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Tutorial 5.

Modeling Radiation and

Natural Convection

Introduction: In this tutorial, combined radiation and natural convec- tion are solved in a two-dimensional square box on a mesh consist- ing of quadrilateral elements.

In this tutorial you will learn how to:

Use the radiation models in FLUENT (Rosseland, P-1, DTRM, discrete ordinates (DO), and surface-to-surface (S2S)) and un- derstand their ranges of application

Use the Boussinesq model for density

Set the boundary conditions for a heat transfer problem in- volving natural convection and radiation

Separate a single wall zone into multiple wall zones

Change the properties of an existing fluid material

Calculate a solution using the segregated solver

Display velocity vectors and contours of stream function and temperature for flow visualization

Prerequisites: This tutorial assumes that you are familiar with the menu structure in FLUENT, and that you have solved Tutorial 1. Some steps in the setup and solution procedure will not be shown explicitly.

Problem Description: The problem to be considered is shown schemat- ically in Figure 5.1. A square box of side L has a hot right wall at T = 2000 K, a cold left wall at T = 1000 K, and adiabatic top and bottom walls. Gravity points downwards. A buoyant flow devel- ops because of thermally-induced density gradients. The medium

c

Fluent Inc. November 29, 2001

5-1

Modeling Radiation and Natural Convection

contained in the box is assumed to be absorbing and emitting, so that the radiant exchange between the walls is attenuated by ab- sorption and augmented by emission in the medium. All walls are black. The objective is to compute the flow and temperature pat- terns in the box, as well as the wall heat flux, using the radiation models available in FLUENT, and to compare their performance for different values of the optical thickness aL.

The working fluid has a Prandtl number of approximately 0.71, and the Rayleigh number based on L is 5 × 10 5 . This means the flow is inherently laminar. The Boussinesq assumption is used to model buoyancy. The Planck number k/(4σLT ) is 0.02, and measures the relative importance of conduction to radiation; here T 0 = (T h + T c )/2. Three values for the optical thickness are considered: aL = 0, aL = 0.2, and aL = 5.

Note that the values of physical properties and operating conditions (e.g., gravitational acceleration) have been adjusted to yield the desired Prandtl, Rayleigh, and Planck numbers.

3

0

Adiabatic = 1000 kg/m 3 4 c = 1.1030x10 J/kgK p k = 15.309 W/mK
Adiabatic
= 1000 kg/m 3
4
c
= 1.1030x10
J/kgK
p
k
= 15.309 W/mK
T h = 2000 K
-
3
= 10
kg/ms
-
5
g
= 10
1/K
- 5
2
g
= -6.96 x 10
m/s
a
= 0, 0.2, 5
1/m
y
L
= 1 m
5
x
Ra = 5 x 10
Pr = 0.71
Pl = 0.02
L
= 0.2, 5
T c = 1000 K

Figure 5.1: Schematic of the Problem

Modeling Radiation and Natural Convection

Preparation

1. Copy the file rad/rad.msh from the FLUENT documentation CD to your working directory (as described in Tutorial 1).

2. Start the 2D version of FLUENT.

Step 1: Grid

1. Read the mesh file rad.msh.

of FLUENT . Step 1: Grid 1. Read the mesh file rad.msh . File −→ Read
of FLUENT . Step 1: Grid 1. Read the mesh file rad.msh . File −→ Read

File −→ Read −→ Case

As the mesh is read in, messages will appear in the console window reporting the progress of the reading. The mesh size will be reported as 2500 cells.

2. Check the grid.

Grid −→ Check −→ Check

FLUENT performs various checks on the mesh and reports the progress in the console window. Pay particular attention to the minimum volume. Make sure this is a positive number.

Modeling Radiation and Natural Convection

3. Display the grid (Figure 5.2).

and Natural Convection 3. Display the grid (Figure 5.2). Display −→ Grid Note: All the walls

Display −→ Grid

3. Display the grid (Figure 5.2). Display −→ Grid Note: All the walls are currently contained

Note: All the walls are currently contained in a single wall zone, wall-4. You will need to separate them out into four different walls so that you can specify different boundary conditions for each wall.

Modeling Radiation and Natural Convection

G r i d Jul 25, 2001 FLUENT 6.0 (2d, segregated, lam)

Grid

Jul 25, 2001 FLUENT 6.0 (2d, segregated, lam)

Figure 5.2: Graphics Display of Grid

4. Separate the single wall zone into four wall zones. Grid −→ Separate −→ Faces

single wall zone into four wall zones. Grid −→ Separate −→ Faces c Fluent Inc. November
single wall zone into four wall zones. Grid −→ Separate −→ Faces c Fluent Inc. November
single wall zone into four wall zones. Grid −→ Separate −→ Faces c Fluent Inc. November

Modeling Radiation and Natural Convection

(a)

Select the Angle separation method (the default) under Op- tions.

(b)

Select wall-4 in the Zones list.

(c)

Specify 89 as the significant Angle.

(d)

Click on the Separate button.

Faces with normal vectors that differ by more than 89 will be placed in separate zones. Since the four wall zones are perpendicular (an- gle = 90 ), wall-4 will be separated into four zones.

5. Display the grid again.

(a) Select all Surfaces and click on Display.

Notice that you now have four different wall zones instead of only one.

Extra: You can use the right mouse button to check which wall zone number corresponds to each wall boundary. If you click the right mouse button on one of the boundaries in the graphics window, its zone number, name, and type will be printed in the FLUENT console window. This fea- ture is especially useful when you have several zones of the same type and you want to distinguish between them quickly. In some cases, you may want to disable the dis- play of the interior grid so as to more accurately select the boundaries for identification.

Modeling Radiation and Natural Convection

Step 2: Models

As discussed earlier, in this tutorial you will enable each radiation model in turn, obtain a solution, and postprocess the results. You will start with the Rosseland model, then use the P-1 model, the discrete transfer radiation model (DTRM), and the discrete ordinates (DO) model. At the end of the tutorial, you will use the surface-to-surface (S2S) model.

1. Keep the default solver settings.

(S2S) model. 1. Keep the default solver settings. Define −→ Models −→ Solver c Fluent Inc.
(S2S) model. 1. Keep the default solver settings. Define −→ Models −→ Solver c Fluent Inc.

Define −→ Models −→ Solver

1. Keep the default solver settings. Define −→ Models −→ Solver c Fluent Inc. November 29,

Modeling Radiation and Natural Convection

2. Turn on the Rosseland radiation model.

Natural Convection 2. Turn on the Rosseland radiation model. Define −→ Models −→ Radiation When you
Natural Convection 2. Turn on the Rosseland radiation model. Define −→ Models −→ Radiation When you

Define −→ Models −→ Radiation

radiation model. Define −→ Models −→ Radiation When you click OK in the Radiation Model panel,

When you click OK in the Radiation Model panel, FLUENT will present an Information dialog box telling you that new material properties have been added for the radiation model. You will be setting properties later, so you can simply click OK in the dialog box to acknowledge this information.

Note: FLUENT will automatically enable the energy calculation when you enable a radiation model, so you need not visit the Energy panel.

Modeling Radiation and Natural Convection

3. Add the effect of gravity on the model.

Convection 3. Add the effect of gravity on the model. Define −→ Operating Conditions (a) Turn

Define −→ Operating Conditions

gravity on the model. Define −→ Operating Conditions (a) Turn on Gravity . The panel will

(a)

Turn on Gravity.

The panel will expand to show additional inputs.

(b)

Set the Gravitational Acceleration in the Y direction to -6.94e-5 m/s 2 .

As mentioned earlier, the gravitational acceleration has been adjusted to yield the correct dimensionless quantities (Prandtl, Rayleigh, and Planck numbers). See Figure 5.1 and the asso- ciated comments.

(c)

Set the Operating Temperature to 1000 K.

The operating temperature will be used by the Boussinesq model, which you will enable in the next step.

Modeling Radiation and Natural Convection

Step 3: Materials

The default fluid material is air, which is the working fluid in this prob- lem. However, since you are working with a fictitious fluid whose prop- erties have been adjusted to give the desired values of the dimensionless parameters, you must change the default properties for air. You will use an optical thickness aL of 0.2 for this calculation. (Since L = 1, the ab- sorption coefficient a will be set to 0.2.) Later in the tutorial, results for an optically thick medium with aL = 5 and non-participating medium with aL = 0 are computed to show how the different radiation models behave for different optical thicknesses.

radiation models behave for different optical thicknesses. Define −→ Materials 5-10 c Fluent Inc. November

Define −→ Materials

models behave for different optical thicknesses. Define −→ Materials 5-10 c Fluent Inc. November 29, 2001

Modeling Radiation and Natural Convection

1. Select boussinesq in the drop-down list next to Density, and then set the Density to 1000 kg/m 3 .

For details about the Boussinesq model, see the User’s Guide.

2. Set the specific heat, Cp, to 1.103e4 J/kg-K.

3. Set the Thermal Conductivity to 15.309 W/m-K.

4. Set the Viscosity to 0.001 kg/m-s.

5. Set the

Absorption Coefficient to 0.2 m 1 .

Hint: Use the scroll bar to access the properties that are not ini- tially visible in the panel.

6. Keep the default settings for the Scattering Coefficient and the Scat- tering Phase Function, since there is no scattering in this problem.

7. Set the Thermal Expansion Coefficient (used by the Boussinesq model) to 1e-5 K 1 .

8. Click on Change/Create and close the Materials panel.

Modeling Radiation and Natural Convection

Step 4: Boundary Conditions

Radiation and Natural Convection Step 4: Boundary Conditions Define −→ Boundary Conditions 1. Set the boundary

Define −→ Boundary Conditions

1. Set the boundary conditions for the bottom wall (wall-4.006).

Note: The bottom wall should be called wall-4.006, but to be sure that you have the correct wall, use your right mouse button to click on the bottom wall in the graphics window. When you do this, the corresponding zone will be selected automatically in the Zone list in the Boundary Conditions panel. You can do this when you set boundary conditions for the other walls as well, to be sure that you are defining the correct conditions.

to be sure that you are defining the correct conditions. (a) Change the Zone Name to

(a)

Change the Zone Name to bottom.

(b)

Retain the default thermal conditions (heat flux of 0) to spec- ify an adiabatic wall.

Modeling Radiation and Natural Convection

Note: The Rosseland model does not require you to set a wall emissivity. Later in the tutorial, you will need to define the wall emissivity for the other radiation models.

2. Set the boundary conditions for the left wall, wall-4.

(a)

Change the Zone Name to left.

(b)

Select Temperature under Thermal Conditions and set the Tem- perature to 1000 K.

3. Set the boundary conditions for the right wall, wall-4:007.

(a)

Change the Zone Name to right.

(b)

Select Temperature under Thermal Conditions and set the Tem- perature to 2000 K.

4. Set the boundary conditions for the top wall, wall-4:005.

(a)

Change the Zone Name to top.

(b)

Retain the default thermal conditions (heat flux of 0) to spec- ify an adiabatic wall.

Modeling Radiation and Natural Convection

Step 5: Solution for the Rosseland Model

1. Set the parameters that control the solution.

Model 1. Set the parameters that control the solution. Solve −→ Controls −→ Solution (a) Retain
Model 1. Set the parameters that control the solution. Solve −→ Controls −→ Solution (a) Retain

Solve −→ Controls −→ Solution

the solution. Solve −→ Controls −→ Solution (a) Retain the default selected Equations (all of them)

(a)

Retain the default selected Equations (all of them) and Under- Relaxation Factors.

(b)

Under Discretization, select PRESTO! for Pressure, and Second Order Upwind for Momentum and Energy.

Modeling Radiation and Natural Convection

2. Initialize the flow field. Solve −→ Initialize −→ Initialize

flow field. Solve −→ Initialize −→ Initialize (a) Set the Temperature to 1500 K and click
flow field. Solve −→ Initialize −→ Initialize (a) Set the Temperature to 1500 K and click
flow field. Solve −→ Initialize −→ Initialize (a) Set the Temperature to 1500 K and click

(a) Set the Temperature to 1500 K and click on Init.

Modeling Radiation and Natural Convection

3. Enable the plotting of residuals during the calculation.

3. Enable the plotting of residuals during the calculation. Solve −→ Monitors −→ Residual (a) Under
3. Enable the plotting of residuals during the calculation. Solve −→ Monitors −→ Residual (a) Under

Solve −→ Monitors −→ Residual

the calculation. Solve −→ Monitors −→ Residual (a) Under Options , select Plot . (b) Click

(a)

Under Options, select Plot.

(b)

Click OK.

Note: There is no extra residual for the radiation heat transfer because the Rosseland model does not solve extra transport equations for radiation; instead, it augments the thermal con- ductivity in the energy equation. When you use the P-1 and DO radiation models, which both solve additional transport equations, you will see additional residuals for radiation.

Modeling Radiation and Natural Convection

4. Save the case file (rad ross.cas).

Natural Convection 4. Save the case file ( rad ross.cas ). File −→ Write −→ Case
Natural Convection 4. Save the case file ( rad ross.cas ). File −→ Write −→ Case

File −→ Write −→ Case

5. Start the calculation by requesting 200 iterations. Solve −→ Iterate The solution will converge in about 180 iterations.

Iterate The solution will converge in about 180 iterations. 6. Save the data file ( rad

6. Save the data file (rad ross.dat).

180 iterations. 6. Save the data file ( rad ross.dat ). File −→ Write −→ Data
180 iterations. 6. Save the data file ( rad ross.dat ). File −→ Write −→ Data

File −→ Write −→ Data

Modeling Radiation and Natural Convection

Step 6: Postprocessing for the Rosseland Model

1. Display velocity vectors (Figure 5.3). Display −→ Vectors

Model 1. Display velocity vectors (Figure 5.3). Display −→ Vectors 5-18 c Fluent Inc. November 29,
Model 1. Display velocity vectors (Figure 5.3). Display −→ Vectors 5-18 c Fluent Inc. November 29,

Modeling Radiation and Natural Convection

2.11e-04

1.90e-04

2.11e-04 1.90e-04 1.68e-04 1.47e-04 1.26e-04 1.05e-04 8.42e-05 6.32e-05 4.21e-05 2.11e-05 2.61e-09

1.68e-04

2.11e-04 1.90e-04 1.68e-04 1.47e-04 1.26e-04 1.05e-04 8.42e-05 6.32e-05 4.21e-05 2.11e-05 2.61e-09

1.47e-04

2.11e-04 1.90e-04 1.68e-04 1.47e-04 1.26e-04 1.05e-04 8.42e-05 6.32e-05 4.21e-05 2.11e-05 2.61e-09

1.26e-04

2.11e-04 1.90e-04 1.68e-04 1.47e-04 1.26e-04 1.05e-04 8.42e-05 6.32e-05 4.21e-05 2.11e-05 2.61e-09

1.05e-04

2.11e-04 1.90e-04 1.68e-04 1.47e-04 1.26e-04 1.05e-04 8.42e-05 6.32e-05 4.21e-05 2.11e-05 2.61e-09

8.42e-05

2.11e-04 1.90e-04 1.68e-04 1.47e-04 1.26e-04 1.05e-04 8.42e-05 6.32e-05 4.21e-05 2.11e-05 2.61e-09

6.32e-05

2.11e-04 1.90e-04 1.68e-04 1.47e-04 1.26e-04 1.05e-04 8.42e-05 6.32e-05 4.21e-05 2.11e-05 2.61e-09

4.21e-05

2.11e-04 1.90e-04 1.68e-04 1.47e-04 1.26e-04 1.05e-04 8.42e-05 6.32e-05 4.21e-05 2.11e-05 2.61e-09

2.11e-05

2.11e-04 1.90e-04 1.68e-04 1.47e-04 1.26e-04 1.05e-04 8.42e-05 6.32e-05 4.21e-05 2.11e-05 2.61e-09

2.61e-09

1.68e-04 1.47e-04 1.26e-04 1.05e-04 8.42e-05 6.32e-05 4.21e-05 2.11e-05 2.61e-09

Velocity Vectors Colored By Velocity Magnitude (m/s)

Jul 25, 2001 FLUENT 6.0 (2d, segregated, lam)

Figure 5.3: Velocity Vectors for the Rosseland Model

Modeling Radiation and Natural Convection

2. Display contours of stream function (Figure 5.4).

2. Display contours of stream function (Figure 5.4). Display −→ Contours The recirculatory patterns

Display −→ Contours

of stream function (Figure 5.4). Display −→ Contours The recirculatory patterns observed are due to the

The recirculatory patterns observed are due to the natural convec- tion in the box. At a low optical thickness (0.2), radiation should not have a large influence on the flow. The flow pattern is ex- pected to be similar to that obtained with no radiation (Figure 5.5). However, the Rosseland model predicts a flow pattern that is very symmetric (Figure 5.4), and quite different from the pure natu- ral convection case. This discrepancy occurs because the Rosseland model is not appropriate for small optical thickness.

Modeling Radiation and Natural Convection

6.95e-02

6.26e-02

6.95e-02 6.26e-02 5.56e-02 4.87e-02 4.17e-02 3.48e-02 2.78e-02 2.09e-02 1.39e-02 6.95e-03 0.00e+00

5.56e-02

6.95e-02 6.26e-02 5.56e-02 4.87e-02 4.17e-02 3.48e-02 2.78e-02 2.09e-02 1.39e-02 6.95e-03 0.00e+00

4.87e-02

6.95e-02 6.26e-02 5.56e-02 4.87e-02 4.17e-02 3.48e-02 2.78e-02 2.09e-02 1.39e-02 6.95e-03 0.00e+00

4.17e-02

6.95e-02 6.26e-02 5.56e-02 4.87e-02 4.17e-02 3.48e-02 2.78e-02 2.09e-02 1.39e-02 6.95e-03 0.00e+00

3.48e-02

6.95e-02 6.26e-02 5.56e-02 4.87e-02 4.17e-02 3.48e-02 2.78e-02 2.09e-02 1.39e-02 6.95e-03 0.00e+00

2.78e-02

6.95e-02 6.26e-02 5.56e-02 4.87e-02 4.17e-02 3.48e-02 2.78e-02 2.09e-02 1.39e-02 6.95e-03 0.00e+00

2.09e-02

6.95e-02 6.26e-02 5.56e-02 4.87e-02 4.17e-02 3.48e-02 2.78e-02 2.09e-02 1.39e-02 6.95e-03 0.00e+00

1.39e-02

6.95e-02 6.26e-02 5.56e-02 4.87e-02 4.17e-02 3.48e-02 2.78e-02 2.09e-02 1.39e-02 6.95e-03 0.00e+00

6.95e-03

6.95e-02 6.26e-02 5.56e-02 4.87e-02 4.17e-02 3.48e-02 2.78e-02 2.09e-02 1.39e-02 6.95e-03 0.00e+00

0.00e+00

5.56e-02 4.87e-02 4.17e-02 3.48e-02 2.78e-02 2.09e-02 1.39e-02 6.95e-03 0.00e+00

Contours of Stream Function (kg/s)

Jul 25, 2001 FLUENT 6.0 (2d, segregated, lam)

Figure 5.4: Contours of Stream Function for the Rosseland Model

Extra: If you want to compute the results without radiation your- self, turn off all the radiation models in the Radiation Model panel, set the under-relaxation factor for energy to 0.8, and calculate until convergence. (Remember to reset the under- relaxation factor to 1 before continuing with the tutorial).

Modeling Radiation and Natural Convection

1.97e-02

1.77e-02

1.97e-02 1.77e-02 1.57e-02 1.38e-02 1.18e-02 9.84e-03 7.87e-03 5.90e-03 3.94e-03 1.97e-03 0.00e+00

1.57e-02

1.97e-02 1.77e-02 1.57e-02 1.38e-02 1.18e-02 9.84e-03 7.87e-03 5.90e-03 3.94e-03 1.97e-03 0.00e+00

1.38e-02

1.97e-02 1.77e-02 1.57e-02 1.38e-02 1.18e-02 9.84e-03 7.87e-03 5.90e-03 3.94e-03 1.97e-03 0.00e+00

1.18e-02

1.97e-02 1.77e-02 1.57e-02 1.38e-02 1.18e-02 9.84e-03 7.87e-03 5.90e-03 3.94e-03 1.97e-03 0.00e+00

9.84e-03

1.97e-02 1.77e-02 1.57e-02 1.38e-02 1.18e-02 9.84e-03 7.87e-03 5.90e-03 3.94e-03 1.97e-03 0.00e+00

7.87e-03

1.97e-02 1.77e-02 1.57e-02 1.38e-02 1.18e-02 9.84e-03 7.87e-03 5.90e-03 3.94e-03 1.97e-03 0.00e+00

5.90e-03

1.97e-02 1.77e-02 1.57e-02 1.38e-02 1.18e-02 9.84e-03 7.87e-03 5.90e-03 3.94e-03 1.97e-03 0.00e+00

3.94e-03

1.97e-02 1.77e-02 1.57e-02 1.38e-02 1.18e-02 9.84e-03 7.87e-03 5.90e-03 3.94e-03 1.97e-03 0.00e+00

1.97e-03

1.97e-02 1.77e-02 1.57e-02 1.38e-02 1.18e-02 9.84e-03 7.87e-03 5.90e-03 3.94e-03 1.97e-03 0.00e+00

0.00e+00

1.57e-02 1.38e-02 1.18e-02 9.84e-03 7.87e-03 5.90e-03 3.94e-03 1.97e-03 0.00e+00

Contours of Stream Function (kg/s)

Jul 25, 2001 FLUENT 6.0 (2d, segregated, lam)

Figure 5.5: Contours of Stream Function with No Radiation

Modeling Radiation and Natural Convection

3. Display filled contours of temperature (Figure 5.6).

3. Display filled contours of temperature (Figure 5.6). Display −→ Contours The Rosseland model predicts a

Display −→ Contours

of temperature (Figure 5.6). Display −→ Contours The Rosseland model predicts a temperature field (Figure

The Rosseland model predicts a temperature field (Figure 5.6) very different from that obtained without radiation (Figure 5.7). For the low optical thickness in this problem, the temperature field predicted by the Rosseland model is not physical.

Modeling Radiation and Natural Convection

2.00e+03 1.90e+03 1.80e+03 1.70e+03 1.60e+03 1.50e+03 1.40e+03 1.30e+03 1.20e+03 1.10e+03 1.00e+03 Contours of
2.00e+03
1.90e+03
1.80e+03
1.70e+03
1.60e+03
1.50e+03
1.40e+03
1.30e+03
1.20e+03
1.10e+03
1.00e+03
Contours of Static Temperature (k)
Jul 26, 2001
FLUENT 6.0 (2d, segregated, lam)
Figure 5.6: Contours of Temperature for the Rosseland Model
2.00e+03 1.90e+03 1.80e+03 1.70e+03 1.60e+03 1.50e+03 1.40e+03 1.30e+03 1.20e+03 1.10e+03 1.00e+03 Contours of
2.00e+03
1.90e+03
1.80e+03
1.70e+03
1.60e+03
1.50e+03
1.40e+03
1.30e+03
1.20e+03
1.10e+03
1.00e+03
Contours of Static Temperature (k)
Nov 28, 2001
FLUENT 6.0 (2d, segregated, lam)

Figure 5.7: Contours of Temperature with No Radiation

Modeling Radiation and Natural Convection

4. Plot the y velocity along the horizontal centerline of the box.

(a) Create an isosurface at y = 0.5, the horizontal line through the center of the box.

= 0 . 5, the horizontal line through the center of the box. Surface −→ Iso-Surface

Surface −→Iso-Surface

through the center of the box. Surface −→ Iso-Surface i. Select Grid in the Surface of

i. Select Grid

in the Surface of Constant drop-down list

and select Y-Coordinate from the list below.

ii. Click on Compute to see the extents of the domain.

iii. Set a value of 0.5 in the Iso-Values field, and change the New Surface Name to y=0.5.

iv. Click on Create to create a surface at y = 0.5.

Modeling Radiation and Natural Convection

(b) Create an XY plot of y velocity on the isosurface.

(b) Create an XY plot of y velocity on the isosurface. Plot −→ XY Plot i.

Plot −→ XY Plot

of y velocity on the isosurface. Plot −→ XY Plot i. Check that the Plot Direction

i. Check that the Plot Direction for X is 1, and the Plot Direction for Y is 0.

With a Plot Direction vector of (1,0), FLUENT will plot the selected variable as a function of x. Since you are plotting the velocity profile on a cross-section of constant y, the x direction is the one in which the velocity varies.

ii. Select Velocity

and Y Velocity under Y Axis Function.

iii. Select y=0.5 in the Surfaces list.

iv. Click on Plot.

Modeling Radiation and Natural Convection

y=0.5 2.50e-04 2.00e-04 1.50e-04 1.00e-04 5.00e-05 Y 0.00e+00 Velocity -5.00e-05 (m/s) -1.00e-04 -1.50e-04
y=0.5
2.50e-04
2.00e-04
1.50e-04
1.00e-04
5.00e-05
Y
0.00e+00
Velocity
-5.00e-05
(m/s)
-1.00e-04
-1.50e-04
-2.00e-04
-2.50e-04
0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.6
0.7
0.8
0.9
1
Position (m)
Y Velocity
Jul 25, 2001
FLUENT 6.0 (2d, segregated, lam)

Figure 5.8: XY Plot of Centerline y Velocity for the Rosseland Model

The velocity profile reflects the rising plume at the hot right wall, and the falling plume at the cold left wall. Compared to the case with no radiation, the profile pre- dicted by the Rosseland model exhibits thicker wall layers. As discussed before, the expected profile for aL = 0.2 is similar to the case with no radiation.

(c) Save the plot data to a file.

i. Select the Write to File option, and click the Write button.

push

ii. In the resulting Select File dialog box, specify rad ross.xy in the XY File text entry box and click OK.

Modeling Radiation and Natural Convection

5. Compute the total wall heat flux on each lateral wall.

Report −→ Fluxes −→Fluxes

wall heat flux on each lateral wall. Report −→ Fluxes (a) Select Total Heat Transfer Rate

(a)

Select Total Heat Transfer Rate under Options.

(b)

Select right and left under Boundaries.

(c)

Click the Compute button.

The total wall heat transfer rate is reported for the hot and cold walls as approximately 7.43 × 10 5 W. The sum of the heat fluxes on the lateral walls is a negligible imbalance.

6. Save the case and data files (rad ross.cas and rad ross.dat).

case and data files ( rad ross.cas and rad ross.dat ). File −→ Write −→ Case
case and data files ( rad ross.cas and rad ross.dat ). File −→ Write −→ Case

File −→ Write −→ Case & Data

Thus far in this tutorial, you have learned how to set up a natural con- vection problem using the Rosseland model to compute radiation. You have also learned to postprocess the results. You will now turn on the P-1 model and compare the results so computed with those of the Rosse- land model.

Modeling Radiation and Natural Convection

Step 7: P-1 Model Definition, Solution, and Post- processing

You will now repeat the above calculation using the P-1 radiation model. The main steps are identical to the procedure described above for the Rosseland model.

1. Enable the P-1 model.

above for the Rosseland model. 1. Enable the P-1 model. Define −→ Models −→ Radiation 2.
above for the Rosseland model. 1. Enable the P-1 model. Define −→ Models −→ Radiation 2.

Define −→ Models −→ Radiation

2. Confirm that the wall emissivity is 1 for all walls.

Define −→ Boundary Conditions −→ Boundary Conditions

For each wall boundary, there will be a new entry, Internal Emis- sivity, in the Thermal section of the Wall panel. Retain the default value of 1.

3. Modify the under-relaxation parameters.

value of 1. 3. Modify the under-relaxation parameters. Solve −→ Controls −→ Solution (a) Under
value of 1. 3. Modify the under-relaxation parameters. Solve −→ Controls −→ Solution (a) Under

Solve −→ Controls −→ Solution

(a) Under Under-Relaxation Factors, set the factor for P1 to 1.0, and retain the default factors for Pressure, Momentum, and Energy (0.3, 0.7, and 1.0).

Note that an additional equation, P1, appears because the P-1 model solves an additional radiation transport equation. This problem is relatively easy to converge for the P-1 model since there is not much coupling between the radiation and tempera- ture equations at low optical thicknesses. Consequently a high under-relaxation factor can be used for P-1.

4. Save the case file (rad p1.cas).

can be used for P-1. 4. Save the case file ( rad p1.cas ). File −→
can be used for P-1. 4. Save the case file ( rad p1.cas ). File −→

File −→ Write −→ Case

5. Continue the calculation by requesting another 200 iterations.

the calculation by requesting another 200 iterations. Solve −→ Iterate The P-1 model reaches convergence

Solve −→ Iterate

The P-1 model reaches convergence after about 115 additional it- erations.

Modeling Radiation and Natural Convection

6. Save the data file (rad p1.dat).

Natural Convection 6. Save the data file ( rad p1.dat ). File −→ Write −→ Data
Natural Convection 6. Save the data file ( rad p1.dat ). File −→ Write −→ Data

File −→ Write −→ Data

7. Examine the results of the P-1 model calculation.

Note: The steps below do not include detailed instructions because the procedure is the same one that you followed for the Rosse- land model postprocessing. See Step 6: Postprocessing for the Rosseland Model if you need more detailed instruc- tions.

(a) Display velocity vectors (Figure 5.9).

Display −→ Vectors −→ Vectors

2.87e-04

2.58e-04

2.87e-04 2.58e-04 2.29e-04 2.01e-04 1.72e-04 1.43e-04 1.15e-04 8.61e-05 5.75e-05 2.89e-05 2.27e-07

2.29e-04

2.87e-04 2.58e-04 2.29e-04 2.01e-04 1.72e-04 1.43e-04 1.15e-04 8.61e-05 5.75e-05 2.89e-05 2.27e-07

2.01e-04

2.87e-04 2.58e-04 2.29e-04 2.01e-04 1.72e-04 1.43e-04 1.15e-04 8.61e-05 5.75e-05 2.89e-05 2.27e-07

1.72e-04

2.87e-04 2.58e-04 2.29e-04 2.01e-04 1.72e-04 1.43e-04 1.15e-04 8.61e-05 5.75e-05 2.89e-05 2.27e-07

1.43e-04

2.87e-04 2.58e-04 2.29e-04 2.01e-04 1.72e-04 1.43e-04 1.15e-04 8.61e-05 5.75e-05 2.89e-05 2.27e-07

1.15e-04

2.87e-04 2.58e-04 2.29e-04 2.01e-04 1.72e-04 1.43e-04 1.15e-04 8.61e-05 5.75e-05 2.89e-05 2.27e-07

8.61e-05

2.87e-04 2.58e-04 2.29e-04 2.01e-04 1.72e-04 1.43e-04 1.15e-04 8.61e-05 5.75e-05 2.89e-05 2.27e-07

5.75e-05

2.87e-04 2.58e-04 2.29e-04 2.01e-04 1.72e-04 1.43e-04 1.15e-04 8.61e-05 5.75e-05 2.89e-05 2.27e-07

2.89e-05

2.87e-04 2.58e-04 2.29e-04 2.01e-04 1.72e-04 1.43e-04 1.15e-04 8.61e-05 5.75e-05 2.89e-05 2.27e-07

2.27e-07

2.29e-04 2.01e-04 1.72e-04 1.43e-04 1.15e-04 8.61e-05 5.75e-05 2.89e-05 2.27e-07

Velocity Vectors Colored By Velocity Magnitude (m/s)

Jul 26, 2001 FLUENT 6.0 (2d, segregated, lam)

Figure 5.9: Velocity Vectors for the P-1 Model

(b)

Plot the y velocity along the horizontal centerline (Figure 5.10), and save the plot data to a file called rad p1.xy.

Plot −→ XY Plot −→ XY Plot

! You will need to reselect Y Velocity under Y Axis Function. Also, remember to turn off the Write to File option so that you can access the Plot button to generate the plot.

Modeling Radiation and Natural Convection

y=0.5 2.50e-04 2.00e-04 1.50e-04 1.00e-04 5.00e-05 0.00e+00 Y Velocity -5.00e-05 (m/s) -1.00e-04 -1.50e-04
y=0.5
2.50e-04
2.00e-04
1.50e-04
1.00e-04
5.00e-05
0.00e+00
Y
Velocity
-5.00e-05
(m/s)
-1.00e-04
-1.50e-04
-2.00e-04
-2.50e-04
-3.00e-04
0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.6
0.7
0.8
0.9
1
Position (m)
Y Velocity
Jul 26, 2001
FLUENT 6.0 (2d, segregated, lam)

Figure 5.10: XY Plot of Centerline y Velocity for the P-1 Model

(c) Compute the total wall heat transfer rate.

the P-1 Model (c) Compute the total wall heat transfer rate. Report −→ Fluxes The total

Report −→Fluxes

The total heat transfer rate reported on the right wall is 8.47× 10 5 W. The heat imbalance at the lateral walls is negligibly small. You will see later that the Rosseland and P-1 wall heat transfer rates are substantially different from those obtained by the DTRM and the DO model.

Notice how different the velocity vectors and y-velocity profile are from those obtained using the Rosseland model. The P-1 velocity profiles show a clear momentum boundary layer along the hot and cold walls. These profiles are much closer to those obtained from the non-radiating case (Figures 5.11 and 5.12). Though the P-1 model is not appropriate for this optically thin limit, it yields the correct velocity profiles since the radiation source in the energy equation, which is proportional to the ab- sorption coefficient, is small. The Rosseland model uses an effective conductivity to account for radiation, and yields the wrong temperature field, which in turn results in an erroneous velocity field.

Modeling Radiation and Natural Convection

2.16e-04

1.94e-04

2.16e-04 1.94e-04 1.73e-04 1.51e-04 1.29e-04 1.08e-04 8.63e-05 6.47e-05 4.31e-05 2.16e-05 8.78e-09

1.73e-04

2.16e-04 1.94e-04 1.73e-04 1.51e-04 1.29e-04 1.08e-04 8.63e-05 6.47e-05 4.31e-05 2.16e-05 8.78e-09

1.51e-04

2.16e-04 1.94e-04 1.73e-04 1.51e-04 1.29e-04 1.08e-04 8.63e-05 6.47e-05 4.31e-05 2.16e-05 8.78e-09

1.29e-04

2.16e-04 1.94e-04 1.73e-04 1.51e-04 1.29e-04 1.08e-04 8.63e-05 6.47e-05 4.31e-05 2.16e-05 8.78e-09

1.08e-04

2.16e-04 1.94e-04 1.73e-04 1.51e-04 1.29e-04 1.08e-04 8.63e-05 6.47e-05 4.31e-05 2.16e-05 8.78e-09

8.63e-05

2.16e-04 1.94e-04 1.73e-04 1.51e-04 1.29e-04 1.08e-04 8.63e-05 6.47e-05 4.31e-05 2.16e-05 8.78e-09

6.47e-05

2.16e-04 1.94e-04 1.73e-04 1.51e-04 1.29e-04 1.08e-04 8.63e-05 6.47e-05 4.31e-05 2.16e-05 8.78e-09

4.31e-05

2.16e-04 1.94e-04 1.73e-04 1.51e-04 1.29e-04 1.08e-04 8.63e-05 6.47e-05 4.31e-05 2.16e-05 8.78e-09

2.16e-05

2.16e-04 1.94e-04 1.73e-04 1.51e-04 1.29e-04 1.08e-04 8.63e-05 6.47e-05 4.31e-05 2.16e-05 8.78e-09

8.78e-09

1.73e-04 1.51e-04 1.29e-04 1.08e-04 8.63e-05 6.47e-05 4.31e-05 2.16e-05 8.78e-09

Velocity Vectors Colored By Velocity Magnitude (m/s)

Jul 26, 2001 FLUENT 6.0 (2d, segregated, lam)

Figure 5.11: Velocity Vectors with No Radiation

y=0.5 2.50e-04 2.00e-04 1.50e-04 1.00e-04 5.00e-05 Y 0.00e+00 Velocity -5.00e-05 (m/s) -1.00e-04 -1.50e-04
y=0.5
2.50e-04
2.00e-04
1.50e-04
1.00e-04
5.00e-05
Y
0.00e+00
Velocity
-5.00e-05
(m/s)
-1.00e-04
-1.50e-04
-2.00e-04
-2.50e-04
0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.6
0.7
0.8
0.9
1
Position (m)
Y Velocity
Jul 26, 2001
FLUENT 6.0 (2d, segregated, lam)

Figure 5.12: XY Plot of Centerline y Velocity with No Radiation

Modeling Radiation and Natural Convection

Step 8: DTRM Definition, Solution, and Post- processing

1. Turn on the discrete transfer radiation model (DTRM) and define the ray tracing.

transfer radiation model (DTRM) and define the ray tracing. Define −→ Models −→ Radiation (a) Select
transfer radiation model (DTRM) and define the ray tracing. Define −→ Models −→ Radiation (a) Select

Define −→ Models −→ Radiation

the ray tracing. Define −→ Models −→ Radiation (a) Select Discrete Transfer under Model . The

(a) Select Discrete Transfer under Model.

The panel will expand to show additional inputs.

Modeling Radiation and Natural Convection

(b) Accept the defaults by clicking OK.

The Ray Tracing panel will open automatically.

OK . The Ray Tracing panel will open automatically. (c) Accept the default settings for Clustering

(c)

Accept the default settings for Clustering and Angular Dis- cretization by clicking OK.

When you click OK, FLUENT will open a Select File dialog box so you can specify a name for the ray file used by the DTRM. A detailed description of the ray tracing procedure can be found in the User’s Guide. In brief, the number of Cells Per Volume Cluster and Faces Per Surface Cluster control the total number of radiating surfaces and absorbing cells. For a small 2D problem, the default number of 1 is acceptable. For a large problem, however, you will want to increase these numbers to reduce the ray tracing expense. The Theta Divisions and Phi Divisions control the number of rays being created from each surface cluster. For most practical problems, the default settings will suffice.

(d)

In the Ray File text entry box in the Select File dialog box, enter rad dtrm.ray for the name of the ray file. Then click OK.

FLUENT will print an informational message describing the progress of the ray tracing procedure.

Modeling Radiation and Natural Convection

2. Retain the current under-relaxation factors for pressure, momen- tum, and energy (0.3, 0.7, and 1.0).

for pressure, momen- tum, and energy (0.3, 0.7, and 1.0). Solve −→ Controls −→ Solution 3.
for pressure, momen- tum, and energy (0.3, 0.7, and 1.0). Solve −→ Controls −→ Solution 3.

Solve −→ Controls −→ Solution

3. Save the case file (rad dtrm.cas).

−→ Solution 3. Save the case file ( rad dtrm.cas ). File −→ Write −→ Case
−→ Solution 3. Save the case file ( rad dtrm.cas ). File −→ Write −→ Case

File −→ Write −→ Case

4. Continue the calculation by requesting another 100 iterations.

the calculation by requesting another 100 iterations. Solve −→ Iterate The solution will converge after

Solve −→ Iterate

The solution will converge after about 80 additional iterations.

5. Save the data file (rad dtrm.dat).

iterations. 5. Save the data file ( rad dtrm.dat ). File −→ Write −→ Data 6.
iterations. 5. Save the data file ( rad dtrm.dat ). File −→ Write −→ Data 6.

File −→ Write −→ Data

6. Examine the results of the DTRM calculation.

Note: The steps below do not include detailed instructions because the procedure is the same one that you followed for the Rosse- land model postprocessing. See Step 6: Postprocessing for the Rosseland Model if you need more detailed instruc- tions.

(a) Display velocity vectors (Figure 5.13).

instruc- tions. (a) Display velocity vectors (Figure 5.13). Display −→ Vectors c Fluent Inc. November 29,

Display −→ Vectors

Modeling Radiation and Natural Convection

2.88e-04

2.59e-04

2.88e-04 2.59e-04 2.30e-04 2.02e-04 1.73e-04 1.44e-04 1.15e-04 8.65e-05 5.77e-05 2.90e-05 2.08e-07

2.30e-04

2.88e-04 2.59e-04 2.30e-04 2.02e-04 1.73e-04 1.44e-04 1.15e-04 8.65e-05 5.77e-05 2.90e-05 2.08e-07

2.02e-04

2.88e-04 2.59e-04 2.30e-04 2.02e-04 1.73e-04 1.44e-04 1.15e-04 8.65e-05 5.77e-05 2.90e-05 2.08e-07

1.73e-04

2.88e-04 2.59e-04 2.30e-04 2.02e-04 1.73e-04 1.44e-04 1.15e-04 8.65e-05 5.77e-05 2.90e-05 2.08e-07

1.44e-04

2.88e-04 2.59e-04 2.30e-04 2.02e-04 1.73e-04 1.44e-04 1.15e-04 8.65e-05 5.77e-05 2.90e-05 2.08e-07

1.15e-04

2.88e-04 2.59e-04 2.30e-04 2.02e-04 1.73e-04 1.44e-04 1.15e-04 8.65e-05 5.77e-05 2.90e-05 2.08e-07

8.65e-05

2.88e-04 2.59e-04 2.30e-04 2.02e-04 1.73e-04 1.44e-04 1.15e-04 8.65e-05 5.77e-05 2.90e-05 2.08e-07

5.77e-05

2.88e-04 2.59e-04 2.30e-04 2.02e-04 1.73e-04 1.44e-04 1.15e-04 8.65e-05 5.77e-05 2.90e-05 2.08e-07

2.90e-05

2.88e-04 2.59e-04 2.30e-04 2.02e-04 1.73e-04 1.44e-04 1.15e-04 8.65e-05 5.77e-05 2.90e-05 2.08e-07

2.08e-07

2.30e-04 2.02e-04 1.73e-04 1.44e-04 1.15e-04 8.65e-05 5.77e-05 2.90e-05 2.08e-07

Velocity Vectors Colored By Velocity Magnitude (m/s)

Jul 26, 2001 FLUENT 6.0 (2d, segregated, lam)

Figure 5.13: Velocity Vectors for the DTRM

Modeling Radiation and Natural Convection

(b) Plot the y velocity along the horizontal centerline (Figure 5.14), and save the plot data to a file called rad dtrm.xy.

Plot −→ XY Plot −→ XY Plot

! You will need to reselect Y Velocity under Y Axis Function. Also, remember to turn off the Write to File option so that you can access the Plot button to generate the plot.

y=0.5 2.50e-04 2.00e-04 1.50e-04 1.00e-04 5.00e-05 0.00e+00 Y Velocity -5.00e-05 (m/s) -1.00e-04 -1.50e-04
y=0.5
2.50e-04
2.00e-04
1.50e-04
1.00e-04
5.00e-05
0.00e+00
Y
Velocity
-5.00e-05
(m/s)
-1.00e-04
-1.50e-04
-2.00e-04
-2.50e-04
-3.00e-04
0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.6
0.7
0.8
0.9
1
Position (m)
Y Velocity
Jul 26, 2001
FLUENT 6.0 (2d, segregated, lam)

Figure 5.14: XY Plot of Centerline y Velocity for the DTRM

(c) Compute the total wall heat transfer rate.

Report −→ Fluxes −→Fluxes

The total heat transfer rate reported on the right wall is 6.06× 10 5 W. Note that this is substantially lower than the values predicted by the Rosseland and P-1 models.

Modeling Radiation and Natural Convection

Step 9: DO Model Definition, Solution, and Post- processing

1. Turn on the discrete ordinates (DO) radiation model and define the angular discretization.

(DO) radiation model and define the angular discretization. Define −→ Models −→ Radiation (a) Select
(DO) radiation model and define the angular discretization. Define −→ Models −→ Radiation (a) Select

Define −→ Models −→ Radiation

discretization. Define −→ Models −→ Radiation (a) Select Discrete Ordinates under Model . The

(a)

Select Discrete Ordinates under Model.

The panel will expand to show additional inputs for the DO model.

(b)

Set the number of Flow Iterations Per Radiation Iteration to 1.

This is a relatively simple flow problem, and will converge easily. Consequently it is useful to do the DO calculation every iteration of the flow solution. For problems that are difficult to

Modeling Radiation and Natural Convection

converge, it is sometimes useful to allow the flow solution to establish itself between radiation calculations. In such cases, it may be useful to set Flow Iterations Per Radiation Iteration to a higher value, such as 10.

(c) Retain the default settings for Angular Discretization and Non- Gray Model.

For details about the angular discretization used by the DO model, see the User’s Guide. The Number of Bands for the Non-Gray Model is zero because only gray radiation is being modeled in this tutorial.

Note: When you click OK in the Radiation Model panel, FLU- ENT will present an Information dialog box telling you that new material properties have been added for the radiation model. The property that is new for the DO model is the refractive index, which is relevant only when you are mod- eling semi-transparent media. Since you are not modeling semi-transparent media here, you can simply click OK in the dialog box to acknowledge this information.

2. Retain the current under-relaxation factors for pressure, momen- tum, and energy (0.3, 0.7, and 1.0), as well as the default under- relaxation of 1 for the discrete ordinates transport equation.

of 1 for the discrete ordinates transport equation. Solve −→ Controls −→ Solution 3. Save the
of 1 for the discrete ordinates transport equation. Solve −→ Controls −→ Solution 3. Save the

Solve −→ Controls −→ Solution

3. Save the case file (rad do.cas).

−→ Solution 3. Save the case file ( rad do.cas ). File −→ Write −→ Case
−→ Solution 3. Save the case file ( rad do.cas ). File −→ Write −→ Case

File −→ Write −→ Case

4. Continue the calculation by requesting another 100 iterations.

the calculation by requesting another 100 iterations. Solve −→ Iterate The solution will converge after

Solve −→ Iterate

The solution will converge after about 25 additional iterations.

5. Save the data file (rad do.dat).

iterations. 5. Save the data file ( rad do.dat ). File −→ Write −→ Data c
iterations. 5. Save the data file ( rad do.dat ). File −→ Write −→ Data c

File −→ Write −→ Data

Modeling Radiation and Natural Convection

6. Examine the results of the DO calculation.

Note: The steps below do not include detailed instructions because the procedure is the same one that you followed for the Rosse- land model postprocessing. See Step 6: Postprocessing for the Rosseland Model if you need more detailed instruc- tions.

(a) Display velocity vectors (Figure 5.15).

instruc- tions. (a) Display velocity vectors (Figure 5.15). Display −→ Vectors 2.89e-04 2.61e-04 2.32e-04

Display −→ Vectors

2.89e-04

2.61e-04

2.89e-04 2.61e-04 2.32e-04 2.03e-04 1.74e-04 1.45e-04 1.16e-04 8.70e-05 5.80e-05 2.91e-05 1.91e-07

2.32e-04

2.89e-04 2.61e-04 2.32e-04 2.03e-04 1.74e-04 1.45e-04 1.16e-04 8.70e-05 5.80e-05 2.91e-05 1.91e-07

2.03e-04

2.89e-04 2.61e-04 2.32e-04 2.03e-04 1.74e-04 1.45e-04 1.16e-04 8.70e-05 5.80e-05 2.91e-05 1.91e-07

1.74e-04

2.89e-04 2.61e-04 2.32e-04 2.03e-04 1.74e-04 1.45e-04 1.16e-04 8.70e-05 5.80e-05 2.91e-05 1.91e-07

1.45e-04

2.89e-04 2.61e-04 2.32e-04 2.03e-04 1.74e-04 1.45e-04 1.16e-04 8.70e-05 5.80e-05 2.91e-05 1.91e-07

1.16e-04

2.89e-04 2.61e-04 2.32e-04 2.03e-04 1.74e-04 1.45e-04 1.16e-04 8.70e-05 5.80e-05 2.91e-05 1.91e-07

8.70e-05

2.89e-04 2.61e-04 2.32e-04 2.03e-04 1.74e-04 1.45e-04 1.16e-04 8.70e-05 5.80e-05 2.91e-05 1.91e-07

5.80e-05

2.89e-04 2.61e-04 2.32e-04 2.03e-04 1.74e-04 1.45e-04 1.16e-04 8.70e-05 5.80e-05 2.91e-05 1.91e-07

2.91e-05

2.89e-04 2.61e-04 2.32e-04 2.03e-04 1.74e-04 1.45e-04 1.16e-04 8.70e-05 5.80e-05 2.91e-05 1.91e-07

1.91e-07

2.32e-04 2.03e-04 1.74e-04 1.45e-04 1.16e-04 8.70e-05 5.80e-05 2.91e-05 1.91e-07

Velocity Vectors Colored By Velocity Magnitude (m/s)

Jul 26, 2001 FLUENT 6.0 (2d, segregated, lam)

Figure 5.15: Velocity Vectors for the DO Model

Modeling Radiation and Natural Convection

(b)

Plot the y velocity along the horizontal centerline (Figure 5.16), and save the plot data to a file called rad do.xy.

Plot −→ XY Plot −→ XY Plot

! You will need to reselect Y Velocity under Y Axis Function. Also, remember to turn off the Write to File option so that you can access the Plot button to generate the plot.

y=0.5 3.00e-04 2.00e-04 1.00e-04 Y 0.00e+00 Velocity (m/s) -1.00e-04 -2.00e-04 -3.00e-04 0 0.1 0.2 0.3
y=0.5
3.00e-04
2.00e-04
1.00e-04
Y
0.00e+00
Velocity
(m/s)
-1.00e-04
-2.00e-04
-3.00e-04
0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.6
0.7
0.8
0.9
1
Position (m)
Y Velocity
Jul 26, 2001
FLUENT 6.0 (2d, segregated, lam)

Figure 5.16: XY Plot of Centerline y Velocity for the DO Model

(c) Compute the total wall heat transfer rate.

Report −→ Fluxes −→Fluxes

The total heat transfer rate reported on the right wall is 6.12× 10 5 W. Note that this is about 1.5% higher than that predicted by the DTRM. The DO and DTRM values are comparable to each other, while the Rosseland and P-1 values are both substantially different. The DTRM and DO models are valid across the range of optical thickness, and the heat transfer rates computed using them are expected to be closer to the correct heat transfer rate.

Modeling Radiation and Natural Convection

Step 10: Comparison of y-Velocity Plots

In this step, you will read the plot files you saved for all the solutions and compare them in a single plot.

for all the solutions and compare them in a single plot. Plot −→ File 1. Read

Plot −→File

and compare them in a single plot. Plot −→ File 1. Read in all the XY

1. Read in all the XY plot files.

(a)

Click on the Add

button.

(b)

In the resulting Select File dialog box, select rad do.xy, rad dtrm.xy, rad p1.xy, and rad ross.xy in the Files list.

They will be added to the XY File(s) list. If you accidentally add an incorrect file, you can select it in this list and click Remove.

(c)

Click OK to load the 4 files.

2. Click on Plot.

Extra: You can click Curves

in the File XY Plot panel to open

the Curves panel, where you can define different styles for dif- ferent plot curves. In Figure 5.17, different symbols have been selected for each curve.

Modeling Radiation and Natural Convection

3. Resize and move the legend box so that you can read the informa- tion inside it.

(a) To resize the box, press any mouse button on a corner and drag the
(a)
To resize the box, press any mouse button on a corner and
drag the mouse to the desired position.
(b)
To move the legend box, press any mouse button anywhere
else on the box and drag it to the desired location.
Y Velocity
Y
Velocity
3.00e-04
Y
Velocity (rad_p1.xy)
Y
Velocity (rad_dtrm.xy)
2.00e-04
Y
Velocity (rad_do.xy)
1.00e-04
Y
0.00e+00
Velocity
-1.00e-04
-2.00e-04
-3.00e-04
0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.6
0.7
0.8
0.9
1
Position
Y Velocity
Jul 26, 2001
FLUENT 6.0 (2d, segregated, lam)

Figure 5.17: Comparison of Computed y Velocities for aL = 0.2

Notice in Figure 5.17 that the velocity profiles for the P-1 model, DTRM, and DO model are nearly identical even though the reported wall heat transfer rates are different. This is because in an optically thin problem, the velocity field is essentially independent of the radiation field, and all three models give a flow solution very close to the non-radiating case. The Rosseland model gives substantially erroneous solutions for an optically thin case.

Modeling Radiation and Natural Convection

Step 11: Comparison of Radiation Models for an Optically Thick Medium

In the previous steps, you compared the results of four radiation models for an optically thin (aL = 0.2) medium. It was found that, as a result of the low optical thickness, the velocity fields predicted by the P-1, DTRM, and DO models were very similar and close to that obtained in the non- radiating case. The wall heat transfer rates for DO and DTRM were very close to each other, and substantially different from those obtained with the Rosseland and P-1 models. In this step, you will recalculate a solution (using each radiation model) for an optically thick (aL = 5) medium. This is accomplished by increasing the value of the absorption coefficient from 0.2 to 5. You will repeat the process outlined below for each set of case and data files that you saved earlier in the tutorial.

1. For each radiation model, calculate a new solution for aL = 5.

(a)

Read in the case and data file saved earlier (e.g., rad ross.cas and rad ross.dat).

File −→ Read −→ Case & Data
File −→ Read −→ Case & Data

File −→ Read −→ Case & Data

(b)

Set the absorption coefficient to 5.

This will result in an optical thickness aL of 5, since L = 1.

Define −→ Materials

Define −→ Materials

(c)

Calculate until the new solution converges.

Solve −→ Iterate

Solve −→ Iterate

! For the DTRM calculation, you may need to click the It- erate button repeatedly until the radiation field is updated. Since the number of Flow Iterations Per Radiation Iteration in the Radiation Model panel is 10, it is possible that the radiation field will not be updated for as many as 9 iter- ations, although FLUENT will report that the solution is converged. If this happens, keep clicking the Iterate but- ton until the radiation field is updated and the solution proceeds for multiple iterations.

Modeling Radiation and Natural Convection

(d)

Save the new case and data files using a different file name (e.g., rad ros5.cas and rad ros5.dat).

File −→ Write −→ Case & Data
File −→ Write −→ Case & Data

File −→ Write −→ Case & Data

(e)

Compute the total wall heat transfer rate.

Report −→ Fluxes

Report −→Fluxes

(f)

Plot the y velocity along the horizontal centerline, and save the plot data to a file (e.g., rad ros5.xy).

Plot −→ XY Plot

Plot −→ XY Plot

2. Compare the computed heat transfer rates for the four models.

The wall heat transfer rates predicted by the four radiation models range from 3.50 × 10 5 to 3.97 × 10 5 W.

3. Compare the y-velocity profiles in a single plot (Figure 5.18).

the y -velocity profiles in a single plot (Figure 5.18). Plot −→ File Note: Use the

Plot −→ File

Note: Use the Delete button in the File XY Plot panel to remove the old XY plot data files.

The XY plots of y velocity are nearly identical for the P-1 model, DO model, and DTRM. The Rosseland model gives somewhat dif- ferent velocities, but is still within 10% of the other results. The Rosseland and P-1 models are suitable for the optically thick limit; the DTRM and DO models are valid across the range of optical thicknesses. Consequently, they yield similar answers at aL = 5. For many applications with large optical thicknesses, the Rosseland and P-1 models provide a simple low-cost alternative.

Modeling Radiation and Natural Convection

Y Velocity 5.00e-04 Y Velocity Y Velocity (rad_p15.xy) 4.00e-04 Y Velocity (rad_dtr5.xy) Y Velocity (rad_do5.xy)
Y Velocity
5.00e-04
Y
Velocity
Y
Velocity (rad_p15.xy)
4.00e-04
Y
Velocity (rad_dtr5.xy)
Y
Velocity (rad_do5.xy)
3.00e-04
2.00e-04
1.00e-04
Y
0.00e+00
Velocity
-1.00e-04
-2.00e-04
-3.00e-04
-4.00e-04
-5.00e-04
0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.6
0.7
0.8
0.9
1
Position
Y Velocity
Jul 26, 2001
FLUENT 6.0 (2d, segregated, lam)

Figure 5.18: Comparison of Computed y Velocities for aL = 5

Modeling Radiation and Natural Convection

Step 12: S2S Model Definition, Solution and Post- processing for a Non-Participating Medium

In the previous steps, you compared the results of four radiation models for optically thin (aL = 0.2) and optically thick (aL = 5) media. The surface-to-surface (S2S) radiation model cannot be used to model partic- ipating radiation problems, but it is suitable for modeling the enclosure radiative transfer without participating media. The S2S model assumes that all surfaces are gray and diffuse. Thus, according to the gray-body model, if a certain amount of radiation is incident on a surface, a frac- tion is reflected, a fraction is absorbed, and a fraction is transmitted.

For most applications the surfaces in question are opaque to thermal radiation (in the infrared spectrum), so the surfaces can be considered opaque. The transmissivity, therefore, can be neglected. Effectively, for the S2S model the absorption coefficient can be considered to be zero.

In this step, you will calculate a solution for aL = 0 using the S2S radiation model. In the next step, you will use the DTRM and DO models for aL = 0, and compare the results of the three models. The Rosseland and P-1 models are not considered here as they have been shown (earlier in the tutorial) to be inappropriate for optically thin media.

1. Turn on the surface-to-surface (S2S) radiation model and define the view factor and cluster parameters.

model and define the view factor and cluster parameters. Define −→ Models −→ Radiation c Fluent
model and define the view factor and cluster parameters. Define −→ Models −→ Radiation c Fluent

Define −→ Models −→ Radiation

Modeling Radiation and Natural Convection

(a) Select Surface to Surface under Model.

The panel will expand to show additional inputs for the S2S model.

Model . The panel will expand to show additional inputs for the S2S model. 5-48 c

Modeling Radiation and Natural Convection

(b) Set the view factor and cluster parameters.

i. Click Set

under Parameters.

The View Factor and Cluster Parameters panel will open automatically.

and Cluster Parameters panel will open automatically. ii. Click OK to accept the default settings. The

ii. Click OK to accept the default settings.

The S2S radiation model is computationally very expen- sive when there are a large number of radiating surfaces. The number of radiating surfaces is reduced by cluster- ing surfaces into surface “clusters”. The surface clusters are made by starting from a face and adding its neighbors and their neighbors until a specified number of faces per surface cluster is collected. For a small 2D problem, the default value of 1 for Faces Per Surface Cluster is accept- able. For a large problem, you can increase this number

Modeling Radiation and Natural Convection

to reduce the memory requirement for the view factor file that is saved in a later step. This may also lead to some reduction in the computational expense. However, this is at the cost of some accuracy.

Using the Blocking option ensures that any additional sur- face that is blocking the view between two opposite surfaces is considered in the view factor calculation. In this case, there is no obstructing surface between the opposite walls, so selecting either the Blocking or the Nonblocking op- tion will produce the same result. The default setting for Smoothing is None, which is appropriate for small prob- lems. The Least Square option is more accurate, but also more computationally expensive. See the User’s Guide for details about view factors and clusters for the S2S model.

(c) Compute the view factors for the S2S model.

This step is required only if the problem is being solved for the first time. For subsequent calculations, you can read the view factor and cluster information from an existing file (by

clicking Read

instead of Compute/Write

).

i. Click Compute/Write Model panel.

under Methods in the Radiation

FLUENT will open a Select File dialog box so you can spec- ify a name for the file where the cluster and view factor parameters are stored.

ii. In the S2S File text entry box in the Select File dialog box, enter rad s2s.s2s for the name of the S2S file. Then click OK.

FLUENT will print an informational message describing the progress of the view factor calculation.

Modeling Radiation and Natural Convection

2. Retain the current under-relaxation factors for pressure, momen- tum, and energy (0.3, 0.7, and 1.0).

for pressure, momen- tum, and energy (0.3, 0.7, and 1.0). Solve −→ Controls −→ Solution 3.
for pressure, momen- tum, and energy (0.3, 0.7, and 1.0). Solve −→ Controls −→ Solution 3.

Solve −→ Controls −→ Solution

3. Save the case file (rad s2s.cas).

−→ Solution 3. Save the case file ( rad s2s.cas ). File −→ Write −→ Case
−→ Solution 3. Save the case file ( rad s2s.cas ). File −→ Write −→ Case

File −→ Write −→ Case

4. Continue the calculation by requesting another 100 iterations.

the calculation by requesting another 100 iterations. Solve −→ Iterate The solution will converge after

Solve −→ Iterate

The solution will converge after about 80 additional iterations.

5. Save the data file (rad s2s.dat).

iterations. 5. Save the data file ( rad s2s.dat ). File −→ Write −→ Data 6.
iterations. 5. Save the data file ( rad s2s.dat ). File −→ Write −→ Data 6.

File −→ Write −→ Data

6. Examine the results of the S2S calculation.

Note: The steps below do not include detailed instructions because the procedure is the same one that you followed for the Rosse- land model postprocessing. See Step 6: Postprocessing for the Rosseland Model if you need more detailed instruc- tions.

(a) Display velocity vectors (Figure 5.19).

instruc- tions. (a) Display velocity vectors (Figure 5.19). Display −→ Vectors c Fluent Inc. November 29,

Display −→ Vectors

Modeling Radiation and Natural Convection

2.47e-04

2.22e-04

2.47e-04 2.22e-04 1.98e-04 1.73e-04 1.48e-04 1.24e-04 9.89e-05 7.43e-05 4.96e-05 2.49e-05 1.92e-07

1.98e-04

2.47e-04 2.22e-04 1.98e-04 1.73e-04 1.48e-04 1.24e-04 9.89e-05 7.43e-05 4.96e-05 2.49e-05 1.92e-07

1.73e-04

2.47e-04 2.22e-04 1.98e-04 1.73e-04 1.48e-04 1.24e-04 9.89e-05 7.43e-05 4.96e-05 2.49e-05 1.92e-07

1.48e-04

2.47e-04 2.22e-04 1.98e-04 1.73e-04 1.48e-04 1.24e-04 9.89e-05 7.43e-05 4.96e-05 2.49e-05 1.92e-07

1.24e-04

2.47e-04 2.22e-04 1.98e-04 1.73e-04 1.48e-04 1.24e-04 9.89e-05 7.43e-05 4.96e-05 2.49e-05 1.92e-07

9.89e-05

2.47e-04 2.22e-04 1.98e-04 1.73e-04 1.48e-04 1.24e-04 9.89e-05 7.43e-05 4.96e-05 2.49e-05 1.92e-07

7.43e-05

2.47e-04 2.22e-04 1.98e-04 1.73e-04 1.48e-04 1.24e-04 9.89e-05 7.43e-05 4.96e-05 2.49e-05 1.92e-07

4.96e-05

2.47e-04 2.22e-04 1.98e-04 1.73e-04 1.48e-04 1.24e-04 9.89e-05 7.43e-05 4.96e-05 2.49e-05 1.92e-07

2.49e-05

2.47e-04 2.22e-04 1.98e-04 1.73e-04 1.48e-04 1.24e-04 9.89e-05 7.43e-05 4.96e-05 2.49e-05 1.92e-07

1.92e-07

1.98e-04 1.73e-04 1.48e-04 1.24e-04 9.89e-05 7.43e-05 4.96e-05 2.49e-05 1.92e-07

Velocity Vectors Colored By Velocity Magnitude (m/s)

Jul 26, 2001 FLUENT 6.0 (2d, segregated, lam)

Figure 5.19: Velocity Vectors for the S2S Model

Modeling Radiation and Natural Convection

(b)

Plot the y velocity along the horizontal centerline (Figure 5.20), and save the plot data to a file called rad s2s.xy.

Plot −→ XY Plot −→ XY Plot

! You will have to reselect Y Velocity under Y Axis Function. Also, remember to turn off the Write to File option to access the Plot button to generate the plot.

y=0.5 2.50e-04 2.00e-04 1.50e-04 1.00e-04 5.00e-05 Y 0.00e+00 Velocity -5.00e-05 (m/s) -1.00e-04 -1.50e-04
y=0.5
2.50e-04
2.00e-04
1.50e-04
1.00e-04
5.00e-05
Y
0.00e+00
Velocity
-5.00e-05
(m/s)
-1.00e-04
-1.50e-04
-2.00e-04
-2.50e-04
0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.6
0.7
0.8
0.9
1
Position (m)
Y Velocity
Jul 26, 2001
FLUENT 6.0 (2d, segregated, lam)

Figure 5.20: XY Plot of Centerline y Velocity for the S2S Model

(c) Compute the total wall heat transfer rate.

Report −→ Fluxes −→Fluxes

The total heat transfer rate on the right wall is 6.77 × 10 5 W.

Modeling Radiation and Natural Convection

Step 13: Comparison of Radiation Models for a Non-Participating Medium

In this step, you will calculate a solution for the aL = 0 case, using the DTRM and DO models, and then compare the results with the S2S results.

1. For the DTRM and DO models, calculate a new solution for aL =

0.

(a)

(b)

Read in the case and data files saved earlier (e.g., rad dtrm.cas and rad dtrm.dat).

saved earlier (e.g., rad dtrm.cas and rad dtrm.dat ). File −→ Read −→ Case & Data
saved earlier (e.g., rad dtrm.cas and rad dtrm.dat ). File −→ Read −→ Case & Data

File −→ Read −→ Case & Data

Set the absorption coefficient to 0.

This will result in an optical thickness aL of 0.

(c)

(d)

(e)

(f)

Define −→ Materials −→ Materials

Calculate until the new solution converges.

Materials Calculate until the new solution converges. Solve −→ Iterate Save the new case and data

Solve −→ Iterate

Save the new case and data files using a different file name (e.g., rad dtr0.cas and rad dtr0.dat).

file name (e.g., rad dtr0.cas and rad dtr0.dat ). File −→ Write −→ Case & Data
file name (e.g., rad dtr0.cas and rad dtr0.dat ). File −→ Write −→ Case & Data

File −→ Write −→ Case & Data

Compute the total wall heat transfer rate.

Case & Data Compute the total wall heat transfer rate. Report −→ Fluxes Plot the y

Report −→Fluxes

Plot the y velocity along the horizontal centerline, and save the plot data to a file (e.g., rad dtr0.xy)

and save the plot data to a file (e.g., rad dtr0.xy ) Plot −→ XY Plot

Plot −→ XY Plot

2. Compare the computed heat transfer rates for the three models.

For the S2S model, the total heat transfer rate on the right wall was 6.77 × 10 5 W. This is about 5% higher than that predicted by the DTRM and 1.5% higher than DO. Although the S2S, DO, and DTRM values are comparable to each other, this problem involves enclosure radiative transfer without participating media. Therefore, the S2S model provides the most accurate solution.

Modeling Radiation and Natural Convection

3. Compare the y-velocity profiles in a single plot (Figure 5.21)

the y -velocity profiles in a single plot (Figure 5.21) Plot −→ File (a) Use the

Plot −→ File

(a)

Use the Delete button in the File XY Plot panel to remove the old XY plot data files.

(b)

Read in all the XY plot files you saved for the S2S, DTRM, and DO models.

(c)

Click on Plot.

Y Velocity Y Velocity 2.50e-04 Y Velocity (rad_dtr0.xy) 2.00e-04 Y Velocity (rad_do0.xy) 1.50e-04 1.00e-04
Y Velocity
Y
Velocity
2.50e-04
Y
Velocity (rad_dtr0.xy)
2.00e-04
Y
Velocity (rad_do0.xy)
1.50e-04
1.00e-04
5.00e-05
0.00e+00
-5.00e-05
-1.00e-04
-1.50e-04
-2.00e-04
-2.50e-04
0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.6
0.7
0.8
0.9
1
Y Velocity
Aug 02, 2001
FLUENT 6.0 (2d, segregated, lam)

Figure 5.21: Comparison of Computed y Velocities for aL = 0

In Figure 5.21, the velocity profiles for the DTRM, DO, and S2S models are almost identical even though the wall heat transfer rates are different.

Modeling Radiation and Natural Convection

Summary: In this tutorial, you studied combined natural convection and radiation in a square box and compared the performance of four radiation models in FLUENT for optically thin and optically thick cases, and the performance of three radiation models for a non-participating medium.

For the optically thin case, the Rosseland and P-1 models are not appropriate; the DTRM and the DO model are applicable, and yield similar results.

In the optically thick limit, all four models are appropriate and yield similar results. In this limit, the less computationally- expensive Rosseland and P-1 models may be adequate for many engineering applications.

The S2S radiation model is appropriate for modeling the en- closure radiative transfer without participating media, where the methods for participating radiation may not always be efficient.

For more information about the applicability of the different radi- ation models, see the User’s Guide.