Doucus

THs
HrourN
DrnrnrcH
oN
Srnr
or
HrsroRy
The Truth abour the Little Boy Bomb
Douglas Dietrlch
IDD): When Hary S Trlrman took over his first act as
Presi dent
was t o recal l
t he avrat or Charl es Lrndbergh f rom t he
paci f i c
i mmedi at e y
and send hi rï r t o Ëurope. Charl es Aùgust us Lt ndbergh
spoke
Cerman,
and had been awarded a very, hi gh-l evel
ci vi l i an medal by Adol f
Hl t l er f or hl s sympat hy wi t h cer many bef or e ând dur i ng Wor l cl War I l .
Truman sent Li ndbergh t o E! rope t o deal wi t h âs many Nâzi sci ent t st s and
t echni ci ans
as he coul d, t o bri ng back l he at omi c bomb f rom t he cermans.
Thomas Kirschner
ITK): Oh he senl him over as a spy, so to speak?
DD: No; as whât t hey woul d cal l â
goodwi l l
ambassador
Dunng t he
t i me bef or e Roosevel t di ed, hi s i nsane pr oci amat i on
of uncondi t i cnal
sur r ender sàr d: We decl ar e t hat t he Emper or Hl r chi t o and t he Nazj
government
af e war cri mi nal s. These are
peopl e
whom we wi l l not cont ef d
wi t h Wewi l l not deal wi t ht hemi n
anyway shapeor f or m
Wesi mpywant
t hem dead That i s t he f esùl t of Roosevel t s sâyi ng t hat t he war coul d never
end That i s why Ei senhower, i n t he f i el d, ur' as so desperat e t hat he act ual i y
brought i n a musi cl an-GI enn
Ài l i l l er who spoke Cerman ând was f amous i n
Cermany-t o cord! ct peace
negot i at i ons
secret l y wi t h t he Thi rd Rei ch. That
i s how desperat e
t he Ameri cans were Si nce t hey coul ci n t communi cat e
wi t h t he Thi rd Rej ch government ,
al l t hey coul d do wês t o t ake ceasef i res i n
t he f i ei d Even t he ent t re end of t he war was sj gned by Ceneral Al f recj
l odl
ând Grand Admi ral Karl Dôl ] i t z as a surrender of mj l i t ary f orces
a ceasef i re
TK: A suf f ender
of t he Àl l i ed l orces t o t he cermans?
DD: Wel l no. The Cerman f orces i n t he f i el d surrendered t o t he Àl l i es
t ' ut t he
government
was not spoken t o ând was si rnpl y âl l owed t o l eave The
peopl e
who were i n t he dock at t he Nuremberg l l i al s were al l mi l i f ary men
Even Al bert Speer wâs consi dered rni l t t ary because he was i n charge of
mj l i t ary product j on
TKr So, t o where di d t he government
l eave?
DD: The
government
reasseded
l t sel f i n many many
pl aces,
marnl y rn
Argent j na but al so t n Ant arct i ca and event ual l y i n Unt erl and. But
i Lt st
t o
f i ni sh of f wi t h Charl es Ll ndbergh. rhe Li t t l e Boy bomb was never rest ed by
t he Ameri cars Remember Tri ni t q: i t was t he t est of t he Fat Mân
h, pe
bomb
t he
pl ut oni um
bomb The Ameri cans had
pl ut oni um. ' b! t
t he cef mans and
t he
l apânese had no pl ut oni urn
What t hey had was urani um so al l t he
Cerman and
l apanese bornbs had a st andardi sed À\ i s shei J meant t o f i t i nt o
t he f usel age of a medi um-range
bomber That was a uf ani um bomb t hat t he
Ameri cans cal l ed Li t t l e Boy. By
produci ng
a number of t hese t he Cemans
and
l apanese coul d t hreat en t he Amerj cans wj t h medi urn-range del i very-a
rnedi um-range
i nt erbal l i st l c mi ssi e del j very sysl em, or a roct et syst em
l aunched l rom a U-boat or i n t he
j apanese
case by a kami kaze
pl ane.
B, ôcause
of t hrs t hey were abl e f t r f orce rnul t rpl e concessi ons hom t he
An Intervi ew wi rh
Douglas Dietrich
@ 29 April 2Ol2
by Thomas Kinchner
Publ i shef
of rhe German edi ti on
of NEXUS Magazi ne
Website:
httpr//www.douglaçdietrich.com
AUCUST SI PTEMBFR
20I 2
www. nexusmaqâ, ne. com
*r*Ut,tt
À
When Charles Lindbergh went to continental Europe,
he coul d do what cl enn Mi l l er di dn t do Gl enn Mi l l er
died very mysteriously and the Àmericans organised this
entire cover story that he was killed in an aircraft crash.
That is not what happened. But Charles Lindbergh was
abl e t o succeed i n t al ki ng t he German sci ent i st s i nt o
gi vi ng
over t he Li t t l e Boy bomb as
par t
of t he
concessions that they were dealing with in terms of the
Third Reich s
government.
when this Little Boy bomb
was delivered to the United States, it was never tested
because t he Ameri cans al f eady knew t hat i t worked
They already knew that the Cermans had deployed it
The Extraterrestrial Propaganda Victory
DDr why would the Àmericans have separate bomt)
devel opment syst ems one ur ani um and one
plutonium?
It did not make any sense, but everybody
êccept ed i t af t er t he war âs
part
of t he
propaganda
That was one of t he ways t hat
t he Cermans were abl e t o
get
concessl0ns.
Ànot her was t hr oùgh t he
Reich s Propaganda Minister, Dr
Paul
l oseph
Gôbbel s
l coebbel sl .
He conduct ed a
bri l l i ant
propaganda
operat i on
i n whi ch he cl ai med t hat t he
Thi rd Rei ch had made cont act
with extraterrestrials and that
they recognised the Thitd Reich
as the legitimate
government
of
pl anet
Ear t h. The
"Dr
Gôbbels was able to
convince the western
Allies
that aliens were on the
Nazis' side and recognised
their
government,.."
aerial eqùivalent of a nauticâl mine with all the spikes
sticking out in every drrection in flight
The cermans claimed that because they were the first
gover nment
t o use t el evi si on br oadcast i ng of
ceremonial evenls, they were able to have these signals
intercepted by the extratenestrials that had been flying
i n t he vi ci ni t y of our sol ar syst em, whi ch
got
t hem
recognised as the
government
That is why at the end
of the war sr.rddenly these fireballs appeared and they
were b-1 rre bo- be' .
^v"ry\ r
here rr EJI ope
TKr The Cer mans used t hese f oo f i ght er s i n
connect i on wi t h t hei r cl ai m t hat t hey had made cont act
wi t h t he al i en races?
DD: Absol ut el y, and i t was t hrough t hi s t hat t he
Rei ch s Propaganda Mi ni st er, Dr Côbbel s, was abl e t o
force the Brltish and the Àmericans into standing back.
The American records I was looking at claimed that the
Br i t i sh wer e mor e suscept i bl e t o t hi s
pr opaganda
because of their nervous strain
f r om
year s
of war f ar e. The
Àmeri cans cl ai med t hat t hey
wer e much mor e scept i cal
Per sonal l y, I t hi nk t hat t he
Ameri cans were
! usl
t ryi ng t o
push
it off onto the British, but
t hey wer e
j ust
as af r ai d.
Nobody had seen Feuerbal k
bef ore, and t hey were very
af rai d t hat t hese were act ual
ext rat errest ri al craf t . l t was a
pr opaganda
vi ct or y of
enor mous
pt opor t i ons. DI
ext rat eûest ri al s coul d onl y recogni se one
government
over t he
pl énet ;
and because t he Thi rd Rerch was t he
firct one to make contâct, they were the ones that were
recognised.
At the end of the war, the Third Reich was an example
of a
pol ycracy,
a
government
of di f f erent i nt ernal
depar t me. t ê er r pi "e5 Côbbel 5
Fdd
hr s emp. r e
Hi mml er had hi s Speer had hi s, côri ng had hi s. To
gi ve
you
an example of how
powerfùl
these empires could
be the SS had its own army, its own
panz€r
units and its
own
paratroops.
lt also had iis own air force What was
t he SS ai r f orce? I t was t he Hi t l er-l ugend, t he Hi t i er
Youth, who had been trained to fly what were basically
ramrockets that could
go
up into the sky vedically and
f i re of f a number of shel l s very cl ose t o Ameri can
bombers, and then they would
parachute
out of them.
The Luf t waf f e had i t s own
paf at roops,
al l t he ant i -
ai rcraf t bat t eri es, 20 f i el d di vi si ons and an armoured
unit, all controlled by Rrirr/isrï4rs,rrall Herman Côring.
Then t her e wer e what t he Cer mans cal l ed t he
FrûrÉall5-the fireballs These fell under the control of
the Reich s Propaganda Ministry, under côbbels. These
were hi ghl y manoeuvrabl e, radi o-renot e-cont rol l ed
magnesium flares with supeFelongated coils to
provide
ext ensi ve durat i on of t he f l are s burni ng. I t was t he
Côbbel s was abl e t o convi nce t he west ern Al l i es t hat
al i ens were on t he Nazi s si de and recogni sed t hei l
government ,
and t heref ore t he Al l i es had t o al l ow t he
ent i r e i mpor t ant el ement s of t he Thi r d Rei ch
eovernment
to escape, except for cases of suicide. Now,
Reichsleiter Matlin Bormann escaped. I can
guarantee
through the records that I have dealt with that Dr Paul
loseph
Côbbels escâped.
The Third Reich Relocates
TK: So côbbels escaped, Hitler escaped, Bormann
escâped. who else do
you
think from the leadership?
DDr cert ai nl y SS of f i cer Hans Kamml er, as wel l as
mâny ot her i mport ant t echni ci ans. vi t al t o t he Thi rd
Reich. This became known as the Thousând Year Reich,
and as a result it was dealt with as a third force in the
Col d War
TK: Did they all escape to the same
place,
or did they
spfead into different locations?
DD: Very different locations. There were secret bases
t hat were st i l l mai nt arned i n Nol way, Creenl and, t he
canary lslands, Antarctica, South Àmerica, but mostly it
was Argentina, and then Antarctica, and then unterland.
TK: Where is lJnterland?
DD: Unt erl and requi res some expl âi ni ng. Thi s i s
16. NÊXUS w!vw,nexuSmagazrne,com AUGUST, SEPTTMBER 2OI2
somet hi ng t hat most of t he worl d i s unf ami l i ar wi t h
Dudng the last
year
when Iworked âs a Department ot
Defense research librarian, in 1992, that was when Alan
B Thompson, a
geophysicist
had an article
published
ent i t l ed Wat er i n t he Eart h s Upper Mant l e
l Ndf rre
1992
lul
23: 358 295-3021 He said that the mantle of the
Eadh, t he deep l ayers of t he rock st ruct ures, cont ai n
lôdes ofwater like mineral lodes, that dwarf the existing
oaeans. ln other words, there is more watel undemeath
t he l ower mant l e of
pl anet Eadh t han t here i s i n al l t he
Earth s oceans-and all of wodd s oceans are 75
per
cent of out
pl anet ary
surf ace. Then, t wo Ameri can
sci ent i st s f ound evi dence usi ng sei smi c waves of an
entife ocean in the
porous
rocks deep beneath Beiiing
found well before the active
period
of hostilities in the
war People might ask for instance, who was the one
person
who was so important so criticalto thls. Almost
nobody knows about hi m. He was Mârt i n Bormann.
Everybody knows t hat Oôbbel s was i n charge of t he
propaganda,
Hi mml er was i n charge of t he SS, and
basically
people
are familiâr with everyone s
position
in
the Third Reich but almost nobody knows about Martin
Bormann and what he was doing. Nobody asks what he
was responsible fot
Computer Power and Nazi War Sfiategy
TK: Ithought that Bormann was responsible for the
money.
DD: That i s ân excel l ent
Poi nt .
Now, how di d he wor k wi t h t he
money? He basically used the most
i mport ant weapon t hat t he t hi rd
Rei ch had: t he comput et I n 1935,
t he f i rst
pract i cal worki ng comput er
was developed for the Thhd Reich by
a Germân engi neer named Konrad
Zuse wi t h hi s comput er,
what he
had created was a wây to make the
tralns run on ûme.
Oerman statistician Friedrich Zahn,
ên SS member since 1933, convinced
SS R?is,rsldfrrer Heinrich Himrnler to
est abl i sh a cover t Rei ch
Tabul at i on Bureau t hat woul d
integrate Zuse s technology with
I BM syst ems deveLoped by
Ameri cân st at i st i ci an Herman
Hol l eri t h, who had creât ed t he
pûnch-cêrd
data tabulatot One
of the maior Cerman companies,
I c Farben, devel oped magnet i c
t ape i n 1935, whi ch mâde t he
Zuse- Hol l er i t h i nf or mat i on
processi ng syst em even more
powerf ul . Magnet i c t ape was
actually more Lrseful than
punch
T
The reason I bring this up is becaùse
t he mi l i t ary knew al l t hi s
years
and
.yeals
ago The Nazi
government
knew
of it well before them. churchlll used
t o
get
a bi g l âugh out of t he Thi rd
Rei ch s sendi ng mount ai n di vi si ons,
or mount ai n hunt er s, who woul d
nor mal l y oper at e i n t he Caucasus
Mount ai ns t o Ti bet . Àt t hat t i me
Churchi l l di d not underst and i t but
I Ne| l
Sr i er t i 5t , no 2594, l 0 Mar ch
20071
eftrieswere foùnd into this
paft
of the
Eart h t hat had been bof ed out by
these massive flows of watet
Wat er i s corrosi ve, and
gi ven
rmi l l enni a
or mi l l i ons of
years i t
1t ôNes huge hol es and caverns
t hl ouch sol i d rock Al l of t hi s
. {nderwat er l i qui d had bored
ve tunnels all over, beneath
th€ Earth s surface Underneath
Earth s su ace, there is not a
llo$/ Earth but an i,1ner Earth
are caverns a mile high that
their own weather because
that height the water begjns to
and this
produces
iâin
rclica to the North Pole. This began to be referred
as Unterland.
f K: Do t hese caverns have dry enough spaces i n
h to live?
DD: Yes because theyre like the crand canyon. In
sense, there ale caverns where the water has dried
they hâve a sunless environment of oceans and rivers
at ci r cul at e t hr oughout t he i nner Ear t h f r om
but mostly there are caverns that still have a body of
cards, which were much more expensive. With the use
of magnetic tape, these computerc did the work of 300
clerks, with oniy l5 specialists, in a week instèad oi six
mor t 1. Be. duse of I hi q,
l her e wet e
- ant
r ' l âi or
appl i cat i ons-one of whi ch was
gami ng out t he
waf
They could feed in equations and exâmples of warfâae
that would help them figure out how the warwould
play
out to the encl
one of t he t hi ngs t hat t hey f i gured out
wi t h t hese
computers was that the Àllies outnumbered
the Àxis by
l0 to one. Pitted against
Japan
Germany
and ltaly' the
Allies had seven times the tanks, five times the heôvy
artillery, three times the combat ajrcraft,
five tlmeS th€
t rucks, seven t i mes t he machi ne
guns The Uni t €d
States alone had 27 rnillion men thât it could mobilige
goi ng
l _rou€h ! hem The l êr, i l e
' edl merl
t hàl l ^d'
in the cavern terraces above the water system is
DDr r4ost certainly As a matter of fact, they were
ted for agijculture
.Tl(
So the Nazis found these caverns during wartime
they went there and hid there?
"Underneath
our
Earth's surface,
there is not a
hollow Earth bw
an irrer Earth,
There are caverns
a mile high that
have their own
weather, because
ai that height the
water begins to
condense and this
produces
rain..."
.
SEPTEMBER 2OI2 www.nexusmagazne,€om
N!XI.F.17
t he Br i t i sh SAS dur i ng t he wâr I n
1944, duri ng Operat ron Tdrdl i r t he
SÀS at t acked but l aj l ed t o di sl odge
t he Thi rd Rei ch f rom t he Ant arct t c
Thi s has been wri t t €n about i n NEXUS
magêzi ne
l see
l ames
Robef t , Bf i t aj f s
Secret War i n Ànt ârct i ca i 2l 05-06
l 3/0 |
l.
i n uni f orm The Thi rd Rei ch real i sed t hat t he ent i r-. war
was
goi ng
t o hâve t o be a hol di ng act i on t o del ay t he
advances of t he enemy unt i l i t coul d r el ocat e t h- .
government.
Among t he f i r st t hi ngs r el ocat ed wer e t he maj or
comput er syst ems Because t hese comput ers were so
vâl ! abl e and wer e
pr ocessi ng
so much i nf or mat i on,
Adol f Hi t l er asked Mâr t i n Bor mann, Wher e câf we
rel ocat e t hem? Bormann sâi d, Neuschwabenl ând
basi cal l y because i t had b€en col oni sed si ncet he 1930s
I t wâs Cermany s Af ea 5l wi t hout t he t ouri st s t hey
began to move concept weapons and the computers to
t he Ant ârct i c hol l owi ng out vâst caverns t o f l t t hem
Thj s i s one of t he reasons why t hey f aced i nvasi on by
TK: Wow. Coul d a cj vi
j ên
go
t here, or i s i t of t l j mi t s?
DD: The Ànt arct i c Treat y was si gned t n Decembe.
1959, af t er t he at omi c t esl s t hat t ook
pl ace
down
t her+ Operat i on Ar4 s whi ch l wi l l go
i nt o l at er Af t er
t hât t he area was
pret t y
nuch decl ared of f I i mi t s by t he
Sovi et Uni on and t he I Jni t ed St at es
So i l hês orl y been recent l y, al t er t he col l apse of t he
Sovi et Uni on, t hat t hey began i o
-. xp-. rj ment
wi t h some
€col ogi caL or envrronment al âwaaeness t ouri sm That
has been ext remel y recent af d was
pret t y
much af t er t he
Nazi
presence
di sappeared of f Ant arct rca, whi ch was
ar ound 1997 when pr obabl y
t he l âst vest j ges of i t
ret reet ed i nt o LJnt erl and compl et el y.
Entrances to the lnner Earth
TKi And Unterl and: where woul d
that be locâted? ls it under Antarctica
or i s i t compLet e y
el sewhere?
DD: l here âre mul t i p e ent rances t o
Unt erl and, l i t eral l y al l over t he
gl obe
Ther e ar e some i n Ti bet , t her e ar e
some i n Ant ar ct i ca, t her e ar e some
t hat are l ocât ed i n ot her areas of t he
wûl d i ncl udi ng one i n Swi t zerl and-a
mai or ent rance as wel l as one wi t hi n
l he Al penf est ung. or Al pi ne Fort ress,
encompassl ng a nuge areâ across t ne
nort hern l t al i an and Àust ri an Al ps
TK: I n Cermany t oo.
probabl y.
DDr Yes
TK: I know t hêt Hi t l er had a
ver y r r npor t ant hi deâway i n a
t own cal Led Bercht esgaden whi ch
i s i n t he Ce. man Al ps woLr l d
t hat be an ent r ance t o t he
LJf t erl and?
DD: Concei vabl y I never saw
eny records concemi ng t hat The
Amer i cans mi si nt er pr et ed t he
Rei ch s concept of Al penf est ung
They t hought t hat i t f unct i ored as
a ki nd of Sal ô Republ i c f or t he
Thi r d Rei ch, as t he l t al i ân Sal ô Republ i c ser ved
Mussol i ni s f asci st st at e The r eal j t y i s t hat t he
Al penf esl ung was essent râl l y securi ng t hat ent rance i nt o
Unt erl and f rom t he Europeân cont i nent , but t here are
ot her ent rânces i n ot her
part s
of t he worl d. I am cert ai n
t hat t her e ar e many mor e t hat have never been
dj scover€d l rLrt
t he maj or ent rances spoken ot i n t he
records I ve dealt with are in Tibet ând in Antarctica
TK: ] s t here a whol e area where âl l t hese ent rances
are rnterconnecled?
DD: They are inlerconnected because so mucn water
has eroded Grand Canyon-t ype caverns t hroughout t he
pl anet
many mi l es bel ow I t i s a very hot envrronmenr
â very st eamy envrronment , l j ke a t ropi cal envl ronment
wi t hout t he Sun l l has a l ot of room
pl ent y
of room
Hi t l er was l ooki ng f or an ar ea i n
whr ch t o keep t he comput er s i n
st eri l e, cool condi t i ons becaLt se t hey
over heât ed ea s i j y Bor mann s
comput ers were begi nni ng t o become
the centrâl focus of the science of the
Thi rd Rei ch, whi ch was based on what
Hi t l er and Hi mml er consi dered t o
be Aryan
physics
TK: But di dn t t hey al so need
enof mou s amount s of
power ?
The Thi rd Rei ch woul d have had
t o have moved â whol e
inf rastructure there of
generators
and di esel back"up and
peopl e
and what not .
DDr They f ound ways t o
gener ât e geot her ma
I and
hydr oel ect r i c power
i n t he
Ant arct i c regi ons t hat were very
si mi l ar t o l cel and They used t hese en€rgy sources t o
power
t hei r comput ers ând i nf rast ruct Ure Underground
There are areas of Ànt arct i ca whi ch i s an enormous
cont i nent hom whi ch Àmeri cân
pat rol s
never ret urned.
I wj l l t el l
you
somet hi ng about Ant arct i ca i n t erms ol i t s
popul at i on
The l argest concent rat i on of sci ent i st s i n
t he worl d i s i n Ant arct i ca
TK: At
present?
DD: Yes I âm t ryi f g t o
put
I hi s i nt o
persp€ct i ve
There i s not hi ng el se t o do i n Ant êrct i ca of f rer t han
sci ent i f l c i nvest i gat i on
and as a f esul t many count nes
est abl i shed bases t her e t he Sovi et l Jni on/ Russi a,
Soul h Ài ri ca France, Norway
Japan
Chi nâ. t he US t he
UK Aust ra i a and New Zeal and among t hem Argent i na
and Chi l e act ual l y col oni sed f ami l i es down
t here
"There
are
multiple entrances
to Unterland,
literally all over
the globe.
There
are some in Tibet,
there are some in
Antarcticâ, there
are some that are
located in other
areas of the
world,
including one in
Switzerland..."
18. NEXUS
www.nexurmagazlne.com
AUCUS T SËPTEN4BER 2OI 2
tor the establishment and expansion of civilisation.
TK: And this is all being kept from the
public?
DD: Absol ut el y. Take a l ook at what happens i n
Ànt arat i ca The bi ggest
probl em
t hat t hey have i n
Ant ar ct i ca i s wi t h al l of t hose sci ent i st s. The
over whel mr ng ma
j or i t y
ar e Caucasi an- RLr ssi an,
ûufopean, Àustralian, New zealander, Àmerican, all of
them Caucasian except for those from
Japan
and China.
t hef e are verv f ew et hni c mi nori t i es on t he Ànt arct i c
continent.
Generally, the only minorities that
you
would
lindwould be in the Amencan military
There i s an enormous Àmeri can mi l i t ary
presence
down
i n Ant arct i ca, but t hef e i s no t hreat of â war
ltarting in Àntarctica between the United States and
Russia or China or any surface nation. So why are they
E
t he end of t hei r I i ves wi l l col l apse i nf i ni t el y. Hewasabl e
to ascenain rnathematically the existence of black holes.
Some of the cliquish British scientists laughed at him
and even went so far as to call him a
yellow nigger" but
the Cermans and the
Japanese
viewed his science to be
Aryan sclence.
The
Japanese
vi ewed t hemsel ves as Aryan
peopl e
descended f rom nort hern I ndi a t hrough mâri t i rne
rnigration The Cermans viewed themselves under the
Nazr ideology as Àryans descended from northern India
and lran through land migrations into northern Europe.
Bot h
Japân
and cermany had a raci al i deol ogy t hat
uniied them in the Àxis that was centred on Asian lndia.
the Cermans in
particulat
usjng computer technoLogy,
were able to take Chandrâsekhaas equations and
put
them rnto therr computer systems. theycalculated them
to the Iogical conclusion, and they concluded that our
entire
galaxy
and indeed the centre of every
galâxy
is
held together by a supermassive
bl ack hol e-t he mot her of al l
bl ack suns. Thi s may sound
very obtuse.
People may ask, why would
theoretical
physics have such an
impact on the war effort?" It is
because t he Thi rd Rei ch was
able to take a half-century leap
in
physics,
thânks to taking the
chandr âsekhar equat i ons t o
t hei r l ogi cal concl usi on usi ng
comput er t echnol ogy. Thi s i s
how they
Cot
into the concept of
ieàsons that Marines are on a ship: not only to act âs
the infantry am of the na\T, but also to
prevent mutiny
? The reason why i s f or one of t he same maj of
t he sal l ors That s why
def€ction. The biggest
problem
they have with scientists in
:the
Antarctic is defectlon to the
Reich.
TIc So are
you implying that
îhird Reich is still there?
her e s mi l i t ai y
pr esence
i n
i Ant arct i ca, t o
prevent
"That's
why
there's military
presence
in Antarctica...
The biggest
problem
that
they have
with
scientists in
the Antarctic is defection
to the Third Reich."
fev,
years
after I left working with the Depaftment of
DD: Well. nobodv knows because all contact broke
Tl(: what are they doing there?
DD: The scientists?
No, the Third Reich in Unterland
in 1997, during the Clinton administration. That was
nse. What happened was t hat af t er t he wat t he
DDr Not in the Antarctic
/rr
*, but i n Unt erl and and t hey
t o reach i t t hrouch t he
t r ances i n t he Ant ar ct i c
from lndia, which at that time was under the
nent,
icans failed in ope.arian Highiuftp and various
ion Àr4us in
preventing
a Third Reich domjnation
ss.
RÊkh Physics and Computing
zuse developed the original workinC computet a
named Dr Subrahmanyan chandrâsekhar-a Hindu
ant i gravi t at i on and t he hl gher-l evel
physi cs.
The
problem
was that this wâs still in a developmental stage.
However . t he Thi r d Rei ch s conf l i ct si mul at i ons
der r or , . r at ed t hat r he war coul d nol be won i n a
conventional sense. The entire Second world war in the
Atlantic and continental Europe was considered to be
one massive series of holding actions until relocation of
the Thousand Yeâr Reich could take
place.
This is why
so many cerman
peopl e
di sappeared. Bef ore t he
Second world Wat the
population
of Germanic
peoples
in Switzerlând, Liechtenstein, Àustria, Germany and the
cerman diaspoia throughout Europe was 180 million-
cl ose t o 200 mi l l i on
peopl e
when
you
count t hose i n
various
places
in Russia and the Ameicas Today, there
are around 80 mil]lon Germans in United Germanv.
TK: So 120 mi l l i on Ger mâns di sappear ed
t n
Neuschwabenland?
DD: No I a* not
. ayi ng
t h"t Ce' n ar s dr<appeared
bul l d4 sayi ng t hal oul oi mot ! o' l hose Cerrans
who
disappeared there were thousands who were relocatecl.
Hi mml erwas obsessed wi t h t hi s.
Many
people
do not understand the
purpose
oi th€ SS.
The wehrmacht fought for the natlon for oemâny, and
the SS fought for the Aryan race The
purpose
of the SS
was not only to fight for the continuity of the Arytn race;
r operat i ons but onl y succeeded i n 1958, wi t h
near space I am more than happy to explain this
use i t has t o do wi t h t he
physi cs
I was about t o
I Thrs much I do know aboul t he
physi cs 1
it as an historical librarian, as opposed to a
i ci st , but basi cal l y, i n 1935, t he same
year
t hat
al Àst ronomi cal Soci et y wi t h hi s ast rophysi cs
ions He had
proven
thât stars within a certain
of mass about 1.4 times the mass of our Sun at
mând ol t he Bri t i sh Raj -approached t he Bri t i sh
t
- SEPTEMBER 2OI2 www.nexusmagâzrne.côm
N€XUS.19
t wasal so a mul t i nat i onal army. I t i nspi red
t he model coul d operat e at a
great er
speed t han a hel i copt er
for both warsaw Pact forces ând NATO forces in terms of because of its aerodlnamic frame, sans the durability.
supranational
command.
Because the Fl.igshads
could be mounted with rocket;
Himmler was intent on relocating what he considered they were able t; wipe out the Àmerican invasion force
t o be
genet i cal l y pure
Nordi c Àryans t o duri ng Operat i on Hi gl i l rr1l
Neùschwabenl and,
but he reâl i sed t hât he needed
TK: Operat i on Hi 4t rj û, xp i s ân hi st ori cal f act , i s i t ?
enough
genetic
diveisity to
prevent
morbid inbreeding in DDr Àbsolutely. In the southern summer of 194Ê,7,
what would begin as a limited
population
base. the us Nar,y opeiation was led by Reaf Admirar Richard
.
Às.an aside Himmler made a
point
of emphasising Everyn Byrd
lr
It was actuaiiy organised by men who
that his ss troops had perfect
teeth. Arried inte igence were above him but he becam€ rhe scapegoat who was
l nt erpret ed t hi s âs some mani â f or aest het i cs.
The bl amed f or i t s f ai l ure. I t was an al , r, f ; rce, hast i l y put
realitywâs
that he needed men who could operate in the together by Fleet AdmiralChester Nimitz.
sub-zero conditions of Àntarctrca, where metal dental Ôn 26 August 1946 basically what happened was that
fillings would contrâct to excruciating €ffect.
they had 3,5-00 Marines and allofthem died. but nobodv
Anrarctic op€ralions
:Ë::ji."j [.]Jg l"j:,"ff"i,:\î1"1ï:liî:1"t '*:
DD: To
put
it into
perspective
about the miljtary concerned the aûcraft carri;r USS
prilil/ine
S€d, with 100
operations that took
place
in Àntarctica, as I explained aircraft, and it was not assigned to any of the
groups
with operation sedwdfand courland, world war 11 was a because it u,as the fighter-base flagship-an Essei-class
l ' ' ] : l ear }var TheAxi spower S_car r i er , 900f eet l ong' 3' oomen
wer e usi ng nuci ear weèpons
I I
",
cr ew, and si x ski - t i t t ed
ll:f
".,
r-".1 as the Àmericâns
]
,,8".rr,""
th e Fliidolwàc f
Douglas C_47 SkJ,rrain transporr
I:T
j i l
,] a.,more
prrec.rvê
I :":fYt"
Lttç,Il gl t,Yu:
I
ptanes
equrpped wrtl . ,qro
i i et_
l evel because they.were usi ns
I
COUId be mgqnted
Wth I
assi sted take-off
I
"boi i te
t hem oper ar i ona t y a, t r r e
] *"l i - - r . - . , . 1^- - ^i , L^ f
i oi r "t , t her e wer e â. so
blyfl:
^^
|
r\rr-Kcrl,
anËy WeI€ aDte IO
I
loreigr ve,sets oartrcrparing.
In
January
and February 1939,
I WiOe OUt the AmefiCan I
rri So there must have"been
there were sevêra' eÀpedi ri ol r
I
' ;::.:-;::;^:__";l :_,:]'
I
arouro,u,Lruumen,
to Antarcti cd. where
l he
I
l ttYasl on IOfCe
Oufl ng
I oo, v
: " ^' , "' . , ' , 1
wner e
r ne
I
DD:
ye5
Thêf e wer e
4
ZO0
cerT:.' : l ' èd
.
dl readv
] OOgfati On Hi Ohi Umn-r, f
-en rn r",k Force ô8
?,500
e5r abl i chedd basebywo' l d
|
- r - ' - """
I
vann. swe, et t own i n t r om New
Wdt I , Ther e was a Kai cer
|
2. " a- o
, t ,
pr i mar y
mt ssi on
Wi l hel m I l Lând t hat you
can
-
wàs t o est aOt i sn an Ameri can
iind on maps paoduced
before the second wofld war base to counteract the Nazi base in Antarctica
-
Then what happened was that between rg49 and r94r, Now, it doesn t matter whether
or not
you
or r believe,
t he Bri t i sh Royal Navy, commanded by Kei t h Àl l en
l ohn
or whet her or not any Ame' can or Uni t ect cerman
Pitt had varlous ships deployed down therc, and there believes, that the Nazis hêd established a soveroment in
was a secret wartime operation codenamed Tdrdrin-a exile in Antarctica. Àll that matters rs th;t the unrted
failed occupation attempt in ihe winter of 1944 Men States
Covernment
was convjnced that the Third Reich
from an sÀs re€iment were involved, and they went to had re-èstablished
itself in Antarctica. This is why the
war not onlywith the Cermâns but the Afgentjn ians. Americans got
togetherTask Force 68.
.To
exp lain in
lanuary
and Februâry I 942 comandante It was endrmoui, and had at least l 3 American sh ips-
Albeno oddera aboard the
prirfiero
de Mag, had landed êt a central battle
group
commanded
by RearAdmiral ôyrd
Deception Islând in the south shetlênds and fought off The uss M,aftr ôlu;pas was his fracahip, not the air;ft
the British This is whyArgentina neverjoined
theÀllied carrier because thât had crewmen as well as squadrons
war effod If
you
ever see the Allied zone of
patrols
that of fighters, torpedo planes
and Helldiwr dive b;mbers,
stretches
ali across the westem hemisphere on the map, and ihese ctaftïere àll crowded onto the deck. None of
I+fiïrffiiËiïr:i{'iH;i:i::""T::i:liït*Tîiï*r:i:#:ftî"il1"l$#.ï1l."l";;t
A. er i cdns. duet or hecer m"nFl i dphad' ot ar ydi scJnr r '
r he
Ànr ar cr r c . "e and t \ er o" usea à r i shi i n ; , , ; i I
l ne r ot dr y ol ades wer e bui r t ar oul dt hebodvo, t f ecr af l .
, r om
I neqê
ar t t l t ct àl l ar d. r g <r r . p,
on
r hi
r ce That i s
I
$:-**,ruW**u-**,"-*ffi 1 I
TK: Àrd
j ust
a l ract i ori of t hat t ask f orce came back?
DD: Cert ai n
y
a I t he Mâri f es t hat were f l owf
j n
on Lhe
t raf sport
pl anes di ed on t he Ânt af ct i c l ce They $' ere
massacred by lhe ftrckcts ldunched b! the Flii4elrdiis A
f ew of t he
p
anes \ \ r cr c shot down wr t h t h- . navâl
el ement bul ahcr what happened t o t he N{aI i ne! t hcj r
operal j or had l o Érnd and t hey
pul l ed
out
{êc Aor I d
B, vo \ oot - [ d, ê. I d \ \ l - | d.
a
goodbye
spee. h t o â newspaper at t he t i me i i was
publ rshed on
t ,
rn Ch l c a| d never rn t he LJf i t ed St at cs
Byrd had warned oF ân i mmrnent at t ack on l he Ll ni t cd
St at es and l hc nccessrt y t o mai nt arn a 51ai e ol el en t o
t dke del €nsi ve
precaut i ons
agarf st Lhe
possi bi l j i y
of an
rnvasi on by host 1c ei rcraf t
proceedi ng l l om t ho
pol ar
regi ons H"" *i d don t waf t t o scare af yt )ody but t he
2 000
pr
ot s had dred f rom bet ween t he mj d-1940s and
t he mi d-1950s rn t he di sc war.
Thi nk about whâl | ; m sayi ng. l l i s f or t hi s reason t hat
t he Ai l r es $er e sl i I dt wal wr t h l he Thi r d Rer ch, t hat
, l u
h | . , ,
-
g, l d
r ,
1r o. , l ' ,
,
' n
l o5
Stalin's Internationâl Communist Agenda
DD: People don t reâlise how advantageous it was lor
t he l hi r d Rei ch aL l hc end of t he waf Pr esi dent
Roosevel t had di ed myst cri o! sl y and essent i al l y by t he
documef t s I was d-"al i ng wi t h i t wâs suggest ed very
st rongl y t hat he had been assassrnat ed by Àxi s agent s.
' l r uman
l ook over i n Apr i l 1945 and t hen i n
l ul y,
chuf chi l l vas \ , ol ed out of of f rce
The real i t y rs t hat
j n
1945, St al i n. who had enormous
rnt l uence on bo{h t he Unl t ed St at es
ând t he Uni t ed Ki r gdom
gàv€
t he
or der t o t he Labour Par l Y uni on
bosses l o oust Churchi l I n t he US,
we woul d ref er t o t he Labouri t es as
whêt Br i t âi n cal l ed communi st s
These w€re hard-core rtn ionists
bl t t er real i t l , i s t hat i n t he evef t of a
new var t he l j nj t ed St at es
r, vou
d be
attacked by airclaft flying ir from on-.
or bot h of t hc
pol es
Bl rd was suddenl y recal l ed and so
was t he cnt i re expedj t i onary i orc-.
one of t he l ast t hi f gs he sard, one ol
t he most i mpot af t observat i ons he
mâdc was about t he exr sl i ng
si t uat i on l can do no more l haf warn
r . y count r ! men t hat t he t i me has
passed
whef we coul d t ake ref ugc i f
compl et e i sol ât i on and r est i n
conf i dence rn t he
guarant ee
oi secrrri l y
whi ch di st af ce. t he oceans af d l he
pol es provi ded
FI e f i nrsh-. d by
st at rng We are abandonrng t hc
fegion
No of f cr; exp af at i on was cver
di ssemi nat ed Byf d was
assassinated by
Axis agents."
To show
you
t he ki nd of i nf l uence
t hat St al i n had, l wi l l
gi ve you
an
exa m
pl e
When St âLi n i nvaded
Fi nl rnd i n 1939, t hat ùas one ol t he
t hi ngs t hat st af t ed wori d War TT and
t h€r Su, cdi sh Nazi Paf t y sent ai r l orce
pi
ot s t o l i ght t he Sovi et s i n Fi n and
Ther e wer e Swed sh Nazi Par t y
v. rl unt eers who t l eù t he swast rka
i n f r i nl and The Ger mans sent
uni t s af d i t wâs an I nt ernal i onal
war t o f i ghl l he Sovi et Bol shevi k
i nvasl on One ol t he most
ef f ect r ve weapons was t he
Br eu st er Bûl f dl o a US- bui l t
ai r . r af t wh i ch t he Fi nns
purchased l rom t he Ameri cans
The BrÊwster Brlfdlo took down so
many So\ r i et
pl anes t hat St al r n
gav-. thc order to the IJS unions.
whrch wcl c very symp; t hct l c k)
hospi t al j sed and l hal i s how i t
ef ded That i s hovr badl y t hat
expeditlon turned ou1
At t hat
por nl
evcr yt hi ng t f at
Byd had \ uarned . boLrt câme t rue
Bet ween l 95l âr d l 95ar t her e
t ook
pl ace r vhal t hc
^mer i can
docurnent s t hat I was deal j ng ! vi t h
cal Led a massacre ol t h-. ski es. or' t he di sc war Thrs
was after OperalLon Hj4lrirfllp
Bêri ca l y t he Thi rd Rci ch ret al i at ed rnd l he l -l ùq. i rdds
and t he ol her
pl âr. s
t hat t hey d deve op-. d. whi ch were
concept ei rcrâl t t hat t hey d brought down kr Ant arct i ca,
atlack€d irnd shot dor'f mefy US fighter arrcratt
The end r csul t wes Oper at i on Ar 4u5 i n whi ch t he
Ameri câns dcpl oycd f ucl ear weâpons i n 1958 af t er a
decade Li f f ai l ed t urt arci i c ! nvasrons J()l l owi ng Operat ron
Hirfijuflp The Nof Yofl Tin.J r-.p(]ricd that there w-.re
204 dest royed or mrssrrg f rghl €rr ârrcraf t i n t hat
peri od
By t he 1950s whàt uas known as t he aerospace war
was f rnal l y account ed f or I n l hc document s t hat I had
been ordered t o rf crner; t e and i l vas cal cul at ed l hàt
t he Sovi el car Jnmuni st câ! se, t o sebot ; €{: al l t he
Breù'ster Brfdlds on the assembly life ov-'r.r
yetl aller
St i rhf hâd
gi ven
t hi s order, t he
l apanese
i l t ack. ' d
Pearl
l l arl x)r i n 1941 and l hen went on t o âl l âck Ji ong Korg
Srrgaporc and i h-. Phi l i ppj nes Lverywf cre t he l apanese
al l ackcLl t he Ameri c. rn Brewst er Bnf dl os wel e l al l j ng out
oi l hc sky because t hcy had been sabot aged back home
on t hcj r own assembl y l j nes That i s how mùch
i nf ucnce St a i n had on ot her naLi ons because of t hi s
i nt ernat i onal commrrnl st
rnsurgef cy
At t he end oF t he
pr o_; cl i ve host i l i t i es on t he
cont i nent al maj nl and i n I 9, 15 St i rJi Jl
gave t he order t o
t he Labouri l es i n l l rl t arn, J don t need Churchi l l i n
powef
any mora Jrd I . (t rsrdel hi m t t hl eal He wâs
"President
Rooseveh had
died mysteriously,
and essentially,
by the documents
I
was
dealing with,
it
was
suggested
very strongly that
he had been
AUCUST SËPI LMI ] ER 2OI 2 wwù. ne\ usmàgâr i ne. com
NEXUS. 2I
convinced that Churchill had
poisoned
Rooseveu, ano
t he end resul t was t hat he sai d: cet Churchi l l out of
office.
Churchill was voted out of office by ân overwnermlng
maj ori t y, a I andsl i de
Thi s was f ol l owj ng t he
general
European ceasef i re i n t vay 1945,
j ust
as Bri t ai n was
turnlng its resources
towaids invading Hong Kong and
Singapore.
America's
Unwinnable
World War
DD: Àt that time, the
Japanese
were advancing on the
mâi nl and
wi t h such success t hat t he B. i t i sh àct ual l y
buried a bunch ol British Spitfires entire air squadrons,
i n Thai l and and Bur ma. They
j ust
bur i eo r nem ! o
prevent
the
Japanese from capturjng them. That is how
cl esperat e
t he si t uat i on wâs i n 1945.
peopl e
don, t
understand
the
perspective
of this.
Put this into perspective
for how bad it was ror rne
monumental
mass mobiiisation was the verT reason why
so f ew i f any, abl e-bodi ed
Japanese men ever di ed i n
strategic bombing, etther conventional or nuclear, dunng
the entire war. They were all in the field
At this
point,
the Àmericans realised thât they had lost
t he war l t di d not mat t er t har t hey coul d mobi l i se al l
t hi s manpower The vast maj ori t y of t hei r personnel
were acrcss the sea in the Atlantic; and if they were to
bri _g t l "c d, over . o t l ^e
Pd. i i . l o I
ghr I ne
l apanpçe
t hêy soul d o. obdbl y i p"ve L rroDê open l o re. Lonquest
by Nazi insurgents
So t hey ei t her f aced a seri es of somet hi ng l i ke t he
Napol eoni c wars where t hey had bat t l es cont i nùi ng
agai n and agai n, or t hey coul d sue f or
peace.
The
Americans chose to sue for
peace
because Roosevelt was
dead and Churchi l l was gone
TK: they sued for peace?
Towards whom?
DD: Towards
theAxis both Cermany and
iapan.
TK: And that was in 45?
DD: I n 1945.
TK: The
public
never leamed
about that.
Edhor's
Note:
Pârt three in our next issue coveas
Nazi r ocket sci ent i st s and
advanced technologies, the Suez
crj si s, nucl ear det onat i ons over
Ant ârct i car
space weapons, t he
Third Reich's alleged Moon bases,
Americans. they were so racist,
they hâd concentrated
most of
t hei r r esour ces
agai nst t he
cer mans because t hey sai dl
'Oh,
they âre white. They are a
bi gger t hreat . The Ameri cans
allocated only 15 per
cent of all
their rcsources
during the warto
f i ght i ng t he
I apanese i n t he
Pacitic
TK: And by t hat t hey t ot al l y
underestimated them.
DD: Yes, t he
Japanese had
i nvaded
t he Àl askan i sl ands t o
"At
this
point,
the Americans realised
that they had lost the
war.
It did not matter that
they could mobilise
all
this
manpower,"
prevent
the Amencans from bombing
Japan ftom Alaskâ.
of t ha l 5 per. e. 1t
resource rora t he An e, rcan. were
t orced t o dedi cat e one-t hi rd t o t ryi ng t o remove t he
Japanese
from Alaskan territory
No! on
y
wds ovêr
o0
per (enr
ol f he l n oêri a l dpd, rese
Army i n Chi -a dr t he l t me o. t he Hi rosl t md oomoi rg or
6 Àugust 1945, but on t hat very day a speci al war
department
anâlysis of the new
Japanese divisions being
mobjlised reâched
US Army chief of Staff ceorge câtleti
Mar shal l - t he
same Mar shal l who was f or ced t o
i nst i gat e t he l \ , 4arshal l
pl an
as reparat i ons
f or t he
reconstruction
of Europe
It was revealed to Marshall that, from 1937 to t943,the
I mperi al
j âpanese
Army had mobi l i sed
an average of
eight divisions
a
year,
but 1n 1944 alone it had formed 30
t o secure t he Chi nese mai nl and
I n t he rt rs! seven
months
of 1945, the
Japanese âctivated
at least 42---of
these, 23 inside
iapan
itself-and had the manpower to
generate
even more: as mêny as 6t infantry and five
amoured
di vi si ons by Oct ober 1945-t he
j nt ended
About the Interviewee:
Douglas Dietrich is the son of a deco.ated US Navy sailoi
He worked for l0 years
as a US Department
of liefense
rni l i t ary l i brari ân
ât t he Presi di o mi l i t ary base i n San
Francisco,
where one of his major duties was document
destructjon.
He wâs fesponsible
for incinerâting highly
classified materials on criticâl historicâl
topics. Each night,
he made entries frorn memory in a peasonal
notebook of
allofthe top'secret documents he had destroyed.
Di et r i ch exper i enced t he Kuwai t i campâi gns of
optrations Desert Sh/e/d (1990)
and Desen Storn
\l99lJ
as a
US Mar i ne, dur i ng whi ch t i me he wâs exposed t o
(t (l o<dri n
nerve
qà\
$hi (h re\ uhed
j n
col l àpl ed l ungs and
radi (àl e\ peri menl al \ urqen,
Af l er mu\ t enng oul of t he
USMC in late 1991, he began a career âs a
privare
secunry
aqent which continued until he became a full-time
cârer
for his dying parents.
He now channels his energies into
medi a product i on,
conf erence present at i ons
ànd râdi o
interviews covering a wjde range of hidden hhtory topics.
His DYD Roswell ond the Rjsjnq Sun was .eviewed in
NEXUS t9l04.
For more information,
visit Douglas Dietrich\ website
http://w\,rwdouqlasdierrich.com.
ing of Operâtion Drorrf4ll, the scheduled American
of the
Japanese home islands.
aDan
had onl y
i ust
begùn r o f i ghr , and t hi s
sww. ne\ usmr9azi n€. . om
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The Dawn of the Space Race
Dougl as Di et rl ch
(DD):
Adol i Hi t l er was si i l (] n t he of f ensi ve i n t 944-45
because he had everyt hi ng t o
garn
by hodi ng as mLt ch ground
as
possi bl e
unt i l evacuat i on.
' l ht s
was not a war t hat was bej rg f ori ght wi t h some sense
of hopel essness on hi s part .
Wi t h t he S, r?i 6. f t ri pa-t he Dj sc War-t he
Ameri cans
soon concl uded t hat t he Nazrs were est abl j shj ng a
presence
on t he
lunar surface That is rvhy they invesled so much after Operalion Hi4,ij np
i nt o l i t eral nucl ear war âgai nst t he Thi rd Rei ch i n exj l e Thi s woul d ul t j mat el y
manifest âs Operation Ard s
Thomas Kirschner
ITK):
Are you
saying the Third Reich established or was
goi ng
t o est abl i sh a base on t he Moon f rom i t s base n Neuschwabenl and?
DD: Oui t e so. The Nazi s were not usi ng normal rocket s Theywere usi ng
ant i gravi t y and t he new t echnol ogi es i ncl udj ng Tesl a t echnol ogy The
G€rnans broke t he sound bârri er and t he spâce barrj er usl ng rocket s very
ear l yon, i nt he 1930s. Theywer eabl et oper t ect t heuseof
t hi st echnol ogyf or
l ong-ran€e bombi ng agai nst t he Sovi et Uni on, bLt t a Lt hei r st rât egl c bombers
were rendered Russran pl undef
by t he t j me of ceâsef i re l h. Ameri cansonl y
l earned t hi s l at er t hrcueh i nt el l i gence sources
The modern space age began i n March 1926 when Dr Robert Coddard
l aunched
t he f i rst l i qui dj uel l ed rockel rn t he l Jni t ed St at es l n
j une
1929
Fri edri ch St amer made t he f j rst m, t nned rocket -powered f l i ght i n a
gl i der
devel oped by Àl exander L, i ppj sch i n
l ul y 1929 l he l aunch f ai l ure of
coddard s f i rst i nst rument al rocket câused al J of hrs n-. rghbours t o compi ai n
ênd t hey obt ai ned ar i f j unct i on agâi nst hl m, prevent i ng
f urt her l aunches i n
Massachuset t s
Codd: Lrt l was
pubi i cl y
humj l i at ed and became i ncreasi ng y
recl usj ve l n November 1929, coddard
gai ned
a Cugg€nh-"i m grant
wi t h t he
hel p of Charl es Ll ndbergh whi ch f j nanced Lhe moveof hi s rocket l aborat ory
t o Roswel l . New Mexi co, whrch at t he t i me was t he l east
popùl at ed
st at e i n
l he Uni on
yel
st i l l mai nt ai ned enough ol an i nf rast ruct l re f or hj m t o have
pl umbi ng
l n February 1936 t he Cerûrans t est ed t he À 3 rocket Despi t e t he
prol ect s
secrecy, t JS i nt el l i gence got
t he news back t o Wâshrngt on but t he
t hl eat pot ent i âl
was t akef l i ght y
by t he US Army l eadershi p I n Oct ober
1936 t he army s assessment of Dr Coddard s rock, "l
, , vas
t hat i t had very l i t t l e
mi l i t ary va ue Agai n, t hi s
pl aced
t he Cermans rar areao
I n 1930, t he anal og! e comput er. t h-. di f f erent i nl i rn; l yser wrs devel oped by
DI Vannevar Busl r, who was t h. dean of el gi l crf i | g àl t he Massachuset t s
l nst i t ul eof Techn(rl ogy1M1)
f hl s w, rs a hb. , )[ ] pLrt or t he f i rst one on t he
market , and was l sed t o sol vr: ' ad, rancerl
t Jl obl f ms
i n
physi cs
The Bush
desi gn wâs so ef f ect i ve t h; rt
\ . , l l t
s. rw l rr) pornt i f expcrj ment i ng wi t h dj gi t âl
comput ers. whi . h werr so . rpensrve t hà1 t hc Lrni v-. rsi t y coul d not af f ord such
pi oneeri ng
wof k l hat [ , . rs dore el \ ewhere by t he t i S governmenl
f ort he use
ol crypt ographers workj nÈ r' l h c. rdes f or u' Jrom anal ogue comput ers were
An Interview with
Douglas Detrich
O 29 Apri l 2012
by Thomas Kirschner
Publisher of the Cerman edition
of NEXUS N4âgazine
Websi!er
http://wwwdouglasdierrich.com
OC] oBER NOVEMBER 20I 2 www.nexusmaaazrnc..om
NE\ U5. 29
Rudolf Hcss Takes On the Americans and Soviets
DD: This is where Rudolf Hess comes in because he
flew to the UK with the intent of t€lling the Britjsh thât
Cerman computer research was far behind-ultjmately
confounding the Àllies
TK: I thought he flew to make a
peace
offer
DD: You rnean a
peace
offer for the Bntish monarchy
to settle with the Tfird Reich? Cedainly not H€ went to
^^nv
nr p i hê r l r r ^ <"â f ^' nâr . â
TKr we have been told that he flew over to make an
offer to surrender
DD: That s ri di cul ous l t was 1941. Nei t her t he
Americans nor the Soviets were
yet
committed to total
war agai nst t he Rei ch
TK: I have a completely different story in the back of
my head Why don t
you
tell us what
you
know about?
DD: Hess succeeded in convincing the British that he
had to talk to the Americans because he d loùnd out
about Malrin Bormann s computer technology: that the
computer situation in lhe Third
Reich was very bad and that the
Ameiicans were way ahead wjth
t hei r comput ers. So, t he Bri t i sh
flew him over to the US and
yoù
never heard of hi m i n Bri t ai n
agai n Supposedl y t he Bri t i sh
had hi m rn
pri son
but basi cal l y
i t was t hi s
poor,
ment al l y
disturbed man who looked very
much l i ke Hess and was a
German citizen-iust somebody
they had rounded up after the
cessat i on of host i l i t i es i n
technology was very
primitive
and was only used for
unguided bombs and, actually, those were not rockets.
He was able to tell them that the V-l and the V-2 were
not rockets at all but
jet
engines that were used with
remote control as a weapon of terror in England, and
that the Germans reallydidn t have this rocket capability.
Because of that, Hess was able to
poison
relations
belween Àmerica and the Soviet lJnion, which ultimately
led to incredible hostllities between them because Stalin
was telling the Americans that he was being bombed by
the Cermans using this space technology.
Let s
put
this into
perspective.
Space is an intrinsically
hostile environment in which to work, half of the Eafth s
ai mosphere bej ng l ess t han t hree mi l es
l -4. 8
kml above
sea level Military aircraft and spacecaaft depend on
pure
arr seal ed i n a
prot ect ed
envi ronment af t er t hey
approach al t i t udes t hat approxi mat e l 5 mi l es
l -24
kml
w\ êre heo. l rons[ êr i . exces: rve and
poi sonous
ol ot e i c
present
Turboiet engines refùse to function above 20
mi l es
l -32
kml . Al t i met ers st op
worki ng at aboui 28 mi l es
l -4t
krnl. Rockets are required to
work beyond that
point,
and the
Oermans hâd developed those
rockets.
When Dr coddard developed
hi s rocket and t he Cermans
began t o conduct manned
rocket flights, they had their
own versi on of ast ronaut s
Rûumne ner. The first men to
breach space were not Soviets
or Ameri cans, but v/ ere
"ln
any case, the Nazis
had
made such a huge leap in
rocketry that they managed
to bomb the industrv that
Stalin had moved behind
the Ural Mountains."
Eùrope Thi s i ndi vi dual coul d bârel y speak coherent l y
Hesss son hi s f ormer secret aqr al l of t hem i dent i f i ed
hi m as not bel ng Rudol f Hess.
l Kr Thi s was i n l he document s
you
were i nci nerat i ng?
DDr Absol ut el y Thi s man was ul t i mat el y ki l l ed, not
because they were afraid that he would talk-the maf
coul d barel y t al k but b€cause âl l t he
peopl e poi nt i ng
hi m out as not bei ng t he real Hess woul dn t be abl e t o
t al k about hi m any more
TK: So, what happened t o t he redl Rudol f Hess?
DD: He was f l own t o t he US where he spoke t o
Vannevar Bush convi nci ng t he US t hat t he Thi rd Rei ch s
comput ers di df t work and t hat t he Cermans were way
behj nd. l l e f ooLed t he Ameri cans i nt o underest i mat i ng
several aspect s of t he Nazi war f i rachi ne They ul t i mat el y
believed a lot of what he was saying and were very
misled. They were specifrca
y mrsdrr-.cted abor.rt Nazi
f l i ght capabl l i t i , . s i nt o space As i or hi s u l rmal e f at e l n
t he US. t he document s t hat I d-. al l wrt h mad-. no
ment i on ot t hi s
I n any case t he Na2i s hâd made such a huge l eap i n
l ocket ry t hat t hey managed t o bomb t he i f dust ry t hat
St al i n had moved behi nd t he Ural l \ ' l ount ai ns Rudol f
Hess was abl e t o hi de t hi s by sayj n€ l hat Narj rocket
members of the Rdfir,1r4d,1il-the Space Force. This was
a force that resulted from a collâborative
program
bet ween Hermên Côri ng ând Hei nri ch Hi mml er. l t was
i n conj unct i on wi t h t he Case Bl ue summer of f ensi ve i n
May 1942 t hat t he Cermans i ni t rat ed a bombi ng
campaign with whât were called S,ï
r?r5.
These were
Lrs-.d to strike at Stalins Trans-ljral industrial base.
Ext remel y hi gh al t i t udes l i mi t ed t he campai gn s
effectiveness, but, over time, the attacks took their toll
and they
prevented
the Soviet Union from advancing at a
rapid
pace.
This is one reason why the Soviet advance
was
qLrite
slolv, comparatively speâking, and took so
mâny yeârs The Sd
Orr
was desrgned as an antipodal
ski p-bombet ski ppi ng on t he at mosphere arouad t he
world after each attack run soaring high above Central
Ameri ca and chi na whi l e t aki ng t he l ong way back t o
Cermany
The Àmencans never captured a single specjmen oi
t hese bombers because al l of t hem were depl oyed
"gdr . l
l ê
. o\ i el
ur i on 81 . ea' ef r t "
l Lê! r pr c -
Sovl et hands al ong wi t h Wernher von Braun s brot her,
Magnus
Just
as von Braun subt l y mi sdi rect ed t he
Amef can space
program,
hi s bi ot hcr successf ui l y
sl ymi -. d t he Sovi -. t space
pi ogram
They di rect ed t hem
I
30. NEXUS www. nexusmaqazrne. com OCTOBTR NOVE]BER 2OI2
i nt o di f rerênr
", ê".
ot her t l -"n n i Jdf rrerel re,
Loui o
Èsserl l al l y
l nêy Were workt l g
a\
(doorevr\
l o
p, eveal
both ihe.Soviets
and the Americans
from ever catching
up with the Third Rejch s rechnoloeical
lead
TK: Oh really?
DD: \ ery
much , o
The red' , t )
i s
. hdr
much
or t re
Anef l . an
and sov' êt
qpdce
progrdm-
wô, e wd) be\ , rd
the trmes, sabotaged
by subversive
cadres
of cerman
screntists such
as the von Braun brothers
Nazi Link
with Egypt
and Spain
DD: Where
do
you
think thÀ
greatest
number
or rocket
screntlsts
irom Germany
went?
TK: To Neuschwabenland?
. , DD:
l \ o. À, a"ny
ot
rhem
dct ul h weJ I
o EBi p.
^ooel
. Naç. e.
who as a l -rgh. . dnkrr g
_
Gamal
general
was
covertly
sponsorine
th;
Nazi scj ent t f t c
exodus I nt o Egvpt
as rhe
war was drawing
down, had so many
scientists
that he created an entire cjty
lor them-Fâctory
33j at Heljopolis,
outside
cairo The.e were 400
(rf
these
Nazi rocket scientists,
and they called
this the new,rynkd
Korrs
This was the
l oundat i on
f or a paral l el
Egypt j an
aerospace program
That iswhyNasser
was eventually
able to threaten
the US
that he was going
to nâtionajise
the
Suez
Canal
Nasser
used Spai n. s
lrancrsco
Franco
as an example
don t we take out Franco?
We
are
going
to invôqe.:
rs when, 1n the summer
of 1946,
Franco
lâunched
I
t he. e r or ket ,
dr o hewosl i r er a, l ywar cl "i n
l mt he
or one or hrr pri vat e ya"rt s
[ hen
t hese roal et s
,:,,l ,fd,l :
ral ,e oJt rrLo
erun,""
.i ui i i .n p"i rung;
!
: l l : . "]
".
, di d
. you
. rrdde
Soarn
dnd I . m goi ng
t o
rdl , e
do$n
nore Arre. i cdr possenger
ai rcral . , .
The
Amencans
sal d Hênds of f
Wher i r-cdme
ht c ! Jrn Ndc-er
)dt o. I . n nat j onàl t si rg
l "F Suel
Cà1. 1 l _ranco
hè- t wo
Ce, mdn. ci ent t st s,
I nave
or er ' oLf
f Ul dr . d
I , vou t ake meoJ. o,
t r yt ot akemeout
wre, I ndt t oadri : e t f e
suêt cano l F got ng
! o wi pe yout
_i vl l rdr
pâs\ el Cer
d' rl i ne^
o. t o' ! hê
qki es.
The
crnencdrc
(dt d
Wei l rêd
beuer ge.
on \ a\ ser
s s, de.
AI nal pol nl .
i n
l o5o t l ^e
SJez
an\ . .
devel oped
whi ch
wàs even more
devêst èt i ng
t han t he
Lu0an ml ssrt e
cri si s
Amet i cà
èl most
wenl to wat âgatnst
France,
Britâin
and
lsrael when they
tded to re-tal(e
the
Suez Canal.
Amedca
came in at the
side of Nass€r and
said: If
you
arc
golng
to rctake the Suez Canal.
we are
going
to war agajnst allthree
of
you
That was the death
of the Àllies the
f al l
of t he Uni t ed Al l i ed
Ff ont . Thi s
t s
t he ki nd of power
t hat Nazt
sci enhst s
wielded
throughout
the world.
This
js
why
they were
called the Ditk
Matht_
the Third Power----of
the so-called
Cold
Franco
had
several
Nazi
sci ent i st s
bui j di ng
KM-2
electromagnetic
rockets
for hlm in
secret taboratories
near Marbella
on t he sout hern
coast of Spai n,
east ot ci bral t âr
They
were
named
af t er t hei r i nvent ors,
pf ol essors
Knoh and Mûl l er
The
KM-2
had a range
of 16, 000
kllometres.
Once its control
was
disengaged,
it was attracted
by
t he el ect ri c vi brât i ons
of
pa; si ne
magnetism
of the nearest
metal rnass
impact
with the source that attracted
it
because
he d also taken in m;ny
Nâzi emigrants.
War
Wherever
these
Nazi
screntlsts
were present
in the
Sovi et
Uni on or i n t he Uni t ed
States,
they wefe viewed
âs
obseffers
ofa foreign government.
TK:
Of a
government
in exile
DD: Yes That
s how they were
percelveo.
Operation
A4qus
TK: What hâppened
with
the
govemment
in exile?
DD:
The government
in exjle is
,
DLn1q,
Wor l d
Wâr l r l . dn- i . co
l r dn, , p, o\ t oeo
r no! \ dno\
o mêt t o
l or n t r e \ p"ni . l ^
Bt ue D, \ t . t on
wn, cn
. ened
on t he RL, . i àJ
, oJ ,
rh, o
t €hout
t h^ wd. dt J
I f ewd)
r punl i ' l oa5
Thi \ , . uhyt
eAme, i con. t ound
r' l al
dî ong
t t epri sorer.
rhey ue. e rdki l g
dt {h" er cJ ul
rne wdr rr. nv ol t l em
{
êre
t .
, m
di l erêr I . , Ln f l e. t t d,
oeopt e dt dr
.
even kno\ \ ^ere I n\ oheo
i n l r e uor
Some
or r' t o\ ê prt . onê. -
werF sodl , oro
ul -o
woJ_d
up I n
American prison
camps
and were involved
with the
Spdnr . l ^
Bl ue D\ i . , or
The Ahen( on.
uer e
I n. ênçeo
wr n t r anLo
ar d hei . èt d
Nowt hat . h"L, ar i .
ovê, , , , / hi
know
i s exact l y
what chânges
t ook pl ace
wi t hi n i t . I wi l l
Crvê
yoL
d1
j deè
o[ whdt rt wa(, l i re very
.
hor, y âÊer rhe
\ {à However
be. o, e l even go
I n, o t r i , w"
-i rou
o t o. l
a0or wnàt
i dpoer ed
wi t h
Oper at i ol
At gu"
I "e
, AI re4. dns-bd. ed
or t he
di , c l Àat
t re mt \ çi t e
wâ,
everyhrrg
t hdt ud.
eoi ng
on wl t l ,
ro(ket ,
and ot . (
I êCnnol ogy
-hdd evêrv nghl t o
be conv. rrêd
t hàt t he
Nd/ .
hdd
-e!
Lp è base on t he soLt r pol e
ot l he Moon
l r l : dd9 d ver v. mdl ' ba\ ê
On t he. ol l T pot e
but l r wos
. on) ' Oer ed i o
bê: J. h
A t h. eo'
l O I n. er ndr i or
dl , er u, , l y
l hal
l he Ame. t . "r , , , r
r o5g
dpor odcheo
N, . hol o-
I l ' ' s' o l l 05
d r dd. gê. t 1.
\ ^ho
di o nor hot d
"
phy. i (ç
oegree
HÂ wo. ked
"t
Cdrl f orrt a _
Lèuren. e
Radi d, i on
Laboratory
at Livermore
on techniques
to harness and
still there
today What
we don,t
ai rcraf t
or t he
It exploded
on
OCTOBER
- NOVEMBIR
2OI2
www.nexusmâgaztne.com
NEXUS. 3I
control energy released in hydrogen fusion reêctions
There are no known
physical materials in the world that
could co.tain the super-hot
plâsma
involved because
t hat was at t he t emperat ure oi t he Sun. He worked on
f ashi oni ng magnet i c bot t l es .
powerf ul
mêgnet i c f i el ds
t o hol d t he el ect ri cal l y charged
pl asma.
Because ol t he
nat ure and t he shape of t he magnet i c f i el ds, a cef ai n
quant i t y of charged
part i cl es
woul d l eak out hom t he
ends of the magnetic bottle-much as how trapped
pai t i cl es
l eak out of t he Eârt h s
pol es, produci ng
auloras
Whi l e t he di sc war was ongoi ng t he US
government
approached Chri st of i l os and sai d: We have t o el i mi nat e
t he German ast ronaut
program
f rom col oni si ng t he
Moon On l 0
Jânuary
1958, he
responded wi t h al l of hi s equat i ons on
paper
and sal d t hat i f a nucl eal weapon
wete to explode in neal space the
radjoactive debris would be trapped
and directed by the magnetic field and
the result wolld be the cleation oi an
arrificial band of relativistic electrons
t hat woul d compl et el y surround t he
Eal rh I n ot her words. he sai d t hat he
coùl d creât e an art i f i ci al Van Al l en
radiation belt which would be intense
enough to destroy anl,thifc in orbit
TK: Would that artificial Van Allen
bel t hol d up f or a l onger t i me? I s
it still thefe?
DD: No I t woul d be a mi l i t ari l y
vi abl e assaul t t hat woul d l ast onl y
long enough to take everything out
of space Mi l i t âry ast rof aut s
al ready f ace a host i l e
envi ronment I n srt uat i ons where
t he enemy renders t he regi on of
near-Eart h spâce t emporanl y
l et hal wi t h radi oact i vi t y, t hat
envi ronment becomes i mpossi bl e.
The belt would
produce
worldwide
radi o noi se on t he HF and VHF
radi o bânds t hat carry t he bul k of al l mi l i t ary
communi cât i ons Most si gni f i cant l y, t he expl osi on ol
nucl ear weâpons woul d creat e t hese art i f i ci al auroras
and increase the intensity of a chosen region of the
i onosphere wherever t he bomb was bl own. That woul d
render warni ng radar and ant i bal ùst i c
gui dance
mrssi l es
usel ess I t woul d bl ack out radi o communi cat i ons
The bomb with accurate calculations done fol the site
of the explosion, could be mdde to
produce
effects over
a specific dreà wrih enough of an electromagnetic
pulse
not onl y t o ki l l àl l of t h€ sp: Lcecraf t f l yi ng i n and out of
t he at mosphere but t o ki l l any mi ssj l e rel al i at ron
Christofilos said that this was the only way th;Lt the
Àmeri cans coul d f i ght t he l hi rd Rei ch rn exj l e, wi t h t hei l
rocket scientists and disc craft
On l August 1958, t heAmeri cans
put
hi s t heoryt ot he
test when they rocketed a 1.8-megaton H-bomb which
expl oded 48 mi l es
l -77
kml above
l ohnst on
At ol l i n t he
pacific
The resultant blast according to the Atomic
Energy Commrssion, was the most spectacular shot ever
fired by the US The fireball rose above the atmosphere,
t ri ggered a magnet i c st orm and bl acked out radi o
transmissions all the way from Tokyo to San Francisco.
On 27 August 1958, t he f i rst of t hree nucl eal shot s was
fjred over the Antarctic. One rocket canied a low-yield
at omi c wàrh€ad 200 mi l es
1322
kml above t he Eaf t h
Af t er t hat , t he Ameri cans f ol l owed up wi t h l 9 separat e
rocket s t o measure radi at i on Near t he Grand Canyon i n
Ari zona t hey even had a
gi anl met al coi l l ooped across
t he desert f l oof t o measure changes i n
the Earth s magnetism Observers on
ships in the North and South Atlantic
watched how al1 the debrls followed
the electromagnetic field of the Eafih
and f el l i mmedi at el y i n t he
at mosphere at t he sl t e of t he bl ast ,
and t hen al l t he way at t he ot her end
of t he bl ast and creat ed art i f i ci al
alroras That is how
powerful it was.
The râdi at i on enci rcl ed t he Eânh and
creat ed a new radi at i on bel t 40000
mi l es
164, 440
kml hi gh
On 30 August and 6 September, they
di d i t a€ai n. These expl osi ons i n
the ionosphere were so rntense
that they destroyed the
products
of the billions of R?irlisnarfts that
t he Thi rd Rei ch had spent on a
military space
program.
The high-
energy radiation effects in spâce,
the worldwide radio noise and the
i nt ensi f i cât i on of t he i onosphere
were lethal
TKr Do
you
t hi nk t hat t he Thi rd
Rei ch by t hat t i me had rf ênned
[,4oon bases?
DD: Yes and it was concluded
at t he end of Operat l on Ar4rs t hat al l of t he
personnel
of
t hat base di ed wi t hoùt b-. i ng r€-suppl i ed f rom t he Eart h
The Ameri cans never l earned t he Thi rd Rei ch s name f or
i t s Moon base; t hey code-named i t Moon Base Al pha.
TK: You saj d l hat i t was on t he sout h
pol e
of t he
Moon Woul d l hat be t he dark si de or woul d I hat be t he
si de t hat we can see?
DD: I t rs rei t her si de The sout h
pol e
ol t he Moon i s
i n t he t wi l i ght zone That way t he base woul d be
protected
in a valley from the intense solar radiaiion that
woul d be
l ust
as damagi ng t o i nst rument at i on âs t hese
The regions of intensified radiation in space wreaked
havoc wi t h t he Thi rd Rei ch i n exi l es mi l i t at y space
syst ems l n t he vacuum of space, t here i s not hi ng t o
"The
resuhant
blast...was the
most spectacular
shot ever fired bv
the US. The
fireball roæ above
the atmosphere,
triggered a
magnetic storm
and blacked out
radio transmissions
allthe way from
Tokvo to San
Francisco."
32. NEXUS !!\w,nexusmagazrne.com OCTOBER NOVEMBER 2OI 2
dissipate or absorb the radiation. When the high-enerCy
elect.ons strike any obiect they
generate
X-rays whiah
are
penetrating.
They damage electronic equipment,
erase computer memoties and are lethal to astronauts.
Si nce t he radi at i on
bel t was gl obal
and ext ended
out wârds f or t housands of mi l es, al l t he orbi t i nC
satellites that the Third Reich had put
into orbjt, Ion€
before S/rtti[, frequently kept
passing
th.ough thes;
regions of intensified radiation
and they djed in orbit.
The implication forthe Thi.d Reich in exile for the use of
space âs â future field of operations was devastating. It
showed howvulnerable
the entire range of military space
equipment really was, even with moderately sized
warheads.
TK: But t he base i n Neuschwabenl and
kept . . . ?
DD: The Third Reich in exile never lâunched any more
nârd-vâcuum assets The increased ionisation
of the
upper atmosphere that resulted from these nuclear
expl osi ons proved
hazardous t o t he hi gh-al t j t ude
bombers and aerospâce gliders
that had been desiened
by Sànger À, 4al e ond l emal e
I
For a while after World War II the Fliioerads were a
common sight. There vrere flights over the UK, and
maior flighis over New York City that caused the l96j
Northeast blackout which affected several US states and
parts
of Canada. Wehada norhal wave of UFOS every
ot her mont h.
TK: The blackout was caused by the Flù4dldl5?
DD: Yes. They were flying overhead and interfering
with the electronic works of the area
just
to show thât
they could do it. This is what kept the Allies from
âttacking the Third Reich in exile while they relocated
underground. This is why they had so much time that
they were able to buy. They still needed thin€s:
underground machine tools, fabics,
pharmâceûticals,
luxury goods
cigarettes, nylons.
TK: I would irnagine that they needed allthese things.
DD: Well they
got
them from the Allies in trading fof
the threats they
prolected
until the
point
of Operâtion
A/4!s. Bear in mind when Operation Ar4lrJ took
placel
1958. From 1945 until 1958, more thân a decade lâter
pilots
flying above 50,000 feet
through a region of intensified
ionisation
received lethal doses
of radiation before they could
even reach t hei r t arget s t o
retaltâte.
This was probably
the most
powedul
seri es of nucl ear
strikes that America has ever
launched.
Near-space proved
to
be indefensible and unworkable
during a nuclear confltct This ts
why both the US and the Soviet
Uni on deci ded t hat t hey were
never going
to hâve a military space
program
of any
consequence
oreven try to estâblish bases on the Moon.
On 3l October 1958, the US and the Soviet Union began
a morâtorium
on the above-ground deployment
of
nuclearweapons.
Theyrealised: What s the polnr
or our
hdvi ng a spdce ràce ol 1"r Ll . èn f or
propàgênda pLrposes
becduse i f e t her
one ot us
Coes
t o war we
can ! ! rpe out
each other s space assets so
quickly
that all the money
we spent on it would be useless antq/ay,'
Trading
with the Third Reich
DD: The Third Reich retreâted
to a total underground
existence. The Americans were stillwjlling,
through their
intelligence
agencies to work with the Third Rejch in
exile because they had Nazis as advisers ano meorarors
! h"nk5 ro
Ope' at t ot Pa^nt ; p. l l ev nao enough SS
ol l rcêrc oul l i ere
Cecràpo i n t l ^e
CJA bdck r t he l at e
I 940s and 1950s, f or everyone t o speak t he same
rarguage
w. rr rre l Jrt erl al der\
Tl e\ co opt ed he
Cehl en O
ganl zdr
on-nol

mu. h f or t > experi e-Le I
Sovi et count eri nt el l i gence
as f or i t s val ue i n l i ai si ng wi t h
the exiled Reich
the Third Reich in exile held the
Allies in sheer terror and was
able to
get
eve4/thing it needed
from them.
What t he Unt erl anders
needed was quite
a bit For
instance,
they needed enough
of â food base-foods that they
could not
grow
underground
until they
got
their hydroponic
Cardens
growing.
Às a matterof
fact, it was a laiwânese scientist
who t aught U-boat capt ai ns
how to
grow
bean sprouts in
their U-boais
As for materials, people
may ask, What is it that
you
cannot mine underground? Rare materiâls srch as
tantalum. It s a metallic element that is used as tiat thin
capacitor strip in cellphones and other electronic media,
ând is often sourced ftom meteorites. Right now, there
afe a few places
on the Earth's sur-face, such as in Congo,
where tantalum can be found.
As a result, thetântallm wars run by major corporations
employ mercenaries in Congo who have killed well over
one million, maybe two million
people.
That is how rare
and valuable it is, and
you
never hear of it but eveayone
uses it. You cannot find materials like that underground.
That is also what the Third Reich traded for, at leâst until
t 997.
Until i958 as unbelievable as it is, it was a battle, but,
at that
point.
the Thifd Reich in exile was still trading
ând dealing with the Àliies, the US and other surface
governments.
What would they be
giving
the Allies in
return? They
provided
technical information, formulâe,
inventions for synthetic foods and materiâls. It was one
ofthose lncredible situations where they were obviously
very much âhead of the Allies.
OCTOBER
- NOVEI

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NEXI Js. 33
Def ections and Abductions
TK: Ànd t hey were st i l j abl e t o mai nt ai n t hât
advantage in scientjfic
progress?
DD: How could they not? They had a 50-year leap in
technology This brings us back to the maior
problem
with scientists in Antarctica: defectron These guys
wind
up
going
to the Third Reich in exile where they are
considered a tr€mendous resource By the 1980s, the
Untelander
popu
lation apparently hâd
quintupled
to five
million intraterrestrial Àryans They had their own
equi val ent of a bâby boom t hrough cont i nui t y of
Lebe sborn-lhe Spring of Life breeding
program.
Still
t he l j nt e. l anders had
probl ems
wi t h a smâl l breedi ng
popul at i on,
so t hey al ways wel comed i n new Caucasi an
i mmi grant s. These
peopl e
aLso brought i n new sci ence
' ew ded. . r 1d I nf o- - dLr o abo. r $, dr r r ' d. r oppet I ngot
the surface world
TK: Do you
t hi nk t hey cont i nuousl y keep t hei r
communi cat i on goi ng
wi t h t he worl d above
ground?
DD: Not of f i ci al l y These scrent i st s are st j l l abl e t o
cat ch what êre uncont rol l ed ênd
at this
point
unwelcome enemy
t ransmi ssi ons. Remembert hat
t he US i s st i l l l egal l y at wâr wi t h
t he Thi rd Rei ch
Abduct i on was of e way t o f uel
t he
popul at i on
of t he Thi rd
Rei ch i n exrl e when t hey had
probl ems
wi t h popul at i on,
t hey
abduct ed
peopl e
and brought
them down as breeding stock.
There i s al so t he b. ai n drai n wi t h
sci ent i st s par t i cul ar l y
genet i crst s
and bi ol ogi st s-
def ect rng t o Unt erl and.
ori gi nal Neuschwabenl and Nazi s-hel d ont o
power
f or
lar too long. Dissent was repressed lJnterland started
to resemble North Korea in some respects Around 1997
i t was concl uded t hât som, . ki nd of upri si ng had occured
and âll contact broke down There is no more formal
cont act wi t h Unt erl and I st opped worki ng wi t h t he
Depart ment of Def enseâsa l i brari an i n l 992, andaround
t hen t hey were cl ai mi ng t hat , si nce t he earl y 1990s
communi cat i ons were maki ng l ess and l ess sense The
Unt erl anders were becomi ng st ranger and st ranger and
it wâs felt that they were surely becoming a different
- pê
r e, o_ hJr oni , y dno wê
e , o . or ge-
. ê
dt
i g
I o
surl ace humans
TK: So t hey f i nal l y became a t rue breâkaway
ci vi l i sat i on
DD: That is
quite
co.rect. but they are still attracting
defections, such as what happened at Lake Vostok.
Ant arct i ca, i n February 2012 Those Russi an sci ent i st s, a
t eam of hâl f a dozen, di sappeared and t hef t he Russi ans
suddenl y cl ai med t hat t heyd f ound t hem The Russi ans
do t hat al l t he t i me. They l ose a
t eam of sci enl i st s, and t hen
t hey bri ng i n a t eam of
i mpost ers and si mpl y say:
' They
f ound us agai n
'
Meanwhi l e each sci ent i st s
f ami l y i s i nf ormed: Your
husband has disappeared while
exploring for the state, and we
don t want lhe rest of the world
to know what happened It ts
guaranteed
that this was a case
of mass def ect ron Those t hi ngs
aae
qurte
common down thete
l Kr Do you
t hi nk t hat some of t he UFO abuucuons . rr
ev€n cow mut i l at rons cou d be caused by Unt erl anders?
DD: I woul d say yes
cert ai nl y up unt i i t he
poi nt
oF
1958 i n
pat i cul ar; probabl y
even some t i me af t -. r t hat I
am not t al ki ng about âbduct i ons where
peopl e
suddenl y
wake up ând cannot remember where they have been for
si x hours I am t al ki ng about abduct i ons where peopl e
di sappear and nev€r come back That i s what Unt erl and
woul d be responsi bl e i or As f or cow ml t j l auors, no, r
don t see t hat as
pan
of t hrs
phenomenon
Ànot her t hi ng t hat t he Unt erl anders t raded wi t h t he
surface world was genetic
research The biggest
problem
t hat t hey have rs morbi d i nbreedi ng Àl so, t h€y need t o
work on
genetlc
modificatiarns
to improve their own
adapt abi l l t y t o a dark, hot house envj ronment Through
genelics
reseerch they were âble to counteract any
pot ent i al
congeni t al def ect s They devel oped t he abi l i t y
t o ext end l i i e span I don t know how ei l i caci ous t hi s i s,
but i t was ment i on. d i n t he document s as bei ng one ol
t he di scol eri es t hat t hey t raded t o
pol Lt rcrêns
ot t he
surface world
Through sùch bi ot echnol ogi es. t hc ol d
gudro
I n-.
ând t hey cover t hem up al l t he t i me The Unt erl anders
are st i l l
get t i ng
new bl ood and new t echnol ogi es, and,
si nce most of t he del ect ors are hi ghl y educat ed
sci ent i st s, t hei r sci ence cont i nues t o advance
l Kr So
you
t hi nk t hât some of t hose di seppeâred
sci ent i st s are not even hel d
pri soner
and deci de t o st ay
there in free will?
DD: Absol ut el yl They are l i t eral l y dyi ng ro
ger
down
t here The Ameri cans. ând apparent l y t he Bnt i sh, have
t aken t o ki l l i ng t hei r sci ent i st s t o keep t hem f rom
l eavi ng. Accordi ng t o t he document s 1 was worki ng wi t h,
whenever frustrated defectors were interrogated they
reponedly said: I want to
go
to a
place
wnere rnere ts
not hi ng but whrt e peopl e.
The surf ace worl d t o t hem i s
a nightmâre They are looking for a rational society
wi t hout mi nori t y probl ems
They admi t t o rgnorance of
t he
part i cul ars
of subt erranean l i vi ng, but have been
made bi t t €rl y aware of an enormous f ront i er-wi t h
oppoftunitres to breed never
presented
to s!ch socially
i sol at ed i ndi vi dual s uf der our open ski es
TK: So t hey want securi t y f rom âl l t he surf ace
probl ems
and dangers
DD: Oui t e ri ght Al l -out I ucl ear wâr c. rùi d break out
34. NE\ US
www. ncxu5maqaz ne. ( on] ocroBER NovEl BER2012
on the surface
and they wouldn t even notice
TK: Has there ever been someone who came bâck and
gave
t est i mony
of how i t
j s
t here?
DD: nerê . t i -e
orool er
pow
oo
yo-
-, i i ! rd
p
d
h. g' l \
. eci . ed
l t ghl \
mi l i r a i . ed. o"r ^ Lr r . yj
' t
woL, o
be more difficult than infjltrating
North Korea Until
1997, t here were st j l l enough peopl e
f ron t he earl i er
generat rons,
af d i n t he earl y days t he mel ani n and t he
! k-
' onF uer p. r l l
\ t . n
"r
enot gr t o
c. r , t o, ê
f L- dn
bP, ' g! \ o r hdl peool ê
r oul d pLl l
of , some r ' i l . r duon
Nowadays,
that would
be impossible
Unless you were a
ocl er t ot pdr
l i ng l o. t "v l her e l or Ê! er how coul d yoJ
r l i l rrd-el Al I ' j 5 po
rt t ho. e peopt e
do, , r n rhFre dre
white-lirerally
white-and
their eyes are adapted to
Perpet ual t Wi l i ght .
What I could
grasp
through footage
retained by the few reconnaissance
leams able to make it back from below
is that it s ]ike a futuristic
theme park
with overhead passenger
monorails as
you
d find at world fairs and
plenty
of
aftificial lieht. there
are enormàus
convex parabolic
mirrors positioned
everywhe_re
above. which disperse
raorance
trom static searchlights
aimed
at them from below-all
continually
pol i shed
by
puf i shment
det ai l s
comprised
of
polùical
dissidents
Thei r
of f i ce bui l di ngs
have an
i nvert ed
nushroom
cap
archrt ect ure
wj t h roof gardens
t hât expl oi t
t he subt erraneên
rarns. The uneven
t errai n of
cavern floors ls defined by Iifes of
f rei ght ed
rai l cars
t hat nl n
bet ween
t he st ems,
of t hese
st ruct ures,
and I i ght s out l i ne
tiered residential
complexes
built
to skyscraper
heights
along the
rock wal l s I underst and
one of
t he mai n
chal l enges t o be ai r
ci rcùl at i on. whi ch
woul d account
f or t he massi ve
i ndust ri al -scal e
TK: Wowl Whât mj ght t hei r
pl ans
be f or t he surf ace
worl d? \ Vi l l t hey ever come back and recl aj nr
l t l
DDr The Thi rd Rei ch s
j ni t i al
posi t i on
was al ways rnar
i t was el ect ed l egâl l y and t heref ore st j l l mai nt ai ned l egal
cont rol ov-ar cermâny The Federal Republ i c
of cermany
and the Cerman Democratic
Republic
were artificial
occupat i on government s
set up i n Bonn and i n Berl i n by
i orce oi arms. Unt i l t he Thi rd Rei ch re-est abl i shed
i t seaf
and was l egêl l y vot ed out ,
j t
woul d never renounce
t t s
ci ai m t o t he Fat herl and
' Thi s
was al so t he
posi t i on
of i he Nat i onal i st
Republ i c
of Chi na whi ch re-est ab| shed
i t sel f on t he i sl and of
Tai wan,
where I was born Tai wan
ând Communi st Chi na
on the mainland âre still legally ât war But today, many
Tai\À'anese-as
they increasingly
cêll
t nemsel ves,
as opposed t o chi nese
lrom Taiu,an-simpiy
want recognition
as ê sovereign
state by the united
Nations The UN refuses
this because
Communi st
Chi na i s on t he Securi t y
Counci l . l t was Nat i onal i st
Chi na. not
Communi st
Chi na, t hat was an ori gi nal
l oundi ng member
of t he UN Securi t y
Counci l
When Nat i onal i st Chi nâ
separately recognised
the Third Reich
and l mperi al
Japan, t he Àmeri cans
and
the Soviets
conspired to expel it from
t he Uni t ed Nat i ons
That i s ul t i mat el y
what t hey di d
At t hj s poi nt ,
l i ke many modern
Taiwanese
maybe the Thlrd Reich
rf exi l e
j ust
want s recogni t i on.
Perhaps
t he Unt erl anders
si mpl y
want t o be l ef t al one.
Or wi t h t he
const ant
brai n drai n f rom
t he
surf ace
worl d. t hey have
devel oped
enou€h âdvanced
weaponry
and mai nt ai ned
enough
bi odi versj t y i n t he
popul at i on
t hat maybe t hey are
pl anni ng
an i nvasi on of t he
surl ace worl d-hayi ng
used
' ' recessi ves
of darker mei ani n
shades t o conduct reconnai ssance
Nazi Links with Zioniss
TK: Do you
l now i f t he maj or pol i t i cl ans
on t he
surface wodd know êbout its existence)
DD: I will
€ive
you
an example The last
yeaf
when I was
workrng at the Depaftment
of Defense was I992 and Bill
C| nt on was t unri ng f or
presi dent
I t was uurrng rne
Cl i nt on admi ni st rat i on
t hât al l . ont act broke of f wi t h
Unterland. À,,1y understanding from
the connecÛons
I
marnt ai ned i n t he Depaf t ment
of Def ense i s t hat Cl i nt on
never even knew of Unlerland The major politicians
have
no idea that there is an Unterland. It was only contacted
t hrough t he i nt el l i gef ce
col rrmuni t i es
and onl y t he
f ans
channel l i ng
emi ssi ons
i nt o apparent l y
empt y
tunnels. OtheMise
development
is frééd from rne neeo
to
provide
heât contatnment
wind resistance
or snaoe
demandt ng i nst ead
t ransl ucent
mat eri al s
t o expl oi t al l
i l l umi nat i on
t o maxi mum pot ent i al .
Thus I saw a
sca' r ol dJg
<l r ucl ur o,
st r i e Lsi ng
DI exi g. as.
LuC. t e.
r aOr . . !
dnd l ght we gl ^t pdpe.
r al l p. r e, t r g
l r ke
l a0d1êce
!
reenç i u t g o- l o"d. bedr. rg
l rome$ o. / s ! hdl
n<. ô l r(F )t dl dgmi l e-
-ened
by ext er. ore
evdt of )
t r e 0oC r^ ent at i on
I wd, ordered t o oesl f oy I n! i m"t ed
that there are at least l7 crand
Canyon-slzed pockets
of
t hi s ci vi l i sat i on
and hundreds
of smal l er
occupi ed
cavrt l es
connect ed
t hroughout
t he Eanhs
crust by
networks
of bored track
"What
Icould
grasp
through
footage
retained
bythe few
reconnaissance
teams
able to
make it back from
below is that it's
like a futuristic
theme park
with
overhead passenger
monorails,,.'
OCTOBER NOVE]BER2OI2
www.nexusmagazrne,com
NEXUS. 35
originalWofld War II
poiiticians
even kneù/ â hint âbout it.
Trc so thê cefman
govèmment
would also not
necessatly know about it.
DD: corrcct. the only
people
who knew about it were
Reinhard Gehlen, his organisation, some of the old SS
intelligence organisations like the CIÀ and Mossâd, or
criminal networks like Odessa. Whv Mossâd? Well, that
is one of the biggest secrets of World War 11. Now,
you
know that, even with the unificâtion of east ald west,
Cermany is still
paying
millions of dollars of reparations
to Israel. Now whv would the Cermans stand for this?
One of the reasons why is because it was Germany that
established the state of Israelthrough the Third Reich.
TK: What?
DDr Most
people
are totally unaware ofthis, but on 20
Àpril 194t.
TK: Days before the European ceasefire?
DDr Yes. Àfter
paying
his respects to Adolf Hitler on
his birthday, Heinrich Himmler
drove alone for several hours to
meet with Norbeft Masut, a
representative of the World
Jewish
Congrcss. why? Because
throughout the wat there was
only one
Croup
of
lewish
people
whom Hi t l er ând Mussol i ni
support ed adamant l y: t he
Zionists The average Europeân
lews
were highly educated ând
deeply invested in the society
around them. Why on Earth
would they do as the Zionists
asked and move to a strip of
Year Reich in Unterland untjl around 1997 lt appears
that Adolf Hitler became more like Mao Tse Tung did
towards the end of his life-more of an ideological
nol i val or a. opposêd ro al admi nrst ràt or
Heinrich Himmleas fate remains a mysteLThe
Americans claim that he killed himseif. The reality is that
we don I redl l y
(now
He l oved ni s ddughrer very rrrrh
and could never return to the Fatherland to visit her
'
!
1 Linderstând that côbbels had a degree of fanaticism
where he was willing to leave hrs wife and family to die
in Berlin as he moved to relocate the National Sociâlist
government
in exile. He took that as
part
of the sacrifice
ofthe war efloft because this was a totalwar and he wàs
the ideologist of total war for the Third Reich His 1{i.fe
was a
prâctising
Buddhist, so she was able to kill her6g{f
and her children without
guilt.
In her
personal
belief
syst em' t heywoul dal l berei ncarnat edqui ckl y'
Hans Kammler remains a mystery even in my
nol€s,
but I took volumes of notds,.'
desert in the Mediteffanean? The Zionists were â lunatic
f ri nge, a mi l i t ant movement f ormed i n. . t he 1920s
dedi cât ed t o est abl i shi ng a
l ewi sh
homel and i n
Pâlestine So who supported the Zionists? The Nâzis
and the Fascists, because theZionists were the only
Jews
who were willing to leave Europe.
Himmleds SS agrarian schools trained the Zionists in
aCriculture. Suddenly, when they were re"established in
Israel theywere
growing
oranges in the deset. Howdid
they defeat the Àrabs in several armoured engâgements?
They were trained by Rommels staff in Panzer tactics
Why do they have an apartheid
govemment?
lt is â
white-settler regime. It runs an apartheid state against
lhe Palestinians. lt maintains migrant labour,
just
as the
Third Reich did in cermanv.
Fate of the Nazi Command
TK: lwonderwhat may have happened to the chain of
command with allthese top membe.s of the Third Reich
government
when they went into exile Did Himmler or
Gôring or even Hitler stay in command, or
pass
on the
command at the
point
where they left?
DD: Martin Bormann and
Joseph
Côbbels seem to
hâvebeen the most outstandine leaders oftheThousand
TK So there is still more
matedal in
your
notes, wâiting
to be discovered by
you?
DD: Yes, because much of
what I wrote down I would then
forget. lts miraculous that I
rememberwhat I do Recallthat
I was burningwhat amounted to
tons of material. We had â
mul t i mi l l i on-dol l ar i nci nerat ot
si mi l ar t o t he one at CI À
headquâfters in .Langley,
Vi rgi ni a
About thc Interyiewee:
Douglas Dierrich is the son of â decorâted US Nâvy sâilof.
He worked for l0 veârs âs â US DeDânment of Defense
mi l i t ary l i brari an ât t he Presi di o mi l i t â. y base i n Sân
Francisco, where one of his major duties wâ! document
destruction. He was responsible for incinerating highly
classified materiah on c.iticâl historicalropics. Each night,
he mad€ entries from memorv in a Dersonal notebook of
allofthe top{ecret documents he had destroyed,
Di et r i ch exper i enced t he Kuwai t i campai gns of
opetations Deseît Shield
(1990)
ând D?serr
'ro.n
(1991)
as
a US Mari ne, duri ng whi ch t i me he wâs exposed t o
cyclosarin nerve gas which resulted in collapsed lungs and
radical experimental surgery. After musterjng out of the
USMC i n l at e l 99l and undert aki ng mi l i t ary l i brari an
dut i es agai n i nt o 1992, he began a career as a pf i vat e
security agent which continued until he became a full-
t i me carer f or hi s dyi nq
parent s.
He now channeh hh
energies into media
production,
conference presentations
and râdi o i nt eryi ews coveri ng a wi de range of hi dden
history topics. His DYD Roswell and the Rising Sun \vas
reviewed in NEXUS l9l04.
For more informâtion, visit Douglas Dietrich\ webske
http://wwwdouglasdietrich.com.
36. NEXUS www.nexusmâ9âzine.com OCTOBER
-
NOVEMBER 2OI2
, . ' .
Our neal
"uuar
of the worlds"
_
BY FRANK JOSEPH
_
ike rnany New Ddrn readers, I occasionâlly
heard rumours over the years of frre6ghts
alleged to hav€ tâken place between United
States armed forces and technologically
supeiior Nazi naval units in, of all placæ,
Antârctica, soon after the Second World
War. Having authored severâI20'h century military
histories,l possibilities
for sùch a
confrontation seemed to me unlikely
in the €xtr€me, an impression deep
ened by some writers, who insistedthe
Germans were piloting "flying
saucers"
around the South Pole.
'Ihese
far-f€tched clâims long
convinced me that the subj€ct was
unworthy of considention, until I
was recently shocked to learn how the
US Navy actually did launch nothing
less than a secret, full-scâle idvasion
of Antarctica less than a year follow-
ing the Second World War, and under
highly suspi.ious circumstances thât
have never been fully erplained, even
aft€r the passage
of neeù seven
decâd€s. Iwas determinednowto investigate this tr|ly
bizâife event with the sole aim of discove ng, if possi-
I ble, what feâlly happened
-
to discard every groundless
specuhtion, hearsày or obvious fantâsy
- by nÀrrowing
I
my research exclusively on hard data and credibte infor-
I
mation only ftom reliâble sources. Here are those facts:
I
With the words, these pro(eedings
are ciosed, US
I
General Douglas MacArthur, representing rhe victori
I
ous AIIies. à((epted lrnperidl Japant surrender aboèrd
I
the bàr t leship USS Miçsoun on 2 Sep r ember 1945,
I
thereby of6cially . on( luding the Se(ond World Wà r.
I
But eleven months làter. â huSe armàda deparred US
I
q/àters
on 26 August 194b for Aniarcticà. lts Ràgship
I
v/às the USS Pfttttppinp Seo. Crptàin Delbe' I s. Cornwell
a
I
J
*wurewaa*nmaeane
rcm
I
I
commanding her 3,448 of6cels and enlisteil men. At
27,100-tons, she was among the largest aircreft cârri€rs
âfloat, powered
by €ight boilers and four Westinghouse
gear€d
steâm turbines for e combin€d 150,000 horse
power
and a range of 20,000 neutical miles. In addition
to the Philiryine Sea\ 700 fight€$, dive- ând torpedo-
bombers, she bristled with allay5 of 6ve-inch atillery
and 40 mm Bofor anti-aircraft gù ns. Four-inch,2.5
inch, and 1.5-in€h steel armour prot€cted
her 888-foot-
long hull, hanger deck and conning
'Ihe
PÀiàppina Sea was scre€n€d by
USS Bro nson
(Commander
H.M.S.
Gimber) and USS Henderson
(captain
C.F. Baile,.At 3,460 tons each, these
Geding Class destroyers wele 390 feet
long, and powered pairs
of General
Elect c steam turbines, plus fourboil-
ers for 60,000 horse pow€r. Armament
consistêd of half-â-dozen 6ve-inch
guns guidedby Mark 37 Gun Fire Con-
trol Systems with Mk25 ûre control
râdâr linked to Mârk 1A fire-control
computers. Additionâl weapons
included twelve 40-mm Bofo$ guns,
sixte€n 20-mm Oerlikon cannons, and
ten 21-inch torpedo tubes.
'Ihese
surface units were
ioined
by a 312-foot-long
Eubmarine, the 2,401-ton Senn€r. with 10 ofÉcers end
71€nlisted men aboârd.ln addition ro 24torpedo€s,
Commander Joseph B.I.enhower's boet featured a five-
inch deckgun, one40-mm Bofors, and a single 20-mm
Oerlikon cannon.
All warships were supportedbythe tankers USS
Canisteo an.d USS Ca.apon
(Captains
Edward K. Walker
and R.A. Mitchell, cornmanding, respectivelr, plus the
supply ships USS Merrtcft
(Câptain
Johû J. Houdhan)
and USS van.e1l (Captain
J.E. Cohn, commanding).
'Iheù
passage through Anterctic wâters wâs clealed
bvthe ice-breakers USS Bulton Island
(Commâûder
cer-
Special lssue Vol.6 No.5
.
NEW DAWN 39
ald L. Ketchum) ând USCGC No,'tftwind
(Captain
Chârles
W lhoûes, commânding).
'ft^'o s€aplane tenders - USS
Pine Islard
(Captain
Henry H. Caldwel, commanding)
and USS Curntu.&
(commâûded
by Captain John E.
Clark) -were
part of the Antarc tic-bou nd fleet. ftey
were Barnegat class vessels, 2,750 tons fully loaded,
311 feet long, each manned by 215 crewmembers, and
armed with two s-inch guns, sii dual 20 mm anti-air-
craft guns, plus four depth-charge
râcks. Combined, the Pine Isiand
and Cu,riti1.k stored 160,000 gâl-
lots of aviation fuel, enough spare
parts, lepairs, aûd berthing for two,
full seaplane squadrons.
'Ihese
capacious tenders serviced
six specimens of a lerge and power
ful flyiûg boat. With a wing aiêa of
1,408 square feet and loaded weight
of 56,000 pounds, the Mârtin PBM
Marinels twin Wright R-2600-12,
fouteen-cylinder, 1,700-horse
power, rediâl engines âllowed its
seven-man crew to deliver 4,000
pounds ofbombs over 3,000 miles.Another
half-dozen examples of the Sikorsky H-5
helicopter
(referred
to in the Navy as the
HO3S Drdgonfy) flitted between USS Pftilip-
pine sea and the seaplene tenders.
So mâny ships and aircraft ûecessi-
tated their division into an Eastem Group
commanded by Captâin George J. Dufek, a
Western Group headed by captâin charles
A. Bond, a Central Group, Rear Admiral
Richard H. Cruzen, commanding, and
a Caûier Group with none other than
RichardE. Byrd, ù. in overall command.
'Ihis is the same Admiral Byrd world-
renowned for his epic polar explorations
during the 1920s ând'30s. He was usually
to be found aboard the USS Mount OIym-
pus (Captain
R.R. Moore, coûmanding), â
Mount McKinley-class, amphibiou8 force
command ship, with advan€€d communi-
cations equipment and extensive combet
information spaces for large-scale landing
operations. the 12,142-ton, 4sg-footlong
vessel, operatedby 729 of6cers, specialised
technicians and enlist€d men, was armed
with apair of6ve-inch deck guns, eight 40-mmguns,
and twenty 20 mm anti-aircraft guns.
OPERATION }IIGH,|UMP
Altogether, the four Groups were known collec-
tively as Task Force 68. thetu assignment, referred to
oficielly, if rather vaguely in an initial report as the
United States Nâly Antarctic Developments Progrâm,"
was to estâblish Little America IV. â researchbase in
the Antarcti.; train personn€l aûd
test equipment in frigid condi-
tions; determine the feasibility
of estâblishing, maintaining and
utilising bâses in the Antarctic and
investigating additional,
possible
bâse sites; develop techniques for
establishing, maintaiûing and
utilising âir bases on icej increase
knowledge of hydrographic, g€o-
graphic, geological, meteorological
ând electro-magtetic
propagation
conditions in th€ area.'?
'Ihe
r€port also mention€d that
the expedition aimed at con-
solidating aûd extending United
States sovereignty over the largest
practicâble ar€a of the Antârctic
coûtinent, a goal previously and
emphatically denied in repeated
public pronouncements issued by
the US government, €v€n before
Operâtion fiigl'junp ended. In any
RIGHT
upon landing atthe Bayofwhaleson
15 January l94Zworkcommenced on
buildinga headquàrtel' Little Ameica lV
an whatwasto be ofoneofrhefew
€xpedition
goah
actually a(âined.
40 NEW DAWN
.
saecial lssue vol.6 No 5
wwwnewdawnmagazine.om
case, its oftcial, modest, entirely peâceful
agenda was
overwhelmingly dwarfed and contradicted by the pro
digious fire-power
andarmed mightassembled
by Tâsk
Forc€ 68.In fact, f€w res€arch scientists ând very little
investigâtive êquipment
were included. Moreover, most
of its stated objecrives were never
âttempted,
much less achi€ved.
No personnel
training nor equip-
ment t€sting took plâce.
No efforr
was made to explore possibilities
for
other base sites involving aircraft
or ships. No practice

exer.ises of any kind were undêr-
tâken. And whatever rvâs learned, if
anything, about Antarcti.a
s hy
drographic, geographi.,
geologicât,
meteorological
ând electro-magnetic
propagation
conditions
was never
disclosed.
While Operation Hrg,'i-
jurnp's
declared goals
represented
hardly more than an academic
exercis€, it was in reality an entirely
military affai!.3 An aircrâft cârrier,
two d€stroyers, a
PaiI
of armed
seaplane teders, one submârine
ând a sophisticâted
communications
ship, supported by
a flotilla of supply vessels, plus 112 aircraft erld 4,200
s€ûicemen organised
by US Navy commanders and rear
admirals
-
including
world-famous Richard E. Byrd, Jr.
hirnself
.
faroutstrips
the requirements
of some scien,
ti6c investigâtion,
no matter how ambitious
Ihis unlikely armada ert€red the Ross Sêa ice Dack
on 31 December
1946, 6nal l y l andi ng at rhe Bay of
Wheles by 1s January the fottowing year.
Work com-
menced there at once on buitding a heâdquarters,
Little
America IV, in what was to be of one
of the few previously
ânnounced
expedition goâls
actually attained.
Just forty dâys lat€r, the Centrâl
Group €ast off to
join
the rest of
Task Force 68t units alreâdy with
drawing toward South America for
repâirs, thus premâturely
t€rmi
nating their massive, erp€nsive
mission, whi.h had been originally
scheduled to take from half a year
to eightmonths. Even so, in only
eight weeks, its aircrâft logged 220
houis flying time over 22,700 miles
- ân area hâlf the size of the United
Stâtes
- taking some 70,000 recon
naissance photogrâphs,
only a very
U55 Senhêt struggles through Ope.ation
Highlump
llDage Credû US Navy, Ar.tic
Sùbhàrine Laborâtor, 1946)
ATIAC|(ED BY FLYING
OBJEGIS?
Immediately âfter arriving in severel Chiiean por$,
word of the apparently aborted expedition s high
strâng€ness ând even disasters that plâgued
it began
spreadinglike
wildfire from some looselipped Opera-
tion Hrgirjmp sailors. Admirât Byrd
himself contributed to the dire
spêculation. The rnainstfeampresg
in ChiI€ wâs quoting
some of his
men to the eff€ctthâthis expedition
hâd
"run
into trouble" and sufiered
"mâny
fatalities." lnsteâd of denying
thêse all€gatioirs, he expressed deep
concem to reporter Lee van Atta
about reâl possibiliries
for devas-
tating aeriâ1 attacks on the US at a
time when the whole world, hav,
ing been lârgely devâstated, was ât
peace, hardly what one would have
expected to h€ar from the leader of a
purely
scientific enterprise. Van Attâ
published
the results of his stârling
interview, headlined "Aboard
the
Mount Olynpus on the High Seâs,' in
the 5 Mârch 1947 edition ofll Mer.r/io, a conservative
newspeper and Chile's lârgest, "considered
the country,s
pâper-of-record
ând its Vâlpâraiso edition is the oldest
daily in the Spanish tanguage currently in circulation,,
sirl.e 1.427.4
"Admiral
Ri.hard E. Blyd warned today thar it n'as
imperâtive for the United States to initiat€ immedi-
ate defense m€asures against hostile forces threaten-
ing from the Arctic or Antarcti.," according to van
Attâ.
"'Ihe
Admiial explained that hê wâs ûor rryDg
to unduly alarm anyone, but th€
cluel reality is that in case of e new
wai, the United States could b€ at-
tacked by nying objects which could
move from pole to pole
ât incredible
speeds.'Ihis stâtement was made as
part of a recâpitulâtion of his own
polar
experience, in an erclusive in
terview with the International News
Service.
"Talking
about the recendy
complet€d expedition, Byrd said
that the most importânt res\rlt of
{
his obseruâtions and dis.overies is
the potential
effect that they have in
relation to the security of the United
States. He repeâted the above poiûts
of view, resulting from his personal
f€w of which were subs€quently reteased to the public
by the Navy. To this dây, the remainder, ifthey stilt
exist, are still classified. Ihe aerial survey atso recorded
ten new mountâin ranges.
www.newdawnmagazire
com
knowledge gathered both at the north ând south potes.
'Ihe
fantâstic spe€d with whi.h the world is shrinkine
re, àl l ed t he Admi râl i . oneot t he most i mporrÀn;
lessons learned during his recent Antarctic exploration.
TheUSS Philipplnêlea (tmagêCredtr
US N:vy)
Speci al l ssl e Vol . 6 No. 5
,
NEW DAWN 4l
"'l have to warn my compâtfiots', Byrd sâid, 'that the
time bas endedwhenwe were able to take refuge in our
i6olation erd rely on the €ertâinty that the distances,
the oceans, and the poles w€re e gÉrântee of safety'."s
On his retruD to Wâshington, D.C
,
aft€r Byrd's
irt€rogation by Security Services ofhcers, he never
uttered another word about Op€latioû Hvltjurlp, which
was simultaneously classified, thereby legally
Prevent-
ing eny of its vet€rans from evêr discussing th€ mis-
sion.6 Shortly thereafter, the US Navy published a briei
not vèry infoimative, even €vesive summary of the Ant-
arctic expedition's
"achi€vements,"vthichnonetheless
stated that some losses had been incurred.T Altbough
these were glossed over and minimised, th€ tyPicâUy
ànonymous report nonetheless admitted thât fully
I'aifof Byrd's sêaplane ând heli€optet
for€es hâd been destroyed, ând that
he himself was nearly brought down
in the aircraft he was flying, âvoiding
ân otherwise inevitable crâsh only
because he
jettisoned
ev€rythirg on
board, sav€ the most barê eslentials
and reconnaissance 6lms he had
just
tâken for staying aloft. During that
perilous flight, he had goûe missing
for more than three hours in an epi-
sod€ of lost time officially blamed on
failed radio communications.'
'Ihe summary turther admits that
îâsk Force 68 did indeed suffer some
human casualties, but all were sup-
posedly du€ to âccidental causeB. On
30 Dec€mber 1946, three men flying
Geolge 1, their Mârtin flying-boât, died when it crashed,
allegedly during a blizzard. Six surviviûg crela.membels
were rescued thirteen dâys later. Another mâû died in a
construction ac€idert, totalling the numb€r of fatâlities.
'Ihe of6cial summary conchdes by explâining that the
mission was terminated due to the early approach of wiû-
ter and worsening weather conditiots - which were sup-
posedly
just
whât the Americans had sp€cifcâUy come
for and requir€d to test tbemselves and their equipme .
SOVIET SECREIS RELEASED
Releâsed in 1948, short frlm coverag€ of Operation
Highiunp, ironicaut entitled,
"
Ihe Secret Land" -
â1-
though more of a breast-beating
propagânda send-up
for the US Nâl.v thân a real documentarv n€vertheless
gives viewers something of a f€eliÈg, however incom-
plete, for the expedition.e It went otherwise unnoticed
by the general public, and, beginning with the onset of
the Koreen War two years later, soon fell into virtual
obscurity over the next forty years. 1991s couapse of
the Soviet Union, however, suddenly declassified liter-
elly miflions of previously secret papers, among them,
suryrisingly, a 1947 des.ription of Tâsk Force 68 s mis-
sion to Antârctica.
42 NEW DAWN
'
special lssue Vol.6 No.5
thât Joseph Stâlin should have known far more
Âbout it thân the American peoplê is not surpdsitg.
'Iheir
country's close âlliance with him during World
War Two allowed his spies to in6ltrate all levels of the
US governmenr, in(luding its armed for.es espionàge
rhàr peàked, but djd not end. with the 1953 convic
tion ofCommunists Julius and Ethel Rosenbergfor
their betrâyal of Am€ cat atorni. bomb research to the
USSR. As eârly âs the 1930s, throush the SecondWotld
War ând into the so-called
"Cold
War," US Congressman
Sâmuel Dickstein
(New
York) wâs â D€mo.rat PâIty
confdant of Pr€sident Franklin Roosevelt, all the while
â paid agent of the NKVD, the Russian s€cret police.
Th€re were many others like him, and, because of the
often high positions âttained, th€y hâd a.cess to classF
6ed undertakings such as Operation
Highjump.
Its detâils, hidden from the Us
public and the rest of the outside
world, were trdsûitted by a Soviet
operâtive to the Kremlill, wh€re th€y
lânguished until their rediscovery
befor€ the turn of the 2f
i
centurY.
Shortly thereaft€a a Moscow Televi-
sion documentary feâtured spokesmen
from both the RussianArmy
(Dr.
Dim-
itri Filippovitch, lieutenant adjutant)
ând prestigious Russian Academy of
Sciences
physicist, Dr. Vladimir Wa-
silev, who finally disclosed the stalin
era report âbout Tâsk Force 68's covert
experiences in Antarctica.
A'{ AIIACK BY "SPHERICAI. LIGHTS,,
It quotes redioman John P Szelwach aboard USS
Srolrnson, where, around 0700 hours, in the earlymorn-
ing darkness of17 January 1942
justtwo dâys after
Admiral Byrd's Centrâl Group made Iandfall at the Bay
ofWhales,
'we
observed the following: On the horizon,
â bright, colourl€ss light. we thought it was another
ship. We were below the Antarctic Circle in unchartered
wâters
loff
charcot Islând, in the Weddle Sea]. our ra-
dâr was activâted to no avail. I and my shiprnates in the
pilothouse port sid€ obselved for several miûltes the
bright lights that ascended about 45 degrees into the
skyvery
quickly. We couldnti.d. the lights, becâuse our
radar was liùited to 250 miles in a straightlin€. Our
quâitermaster, John Driscoll, record€d this in our 1og."r0
'Iheir ominous sighting wâs followed nearly three
hours latea when the lights
(6ve)
reâppeared in the
same arêâ of th€ Ross Sea and began to rapidly close on
the destroyer. Commander Gimber ordered the shipt
40 mm Bofors antiaitcraft
guns ând 20-mm Oerlikon
.annons to commence Éiing on the objects, which flew
over the B/ornson at high speed and low altitude
(âbout
200 feet), without sustaining anyhits. Ihis encoun-
ter opened a series ofbriel but Éerce skirmishes thât
wwwnewdawnmagazne.con
lasted over the next severàl weeks, âccording to the
Soviet espionâge report, between Task Force 68 ând the
I8hts, resulting in
"dozens"
of of6cers and men killed
or wounded. Most casuâlties wer€ suffered by Admiral
Byrdt Central Group, which even the sanitised, post-
expedition US Nevy version admitted hâd to b€ evacu-
atedby rhe Bûton Island ice-breaker from the Bây of
Whales on 22 February 1947'
After four dâys, in a kind of parting shot, the spheri-
cal lights executed a dramâtic attâck witnessed by Lieu-
tenant John Sayerson, a flying-boat pilot
âboard one of
the seâplane tend€$:
"
Ihe thing shot vertically out of
the water at tremendous velocitt as though pursued
by the devil, and flew between the mâsts
lof
the ship]
at such a high speed that the radio
antenna oscillatedback and forth in
its turbùlence. An aircraft
lMartin
flying-boatl from the Crrlttu.& that
took offjust a few moments later was
struck with an unknown type of ay
from the object, and almost instantly
crashed into the sea near our vessel.
I could hardly believe what I saw
'Ihe
thing flew without making any
sound, as itpassed.lose over our
ships and harrnlessly though their
lethal anti-aircraft fr re.
'About ten miles away, th€ torpe
ào-boat Maddox bi!1st into flames ând
began to sink. Dêspit€ the dânger
rescue boats went to her aid before
she sânk tw€nty minutes lâter.
"Havitg personâlly witnessed this
âttack by the obje.t that flew out of
the seâ, all I can sayis, itwas ftight-
ening.""
February26tht eneagement was the lâst experi-
enced by Task For€e 68, which by then was âlready in
headlong retreat ft om Àntârctica.
Although identity of the invincible "lights" was
unknown to Lieut€nant Sayerson, he wondered if they
were perhâps
cermân
"wonder
weapons" operated by
survivors of the recently defeated third Reich flying out
ofa secretAntârctic base. His speculation is still shared
by investigâtors todey, not without cause.
GERMAiI EXPEDITIONS
ÏO ANTARCTICA
Nine years before the mighty forces of Operation
Hrgàjunrp had been routed from the South Polar Re
Eior.,
the Schwartzwald, a freighter built during 1924,
was refrtted in Hamburg shipyerds for cermâny's most
ambitious Antârctic ex.pedition at â cost of about one
nillion Reichmarks, almostathird ofthe entire mis
siont budget. Re-named after th€ Schwâbian region
in southern cermany, th e Schwabenland was moùnteà
with steâm catâpults for âpâir ofDornier Do J II Wal
i
wwwnewdawnmaeazne.com
I
("Whale")
seaplanes.lhey were powered
by pairs of
6s0 HP BMWVI water cooled V-12 engines mounted
in tandem, inside â nâce[e above the high-mounted,
strut-brâced monoplane wing aligned with the hull.
The forward engine drove a tnctor propeller,
whil€ t}}€
rearward tumed a pusher propeller.
At 56 feet, ? inches long, with a 72-foot, 2-inch
wingspan, the unarmed t4lai had a mâximum tâle-off
weight of 15,432 pounds
and ân effective rânge of 49?
miles, with carrying capâcity for twelve pass€ngers.
Dornier's reliable, rugged, seaworthy air.laft estâb-
lished its suitâbility for polar operations as eaù as
1925, when famed Norwegian explorer, Roâld Am]ln-
sen, flew two of them into the Arctic. NoW thirteen
years later, they were being loaded
with specially desiged Zeiss RMK
3a' 33 Reihenness.bildkameras and
miles of 6lm.
By lâte 1938, the Germân So€i
ety of Polâr Research was reâdy to
undertake its assignment: locâting ân
areâ in Antarctica for establishment
ofa whaling station, as â meâns of
augm€ntingtheir countrt's produc-
tion of fat. Whale oil wâs then the
most important raw materiâl for the
production
of mârgarine and soap in
Germany, the second largest purchas-
er of Norwegian whâle oil, importing
some 200,000 metric tons annually.
To avoid this dep€ndency on foreign
imports, the Reich needed to frnd al-
t€rnative sourc$ outside the Arctic,
then something of a Norw€giân mo-
nopoly. But the military side of the
expedition wâs appârent iû its determination to scout
possible locations for a naval base in the Antârctic.
the mission, âlthough not secret, was, afte! all,
headed by a captain in the
(/iegsrnanne,
th€ cerman
Nâry, Aured Ritscher, a vetenn Arctic explorer. He
and his fellow 33 German Society of Polâr Research
members, together with the Schwabenland's 24 oficels
and crew, were addressed in Be/in by rcne other than
Admirâl Richard E. Byrd, ù., who, inthe nextdecade,
would be heading his own expedition in the same direc-
tion.Ihus, the 6rst connection between Tâsk Foice 68
and the
'Ihird
Reich appears early on âs â
pr€lude
to
Opelarion Highjump. By rd evinced sincere enthusiasm
for the German und€rtaking, regretfully turning down
Ritscher's invitation to
join
it, only because of deterio-
rating relations between their two nations.
On 17 D€cember 1938, the New Schwâbia Expedi-
tion left the port of Hamburg, arriving one month and
two days later ât the Prin.ess Matha Coast ofAnt-
arcticâ. After droppins anchor at 4' 30'W and 69'14'
S, Ritscherând company spent three weeks Ât
Queen
Mâud Land, the same area lâter invaded by Arnericat
Speci a l ssue Vol . 6 No. 5
.
NEW DAWN 43
Task Force 68. ftey flew theiï seaplânes,
nicLnâmed
Passat and Boreas, in Êfteen rnissions
actoss some
370.000 sqùâre miles ofthe continent,
taking tens of
thousând;of
photographs and making a colout
Êlm
of their flnds. Ihese includ€d
a mountain
still known
as Ritscher
Peak, Schirmâchef
oâsis
(namedafterits
SPHERICAL
"LIGHTS" I{OT
THIRD REICH
FORCES
Nor did Geiman aeronautical
engineers
evet de-
velop the kind ofoverpowering
spheri'al
"lights" that
attacked Task Force 6S While'Ihird
Reich advances
in
dis(overer,
Bol€as
Pilot,
Richard H€iniich Schir-
macher),
and â fâr larger
ice-free region, som€ 300
square miles in extent,
embracing â trio of lârge
Iakes,
plus several smaller
lâles, separated
by masses
of baren, reddish-brown
rocks, ând fllled with
relâtively warm, brackish
water of
green, blue ând
red algae. conn€cted
to the
sea, the geothermal heated
ârea represented
a
Perfect
setting
for a militâry
bâse,
particulârly for u boats
Althotieh the Gernâns
reconnoitr€d
nearlY a 6fth
ofAntarctica
most of it
Membe6 of thè Geman Societv of Polar Research after
âlnvinq In Amarcti.a
are entênainêd
aboardfie
5chwa6.h/dnd
bY à nâtive
PefÔrmer
j€t
and focket technologY
are well known,
Plans,
eyewitness
rePotts,
ând
even
photograPhs of tron
Cross-insignia
bedecked
oying sâucer-like
craft
attributed
with truly
out-of -this
world
Perfor-
mance capâbilities
are
undocumented,
postwar
fabri€ations
PerP€tuated
by uncriticâl
writers more
interested
in controver
sial sensationalism
than
fâctual
reseafch
At most,
Luftwaffe
draftsmen
mâY
have sketched
out theo-
retical concePts
for designs
somewhat
resembling
disc-shâp€d
âir-frâmes
lâte
in the war. But these
PiPe
At the time of Admiral
Byrdt
eârly 1947 interview
with a Chilean newsPâPer,
no one, not even German
scientists,
had built
"AYing
objects which could move
ffom
pole to
Pole
ât in€red-
ible speeds
"
ln 2007's Moscow
Television
documentarY
abo.ut
Operation
Highjumq,
aerospace
engineer
Profes-
sor Dr. Valeri Burdakov
and astro-PhYsicist
Ylrri
Bondarenko
theorised
thât el€ctro-magneticallY
operated
extnterrestrial
never seen before -
they left no
permanent structures,
save for a few hundred smal, aluminium
stâkes flving
swastila
pennânts dumped
by the Dornier W'?al"s
on
snow-covered
ground between 20"E and 10'W
ln honour
dreams c€rtainly
never left theil dnwing board,
given
t he verv l one t erm devel opment
such
proi e' l s requi red'
ro say not hi ng of r he F, t herl ànd
s st erdv depl et i on
of
11 materials and resources-
of his ship, Rits.her chds
tened this area Neuschwa-
,enland, or
"New Sch'vabia,"
a
purely cârtograPhic
designation
never intended
as a teritodal €laim.
the
namê still aPPears
on manY
maps of
Queen
Maud Land,
which
the German SocietY
of Potar Research dePated
on 6 February 1939. Soon
âfter arriving back in Ham
burg on 11 April,
Plans
were
laid for âretum to Ant c-
ticâ, whicb the outbreak of
war in September
forever
cânceIed.
Over the next six
veârc
of interDational
conflict, no u-boat
put in ât New
3chwabia
or anywhere
else along
the continental
coast'
conl ràry
l o
posl wàr specul al i on'
1f onl v be(ause t he
Kri ee"manne!
submari ne
f or(e wâs l àxed l o i rs l i mi rs
andbeyond by the exigencies
of transoceani'
'ombat'
AI its u-boats
have been satisfactorily
accounted for
since, and absolutety
no evidence
exists to even suggest
that â military
instaltation of âny kind -
temporâry
or
permânent -
was bâsed in Neuschwabeniantl.
44 NEW DAWN
'
special lssue vo .6 No 5
German Society oI Polar R€5earch erpedition membe15
posewirh the Nàzi swâstikafl aq
vehictes would
naturally base themselves
at
Antârctica
ând the Arctic in order to take advântage
of streams
ot masnet j (
enersv si ï eàmj ngt rom
t he Eàrrh' s Sout h
ro t he' Nort h
Pol e Our
phnet . t hey exPl ài ned
i sl i kea
laree bar maenet, which
(ontinuouslv rePels these lines
.t i"'ce ar
"ne
e'a a"a attràcts
lhem ât tbe other' An
electro magnetic
proPulsion technologv
might be âble

'ide
the; maenetic currents
similâr
to a ship riding
the ocean currents
ofthe sea. Ihe US Navv's
published
wwwnewdawnmagâ2rne.con
report about Operation HrgÀlnp
dectared thât one of
itsprimarygoals
was to study the South
polar
Reeions
"el e,
rro magneri c propagat i on
condi t i ons. ' To (d; y
rhi s
out, each seaplane was equipped
of â bâse ùear the coast of New Schwabie
built and oc_
cupiedbybeings
from another
world in
possession
of
highly advanced €ight technology.
Retu;ningwith
this
with a magnetometer
a device that
resisters anomâlies
in the Ëârtht
magnetism,
th€ieby determinins
hollow spaces under the surface ice
or ground.
Antarctica's
300-square-mile
anomaly the Dornier tfat pilot
discovered
and yeârs lat€r scouted
by Lieuteirant
Commander
David
BunCea
flying his Marin Ma,'mer
for Task Force 68, was, as Admirâl
Byrd
stated, "a
land of blu€ ând
greenlâkes
and brown hills in an
otherwise
limitless expanse
of ice'
- ao idyllic location for an instal-
lation, ifnot for u-boâts, then for
som€thing
else.1,
disclæure
to Hâmburg,
Captâtn
Alfred Ritsche! begins orSanising
a
tetum trip prior
to its cancellation
by the advent of war.
Immediately
after the close of
hostilities,
he arrives in the United
States, where he con6des
the
disturbing,
secret discovery mede
in Februâry 1939 to his old friend,
Richard Byrd.
Som€how, both
men determine
that th€ extrater-
r€stlials embody a serious threat,
and the highly regarded
Admiral
uses his prestige
ând inûuence to
otge'rise
Operetion Highiump,
a
codename for th€ armed invâsion
of Antar.tica
aûd plânned
destruc-
tion of its alien base.r3 But his Task
Force is def€ated
and retreats
in
the face of strpedor
weâponry.
'Ih€
story does not eld here, however.
Just three
months lat€!, â pair
of UFOS crashed in t}le New
Mexi(o desert, not far from Americâ
s oriEinal nuclear
research facilities,
where t}le 6rst Àtodic Éombwas
Please reserue a copy of New Dawj rrlagazine and/oû
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romplele,
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at least in general
outline,
beqiûs with th€
accidental
6nd by the cermâû Societyolpohr
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NÈW DAWN 45
'rhe
iôcation ôf Neuschwâbenland
SUPPORÎ
YOUR LOCAL
NEWSAGEI{T
Use the Order Form Betow To Resêrve
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Dawn Magazine
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Don't miss outân issue, simplycomptete
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todây!
Speci al l ssue Vol . 6
constructed
just
two yeals before Published testimony
by US military veterâns of the fâmous Roswê]l
Incident
reveals thatboth flying disks were deliberÂtely shot
down during the 6rstweekinJune
1947 byAiY
Foi.e
batt€ri€s operating, not
Sround-to-air
missil€s or anti
âircraft fire, but highly fo€used râda!beâms that fatally
disrupted the space crâft's guidance systems
l'
Over
the next twelve years, a secretwar raged aroùnd the
world between extraterrestrial intruders violating the
air space of several nations determinedto defend it, as
thoroughly do.umented
by comPetent researctters
Outstanding among them is Ukrainian Paul Stone'
hiu, born in Kiev, who received his BAin Political Sci-
€nce frcm Câtifolnia Stâte University for his thesis on
the USSRT invâsion of Afghânistan Aworld-re.ognised
expert on Soviet covert operâtions,
his publishedbooks
describe hundreds of bloody skirmishes between Rus
sian interceptors ând off-world.raft throughout the
Stalin erâ and after.r5 Similar aedal confrontations
occurf ed over Bni di n rnd t he Uni l ed Sràt es du' i ng
th€ sâme period. Losses occurred on â1lsides, but the
earthlings ùsuâlly came offsecondbest. Ihese combat
engàgem€nt s. Jme l o à heÀd, a' . ordi ng I o ATêri . rn
physicistJoseph P. Farrell andhistorian
Henry Stevens,
under cover of the Internationàl Geophysical Yeâr,
46 NEW DAWN
.
special lssùe vol6 No 5
LEFT
Rear AdmiralRichard
E. syrd,lr
(r888r9s7)
when, at the height of the Cold War, the air forces of the
UnitedStates andthe Soviet Union, inaunique ând un
precedented cooperative effort, together attâ.ked
New
Schwâbia with nuclear weâpons
"Ihree
bombs wete thus detonated at an altihrde of
approximâtely
300 miles above the target," writes Far
rell,
"one on August 27, 1958, one on August 30, 1958'
anda third on September 6, 1958 "rô
Trese high âltitude bursts were âpparentlyâimed ât
causingsevere
enough disruption ofthe South Pole's
electro-magnetic
Éeld to short out the âlien space-
cïafts' operational .apâcities; to literallyfry their
directional systems. Justhoweffective
was thisjoint, if
drastic effort is not fully known, but it certainly dem-
onstnted the urgency felt by both theAmericans and
Russiâns.
'Ihat
the undei-publicised,
triple atomic bombing of
Antarcticawas not, âfter â11, a 6nal solution hasbeen
suggestedâs recently âs the 12 January 2011uP date
of a previous 13 December article entitled,
"Wikileaks
Set To Reveal U.S.-UFO war In Southein Ocean
"Ihe
ËU Ti'r?es stated,
'Anew
report circulating in the Krem
lin today
prepared for President Medvedevby Russian
Space Forces
(VKS) 4sth Division ofSpâce Control' savs
that an up.oming Wil<iteafts release ofsecretU S cables
details that theAmericans have been 'eneaged' since
2004in a îar'agâinst UFOSbased on ornear the conti-
nent ofAntarcticâ,
pârticularly the Southern Ocean
'According to this report, the United Statès
went to
i t s hi ghe' r àl ert l evpl on June l 0 2004af l et àmassi ve
neet of UFOS
'suddenly energed' from the Sôùthern
Ocean and approâched
Guadalajan, Mexico barely
1, 600 k; l omer r"s
I
L000 ai l e. ) f rom I h" Ameri (rn
border. Prior to reaching the U S bordea howeveY, this
mâssive UFO fleet is said inthis report to have dim€n-
sionally returned' to their Southern Ocean'honebâse
..-Since 2004, this report continues, fleets of Southem
Ocean UFOS have continued to emerge from theirbases,
with thelatest sucL eventbeingthis
Fridaypast, when
ânother oftheirmassive fleets wâs sightedover the
South Ameiican nation of Chile
'r?
Interestingly, the ËU Titt?es' quoted rePort desc b-
ing UFOS thât 'suddenly energed' from the southern
Ocean'is identical to Op€ration Higàiump accounts of
sphe/ical lights shooting out ofthe water' It indeed,
such an interptanetâry war has been raging,
perhaps on
and off, for the past 65
years, then the consistent de-
terminâtion of world leaders to keep âll knowledee ofit
from the rest ofmankind
is understandable: Werê they
to admit that the most
Potent
Earth-made weâPons
even ûuclear bombs âte patently inferior to extra-
terrestrial violâtors ofour air spâce, resultant socialdri
locâtion could shâtter human civilisation, especiâllyin
www newdawnmagaz ne.or
I
our
p.esent
condition of economic fragiliry Ànd culturàl
I
i nsl âbi l i t y. Less cet Ài ni st he l ut ure of su(h asecret
-
.^.Ai .t
I
t
I
FOOÏNOTES
1.'Ihe Axis Air Foftes, Praeger Pless, 2011j Mds,linit Waa Hê
liôn,2olot Lost of the Red De"/3. Cald€ Prêss. 2003.
2. DalidA. Keat^s, \llherc HelI Freezes Otet A Stoty of Amazing
Btav!yond Sutvivol,Thomàs Dunne Bookq, 200\
3. Just bêfore de?ârting for Antarctica, rêfe4ing to Operâtion
Highjunp, Bytd de.larcà to rcpresentatives of the Aûeri.ân
piess, "My
expedition hâs e ûilitary character." www.youtube.
comlwâtch?eznbHucbKkjk&f eature=relâtêd
4. Peter Kornbluh, Tle Pino.het Fib: A De.Iassifred Dossiet oh
Atro.itt dn.l Acôuntability,'rh. Nêw Press, 2003,
5.leevânAttâ, "El almirante Richârd l Byd se re6erê ala
importân.ia estrâtegicà de los polos," Sanriago de Chile, E/ MeF
.!rio,5 Mârch 1947.
6. "Byrd was leturned to Wâshington, D.C., debriefed, and his
pereonal and operational logs from the mission were Beized and
remàin classifiedto this day..- Jôseph P. Farrell, Ret.à ofdé
Bld.irSùa,Adventureç Unhmited Pre$. 2004. 247
7. Robêtt S. Dietz, Son, o.e dhogaphic ôbkrvatiûns on Operdtion
Hiqhjunp:
ftndl
rcpalt, Uniye$ity of CalifolDia LibrÂlies, 1948.
8. Ihree hours over due, but his plane did not run out of fùel?
9. www.youtub€.com/wâtch?v=tHXZcV6hQfs
10. w@.thetruthbehindthescenes.orgl2010/05/23lus-nâvy-
secret-operetion high jump-antârtica/.oûnêrt
page-ll
11. wwwvoutube.com/wâtch?v=znbHUcbKkik&f
eature-lelâtêd
Ihê NKVD report rcfe$ to Sayersont ship æ the "Cæablan.a,
probâbrybe.ausê
the Russian spy hâd troubl. pronouncing its
real nâme, Cûl/itz./c Ïh€ Soviêt aSent âlso stâtêd thet ân Ameli
can vesset s€t afir. and destroyed wæ the USS Maddoa either
à torpedo boat or torpedo .ar)'ing destloyei. Ofi.ial recôrds
list only the Hénderson and A@hsd, as part of Task Force 68,
which possessed no tôipedo boats. Both destroyers survived rhe
nissiof, ând a!ê accounted for. A USS Madd,r was indeed sunk
by enemy a.tion, but 6vê yeds earlie! by a Germân dive-bohber
during the Allied invasion of Sicilr Actuàl1r the.e werê ât
lêâst threêAnericân destroye8 know! by that name
(DD-168,
DD 622, and DD-731), alt of them conteûponneous. Ihê US
Nâr7 has long beên notorious for fabifying the identity of its
,hips and rc-writing thêir histories if they ehbarrâss oficial
polict Cæes in point include 1944: pre-Nornendy lwàsion
Battle of Slapton Sands, whêle â ruhber of veesels were sunt
and mâny servicehen killed by ki%dharine torpêdo bo.ts, but
unâcktowledg.d for the next hâlf century; ânothêr AmericaD
massacre, otr the ltalian .oâst neàr Bâri, itr 1943, was censoled
when nunerous Allied units, illegâlly cârrying nêne gae, were
sunk by the Luftwafej âlthough the targest loss of US troops
ât seâ
(1,015
fatalities) in a singlê incident occured when the
troop6hip, Rolnd, was suûk by â Geihan guided nissile in thê
Mediterfetuen on 26 November 1943, oly afte! âgêd vêtêans
won a length, costly lawsuit against the US Nary 57 yeals later
did they receive oficial recognitiotr {of their role in the disâstei
So too, the Maddox" cited by Soviêt espionâgê wàs similârly
colsigned to ân officiâlmemoryhol€.
12. wwweàglespeak.us/2009/03/sunday-ship-history-ôperâ-
13. Although the German So.iety of lolâr Resêârch took more
than 16,000 aêrial
?hotographs
ofAntâr.ticâ in 1939, Ritscher
êllowed publi.âtion of à chosen few rather unenlightening
exàrples;the rest have never leen sêen by ortside$. So too,
a radically edited, truncâtêd veision of the full'colou! film his
cotleagues made of the expedition wâs briêny premiêred in rhe
Reich duling thê eârt war yeds. Since then, only snippets of
â swastikâ flag waving in a south polâ! bieêze, or â few So.i€ty
Denbetd posing on the ice âre 3till ôccasioDauy viewed. Task
Borce 68 was throwr rogether with a truly frântic hâste, in
contradistinction to its allegedly s.i€ntific purpos€s, 4 thoud
it were âbsolùtêly ihperative to thê 6ecurity of thê Unitêd Stâtês.
Ihe ice brêaker Arrfon Isidn4 foi eiâûple, hâd only receDdy
been commissioned, and wa6 still undergoing sêâ tliâls otr thê
CàliJornian coast, when Operation HvÀ.irnp war launched. !ull'
ing e newly .omhissiôned 6hip ofi trials adds to thê mi*ion'g
sense of ury€ncy rtill echoêd month lâtèr, ev€D aft€r roncrurcn
of the expedition, when Byrd could orly talk âbout potêntiâl ât-
ta.l.r cohing from ove! the Poler Regions.
14. http://crâzyho6eghost.hub?ag6.com/hub/Interviêw-With-
One-Of-ïh€ Army'Sergeants-At-Roswell-In-1g47
t5- Paul Stonehill, Thé sd,tet UFO fte., Clb, 1998; with Philip
Mattle, UFO Case filrs ofRûssia, 11th Dimênsiô. Publishing,
2010.
16. Joseph ?. Faircll, Rei.À ofrie alac* Sur, Adventules Urilih-
ited Press, 2004, 254.
17. ww.eutimes.net/2010/12lwikilêak set-to{eveâl-s'ufo-
FRÀN(.,O5EPH has
publithed
morc books
(elght)
about the lost civilisàtion of
Adantis than any otherwrir€r in history These and his twênry, oth€rtitles dêaling
with ârchaeology, mililary history and metàphysics have been rcleâsed in thirty-
seven foreign edilons âround the world. He was thê editotsin-chief of Ancient
Ameri.an, a
popular
scienc€ maqazine, from lts inception in 1993 until his ferire-
ment fourt€en years later He lives today with his wlfe, Laura, in the Upper Missis-
sippi Vâlley of the Un ited Stàtes.
.newdawnmagâzife.com
specâ l ssue Vol 6 No. 5
.
NEW DAWN 47
MISSION ANTARCTIOUE 194
La
guerre
secrète britannique
l.t ûpét.rion, nllilrn.t
dllto .i Àihdiqre, il rd tès per qrs*ion ds lr
CLr ' l . . Bnhgne. Por i I r d. ! do! ! n?r s r t t {l . r l qut l l .
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6dl Ë. qcdi al da6ùi t uEûF, ù! ù! t
rdN
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piéé du puzrê
FÛ, st ôt i oci dÉdùd( ko, ù' ] pl Ù6( nsi
Le p r e, i e6l que | é. pddi r i nn n r l t
DédrEG du* d|ldûlb ss lâ
Elâé
.là l Âriirndqu
n
rÊ.ônnâissanc€. ni le!
qùvirants
àùcùn hotneur. tt.ontraire
d
Frt ud4t uÉ6
s ei dÈrL6 i sei
-
'hdr'
;
i i -' Éi 4{rndrbJ-FÉbu D D
:
-/
.
fut-*$rùdn*â*r-ù ba
.Èc
-ùÊ?t-ËqgdE@
iï6;f6;r;iih;riËiqtËi;;b-;e l
rr''É|.-
l F*!*..4b4| l eFEatd*r i
. t
-
',:l::5,*:*
llazi Bases
in Antatctisafl
6l
yGorc
aftel the Gnd 0l mG SGcord l{0rld Wal
rumouls
[el$i$t0l
llitlerc G$Ga[e f10m Bellin.
BY l \ , 1EH l \ j 1ET SABEHEDDI N -
mpossible! Whât nonsens€. Everyone knows the'Ihird
Reich endedwith Hitler's sui.ide in 1945, ând no Nâzi
escâped to a secr€t Germanbâse at the South Pole. ïhe
plain fâds ofhistory âre simply beyond question. Or
UFT: The cover of à Rusrlàn lângmge book âbout Hltler, UFos
ànd the Nàzl Antàrcdcà baie. RlcllT: Storl€s of ÀdoÏ Hltlert
$tipe liom Berlln regulady feâlured In US tâblolds llk€ Tte
wt!w.newdôwnmagaz ne.com
ofthe US triâl counsel at Nurenberg, Ihornas J. Dodd,
also stated:
"No one can say he is d€ad." In 1952 no less a
personâge thâD US President Dwight Êisenhower âdmit
ted, "Wehavebeen unable to un€ârth one bit o( tângible
evidence of Hitlert death."
WHERE DID HE BEAII.Y GO?
The indefatigable .onspiracy theorist and left wing
radio personality Mae Brussellwas convinced Hitler fled
Berlin to a safe haven in th€ southeE hêmirphete. Brus-
sell said "that th€re's no physicâl evidence of any kind
-
ând this is written up in mânybooks, that Adolf Hitl€r
and Eva Braun diedinthe burkêriandthere is epossibil-
ity that Hiti€r has beer directing â lot of activity thât hes
so we have been led to believe.
A highly controversial bo ok Grey WoIf: me Escape Of
Adolf published lâst yeax in the UK, claimsAdolfHit
Ier fâked his own death ând ned to Argentina, where he
lived out the rcst ofhis days with Eva Braun. rle authors
believe evidence o{the Nazileader's suicide in Bedin at
the end of world War II is seriouslyflaw€d. The bookt
co âuthor cerard williams, a historian ândiournalistwho
has written extensively âbout World WârII, toldSkyNews:
"We didn t want to re-write history but the evideft€
weT€ discov€red about the €s.ap€ of Adolf Hitl€r is
iust
too overwhelming to ignor€. 1herc is no forensic eridence
for his. o! Eva &aun's deaths. and the storiês from the
€yewitness€s to their continued survival in Arg€ntinâ ât€
compelling."
"Staùû.
Eisenbowe! Ànd Hoover of the FBI aI knew
ther€ was no proof of him dying in the bunker," Williams
âdded. "It's difÊ.ult to understând why so much of th€ âl-
ready published matcrial we pres€nt in the book has been
ignored over the yeers."
When Us President Tlumân asked Statin at the Pots-
dam Confêrence inAugust 1945 whether or not Hitler wes
dead, Stâlin replied bluntly, 'No'. 'Ihe Soviet dictator re-
fused to âccept Hitler hadcommitt€d suicide. In the
yêârs
ilnmediâtely fouowing the end of th€ v/aa mâny Ameri
can ofÊcials held sirnilar doubts. Lt. Gen. Bed€llsmith,
Chief of Staff to Dwight Eisenhower andlâter director of
the cLA, stat€d publidy on 12 Octob€r 1945, "Nohuman
b€ing can sây conclusively thât Hitler is deâd." the chief
Speci aL l çsue Vo1. 6 No. 3
'
NEW DAWN 55
been going on since WWII, ftom Antarctica, from Arg€n-
Irom Antarctica?
IfAdolf Hitl€r did not commit suicid€ iD his Berlin
bunker in April 1945, where did he go? the most enduring
-
ând fantâstic -
storyhas tbe lùhrer escePing to a secret
bâse at the South Pol€ | Wtiting ove! 40 yeâr, âgo, Gunther
Rosenberg ofthe Europeen occult Research Societynoted:
One persistent rumour in oc.ult-
ism is that Hitler, Martin Bormân
and many ofthe missing Nazis were
spirited out ofGermany. Some claim
they are in South Ametica, ând a3 we
know Eichmanû was found therê
Otbers who believe in tùe Hollow
Eanh thêôty claim that a Âeet of
Nezi submârines took Hitler and his
henchmen to a Nâzi bâse set ùp un-
der the ice cap at the South Pol€...
Evid€nc€ ofa secret Nâzi base in
Antarctica Êrst sur{âced in July 1945,
two months aftêr the Third Reicht
surrender, when a G€rûan submâdne,
U-530, entered th€ Arg€ntinê naval
bâse at MardelPlatâ. several Buênos
Aires newspapers clâimed thât rubber boats hâd been seen
lânding from it, end othe! mbmârin€s w€re spott€d in th€
arca. Or.e pape\ La Critica,
Published
â detÂiled eccount
of Hitler's flight and suppos€d hiditrg place in Dronning
Maud Lând, Antârcticâ. the stoly caught the âttention
of newspapers àro u nd t h e wo:.Id.
'aclvdinsLe
Monàe, Th?
New York Times, Chi.ago Tines, and the Toftnte Dailt Stat
(which
ran the heâdline
'Hitlert on lce id Ants"tctiC).
Speculation increâsedwhet aûother G€rmâfl submatin€,
U-977, appeâred at Mar del PlÂta in Augùst.
Two years latel, Ladislâs Szabo, a Hungarian €lile liv-
ing in Argentina, published Httlel is Alire Szabo c]âim€d
the submarines were pârt of a U-boat convoy tbat had
tâken Hitie! and other senior Nâzi of6ciâ1s fxoD G€rmânv
to Antarcticâ, where a 'New Beichtesgaden had been
secretly set up plior to the stalt of World War tl, on the
orders of Crând Admiral Karl Dônitz.
Stori€s oi Hitler's escàpe to â German.olonv at the
South Pole soon startedto appeâr in
Americâ's non-mainstreâm
press. In
7952,The Plain'lruth pùblished an issue
headlined:
"HITLER'May Be Alivel" TTe
article stated:
"Noq NEWFACTS, ot
purported facts, leâk out. It's repoted
nôw that in 1940 the Nâzis stâtted to
amass tractors, plânes, sledges, glidts,
ând âll sots ofmachinery and mât€ti-
als IN THE SOUTH POLARREGIONS
-
thât for the next 4 yêars Nazi tech-
nicians built, on ân almost unknown
CONTINENT, Anterctica, the Fuhrels
SHANGRT-LA- â new Berchtesgaden
"
When in the yeârs immedietely
fouowing the end of World W* II ny
ing saucers were first teported in greât
numberc, the logical question was: a/e
they the work of an eafthly government?
US Airforc€ offic€r Edwârd J. Ruppelt in his 1956
Report on Unidentified Flyi,g Or./e.ts mentioned secret
Nâ.t technology'as
the only known craft that coùld ev€n
approach the performance of th€ objects reported by
UFO observers. Col. Ruppelt heâd€d Project Blue Book, a
formal govemmental study of unidentiÊ€d flying obj€cts
As tbe cold War got under wa, the Anl€dcens feared ad-
vânced Germân t€chnology mây have fâflen into the hands
ot the Soviets.
It didn t tak€ long foi UFOS to be liDkêd with lePorts
of â 'hidd€n edpire of escaped Nâzis in Antâlctica lhe
strâng€ Mi<hael X Bârton penned a snall book in 1960 We
Want You-Is Hitler Alil'e? He stated the UFO mystery was
no mystery at all
-
the saucers built by Germân s.i€ntists
câm€ from a secret Nazi bâse on earth. Ray Pâlmer's
magazine Flying Saltce/s also meûtioned tlc tdêa of UFO9
orisin ting from th€ 'third Reich's lest outpost ât the
Soutb Pol€.
As Jenny Randl€s, one of Britâin's leading UFologists,
says in her book Sftyrrasi:
One or two UFO investigâtors have speculâted thât
â fantastic UIo te.hnology was handed on from
the dying remnânts of th€ Ihird Reich in 1945. And
inde€d, we know that exPeiimentâl weapons of a
ReDorti ser. df..lter world wàr lt $.1th. t{rrl3lÊd .stibllsh€d
à sêcrat ba54 on the routham @ndna of Ant|rdlaâ.
Speci al l ssue Vol . 6 No. 3
www.newdawnma9azrne.com
Hitler's
UFOs
We still have things that need to be tnishe4 and
when they are frnished, they will tum the tide.
- Adolf Hitler, 13 March 1945
When World War 1l ended, the Germans hâdsev_
eôl radical types of aicrcft and
guided missiles
under development. The maiority of these were in
the most
prcliminary states, but they were the only
known craft that could even approach the
perfor'
mances of the objects rcported by uFo obseryerc.
- Captaln Edward J, Ruppelt, head of Project Blue
Book, 1956
n.lanuâry 1945, as the war aEainst Hltler in Europe
entered the fnal months, Associated Press repolted
on the aDpearance of unidentified flying objects over
cermany. A story in the New
york
Herald Tibune
dated 2 lanuâry statecl:
Now it seems, the Nâzis have thrown something
new into the night skies over Germany. lt is the
weird, mysterious'Foo
Figfttêr' balls which race
alongside the winÉs of Beauighters lying intrucler
mlsslons over Germany, Pilots have been encoun-
teringthis eerie weapon for more than a month in
their niÉht ffights. No one apparently knows what
this sky weapon is. The balls offre appear sudden-
ly and accompanythe
planes
for miles. They seem
to be radio controlled from the
éround,
so offcial
intelligence reports reveal...
lwo months before thls article appeâred, Lleutenant
schlueter of the 415rh us Night Fighter squadron re-
ported
being harassed by'tÉrismall balls of reddish ffre'
when fylng overthe Rhine. A few weeks earlier, on the
night of 27 September 1944, two Allied airmen encoun-
tered "an enormous burning liéht'that wâs llyingabove
their âircraft at about 250 miies
per
hour
(400 km/hr)
The'Foo Fighters" disappeared frcm the skies a few
weeks after the end of World wâr ll. Howèver, between
1946 and 1948 there were several strange UFo siÉht-
ings over Western Europe. Then on 24 June 1947, the
Am€rican aviator Kennêth Arnold claimed to have en'
countered nine unusual oblects flying in a chain near
Iount Rainier, washinÊlton. There was much speculation
âtthe time that both the Americans
ând the soviets were
developinÉ advanced disc-shape
aircraft bâsed on secret
Nâzi technolofly.
In early 1950 Professor Giuseppe Belluzzo, an ltalian
scientist and a formêr Ministef of National Economy in
Mussolini's Fascist
government, claimècl in ll G/ornale
d'lta,iâ that "gpes offlying discs were designed and
studied in Germany ând ltâly as early as 1942 "
west Gefman newspapers and magazines
began
Dublishing
articles in the 1950s about Nazisuper weap-
www.newdawnmâqazrne.com
Post war Cemaû
prest
(ov.rage
of l{àzl UFO!
t
ons. A former Luftwaffe aeronautical
enginoer Rudolf
Schriever. in a. interuiew with Del Sp,ege, maÉlazine'
said he hâd designed a disc
powered
by a ckcular
plane
of rotating turbine blâdes
49 ft
(15
m) in diam€1er.
Schriev$ was convinced the spate of UFO slghtings in
the late 1940s was
proofthat the original research
hâd
been developed further with successful results.
In early 1953, another
German engineor' George
Klein, former specialcommissioner
in Nazi leader Albert
Speer's
Ministry ofArmaments
and lunitions, claimed
designs
for ffylng discs were drawn up bythe Third Rèlch'
Soecial lssue Vol.6 No.3
'
NEW DAWN
57
Dg$ciBs6
6ÂLÈm
ûqqlDtÀ'r€
--
r.!élowr
p1.
lâÈrt@, I
t'rn
t'l
He identiled at leâst two types of Germân craft. The
first developed by V 2 rocket englneer Richafd Miethe,
and the other the disc of Rudolf Schrievef and Klaus
Habermohl. Klein also recounted how he had wtnessed
the craft's first manned test flight on 14 February 1945,
when it manaéed to climb to 12,400 m (40,700 ft) in
3 minutes and attained a speed of 2,20O kmlh
(1,4OO
mph) i n l evel f l i ght .
One ofthe'G€nnàn tlylng sâucer deslgns,"
publlthed h lhr Spleg€l In 1950.
ffiffi$$ffiffi-
ffi
LEFT: A ClÀ report dated 27 Mày
195{, sàys: "À Ceman newtpàper
rcaently
published
an Inlerulew
wllh ceorge Xlein, famoos Ger-
màn englneq and airaaàft experl,
descrlblng the experimentàl .on-
structlon of 'flying saucets' canied
out by hhn from 1941 to 1945.
Xleln stated that he wàs
presenl
when, in 1945, the flrst
plloted
'flylng sauce/ took oft..."
these câses were
presented to heavyweight scien
tists. such as David Grggs, Luis Alvarez and H.P
Robertson. the
phenomenon was never explâined,
lv,lost ofthe information about the issue has never
been released by milltary inteliigence.
Both the British RAF and the US Army, unable to ex-
plain
the mystery, later disrnissed the "Foo Fighters as
the
product of "mass hallucination,
The ltaliân author Renato Vesco, in
a book
published
in 1968, claimed the
mysterious "Foo FiÉhters" were in rcality the
German "Feurball"
(fireballs),lrst built at a
Nazi âeronautical establishment in weiner
Neustatt, According to Vesco, the craft was
a flat, circu ar flying mâchinê,
powered
by a
speci al t urboj et engi ne, whi ch was used by
t he Germans duri ng t he l ast mont hs of t he
war. Vesco also claimed the basic
princÈ
p
es ofthe "Feurball" were later applied to
a much larger craft called the "Kugelblitz'
or Ball Lightning Fighter. This ctaft, which
was rumoured to be a revolutionary kind of
supersonic alrcraft, was the one success-
fully tested over the underground complex
of Kahla, in Thuringia, n February of 1945.
-
Mehmet Sabeheddin
Neither the Americans, the British nor the Russians
were lorthcoming with details ofwhât they discovered in
the secret laboratories and vâst underground research
facilities of the Third Rèich. But Sir Roy Fedden, who
headed a British lvlinistry of Aircraft technical mission to
Germâny in 1945, admitted:
I have seen enough oftheir designs ând
production
plans
to realise that ifthey had mânâged to
prolong
the warsome months longer, we would have been
confronted with a set of entirely new and deadly
developments in air warfare,
Whatthen were the strange "Foo Fighters" encoun
tered by Allied
pilots?
wlitinÉiîthe Jounal of scientific
Explorat,on, Michâel D. Swods notes:
During World War ll, the foo fighter experiences of
lAlliedl
pilots
were taken very seriously. Accounts of
58 , vÊW DAW ,
.
spec al rssue vol . 6 No. 3
I
www newdawnôa9a2rne.com
' . - - L
r{l rt-scti wÀBENIÂXt
1. , r 3: i r i l - n r r ! : ddr û
r : : , ' ! ' 4"".
. '
LEFIi Otfldàl Gennàr Thlrd Rel(h
gover ment màP, l{.w swàbla,
Areâ âpprox. 600,000 sq. kllo-
melres. BELoWr The sp€dilly-
deslgn€d €tnblàn of lh€ Cerl|lrn
Anlàrcu. Exo.dldon. 1938-1939.
Dônitz said,
"the
Getmân submarinefleetis
. L. unr t l ) UFu l i kp dppeàr àn,
P wPt e r Êsi pd dur . ng
the last few months ofthe war. It is sâial that a fourth
reich eaists, and is reàdying itself {or future world
leadership. P"rhdps rhere is a group ot Nâzis Rving
around the world in UFOS.
}IEUSCH{YABEI{LA
D
lHE LÂSÎ t{AZl OUIPOST?
in 1943, the Third Reicht Grand AdmiràlKârl
disputed Norwâyt clâim to the region làe German ship
schwabenlând reached the pack i€e off Antarctica on 19
January 1939. During the expedition, ânareâ of about
350,000 squâre kiiometres was photogtaphed ftom the
air. ]}le Germâns dropped darts inscribed with swestikâs
e\ er y 26 ki l omer r ê<. They àl 5o di ( cover ed ât eà'
' ur Pl i s
inglyfree o{jce, mâinly âroùnd â few hot springs Ïàe
legion ofAntârcti.a between 20"8 ând 1o"W in
Queen
Mâud Land, they .laimed for the T,itd Reichafldcâlled
'Neuschwabenland',
or New Swâbia. Declâssified
records reveal seniorNazi Herman Goering
authodsed the Antalctic expedition with
the intention ôf establishing a Gennan
Nâzi Germany wâs Dot the only
country interest€d in hêving â
militâly
presence iD Antârctica
ln
1943, at the heightofthe
war, th€
British laun.hed their own secret
wartime Antârctic oPeration
code nâmed'Tabarin.
Was Blitain
responding to the thrcât
Posed
bY a
Nazioutpost at the South Pole?
This is where mainstream his-
toriâns leàve off, às onlyresearchers
ofthe outer limits of alternâtive
history
daye consider the imp1i.àtions ofthe rest of
the story. ]}Ie official velsion sâys the Nazis âban_
doned Neuschwabenland once war.ommenced.
However,
sone crewnembers
from the 1938-39 expedition claimed
they mâde Dot one, but several tripstothe
Germân Ant-
arcti..o1ony,
transporting militàry equipnent and heaq'
tools for miningand
tùnnelljng
A.cordingto anunber of àlternative histotiâns, on
the eve of wdthe lhild Rei.h embarked on â ToP Seclet
plân to build an underground base ât th€ South
?ole Once
proud ofhâvingbuilt for the Fùhret in
ânother part ofthe world, â Shangri Là
on land, ao inpregnable fortress.
Strange languâge fot â .âr€er Naval
man well known for strâtegY and
tactics. then again, in 1944, the
Grând Admitai reportedly made
the curious remalk:
th€ German Nâvy will have
to accomplish â great taskin
the {utute. I}le German NâvY
knows all hiding places in the
oceans ând th€refore it willbe
..:a
,f,
very easy tô bling the liihrerto a
safe pla.e shoù1d the ne.essityarise
and inwhichhewill
have the opporru-
nity to work out his ÊnalPlans
These statements bolstered speculation
thât â Nazi
polâr e4edition undertaken on the eve of Worl{l Wâr II
wâs part ofâ muchg/eàterTop Secret oPeratlon
Likc nany other countries, Germanysent expeditions
to the South Pole inthelâte 19
h
ânil early 20'" .entuties,
most of which were s.ientifi(. Beginningit 1938,loÊg
before the eûdofWorld Wa111, the Nàzis seDt an expedi
tion to the
Queeù
MâudLândarea
ôfAntarcti.â Gerrany
www newdaw. maqaz ne. om
Soec a l ssue vol 6 No. 3
'
NEW DAWN 59
Crànd Admlràl l(arl Dônllz
Inspectlng à Cerman U-Boàl
À.cordlng to a rec.nt re'
port ôn Rusilà lodàY, Dônilz
told Adoll Hliler h 1943 t!àl
'Cermânyt
submà nê fle€l 13
proud thàt ll cr€âl€d àn unàs_
sallible lortress for tle Fûhrer
on the other end ol tle world.'
the Nazi leadership
hàd analysedthe
initial dât' froû
the 1938 expedition,
undergiound
constrùction
teâms
wele dispâtch€d to the region.In
utmost secrecy and
às the Nâzi blitzkries
/olled a.foss Europe cârgo ships,
transport vessels, and U'boâts made their wây
to the
South Pole. As H.A. BuechnerandW
Bernhârd desclibe in
Hirl.rsAsÀes,
by the middle of 1940,
submârines
were bringing in
vast stores offood, clôthing,
fùel ànd every other conceiv
âble iteD n€.essa/Y tor set
ting up Hitler's refuge. Con_
struction matedâls, tra.tors,
arms, dist
jllation
âPPâ1âtus,
ma.hinery,
râdio equiPment,
pelsonnel, engineets
ând sci
ef,tists were included. Dùring
the next fôur years shelters
were bùilt ând a mountain
was s.ooped out.
ln whât wâs to become the
lâst outpost of Hitler: Third
based on Viktor schauberger's
designs ând all using
his electromagnetiC
power system.
. While plâns fÔr
nostof Gerûâny's
secret ars€nal fell into the hands
of the Allies alte/ V-E day, the flug€ltad scientists
ând th€ir crâft escapêd,
with the Fùhrer himself and
a band of crâck troops known as the 'Last Battâlion',
to a sector of Antarctice
caued New Schwâbenland
OPERATIOII
HIGHJUTIP
While many readers will
be quickto dismiss the story
o{ Hitlert escape to an under
ground stronghold in Antarcticâ,
there wâs a timewhen some
Allied ofûcials feared this might
hâve been the câs€. We âlreadY
mentioned the scePticism ofAl
liedl€eders over Hitler's suicide
Con.erns about a NÂzi Last
Bâttâlion'
hiding out some
The rerear(h shlt "Sciwàbetrlànd,"
tutàIctkâ 1938_39
Reich, Nazi scientists andengineers
wouldperfe.t
ânti-
gravity research begùn in the 1930s Safe in â se./et
netwôrk of undergfound bunkets, the Germans d€vetoped
theirflying discs in prepalation for the last Greât Battle
WâIter Kafton Minkel in Subterraneanworlds
@ .iselv
sums up thê sensational
stoYy of Nazi flying sâu.€rs as
presented by â number of Getman authorsl
the pïide ofthe Rei{h's s€cret weapons
lâbs wâs the
fluselrad,
or Rying saucer, .âpable ofspe€ds beyond
2,000 kn/hr. By the end ofthe war, the Germans
hâdbùi]t and ffown three prototype sâucers, âll
60 NEw DAWN
'
\ pe. à r 5sue vol 6 No. l
where on earth and prepàring to strike back wete not so
falfetched in the late 1940s.
'Ihe
late surrender of Germân U bôats in Aigentinâ
in
mid 1945 foosedattention
on the possibilitv ofHitlets
escape to the southern hemisphere.
fte mystery of the
submêrines long voyages, .onsiderable stocks
ôffôodand
supplies, young crew and unknown whereâbouts
during
the months prior to theil sufrendet,
âlaimedAllied
intel_
ligence chie{s. I}Ie crews ofthe U boatswere
interrogated
by the Americans ând the Blitish Did th€ Aliês
know of
the existence of the Nazi Antarctic base?
Whateverthe U'boat .rew members
told them, ap
www n€wdawnmagazine..om
pd e, l ) r hpA- F. i . , n r ô, i , ' or , on\ r n. êd. espe( , àr r y
consideringthe subs.qu.nt anii ill fated secret ôperâtiôn
dire.ted by US A.tmiral tlyrd.
In the soùtherD hcmisphere summerof 1946 4Z the
US Navydispat.hed Rear'Admirâl Richard E. Byrd, on a
confidential missionwith an entiie militêryâimada ind
provisions to 1âst sir nonihs. Code named Operâtion
Highjump, thc Aneri.ans âppeâredto invad€ Antarctica
with thtrteeù ships and nearly four thousànd men, along
with taDks, heljcopters ând two hundled airplânes. How
ever, the entire expedition lasted ônly eight weeks, wrth
only approximately three weeks ôfâ.tuàlfull scale opera
tions. On ârriviDg in Antar.ti.â, By/d quickly ran
jnto
difliculties, aftel losing four airylânes, the whole mission
had to be abandoned.
L"ê vàn Ar r à. o- p or r h" I JS
j our ndl r . r i
r or er : r g
'Operâtion
Highjump', quotedAdmiral Byrd as \rarning ât
the time that 'the United Stat€s should êdopl meâsures
of protection âgainst the pôssibility ofan invesion of the
. ount "y by hô. t f e pr àne. . omi ng f r om l hp pol àr r egi ons. -
'Ihetestingof
troopsândequipnentunderAntâr.ti.
.onditions is the ofhciel US government explanationfor
the massive manoeuvre. Rear-Admiral Richatd H. Cruzen
roldlhe New YorkTimes, " iI the de{ense of Americâ hinges
on the Poles
-
âs it may well do in the future â unit of
informed and expeienced air and sea power presents a
formidable defense combination."
Profess or Joscelyn Godwin, in his er.ellent boôk Ark-
tos:Th. Palar Myth in Scien.e, Synbolistu dnd Nazi Suniwl,
points oùt the following regafdingAdmirâl Byid s nysteri
those who believe in the NaziAntarctic bases, with
ôr without Hitl€ralive ordead, willûndit signifi.ânt
that Richard Byrd went there in 1946-47, and agâin
in 1956, on expeditions massively supportedbythe
vl ost reasonabl e peopl e
\,!oul d di smi ss as fantas-
ti c nonsense the i dea that many Nazi s fl ed the
rui ns of the Thi rd Rei ch and took up resi dence i n
a secret Antarctic colony, armed with a squadron
of flying discs with which to
protect
themselves.
However, the
paranoid
conspiracy theories that
hâve
proliferated
in the second half of the twen-
tieth century are based not so much on reason
but rather on elaborate extrapolations of
puz
zl i ng but i nconcl usi ve evi dence. In the
present
case, thi s evi dence centres on the undeni abl e
interest the Third Reich maintained in Antarctica
throughout the war: German shi ps and tl -boats
constantly
patrolled
the South Atlantic between
South Africa and the region of Antarctica contain-
i ng Neu Schwabenl and,
and i t i s certai nl y
possi bl e
that many of these voyages coui d have i ncl uded
shi pments of
personnel and suppl i es for the
constructl on of heavi l y forti fi ed faci l i ti es. When
we add to thi s the testi mony of the captai n
qf
the
U-972 Hans Schaeffer
(whi ch admi ttedl y may wel l
be fal se), the Çl ai ms of the neo-Nazi
publ i cati on
Brl sant that such tri ps i ncl uded the transfer of
fl yi ng di sc research teams and di sc components, and the rumours regardi ng the di sastrous
fai l ure of Byrd' s Operati on Hi ghj ump, we have the i ngredi ents of a
powerful
and enduri ng mod
efn mvth, i n whi ch the evi l s of Nazi sm di d not meet destructi on at the hands of the vi ctori ous
Al l i es i n 1945 but conti nue to exert a terri bl e i nfl uence over human affai rs to thi s day.
-
Alan Baker'
tnv,sibte Eagle:.The Histoty of Nazi Occultlsm
A Modern Myth?
tiilt$ ill
ilrrAItilil
fl||
Artlcl€ in tife Màgazin€,luly 1939
www n.woawf màqàzrr.- .ôm
speci dl l s5ue Vol . 6 No. l
'
NEW DAWN 6!
United States Navy. Buthele is the ûost extrâordi-
narything: accordingtô the of6.iâl mâps of his many
flights, Byrds expeditions l€ft
Queen
Maud Lând
INeus.hwâbentandl
absolutely unvisited. The con
spiratorial literature hâs no diffi.ultyin explaining
this:Bydwas sceled away by the protectivê pôwer
d€monstrat€d by tle secret centef, and âfter losing
f our pl ânes, k€pt hi s di st âncê
, ,
AFTEB ATH
So, if there ever was a Nazibase, what happeDed to it?
Henry St€vens isthe autho! ofseveralbooks onthe Nâzi
connectiôn to flyingsaucers andthe South Pole. He says
the secr€tbâse
"was
in operation until the late 1950s,
whenitbecane the subject ofanAmerican nu.leâr test D
which three bombs were detonâted under cover ofthe In-
têrnational GeophysicâlYeer 1957-58." there were indeed
thrce
Éecret nucl€ar explosions in the atmosphere of the
euthern hemisphere in 1958.
Toda, the âyeâ of DronniDg MaudLandis thoroughly
[lâlped, andover 1,000 scientjsts have visitedthe region.
lhere are numelous bases ând.onsiderâble ai/ trafÊc.
there à!e no reportedsigns of âny Nazi bâse.
And what ofthe Cernan Fùhrer? Born in 1889, Hitler
tould today bê 123 yeàrs old.
US Reàr-Àdnlnl nlchard E. Byrd
(1848-1957)
the undeig/ound Antarctic base he made.ontâct with the
Hollow Earth- serrano believes the Earth's interiortobe
inhabited by â highly advanced civilisâtion ôfettraterles-
t!ial origin.
S€rrânos cleims are based on pelsonel en.ounters witt]
formerofficiâls ofHitler's Gelmâny. He writes ofa mys
terious meetinginVienna with a Gelmaninvolved in the
third R€i(h's secret weapons plogrâm who told of Hitlert
escape to Antârctica. Iàe engineer âssured th€ Chileân
diplomât thât "the scientists ofthe TTird Reichw€remorc
thân a hundred years ahead in the discoveries oftechnolo-
gy, mechanics and also biology-" Miguel Serrano published
a letter written in 1947 by a Germân submâriner that
dedared he wâs insidethe Earth." Interestingly, Miguel
Seiranowas pa/t of â 1947 Chilean Nâvâlvoyâge to Ant_
ârcticâ. He later penned Wio Beckans Us Fron the Le? ahoùt
his experiences ât the South Pole.
AdoU Hitler in his'LastWill ând Testament named
Giand Adûiiàl Dônitz as his sù.cessol. Hisrorians.ontin
ue to spe.ùlatewliy Hitlerchose Dônitz, a Navalmanwith
no politicàl involveûent, âs the ftird Reich's ]astHeâd
of State. Was it because ofhis unquestioning loyalty ând
ability to keep secrets? lnhis memoirs, Dônitz writes,
"lÏe
betrayer of military secrets is a pariah, despisedby every
man and €very nâtion. Even the enemy whom he serves
has no respect fo! him, but merely uses him."
If, es some writers ofthis most incredible âlternative
history contend, Grand Admirâl Dônitz masteiminded the
secret Nazibâse at the Sorth Pole to which Hitle!escaped
by U-boat, then he wâs indeed the keeper of World War II's
Sixty seven years âftê! the fâll o{ the third Reich,
stori€s pelsist of Hitler's es.ape frcm the ruins ofBerlin
to ê safe haven somewhele. Rùssian state television aired
a documentâry thât.ast doubt on the officialvelsiôn of
Hitler's deâth ând highiighted cla iûs ofa NâziAntâr.tic
bâse. A growing number ofbooks ând magazine ârticles
.ontinue to reisebizarre and disturbing questions âbout
everythingfrom Hitler's suicide in Beitin, to Nâzi UFOS
ând Germenbases in Antarcticâ. Recently, on 6lebruayy
2012, the Russian globai news channel Rt in a teport on
Russian scientiÂc research at the South Pole, stâtedthe
"German Nâzis may hâve built â se.retbase there as early
âs t he 1930s. . . '
A multitude of strange end mysterious questions re
mâin.... Ï}le rumours persist.
I he Chi hàn di pl omdr
"nd
n, , r , r i , . r \ or Vr t , Êl
(19Û-2009)
wlites thât ôn.è Hitlerwas safe at
MENMET SABEHEDDIN 15 J re5earcher, witer and inveterale
globà
lrâve er lle is ô long
llme
(onrributor
ro New Dàwn maqùine His al6i adicle àppeàrs rt N.w Dawn Màgazine
2012 aolle(bls Edition
lsee
page
15) À \pihiua swàggie, his areas of inlefesl àre wide
ranginq ànd lndùde myneries, hidden history, Sùiisn, kàm ànd esoleri. Chrisllanily
'
Special lssue Vol 6 No 3 www newdàwnma9àzrne.com
rÉSi$WÈr::
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ilililfl 11ililil|ruilffi
Mysteries
of
Antarctica
Atlantis,
Nazis & Ancient Cataclysms
By LEN KASTEN
n Septembei 1948, ?rre Masa.rrlé
published
an article about the th€ory of ône Hugh
Auchincloss Brown, then aged 69, tid€d, "Can
the Earth Câpsize?" Brown, an Ele€trical En-
gineer from Douglaston, New Yo*, wamed
that th€ eanh wâs like an 'bverloâded canoe"
becâuse the accumulation of ice in the Antarctic
caùsed it to be "tlottom heavy," ând subject to ân
irnminenrpolarshift.Iitt"
Ên lhe shon news irÊm
b€caùse they were impr€ssed thât the New
yotk
ftræs hâd rec€ntly thoùght enough of Brown's
alârming hypothesis lo elÂbomte on it at length
'
Brown believed that such polar shifts oc-
curred around every 0.000
years becâuse rh€ ice
accumulation at the
potes caused the eârth to
ropple over on ils side such lhal pr€viously torrid
pârts of ihe globe be€ame frozen over, and the
polar areas became ùopical. The âxis of spin,
however. remâined at the customary 2J.5 degree
tilt, but now with new geographic poles.
This
polar
flip always occurred suddenly ând
quickly atd wrought incredible devastation. He claimed this
also explained the so-ۉlled "ice
ages" which were reâily
just
localised
phenomena in the new
polar âreas According
to the fine article, Brown reconmended "atomic blâsting"
in Antarcticâ to dissolve the excess
glaciation and
Fevent
th€ iævitâble coming catastrophe.
Interestingly enough, intrepid
polar explorer Admiral
Richard E. Byrd had also rccommended nùclear detonations
in Antarcticâ
(to
the US Congress) only one
yeâr €arlier, but
for a very different reason. He was convinced il wâs a Nâzi
refùge, and they had fearsome ântigravity fighter air€raft
that "could fly from pole to pole with incredible speed."
T\e New
york
Times editoriâl was evidendy bas€d on ao
interview with Brown since he had not
yet written anything.
But for
yea$
he had assâiled congressmen, n€wspapers ând
magâzines with his
predictions of an imminent doomsday,
and the need to allocale $10 mrllion ro nuke Antârclica
Probably it was when he prophesied thât New York City
woùld be under wâter thât the Nel,
yorÀ
?lrr?r took
'lonce.
www.newdawnmaqazrne.com
st. Petercburg, Russio,
ln fact, it wâsnt unlil tineteen
years lâter in 1967 when,
at the age of 88, Brown's extensive notes ând research w€re
incorpomted into his book Cdtaclrsms ol îhe Eaûh.z lnrhe
290 page book, Brown cited copious geological proofs of his
theory in terms of land formâtions all over the world whose
striations showed successive epochs of differenriation of
about 6000
years each.
Perhaps his most convincing argument for sudden
climatic chânge derives from the "woolly" mammoths
found
perfectly preserved in the frozen lundra of nonhem
Siberia. The famed Beresovka Mamrnoth was foud in l90l
at 66 d€grees north latitude in Siberiâ. almost at the Arctic
Circle. Half-chewed
grasses were found in
j.s
moùth ând
27
pounds in its stomâch, which means the rnâmmoth di€d
suddenly while eâling. The grasses were ânâlysed ând most
were found to bê from a temperaie climate He was found
sitting on his bâùnches with his pelvjc bone and righl forEleg
brok€n. And he died of sùffocation
Brown reâsons that the animal "perished in lh€ super-
hurricane ând dust and dirt storln câused by the râPid
The stufted Beresovka mannoth, in The Museun of Zoalogy'
septembeFoclober
2012
'
NEW DAWN
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26 NEw DAWN
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! Èp, . . , h. , . r! r. , Lr, , r r. r; l
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ity ând now lines up with Brown's conc€pt. According to
Brown, in the lâst epoch, prior to the "greât flood.'Anl
arctica was at the Equâtor, as it will be âgain in the next
"shake-ùp," since he claims the
plânetbâsicâlly does a 90
degree flip with each pole shift.
The possibility of an ice-free Antârctica only 6.000
years âgo, as depicted by the ancient maps. caused Cana-
diân writer Rând Flem-Ath to consider that it could have
been Àtlantis, and motivated him lo explore thât possibility
ât length. lnitially not acquainted with Hapgood's theory,
he came to conclude thât a temPerate or tropical Antarctica
mâtched Plato's description of Atlântis in the Crtredr ând
rinearlr âlmost perfectly. But he couldn't understand how
thât could have happened until he encount€red Hapgood's
A Nazi Bose
Obviously the Flem-Aths have sensed, as have mâny oth-
ers, the aura of mystery surrounding this huge
glacial world
at the bottom of the
planet. Now covered with â blanket of
ice over two miles thick, it is only natural to wonder what
secrets might be concealed under that frigid
protective
wmp. What high civilisâtion, Atlanteân or other, has thdved
there in its balmier dâys? The ghosts of those
prehistoric
sea-faring denizens seem to dance on this now eerie, frozen
desert.Is it possible thât â remnant of that civilisâtion might
still remain there iû underground caverns? Might tùere be a
golden city ensconced in â wârmer world under those mâs-
Apparently, the Nazis knew, or at least strongly sus-
crustal displacement expla-
nâtion, and then he became
convinced he was rieht.
Flem-Ath and his wife
Rose then delved deeper
into Atlantis research and
Hapgood's books, ultimately
resuliing in a synthesis of
both concepts iû the book
When the Sky Fell: ln Search
o/Arcrtir(Stodda Publish-
ing Co. Ltd, Cânâdâ. 1995),
which they co-âuthored.
Their theory was endorsed by
Grahâm Hancock in his book.
Finserptints oJ the Gods.as
well âs by well-known, hishly
respected researcher-rvrners
Colin Wilson and John An-
The Flem-Aths were
ddiculed for this theory, since
Sectian af the Pin Reis map, o
fonaus
prc-nodemwarld
map crcated by 76th centuty ottoman-Tufkish ddnircland
cattogrcphet Piti Reis.rhe nop is oLso known
fof
the depiction of a southem londmass that
looks a lot
(*e
Antorctica.
pected, something âbout
Antârctjcah secrets when they
mounted an elatlorâte and
expensive expedition to the
South Pole io 1938. When it
is considered that Germany
was on the brink of launching
a world war thât year, widr
all the
preoccupations and
military
prepârations neces-
sary for such an undertâking,
it is astounding they would
find it so importatu io expend
the resources necessary lo ex-
plore and lay claim to a bârren
wâsteland half-wây around the
world with no appârent mili
târy significarcel They hired
Richârd Byrd, then â civilian,
to come to Hamburg and brief
the exp€dition l€aders.
Ac€ording to lhe omeSd
most archaeologists believ€ tlle Adantis story is a myth.
Hov€ver they remâined convinced and embârked on an
intense research effort to prcve their hypothesis. They
spent thrce weeks al the Yâle archives of Charles Hapgood
and discovered his coûespond€nce wiah US Presrdent
Eisenhower that convinced the president to investigate the
possibility Christopher Columbus had ân ancient map thal
cleârly showed North Americâ ând an ice-fiee Antarctica.
Documeûts found ât the Eisenhower Library in Abiline,
Kânsas revealed the fact thât Eisenhower's research teâm
uncovered evidence Columbus did indeed have such a map,
and that astronomical clu€s pointed to the likelihood it wâs
drâfted âround 3800 BCB, probably by survivors of the
Adânteân deluge.
They found out that the famous Piri Reis map of 1513
was bâsed on maps taken fmm charts found on Colum-
bus's flâgship vessel âfter it was câptured by the Turkish
{eet. After seventeen years of additional iûves.igâtion, the
Flem-Aths published their rÊwestbook. Atlantit Beneath
the lce: The Fate ol the Lorr Co,itin?rr, releâsed in March
2012 by Beâr & Co. This book solidifies their theory wilh
much new and verv convincins evidence.
F le, ê comprehensive history of the Nazi Antârctic adventure
b) rhe l ar€ Bruce {l dn wal l on. or' Branl on. "Begj nnj ng i n
1938... the Nazis commenced to send out numerous explorâlo"
ry missions to the
Queen
Maud rcgion of Amârctica. A steâdy
stream of expeditions were rcportedy sent out ftom
(at
the
time) white suprcnâcist South Africa. Over 230,000 squarE
Hw a Bas . Kôovledge ol Lile and Realily EmPNn
ustoTramlomoùLilesandWord ASimpiôg!id.to
Lile, Cone.io6iê$ aid Really
Now do Lile, Coô< o6ne$, Reâ ty Den iy, and
Re rcarnalioi ra
y work and rh dæ5 it Fcai ior
me? Whal dôet
Qùà
umS.en.êprcE?
Th 5 bool explàins in s mple ierms, usinq lh. bâ!4
oiQuaitrms.etue hw@cs manpùral.our
Éa tiês ând furures lhrough mlidlul applkalion ol dr
thô u9 hls enot on s. beliets, ai d litentions.
We all have lhe potent al aid
pmr lo lum our lic
sêpie mbeFocto ber 2012
'
NEW DAtlW,
www.newdawnmaqau Ine.côm
miles of the frozen coftinent were mâpped from the air. and
the Germans discovered vast regions thât were surprisingly
fre€ of ice, as well âs wârm water lakes ând cave inlets. One
vast ice ca\,€ withiû the glacier was rcportedly found to extend
30 miles to a large hotwater georhemâl lâke deep b€low.
Various scientifrc teams werc moved in to ihe area, includ-
ing hunters, tmppers, collectors ând zoologists, botanists,
agriculturbts, plânt
specialists. mycologists, parâsitologists,
marine biologists, omithologists, and mâny others. Numercus
divisions of the Cerrnan government were involved in the rop
secret p[oj€ct." The Cermans &opped hundieds of swâstil(â-
adomed flags all over
Queen
Mâud l-ând to estâblish their
Russian ufologist Kon-
stantin Ivanenko says that
Neu Berlin adjoins "the
prehistoric
ruins of Kadâth,
which mây have b€en built by
setde$ from the lost con-
tinent of Atlantis well over
100000 years
ago." Ivânenko
heie mixes his speculâtion
v.ilh fiction ir his reference
to Kadâth, which is the nâme
given to the prehistoric
city
under Antârcticâ by H.P
l.ovecraft in his novella, Zlre
Drcam-Quesr ol Unknovn
Kadath, rnitreû in 1921.
Lov€craft describes this city
in grcat detail in another of
his no\ell^s, At the Mountuins oJ Madness (1931).
It was
supposedly built mote than 500,000 yeârs âgo by the mon-
strous
"Elder Ones:'
The fact that l,o\€crâft, a mrher mysrerious figure. was
rble ro make this âssociation of Antarcticâ \rilh an ancient
.ace, even though fictionally, at such an early date, suggests
he mây have hâd some so( of paranormâl source of infor-
mÂtion. Iû vi€w of how litle was known abour Antârctica at
that time, it is not ân âssociation thar anyone woùld ûormally
b.likely to Inake. In âry case, these works by Lovecraft cer-
t8hly enhance ihe âura of mystery surrounding this srrange,
loibidding land.
According to James Roberrs, a Bdrish civil servant
ed WWII historian, in ân article in lr'ejlr.r mâgazine,r the
Otrmans succeeded in building an underground base in a
i.EINSsive ice cave in Neu Schwabenland, using the discovered
. hlcts for access. He claims rhar British soldiels from rhe
Ant Âr oi c Maudhei m Base l ound l i e €nnânce i n l al e
,
snd "followed ihe tunnel for miles, ând eventually
cam€ to a vâst underground cavern thar was abnormally
eome of the scienrisrs believed that it wâs wamed
In the huge cavern were underground lakesi
,
the mlstery deepened, âs the cavern wâs lir arrifi.
TIl€ çâvem
proved
so extensive that rhey hâd to split
lbrt was when the real discoveries were made. The
cmstnrcted a huge base into the caverns and hâd
do.&s for U-boats, and one was idenrified suDDos-
Still, thc deep€r thêy lravelled. the more srrange visioDs
they were greered with. The survivor reporred thar 'hângars
for strange planes ând excâvâtions galore' had been docu-
It was this British intetligence and orher informarion
elicited from former U-Boât câptâins, that triggered the US
led Operation Highjump in December, 1946. Imnically, this
mission was led by Richârd Byrd, now a nêvy adminl with
â distinguished wâr record.In â press release given
on 12
November 1946, Blrd said, "the purposes
of the op€râtion
âre primarily of â militâry natùrc, that is to train nâvâl per-
sonnel and to test ships, plânes
ard equipment under ftigid
zone conditions." The oDerâtion force consisted of thirteen
ships, including the âircrâft
catier 'Philippin€ Seâ,' and
4J00 marines. Since it was
planned
by, and under the
commând of, war hero Ad-
mirâl Chester W Nimitz, it
wâs widely belieYed in covert
militâry c;cles that the rcal
puryose
of the mission wa3
to desft)y the Nazi Antarctic
base. Originâlly scheduled
to be â six-month operation,
it was mysteriously aborted
after only two rnonths.6
An Ancient Caty
Under lce
In 1957, the Russians built
â base in central AntarcticÂ
called "Vostok Station." Sinc€ then, the base has been as-
siduously, continuously maintained under great
hardship
conditions, since it is not coastal ând hâs to be supplied by
ah or via â 1
000
kilonetre
journey
ov€r land.
ln the 1970's the British discover€d through the use of
airborne mdâr thât the base wâs diæctly over the tip of a
huge subglacial lâke under four kilom€trcs of ice. Through
a combinâtion of orbitâl radar measurcments, and surfâce
seismologicât reâdings, they determined that the newly
christened Lâkê Vostok wês roughly the size of Lake On-
tado ând wâs âbout 3000 feet deep. Since then, about 140
other smaller underyround lakes have been discovered and
scientists believe they âre âll interconnected, possibly linked
to the Nazi discovered lâkes under
Queen
Mâud Land many
hundreds of miles to the northwest.
According to Richard Hoaglând on his websire, ?te E
-
terprise Mission,writrer\ in 2001, the water in l-ake Vostok
"ranges from 50 to 65 degrees
R
cleaù indicating a subter-
ranean heât sourc€. In addition, the whole Lake is covered
by a sloping air 'dome' severâl thousand feet high that has
formed (from
the 'hol water nelting the oveùing ice)
just
âbove the Lake's sufâce. Core sâmples taken by the Rus-
sians a couple years ago ât their Voslok Base
-
when th€y
drilled down very close to the bottom of the ice sheet
-
hav€
rer €s led t he presence of m icrobes, nut rients and vârious
gases
like methane
-
embedded in the clear. rcfrozen l,âke
continued aô
page
30...
wwwnewdôwnmagazrne.com
Russion dilling operction ot Loke Vostok, Antorctico.
NiV OAWN
'
septembèFoctober 2012
wâterjust above rhe 'dome.' Such items âre typical signa-
turcs of biological processes.
The I-ak€, therefore, hâs atl
the ingredients of an incredible scientific findr a complerely
'isolated' eco-system
-
wâter, heât, respired gases and (judg-
ing from the unique miooorganisms that scientists were ac-
tually abl€ to cullure in th€ United Srâtes and Russia, when
retdeved ftom their icy prison)...
currenr biological âctivity."
In early 2001, says Hoàgland. 'A team of scienrists from
Columbia Unive$ity, working under the auspices of rhe
NSF. . . began a series of unprecedented low-altitude aedal
surveys over Lale vostok, designed to chart gravitârionâI,
mâgnetic and thermal activity under th€ ice. In the course
of doing so, they made â stunnine find. A huge magnetic
ânomaly was discovercd covering the entire Southeâsr por-
tion of the shore of the Lake-"
One of the possible
explâDations for rhis, Hoaglând theo-
rises, is â large âccurnulâtion
of metallic strùctures. This. he
says, could be "therûns ofan âncient. buried ci1y..'tmmedi
ately âlter this finding,the Jer Propulsion Lab pu
ed back its
Lake Vostok explontion program, ând turned rhc prugrû
ovèr to the NSA,which is the agency specifically rÂsked
$i l h i nl eracl i on s
rrh exrrarerresl râl \ . Thrs scenar ro. sa\ ]
ltoagland. iç
-eeril)
reminscenr ofrhe plor ofrhe French
^ovel
Subterranean "in which Antârctic scientisrs discover
an inhabited 'lrst City' under the ice."
Around the same time âs the anomâly discovcry, news
of a series of v€ry strange and suspicious events surfâced
regarding Vostok Stâtion and rhe US McMurdo Base. as
reponed by Hoagland. Someone at McMurdo starÉo cNu-
lating a rurnour about a giant UFO hovering
over the base.
and a postei
âppeaEd at the base depicting the scene. The
rumour-trIonSer was promprly
"deporred" to New zealand.
Then thrce young
Russiân scientists at Vostok died over a
two-year period,
one of whom had discovered a sedes of
geometric
"dunes" in the centre of the ânomaly. The causes
of their deâths were never reported. Srrangest of âlt, as many
as twelve emergency medical evacuârions were mâde from
McMurdo during the 2001 Antarcric Winter season, âlt of
whom were employees of Râytheon Corporation, described
by Hoagland âs "a high-t€ch firm thâr is deeply involved in
a variety of blâck ops programs
for rhe US governmenr
all
Hoagland concluded fron all this rhar probâbly a iop
secrÊt black operations drilling operarion has been râting
place,
and perhaps
some sort of exotic virùs has escaped
from lhe lake area to the surface. Or more tikely, he sâys, the
hint! of a vint epidemic âre meant ro explain the need for a
very Iârge âirplâne to bring "something" back to rhe main-
land. This woùld be mor€ likely, since th€ exheme cold kills
most bacteria and viruses,
Hoâgland, ever the coNpiricist, finds a strân8e pÂrallel
between this story and the Arthur C. Clark€ short story and
film,200l. He sâys,
"This whole weird scenado, rhe discov-
ery of a magnetic anomaly at ân isolated location, rhe secrer
digging to uncover an ancienr ârtefâct, the danger of shat-
tering social consequences if the informâtion is not properly
contâined, the concoction of ân epidemic âs a cover story for
the secret activities around rh€ extraction of the artefâct
-
is
strâight out of Clarke's '2001' playbook!
Th€ only æal dif-
ference is the locatior of the ârtefâc!, Antarcricâ, instead of
the Moon!"
Scientists believe that Lâke Vostok is about thirry mil-
lion years
old. and thât it wâs encapsulared in ice âbout
fifteen million years
ago. If this is rrue, il would seem ro
suppo the Flem-Ath theory that Anrarcricâ was ind€ed
Atlanlis, which was sâid to have been â very ancienr con-
tinent. This time framê does not necessarily contradict the
6000 yeâr cycles put forth by Brown and Hapgood. slnce
there could have been repeated glaciations.
As it is fufher
exploredr that ûysteious city on the shore of Lâke Vostok
may yet reveÂl itself it to be the fabled fabulous ciry of Po-
s€idon, or perhâps
even rhe legendary Ruins of Kadath.
tou can rc.ld about Opetution Highjùnp and nu.h norc ih Flank
Joseph's atticle 'Oû Reol "Wdr oJ the Wo dd" to be
pubtished
iû Ne|| Dawn Special Issue VoI6 No 5, out iû October.
Footnotes
L Antarctic Doomsdax An EdiroriâI,' ,{yl S.piembq t, 1948.
2. liugh Archinclos B@n. Card.l}ru r olrle Ear,, N,ayre
pubtish.s,
3. Fo. a conpl€te disulsior of rh. Flm ArhJ iùstinc*ion of AnLrctica
a3 Ata is al lnar stâge oI ùeir És.arch. lce the a ict. in rrdrris irrlr?
rsuêf-
b
ednor DouC Keû' on.
4. The Gêrôan inteÉsl i! Anrârcrica may nâve beer conn ct.d with
ùeir repoû€d pâct
wilh th€n eftrated€striâl trieds. th. Reptnjans. frcm
th€ Dræô sâr syslen wirh whoû th€y mad. @nrèct on th.i! Tibêtan
expedirions in ùe 1930s. Il is believed the R€p1ilies
8av.
ine Nuh the
a.tlgravity technology ued ro build nying discs, ând rh. sD called
..wù-
derwafen (wonder
sapon9. Since tb. Rêpliliatu are kndn ro have
inhabired Atlaûn, it is very possible
tn ir @lory €minêd ùndcrytuu(t
alt€r the pol€
shift ad rnet erc $ill living uder AnLrctica,
5. James Robens, Brilâin\ Sêcrer War ia Anlârcri.â
,1vcr!r,
voltrne 12.
6, For norc conplele inJormation on thG sùbjêci. Fe
..Nazi
Bâs.s iû A
-
artica" by M€hnd Sâb€n ddio in .ry# Da,, Speciâl Issue Vol 6 No 3,
LEN KASTEN has been involved in metaphysicat and UFO/ET stud-
ies, research and writing for over th irty yea rs. A
graduate
ofCornell
university, he is a former member of NICAP and MUFON. He has
written over fifty published
articles for Atlantis Risjng magazine.
His book, The Secret History of Exùateftesttials, pot)lished
by Inner
Traditions. wer o rumber silreen on the publisheis
Top F,fty list.
30 NÈW DAWN
,
sept ember ocrobe, 2ot 2
wwwnewdawnna9ô2rne.com
I
Underground
Bases
I
Nick Redfern Uncovers
Top Secret Places
Governments
Don't Want You To Know About
ett-telllng autho, lecturct, ondlounalist Nick Red-
fen |two d-famouslor pplng
the lid otr unsolved
mytte es ahd conspitocy thaoies.
H/s /dtest book, Keep Out!Top Secret Placês
Government! Dont Want You to Know About, /, d Jtudy
olwo dwide seûet govemment
ond tnllltary inttollotlons
such as the Unlted States' Arca 51, Hangot 18, the Dulce, New
Mert.o underyrcund base, ond the HAARP fo. lty ln Alasko;
Roydl Ah For@ Rudloe Manor ]n England; Chlna3 seûet
Sonya instollatlon; Aus?tolla's Plne Gap; Russia's very own
Arca 5l; dnd even claims thot therc is a secrct bose oh the fol
The book detoils
grcundbrcal'ing
testinony and officiol
documentotlon that rcveols lhe lnvolvement of tne ooove
installotlons
(and
many morc) ln such orcot as UFO investi-
gatlont,
tha Wat on TeftoL the 2012 contrcveÆy, blological
watorc and exotic vhus rcsearch, se.ret ohcrcft, dliên autop-
slet,con olling and manlpulating the weatheL and ftinge
eseorçh lntotelepor?otlon dnd invlsib tty,
Nllk Redfern w tes about a wide rcnge of unsotved mys-
des, lncluding Blgfoot, UFOS, the Loch Ness Monstet alien
encounteÆ, thewo d5 of the supematutul ond the
parcnor
nol, onal
govetnment
conspiracies and aover-ups.
He ls d regular contibutor to New Dawn rnogozine, and
Wevious
books lnclude Contactees; Memolrs of à Mon-
Hunter; FlnalËvents; On the Trailofthe Sâucer Spiês;
rce Men Seeking Monsters;A Covert Agenda; The FBI
Cosmlc CËshe' Celebrity Secrets; Body Snâtchers
the Desert;Monsters of Texôs; Sclence Fictlon Secrets;
NEW DAWN
(ND):
Wlat is tr?ep Ortl about and what
promptcd yoù
to wrire the book?
NICK REDFERN (NR):
Xsep O,rtl is a study of secret and
off-limit! installations wiih, chiefly,links to such issues Às
UFOS (cÉshed and olherwise), alien autopsics, exoùc llrus-
es, weaihcr modification, as well as rcscâlch into such fringe
areas as tcleportation, invhibility, and even timc{ravel.
ND: Whal is the truth about Area 5l? Is it rcâlly homc to
crashed and rccovereal UFOS?
NR: Area 51 is actualty
just
one of â numbcr of ar!g! oû
the US Air Force's vast Nevadâ Test add Trridrg Râûgc
(see
sât€llite photo
above), By 1955, . hugc, 5,000-foot-long
runway wa8 constructed ât the base, fiom rr|hcrE tests-ffights
ând landiDgs of the U-2 spy-planê wcrc conductêd. By thc
1960s, th€ SRTI Blsckbird âircraft bêcrmc s staplc ingrcdi-
ent of the .escarch et Arca 51. Thên, in thc late-1970s ând
throùghout the 1980s, bssc-pcrsonncl w€rc dceply cngaged
in
perfccting
Steafth technology.
In cârly 1989, a man na$ed Bob kzar cl&imcd that, ss
a
physicisl,
in latel988 he was recruited i!|o a lbp Sêclet
progftm
l. a section of Area 5l called S-4. lt was an R&D
effort that focued on nothing less thân the analysb of ninc
spâcecmft from other worlds. They operated oo fantâsti-
cally-advanced techological principles,
and Lazar had
seeû thè Holy Giail-like evidence for himseff, he claimed.
something in the Woods; Strahge secrets, NASA
ËclesdndThe ReàlMen In Black.
Nkk has also oDpeorcd on numercus television shows
It o rcgulot
guest
on Coast to Coost AM tudio with
Noory, Originally frcn England, Nlck Redhn lives in
lon, Texas with his wlfe, Dana. He can be contacted at
Dawî mogozine rccently spoke 1o Nick about his
Mà'ch-April2ol2
'
NEW DAWN 59
Dcspi l e war ni nSs and l ess t hân \ c' l ed
threrrs fronr Area 5l personn.l ncler.
clet ro reveal \!hat wâs afbot ât thc
mlsrcrious basc. here was I r7r' do"rg
pr eci sel y i h. r : spi l l i ùg t he bt âns r o
t he wof kl . l b t hi s dr ) . Lt 7. f ht s
i usL
aboul as many bclicvcrs âs hc docs
ND: Australir h.s ote ot thc nùr(
secr el i ve of r l l cl assr i i ed i nsl r l l al i ûr s
Pine Cap Whrl goes on th.rcl
NR: Pi ne Gâp ol l i ci al l y t i t l . d l he
Joiot Defènsc Frcilrty Iln.
(irp
-
's
sihrated in .cnlrâl ALrstral'â. alrnrnd
I L-miles frcm the losn of
^lice
Springs. Purc Grp is, ostcnsibly.
described in cârefulternrs by the
Australiân Government as a sâtel1ite
t r acki ng nat i on.
l hc orisins ofthe fâ.ility crn be
traced bâck to 1966, thc ycar i whiclr
the golernments of Australili aod the
United Stales of Amcricâ secretl)
signed whâl has becomc krrown as
the Piûe Gâp-Iiear).In sinrple terms,
it allowed lbr the estâblishnrent. on
Aùstrâliân soil. of a highly-classilied
ealesdropping'themed
licility that. for thc nrost part would
be mânned by personnel from the US Nrrional Securily
Agency and CI À and, of cour se, Aust f al i ai r
per sonnel f t
day. vâst radomes protective enclosures l(t rxdlir-anlenna
-dominate
the base, gi!irlg it a oear othcr
\lorld appear
ance, ând its nunrher ofernpkryees rs no\ runroured to be
close to one-thousand.
A.cordi
e
lo nnnc. ho$$'eÎ,lhe
l.ondon Unde,groùnd N hoire to
otrrch more I ha n
j
un track\. tnins ând
counrlcss comnrulcrsr deep silhin,and
t i i bck^! , l hi s sLr b su àcc nazeoi
dxrk rnd oki hrnncls, dislircllyrlnn&
aud t.rfible thinSs ârc s.id t0erisl,
i ncl Lr di ng
pr i ur r l i ve r pc n n: t i p€
ci eâl ur cs. so- cî l l cd exol i c' bl g ca$l l
wide range ol ghons !nd speclfes,ad
elen â secret rto..gc arer lora Ùâshtd
uf ( ) .
NDr Whâr hr\e
)où
fouird out âboul
the allùged underSrù]d allen bâse ar
I ) ul oc, Nc$ N4exLcol
NR: Longstinding rnrours suggesl
that aù ùndersround rlie base exisls
wi t hi n. r d bei ow, â mr ssi ve mesâ
ar Dul cc, Ri o Ani hâ Couni l . New
Me\i.o. lrterestingly.
we can pmve
.
rherc has been a wcâllh of $eid achr'
i t y i n l hc âr ea l i or cxi npl e. l heFBI
h.s officialu dcclassihed
â lârg€ lile
on caltle-nlutilatio|rs iI the area. And,
on l0 Decenrbef 1967. the Atonic
Iinergy Conrmissn'r
(AEC) detonalcd
a 29 kil(nor-.!ield nucleardelice
4,240 fecl below ground le\ el
,
in an allempt to proloke lhc
release and. as r d irect .onsequence. pr)dùction ol natu_
ral gas. Thus vrlts born CasbLrggy: a
Prugram
oîan olèrall
project kno\n rs Operation PloNsharc. wh ich, ostensibly'
$3sde. i ! r hJr . <\ t ' . or r r hc p. . t r <r r r
' r {\
i
I cr omL ener yt
Notâbly. the bcâtion ofthe Gasbùg3) tcst- thatcolered
ND:Can you tcll us about secret
government acrility deep within the
depths of the London Underground
NR: Flnghnd s luùo'rs London
Und.reroùnd frihla) \ysie serles
Grealc. Lonrlon and pâ s of the slrr-
roundtng counties oi Esse\. Hefi
ibrdshire and Bùlkinshânrshire lt s
also lhe Norld s oldcsl ûnderground
net wor k of r l s r l pe: ser ! r ces begi r or
l 0 Jaùuar ) 1861 on r he Mcr r cpol r an
Rai l \ l ay. And $hi l c t l r c ol cr al l t ; ndcl
ground
ilsell is not, of coù6., r s.crct
lo.ation.it ccrrainl\ hrs hâd ùn.
than its fair shâre ol classillc.l. oll
lirnits sedions durin!
(hr
couhe ot iLs
ktng and. literall)'. $ rlrding.xist.ncc.
Nû isit exactl) r srfanSer ro nrallcN
d ofîciâI, goven
nrent sc.r..)- eii|ef
Pù)e Gop at't'l..o||y ùtled the.loint Defense fa.iLny PineGop
l{lw DAWN
.
N4ar.h ap, I 2otl
an arca oi640 rcres was Nes lucxicos Crrson Nationâl
Fo.csl, which
iusr
hâppens to b. siturled only nvelve iniles
frcnr the k)wn of Dulce. lorlay. pcoplc âre lorbidclen t'roùr
. l i ggi r i g under gr oLr nd i u t hat ! . r y r r ca
-
whi ch i s ver y i nt cr
csling iD vierv oi rhe 0ndergfoùrd base allegâtions
ND: Whltr is rhe link bel$een thc tinired Slâles. trort l)etrick.
the pon 9/ll Aûrhra\ atta.ks, ând thc Wlron TerÛ l
NR: only one'week after 9/l l. âùonynou sly'rra iled .n!e
lopes conlâ in ing anthra x spo.es ârriled rt the offi.cs of a
va r iety of nrajor med iâ oùllels. includ ing lhe À1 tr r,)/l P.) tl,
CBS News ând ABC News. Thc results were catastrophic: at
least twenty two people \erc inicctcd. ofwhom five trrgl
. al l y bst t hei f l i ves. I t wâs a l i . ùghl si l Lr : r t i on t hat l ed t he
FBI to launch onc of rhc biggesr urârhurts in iis lonS and
_Documem!(()n
thâl hâs snriaced via lhe prcvisions of
thc Fteedonr ol lDliJrmârion Act sho$s tha!. by the early
nonrhs of 2005, the FBI had â suspect lirmly in mind. Iî
rrâs â mân nâlr1ed Dr. Bruce Edwârds lvins. a mi.robiolo
gist who had worked forthe United States Army Medical
Reseârch Instirute ollnlèctious Diseases
(USAMRUD)
at
Fort Delrick. Maryland for no less than eightecn yeârs.
Ry 2007.lvins became the subject ofperiodic but regrlâr
secret surveillance by the FBL And it did norlake thc FBI
long to build-up what was perceived by the Bùreâu âs â very
strong case âgainst the man: in June 2008,Ivins was informed
thal proseculiqr fbr the anthrax aitâcks. âs wellas for lhe
subsedùent injuries ard deaths.s,as almostcertâinly
going k)
ND: Willyou explain the links bet\,!€e| official secrecy ând
off limits areas wirhnr ùe Vâticanl
NR: During rhe Second world War, the Nâzis estâblished
what was, essenliâlly, â puppet ou!fit in then Croâtia, câlled
the Ustâshi drat wâs âs relentless as it ças rùlhless in steâl-
ing gold and rtems ofgreât vâlLre liom the popùl,.:e
-
r'l
the extent that âround S80 million s,as secured forNâzi
'nilitary
progrâms.
-
p
be forthcoming very
soon. l vi ns di d not wai t
around to learn what
the FBI had in store for
bim: on 27 July 2008
he died. as a resuh oTa
sieni6cant overdose of
acelanùnophen, a parn
Elie!€r a \uicide"
Longstanding rumours suggest that
an under-
NR On 28 April 1997. the then-Us secrerâry of Defènse
Willianr S. Coheo. delivered the keynote speech at the
I ni \ er . . r ) or Ueor r r d- ha. ed Conf er er t r c, , n T<Ûor i r nr .
Weapons ol Nlass Destrùction. ând US Strâtegy. and In
ùiguinSly wârned the âùdiencc thât there werc poweriul.
shadowy forces oùt there who werc "engaging in an eco
typ€ ofterroris'n whercby the) cân âlterthe climate. set off
€dthquakes, rolcanoes rcmotel) th()ugh the use of Electro
Magnelic çlaes. So there are plent) of ingenidrs ûùn.ls oul
thùe thât are ai $,oik linding wrr-s in $ùich lhey can wreak
lenor upon other nations. lr's rcâ1." So,
)es,
such researoh is
undoubtedl) being ùndertrkcn.
Secret miLitoty reseorch is said to be conductecl
ot Btitain s Pafton Down
ground
alien base exists within, and below,
a massive rnesa at Dulce, Rio Arriba County,
NewMexico. . .-.i,,r,r,rrf, ,rrr
:"
.,rr"'
:
,' :.t{'
r . : :
"t
. r , i l ê"
that many in the field
ofconspiraly research view with
srcar
skeplicisn'
lO, er. go""rn-"n, i"u"llatiors reâlly seùetly rc\earch'
ing technology to change and modif] the $ealher. and
utilise the weather as a weapon ofwar, such âs indLrcins
earthquakes and hurricanes'l
Evellnrâllr- r big p(Jblcnr surfa.cd: thc Ustashi was reli-
anl Lrpon Ciernrâny iirr 1lnâncial support. âs well as for secu'
ùr ) : , r o n r i r \ di J. w| hr he. r l ' / p' eol r heNazi r egi mei n
1945. howclcr. rhc no'r-alorre Ustashi began to spiral down-
sards into splintered iàctions. Seeing the end as being near.
rts high ranking otïcials hot'footed ir to ltaly, and ùltimâlely
got a wârm welconre fronl Rome's Sân Giroiamo pontificâl
college.Il âlmosl ceriainly got signi6cânt monetary fund-
ing via the Ustâshi,
possibly even with Vâtican assent ând
On 2l Oclober 1946. one Harold Glasser. the Direc-
tor of Monelary Rèsearch at thc US Treasùry Bùilding in
Washington, D.C., received a Top Secret communication
from a certâin Emerson Bigelow, who was himselfan
ageni ofthe Treâsury. Bigelow ùrote that, from a repu
t abl e hal i an i nl or nnnt , he l ear ned r hi r t of t he si gni l cant
tunds se.ufcd lo fuel the Uslashi movemenl. no less thân
approximatcly 200 nillion Swiss Frâncs found their way
newdàwnmagaz nÊ. oi n Mar. h. ADr | 2012
.
NEW DAWN 6l
to the Vâtican and were h€ld decp within its vaults for safe-
kceplnS.
ND: Bntain's Porton Down is at the foæfront of research
into biologicalând chemicâl
warfare, ând €xolic viruser'
What is the link betwe€n the base and crashed UFO8 ând
Âlien âutopsi€s?
NR: On th€ night of 23 Jânuary 1974, â still-unresolved
event occuned on the lârge Berwyn Vountâins range in
North Vr'al€s, United Kingdom that, for sornc within th€
UFO reseâr€h community, hss come to bc known ar the
deônitive British Rosw€ll
Reseflcher Andy Robens $ated of ihis mystcrious âf-
NR: As far back as the late-1950s, the US Arûy
plan to build an outpost on the Moonl ân
permanend)-manned bâse th would demonsrâtc
military superiority over the former Sovi€t Union
Even though the Army's operation -
cod€
ject
Hoflzon
-
$as reportcdly catcelled du€ to I
âdequate t€chnology and
(b) strfficient funding io
such a task nearly half-â-ccntury âgo, there ar€
tary mây have a super-secrat space
program, âbout
NASA knows vely litde, or
possibly even nothing at
such a sc.nariojust too incredible lo bê trucl Just
isn1.
beligve the project may not have been abortcd at rll,
secredy coûtinued in distinct stealth. The resùl! tl!
,..dark rumours have clrculated
to the effect
NDi How does thc
that
government agcncles are secretly work'
Ing to bulld or revamp hugc, underground
realms to housc senlor, cllte elements...
seqet,
gov€rnm€nt
Iâtions?
NR: For a nl)mbcr
who are aware that a worldwide,
planetary
culated to thc
upheaval
will tause massive devactation"",
govenment
secretly workirg tt
fâir, which woùld easily be wonhy of the expert att.ntion of
Holmes and Watson: "The claim was thât a UFO
pilotcd by
êrtrâterrestriÂls cr4sh€d, or was shot down, on the mountain
knownss Cader Beniy. and that thc alien ciew, some still
alive, wcrc \rhiskcd off to a sccrÈt mililary installation in
the south of Er.Elând for study."
Thât s€crct military installâtion \l€s said to be none othel
ihân Poton Down, which is situated in the English county of
Wiftshirc, and from where official research is und€naken into
€xotic viruses, biologicst warfare, and chemicâl warfare. Of
cou$ê; this sounds like a conspiracy theorists' wildest dream
come to life. But, despite vociferous attacks from the more
sLcptically-minded researchers in the UFO r$earch commu-
nity, it has steadfasdy rêrnâined an integml
part
of the story
€ver sinc€ it
Erst
surfaccd
-
publicly,
al least -
in 1996.
ND: wllar is th€ storv of the Russian Area 51? Is it real?
revamp huge,
reâlms to house senior. elite clements of the
ily pr.dictcd, many essert, centuries ago by thr
Some say Rùssia is pulling out all th€ stops to
the construction of â multitùde of underground
Nn: Better known as the Russian Area 51. zhitkur is a
hiShly secRt Insrallaùon builr below â seerningly innocuous.
rr!.I l,own in the region of VolgogradskÂya Oblâst. Stories
tlomâting from former employees of tbe bâse tell of top
snrdi$ of crashed UFO5 - or. as
we should perhaps
thêq Russian Roswell's. Darker âccounts reveal the
arc hffd ât work to try and d€velop deadl). ter-
supeF\ rruses at Zhitkur
(har
eill hâve lhe ability to
tÀrget lpccrfrc râces of people. $hile lear ing orher'
who &Ie awâre that a worldwide,
planetâry uph€avrl
câuse massive devastâtion oû 2l December 2012,r!
fâcilities before 2012 hits us. One such bâse is
rvithin th€ Kosvinsky Mountâins in the Urals.
The now desetted ond rcst cted MontoukAir
Long lsland, New York.
free of deadlv infection. lf true. this is. without
t$iter of mâjor concern.
û.al the story of the âlleged secret base on
thc Moonl
T
tary construction at ihe site was
confirrned in the late-1970s by
Nâtional Reconnaissênce Offi ce
controlled spy-satellit€s.
Today, matters have progressed
significandy, and dat recently
collecPd by iurther US satellites
suggests âddjtional expansio' in
th€ last few years has been intense.
The Kosvinsky site is now protecr-
€d by amund I
000-feet
of
grânite,
ând is a sêlf'contained hub câpâbl€
oi comfortâbly housing in excess
of 50,000 individuâls.
ND: Can you explain what you
uncovered about the so-called
Montauk
Ëoject?
NR: One ofthe truly strangest,
many have said wholly outra-
geous. auegations that bas been
made within conspiracy-themed
research circles, is that at a rela-
tively-innocuouslook;rg location
on Long Island, New York origi-
'nallytâlled
Câmp Hero, and later
Sign at Hanger 84. This is the infomaus hangor
at the
former
Waker Ai Force Bose ù whtch the
supposed rcmoins ofo ctoshed UFO werc held.
renamed the Montauk Air Force
Stâtion
-
hichly-classified research
has, for decâdes,been undertakèû
into â dizzying array of far-our is-
sues, including time-trâvel, telepor-
trtion, invisibility, mind-control,
Althoueh many peopte scoff at
such claims, I uncovered officiâl
files on many of these very issues,
including Air Force plograms to
irvestigate if teleportation was fea-
sible, and attempts to ûake aircrâft
invisible
-
literally.
ND: In your book, you talk about
a number of secret instâllâtions on
Puerto Rico linked wiah the Chu-
pacabra and UFOS. Can
you tell us
NR: On on€ of my severâl expedi-
tiors to Pue o Rico, â number of
resideDts suggested it would be a
very good ide for me to focus my
attentior upon the links betw€en the
Chupacabra and a former US Naval
TEÎAPHYSICS AIID
ÏHE IIEW AOE
By DR. PEIER DAIEY
Ihe Nêw

bêson
wi$ vd Mêlophysicol
Opêrolion!. the Spir
ituoliiolion of ù€ Corù
imreos€d ond odvdn<od
50 ytor: chonsing fie
yror 2012. Tho Eorth wus
oroc*cd thrro tiner in
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e sloundkenlins. ftn
(€d
Ddmntl ieN
thar no oÙ'd! do Hd
bools rd
"orlsoôps
uÀ mique. i$pitalùD.l ùd otbng .ds.-r.he'r
wê will bccoûs gods afiêr mory rebirt$r ond liws on
Now Àwihble fom w*w.Anozon.corn ond ww.
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ww.newdawnmagazine.com March-April2012
.
NEW DAWN 63
base câlled Roosevelt Roads. locâted in the town of Ceiba'
but which is today the José Aponte de la Torre Airport.
As far back âs 1944, when rhe base wâs inaugurated' it
wâs rightly
perceived âs being a plâce of
prime' strategrc rm-
portance. By 195?, Roosevelt
Roads had b€en officiallv des-
ignated as a Naval-Stâtion
To demonstiâte lts rmpoaance
from{ militâry
perspective, the US Navâl Forces Southern
Command hâd its bâse of operâtions
at Roosevelt Roads
According to the stories, which weie coming from all
âcross Puerto Rico, d number ol caplur€d. ând
very ! ic'ous'
Chupacabrâ had sùpposedly been briefly held rvithin â se-
cure, secret facility at Roosevelt Roâds at some
point in lh€
earlylggos, before being secredy shipped to the States. And
that, to vârying degrees, was the story told to m€ by numer-
ous individuals on ihe island, which onlv makes it even mor€
intriguing.
ND: What is
youl view on the theory ihât there are huge
cavems and câves deep below the surfâce of the Earth' in
which highly advanced beings exist?
NR: I don't actually write this possibility off A former
US AiI Force Intelligence operative naned Walter Bosl€y
made a highly valuable contribulion to this mâtter. Bosl€vh
fâther served in the Ûs Air Force in the lâte-1950s'on mat
ters rclative to the US spâce'program. Signilicantlv' during
th€ perioà ofhis employment
with the militarv. Bosley Sr.
r€ceived ât Wright Pâtterson Air Force Bâse, Ohio
perhâps
within ihe cosmic confines of the secret Hânsar 18 â clâs-
sified briefing relativ€ to the reported UFO crash at Roswell,
New Me\ico iû the summer of 194?
Bosley said thât by the time of his fâ.her\ brieling' the
US Air Force hâd come to â starding conclusionr ûeither
the strange âeriâl device nor the bodies found in the desert
outside of Rosw€ll at the time in question had alien ongins.
Very significanrly, Bodey revealed, his fâther told hin the
enrities and their crâft come from inside our
plânet Their
civilisâtion sùpposedly resides within a hug€, underground
system of caverns and tunnels beneath the southwest
portion
of the United States.
t ,
ND: Do yoù believ€ that govemments are intent on building
morc and more secret instatlâtions to prevent the public and
the m€diâ lrom knowing whât ihey are doing?
NR: Yes.tn April20ll, extensive digging began at the
Wùite House
-
in the
yicinity
of the famous West-Wing.
Ost nsibly, the media was infomed. the wolk was strictly
bâsed, and focùsed upon repairing and upgrâd-
sêwcr-systeûs, çaterpipes ând elecûicâl-systems.
such
officiâls and spokespersons.
Some
joumalists
suggest€d the
White House scoffed
just
â litde bil too much
ND: You discuss in the book suspicious deâths of scieûtists
in the freld of microbiology who hâd links to secret sitesl
wllât did
you find out about this?
NR: From the latter part of 2001 to the present day' liÈrâlly
dozens of individuals
wo*ing within the elite field of micro'
biologf
-
the study of bacteria ând viruses, somè of a lethal
nâture in various counûies
around the world, havê died
ùnder circumstances
view€d as being extrcmely suspiciotrs
in nâtuÉ. Herc are
just
â hâdful of many such er(âmPles:
On 23 Novemb€r
2001. Dr' Vladimir P$echnik' â for'
mer mrcrobiologist tor Brorepârât -
a bio
weapons produc
tion facility that existed in Russia
prior to th€ coltaps€ ofthc
Soviet Union -
was found dead near his home in the county
of Wiltshire, England; the county that
just
happens to be
home to Porton Down, too Pasechnik's
defection !o Brilain
in 1989 revealed to Western int€lligence
services' for the
very frrst time, the sheer extent ând scale of the former-Sovi-
et Unioû\ sedet research into lhe field of biological-wâd
t,
includine ânthrax.
Then, on 18 July 2003, David Kelly, a Bri.ish biologicâl'
weaponry expen, fâtally slashed his own wrists
wlil€ out
$alking in woods near his home -
or. at learr. rh'r wâl thc
offrcial version of events, and the one much preferred by lic
British Covernmett.
In 1984, Kellv had been appomted
as
Head of Microbiology ât Porton Do\vû. In lhe âutumn of
1989. he was called in to assist MI6 it debd€fing none oûcl
than the aforementioned Vladimù Pasechnik-
On 3 July 2004, Dr. Paul Norman, of Salisburv' Mlt
shire, Englând. was killed when the Cessna 206 âircrÂft hr
wâs piloting cmshed in the English countv of Devonslirc
Dr. Normân
just
hâppened to be the Chief Scientist
fôr
Chemical ând Biological Defense at Porton Down. Such
deaths are sti beilg reported into 2012.
by cenain elements of the washiûgton press corys.
ND: What do you hope that the publicâtion of the book
NR: I hope it will help to demonstrate
that there Àrc, rll
âround the world, ân âbsolute mass of lop secret and
its installâtions where some
pretty disturbing sluff is
to be going on. If crâshed UFOS and dead âliem ârÊ
secretly stored a\tay, if there âre shadowy litrc€s
poses, if microbiologisls

slstemâticallY
il.. well, the list goes o1...
& Nick Reqeû\ ié')
,
however. were viewed sonewhat skept!
the Eâsr.Wing of the Whrte House sits atop â
bunker designed to survive a nuclear-a{ack on
câÉtal
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p.n!r€
et pâiri@liè@dr qès l$ debièG .n4-
qué @tæ Lr foyêB.b dêûù.LN 4æilè poliliqB C€peûlrnt, pcu de per-
sm .('@i!sr b6 mis mti& d'rld Or atenil parle. portoùi dc It
.dodriÉ d. la !æ d'élir. ary@é" er d6
"cùùùEs
À ge poùr ls Jùift- tuis
pêM E orâft tdigiæ d! æd fait Dr 16liE s|'ir€.,@ pode u
écoliæ dù rdrdrt Adof tttÈr qui, utêrù pôr @
!ro!69.tr&
bÈn cibléc
el pù I'bypnæ &s næq.sç ærotr butes 16 apFærc€n l'ùiqu.
qpoe
ùlc <te 6 évéIlme s Mrir or m leù r@te pa! de qù il r@ir M idéliq
gic, @ æ Lù dit pcs qùi I'mii pl*é d,tr @tte poitior €1 ruitoùt pe qùi il
âait n!a!é, IÈs 1itM qù râidt pù dévdler
q
cn(Æ tuût volûtdrc-
Eda r@st ai$ pû È. Alliér et it tu1ûêù. ârf.ryl'
de ld liÉ Cela r dtri-
bùé r$i à tuirrènir juquà
c
jo$
u sdbE siie d. n}tlici@ u Ié ps-
ié d* Allenm(l3 Cdt p.rrq@i je pos q!'ù cst pl6 qE ré@eirc d'éddg
€ qli $t rcsié dùc l'dbr.r ne@ !i lq ihè..s .h3 SS
Fwar
âpparatt ! À
plB d@ wc izcrolaria VM rlez t@vd ici
"rÉnbhle
mlÈrc. à dis
o$i@.
Ertr. É4, et 1890. ba@up <lê peMù.lirés et, p.ri éllei! quelq@s €t6
d€s plu6 éoiidles dAngLeréft e r.ùoùvèrdt pou fmd
"L'ORDR.E
HERMETTQUE DE UAUBB DOREE"
Gb.
H.mtic Ordû of tùê Goldd
Dam). ra Mhr.c ù
"cold6
Dam" étlie t€dtéq ên pt@È. li.u, dls
I. Gmde log. d. h FRANGMAçONNBRJE ind"i€ (loee mèré) .t daE
I'ORDRE DES ROSE-CRODa ræ
"Goldm
Dâm" étÂil. d qæhe Mt j à la
Fùtc
dc Lr fræmçdEie â,1,&4r ùelaiæ de @tte époqùè er Mdruit
@ Âqau le pl6 ize el le plN mr.
EtaieBL oLc autrc I)Mb6 :
FI-OR.ENSE FARR I W B, YEATq prir Noùel & litrédùre
: BRAM STO,
KER (&lêù dc Dh.ùlâ)
: GUSIAV MEYRINK (rùt.ù dé ltvg
"D.i
Golh" d
"D$
ùhê Gdicùf.) ; ALEISTER CROWLEY (tê @er.ièo lc pts
cmu dcs 6t ddÈ6 lmé6 qùi pasà, pl's lôi4 à |' mgi. noi.ê, fodrlr
d.l'Ediæ Tlelw ertuæût4{\ du 33ène degré dû Pitê é*i.), RUDOT,F
SIEINER (fodlreù tl€ l'ùtbropsô,'hre, ô!@Mçd du 33he deBré dù Rite
éqEaù, dnigdr dê h ,Sciété
rhé@!tiqæ"
er Allemagne,
Crùd
tutrre de
Iùdrc d.. Illuin&
-ORDO
TEMPLI ORIENnS
"
(OTO) et gmd tuitre de
105
lâ brmhe .,MYSTERIA MYST'ICA ÂETERNA..I1 qùfttâ, æpênduq plu rard
le
"Goldetr
Dam"
IDù
divê4ê!æs de @(73)
Steinq rcfua d a@ptq au ,Goldeû DrM" t'æùltisie-Ècttrù-tinoln, on
le lùi .evaùdra plu tùd.
Etr 1917, ls
IÈfures
sivmra æ M@ltrèrent à Meue : I'cùllirte
BARON RUDOLF VON SEBOTIENDORR le disiplc d. cudjêfi XARL
IIÀUSHOFER, l'avial.û de @b!t IrTlIÀR WAIZ, L PREIT|T GERNOT
rt la
"Seiéié
des hériti.G d4 teDplies" (Sæiersïhrpli Mæidi).t MARrA
ORSITSCH (oFic), u nédiu de zâgrcb. c6 peetus ùniat h.aeotrp
étrdié ls aloctrirs €t lel ftùels dù
"Golder
Dâm er éllidr Drnio ièmnr
tui8rc* sur les loger !æts
'Mùqu6
SebotLe Ddod d H;Ghote, eo Dù-
ti.uliù. étdùr ds rcytgeB .rl*riMtê5 de I lndr €r du lbet, rrÈ ioprég-
d.16 .locxim et ds mrthcs de e prts Hautrofêr mù! d6 @1ærs pr-
dânt la Èêdèrc Cùæ ôwc ue &s plu bn@tes sæiérés seùèiq dè | AÉié!
æI. d€s
'BONNETS
JAUNES", C€IHi fùt fddée en 11(19
De
le éf@teu
boùdithilte Tsngth.po. Hauholq y tut ùitié €t jm de se suicider si sa
"mie
rid" demir é.|ioæi Suire à
q
@ta.ê d.s cllfu@ùr& tibér.ù6 s for-
ûère en ÀIemâgte &ns l€s ùné€. vingt,
ls &.la réuion à \,ietu, l€s qulrc j.m6 géB êspénienl âlFcdæ
qu.h@ ch@ û ls lert6 dé révélltim suèt ! d6 TEMPLIERI| .tui oe
rû lâ @ftérie s.ÈE
-LFS
UAITRES DE LA PIERRE NOTP.E-. t prétal
G.mot r!'Frlêrait À b
,,SOCIETE DES HERITIERS DES TEMPLIERS" qui,
t m mdmisnce! 6t l'ùniqùê @iê @iété rdplièe Il Cagir d€.læE
tÈ! tcnplien de 130/ qùi æ smt F.|Mis lèu @êts dê pèr€ en fils
, jù6qu'À
ùiùdihùi Ii prétat Gemot leù auit
lElé
de I'dirée d ù. ère muyelle
i.i.lù r{s.Sê
de l'èrc des PoissG à l'èrc dù vcM Or y é.hnngair sùr L lait
{oc
rctre dé€ solrire cmspordant ru .ioE évolutid. dé lâ IÆ 6t
i detua€ er i!o@ noia dê nenè qu. h tvolùtion de mtrc soleil ùrr du gM
;i5Àcn
æntral
0e ,JtôLfl
mi' d@r pde tles
q;enq
nythd) dr divisée er
i@ru prnid C'6t t@t ei., m oublÈr la
!ûéc*id
du noùvmenr @niq@
dc h tère sù enqDêûe d@ ù t'irdi@iu de s! are qûi dérétuiùe ler èra
.
&lûn æc dorré€s, u
"ûois
clMiqùe* d@ 2.155 adéen u€
"méè
cxmi-
Nre'
duE etrrird 15.860 âmé4 D.plès lB
(ûH
des réoplierr noB 6(fu6
Èù Ful€lMt âù su_l d'ùe èæ mùvelÈ
(m
c'.sr te 6 rN 16 2.155
r!ûr), @B lai À L fn due ùlée ciMiq@ el an sùn d\me rra Ayùt
li æ3 5.8@ tuées, la lÈre rcçoit lcs dctui* faible nyoN d€ lèrc ilq
àvdt d @iÈr d!6 lèE dù Ve'gu aù {on ÈyoMent. EIe qùftre,
106
rclm la définilid indGaiyenæ, l'époqæ dù ,,Kali-Ynga , èrc du
!éché.
Tou
l$ cùmgænls d'è.e ont mduit à <les boulæene s polùiqu.6, rclùèu,
sftiaù et nane aéoloeiqùd de trè. g@de mpleù. CêtÈ pù6e de irarrloF
tutim d€ I'ucÈn veE le ùoùvel âge e$ dédgnée dûr la dælrift de la Més
potMie d€ ,trcis
pos doùbls de À{edùt'. C6r m l.p6 de 168 ùrées au milieu
duqæl ër ltretrd@ su Têre l'ùivéè dù raFn ILU, du nyon didn.(?4)
Aprà d€ .avaûi. dldli 16 êrplÈr dé"ig"àrc L t féri6 1962 .()!)m
dlt. dc l'appdiiiô. dê @ c}!n. C6t aini qu'or @ùut lâ dar€ @@pondût
à la noidé {te eit périôdê .ie irn.romalioa dé 168 dé6.t qùe d€s &énÊ-
na& partidlièMerl inporllrt3 fùre p.ér pow les Mé$ 1934 .t 19$.
OD peut $ppcer qe le sjel princilal de h ove&tid dtr€ Ls per-
s@s ndriodnéé pl6 baùt oMrmit ld 3l]rll4rendu dù
taege

NoÙuù T6l.IMr dô MÂfiùid 21J3 où J&u r'&lree âù JI,IFS .
"
& ro'ua,
me d. Di4 9oB sr ôté e|#,o don é à u AtfIRE pzùttlc qai ptud,no Ls
l. t.n dgitr.l omplet à @ sjèt qui c tNrc dm les .rcliEs dc la
-Soci.ta
lÈnpli M,r.idi" fl pÛle dê façû ber@p plc clairc : En IailJésu
a di1 @Mèiem d. qù€l
"rutrc
peuple" il . agil pùisqu'n pâde à &s Get@i6
qùi sært ib$ re légid romiæ et leur dit que e *É LBUR peuple, Cétrit
@ qæ S.ùottd.lod ê1 6 dir avaiat
yoùlu
défniriænmr evoir .1. peûple
gpmtù, doF allémd, mit été ni$io é pou dés le .otaù@ de lmière
!r lbrè Oi âvail û.oîé q@ lê nyor pé!érrcrait là Tere âù
'@l
Urles
bèry prÈ d. S.lzbôug
En æptembE 1917, Seùoitendorf ren@nta les nêmbEs d. t wiété ,J-ES
MAITR.ES DE LÀ PIERRE NOIRF .u monr UûL6ber8 pou ævdr le
poùvoir de L
Éæ
violeÈroir,.om dont sétait irspirée la siéré sénte
,J$ daltre dè lâ pieEê rone', iss en t22l de la siété de TerpùèÉ
|]eidisr6 et dirig6 pù Itub€rtN lço.b,3 étaient donés
tEu
but de @û-
bâtt ê le m.l dar e mord. et dè poniciper à h mtÎEtion du oyale d.
lmièæ dù Ch.ilt Crtté fo@ $nbÉ qù'il f.Iair @bbaltrê srétait
p'nir6réc
dm l.
Fétér(nr
"Anciê.'rbstaftn1"
<te l. Biùle
(fue
,,Did
à Ea6 Moi-
æ et d'rùtrë nédiunf, Y.bé &'ad6e ai6i à ,\bûhû !€ Ls mots ùébreu
:
-Ani
br El Scbâddd', Frduir por
J. dl El S.lrH.i"
,
"lê
grard snge dé.ùù
(S.ùsddei El)
-
È S"t n' (mn la r6dù.ti@ oiginale d€ la Bible, Genè* : 17,1),
Sêbond.lod rvril tmrd épos I s q@ti@ : t! S.laddai,le Diêu de
I'Aei6 T6ttndt, étâit È 6Eù!têû, I'advdâiæ tle Dieù 56 âdepts p6rti
.ipâi6t ddc à la destruction d€ h tbr€, d€ la mtue, dd nomd
qûâi.rt
ld Hébr.u
-
lê peuplé juif,
fl7
fts l'.+liqM md détoG dus l'Evdgiie de Jeù 8 : 3û45 qo,.d n dir
"Ib
lb
ruift) .apo"dtua1t .r tùi Aimt :
"AbruùM
6t ,otre pèn,létu leur
ùt: Av]ro êtia afû t.lAbahtn, @6l.ti.z bs Mvrs.lAbtuh4n; tuit
wùbaa4! t@ chsdta à w
lzit
nMh, tua w honw qui ww ai dn ta
térité qu
i
ai où. .L Dia : Ab.dtM
^'a
pu
lalt
@1t\ Uout, ww
ttut
14 @-
rM d.yon PERE Ib Iù .lircû dorc: Now ûc tu MpNù,ét.t ]a
fomi@
tinu ; M NM ù pèr., Dia l&B kar .ltt : Si Diu &dit totæ p2/., w û,ai-
ntio, @/ tui
ie
pfocèd. .la Did d
h
liêa d. lui
;
et je tu rurt pû v.N d.
tui-dAn4 Mi c dt lui qui m'd ù,o!a. Pôutq@i t'enta,l4-wB p6 @ lt4-
k diabb a w6 @uLz
Jbirc
ld cùvnù'u d. wtE pèd Lli . aÉ wnis dès
b Mu@t, d il nb pa
rEâêrara
.h6 Ia véiia, tu il a
t
. pB .lz
y,tité
6 hn
Quû.Iil
pnftæ la @Ee, il po e.L w propE
lokda.t
il6r nd-
tàt, et L pèrc .lL wge Mait tua pa@ qtu je
dis laaétilé, ros æ tu c.ot
AtA.
? P . qre wB M pMz pa err tu pdroL Vout ww awz pM pèrc
. B€@up dermdent 1oùjM rrlvffir : Iroelei llirler s'.tuqu-t-il pré-
Cûénent ùr Juift ? XcÈre qùe l€s ligrq ci-dess vou @t é.lairé< D'aprèt
h SOCIETE TI]ULE, d'où Mt isùn
Dl6 tàrd, L DAB re NSDÂe |6 SX etc,
,.1ê Fùple
jùif miai@é pù le DÈu ,,YAI{VE' d€ I'Atrim Gsranent poù.
"x.é.r
ltnler lur T.ft_ élal la @e drr
sEn6
er d€s dimrd€s 3ù TÈre.
i
t$ gea d.lhùlé smÈnt p.rtie@61@ qù'il en éhn d6 st$èn6 ùân-
qis jùjfs,
cài, de Rottsùild .l @pag.ie aiEi qe des l,ror@ld d* Srgs
:
iL Si@. ns æ æntaicnl ntudaréE d .@rd av€ la éi{laùon de Sâjâh., poû
ôùbaltre @ peùple d panicltlièrcrcd lè ri5rèm. d.. loed jùs
êt è le6
IûqEs
âfin ile .réû le roya@ rle lunièr. su TIG
i
(Cdæ wu pouw le cGlôtd, es ùoms étsidr toû âùrdt id€pa-
I 16 d. s'ffiàqùù âù c.wr c|)|'@ leù z.tts JésEOrj$ le Èù Nait æ
i
êlné, êt tle tr.n form l€
'udè
par l'a@u de soi <le la crérrio et rle sn
r;
Ftchain
(el le prch.ù peùt rpparietrn à @ aùt e r@ o ftli8ior), ft ont
n*né leur prope r6pNt'ilira er se nL déctarga{ ru @ .dr.r/a SATAN.
. Ilu nâine 16 a rcndu si aveûgÈs qu'ils r. * Mt harc pû rcldù @Epte
qu'ib ùtiliqient ls néms m6 q@ le oi-diwt Di.ù Mtmiqùe YAfitrE qù'ik
rtotdtienl Mùâtt@ @s goelà dev.ie ,
pourtdt, ewir qu. h prn !. s'ob-
t&!t
ps èn tuiut la
e|l€@
Renarqué de l'dicû.)
E
i Altû d! BARON RUDOLF VON SEBOTTENDORF $ f()fu U 6dC
llù
p{6 d,e
"l'ordre
gômrin" à L
-SOCIETE
ÎHULE' .tr 1918 à Brd AiF
Oùtre le prânq@ du
"Ooldd
DrM'. reu€s que l€ t.rtrim l. yoga .l
104
16 dédirâtim ddrrÈE tu s'rd.dmiedt À la nagie! à l'ùtroloAie, À l'.cùlrie
r., dé.rrptridt le ssvoir {È3 tenplieE et ik êsy3iênt dltab|n u [etr enrE
æs d@,ôca
c1 lâ pûlitiq@
Ix Sciété nuté ooyâil, Éloû lÀ É\éhtim d'Is.ier à h r€nùê d ù M6iq
le ,,trcisiène Salgd", qùi d.Eit .ppond h
eloift
êt ûê nNre[e c|'lrùe ,ryen,
ro à I'AIetugE.la mmbq L!
du
imponmrô û()més pù Dieiricn Bron-
dd ddts $n [Ee ,,Bevù HitLr tm" (Avmr h vmué d'Hitld) êt pù E. R.
Camin ddc
"Cw
[Tder' (Il gourcù Bid..) mr re| sùva 6 |
1. Bm Ru<tolI r@ Seboftetdorl
srud
nrltle dè lo(lre
2. Gùido vd Lbl oâltte de I'ùdæ
3. Jôrg IÆ iû tiebalcllt oalræ de l'ordrc
4. Ador tlids, Fiibrd, ch@lier dù Reicù èt chef sDrêûe d€s SS
5. Rrdo|I Hes ldioùt aù FiihEr
6. Hemaû Gôriry ma!échrl dù Rei.A .t gmd dbr d6 SS
7. Heinrich ttimler. chef des SS dr Rcich er nirirrrc du Rêicb
8. Alted R()@b€r& dnjstE du R.ict er dùig.mr d4 natioaur
9, l€ Dr H.ft Franr, dùigedt aÈs mtiomuæi.lietë et goùvemeû
géÙÉral d. Foloee
10. Jùli6 SlEicùû, gnd ch.f d€ SA êt dirig@1dé l régior de Fr'ln
lé D. Kùl Hàùshofer, gctréLl dc hrigà.tc d rctrâite
le Dr Go(fried Feds. saérÀire d Etat a rt aitê
DÈtriab Ectal rédacteu d cld dù
-vôlti*àù
Bolrâchrei'
B@hdl Slerpne, @trIew d Hitler ei sn mi intime
rIEû Morcli, médÊ.ir peGmd d'Hitler
Èau Gùrher, dber de la policé d. Mûricù
Rùdo[ St€ird! iotrdateu <le la derrile dtbropMpùiqùe
W. o' ScùUmtr4 Dr.t prolcsù à la F drlé d6 $iêr6 de Mlttricù
Tftbisù-l,iMln, @ùltirte er voyâgù de lIlinâlay.
12.
74.
15.
17.
18,
19,
20.
In Sæiété ûulé s divi*, plu t{d, en dd brmcù€s, la bmnche édotérique
(le mot grcc etd6 Bigûifr I'i.rériêu) dool Rudor Stein€r 6irsit paniq et la
tndcle erotrénqre (erct@ @
e@
rigriEé I'dériêu) ddt Itrd€r prit, plu
lard, la dircctid CerraiN Ntêm ârfrmt qE ld étotérist€s âûâient, entre
aùtæ8! tènu d6 débols
judÈûircs
ct cm;'ntré d* àm@ à mort. E tdt os
109
l,.fl
do.. de l'énergÈ (qùi E côtl,ir ri@) a! cbdp Mgnétiqu. t r€tr.,
qû-
6. L I@t lq drqriru À tl.ùym du cmnùd.ût Hm CrLr d tc
Ilitld 6t po|lmivrq plu tarù SÈird èr s dieiDl* er ft @{re à Eùi æu
ddr ù put 3'enper(?s)
Quelqu+l|c d€. do.rriæs @pit 16 qùi ot narqùé rortémùt ta
qiété
thulé fùEnt l. rligid gênùc.ryê@
onihini4 éhborê
lr
lé ptilcopt
Gùido ro Lùt, h grd.irrr4ù d! rard. d.
qæs qihbigd
el le.ltrirri&i@
@ieirel <r* adèptee .te Mrrcid <tJi s opp@ A fArcid Tèstmnlra @c)ê te
pr$ i i@ 3'ét it,.r tdt ca4 ligué cdtre 16 Jùi& du ûddê arder et @læ
h ft1@6.i@ndie et s loSR
B.a@ùp d'auté6 prûêndeÀ1, erHddt, qùc h Seiéré Thùté ârsit o,
d ptun ùe Nûe idéologie JÊ ne veu
t6
wu li sc[d mêæ.'it rc s'agit
p.5 forEéndr dlæ éâlité inébrùlablè
Qe lc læteù
jùs.
!
LtltoiÊ d...!HUI,E( n br..:
"UUflMA
fiIULE" awit été la €piralê dû pmid @ri@t €ldi'. pù
l'!s Aryd C.luiri ô'lppÈlsit
"Hyp€rbo.éè..
el aûait élé pl$ ri.u qe Ia
lrnùÈ el l'Arlantidé (dùent' dgldrtis, h.biés jadis pù dc gmd6 .iviti
*tioû), En s."ndlnavi.!
il y a @ lég.nd. âùt@ dé l' .,l,lriM thn
",
æ pitr
Dweileu d,s ie Cmd No.d où lê slêil E æ @récÉit i.fuis €t où ûvrai-
..t 16 ùælEs de h rae art€nne,
Il @liMt .IlrT.rbora!" âmit été .itué das h r@ du N6d et lwit été
.4louti loB d'ûe époqw glacjÂiE Oa sùtp6e qæ ss hrbftu$ viùètt
jadit
'<h
strtè4 &lairc d'Aldéb@ qùi 6t l$trc pri&iprl drs l @rc!.tio! du
Tle.ù : ils tu@icnt èNid qûtr€ mèrrc!, avaiênltô p€rù ùt rclc .r érri-
ètt blor(|s ,Ù ycu t'lê6 Ilr rê .llMisâient pù ls gæG d ih ari.nr
vététùies (Ititlq a6i, d'8ilê8). Xtaprù ls péiendu teltes de Ihùré, ld
H'?dùoréc$ étridl rÈs êr avde daû ld r-h'oliogic
!r ils $ ldidt s-
rù d6
"Vril-ya-,
eryis vôlr.t qE l)G d4rigM aùjoùrdlùi dû rm d'
-O

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