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Saint Leo University ENG311 th Major Writers of the 20 Century Course Description: th A study for non-English majors of the

most significant and influential movements of the 20 century as those movements have shaped the course of human experience. Provides an opportunity for students to discuss and analyze a broad range of writers from several countries, drawing on cultural and ethnic issues particularly relevant to those writers. Prerequisite: ENG 122 Textbooks: Select Writers of the Twentieth Century: A Brief Anthology. New York: Pearson Custom Publishing, 2005.* Hemingway, Ernest. The Sun Also Rises. New York: Scribners, 2003.* Morrison, Toni. The Bluest Eye. New York: Plume, 1994.* *The above books are bundled together. Course Objectives: Instructors shall expect students to develop: 1. A better understanding of the twentieth century through a study of significant issues. 2. Greater skill in expression as a result of reading, thinking, talking, and writing about the ideas and experiences reflected in the literature assigned. 3. Further appreciation of imaginative literature. Evaluation: Exam 1: Essay and Short Paragraph Exam 2: Essay and Short Paragraph Essays on Selected Works (3 x 100 pts) Reflection Responses (3 x 100 pts) Discussion Questions (9 x 80 pts) and Peer Responses (9 x 20 pts) Total Grading Scale: A 94-100% A90-93% B+ 87-89% B 84-86% B-: 80-83% C+ 77-79% C 74-76% C70-73% D+ 67-69% D 60-67% F 0 - 59% Exams: Exams are timed, so you should study and prepare ahead of time. You will lose valuable time if you are looking through notes or your textbook. You will have 75 minutes to complete each part of the exam. Exams have two parts: essay and short paragraph. Exam essays and short paragraph responses will be graded for content and clarity and with the same criteria used for discussion question responses. Short paragraph responses should be 30 to 50 words in length.

100 points 100 points 300 points 300 points 900 points 1700 points

20% 20% 40% 10% 10% 100%

Reflection Responses: Reflection responses will be graded for both grammar and mechanics and content and development. Submit as a Word document with the specified file name format (i.e. YourLastNameENG311ReflectionM4) to the instructor via related Module Dropbox. Reflection responses are due on the dates identified in the module. Discussion Questions and Peer Responses: Discussion Postings are worth a maximum of 80 points. Peer responses are worth 20, making total number of points for each set of discussion postings worth 100 points. Discussion question responses are considered informal writing, so even though your writing should be as clear as you can make it, I will not grade grammar and mechanics. If writing is unclear, incoherent, or difficult to read because of grammar and sentence problems, however, your score will naturally be impacted. In order to achieve a high score on discussion questions, you must respond directly to the question and avoid unnecessary plot summary. Your response should demonstrate reflection and critical thinking. Avoid personal responses that stray from the question such as "I had a similar experience to the character in the story." Responses to a classmate's question should be thoughtful responses that can add to, agree with, or disagree with a particular point. Again, purely personal or emotional responses or responses that stray from the point should be avoided. And always respond to your classmates with respect, even if you disagree strongly with a particular point. Turnitin: This is a writing intensive course. All students must use Turnitin for submission of course work and assignments as directed by the instructor. Turnitin is a plagiarism identification service that can also assist students with term paper reference methodology. Turnitin tool compares your writing against all published sources and also checks against previous classes written work(s). Late Policy: All work must be submitted on time. Exceptions must be documented and acceptance is at the discretion of the faculty member. Attendance Policy: Students are expected to view the course modules in the week they are offered, and to log onto the course often enough to remain abreast of any communications from the instructor. It is the students responsibility to be aware of what is happening in the class online. Disability Services: Saint Leo University is committed to a policy which provides an equal opportunity for full participation of all qualified individuals with disabilities in accordance with the ADA. Appropriate academic accommodations and services are coordinated through the Office of Disability Services. Students with disabilities who require accommodation should contact the office as soon as possible via email: ADAOffice@saintleo.edu or telephone: (352) 588-8464. For additional information, students may access the Policy and Procedure Manual through the Saint Leo website. Academic Honesty: As members of an academic community that places a high value on truth and the pursuit of knowledge, Saint Leo University students are expected to be honest in every phase of their academic life and to present as their own work only that which is genuinely theirs. Unless otherwise specified by the professor, students must complete homework assignments by themselves (or if on a team assignment, with only their team members). If they receive outside assistance of any kind, they are expected to cite the source and indicate the extent of the assistance. Each student has the responsibility to maintain the highest standards of academic integrity and to refrain from cheating, plagiarism, or any other form of academic dishonesty. Academic dishonesty is representing another's work as one's own, active complicity in such falsification, or violating test conditions. Plagiarism is stealing and passing of the ideas and words of another as one's own or using the work of another without crediting the source. The sanctions for academic dishonesty (including cheating on an examination, plagiarism, and similar offenses) are as follows:

The minimum sanction for the first offense is an F for the test or assignment but the usual sanction is an F in the course in which the violation took place. No provision will be ma de for the student to receive a W. The minimum sanction for the second offense is an F in the course, but the usual sanction is suspension of the student from Saint Leo University. Circumstances that would justify sanctions greater than the minimum in clude the students previous academic and disciplinary record at the University or the particularly flagrant nature of the offense. It is the responsibility and obligation of each student to personally uphold the Academic Honor Code. Students are required to report any observed instance of academic dishonesty to the faculty member. For more information on the Academic Honor Code, please see the Saint Leo University Student Academic Catalog. To learn more about properly identifying and citing resources, please see the University Library Tutorial, Reference Sources: Print and Online. University Library Services: University Library Services provides instruction, information resources, and services needed by students pursuing their education and seeking an understanding of themselves, their world, and their Creator. The Cannon Memorial Library faculty and support staff offers direct personal assistance to all students, whether on the University Campus, at Continuing Education Centers or the Center for Online Learning. Library acquisitions are carefully selected to support the curriculum and to provide information resources in a variety of formats. The library website (accessed through the Saint Leo University portal) facilitates remote access to the librarys res ources and services for off-campus students. There is an online tutorial for students to learn about searching the library catalog, researching a paper topic, or using the online library databases. Students who are returning to school after an extended period find this particularly helpful. There is also information on finding and evaluating websites and identifying and citing resources for your academic work. Circulating materials (book, reprints from print journals) are checked out for one month and can be sent to you. If you need an article from a print journal, the library will also fax, email, or send it to you through the U.S. Mail. You can also request direct assistance from a reference librarian online from the library website or by calling the University Campus reference desk at 1-800-359-5945. The library staff is dedicated to supporting all faculty and students, whether on campus or online. Saint Leo University Core Values: Students are expected to be mindful of the Benedictine core values of Saint Leo University when submitting work, interviewing outside resources, and working in groups. Excellence: Saint Leo University is an educational enterprise. All of us, individually and collectively, work hard to ensure that our students develop the character, learn the skills, and assimilate the knowledge essential to become morally responsible leaders. The success of our University depends upon a conscientious commitment to our mission, vision, and goals. Community: Saint Leo University develops hospitable Christian learning communities everywhere we serve. We foster a spirit of belonging, unity, and interdependence based on mutual trust and respect to create socially responsible environments that challenge all of us to listen, to learn, to change and to serve. Respect: Animated in the spirit of Jesus Christ, we value all individuals' unique talents, respect their dignity, and strive to foster their commitment to excellence in our work. Our community's strength depends on the unity and diversity of our people, on the free exchange of ideas and on learning, living and working harmoniously. Personal Development: Saint Leo University stresses the development of every person's mind, spirit, and body for a balanced life. All members of the Saint Leo University community must demonstrate their commitment to personal development to help strengthen the character of our community. Responsible Stewardship: Our Creator blesses us with an abundance of resources. We foster a spirit of service to employ our resources to university and community development. We must be resourceful. We must optimize and apply all of the resources of our community to fulfill Saint Leo University's mission and goals.

Integrity: The commitment of Saint Leo University to excellence demands that its members live its mission and deliver on its promise. The faculty, staff and students pledge to be honest, just, and consistent in word and deed. Additional Services: For technical assistance, please contact the SLU Blackboard help desk by clicking the Help link at the top of the Blackboard 9 page. They can also be reached toll-free at 1-866-404-1595 or online at http://d2.parature.com/ics/support/default.asp?deptID=8038. For academic assistance, please contact your advisor.

Week 1 Module 1 Outcomes:

Entering the Modern World: T.S. Eliot and James Joyce After completing this module the student will be able to : Compare the cultural, historical, and artistic background to the beginning of the twentieth century. Interpret the basic characteristics of modern literature. Examine modern elements in the assigned literature.

Assignments:

Assignments Post introduction to the discussion board Read the module and assigned selections from your textbook Post your initial response to the discussion question Post one peer response to a classmates discussion question Write and submit the assigned essay Check your module progress

Due No Later Than 11:59 PM Thursday EST/EDT

11:59 PM Thursday EST/EDT 11:59 PM Sunday EST/EDT 11:59 PM Sunday EST/EDT

Reading:

Select Writers of the Twentieth Century: A Brief Anthology Eliot, "Preludes," pp. 203-204 Eliot, The Waste Land, part I, pp. 205-207 Joyce, The Dead, pp. 80-110, including Joyce on Epiphanies

Week 2 Module 2 Outcomes:

The Poetry of Wilfred Owen, Robert Frost and Modernism After completing this module the student will be able to : Explain the selected poetry of Wilfred Owen as a product of WWI. Analyze representative themes and motifs in the selected poetry of Robert Frost.

Assignments:

Assignments Read the module and assigned selections from your textbook Complete the Trench Poetry assignment Post your initial response to the Trench Poetry discussion question Post one peer response to a classmates Trench Poetry discussion question Complete the Soldiers Poetry assignment Post your initial response to the Soldiers Poetry discussion question Post one peer response to a classmates Soldiers Poetry discussion question Complete the Frost Poetry assignment Post your initial response to the Frosts Poetry discussion question Post one peer response to a classmates Frosts Poetry discussion question Check your module progress

Due No Later Than

11:59 PM Thursday EST/EDT 11:59 PM Sunday EST/EDT

11:59 PM Thursday EST/EDT 11:59 PM Sunday EST/EDT

11:59 PM Thursday EST/EDT 11:59 PM Sunday EST/EDT

Reading:

Poetry of Wilfred Owen at War Poems and Manuscripts of Wilfred Owen Dulce et Decorum est Anthem for Doomed Youth Mental Cases Disabled 1914 Cramped in that Funneled Hole Select Writers of the Twentieth Century: A Brief Anthology The Oven Bird, p. 57 Home Burial, p. 53 After Apple-Picking, p. 52 Norris, Margot. Teaching World War I poetry---comparatively College Literature. June 22, 2005.

Week 3 Module 3 Outcomes:

The Fiction of Ernest Hemingway and Modernism After completing this module the student will be able to : Apply conceptions of Modernism to Hemingway's work. Analyze Hemingway's The Sun Also Rises as a reflection of Modernism.

Assignments:

Assignments Read the module and assigned selections from your textbook Read The Sun Also Rises Read "Reading Around Jake's Narration: Brett Ashley and The Sun Also Rises." Post your initial response to the module discussion question Post one peer response to a classmates discussion question Take Exam 1 on Hemingway and Modernism Check your module progress

Due No Later Than

11:59 PM Thursday EST/EDT 11:59 PM Sunday EST/EDT 11:59 PM Sunday EST/EDT

Reading:

Select Writers of the Twentieth Century: A Brief Anthology A Clean, Well-Lighted Place, pp. 311-313 Biography of Ernest Hemingway, pp. 313-316 Ernest Hemingway, The Sun Also Rises Fulton, Lorie Watkins. "Reading Around Jake's Narration: Brett Ashley and The Sun Also Rises." Hemingway Review 24.1 (2004): 61-80.

Week 4 Module 4 Outcomes:

The Harlem Renaissance and William Faulkner After completing this module the student will be able to: Identify representative themes and motifs in the literature of the Harlem Renaissance.

Identify representative themes and motifs in the short works of William Faulkner.

Assignments:

Assignments Read the module and assigned selections from your textbook Post your initial response to the discussion question Post one peer response to a classmates discussion question Submit the brief reflection response. Write and submit the assigned essay Check your module progress Select Writers of the Twentieth Century: A Brief Anthology The Death of a Soldier, p. 74 my sweet old etcetera, p. 244 Biography of Langston Hughes, p. 318 The Weary Blues, p. 321 The Negro Speaks of Rivers, p. 321 I, Too, p. 322 Dream Variations, p. 323 Mother to Son, p. 323 Theme for English B, p. 324 Dream Boogie, p. 325 Biography of Zora Neale Hurston, p. 229 Sweat, p. 230 Biography of William Faulkner, p. 267 A Rose for Emily, p. 268 Two Soldiers, p. 288

Due No Later Than

11:59 PM Thursday EST/EDT 11:59 PM Sunday EST/EDT 11:59 PM Sunday EST/EDT 11:59 PM Sunday EST/EDT

Reading:

Week 5 Module 5 Outcomes:

The Writers of the WWI Era and Beyond After completing this module the student will be able to : Analyze the main themes and images in Katherine Anne Porter's "Flowering Judas." Identify sense of place and comic elements in Eudora Welty's "Why I Live at the P.O." Assignments Read the module and assigned selections from your textbook Write and submit the brief reflection response Post your initial response to the discussion question Post one peer response to a classmates discussion question Check your module progress Due No Later Than

Assignments:

11:59 PM Sunday EST/EDT 11:59 PM Thursday EST/EDT 11:59 PM Sunday EST/EDT

Reading:

Select Writers of the Twentieth Century: A Brief Anthology Biography of Katherine Anne Porter, p. 217 Flowering Judas, p. 218 Writing Flowering Judas, p. 227 Biography of Eudora Welty, p. 346 Revelation, pp. 484-498 Why I Live at the P.O., p. 380

Week 6 Module 6 Outcomes:

World Writers in the 50s and 60s After completing this module the student will be able to : Analyze "A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings" as an example of magical realism. Identify the main themes in Singer's "Gimpel the Fool."

Assignments:

Assignments Read the module and assigned selections from your textbook Read The Handsomest Drowned Man in the World Submit the brief reflection response Post your initial response to the discussion question Post one peer response to a classmates discussion question Check your module progress

Due No Later Than

11:59 PM Sunday EST/EDT 11:59 PM Thursday EST/EDT 11:59 PM Sunday EST/EDT

Reading:

Select Writers of the Twentieth Century: A Brief Anthology Biography of Gabriel Garcia Marquez, p. 502 A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings, p. 504 Biography of Isaac Bashevis Singer, p. 326 Gimpel the Fool, p. 327 Authors Perspective, p. 337 The Handsomest Drowned Man in the World by Gabriel Garcia Marquez

Week 7 Module 7 Outcomes:

More World Writers After completing this module the student will be able to : Explain Camus' concept of the Absurd. Identify the main conflict in Camus' story "The Guest." Analyze the conflict between the past and the present in Achebe's "Dead Man's Path."

Assignments: Assignments Read the module and assigned selections from your textbook Post your initial response to the module discussion question Post one peer response to a classmates discussion question Write and submit the assigned essay Check your module progress Reading: Due No Later Than

11:59 PM Thursday EST/EDT 11:59 PM Sunday EST/EDT 11:59 PM Sunday EST/EDT

Select Writers of the Twentieth Century: A Brief Anthology Biography of Albert Camus, p. 368 The Guest, p. 369 "The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas," pp. 511-516 Biography of Chinua Achebe, p. 518 Dead Mans Path, p. 519

Week 8 Module 8 Outcomes:

Toni Morrisons The Bluest Eye After completing this module the student will be able to: Identify the main themes and concerns in The Bluest Eye. Explain the importance of the novel's Prologue and Afterword to an understanding of the novel.

Assignments:

Assignments Read the novel, Morrisons The Bluest Eye Take Exam 2 on the novel Check your module progress Read The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison

Due No Later Than 11:59 PM Sunday EST/EDT

Reading: