle, Morgan Marchakitus, Jacqueline Davenport, Ceaira Smith, Donald James, principal; Jennifer Martin, Laura DePrimo, first-grade teacher.

WVCA walk steps off April 27

Wyoming Valley Children’s Asso - ciation annual “Do it for the Kids” Walk-a-thon and Festival will be held on Saturday, April 27 at the agency, 1133 Wyoming Ave., Forty Fort. Registration begins at 9 a.m. and the walk begins at 10 a.m. The event will be held rain or shine. TUX, Ronald McDonald and a juggler will kick off the event. Ad- ditionally, the SWB RailRiders mascot will make an appearance. There will be pony rides, a moon bounce, face painting, balloon ani- mals and children’s games in addi- tion to raffles, food, a disc jockey and vendors galore. Every walker who registers will

receive a t-shirt, a chance to win a 24” youth bicycle and a voucher for food. Additional food items will be available for purchase. For more information, call 714-

1246

available for purchase. For more information, call 714- 1246 See PUZZLES, Page 2 BMT students named

See PUZZLES, Page 2

For more information, call 714- 1246 See PUZZLES, Page 2 BMT students named to Seminary dean’s
For more information, call 714- 1246 See PUZZLES, Page 2 BMT students named to Seminary dean’s

BMT students named to Seminary dean’s list

Wyoming Seminary Dean Jay Harvey has announced

the Back Mountain students Jacob Ridilla, Shavertown; named to the Upper School Adam Rinehouse, Shaver-

town; Amanda Schall, Hunlock Creek; William Thede, Dallas; Alannah Trombetta, Dallas; Zachary Wise, Shavertown. DEAN’S LIST Corinne Conyngham, Shavertown; Dominique Cos- lett, Harveys Lake; Gabrielle

Desai, Shavertown; Matthew Coslett, Harveys Lake; Ryan

town; Adam O’Brien, Hunlock Creek; Kelly Platt, Dallas;

Dean’s List for the winter tri- mester of the 2012-2013 aca- demic year. DEAN’S LIST HIGH HONORS Sai Abhishek, Shavertown; Emma Bertram, Dallas; Isabel- la Del Priore, Dallas; Samarth

Doggett, Shavertown; Lau- ren Fernandez, Dallas; Jamie Goldstein, Dallas; Gabrielle Grossman, Shavertown; Tyler

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topher Kim, Dallas; Andrew Katherine Paglia, Shavertown;

Leana Pande, Shavertown; Alexis Quick, Shavertown; Alaina Schukraft, Dallas; Jason Schwartz, Shavertown; Kate- lyn Stemrich, Sweet Valley.

Levandoski, Dallas; Tyler Mar- tin, Shavertown; Danielle Mel- nick, Dallas; Kristen Mericle, Shavertown; Elijah Miller, Dal- las; Madison Nardone, Shaver-

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Page 6

EDITORIAL

Sunday, April 14, 2013

The Dallas Post

www.mydallaspost.com

Community Newspaper Group

THE TIMES LEADER 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 18711 - 570-675-5211 news@mydallaspost.com

Joe Butkiewicz EXECUTIVE EDITOR

829-7249

jbutkiewicz@timesleader.com

Dotty Martin EDITOR

970-7440

dmartin@mydallaspost.com

Diane McGee Advertising

970-7153

dmcgee@timesleader.com

Diane McGee Advertising 970-7153 dmcgee@timesleader.com As part of National Library Week at Misericordia

As part of National Library Week at Misericordia University, the Mary Kintz Bevevino Library staff has scheduled a slate of events. Staff members who participated in the planning are, from left, Colleen Newhart, National Library Week coordina- tor; Jean Dobinick, circulation; Beth Spaciano, acquisitions; Jennifer Luksa, collection resource management; Susan Lazur, senior secretary, and Sameera Redlear, electronic resources librarian.

Bevevino Library celebrates National Library Week

The Mary Kintz Bevevino Library at Misericordia University has scheduled a slate of events to celebrate National Library Week, April 14-20. The theme of the 2013 national celebration is “Commu- nities Matter @ your Library” with events planned to help students and the community learn about the services offered at the library. The Friends of the Mary Kintz Bevevino Library at Misericordia University will present “Importance of Keeping Records for Librar- ies and National Archives” by William J. Bosanko, chief operating officer (COO) for the National Archives and Records Administra- tion in Washington, D.C. from 4:30 to 6 p.m. on Tuesday, April 16 in the McGowan Room. A Book Swap from April 16-18 will offer the chance to trade gen- tly-used books for others that have been donated. Members of the Misericordia community have also been invited to tell their personal stories through their shoes at an exhibit en- titled “Walk in My Shoes” which will be on display on the second floor of the library throughout the week. “Think Outside the Book,” a workshop on crafting with book pages will be held from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Thursday, April 18 in the McGowan Room. Anyone signing up during the week as a Friend of the Library will be eligible for list of great prizes, including a gift certificate at Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs and a basket from the Nimble Hill Winery, Tunkhannock, grandstand tickets to the Pocono 500, Martz Trailways bus tickets to Atlantic City and tickets to the Northeast- ern Pennsylvania Philharmonic. Other events throughout the week include a decorating contest for MU clubs and departments, a bake sale and a costume jewelry sale. In addition, an indoor bowling contest, faculty lectures, and a paper airplane contest are scheduled for members of the Misericor- dia community. For more information, call 674-3036.

MOMENTS IN TIME

The History Channel

* On April 23, 1954, Hank

Aaron hits the first home run of his Major League Baseball ca- reer. Twenty years later, Aaron became baseball’s new home-

run king when he broke Babe

Ruth’s long-standing record of 714 career homers.

* On April 22, 1970, Earth

Day, an event to increase pub- lic awareness of the world’s environmental problems, is celebrated in the United States

for the first time. Millions of Americans participated in ral- lies, marches and educational

programs. * On April 25, 1983, the So- viet Union releases a letter that Ru ssian leader Yu ri Andropov wrote to Samantha Smith, an American fifth-grader from Manchester, Maine, inviting her to visit his country. Andropov’s

letter came in response to a note Smith had sent him in December 1982, asking if the Soviets were planning to start a nuclear war.

asking if the Soviets were planning to start a nuclear war. YOUR SPACE Students in Miss

YOUR SPACE

Students in Miss Burgess’ 1953 first-grade class at the Trucksville Elementary School are shown here. Can you identify any of these people?

“YOUR SPACE” is reserved specifi- cally for Dallas Post readers who have something they’d like to share with fellow readers. Submitted items may include photographs or short stories and should be sent via e-mail to news@mydallaspost.com,

by fax to 675-3650 or by mail to The Dallas Post, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711. Information must include the submit- ting person’s name, address and telephone number in the event we have questions. Readers wishing to have their photos

returned should include a self-addressed/ stamped envelope. Items will be published in the order in which they are received. The editor of The Dallas Post reserves the right to reject any items submitted for publication.

20 YEARS AGO - 1993

Two Dallas students recently boom through the combined

Elementary School with a

Fun Night for benefit of Lake-Lehman Band and Ath- letic Banquet is scheduled for Friday night at Lake-Lehman

is a basketball game between PTA and faculty, followed by games between eighth and

Jack Donahue, general chair- man; program, James Duffy and John Bush. Paul Monahan will be in charge of publicity. 70 YEARS AGO - 1943 A special Lenten Musical arranged by the Senior, Junior and chancel choirs will be pre-

of Dallas Methodist Church on April 18. Mrs. Raymond B. Wall Sr. will be guest soloist; Mrs. We sley Oliver, pianist and Lewis LeGrand, violinist. Mrs. Peter Berry entertained members of her card club at the home of Mrs. Grant Shaner of Parrish Street last Wednesday. Guests were Mrs. Sterling Meade, Mrs. Charles Stookey, Mrs. William Wilson, Mrs. Edwin Nelson and Mrs. Clifford Ide. Members of the Dallas Rota- ry entertained their wives and friends at their annual Charter Night dinner and dance at Lun- dy ’s last evening. An informal program and music for dancing were enjoyed. Present were:

Mr. and Mrs. John Nicholson, Mr. and Mrs. L.L. Richardson, Mr. and Mrs. A.C. Dick, Dr. and Mrs. Robert Bodycomb, Mr. and Mrs. Nesbitt Garinger, Mr. and Mrs. Harold Payne,

learned that their entries last year in a drug and alcohol awareness poster contest sponsored by the Drug and Alcohol

awareness poster contest sponsored by the Drug and Alcohol   Liquor Con- ONLY trol Bo ard
 

Liquor Con-

ONLY

trol Board

YESTERDAY

were among

six posters featured on a calendar distrib- uted statewide. Anna Lloyd’s entry from Dallas Elementary School encouraged people to “Get high on life.” John Shaskas Jr. from Westmoreland School entitled his winning entry, “Al- cohol tears people apart.”

efforts of P.T.O., parents and friends. The school is the only

elementary school in the Dallas High School. First attraction

district to have computers. Some of the first students to try out the new computers

Administra- were Tracy Stahl, Howard Post , ninth, tenth and eleventh grade sented at the evening service

tion of the

Pennsylvania Prokopchak.

Chris Kurchinski and Jason

teams. There will be a wres- tling demonstration. Dancing will follow the games. Harry Swepston Jr. is chairman. Thirty-ninth annual banquet of Dallas Chapter No. 396 Order of Eastern Star, honor- ing the Worthy matron, Mrs. Betty Meeker, will be at the Irem Te mple Country club this Friday. Mrs. Evelyn Smith and Mrs. Mildred Bronson, chairmen, are being assisted by Bethia King, Elsie Jolley, Doro- thy Dodson, Myrtle Rineman, Gertrude Davies, Elma Price, Oce Beryl Austin, Mildred Lutes and Virginia Swanson. 60 YEARS AGO - 1953 Altar and Rosary Society of Saint Therese’s Church will

hold a card party in the church Mr. and Mrs. Paul Warriner,

auditorium on the evening of April 29. Mrs. Willard Garey is chairman assisted by Mrs. Algert Antanaitis and Mrs. Clinton Johnson, tickets; Mrs. J.H. Gabel and Mrs. Jacob

Local basketball sharpshoot- ers recently received trophies

for their efforts in the recent Rotary Basketball Shootout. Awardees included Paul Catrombone, Lee Wagner, Joe Phillips, Eric May and Todd Krupa.

40 YEARS AGO - 1973

Cub Pack 132, Dallas, recently held their annual Pinewood Derby at the Trinity

Dallas Area Federated Wom- United Presbyterian Church.

en’s Club inducted two new members at their meeting last

we ek . Welcomed to the club by by David Smith.

Mary Perugino, membership chairman, were Carol Mayeski and Tina Richards. Lake-Lehman High School students Jennifer Booth and Jeffrey Gold were named Commended Students in the National Merit Scholarship Program. The senior students were honored for their out- standing performance on the 1992 PSAT/NMSQT, which

places them in the top five per- cent of more than one million students who entered the 1993 Merit Program by taking the qualifying test.

First place in the race was won by Frank Michael and second

The Dallas Woman’s Club will hold a Salad Luncheon and Fashion Show on April 25 at the Shavertown United Methodist Church. The Marilyn Gauntlett Modeling Agency will provide models for fashions by Bergman’s. Mr. Robert Maturi has been named chairman and Mrs. L.L.

30 YEARS AGO - 1983

The students of Gate of Heaven School recently partici-

pated in their annual Gertrude winners in the Dallas Junior

Hawk Easter Candy sale. First prize was one by Marla Ann Sholtis. Kristin Elechko was

second, Michael Paraschek was prize; Ruth Daley, third prize;

third, and Ta ra Jo nes came in fourth. Microcomputers have entered Dallas Township

Richardson, co-chairman. They Beline, baked goods; Mrs. Paul Mr. and Mrs. Wa rren Yeisley,

will be assisted by the follow- ing committee: Mrs. Leonard Cowett, Mrs. Sheldon Evans, Mrs. James Huston, Mrs. Dan- iel Richards, Mrs. Raymond Flick, Mrs. Michael Yozviak, Mrs. William Schilling and Mrs. Marvin Carkhuff. The following students were

Woman’s Club Senior High Art Contest: Raelene Daring, first prize; George Otto, second

Lynn Peterson, Cynthia Beline and Rich Ricards, honorable mention.

50 YEARS AGO - 1963

Laux, prizes; Mrs. James Si-

mon, door prizes; Mrs. Edward Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Hallock,

Jackson, publicity, Mrs. Albert Pesavento and Mrs. Edward Miller, candy; Mrs. Philip Coniglio and Mrs. Paul Laux, refreshments; and Mrs. John Stenger Jr., door. Plans for a Mother ’s Day breakfast to be held at the American Legion Home, Dallas, were perfected at the monthly meeting of Gate of Heaven Holy Name Society.

Robert Laux, president, presid- mation for “Only Yesterday” is

ed and appointed the following committees: Rev. Francis Kane,

honorary chairman, assisted by

Mr. and Mrs. Peter Jurchak,

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Eck, Mr. and Mrs. Wa rren Tayl or, Mr. and Mrs. Dan Sutch, Mr. and Mrs. John Durbin, Mr. and Mrs. James Huston, Miss Jean Rock- efeller, Miss Marion Veitch, Dr. J.W. Ehrhart , Mr. and Mrs. L.F. Kingsley, Dr. and Mrs. W.L. Lanyon and Mr. and Mrs. George Metz. The Dallas Post has been in existence for 122 years. Infor-

taken from back issues of the newspaper and reprinted here exactly as it first appeared.

newspaper and reprinted here exactly as it first appeared. “The Phillies, of course, because it’s Pennsylvania.

“The Phillies, of course, because it’s Pennsylvania. I re- member seeing Pete Rose play there.”

Debbie Baer

Dallas

“What is Yo ur favo rite baseball teaM?”

“The Evans Falls Jenks. I used to play for them when I was young.” Elmer
“The Evans Falls Jenks. I used to play for them when I was young.” Elmer

“The Evans Falls Jenks. I used to play for them when I was young.”

Elmer Daley

“The Misericordia men’s Cougars base- ball team.”

Becky Kahn

Dallas

Dallas

base- ball team.” Becky Kahn Dallas Dallas “I lived in Manhattan for four years and had

“I lived in Manhattan for four years and had season tickets to the Yankees but they are starting with too many injuries this season.”

Steven Devens

Harveys Lake

too many injuries this season.” Steven Devens Harveys Lake “Got to be the Durham Bull Dogs

“Got to be the Durham Bull Dogs because I’m from Oak Island, North Carolina.”

Deb Groblewski

Chase

from Oak Island, North Carolina.” Deb Groblewski Chase “I’ve been a Phillies fan since I was

“I’ve been a Phillies fan since I was 8 and my dad Jack took me down there.”

Alan Vivian

Kingston

SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013

THE

DALLAS

POST

PAGE 7

OBITUARIES

CHOLLAK - Claire Dett- more Chollak, formerly of Dallas, died April 5, 2013. She was born on Feb. 6, 1918 in Wilkes-Barre and graduated from Coughlin High School and Wilkes-Barre General Hospital School of Nursing. Surviving are her sister, Jayne Methot, of Burlington, Vt.; children, Joseph P. Jr., William Jean C. Karmiel and Christopher L. ; seven grand- children and four great-grand- children. Memorial donations to Mercy Center, 301 Lake St., Dallas, PA 18612.

GRAHAM - Theresa A., 91, of Shavertown, died Tuesday, April 2, 2013, at Manor Care Health Services, Kingston. She was born in Wilkes-Barre and was a graduate of GAR High School, Wilkes-Barre. Surviving are daughter, Ann Roberts, Shavertown; son, Robert, New York; three grandchildren; one great- grandson.

MATTE - Andrew Matte, of Orange, Franklin Township, died on Sunday, April 7, 2013, at home. He was a veteran of the Ko-

rean War, serving with the U.S. Army. He was employed as

a machinist and retired from

Acme Metal. Surviving are his wife, Anita;

a sister, Anna Zarno, Orange;

nieces and nephews. Memorial donations to St. Nicholas Byzantine Catho- lic Church, 271 Tripp St ., Swoyersville, PA 18704, or to the SPCA of Luzerne County, 524 E. Main St., Fox Hill Road, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702.

WOLFE - Ernest, 91, of Dallas, died Saturday, March 30, 2013, at The Meadows Nursing Center in Dallas. He was born in Scranton and graduated from Scranton Te chnical Sc hool in 1941. He worked for four years at Curtis Wright in New Jersey, then for 35 years as a machinist for Native Textiles in Dallas. He was a member of the Irem String Band, the Dallas United Methodist Church, the Harveys Lake Ya cht Club, George M. Dallas Lodge 531, F&AM and the Shriners of the Irem Te mple in Dallas. Surviving are his daughter, Nancy Campbell, Dallas; two granddaughterss; four great- grandchildren. Memorial donations to the Dallas United Methodist Church, 4 Parsonage St., Dal- las, PA 18612.

Lake-Lehman Theatre Troupe presents Cabaret Night

The Lake-Lehman Theatre Troupe presented a Cabaret Night called “The Timeless Overflow Variety Show” with tunes from the 1900s.

Overflow Variety Sh ow” with tunes from the 1900s. Katelyn Sincav age, left, and Marina Malcolm

Katelyn Sincavage, left, and Marina Malcolm sing a duet.

Katelyn Sincav age, left, and Marina Malcolm sing a due t. CHARLOT TE BART IZEK PHO

CHARLOTTE BARTIZEK PHOTOS/ FOR THE DALLAS POST

Aleah Ashton performs a solo during a Cabaret Night of songs from the 1900s.

a so lo during a Cabare t Night of so ngs from the 1900s. Aleah Ash

Aleah Ashton sings a song from ‘The Wizard of Oz.’

Aleah Ash ton sings a so ng from ‘The Wizard of Oz.’ Participating in a Cabare

Participating in a Cabaret Night sponsored by the Lake-Lehman Theatre Troupe are, from left, Doug Alb- ertson, Jasmine Moku, Courtney Rchards, Marissa Moku, Julia Pilch, Aleah Ashton, Lana Sicurella, Rachel DeCesaris, Keara Gallagher, Marina Malcolm and Katelyn Sincavage. Absent at the time of the photo was Bryan Orbin.

SCHOOL BRIEFS

Sculptures, Barefoot Books, Tupperware and more. There will also be a bake sale, food items for purchase

and a Silent Auction which will but seating is limited. Tickets

include gift certificates from area businessess and restau- rants. For more information, call

696-3899.

‘CHASING ICE’ at SEM In recognition of Earth Day on April 22, the Wyoming Sem- inary Environmental Clubs at both Lower School and Upper School and the Louis Maslow STEM School will present the acclaimed documentary “Chas- ing Ice” by cinematographer James Balog. The film will be shown at 7 p.m. on Monday, April 22 in the Lower School’s Amato Au- ditorium, 1560 Wyoming Ave., Forty Fort. The event is free and open to the public.

ADVISOR SPEAKS AT MU The Second Annual Dr. Midori Ya manouchi Lecture Series at Misericordia Uni- versity is presenting Frances Townsend, the former Home- land Security advisor for

from 7:30 to 9 p.m. on Tuesday, April 23 in Lemmond Theater in Walsh Hall. Tickets for the event are free,

can be reserved by calling the Misericordia University Cultural Events Box Office at 674-6719 or the remaining available tickets can be picked up at the lobby box office up to 10 minutes prior to the show. A question-and-answer ses- sion follows immediately after her presentation.

MISERICORDIA SETS OPEN HOUSE Misericordia University is of- fering an open house program for high school students and their parents on on Saturday, April 27. Open house begins with registration at 9 a.m. in the Anderson Sports and Health Center located at the North Gate of the upper campus. A special “Meet the Coaches” ses- sion will be held from 9 to 10 a.m. The open house program will run from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The schedule includes refreshments, campus tours, a faculty session, lunch, and meetings with representatives

LL THEATRE TROUPE SETS PERFORMANCES Lake-Lehman Theatre Troupe presents “Real Story of Red Riding Hood (Act One) and “Big Bad Musical” at 2 p.m. today, April 14 at the Lake-Lehman Jr./Sr. High School. Reserved tickets (advance only) are $10; general admis- sion is $8 and $6. To purchase tickets, call the box office at

901-1259.

REUNION MEETING Lake-Noxen High School Class of 1959 will hold a reunion planning meeting at 6 p.m. on We dnesday, April 17 at Grotto Pizza, Harveys Lake.

CRAFT FA IR SET The Trucksville Early Child- hood Education Center will host a vendor/craft fair from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, April 20 at the school, 40 Knob Hill Road, Trucksville. Some of the vendors par- ticipating include Mary Kay, Ryan’s Country Charm, Ta ste - fully Simple, Origami Owl,

Kims Kreations, Your Pixel Per- President George W. Bush, for

fect, Custom Bead Creations, Jamberry Nails, Unique Art &

the presentation, “Government, of student services, athletics

Law and National Security,’’

and financial aid. For those

interested, a session will also be held on the university ’s Alternative Learner ’s Project for students with learning disabilities. For more informa- tion, contact the Misericordia University Admissions Office at

675-4449.

WSCCHS CLASS OF 1971 PLANS PARTY We st Si de Centeral Catholic High School Class of 1971 will hold a 60th birthday party from 1 to 7 p.m. on Sunday, Sept. 1 at the Grove at Checkerboard Inn on Carverton Road, Trucks- ville. Formal invitations will be

forthcoming when all addresses are finalized. For more information, contact Kate Bustin Ta ro li at KBTaroli@gmail.com.

DHS CLASS OF 1983 PLANS REUNION Dallas High School Class of 1983 is planning a 30th anni- versary reunion for Oct. 26. Any classmate who has not yet received information about the reunion and who wishes to attend is asked to send their current email address to dallasclassof83@att.net or call Sharon at (610) 737-0042.

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PAGE 8

THE

DALLAS

POST

SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013

March TERRIFIC Kids at DES

TERRIFIC KIDS for the month of March at Dallas Elementary School have been chosen. TERRIFIC KIDS is an acronym that stands for T-Thoughtful, E-Enthusiastic, R-Responsible, R-Respect- ful, I-Inclusive, F-Friendly, I-inquisitive and C-capable.

ful, I-Inclusive, F-Friendly, I-inquisitive and C-capable. Kindergar ten TERRIFIC Kids at Da llas Elemen tary Sc

Kindergarten TERRIFIC Kids at Dallas Elementary School for March are, from left, Arianna Spurlin and Keith Hughes.

March ar e, from left, Arianna Spurlin and Ke ith Hughe s. TERRIFIC KIDS fo r

TERRIFIC KIDS for the month of March at the Dallas Elementary School are, from left, first row, Ashley Benyo, Victoria Wicht, Noah Hamad, Zachar y Mikolosko, Rylin Berndt, Rachael Flannigan, Dominick Fazzino. Second row, Cassie Kern, Andrew Lewis, Chloe Dudick, Jordan Bond, Hayden Curran, Lauren Oschal, Nolan Hedglin, Alley Pehala. Third row, Maggie Ropietski, Alex DelGau- dio, Mallory McGeehan, Karliann Gavek, Max Steinruck, Lainee Julian, Jacob Speicher, Kevin Basalga, Seth Dyrli, Amanda Puza. Four th row, Francesca Augustine, Matthew Scherer, Garrett Porosky, Peter Harpensberger, McKenzie Zimmerman, Gabby Sabatini, Nick Spenc er, Nathan Sa vignano , Michael Ro pie ts ki. Fifth ro w, Dominick Riz zo , Sk yler Bo ye r, Da vid Lipinski, Ta nner Sa ra cino , Lu ke DelGaudio, Hanna Oldt, Sam Barral, Chris Killian, Jared Adamski, Gab Miller, Ryan Collins.

pEoplE bRIEFS

MU STUDENTS PRESENT RESEARCH Mary Gulotta and Amanda Tomaselli, both of Trucksville, were among members of the Misericordia University Depart- ment of Speech-Language Pa- thology ’s academic community who presented their research findings in poster presentations at the annual Pennsylvania Speech-Language-Hearing As- sociation Conference.

STONIER DISPLAYS ARTWORK Adam Stonier, of Tunkhan- nock, will have artwork on display at Marietta College’s annual Senior Capstone Art & Design Exhibition in the Her- mann Fine Arts Center. The exhibition, which is the culmination of four years of work, opened April 12 and will remain on display until May 10. A graduate of Tunkhannock High School, Stonier is a senior majoring in Graphic Design.

THREE INDUCTED INTO SOCIETY Lisa Perugino, of Dallas, Amy Austin, of Sweet Valley, and Amber Travel, of Dallas, were among 35 Misericordia

University nursing program

students recently inducted into enrolled at the Commonwealth

the Theta Phi Chapter of the Si gma Theta Ta u International Honor Society of Nursing.

MILLO IS AWARD HONOREE Megan Millo, of Dallas, has been announced as the local Evan Pugh Senior Award hon- oree at Penn State University. The Evan Pugh scholars are those juniors and seniors in the upper 0.5 percent of their respec- tive classes at the end of the fall semester

Millo

ic year the award present his dissertation topic is given. Candidates are eligible “Megabit Faculty in a Gigabit

if they have been full-time undergraduate students for at least four semesters prior to selection. The seniors this year have cumulative grade-point averages of 3.98 and above. Millo, a Penn State Wilkes- Barre senior, will graduate in May with a Bachelor’s in Business. Millo was also the 2012 recipient of the Eric A. and Josephine S. Walker Award. The Walker Award recog-

nizes undergraduate students

Locations whose outstanding qualities of character, scholar- ship, leadership, and citizen- ship have been directed into programs and services that have positively influenced fellow students and have contributed to the prestige and well-being of their campus and, hence, to the reputation of the University as a whole.

CHESKIEWICZ WILL PRESENT PAPER Keystone College Assistant Professor of Information Te ch- nology, Stephen Cheskiewicz, of Harveys Lake, has received international academic blind

of Harveys Lake, has received international academic blind Cheskiewicz conferences. Sh avertown, has accepted an

Cheskiewicz

conferences.

Shavertown, has accepted an

National Society of Colegiate Scholars. A 2012 cum laude graduate of Wyoming Seminary Upper School, Spath is a member of the Class of 2016 at the Columbian College of Arts and Science of The George Wash- ington University in Washing- ton, D.C. and is a Presidential Academic Scholar in the

ton, D.C. and is a Presidential Academic Scholar in the Sh e also has been named

She also has been named co editor-in- chief of the George Wash- ington Under- graduate Law Review and is

The two Eu- offer of membership in The

ropean events are The Inau- gural European Conference on Education to be held

Spath

a member of the executive board of the Pre- Law Student Association.

in Brighton, United Kingdom in July 2013 and the 10th International Con- ference on Technology, Knowl- edge, and Society to be held in

Madrid, Spain in February 2014. University Honors Program.

Professor Cheskiewicz is currently a doctoral student at Wilkes University in the Educa- tional Leadership program and expects to receive his doctoral degree this summer.

SPATH RECEIVES HONORS Emma Lang Spath, daughter of Lois and Gregg Spath, of

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SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013

THE

DALLAS

POST

PAGE 9

JASON

Continued from Page 1

“When Jason died, we requested dona- tions be made to the soup kitchen,” said Schilling, noting that he had presented four pages of names of people who do- nated and received the nicest letter about Jason and how respectful he always was when volunteering at the soup kitchen. The Schilling family is reminded every day of the number of lives touched by Ja- son and Jim Schilling recounted a conver- sation he had with his son on their way to a Penn State football game a few years ago. “We talked about someone who was having a party and Jason told me he would never be able to have a party,” Jim said. “I told him I found that hard to be- lieve but he said he was friends with so many people that if he invited them all to a party, it would be a total disaster be- cause it would not be a good mix.” Schilling cherishes the memory and knows the affinity his son had for all kinds of people, remembering Jason’s infectious smile and the dimples that would show on his face whenever he flashed that smile. About the unveiling of the framed base- ball jersey, Schilling said, “It takes us back to the loss but when we see how many lives Jason touched, it gives us comfort.” Dallas High School baseball coach Ken Kashatus called Schilling the team’s Re- naissance Man. “You could have an adult conversation with him about more than just school and baseball,” Kashatus said. “We talked about movies, music and restaurants. I like all those things and it was easy to engage Jason in a conversation about any of them. Thats what made him different from a lot of the guys I coach.”

what made him different from a lot of the guys I coach.” CHARLOT TE BART IZEK

CHARLOTTE BARTIZEK PHOTOS / FOR THE DALLAS POST

Former Dallas High School baseball player Jason Schil- ling is always in the hearts of mem- bers of the Moun- taineers team as they hang his shirt in memory of him for every game and every practice.

shirt in memory of him for every game and every practice. AT LEFT: B ef or
shirt in memory of him for every game and every practice. AT LEFT: B ef or

AT LEFT: B efor e ever y game and practic e, members of the Da l- las High School baseball team hang Jason Schilling’s shirt- # 31 -in memory of him. Here, coach Paul Narcum remembers Ja- son. ABOVE: Friends have made a living memorial out of the tree on Carpenter Road in Harveys Lake that Jason Schilling crashed into months ago.

tAx

Continued from Page 1

co-filing of a state recycling grant with West Wyoming Bor- ough. The grant monies would

provide for recycling containers to be used in the township’s re- cycling program. After the meeting, township chairman John Jay Wilkes, Jr.

“We have not received the initial paperwork,” he said. Wil- kes has not yet met with Lake- Lehman personnel about the grant but added, “I’m confident

said the Lake-Lehman grant that we’ll be getting together

project was in its early stages.

very soon.”

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THE

DALLAS

POST

SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013

Lake-

Lehman sixth-grade honor roll announced

The following sixth-grade students in the Lake-Lehman School District have been named to the honor roll for the third marking period of the 2012-2013 school year:

LEHMAN-JACKSON ELEMENTARY SCHOOL Abigail Bartuska Ava Baur Aryan Blazick Julia Bucholtz Michael Bulzoni Emily Burgit Christopher Cercone Stephanie Chaga Ibrahim Dabsheh Madison Federici Nicholas Fegely Gabrielle Fitzgerald Dillon Ide Hannah Kasko Hunter Kline Charles Leo Julianna McMahon Mikaela Meeker Samantha Mihalko Gabrial Mitchell Kyle Naugle Chloe-Lyn Osborne Natasha Pavlichko Lauryn Pembleton Jonathan Raspen Keiona Roberts Julia Sabol Jessica Salus Eva Sicurella Trinity Skovira Cierra Snyder Sophia Soifer Elmer Souder Jacob Stokes Donald Thompson Justin Timonte Carly Trapani Shelly White Claudia Wolfe LAKE_NOXEN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL Macenzi Barker Casey Dale Scott Field Richard Kemmerer Hannah Lukasavage Tyler McGuire Corinna Scoblick Casey Shager Jacob Stefanowicz Abigail Winter Christopher Wright Madalyn Wright ROSS ELEMENTARY SCHOOL Rebecca Bonomo Madison Budzak Joelle Burke Mason Cross Jessica Evans Zachary Grey Dakota Heinrich Nicholas Henninger James Herceg Andrew Jubis Luke Kreller Wade Kreller Frank Kutz Derrick Lanning Brianna Lee Dillon Major Morgan Marchakitus Amanda May Mikella Monaco Jacob Prest Savannah Purdy Alyssya Raczkowski Sarah Stanski

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Afternoon kindergarten students named TERRIFIC KIDS for April at the Dallas Elemen- tary School are, from left, Wyatt Hite, Michael Major and Lydia Federici.

April TERRIFIC KIDS named

TERRIFIC KIDS for the month of april at the Dallas Elementary School have been named. TERRIFIC KIDS is an acronym that stands for T-Thoughtful, E- Enthusiastic, R-Responsible, R-Respectful, I-Inclusive, F-Friendly, I-in- quisitive, and C-capable. Betsy Jerome, Guidance Counselor for Dallas Elementary School started this program as a school-wide approach to encourage positive behavior, positive character traits and leadership within the school. The winners are chosen monthly by the staff from each homeroom and are given the opportunity to participate in a community or school based project. Approximately 50 students in grades preschool through fifth grade win each month. The PTO supports the program by award- ing the students with a pin. The goal for the program each month is for the older students to peer guide the younger TERRIFIC kids each month on their leader- ship goal. Some of the activities that the students participated in are the Back Mountain Food Pantry/Caring Day, Earth Day and Christ- mas wrapping for the needy.

Day, Earth Day and Christ- mas wrapping for the needy. TERRIFIC KIDS fo r the month

TERRIFIC KIDS for the month of April at the Dallas Elementary School are, from left, first row, Ashley Benyo, Victoria Wicht, Noah Hamad, Zachary Mikolosko, Rylin Berndt, Rachael Flannigan, Dominick Fazzino. Second row, Cassie Kern, Andrew Lewis, Chloe Dudick, Jordan Bond, Hayden Curran, Lauren Oschal, Nolan Hedglin, Alley Pehala. Third row, Maggie Ropietski, Alex DelGaudio, Mallory McGeehan, Karliann Gavek, Max Steinruck, Lainee Julian, Jacob Speicher, Kevin Basalga, Seth Dyrli, Amanda Puza. Four th row, Francesca Augustine, Matthew Scherer, Garrett Porosky, Peter Harpensberger, McKenzie Zimmerman, Gabby Sa ba tini, Nick Spenc er, Nathan Sa vignano , Michael Ro pie ts ki. Fifth ro w, Dominick Riz zo , Sk yler Bo ye r, Da vid Lipinski, Ta nner Sa ra cino , Lu ke DelGaudio , Hanna Oldt, Sam Barral, Chris Killian, Jared Adamski, Gab Miller, Ryan Collins. Absent at the time of the photo were Leauna Byam, Zachary Luksic and Liz Hodle.

Area Agency on Aging agency plans annual senior dinner dance

The Area Agency on Aging for Luzerne and Wyoming Counties an-

nounces the theme for this year’s Older entertainment by King Henry and the

American’s Month is “Unleash the Power of Age.”

“Swing into Spring” is the theme for this year’s dance which will feature

Showmen. Dinner selections are prime rib au jus, chicken cordon bleu or sole

This year ’s 46th annual dinner dance with stuffed crab imperial, accompa-

will be held from 1 to 5 p.m. on Thurs- day, May 9 at Genetti’s Best We stern,

Market Street, Wilkes-Barre with doors available.

opening at 12:30 p.m.

nied by salad, potato, vegetable, coffee, tea and dessert. A cash bar will also be

A dance contest is being arranged by

Sandy Acornley and Jean Spindler of the for details.

Kingston Center. Prizes will be awarded for the winners of the following dance categories: tango, line and swing. Judges for the contest are Barbara Anzalone of NE PA Dance Academy, Miss Fabrege from Fabrege’s Cabaret in Hazleton; and Jim Harris from Joan Harris Dance Studios. Contact Sandy Acornley at 287-1102

Over 60 door prizes will be drawn and a grand prize of show tickets and a restaurant dinner for two is being donated by Central Penn Gas. Ticket prices are for individuals over the age of 60 - $21 and under the age of 60-$23. Tickets can be obtained at any of the 18 centers or by calling Rhonda Adams at 822-1158, ext. 3337.

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THE DALLAS POST

SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013 PA GE 11

SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013

SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013 PA GE 11

PA GE 11

SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013 PA GE 11
SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013 PA GE 11

Sports

CHARLOT TE BART IZEK PHO TOS/ FO R THE DA LLAS PO ST The Dallas

CHARLOTTE BARTIZEK PHOTOS/ FOR THE DALLAS POST

The Dallas women’s lacrosse team is happy to be playing on its new field next to the new high school complex in Dallas.

Home at last!

Dallas High School lacrosse teams now have a home of their own

By TOM ROBINSON | For The Dallas Post

T he development of lacrosse as a high school sport at Dallas, in

particular, and the Wyoming Valley, in general, continues. When Dallas teams swept the North Pocono boys and Pittston Area girls on April 4, it marked the programs’ debut at on-campus fields. The teams play on a new field adja- cent to the high school.

This is a big season for the sport’s growth throughout the area, as well. Dallas athletic director Nancy Roberts is the president of the Wyoming Valley Conference Lacrosse League, which is in its first season. And, for the first time, District 2’s champions

will proceed directly into the Pennsylvania In- terscholastic Athletic Association tournament rather than having to try to play their way in through a subregional game with District 4 teams. Lake-Lehman, Delaware Valley and Crest- wood join Dallas in both the boys and girls leagues. Tunkhannock, North Pocono and

teams while

Scranton Prep also have boys

Pittston Area, Coughlin and Wyoming Semi- nary have girls teams. The sport is clearly thriving at Dallas. The Mountaineers have 37 boys and 27 girls

at Dallas. The Mountaineers have 37 boys and 27 girls Kris ta n Ca pitano, of

Kristan Capitano, of Pittston Area, defends as Katie Kapral tries to score for Dallas.

on their teams, allowing for junior varsity games when facing other programs with simi- lar numbers. Dallas has one of two unbeaten girls teams, joining Wyoming Seminary, while the boys are off to a 2-1 start in league play. Dallas High School lacrosse traces its roots back to the Back Mountain Bandits club team, which evolved into a Dallas-only club team as more high schools became involved in the sport. The school district took over responsi- bility, making it an official PIAA-sanctioned team with full compliance to eligibility, aca- demic and physical requirements. The latest step is bringing the team onto campus. “We were interested in it, but we didn’t have the space until the new high school was built,” said Roberts, who credits a strong parents club for getting the program moving before the school was involved. “Now, we have the extra field. “It’s something we agreed to progress with

each year. We pay fo r some things, but not all things. There are still some things the booster club has to do.” Boys coach Rich Cohen has been involved since the beginning with the Back Mountain Bandits starting U-19 and U-15 club teams. Cohen said his team is led by three play- ers who received recognition on the Central Susquehanna League all-stars last year when Dallas played in that league. George Pfeiffer was a two-time, first-team goalie. Ray Schultz, a defender, and Casey McAndrew, a midfielder, each received honor- able mention. They helped Dallas roll over North Pocono, 15-1, in the home debut. The girls, coached by Mary Beth Zardus, have defeated both Crestwood and Pittston Area. The girls team, which beat Pittston Area, 14-5 in the home opener, has four seniors - Madeline Mulhern, Cara Pricher, Deidre De- Luca and Evonna Ackourey - who received all- star recognition in their previous league. With dozens of players involved in forming two winning teams, lacrosse is establishing its place in the Dallas athletic program after years of dedicated effort by those excited about the sport’s growth. “They did sell me on it,” Roberts said of the original decision to add the sport to those that the school district sponsors. “The kids pushed it. The boys and girls teams and the boys and girls coaches really didn’t let it drop. “With the numbers we had in it, we knew it was the right thing to do.”

SPORTS BRIEFS

FA MILY FUN NIGHT The Lake-Lehman Track Booster Club will hold a Family and Friends Fun Night from 5 to 8 p.m. on Monday, April 15 at Leggio’s in Dallas. A percentage of all foods sales will go to support the Lake-Lehman Track and Fi el d Bo oster Club. Ta ke -o ut orders and gift certificates count, too.

RAIDERS REGISTRATION The Kingston Township Raiders will hold registration for mini football and cheerleading from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on April 20 and May 18 at the Kingston Township Municipal Buidling, 180 E. Center St., Shavertown. Parents should bring the child’s birth certificate, two proofs of residency and a photo of the child. Registration fees are $50 for cheerlead- ing and $60 for football with a $10 sibling discount.

SOFTBALL CLINIC The Dallas High School softball team will hold its second development clinic

for girls ages 7-14 from noon to 2 p.m. on Sunday, April 21 at the Back Mountain Little League Field. This clinic will have a brief review of Session 1, go over base running, proper infield and outfield positioning and of- fensive execution drills. For more information, call call Brent Berger at 793-1126 or Bill Kern at 498-

5991.

In case of rain, the clinic will be held in the Dallas High School gymnasium.

SOCCER REGISTRATION Back Mountain Youth Soccer Associa-

tion will hold registration for the fall 2013 intramural soccer season from 9 a.m. to

3 p.m. on Saturday, April 27 at the Dallas Middle School cafeteria. Age groups U-6 through U-18 will be

accepted. Eligible players must be at least

5 years of age before Aug. 1. New players must showproof of age. Wll players must register online atwww.bmysa.org. Computers will be available at registration.

CAR WASH/BAKE SALE The Dallas Mountaineers High School Baseball Booster Club will sponsor a car wash and bake sale from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Sunday May 5 at Newell Fuel. Members of the high school baseball team will be on hand to wash cars and an array of baked goods will be sold. All proceeds will go to support the Dallas School District baseball program. Car wash tickets are $5.

BANDITS ACCEPT REGISTRATIONS Registrations are now being accepted via the website at www.laxteams.net/ bmylax for the Back Mountain Bandits lacrosse team. Boys and girls in grades 1-3 may sign up for intramurals. Boys age groups are U-9, U-11, U-13 & U-15. Girls age groups

are third and fourth grade, fifth and sixth grade and seventh and eighth grades. The registration fee includes US LacroWsse registration, US Lacrosse magazine and a team jersey. Participants should print the form and mail it, along with applicable fee to BMYL, P.O. Box 1746, Shavertown, PA

18708.

FAST PITCH PLAYERS SO UGHT The Endless Mt Blast U14 travel fastpitch program is still looking for a few qualified players to round out its teams for the upcoming season.

Lake-Lehman sophomore has record-breaking throw

Cayle spencer’s javelin hurl breaks 12-year-old school record.

By TOM ROBINSON For The Dallas Post

Cayle Spencer set a school record in the javelin Tuesday and added a win with a career-best in the shot put. When the impressive performance was over, coach John Sobocinski was not certain that either would ultimate- ly be the best event for the talented Lake-Lehman sophomore. “She has a lot of talent in the discus,” Sobocinski said of Spencer. “She can be really good once she perfects her spin. She has a chance to do some really nice things in the discus.” With the chance to compete in pleas- ant weather conditions for the first time, Spencer had the best day of her high school career, contributing 13 points with two first-place finishes and

a second in the discus to help Lake-

Lehman tie Northwest, 75-75, and re- main unbeaten through three meets. Spencer had never thrown the javelin more than 120 feet in competition. Af- ter unleashing consecutive throws of 124 and another of 127 at Monday’s practice, she carried that momentum into Tuesday’s meet. A throw of 122-8 broke the 12-year- old school record of 120-1 that had been held by Kari Maskalis. “I’ve been working toward that school record since last season,” said Spencer, who finished third in the Dis- trict 2 Class AA Championships as a freshman. While her coach sees the potential for her to become even more of a three- way threat as a thrower, Spencer enjoys javelin the most. “It’s my favorite,” said Spencer, who took up track and field in seventh grade and immediately settled into the throw-

ing events. “Every year I get better at it. “I just try to keep working on my technique and footwork.” That attention to detail has com- bined well with the athleticism that has already made Spencer a two-year starter in soccer and basketball where she was among the Wyoming Valley Conference’s top scorers while produc- ing 20 points per game. “She’s a strong kid,” Sobocinski said. “She’s explosive; she’s very coordinat- ed, a really nice athlete. It’s just a mat- ter of perfecting her form.” Tuesday’s efforts showed she’s well on her way. “We all thought shot put would be her weakest event and she goes out and throws over 33 feet,” Sobocinski said. “That’s a fantastic throw.” Spencer was sixth in the district in the shot put last season. The javelin distance produced Tues- day, if repeated in May at Scranton

distance produced Tues- day, if repeated in May at Scranton CHARLOT TE BARTIZEK/ FOR THE DALLAS

CHARLOTTE BARTIZEK/ FOR THE DALLAS POST

Cayle Sprenc- er throws the javelin in track and field events for Lake-Lehman High School. Her throw in a meet on Tuesday broke a 12-year-old school record.

Memorial Stadium, would make her a district title contender. That throw of 122-8 would have finished second a year ago. “That throw, if she packages it up and takes it on the road has a very good chance to win districts,” Sobocinski said. “That can win districts. If you get

into the mid- to upper-120s, tradition- ally that win will districts in Double-A. “Even in Shippensburg, at the state meet, you have a chance to medal with that.” With Tuesday’s performances, Spen- cer showed she is in position to con- tend for more honors as the season progresses.

PAGE 12

THE

DALLAS

POST

SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013

PA GE 12 THE DALLAS POST SUNDA Y, APRIL 14, 2013 Rock Rec team qualifies for

Rock Rec team qualifies for nationals

The Rock Solid eighth-grade girls basketball team was tournament champions of the AAU Super Regional in Allentown in March. With the win, the team has qualified for the AAU Nationals in July in Orlando for the second consecutive year. The team defeated Fencor (Philadelphia) in the semi-final and the Lehigh Valley Heat (Allentown) in the final to capture the tournament. The team is based out of the Rock Recreation Center in the Back Mountain and is coached by Chad Lojewski and Alison Wolfgang. From left, kneeling, are Sarah Holweg, Wyoming Area; Sara Lojewski, Dallas; Alexis Pizia, Nanticoke; Katie Wolfgang, Wyoming Area. Standing, Sarah Sabaluski, Lake-Lehman; Courtney De- vens, Dallas; Maddie Kelley, Dallas; and Paige Evans, Dallas.

Dallas; Maddie Ke lle y, Dallas; and Pa ige Ev ans, Dallas. DYB travel team wins

DYB travel team wins CYC championship

Th e Dallas Yo uth Ba sket ba ll eighth-grade boys travel team wo n the Ca tholic Yo uth Ce nter League championship on Feb. 16. From left, first row, are Stone Mannello, Paul Zablotney, Colin Pertl, Dalton Gattuso, Nico DeLuca, Ben Donahue. Second row, Coach Mark Farrell, Lee Eckert, Ethan Szczecinski, Mike Farrell, Jason Anderson and Coach Vito DeLuca.

Mike Farrell, Jason Anderso n and Co ach Vito DeLuca. Noxen Strikers win first place The

Noxen Strikers win first place

The Noxen Strikers elementary wrestling team recently took home a first-place team trophy in Troy and had to p place finishes in many To p 100 to urnaments. Boys who co mpete d in the Ce nt ra l Co lumbia To urnament on Jan. 26 are shown here with their trophies. From left, first row, are Nick Za boski, Ro b- bie Ritinski, Jake Gizinski, Ta nner Ya nchick, Brandon Ritinski, Lo gan Slivinski, Hun te r Bu rke. Se co nd row, Coach Meehan, Coach Raczkowski, Shane Sherwood, Dylan Meehan, Jacob Stefanowicz, JJ White, Jake Trumbower, Matt Galasso and Coach Stuart. Absent at the time of the photo was Jeremy Scouton.

Ab sent at the time of the pho to wa s Jeremy Scouton. Team Mercury wins

Team Mercury wins DYB Skills Competition

Team Mercu ry of the Dallas Yo uth Ba sket ba ll fifth/sixth grade girls ba sket ba ll league re ce nt ly wo n the Skills Competition team championship and finished as runner up in the DYB tournament. The skills competition has a weighted scoring consisting of foul shooting and hot spot shooting and the team totaled 86 points to capture the team championship. The team had an extraordinary defensive effort during the annual tournament, holding all opponents to an average of less than 12 points scored per game in the DYB playoffs and championship. Members of the team are, from left, first row, Ashley Shotwell, Abbie Sutzko, Morgan MacNeely, Olivia Roback. Second row, coach Brian Fennell, Haley Fen- nell, Sierra Lo iselle, Ashley We inste in and coach To m MacNeely.

iselle, Ashley We ins te in and co ach To m MacNeely. DYB 8th grade team

DYB 8th grade team wins travel league championship

Th e Dallas Yo uth Ba sket ba ll eighth-grade travel team ca ptured the re gular season and playoff championships in the Wyoming Valley West Travel League. It was the third consecutive year the team captured both championships as it attained a record of 95-16 in league and tournament play. From left, kneeling, are Breezy Coolbaugh, Emily Farrell, Sydney Strickland, Maria Bednar. Standing, Coach Chad Lojewski, Maddie Kelley, Sara Lojewski, Courtney Devens, Paige Evans and Coach Len Kelley.

De ve ns, Pa ige Ev ans and Co ach Le n Ke lle y. Shock

Shock is DYB championship team

DY B Shock is Dallas Yo uth Ba sket ba ll seve nt h and eighth-grade girls champions. From left, first row, are Kave ri Singh, Frankie Tres lar, Ta lia Kosierows ki, Bi anca Ca ntando. Se co nd row, Co ach Pete r Se r- ratore, Claudia Leu, Miranda Roche, Gabby Serratore, Laura Buckman and Coach Steve Kosierowski.

Swim clinics scheduled for Dallas Middle School pool

Peter Vanderkaay, 2012 USA Olym- pic swim team captain, is hosting two swim clinics on Saturday, May 11 at the Dallas Middle School. The morning session from 8 to11:15 a.m. is geared for swimmers ages 10 years of age and under. Swimmers over age 11 can attend the afternoon session from 1:45 to 5 p.m. Peter Vanderkaay is a highly- decorat- ed Olympian from the 2004, 2008 and 2012 Olympics. At the clinics, participants will be able to:

• Watch drills and demonstrations on a 100” screen • Learn and practice drills in the wa- ter with Vanderkaay to improve their technique

• Ask questions in Q&A sessions for

children and parents

• Ta ke photos with Va nderka ay and

get his autograph

• Receive a gift bag with items from

Swimming World Magazine, PowerBar, TYR and more. One registrant and up to two friends will win a free half-hour clinic with Pe- ter Vanderkaay for personalized atten- tion and instruction. The winner of the free clinic will be announced at the end of the session and the clinic will take place immediately following the main event. For more information on the swim clinics, contact david@arluck.com or call 786-837-6881.

DHS swimmers named All American

Dallas High School swimmers Brian Stepniak and Marcus Wagner have been named Academic All Americans by the National Interscholastic Swimming Coaches Association. There are over 289,700 students in- volved in aquatics in high school in over 14,000 programs for boys and girls. Approximately two percent of these students are recognized as high school All Americans. To qualify for this award, the athlete must have a minimum GPA of 3.750 on 4.0 scale or 95.75% on the grade scale the school uses for seven semesters, GPA may not be rounded up and they must be a graduating senior and letter in senior year.

they must be a graduating senior and letter in senior year. Dallas High School sw immers

Dallas High School swimmers Brian Stepniak, left, and Marcus Wagner have been named Academic All Americans by the National Interscho- lastic Swimming Coaches Association.

SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013

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of their own home. References available.
542
Logistics/
Accessories
Transportation
570-301-3571
LIKE
TOYOTA ‘04 CELICA GT
HEAVY EQUIPMENT
CLASSBDRIVER
NEW
112K miles. Blue,
5 speed. Air,
power
windows/locks,
CD/cassette, Key-
less entry, sun-
roof, new battery.
Car drives and
has current PA
inspection. Slight
rust on corner of
passenger door.
Clutch slips on
hard acceleration.
This is why its
thousands less
than Blue Book
value. $6,500
OBO. Make an
offer! Call
OPERATORS &
Municipal waste
hauling. Roll-off
YEARBOOKS.
Coughlin (30) ‘28-
2000. GAR -(18))
‘37-’06, Meyers (15)
‘53-’03, Pittston (6)
‘67-’75, WVW (12),
557
Project/
557
Project/
EXPERIENCEDDIESEL
experience
AEP Industries,
Inc., manufactur-
er of flexible
packaging films in
Mountaintop
hiring Starting at
$10.50/hr. – PLUS
.50¢ /hr. for night
shift; 60-90 day
evaluation pro-
vides increase $$
based on YOUR
performance,
attendance etc.
Full-time 12 hours
shifts alternating /
3 & 4 day work
weeks (overtime
pay every other)
Every Other
Weekend A Must.
1967-2000,Kingston
Used Tires
Program
Program
preferred. Call
Management
Management
&
570.868.6462
As a Machine
MECHANICS
Batteries
-Night
shift
for
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
DRIVERS
for $20
Diesel Mechanics
with classified!
-
Medical, Dental,
& Up
Vision Insurance
Operator you will
remove, inspect,
and pack finish
product to speci-
fications with
strong opportuni-
(11) ‘32-’52, Hazle-
ton, (8) ‘40-’61,
Plains, (3) ‘66-’68,
Hanover ‘51-’74.
Prices vary depend-
ing on condition.
$20-$40 each. Call
for further details &
-
401K
ty for promotion.
- Quarterly Safety
Purebred Ani mal s?
Sell themhere with a
classified ad!
You must be able
HAZLETON SITE CONTRACTORS
Bonus
VITO’S
570-829-7130
- Paid Holidays
Collect
- Paid Vacation
&
Karchner Logistics
is now hiring
*Local & Jockey
Drivers
*Regional drivers
Must have Class A
CDL. We are