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WILKES-BARRE, PA

THE TIMES LEADER
timesleader.com
SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013

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U.S. hunt to unravel bomb plot expanding
Authorities finish search of Mass. landfill, pursue family ties in Russia.
By EILEEN SULLIVAN and MICHAEL KUNZELMAN Associated Press

W-B’s new face

Projects unfolding involve private funding that was promised from past government investment in the theater project

Suspect charged in ricin mailings
By HOLBROOK MOHR Associated Press

James Dutschke now focus of investigation after FBI clears his acquaintance.

BOSTON — With the Boston marathon bombing suspect in a prison hospital, investigators are pushing forward in the U.S. and abroad to piece together the myriad details of a plot that killed three people and injured more than 260. FBI agents have wrapped up a two-day search at a landfill near the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, where 19-year-old suspect, Dzhohkar Tsarnaev, was a sophomore. FBI spokeswoman Laura Eimiller wouldn’t say what investigators were looking for or whether they recovered anything from the landfill before the search ended Friday. A federal law enforcement official not authorized to speak on the record about the investigation told The Associated Press on the condition of anonymity on Friday that the FBI was gathering evidence regarding “everything imaginable.” Meanwhile, U.S. officials said the bombing suspects’ mother had been added to a federal terrorism database about 18
See BOSTON, Page 15A

The Frank Clark Jewelry Building on South Main Street in Wilkes-Barre.

The facade above Pat & Deb’s Sports Memorabilia shop.

The facade above Flaming Star Tattoos on South Main Street.

Casey: Are nuke plans reasonable?
About 80 percent of Pennsylvanians live within 50 miles of a nuclear plant.
By STEVE MOCARSKY smocarsky@timesleader.com

PETE G. WILCOX PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER

The block of buildings on the east side of South Main Street in Wilkes-Barre is undergoing a lot of change.

Flurry of development near downtown theater
By JENNIFER LEARN-ANDES jandes@timesleader.com

Concerned by a report from the General Accountability Office, U.S. Sen. Bob Casey is asking the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to study how Pennsylvanians who live between 10 and 50 miles of a nuclear plant would react if there were a radiation release. The recently Casey released GAO report raised concerns about the emergency planning knowledge of residents outside of emergency preparedness zones, which encompass the area within a 10-mile radius of a nuclear power plant. The GAO conducted the study after Casey and other senators
See NRC, Page 15A

The loud purple facade of the former Flaming Star Tattoos shop will soon be toned down to fit in with the downtown Wilkes-Barre neighborhood’s historical character — a subtle yet significant sign of once-shuttered storefronts being renovated or reopened around the theater complex. It wasn’t just the color that unsettled city officials who saw the potential for the shop’s row of old architecture on South Main Street. It was the way the vibrant hue stopped midway up the

building in an uneven line, accentuating the unfinished progress of the paint job and much of the neighborhood. “One of the first things the new owners will do is repaint that facade,” said attorney William Vinsko, who bought the building at a Luzerne County back-tax auction for $33,000 last week on behalf of private clients who will be identified when the deed is recorded. The buyers plan to renovate the property at 86 S. Main St. to attract tenants, Vinsko said. Next door, Joseph and Pamela Masi are redoing the facade and interior

of their property, which previously housed Topper’s topless bar, Vinsko said. The Masis, who purchased the property for $85,000 in 2010, have added an ice cream shop at the rear of the property. Also, at 91 S. Main, Mark Miscavage is redoing the front his building across the street which houses his dental office and the David Blight School of Dance, Vinsko said. “That whole area is going to be completely transformed,” he said.
See DOWNTOWN, Page 16A

BRANDON, Miss. — An exmartial arts instructor made ricin and put the poison in letters to President Barack Obama and others, the FBI charged Saturday, days after dropping similar charges against an Elvis impersonator who insisted he had been framed. The arrest of 41-year-old James Everett Dutschke Dutschke early Saturday capped a week in which investigators initially zeroed in on a rival of Dutschke’s, then decided they had the wrong man. The hunt for a suspect revealed tie after small-town tie between the two men and the 80-year-old county judge who, along with Obama and U.S. Sen. Roger Wicker of Mississippi, was among the targets of the letters. Dutschke’s house, business and vehicles in Tupelo were searched earlier in the week often by crews in hazardous materials suits and he had been under surveillance. Dutschke was charged with “knowingly developing, producing, stockpiling, transferring, acquiring, retaining and possessing a biological agent, toxin and delivery system, for use as a weapon, to wit: ricin.” U.S. attorney Felicia Adams and Daniel McMullen, the FBI agent in charge in Mississippi, made the announcement in a news release Saturday. Dutschke’s attorney, Lori Nail Basham, said she had no comment. Earlier this week she said that Dutschke was cooperating fully with investigators and Dutschke has insisted he had nothing to do with the letters. He was arrested about 12:50 a.m. at his house in Tupelo and
See ARREST, Page 16A

Mike Tyson brings his life to the stage
Former heavyweight boxing champ to appear at Kirby Center
By BILL O’BOYLE boboyle@timesleader.com

WILKES-BARRE — Ladies and gentlemen, let’s get ready to — chat? Former heavyweight boxing champion — the youngest to ever hold the title — “Iron” Mike Tyson is coming to Wilkes-Barre this week to present his critically acclaimed one-man auto- biographical show: “Mike Tyson: Undisputed
Mike Tyson celebrates winning the heavyweight championship title on Aug. 2, 1987.

Truth,” which is directed by filmmaker Spike Lee. The show is set for Wednesday at the F.M. Kirby Center for the Performing Arts. In a telephone interview with The Times Leader, Tyson said the show is his story and he discusses his life in detail. The show’s promotional flier says Tyson’s performance is “a rare, personal look inside the life and mind of one of the most feared men ever to wear the heavyweight crown — a theatrical knockout.”
See TYSON, Page 15A

AP PHOTO

Former boxing champion Mike Tyson in 2009.

INSIDE

A NEWS: Obits: 2A, 13A Local: 3A Nation & World: 4A Weather: 16A

Game 1
Penguins win in overtime.
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B SUNDAY EXTRA: 1B Birthdays: 8B Travel: 12B

C SPORTS: 1C Outdoors: 14C D BUSINESS: 1D

Stocks: 3D Editorials: 6D E CLASSIFIED: 1E
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SunDAy, ApRIL 28, 2013

timesleader.com

www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER

They connect 1,432 Crayola erasable markers in hopes of making Guinness book.
By GERI GIBBONS Times Leader Correspondent

Area students try to make mark in record book

DETAILS
WEEKLY LOTTERY SUMMARY
Daily Number, Midday Sunday: 2-1-9 Monday: 6-5-7 Tuesday: 0-4-9 Wednesday: 5-6-5 Thursday: 0-2-4 Friday: 3-5-6 Saturday: 2-7-1 Big Four, Midday Sunday: 6-1-8-5 Monday: 5-1-5-1 Tuesday: 5-5-1-4 Wednesday: 4-6-0-8 Thursday: 9-5-8-7 Friday: 7-7-5-6 Saturday: 8-0-1-1 Quinto, Midday Sunday: 0-4-4-9-2 Monday: 9-0-2-9-8 Tuesday: 4-3-7-1-5 Wednesday: 9-2-8-2-8 (3-7-1-3-9, double draw) Thursday: 1-1-7-2-6 Friday: 6-3-7-3-2 Saturday: 6-4-0-6-0 Treasure Hunt Sunday: 04-08-14-17-30 Monday: 01-10-11-13-29 Tuesday: 01-02-10-16-19 Wednesday: 01-07-15-17-23 Thursday: 03-07-12-18-30 Friday: 02-07-10-13-25 Saturday: 04-05-10-23-26 Daily Number, 7 p.m. Sunday: 6-1-4 Monday: 2-9-5 Tuesday: 0-8-1 Wednesday: 2-5-5 Thursday: 9-6-1 Friday: 1-1-2 Saturday: 3-2-9 Big Four, 7 p.m. Sunday: 4-6-9-2 Monday: 2-9-5-4 Tuesday: 0-8-7-3 Wednesday: 4-5-1-2 Thursday: 0-7-2-7 Friday: 8-8-3-0 Saturday: 5-9-2-4 Quinto, 7 p.m. Sunday: 8-0-8-1-6 Monday: 1-0-7-1-7 Tuesday: 8-9-9-0-6 Wednesday: 1-8-2-4-8 Thursday: 2-1-1-1-3 Friday: 3-9-5-1-9 Saturday: 9-1-0-9-1 (2-5-9-1-2, double draw) Cash 5 Sunday: 12-16-30-37-39 Monday: 07-28-34-36-43 Tuesday: 13-19-26-39-41 Wednesday: 21-24-32-35-37 Thursday: 04-12-13-30-38 Friday: 03-09-21-27-34 Saturday: 18-25-37-41-43 Match 6 Lotto Monday: 06-13-17-20-23-44 Thursday: 01-02-09-11-38-45 Powerball Wednesday: 09-19-31-56-59 powerball: 02 Saturday: 03-23-48-54-55 powerball: 05 Mega Millions Tuesday: 09-21-22-32-50 Megaball: 10 Megaplier: 03 Friday: 17-42-49-54-55 Megaball: 31 Megaplier: 04

DALLAS TWP. — Dozens of eager Misericordia University students, ink markers in hand, attempted to set a new world record on Saturday, connecting 1,432 Crayola erasable markers in a straight line in hopes of making a mark in the Guinness World Records book. The event, which took place on campus, was part of the university’s annual SpringFest Weekend, with this year’s theme being “Breaking records!” Don Spencer, of BortonLawson Engineering Inc., was on hand to ensure the attempt was made accurately and would meet Guinness’ standards. “We’ll be forwarding the specifics to Guinness and then hoping that we hear back that we have a place in the record books,” he said. “It’s also a great chance for students to gather together on campus and work together in a healthy drug- and alcoholfree environment,” said Aaron Orchard, a junior majoring in health care management and member of the Student Government Association. “We are hoping to then distribute the markers to organiza-

BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Misericordia University students Aaron Orchard of Belvidere, N.J., left, Gabby Pollina of Olyphant, Jesi Swoboda of Henderson, Texas, and Mary Hawes of Bangor connect Crayola erasable markers Saturday afternoon in Dallas Township during a world record attempt at attaching more than 1,000 markers in a chain.

tions throughout the area serving children,” Orchard said. Across campus, Jaime Washofer, of Waldwick, N.J., a senior majoring in occupational therapy, and Angelo Prince, of Hainesport, N.J., a freshman, were pursuing a different kind

of record. The two were the last of about 30 students participating in the “Touch the Van” competition, which began on Friday. With hands firmly placed on a campus van, each hoped to outlast the other in touching the

van to win an iPad. “It’s not really about the iPad,” said a smiling Washofer. “It’s more about friendly competition.” Both said they were grateful they were allowed to leave their posts for a few hours to attend • Lori Kaschak, 53, of Weatherly said her 2012 Kia was damaged in a hit-and-run incident around 4 p.m. Friday while parked in the Giant Food Stores parking lot. • Irene Cerullo, 90, said Saturday a bottle of Vicodin and a bottle of Neurontin were stolen from her residence. • Three handguns were re-

Friday’s Dance-a-thon held in Insalaco Hall. After nearly 26 hours, the two were named “co-winners” and each received a mini-iPad for their efforts. Darcy Brodmerkel, director of Student Activities, said the event was an opportunity to build school spirit and make memories. She was encouraged by the turnout, she said. “With upcoming exams and plans to return home, it’s a great time to relax and enjoy the campus,” Brodmerkel said. The weather fully cooperated during the festival, which included the dedication of a new on-campus baseball field. The event began with a nod to Misericordia President Michael MacDowell, following the volleyball competition earlier this week. He received a trophy for leadership and participation in the event for 15 years of effort, always participating with good spirit although his team had never won. “Dr. MacDowell is retiring this year and we wanted to especially honor him,” Orchard said. Thursday’s Salon-a-thon and massage station were fundraisers for Relay for Life and the American Cancer Society. Many attendees said they were looking forward to today’s Powder Puff football game before having to head back to class and prepare for final exams.

Marion Dunstan Karsten
April 25, 2013
arion Dunstan Karsten, 94, of Kingston, went to meet her Saviour on Thursday, April 25, 2013. Born in Kingston, Oct. 11, 1918, Marion was the daughter of the late Harry A. and Mary Barney Dunstan. She was a lifelong resident of Kingston, residing most of her life on Ridge Avenue. At age 7, Marion became acquainted with Charles Correll of “Amos ‘n’ Andy”; she was always proud to say “he laid brick for my father.” Marion was a graduate of Kingston High School, class of 1936, and Bucknell University receiving a bachelor’s and a master’s degree in mathematics. Following graduation, she taught at Wyoming Seminary, Crestwood High School, Wyoming Area Senior High School and in the Wilkes-Barre Area School District. She ended her teaching career to care for her ailing mother. Marion authored many published works including poetry and a book titled “Peter Cottontail Survived the Flood.” She was a member of the staff at WNAK Radio until its closing, working as an editorialist. Her editorials were published by The Times Leader and enjoyed by the public on a daily basis. Marion was also in charge of a radio segment called “Hymn Time.” She loved to paint with oils, ride her bicycle and read. Marion

police blotter
HAZLETON — City police reported the following: • Bedwin Gomez-Arias, 30, was issued a citation for disorderly conduct for allegedly playing music excessively loud from his vehicle Saturday night at the intersection of Green and James streets.

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Bernard L. Frantz
April 25, 2013
was a member of the University Women’s Club and the Episcopal Church and its organizations. Although Marion had no immediate survivors she will surely be remembered by the many lives she touched throughout her lifetime. Funeral services will be held at 11 a.m. Wednesday in Ss. Clement & Peter Episcopal Church, 165 Hanover St., Wilkes-Barre. The Rev. William Marshall and the Rev. John Leo will officiate. Interment will be made in Forty Fort Cemetery, Forty Fort. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to Ss. Clement & Peter Episcopal Church, 165 Hanover St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702. Arrangements have been entrusted to the Harold C. Snowdon Home for Funerals Inc., 420 Wyoming Ave., Kingston.

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Karen M. Riley
April 24, 2013

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aren M. Riley, 63, of White Haven, died Wednesday night at Hospice Community Care, Geisinger Medical Center South Wilkes-Barre. Born in Scranton, she was a daughter of the late Alfred and Marion (Makowski) Wrublewski, and a member of Good Shepherd Church, Drums. Karen graduated from the Scranton State Hospital School of Nursing, where she later became a nursing instructor. She received a bachelor of science degree in nursing from Wilkes University and a master’s degree in counseling from the University of Scranton. Until retirement, she was employed at the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center, Wilkes-Barre, as director of education and staff development. Subsequently, she became a preschool teacher at the Fricchione Day Care Center, Marywood University. Surviving are her husband, Ed; uncles, Bernard Lentocha, Rockville, Conn., and Ed Posluszny, Moscow; a number of cousins; and lifelong friends, Paulette
MORE OBITUARIES, Page 13A

Merchel, Archbald, and Rick and Laurie Heimes, Evergreen, Colo. In addition, she will be missed by her six cats, at home. Karen was a kind and giving person who loved people and kept a very positive outlook even while battling cancer and the side effects of its treatment. She never gave up and tried to instill that in others. Even on the worst of days, she kept smiling. She was an inspiration to fellow cancer patients and the staff at the Henry Cancer Center, Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center. Memorial services will be held at 11 a.m. Tuesday at Good Shepherd Church, 87 S. Hunter Highway, Drums. Friends may call 10 a.m. until services. Burial will be at the convenience of the family. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Frank and Dorothea Henry Cancer Center, Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center, 1000 E. Mountain Drive, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711. McNulty Funeral Home, 494 E. Butler Drive, Freeland, is handling all arrangements.

ernard L. Frantz, 90, of Plains, passed into God’s arms with his family by his side on Friday while a patient at Wilkes-Barre General Hospital. Born June 17, 1922 in Kingston, he was the son of the late John and Anna (Steinkirchner) Frantz. Bernard was a graduate of Kingston High School, class of 1940, and enjoyed the old rivalry with his wife’s school, James M. Coughlin, especially on Thanksgiving. His wife, the former Lillian Sisko, was the love of his life and they were inseparable. They enjoyed a long and loving marriage of 68 years, usually holding hands and sharing loving glances. Bernie was a devoted husband, father and worked long and hard for the good of his family. Having served in World War II in Europe, he returned home to work in the coal mines for Sindaco & Prospect Mine. He also worked in manufacturing, for Prudential Insurance and as a carpenter for Rudibon until he retired. His voice was remarkable and he soloed at Madison Square Garden with Concordia in the 1950s and 1960s. He also sang solos in church and with the Knights of Columbus for several years. Bernie was a member of Ss. Peter & Paul Church, Plains Township, and was a member of the Holy Name Society and a Lector at Sacred Heart Church, Plains Township, until its closing. He was a 4th degree Knight of Columbus, Assumpta Council 3987, Luzerne. His strong faith and devotion for the Blessed Virgin Mary and the Rosary were always evident to those who knew him. He often stated that his Rosary got him through the cold and danger during World War II, where he served as an infantry man in the 42nd Rainbow Division under Gen. George S. Patton in Rhineland and central Europe. While in the military, he rose to the rank of staff sergeant, serving with G2 Intelligence and was the only non-commission officer in War Crimes Investigation leading to the Nuremberg Trials. Bernie’s six grandchildren, eight great-grandchildren and two greatgreat-grandchildren referred to him always as “Pop,” and he got big hugs and kisses from them; they were the joy of his life. Bernard and Lillian, through example, always instilled a strong and enduring sense of family and belonging. Holidays

ported stolen from a 1993 Chevrolet Blazer that had its tires slashed. Joseph Gennaro, 25, said Saturday the vehicle was parked near his residence. Jaime Scatton, 30, said the guns, a Taurus PT 145 .45-caliber pistol, a Hi-Point C-9 9mm pistol and a Ruger KP345 .45-caliber pistol, were inside the vehicle. • Police retrieved several pieces of property in the area of Fifth and Seybert streets around 11:35 a.m. Saturday. Anyone with information about the property is asked to contact the Hazleton Police Department at 570-459-4940.

H. Jane Waskiewicz
April 25, 2013

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and any reason to get together mattered most, and they enjoyed card games on Sunday nights. In addition to his mother and father, Bernie was preceded in death by his brothers, John, Robert and Carl; and sisters, Gertrude Grausam and Rita Slavinski. Surviving, in addition to his wife Lillian, are his son, Dr. Bernard Frantz and his wife, Sandra, Plains; daughter, Mariann McGroarty and her husband, Joseph, Plains; grandchildren, Dr. Bernard E. Frantz and his wife, Susan, Shavertown; Wendy Nussey and her husband, Dr. Richard, Ocean City, N. J.; Joseph A. McGroarty and his wife, Kathy, Arlington Va.; Bernard A. McGroarty and his wife, Julie Anna, Hagerstown, Md.; Mariann Jurista and her husband, Mark, Mountain Top; April McGroarty and her fiancé, Brian Godlewski; eight great-grandchildren; two great-great-grandchildren; and several nephews and nieces. He will be remembered and missed forever by his family and wife Lillian. Funeral will be held at 9 a.m. Tuesday from the Corcoran Funeral Home Inc., 20 S. Main St., Plains Township, with a Mass of Christian Burial at 9:30 a.m. in Ss. Peter & Paul Church, Plains Township. Interment will be held in Sacred Heart Slovak Cemetery, Dallas. Family and friends may call from 5 to 8 p.m. Monday at the funeral home. Memorial donations, if desired, may be made to St. Joseph’s Center, 2010 Adams Ave, Scranton , PA 18509 or to St. Ann’s Basilica, 1250 St. Ann St., Scranton, PA 18504. Online condolences may be made at www.corcoranfuneralhome.com.

rs. H. Jane Waskiewicz, of Bear Creek Township, passed away Thursday, April 25, 2013, at Hospice Community Care Inpatient Unit at Geisinger South Wilkes-Barre surrounded by family. Born Aug. 21, 1916 in WilkesBarre Township, she was the daughter of the late Andrew and Mamie Glasson Searfoss and the second oldest of 11 children. Jane attended Laurel Run School. She was employed by the area silk mills and McCrory’s Department Store in Wilkes-Barre. She was a member of the Laurel Run Primitive Methodist Church for more than 65 years, 40 of which she taught Sunday School and sang in the choir. She enjoyed a variety of handcrafts and sewing and was an avid reader. She was preceded in death by her husband, Peter Waskiewicz, in 1974; brothers, Jim, William, Richard and Gerald Searfoss; sisters, Mamie Dominick Chopak, Elizabeth Kolis and Bessie Zendzion. She is survived by her daughter, Nancy J. Waskiewicz, Bear Creek; son, Peter P. Waskiewicz and his wife, Rhonda, also of Bear Creek; grandchildren, Jennifer Elliott and her husband, Derek, of Bear Creek, Peter P. Waskiewicz Jr. of Portland, Ore., and Sara Alsaleh of Bear Creek and her fiancé, Samuel Closic, of Wilmington, Del.; great-grandchildren, Derek (DJ) P. Elliott Jr., Kieran M. Elliott and Tate M. Elliott; sister, Joan A. Searfoss of Bear Creek; and brothers, Andrew J. Searfoss and Arthur Searfoss, both of Buck Township. Funeral services will be held at 1 p.m. Tuesday in Laurel Run PM Church, 3835 Laurel Run Road, Wilkes-Barre, with the Revs. Wayne Yarnall and George Kropp officiating. Interment will follow in Oak Lawn Cemetery, Wilkes-Barre. Family and friends may call at the church on Tuesday from noon until the time of services. Memorial donations may be made in lieu of flowers to the Laurel Run Church in memory of Jane. Arrangements were entrusted to the Jendrzejewski Funeral Home, Wilkes-Barre.

OBITUARIES
Frantz, Bernard Gregory, Jean Harring, Elizabeth Himlin, James Kane, Sister Margaret Mary Karsten, Marion Kaye, Margaret Kiwak, Frank Lewis, Shirley Mills, Michael Petrosky, Florence Riley, Karen Ritchey, Ann Sgarlat, Charles Waskiewicz, H. Jane Williams, Marion
pages 2A, 13A

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IN BRIEF

Are you interested in learning how to manage your land in a healthier, more environmentally friendly way? If so, join a bus tour of six Luzerne County sites that showcase a variety of management techniques such as using native plants, riparian buffers, rain gardens, grass parking pads, green roofs, pollinator gardens and native grassland meadows. The tour — organized by the state Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, Penn State Cooperative Extension and PA Environmental Council — will be held from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. May 31. Participants will begin at the Kirby Park Natural Area in WilkesBarre, board a charter bus and travel to the Plains Animal Hospital, The Lands at Hillside Farm, Butler Township Community Garden/Center for Landscape Stewardship and Design, Life Expression Wellness Center, and Nescopeck State Park. The cost is $20, which includes lunch, door prizes and a tour booklet. For information and to register by May 10, contact the Penn State Cooperative Extension at 570-825-1701. Or download the registration form at www.dcnr.state. pa.us/conservationscience/sustainablelands/conferences/index.htm.
WILKES-BARRE TWP.

Climb aboard ‘green’ bus

LUZERNE COUNTY

LOCAL YMCA program cuts through fat
Area’s agency encourages youths to develop healthier, active lifestyles.
By EilEEn Godin Times Leader Correspondent

timesleader.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013

PAGE 3A

WILKES-BARRE – The amount of fat in a large order of McDonald’s french fries and sugar in a 20-ounce bottle of Mountain Dew were among the displays that the Wilkes-Barre Family YMCA spotlighted Saturday for its Healthy Kids Day. The YMCA, and its counterparts across the nation, invited the public in to learn ways to develop healthier and

active lifestyles. More than 30 percent of Luzerne County children, in kindergarten through fourth grade, have body mass indexes in the 85th percentile or greater, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A healthy BMI range to achieve is 18.5 to 24.9. The BMI is a way to calculate a body’s fat content based on a person’s weight and height. Being overweight can lead to health maladies such as diabetes, hypertension, heart and circulation problems, and respiratory problems. Diane Hoover, with the YMCA’s Wellness Center, said

many area residents think of the YMCA for only swimming or certain gym activities, but there are many more offerings, such as kids’ Zumbatonic classes. Getting active is only one step to becoming healthy; many vendors were on hand to educate families on nutrition, summer safety and drug awareness. Wilkes University School of Pharmacy students provided information on nutrition, such as the fact that a 20-ounce Mountain Dew soda contains 77 grams of sugar. By comparison, one pouch of Capri Sun juice has 16 grams
See HEALTHY, Page 6A

BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Donald Hawkins II, of Americorps National Civilian Community Corps, plays cat-and-mouse on a parachute with children during Healthy Kids Day at the Wilkes-Barre Family YMCA.

Hunter Hughes, a Boy Scout with Troop 281, Dallas, is trying to raise participation in the American Cancer Society’s Cancer Prevention Study-3 for his Eagle Scout project. He is inviting men and women between the ages of 30 and 65 who have never been diagnosed with cancer to join the study. The ultimate goal is to enroll at least 300,000 adults from various racial/ ethnic backgrounds from across the U.S., allowing researchers to better understand the lifestyle, behavioral, environmental and genetic factors that cause or prevent cancer. To enroll in the study, individuals are asked to go to an enrollment location, read and sign an informed consent form, complete a brief survey, have their waist circumference measured and give a small blood sample. After enrollment, participants periodically will receive annual newsletters as well as mailed surveys to update their information. An enrollment session will be held during the Relay for Life from noon to 4 p.m. June 15 at the Robert Betzler Fields (across from Wegmans). Call the American Cancer Society at 570-562-9749 or visit www.cancer.org/ cps3. Or send email to jennifer.washney@cancer.org.

Scout touts cancer study

College’s nursing students in lurch
By AndREW M. SEdER aseder@timesleader.com

Concerned Marywood students, parents contact other area schools seeking transfers.

BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Members of the Symmetry Dance Company of Scranton perform a number in the pavilion at Kirby Park on Saturday afternoon during the Cherry Blossom Festival.

“Pirouettes in the Park” sets apart Cherry Blossom event, the city’s first festival of the spring.
By Jon o’ConnEll joconnell@timesleader.com

Dancers blossom at W-B festival
IF YOU GO
What: Wilkes-Barre Cherry Blossom Festival When: 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. today Where: Kirby Park, Wilkes-Barre Entertainment: Music in the Park features seven area performers from noon to 7 p.m.

WILKES-BARRE

Area churches are celebrating National Day of Prayer on Thursday with free events. Officially marked by the federal government in 1988 as the first Thursday in May, National Day of Prayer is a chance for Christians to share their message openly, something they don’t do as often as they should, said First Baptist Church of Wilkes-Barre member Bob Evans. In addition to events earlier in the week, members of about 20 churches will meet on Public Square, WilkesBarre, for the “Circle the Square with Prayer” event Thursday. There will be music and food vendors from noon until 6 p.m., at which time a prayer service will be held, Evans said. This year’s theme is “Pray for America” and area churches have chosen to pray specifically for young people, Evans said. Younger church members will read aloud seven prayers they collaborated to write. Other National Day of Prayer events scheduled in the area are: • Free skating party from 6 to 9 p.m. Monday at Skateaway, Blackman Street, Wilkes-Barre. • Joint prayer celebration at 7 p.m. Tuesday in New Hope Church, 438 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre. For information, contact Evans at 570823-3030 or Mount Zion Baptist Church at 570-824-0146.

Day of Prayer approaches

WILKES-BARRE — A cool breeze drifted through the Kirby Park pavilion Saturday as Gabriella Randazzo, 9, began her solo performance, one she had choreographed from scratch. Randazzo, slight and timid, assumed her position as the song “Grenade” by Bruno Mars began over the sound system. Any insecurity, she kicked off in the first few bars and executed moves

that mixed ballet and popular hip-hop steps. Dancers from 16 area dance studios performed during opening day of the two-day Wilkes-Barre Cherry Blossom Festival. It marked the seventh year of Pirouettes in the Park, an entertainment feature that sets apart the early spring festival from others of its kind

that occur in the city later in the year, said an event official. “(The dancing) is unique to this event,” said Lore Majikes, WilkesBarre’s special events coordinator. “We’re thrilled that we’re able to keep it going.” The festival gives dancers a chance to perform for an audience that might never attend a dance recital, she said. As the crowds sift through the gauntlet of food and craft vendor stands, they end up sitting by the pavilion to enjoy the show, Majikes said, many of them slurping ice cream cones and licking powdered sugar from deep-fried Oreos
See BLOSSOM, Page 6A

Contest was precursor to May event, which teaches business skills.
By CAMillE Fioti Times Leader Correspondent

Youngsters learn how to squeeze out profit
THIRST FOR MORE?
For more information about the local Lemonade Day and a map of where the stands will be on Saturday, visit www. nepa.lemonadeday.org.

PITTSTON — After pouring a cup of fresh strawberry and pear lemonade into a sugar-rimmed cup, Valerie Nat of Shavertown showed her 5-year-old son Tristan how to garnish the drink with strawberry and lemon slices. The delicious gourmet concoction was only one of many homemade lemonades vying for the title of “Best-Tasting Lemonade”

at the Pittston YMCA’s Healthy Kids Day on Saturday. The contest was the precursor to this Saturday’s national “Lemonade Day,” an annual event in which children of all ages set up lemonade stands using entrepreneurial skills learned through a community-wide educational program. “We teach the kids to spend some, share some and save
See LEMONADE, Page 6A

BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Three-year-old Piper Nat of Shavertown sneaks a sample of strawberry-pear lemonade during the 2013 BestTasting Lemonade Contest on Saturday morning at the Greater Pittston YMCA.

In life-or-death situations, nurses quickly react. Some of the 117 students in the Marywood University nursing program are following that protocol after they learned their program has lost its accreditation. Multiple nursing programs at other area colleges have reported getting calls from nursing students or their parents in the weeks since Marywood announced that the National League of Nursing Accreditation Commission denied continuing accreditation to the program immediately. The school is appealing that decision and has said it would apply for accreditation with that organization and another, but students aren’t waiting. Mary Ann Merrigan, associate dean of the school of nursing at Wilkes University, said the program has been contacted by Marywood students about possibly transferring to Wilkes. Misericordia University has reported similar inquiries. “According to our admissions department, Misericordia has received numerous applications and inquiries for all levels of our nursing program from Marywood nursing students,” said spokesman Paul Krzywicki. At Wilkes, which typically has a policy that denies students from transferring in their nursing credits, Merrigan said this situation might call for a suspension of that policy. “Those students have special circumstances,” she said. But just because they apply, it won’t mean they’ll get in or that their credits will transfer. “They’ll need to take exams and validate their nursing knowledge,” Merrigan said. “I feel very badly for their faculty, for their students,” she added. Merrigan said she is not versed in the details that cost the Marywood program its accreditation, but noted, “The hope is that Marywood will be able to win its appeal and have its accreditation status reversed.” In the meantime, sources have said Marywood officials are in discussions with at least one area college for an “articuSee DILEMMA, Page 6A

PAGE 4A

SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013

N A T I O N

&

W O R L D

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

IN BRIEF

Protests erupt over factory conditions that led to nearly 350 deaths.
The Associated Press

Six arrested in building collapse
them when the 8-story structure came down on Wednesday morning — a time many of the garment factories in the building were packed with workers. It was the worst tragedy to hit Bangladesh’s massive garment industry, and focused attention on the poor working conditions of the employees who toil for $38 a month to produce clothing for top international brands. Among those arrested Saturday were two owners of a garment factory, who a Dhaka court ruled can be questioned by police for 12 days without charges being filed. Also detained are two government engineers and the wife of the building owner, who is on the run, in an attempt to force him to surrender. Late Saturday, police arrested another factory owner. Violent public protests continued sporadically in Dhaka and spread to the southeastern city of Chittagong where several vehicles were set on fire. Working round-the-clock since Wednesday through heat and a thunderstorm, rescuers on Saturday finally reached the ground floor from the top of the mountainous rubble through 25 narrow holes they have drilled, said Brig. Gen. Ali Ahmed Khan, the head of the fire services. “We are still getting response from survivors though they are becoming weaker slowly,” he said, adding that rescue workers were now able to see cars that were parked at the ground level. “The building is very vulnerable,” he said. “Any time the

AP PHOTO

Nancy Nogacek, a member of the Military Care Committee at Memorial Park Church in McCandless, Pa., helps tend to the some of the American flags on display as part of the church’s ‘Field of Flags.’ The display of more than 6,000 flags is to commemorate veterans killed in Iraq and Afghanistan.
WASHINGTON

War dead remembered

SAVAR, Bangladesh — Police in Bangladesh took six people into custody in connection with the collapse of a shoddily constructed building that killed at least 348 people, as rescue workers admitted Saturday that voices of survivors are getting weaker after four days of being pinned under the increasingly unstable rubble. Still, in a boost for the rescuers, 29 survivors were pulled out Saturday, said army spokesman Shahinul Islam. Most of the victims were crushed by massive blocks of concrete and mortar falling on

AP PHOTO

Bangladeshi relatives of a garment worker cry as they pass others looking for missing relatives while collecting his body Saturday at a makeshift morgue.

floors could collapse. We are performing an impossible task,

but we are glad that we are able to rescue so many survivors.”

RAZOR CLOSE FINISH TO BEARD CONTEST

Tax cheats make good

he Internal Revenue Service has recouped more than $5.5 billion under a series of programs that offered reduced penalties and no jail time to people who voluntarily disclosed assets they were hiding overseas, government investigators said Friday. In all, more than 39,000 tax cheats have come clean under the programs. But there’s more. Government investigators suspect that thousands of other taxpayers have quietly started reporting foreign accounts without paying any penalties or interest. The number of people reporting foreign accounts to the IRS nearly doubled from 2007 to 2010, to 516,000 accounts, a report by the Government Accountability Office said.

T

Airports returning to normal, FAA says
End of employee furloughs allows for resumption of normal operations by tonight.
The Associated Press

Slow go on cracker plant
Gov. Tom Corbett says an oil company’s decision on whether to build a proposed petrochemical plant in western Pennsylvania might be pushed back into next year, but he remains optimistic about the plant coming to the commonwealth. Corbett told the Pittsburgh Business Times on Friday that he “never had June as a date” for Shell Oil Co. to decide on the multibillion-dollar plant proposed for Beaver County. “I’ve always thought it would be early next year,” he said, adding that his conversations with officials indicate “they’re still moving forward.” The June 30 deadline stems from a six-month extension Shell negotiated at the end of last year with Horsehead Corp., which would sell its land 35 miles north of Pittsburgh to the energy firm. The Potter Township site is now home to a zinc shelter, which Horsehead expects to shut down.
AP PHOTO

MONACA, PA.

D

ieter Besuch shows off the beard with which he competes Saturday in the Whiskers Freestyle category of the International German Beard Championships at Congress Centrum in Pforzheim, Germany. Prices are awarded in 18 different categories.

BattlebrewingoverPa.beerlaws
bill that passed the House last month. Changes to state’s restrictive beer first hearing is Tuesday. laws likely will be part of larger puzzle. The The debate about adding consumer
By MARC LEVY Associated Press

4 die in NATO plane crash
A NATO plane crash in southern Afghanistan killed four international troops on Saturday, the same day the Taliban announced its spring offensive and said it will target military and diplomatic sites with suicide bombers and infiltrate enemy forces to conduct deadly insider attacks. April already has been the deadliest month so far this year across the country where Afghan security forces are increasingly taking the lead on the battlefield of the more than 11-yearold war. The Afghan Defense Ministry said its security forces were prepared for the Taliban’s new campaign, which is to start today.

KABUL, AFGHANISTAN

HARRISBURG — Where you can buy beer in Pennsylvania will be the subject of debate in the coming weeks in the state Senate, pitting profit-seeking businesses against one another and perhaps even against beer drinkers’ wishes. What do beer drinkers want? In Harrisburg, that story line is being told by a variety of businesses in the context of what lines up neatly with their would-be profits. In the middle of it is Sen. Charles McIlhinney, R-Bucks, who chairs the committee that will get the first crack at a

convenience to the beer system is largely a passenger in the drive by Republican Gov. Tom Corbett to privatize the statecontrolled sales of wine and liquor. So any changes to Pennsylvania’s relatively restrictive beer laws likely will be part of the larger puzzle of liberalizing the sale of all alcoholic beverages. “The only way to do it is to craft a fair playing field for everybody and let them compete,” McIlhinney said. Arguably, beer is more important to Pennsylvanians: The state was fifth in the nation in beer shipments and 12th in wine shipments, according to statistics compiled by the Washington, D.C.-based Beer Institute. Changing the system could be tricky.

Corbett is spending more of his political effort on the ideological battle around privatizing wine and liquor sales. But changing the beer system could take an equally large political effort. Pennsylvania’s hometown brewers, wholesalers and the retail distributors who sell most of the beer in the state are largely aligned against an expansion of beer retailers. What Pennsylvanians want is to be able to buy beer in a wider variety of quantities than is currently allowed, they say. But owners of convenience stores, grocery stores, drug stores, big-box stores and supermarkets are lobbying for the ability to sell beer — not to mention wine and liquor — in their aisles. That satisfies the one-stop shopping that consumers want and get in many other states, they say.

Galaxy not so far away for Navajo
‘Star Wars’ used to preserve native language
By FELICIA FONSECA Associated Press

Threat scrubs school dance
A central New Jersey school district canceled a middle school dance this week after the school’s embattled principal received a threatening email. Authorities did not disclose specific details about the threat made against Readington Middle School Principal Sharon Moffat. But they say the threat received Friday morning apparently came “from overseas” and is not considered credible. District Superintendent Barbara Sargent said township police offered to have an officer at the school for the dance, but said it seemed “more sensible to not hold” the dance.

READINGTON, N.J.

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. — In the new translation of “Star Wars,” Darth Vader is Luke’s bizhe’e. The classic 1977 film that launched a science fiction empire and revealed the force within a farm boy who battles evil has been dubbed in Japanese, French, Spanish and about a dozen other languages. Add Navajo to the list. Manuelito Wheeler, the director of the Navajo Nation Museum who reached out to Lucasfilm Ltd. with the idea, has a very good feeling about this. He sees it as entertaining, educational and a way to preserve the Navajo language at a time when fewer tribal members are speaking it.

“That’s the beauty of what we’re doing; we’re teaching Navajo language to anybody who wants to learn the Navajo language,” Wheeler said. “I find that very rewarding and somewhat ironic. We went from a country that wanted to limit our language, to the Navajo language saving our country through Code Talkers, to our language being part of a major motion picture.” Native languages on the big screen are a rarity. Independent films and documentaries at film festivals have been in the tongue of American Indian tribes. Yet it’s far less common to see it done in main-

stream movies and shown in commercial theaters. “Bambi” was dubbed in the Arapaho language, and the cartoon series “The Berenstain Bears” was translated into the Dakota and Lakota languages. “There’s a little bit of precedent but nothing like ‘Star Wars’ in the Navajo language,” said Michael Smith, director of the American Indian Film Institute and a member of the Sioux Tribe of Montana.

WASHINGTON — The Federal Aviation Administration said that the U.S. air traffic system will resume normal operations by thisevening after lawmakers rushed a bill through Congress allowing the agency to withdraw furloughs of air traffic controllers and other workers. The FAA said it has suspended all employee furloughs and that traffic facilities will begin returning to regular staffing levels. The furloughs were fallout from the $85 billion in automatic-acrossthe-board spending cuts this spring. They started to hit air traffic controllers last week, causing flight delays that left thousands of travelers frustrated and furious. Planes were forced to take off and land less frequently, so as not to overload the remaining controllers on duty. The FAA had no choice but to cut $637 million as its share of $85 billion in automatic, governmentwide spending cuts that must be achieved by the end of the federal budget year on Sept. 30. Flight delays piled up across the country last Sunday and Monday as the FAA kept planes on the ground because there weren’t enough controllers to monitor busy air corridors. Cascading delays held up flights at some of nation’s busiest airports, including New York, Baltimore and Washington. Delta Air Lines canceled about 90 flights Monday because of worries about delays. Just about every passenger was rebooked on another Delta flight within a couple of hours. Air travel was smoother Tuesday. The cuts were required under a law enacted two years ago as the government was approaching its debt limit. Democrats were in favor of raising the debt limit without strings attached so as not to provoke an economic crisis, but Republicans insisted on substantial cuts in exchange. The compromise was to require that every government “program, project and activity” — with some exceptions, such as Medicare — be cut equally. The FAA had reduced the work schedules of nearly all of its 47,000 employees by one day every two weeks, including 15,000 air traffic controllers, as well as thousands of air traffic supervisors, managers and technicians who keep airport towers and radar facility equipment working. That amounted to a 10 percent cut in hours and pay.

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PAGE 6A

SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013

N E W S

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

LEMONADE
Continued from Page 3A

BLOSSOM
Continued from Page 3A

some, just like the local entrepreneurs in our community,” said Trish Mosluk, city director of Lemonade Day-NEPA. Lemonade Day-NEPA started in 2011 when Tristan’s dad and Valerie’s husband, Dale Nat, read a Wall Street Journal article about the national Lemonade Day program, headquartered in Houston. The concept for the program began when a girl, who already owned several pets, asked her dad if she could buy a turtle if she earned the money. After seeing the valuable lessons his daughter learned while running a lemonade stand that funded the turtle purchase, the girl’s father, Michael Holthouse, decided to teach those lessons to other children. Launched in Houston, the first Lemonade Day was held in 2007. Using a strategic 14-step process, children across the nation now learn how to set up their own lemonade stands by mastering the same principles required to start any company. Lemonade Day has grown from 2,700 kids in Texas to 150,000 kids in 36 cities across the United States and Canada. Google has partnered with Lemonade Day to assist the participants with marketing and promoting their stands. “The kids get a free website through Google, which encourages them to be creative,” said Nat, an entrepreneur, and also city champion for Lemonade Day. “They are really encouraged to be creative and to stretch their brains.” Tasting judge Rob Cardone, an instructor in the hotel/restaurant management program at Luzerne County Community College, eyed up the different lemonade recipes, concocted by area children and their families. “There’s a variety,” he said. “I’m looking forward to seeing the creativity in the kids.” ReferLocal and Pepper Jam founder Kris Jones, who also was one of the contest judges, said entrepreneurism should be taught at an early age. “My son took part in this last year at three-and-a-half,” he said. “It taught him that making money isn’t only about profits. For every dollar earned, a dollar went to the Make-a-Wish Foundation.”

off their fingertips. “And as you can see, there’s a lot of genres,” Majikes said with a laugh, pointing toward a trio of belly dancers on stage moving to a South Asian beat. Dancers from the Izdihaar dance troupe, hailing from Tunkhannock and whose name means ‘blossoming’ in Arabic, popped their hips and shoulders in brightly colored costumes adorned with bells and tassels. Vicki Ross, a 10-year bellydancing veteran, said she picked the style because it seemed more fun than ballroom dancing. “And belly dancers dress better,” she said. Ross is the troupe’s seamstress and makes her costumes by hand. After Randazzo, of the Dance Theater of Wilkes-Barre, finished her solo, she confessed that nerves got the best of her and she forgot some of the steps she spent four days crafting. Still, she completed the dance by cleverly improvising and it seemed that nobody in

Meuser will address forum
WILKES-BARRE -- Pennsylvania Secretary of Revenue Dan Meuser will outline Gov. Tom Corbett’s 2013-14 proposed budget and discuss other administration initiatives at the Pennsylvania Economy League Issues Forum from noon to 1:30 p.m. May 10 at the Genetti Hotel and Conference Center, Wilkes-Barre. The forum is open to the public and starts with a luncheon buffet. The cost is $15. For registration information, visit www.pelcentral.org.

DILEMMA
Continued from Page 3A

Six-year-old Kael Benjamin of Hanover Township, right, and his twin brother Nathan ride the Dragon Wagon on Saturday afternoon at the Cherry Blossom Festival in Kirby Park.

BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

the crowd noticed the difference. The outdoor venue lets dancers perform in a more casual setting and the environment

only inspires them more, said Bridget Giunta Husted, an instructor from the Dance Theater and coordinator for the festival’s dance entertainment.

“As a dancer,” she said, “it’s good to get to look out and see the landscape, feel the breeze coming through. It’s a really cool atmosphere.”

lation agreement” for nursing students. Such an agreement would mean Marywood juniors in good standing could transfer many, if not all, of their credits to another school and would graduate from its accredited nursing program.

It’s smart to get serious about your health. Join us for events in May.
Special Events
Skin Cancer Screening
Geisinger Wyoming Valley Specialty Clinic 675 Baltimore Drive, Wilkes-Barre If you have moles, skin changes or have been exposed to UV rays, you may be at risk for skin cancer. To register for a free skin screening appointment, visit geisinger.org/events or call Geisinger Wyoming Valley 1000 E. Mountain Blvd., Wilkes-Barre Wed., May 1, 15, 29 To schedule an appointment, call 1.866.996.5100 or visit geisingerbloodcenter.org.

Breastfeeding Class
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Geisinger Wyoming Valley 1000 East Mountain Blvd., Wilkes-Barre Valley Medical Building

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Geisinger Wyoming Valley 1000 East Mountain Blvd., Wilkes-Barre Henry Cancer Center Call 570.808.5918 for more information.

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about joining Silver Circle, Geisinger’s free 55-and-over club, please call 570-808-3259. Members receive monthly mailings and gain access to exclusive events such as yoga and healthy eating classes.

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HEALTHY
Continued from Page 3A

of sugar. “Twenty grams is the recommended daily allowance for sugar,” said student Erin Hanley. One large order of McDonald’s french fries contains 25 grams of fat and 500 calories, Henley said. Camp Kresge representatives were on hand to provide information about its summer programs and financial aid options. Other displays stressed the importance of wearing bicycle helmets, ways to avoid dog bites, and drug and alcohol awareness. Each child was given a T-shirt, a bag and a choice of healthy snacks, including pizza, fresh fruit, yogurt and granola. Center Director Linda Reilly said a membership to the YMCA is affordable and scholarships are available to help families with the cost. “Many insurance plans will cover one membership to the YMCA,” she said. Many new programs for children, senior citizens, and cancer survivors are being developed, she added.

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6 months after Sandy, thousands homeless in N.Y., N.J.
Recovery still slow as summer vacation — and hurricane — seasons approach.
By WAYNE PARRY Associated Press

MANTOLOKING, N.J. — The 9-year-old girl who got New Jersey’s tough-guy governor to shed a tear as he comforted her after her home was destroyed is bummed because she now lives far from her best friend and has nowhere to hang her One Direction posters. A New Jersey woman whose home was overtaken by mold still cries when she drives through the area. A New York City man whose home burned can’t wait to build a new one. Six months after Superstorm Sandy devastated the Jersey shore and New York City and pounded coastal areas of New England, the region is dealing with a slow and frustrating, yet often hopeful, recovery. Tens of thousands of people remain homeless. Housing, business, tourism and coastal protection all remain major issues with the summer vacation — and hurricane — seasons almost here again. “Some families and some lives have come back together quickly and well, and some people are up and running almost as if nothing ever happened, and for them it’s been fine,” New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said at a news conference Thursday. “Some people

Flags decorate a fence Thursday in Brick, N.J., around the burned remains of more than 60 small bungalows at Camp Osborn that were destroyed last October during Superstorm Sandy. Six months after Sandy devastated the Jersey shore and New York City and pounded coastal areas of New England, the region is dealing with a slow and frustrating, yet often hopeful, recovery.

AP PHOTO

resilience. “Talking to that man was wonderful!” Fricchione said. “He said it takes time and you just have to have hope and know it will all work out eventually.” By many measures, the recovery from Superstorm Sandy, which struck Oct. 29, has been slow. From Maryland to New Hampshire, the National Hurricane Center attributes 72 deaths directly to Sandy and 87 others indirectly from causes such as hypothermia due to power outages, carbon monoxide poisoning and accidents during cleanup efforts, for a total of 159. The roller coaster that plunged off a pier in Seaside Heights, N.J., is still in the ocean, although demolition plans are finally moving forward. Scores of homes that were destroyed in

nearby Mantoloking still look as they did the day after the storm — piles of rubble and kindling, with the occasional bathroom fixture or personal possession visible among the detritus. Throughout the region, many businesses are still shuttered, and an already-tight rental market has become even more so because of the destruction of thousands of units and the crush of displaced storm victims looking to rent the ones that survived. Homeowners are tortured by uncertainty over ever-changing rules on how high they’ll need to rebuild their homes to protect against the next storm; insurance companies have not paid out all that many homeowners expected; and municipalities are borrowing tens of millions of dollars to keep the lights on, the fire

trucks running and the police stations staffed, waiting for reimbursement from the federal government for storm expenditures they had to fund out of pocket. And yet, by other measures, remarkable progress has been made. Boardwalks, the tourism lifeblood of the region, are springing back to life. A handful of homes are going up, and the whine of power saws and the thwack of hammers is everywhere in hard-hit beach towns as contractors fix what can be saved and bulldozers knock down what can’t. Beaches that were washed away are coming back, due both to nature and bulldozers, and real estate agents say demand for this upcoming summer appears good, particularly in the portions of the Jersey shore that were relatively unscathed by Sandy.

are still very much in the midst of recovery. You still have people in hotel rooms, you still have people doubled up, you still have people fighting with insurance companies, and for them it’s been terrible and horrendous.” Lynda Fricchione’s flood-damaged home in the Ortley Beach section of Toms River, N.J., is gutted; the roof was fixed just last week. The family is still largely living out of cardboard boxes in an apartment. But waiting for a final decision from federal and state authorities over new flood maps that govern the price of flood insurance is tormenting her and many others. returned to the case, he realized the device had been stolen. Surveillance footage revealed Tyler had pocketed a Samsung Galaxy S II from the case before leaving, police said. A preliminary hearing has been scheduled for May 30. • John Paul Edstrom, 31, of Wilkes-Barre, was charged with theft, possessing drug paraphernalia and public drunkenness after he allegedly stole two Delmonico steaks and a New York strip on Thursday from Schiel’s Family Market, George Avenue. Edstrom tried to conceal the steaks in his pants, but was spotted by a loss-prevention of-

“The largest problem is, nobody really knows how high we’re going to have to elevate the house,” she said. “At town hall they told us 5 feet, but then they said it might go down to 3 feet in the summer. Most of us are waiting until the final maps come out. It’s wait-and-see.” But more than anything, Fricchione is optimistic, buoyed by a recent trip to New Orleans with her daughter during which they met a resident of the Lower Ninth Ward who was one of the first to move back in after Hurricane Katrina inundated the neighborhood that has become a symbol of flood damage — and ficer, police said. The defendant tried to flee with the meat, but the officer apprehended him, police said. When police searched Edstrom, they found a folded syringe in his pants leg, police said. Edstrom was arraigned Friday before District Judge Martin Kane. A preliminary hearing has been scheduled for May 2. • An unidentified victim reported to police that unauthorized transactions were made from his Citizens Bank checking account, police said.

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WILKES-BARRE — City police reported the following: • Keon Tyler, 23, of WilkesBarre, was charged with theft after he was identified in surveillance footage stealing a mobile phone Monday from The Video Game Store along South Main Street, police said. A store clerk told police he had been showing Tyler merchandise behind a glass case. He went to help another customer, but left the case unlocked. Shortly after, Tyler left the building, police said. When the clerk, Chris Piccolotti,

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with GOLD CARD

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with GOLD CARD

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WE ACCEPT

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on a future g grocery y or meat p purchase...

when you purchase $25 of Select Grilling and Picnic Products with your Gold Card between 4/28/13 and 5/25/13. NO LIMIT.
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We reserve the right to limit the quantities. No sales to dealers. Not responsible for typographical errors. Artwork for display purposes only.

Prices Effective Sunday, April 28 thru Saturday, May 4, 2013

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

N E W S
Arcedo Valdez, 235 W. Diamond Ave., Hazleton, $57,000. • Michelle L. Kachurak to Brendan and Amanda B. Noto, 321 Mooretown Road, Ross Township, $220,000. • Anthony R. and Serena K. Scatena to Ronald J. Athmann, 19 Fairway Drive, Exeter, $385,000. • AMS Renovations LLC to Brian Shouldis, 165 Poland St., Swoyersville, $154,000. • Estate of Mary J. Makowski to Diana Bekkerman, 1 Gruver St., Newport Township, $60,000. • John F. Beretzki to Karen Teresa Campbell, East Nescopeck Lane, Dennison Township, $73,500. • Stephen and Gail Skiro to Matthew R. Rettig, 335 Colley St., Hanover Township, $94,000. • Estate of Margaret T. Propos to Richard and Lindsey Johnston, 26 Dug Road, Kingston Township, $422,950. • Bank of America to Charles W. Jr. and Judith D. Johns, 15 Anne St., Wright Township, $111,000. • Francis Donnelly and Joann Kaminski to Breanna Christian and Thomas Bretz, 19 Lee Park Ave., Hanover Township, $54,750. • Gennaro F. and Wendy R. Laiso and Wendy R. Otteson to Christopher A. and Christine M. Hetkowski, 76 Dogwood Road, Butler Township, $161,000. • David H. Koral and Toni A. Crevo to Edward J. Ciarimboli, 300 Conyngham Drive, Jackson Township, $600,000. • Marie M. Yeraska, Barbara Austin Marcotte and Christopher Austin to Robert W. Soboleski, 36 Bohac St., Swoyersville, $53,500. • Guy F. and Christine Rothery to Thomas J. IV and Lisa A. Reilly, 55 Marjorie Ave., Wilkes-Barre,

SATURDAY, APRIL 28, 2013
$160,000. • Robert L. Neri to Michael C. and Susanne Assad, 21 Oak Road, Foster Township, $210,000. • Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. and Daniel A. McGovern to Robert F. and Susan A. Athow, 16 Lance St., Nuangola, $67,000. • Salvatore N. Alfano and Mariann Liberati to Michael J. and Maria C. Alba, 228 Sharpe St., Wyoming, $115,000. • Estate of Doris Yeager to Chetan J. and Sweta Patel, 68 Kirby Ave., Fairview Township, $139,500. • Kawel B. and Leslie L. Laubach to Douglas W. and Kristen D. Long, 65 Fieldstone Way, Fairview Township, $372,000. • Joseph Yurish to Megan Levan, 390 Tripp St., West Wyoming, $115,000.

PAGE 11A

PROPERTY TRANSFERS
The following real estate transactions have been recorded in the Luzerne County Office of the Recorder of Deeds for the week of April 22: • Kenneth Townsend to David Massaker and Kacie Haddock, 302 Vine St., Larksville, $65,000. • Michael F. Gallagher to 28 Allenberry LLC, 28 Allenberry Drive, Hanover Township, $100,000. • Estate of Hokon W. Rood to Kelly McDonald, 262 Overbrook Road, Dallas Township, $102,000. • Judith Kunec and Sandra Latsko to Richard P. Kozich, 44 Warner St., Plains Township, $60,000. • Scott A. Hanson to Joshua A. and Suellen D. Hays, 33 Apple St., Newport Township, $63,500. • Fannie Mae, Federal National Mortgage Association and KML Law Group PC to Michael J. Pantano, 271 Phillips St., Hanover Township, $52,000. • Presidential Land Co. LTD to Keith A. and Catherine J.K. Jones, 1090 Woodberry Drive, Rice Township, $444,900. • John A. Gimble to David and Susan Moyer, 17 Orchard Ave., Plymouth Township, $150,000. • Patricia Ellen Zabroski to Jay Murphy Jr., 182 George Ave., Wilkes-Barre, $76,500. •Diana Pilcavage to Diane and Thomas Janiszewski, 139 Gouge St., Plains Township, $60,000. • Theodore J. Jr. and Patricia A. Fisher to Jared A. and Julie Marie Vedro, 238 Cliffside Ave., Kingston Township, $114,200. • Mercedes D. Rodriguez and Mauel Pineda to Manuel Pineda, 655 Seybert St., Hazleton, $139,637. • Joseph and Silvana Ciccarello to Tracey D. Perkins, Ferrara Avenue, Hazle Township, $77,000. • Jarrod J. and Bonnie J. Tranguch to Christopher C. and Gina Kokinda, 20 Park Circle, Conyngham, $171,000. • William M. and Margaret M. McKeon to John M. Jr. and Melissa A. Chaump, 154 Buck Ridge Lane, $198,000. • John D. Klimchak to Paul Klug, 109 Academy St., Plymouth, $110,750. • Anthony and Kelly Ranieli to James Andruskiewicz, 111 Abbott St., Plains Township, $70,000. • William H. Lewis to Candace Marie Fenstemaker, 24 Fairview Drive, Hunlock Township, $120,000. • Mary A. Pacelli to Adan F. Cordero, 1000 N. Wyoming St., Hazleton, $97,938. • Beneficial Mortgage Co. of Pennsylvania to Wilfrida Heredia and

• Joseph M. Pitcavage to Allan Mizenko, 558 W. Sperling St., West Wyoming, $73,000. • John E. Halbing III to Thomas and Leslie Wilmes, Saddle Ridge, Dallas Township, $391,000. • Matthew J. and Susan A. Crowl to John R. and Suzanne M. Loyack, 117 Ramblewood Drive, Dennison Township, $591,000. • Catherine Therese Carey to Michael Szewszyk, 10 Deer Run Road, Butler Township, $227,000. • Estate of Celia D. Cavallini to Robert B. Prushinski, 1500 Lincoln Ave., Nanticoke, $76,000. • Estate of John E. Klimuszka Sr. to Marianne T. Sager, 222 Main Road, Hanover Township, $75,000. • Estate of Theodore L. Fravel to Zachary J. Wallick, 174 Beade St., Plymouth, $78,500.

POLICE BLOTTER
PLAINS TWP. — Police allege that a Bear Creek Township man stole property from his employer. Township police charged Matthew Cienciva, 36, with theft by unlawful taking, theft by deception and making false reports to law enforcement. Peter Farrell, owner of Alloy Wheel Repair Specialists, reported in October that he began to discover company property was missing and discrepancies in billing from one of his employees, police said. Cienciva admitted to selling a gasoline-powered generator valued at $1,349 for $250 cash, police said. Cienciva also allegedly admitted to selling spray-paint guns and trailer tires with a total value of more than $1,000 for cash totaling $210. He also submitted a false sales receipt for $150 after charging a customer $450 for refinishing three rims, keeping $300 for himself, police said. Cienciva was arraigned before District Judge Paul Roberts in Kingston and released on $25,000 unsecured bail. His preliminary hearing is scheduled for 8:45 a.m. Tuesday before District Judge Diana Malast in Plains Township. HAZLETON — City police reported the following: • Police responded to a reported theft near 15th and Grant streets. The victim stated her white Samsung Galaxy mobile phone was stolen. Anyone with information is asked to call Hazleton police by dialing 911. • Around midnight Friday, police responded to a report a man was assaulted and robbed at Antone’s Lingerie Lounge. The victim claimed he was approached from behind and struck in the face. An unidentified white male then robbed him of his handgun, fleeing south on James Street, police said. Anyone with information is asked to call police. • Police responded to a domestic dispute report around 2 a.m. Saturday morning along South Cedar Street. The alleged victim, Nelson Gross Lara, was found with minor injuries, and Aracelis De La Cruz Puello De Gross was taken into custody, police said. He was later released with a summary harassment citation. • Police responded to a reported fight at Pine Street Playground on Tuesday. Upon arrival, they saw no fight but confirmed later that a fight had occurred, police said. Police learned the names of two female juveniles involved in the fight and issued several disorderly conduct citations.

PAGE 12A

SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013
is made, extra stickers may be purchased in the tax office. Cost is $2 for each with a minimum of 12 stickers purchased ($24). Stickers are not sold at any other locations. If mailing payment, include both sides of the bill and $3.50 for postage and handling. If stickers are to be sent to an address other than your mailing address, please specify. If you do not receive a bill, please call 570-654-1090. Offi-

N E W S
Officer George Keifer filed the warrant seeking medical records of 85-year-old Margaret Lechleitner, of Summit Hill, alleging she died from massive head trauma after being pushed to the floor by another resident of the Weatherwood nursing home in Weatherly on April 20. She died April 21, according to her obituary. WILKES-BARRE — A

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Sweet Valley man charged with having inappropriate contact with a 13-year-old girl was sentenced Thursday to eight to 16 months in county prison. Ronald Morrison, 20, of Crisman Road, was sentenced on charges of unlawful contact with a minor and corruption of minors. Luzerne County Judge Michael Vough also ordered Morrison to serve two years probation. Morrison was ordered to have no unsupervised contact with minors and no contact with the victim in the case and must register under Megan’s Law for 25 years. Police alleged Morrison inappropriately touched a 13-year-old girl on a number of occasions in March 2012. Morrison pleaded guilty to the charges in January.

MUNICIPAL BRIEFS
PITTSTON — City Treasurer Kathy Cunard announced that 2013-14 trash bills will be mailed out this week, at which time residents can pay their refuse bill and receive new stickers. Trash bill is due within 30 days of the issue date on the bill. Old stickers (beige) can be used through May 31. New stickers (gray) must be used as of June 3. The refuse year runs from April through April. Residents must choose one of the three options below for the year. Payment is considered the annual fee and must be paid by each resident: • 60 stickers (for residents who put out one bag of garbage per week), $115 • 120 stickers (for residents who put out two bags of garbage per week), $165 • 180 stickers (for residents who put out three bags of garbage per week), $200 A late fee of $20 will be assessed after July 15. In the event you run out of stickers after initial payment

COURT BRIEFS
WILKES-BARRE — Weatherly police filed a search warrant in Luzerne County Friday to obtain medical records of an elderly woman who died at the Hazleton General Hospital, alleging a case of involuntary manslaughter.

POLICE BLOTTER
WILKES-BARRE — City police reported the following: • The owner of Fiesler Signs said his Sheetz credit card had been used at various gas station locations without his knowledge. • Officers responded to Eastview Drive after reports a drunken male was knocking on apartment doors, attempting to get inside around 3:30 p.m. Friday. They found Sean Obitz hiding under a blanket behind the building, police said. Obitz was taken into custody and cited with public drunkenness. • An attempted break-in was reported around 3:30 Friday along North Franklin Street. The building was vacant; however, copper pipes had been stolen from the basement.

PAGE 13A

Sunday, April 28, 2013

O B I T U A R I E S

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

FRANK L. KIWAK, 66, of Kingston passed away unexpectedly Saturday, April 27, 2013, at his home. Friends may call from 5 to 8 p.m. Tuesday at the Harold C. Snowdon Home for Funerals Inc., 420 Wyoming Ave., Kingston. A Mass of Christian Burial will be held Wednesday at a time and place to be announced in his complete obituary that will appear in Monday’s edition. JEAN HARRISON GREGORY, 99, passed away Friday, April 26, 2013, at North Penn Manor, Wilkes-Barre. Funeral services will be held at 10 a.m. Thursday in St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, 35 S. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre. A full obituary will appear in Monday’s edition. Arrangements have been entrusted to the Harold C. Snowdon Home for Funerals Inc., 420 Wyoming Ave., Kingston. MICHAEL A. MILLS, of Anthracite Street, Pittston, passed away Friday, April 26, 2013, at home. Born June 9, 1959 in Wilkes-Barre, he was a son of the late Charles and Beverly Bergit Mills. He was a graduate of Dallas High School, class of 1977. He was a driver for Coca-Cola, Pittston, for more than 20 years and a bartender at Ike’s Bar, Wilkes-Barre. Mike was a loving father, brother, uncle and friend. He will always be remembered by the ones he loved and the ones who loved him so much. He is survived by son Kevin M. Mills, Harveys Lake; sisters, Karen Taylor, Wilkes-Barre, and Robin Santey, Hanover Township; brother, Richard Mills, Wilkes-Barre; and several nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by a brother, Robert Mills. Memorial service will be held from 2 to 5 p.m. on May 5 at 64 Anthracite St., WilkesBarre. Arrangements are by Mamary-Durkin Funeral Service, 59 Parrish St., Wilkes-Barre. MARGARET M. KAYE, 95, of Wilkes-Barre, passed away Thursday evening in St Luke’s Villa. Born in Plymouth, she was the daughter of the late Franklin and Helen Winslow Kaye. She was a graduate of the Plymouth schools and earned her bachelor’s degree from the former College Misericordia. She had worked for more than 50 years with the Baltimore family at WBRE radio and television stations. In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by a brother, Franklin J. Kaye. She is survived by her sister-in-law, Dolores Kaye; and numerous nieces, nephews, grand and great nieces and nephews. Graveside services will be held at 11:15 a.m. Monday in Mount Olivet Cemetery, Carverton. Arrangements have been entrusted to the Daniel J. Hughes Funeral & Cremation Service, 617 Carey Ave., WilkesBarre. FLORENCE J. PETROSKY, 83, a lifelong resident of Old Forge, passed away Saturday morning, April 27, 2013, at Geisinger Community Medical Center in Scranton. She graduated from Old Forge High School, class of 1947. Her husband Felix preceded her in death. Florence is survived by her sons, Gerard Petrosky of Binghamton, N.Y., and Kenneth Petrosky and wife, Michele, of Springbrook Township.; her grandson, Russell Petrosky and wife, Mary, of Johnson City, N.Y.; granddaughters, Tracy Petrosky of Binghamton, N.Y., and Amanda, Lauren and Jessica Petrosky, all of Springbrook; her brother and sister-in-law, Al and Joanne Michaels, of The Woodlands, Texas; as well many nieces and nephews. Funeral services are at 9:15 a.m. Tuesday from the Thomas P. Kearney Funeral Home Inc., 517 N. Main St., Old Forge, with 10 a.m. Mass of Christian Burial in Holy Rosary Church, Duryea. Friends may call from 6 to 9 p.m. Monday. ANN CHRISTINA RITCHEY, 97, formerly of Barney Street, Wilkes-Barre, and a resident of Hampton House, Hanover Township, passed away Saturday morning. Funeral arrangements are pending from the George A. Strish Inc. Funeral Home, 105 N. Main St., Ashley.
MORE OBITUARIES, Page 2A

Sister Margaret Mary Kane, IHM
April 23, 2013

Charles A. Sgarlat
April 25, 2013

Marian (Seniuk) Williams
April 27, 2013

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ister Margaret Mary Kane, IHM, (formerly known as Sister St. Margaret Mary) of the Sisters, Servants of the Immaculate Heart of Mary died on Tuesday, April 23, 2013, at Jefferson Hospital in Philadelphia. She was born on June 2, 1939, in Wilkes-Barre, and given the name Rose Ann. She was the daughter of the late Thomas Richard and Margaret Gibbons Kane. She entered the IHM Congregation on Sept. 8, 1956, and made her temporary profession of vows on March 12, 1959, and her final profession of vows on March 12, 1964. Sister Margaret Mary served as a teacher at the following schools: St. John the Evangelist Elementary School in Binghamton, N.Y., from 1959 to 1965; St. Patrick’s Elementary School in Scranton, from 1965 to 1967 and 1975 to 1978; Holy Trinity Elementary School in Poughkeepsie, N.Y., from 1967 to 1970; Our Lady of Mercy Elementary School in Forest Hills, N.Y., from 1970 to 1975; and at Notre Dame Elementary School in East Stroudsburg, from 2007 to 2013. Sister served as principal at the following schools: Holy Name of Jesus Elementary School in Forty Fort, from 1978 to 1980; Our Lady of Grace Montessori School in Manhasset, N.Y., from 1980 to 1989; and St. Clare’s Elementary School in Scranton, from 1989 to 2007. Sister Margaret Mary was a certified Montessori teacher in the states of New York and Pennsylvania. She served on various diocesan committees and also as a consultant for the Center for Montessori Teacher Education for the state of New York. From 2007 until the time of her death, Sister Margaret Mary served as Montessori pre-primary

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teacher at Notre Dame School in East Stroudsburg. She received a bachelor of science and a master of science degree in education from Marywood College. She was preceded in death by four brothers, Thomas, Joseph, Gerard and Dr. Dennis; and five sisters, Alice Gallagher, Helen Simoson, Kathryn Schaal, Sister Gabriel, IHM, and Margaret Mary Williams. She is survived by a brother, Frank E. Kane (wife Virginia) of Ponte Vedra, Fla.; and two sisters, Rita K. Stuewe (husband Dennis) of Somerset, N.J., and Sister Mary Alice, IHM, of East Stroudsburg; and nieces and nephews. The funeral will be at 11 a.m. Monday with Mass of Christian Burial at the IHM Center, 2300 Adams Ave., Scranton. Friends may call at the IHM Center from 3 to 5:30 p.m. today. A prayer service will be held at 4 p.m. Interment will follow Mass on Monday at St. Catherine’s Cemetery in Moscow. Memorial contributions may be made to support the retired IHM Sisters c/o the IHM Sisters Retirement Fund, IHM Center, 2300 Adams Avenue, Scranton, PA 18509.

harles A. Sgarlat, 84, of West Turner Street, Forty Fort, died on Thursday morning at his home. Born in Luzerne on June 26, 1928, he was a son of Frank B. and Margrette Earnest Sgarlat. He moved to Forty Fort in 1937 and attended Forty Fort schools. Before retiring he was part owner, secretary and treasurer of Frank B. Sgarlat Sand and Gravel Co., Forty Fort, and F.B. Sgarlat Realty Co. He was a member of Forty Fort United Methodist Church, Forty Fort Fire Co., Kingston Lodge No. 395, F & AM and Irem Temple. Preceding him in death were his wife of 61 years, Corrine Bovard Sgarlat, who died on April 4, 2008; brothers, James, George, Robert, Joseph, Harry and William; and sisters, twin girls, Mertle, Mary and Stella. Surviving are his three sons, Richard and his wife, Wendy, Overland Park, Kan., David A. and his wife, Deborah, Forty Fort, and Robert and his wife, Helen, Forty Fort; nine grandchildren; 15 great-grandchildren; and many nieces and nephews. Private graveside service will

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be held at 1 p.m. Monday at Fern Knoll Burial Park, 100 Midland Drive, Dallas, with the Rev. Dr. Philip T. Wanck officiating. The interment will follow. Arrangements entrusted to the Hugh B. Hughes & Son Inc. Funeral Home, 1044 Wyoming Ave., Forty Fort. Memorial contributions, if desired, can be made to the Forty Fort/Kingston Ambulance Association, 600 Wyoming Ave., Kingston, PA 18704. For information or to send the family an online message of condolence, visit the funeral home’s website at www.hughbhughes.com.

Elizabeth C. Harring R.N.
April 26, 2013

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James Himlin
April 26, 2013

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ames Himlin, 47, of Yatesville, passed away Friday, April 26, 2013, in Fox Subacute Center, Mechanicsburg. Born in Wilkes-Barre on June 11, 1965, he was the son of Antoinette Tozzi Himlin of Yatesville and the late James Himlin. He was a graduate of Pittston Area High School. He enjoyed fishing, quad riding, and watching wrestling, NASCAR and the Philadelphia Eagles, as well as attending monster truck jamborees. In addition to his father, he was preceded in death by a sister, Kelly Ann Himlin Garmize; and a brother, Christopher Himlin. Surviving are his mother, Antoinette Tozzi Himlin; and brothers, Joseph and Vincent Himlin, all of Yatesville. Also surviving are a nephew, Christopher Tilley; aunts, uncles and cousins.

Funeral services will be at 9 a.m. Tuesday at the Peter J. Adonizio Funeral Home, 251 William St., Pittston. Interment will be in St. Rocco’s Cemetery. Friends may call from 5 to 8 p.m. Monday at the funeral home. Online condolences may be made at www. peterjadoniziofuneralhome.com.

lizabeth C. Harring R.N., 83, of Wilkes-Barre, passed away on Friday, April 26, 2013, in Hospice Community Care at Geisinger South Wilkes-Barre. She was born in Bethlehem on Sept. 22, 1929, a daughter of the late John and Dorothy Dugal Gilmore. Elizabeth was a graduate of Forty Fort High School and the Wilkes-Barre General Hospital School of Nursing. She was employed for 42 years as a registered nurse, having worked for 19 years at the WilkesBarre General Hospital and later as a private duty nurse. She was a member of the Wilkes-Barre General Hospital School of Nursing Alumni Association and a member of the Private Duty Nurses Association. Elizabeth was a member of St. Mark’s Lutheran Church in Wilkes-Barre, where she was a member of its Ladies Aide Society and served as a Sunday school teacher and as a pastie baker. Elizabeth and her husband, William, loved to travel. She was also an associate member of the Calvary Bible Church in WilkesBarre. She was preceded in death by her brother, John Gilmore, and by her sister, Ethel Yurko. She is survived by her husband of 60 years, William J. Harring; her sister-in-law and her husband, Doris and Stanley Jablowski, St.

John’s, Mich.; brother-in-law and his wife, Richard and Joyce Harring, Shavertown; nieces and nephews. Funeral services will be held at 10 a.m. Tuesday from the Nat & Gawlas Funeral Home, 89 Park Ave., Wilkes-Barre. The Rev. Mary E. Laufer, pastor of St. Mark’s Lutheran Church, Wilkes-Barre and the Rev. Sam Garnett, pastor of Calvary Bible Church, WilkesBarre, will officiate. Interment will be in Dorrance Cemetery, Dorrance Township. Friends may call from 5 to 8 p.m. Monday at the funeral home. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to the charity of the donor’s choice. Online condolences may be sent by visiting Elizabeth’s obituary at www.natandgawlasfuneralhome.com.

rs. Marian (Seniuk) Williams, 81, of Hanover Township, fell asleep in the Lord early Saturday morning in the Wilkes-Barre General Hospital following a brief illness. Born May 4, 1931 in WilkesBarre, she was a daughter to the late John and Margaret Seniuk. She was a member of Saints Peter and Paul Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church, North WilkesBarre, where she graduated from the former parish school, later graduating from high school. Mrs. Williams was very active with her parish, previously devoting much of her time to various church committees. Until her retirement, Mrs. Williams worked in the area garment industry as a floor lady. She is remembered by those who knew and loved her as being a loving, devoted wife, mother, grandmother and faithful parishioner. She was preceded in death by her husband, Mr. David T. Williams, on Sept. 1, 2005. At the time of his passing, they shared 55 years of married life together. She was also preceded by several brothers and a sister. Surviving are her children, David J. Williams and his wife, Kathleen of Dallas, and Debra A. Kovatch and her husband, Lawrence, of York; grandchildren, Daniel, Ellen and Kathrine Williams; Matthew, Laura and Molly Kovatch; and numerous nieces and nephews. Funeral services with Panachida will be private and at the convenience of Marian’s family from the John V. Morris Family Funeral Homes Inc. North Wilkes-Barre location, with Divine Liturgy in her beloved parish of Saints Peter and Paul Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church. The Rev. Paul Wolensky, her pastor, will serve as celebrant. Interment will follow next to her husband in the parish cemetery, Plains Township. There will be no formal public visitation. In lieu of floral tributes, memorial contributions may be made in Marian’s name to Ss. Peter & Paul Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church, 635 N. River St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18705 or to the Wyoming Valley Children’s Association, 1133 Wyoming Ave., Forty Fort, PA 18704. To send Mrs. Williams’ family online words of comfort, friendship and support, please visit our family’s website at www.JohnVMorrisFuneralHomes.com.

OBITUARY POLICY
The Times Leader publishes free obituaries, which have a 27-line limit, and paid obituaries, which can run with a photograph. A funeral home representative can call the obituary desk at (570) 829-7224, send a fax to (570) 829-5537 or e-mail to tlobits@timesleader.com. If you fax or e-mail, please call to confirm. Obituaries must be submitted by 9 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Obituaries must be sent by a funeral home or crematory, or must name who is handling arrangements, with address and phone number.

Shirley M. Lewis
April 26, 2013
Shirley M. Lewis, 80, passed away Friday, April 26, 2013 at Bonham Nursing Center, Stillwater. She was born on March 8, 1933 in Bloomingdale, a daughter of the late Loren and Margaret Bowman Culver. Prior to retiring, Shirley was employed for many years at Bonham Nursing Center. She was preceded in death by a daughter, Lucinda Lewis; a son, John Loren Lewis; and sisters, Kate Hart and Loretta Steinruk. Surviving are her husband, John Lewis; a daughter, Carrie Jackson and her husband Richard, New Jersey; grandchildren, Nicole Dunn, Megan Nahas and Lauren Williams; great grandchildren, Matdison Dunn, Bryce Dunn and Logan Nahas; a sister, Connie Ridall, Huntington Mills; and brothers, Delano Culver, Pennsylvania, and James Culver, Kingston. Funeral services will be held at 10 a.m. Monday from the Clarke Piatt Funeral Home Inc., 6 Sunset Lake Road, Hunlock Creek, with the Rev. Terry Hughes, officiating. Interment will be in the Bloomingdale Cemetery, Bloomingdale. Friends may call at the funeral home on Monday from 9 a.m. until the time of service.

FUNERALS
BEDNARSKI - John, Mass of Christian Burial 10 a.m. Monday in Holy Family Parish, 574 Bennett St., Luzerne. Friends may call 2 to 6 p.m. today at S.J. Grontkowski Funeral Home, 530 W. Main St., Plymouth. BERNARDONI - Ruth, funeral services 8:30 a.m. Monday at Gubbiotti Funeral Home, 1030 Wyoming Ave., Exeter. Mass of Christian Burial 9 a.m. at St. Anthony of Padua Church, St. Barbara Parish, 28 Memorial St., Exeter. Friends may call 6 to 8 p.m. today at the funeral home. CONNORS - Martin, funeral services 9 a.m. Monday at Peter J. Adonizio Funeral Home, 251 William St., Pittston. Mass of Christian Burial 9:30 a.m. in St. John the Evangelist Church, 35 William St., Pittston. Friends may call 4 to 7 p.m. today at the funeral home. CONWAY - Jeanne, Mass of Christian Burial 9:30 a.m. Monday in Immaculate Conception Church, 605 Luzerne Ave., West Pittston. Friends may call 2 to 5 p.m. today at Corcoran Funeral Home Inc., 20 S. Main St., Plains Township. DONOWSKI - Violet, Mass of Christian Burial 1 p.m. Monday in the Church of the Nativity BVM, Tunkhannock. Friends may call 1 to 3 p.m. today at Sheldon-Kukuchka Funeral Home Inc., 73 W. Tioga St., Tunkhannock. FEDOR - John, Mass of Christian Burial 11 a.m. Monday in St. Nicholas Church, 226 S. Washington St., Wilkes-Barre. Friends may call 5 to 8 p.m. today at Nat & Gawlas Funeral Home, 89 Park Ave., Wilkes-Barre. JACOBS - Frank, friends may call 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. today at Gubbiotti Funeral Home, 1030 Wyoming Ave., Exeter. Services will follow. PACE - Ann, funeral services 9 a.m. Monday at Paul F. Leonard Funeral Home, 575 N. Main St., Pittston. Mass of Christian Burial 9:30 a.m. in Our Lady of the Eucharist Church, Pittston. Friends may call 4 to 7 p.m. today. RILEY - Karen, memorial services 11 a.m. Tuesday at Good Shepherd Church, 87 S. Hunter Highway, Drums. Friends may call 10 a.m. until services. ROWLES - Kenneth, funeral service 1 p.m. today at Williams-Hagen Funeral Home, 114 W. Main St., Plymouth. Friends may call noon until services. SCHMITT - Carl Jr., memorial service 11 a.m. Tuesday at Hugh B. Hughes & Son Inc., Funeral Home, 1044 Wyoming Ave., Forty Fort. Friends may call 10 a.m. until service. SOWYRDA - Eve, funeral service 9 a.m. Monday at Yeosock Funeral Home, 40 S. Main St., Plains Township. Requiem Service 9:30 a.m. in Holy Trinity Russian Orthodox Church. Friends may call 5 to 8 p.m. today.

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TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
port. “Therefore, it is unknown to what extent the public in these areas is aware of Find the GAO report, these emergency the NRC’s preparedness response procedures, and and Casey’s how they would letter at timesleader. respond in the event of a radiocom. logical emergency.” “Without better information on the public’s awareness and potential response in areas outside the 10-mile zone, NRC may not be providing the best planning guidance to licensees and state and local authorities,” the report states. Casey notes that 10 million people, or 80 percent of Pennsylvanians, live within 50 miles of a nuclear plant. “We need to ensure that appropriate plans are in place and that residents are fully informed about emergency procedures outside of the 10-mile radius,” he said. He wants the NRC to survey residents within a 50-mile radius of nuclear plants to gauge their knowledge and level of

N E W S

SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013

PAGE 15A

NRC
Continued from Page 1A

requested more information to ensure appropriate procedures are in place in the event of a disaster at a U.S. nuclear power plant following the meltdown at the plant in Fukushima, Japan, caused by equipment failure after an earthquake and tsunami hit in March 2011. The GAO report, titled “Emergency Preparedness: NRC Needs to Better Understand Likely Public Response to Radiological Incidents,” found that people living in the 10-mile zone are generally well informed about emergency preparedness procedures, including evacuation and sheltering in place, and are likely to follow directions from local and state authorities in the event of a radiological emergency. “In contrast, (the NRC and Federal Emergency Management Agency) do not require similar information to be provided to the public outside of the 10-mile zone and have not studied public awareness in this area,” according to the re-

Senator wants survey

PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER

PPL’s nuclear power plant in Salem Township is about 15 miles from Wilkes-Barre.

preparedness. There are five nuclear power plants in Pennsylvania. One of them — the Susquehanna Steam Electric Station — is in Salem Township, near Berwick, about 15 miles as the crow flies from Wilkes-Barre and 12 miles from Hazleton. The next clos-

est to Luzerne County is Three Mile Island near Harrisburg. Officials at Fukushima had recommended that people within 12 miles of the plant evacuate and within 12 to 18 miles of it shelter in place. The NRC had recommended that Americans within 50 miles of the Fukushi-

ma plant evacuate. The GAO also questioned the accuracy of NRC’s estimate that a 20-percent “shadow evacuation” would occur if an evacuation within a 10-mile radius of a plant was recommended. A shadow evacuation is an evacu-

NRC will ‘take a look’

ation by people who are not instructed to evacuate but take it upon themselves to do so in order to err on the side of caution. The GAO questioned whether a shadow evacuation greater than 20 percent would slow down the evacuation of people in the 10-mile zone because of clogged roadways. NRC spokesman Neil Sheehan said the NRC has conducted studies that determine a 20-percent shadow evacuation is a “reasonable estimate.” Even if it were a higher percentage, the NRC does not believe it would impede the evacuation of people within the 10-mile radius and “there would be no significant impact on traffic movement.” Sheehan said the NRC would “take a look at” whether people in the 10- to 50-mile radius have adequate information available to them about sheltering in place, evacuation routes and emergency shelters. “Phone books have the information and you can find it on many websites,” he said. Sheehan said NRC studies “have indicated that the public heeds the guidance being provided to state and local authorities to either evacuate or shelter in place.”

BOSTON
Continued from Page 1A

TYSON
Continued from Page 1A

IF YOU GO
Mike Tyson: Undisputed Truth • Wednesday, 7:30 p.m. • F.M. Kirby Center for the Performing Arts, 71 Public Square, Wilkes-Barre • Tickets $49.50, $64.50; VIP ticket $300 includes meet-and-greet after the show. Call: 826-1100

months before the April 15 attack — a disclosure that deepens the mystery around the Tsarnaev family and marks the first time American authorities have acknowledged that Zubeidat Tsarnaeva was under investigation before the tragedy. Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is charged with joining with his older brother, Tamerlan Tsarnaev, now dead, in setting off the shrapnel-packed pressurecooker bombs. The brothers are ethnic Chechens from Russia who came to the United States about a decade ago with their parents. Investigators have said it appears the brothers were angry about the U.S. wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. Two government officials, speaking on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak publicly about the investigation, said the CIA had Zubeidat Tsarnaeva’s name added to the terror database along with that of her son Tamerlan after Russia contacted the agency in 2011 with concerns that the two were religious militants. About six months earlier, the FBI investigated mother and son, also at Russia’s request, one of the officials said. The FBI found no ties to terrorism. Previously U.S. officials had said only that the FBI investigated Tamerlan Tsarnaev. In an interview from Russia, Tsarnaeva said Friday that she has never been linked to terrorism. “It’s all lies and hypocrisy,” she said from Dagestan. “I’m sick and tired of all this nonsense that they make up about me and my children. People know me as a regular person,

Tyson, 46, had a storied career — he was one of the world’s most recognized athletes in the 1980s and 1990s — and a troubled life that included a prison stint for rape, financial problems and two failed marriages. The idea for the play came, Tyson said, when he and third wife, Kiki, were watching “A Bronx Tale,” Chazz Palminteri’s story about a father who worries when a local gangster befriends his son in the Bronx in the 1960s. “I said to my wife, I think I can do this,” Tyson said. “I can talk about my life from an artistic point of view.” Tyson’s show sold out for two weeks in Las Vegas and two more on Broadway. His 10-week tour includes 36 cities, including Chicago, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Houston and Washington, D.C. During the interview, Tyson asked where Wilkes-Barre was. When he learned it was near Scranton, he spoke fondly about his years as an amateur boxer in Scranton and Jessup and his friendship with Joe Munley, a former sparring partner. “Joe Munley is a good friend,” he said. “The Munleys are great people. Scranton people are real people, man. They’re hard workers. I love that area.” Munley, 58, a real estate investor, has seen Tyson’s show three times in New York City. “It’s excellent,” Munley said. “He’s true-blue and he talked about everything — from when he was a kid growing up robbing old ladies to get money to eat to his boxing to his time in prison to how he blew millions of dollars.” Munley said Tyson was always kind to him and his family. The ex-champ has settled down, said Munley, having lost more than 100 pounds to get down to his former fighting weight of 220 pounds. “He wants to be a good husband and father,” Munley said. Munley said he would wear a steel helmet and protective gear when he sparred with Tyson some 25 years ago. “He still broke my ribs,” he said. “He is the most devastating puncher I’ve ever been in the ring with — I never took a punch as vicious as Mike Tyson’s.” Munley faced Jerry Quarry, Duane Bobick, Mitch “Blood” Green and other top heavyweights, he said. Munley said Tyson spent his 20th birthday in Scranton. Munley was in the room when ABCTV’s Barbara Walters interviewed Tyson, and he has been to Tyson’s home many times. “After he knocked out Marvis Frasier in the first round, we came back to Scranton and I took him to Farley’s for dinner,” Munley said. During his amateur career, Tyson fought several times in Lackawanna County. Munley said one opponent — he can’t remember his name — gave Tyson a good battle. “I’ve been everywhere with him,” Munley said. “I’m glad to see him the way he is now. He’s always

been good-hearted.”

Sell-out crowds

Aaron Hern, 11, of Martinez, Calif. sits in a wheelchair with his mom, Katherine, and dad, Alan, as they visit the Boston site where he was injured by the second marathon bomb.

AP PHOTO

and I’ve never been mixed up in any criminal intentions, especially any linked to terrorism.” Tsarnaeva faces shoplifting charges in the U.S. over the theft of more than $1,624 worth of women’s clothing from a Lord & Taylor department store in Natick in 2012. Earlier this week, she said she has been assured by lawyers that she would not be arrested if she traveled to the U.S., but she said she was still deciding whether to go. The suspects’ father, Anzor Tsarnaev, said that he would leave Russia soon for the United States to visit one son and lay the other to rest. A team of investigators from

the U.S. Embassy in Moscow questioned both parents in Russia this week. Late this week, Dzhohkar Tsarnaev was taken from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, where he was recovering from a throat wound and other injuries suffered during an attempt to elude police, and was transferred to the Federal Medical Center Devens, about 40 miles from Boston, the U.S. Marshals Service said. The facility, at a former Army base, treats federal prisoners. “It’s where he should be; he doesn’t need to be here anymore,” said Beth Israel patient Linda Zamansky, who thought

his absence could reduce stress on bombing victims who have been recovering at the hospital under tight security. Two college buddies of his — Azamat Tazhayakov and Dias Kadyrbayev — have been interviewed at length, twice, by FBI agents and have cooperated fully, said Kadyrbayev’s lawyer, Robert Stahl, a former federal prosecutor. They were detained April 20 after being questioned in connection with the attacks, but are not suspects, Stahl said. They are being detained at a county jail in Boston for violating their student visas by not regularly attending classes, he said.

Tyson’s remarkable life: lofty highs, disturbing lows
By BILL O’BOYLE boboyle@timesleader.com

‘Devastating puncher’

WILKES-BARRE — Mike Tyson, once the undisputed heavyweight champion of the world, has led a public life that took him from the dim boxing gyms of upstate New York to Madison Square Garden. Along the way in the 1980s and 1990s there were nightclub scenes, days in court and a personal life filled with trouble. Despite the self-inflicted turmoil, Tyson accomplished something no boxer had ever done before: he won the three biggest belts in prizefighting— the WBC, WBA and IBF world heavyweight titles. Following are highlights of Tyson’s life and career from the website biography.com: • Mike Tyson, born on June 30 1966, and was the youngest person at age 20 to become the heavyweight boxing champion of the world. • He lost the title in 1990 to little-known Buster Douglas in Japan and later served

three years in prison over rape charges. • He subsequently earned further notoriety by biting Evander Holyfield’s ear during a re-match in 1997. • He has gone on to appear in several films, including a documentary on his life. • As a youth, he frequently ran into trouble with police over his petty criminal activities, and by the age of 13 he had been arrested more than 30 times. • Tyson’s bad behavior landed him in the Tryon School for Boys, a reform school in upstate New York. • In 1980 he was introduced the aspiring boxer to legendary boxing manager Constantine “Cus” D’Amato, who had a gym in Catskill, N.Y. D’Amato immediately recognized Tyson’s promise as a heavyweight contender. The relationship between D’Amato and Tyson was more than that of a professional trainer and a boxer—it was also one of a father and son.

D’Amato took Tyson under his wing, and when the 14-year-old was paroled from Tryon in September 1980, he entered into D’Amato’s full-time custody. • By 1986, at the age of 20, Tyson had garnered a 22-0 record—21 of the fights won by knockout. On Nov. 22, 1986, Tyson finally reached his goal: his first title fight against Trevor Berbick for the World Boxing Council (WBC) heavyweight championship. Tyson won the title by a knockout in the second round. At the age of 20 years and four months he beat Patterson’s record, becoming the youngest heavyweight champion in history. • Tyson married television actress Robin Givens on Feb. 7, 1988, in New York. The marriage was tumultuous and ended in 1989. • Tyson’s winning streak came to an end on Feb. 11, 1990, when he lost his championship belt to boxer Buster Douglas in Tokyo, Japan. • In July 1991 Tyson was

accused of raping Desiree Washington, a Miss Black American contestant. Eight months later Tyson was found guilty on one count of rape and two counts of deviant sexual conduct in Indiana. Tyson was released on March 25, 1995, after serving three years of a six-year sentence. • On June 28, 1997, Tyson bit off the right ear of Evander Holyfield during a match. His license was suspended and he was fined $3 million. • On March 5, 1998, the boxer filed a $100 million lawsuit in U.S. District Court in New York against Don King, accusing the promoter of cheating him out of millions of dollars. King and Tyson settled out of court for $14 million. Tyson allegedly lost unknown millions in the process. • After losing several more fights throughout 2003 and 2005, including one to Lenox Lewis after Tyson threatened to “eat his children,” Tyson announced his retirement.

TL: What’s your biggest regret? Tyson: “There aren’t too many regrets. Maybe I should have saved my money or picked better friends. But if I didn’t make mistakes, I wouldn’t have learned anything. Maybe I had a little too much in life; I wasn’t used to all the attention and having a lot of money. At this moment, I’m content. I want more, but I’m happy with my life as it is.” TL: What’s your biggest accomplishment? Tyson: “Getting off of drugs and getting away from a lifestyle that wasn’t good for me. Getting out of prison was big too. And I’m not humiliating my family anymore.” TL: Talk about Cus D’Amato Tyson: He was the best thing that ever happened to me. He gave me the idea that I had the ability to be great. He never held me back. He always encouraged me. He was my stage dad. He pushed and pushed and pushed and pushed. He was intense.” TL: What happened in the Evander Holyfield fight to make you bite a piece of his ear off? Tyson: “Awww, it was the heat of the moment, man. It happened. Look, we’re human beings; no wait, we’re animals taught to be human beings. We make mistakes and we learn.” TL: How’s your personal/family life? Tyson: “Right now this is the closest I’ve ever been with my kids. If it doesn’t get any better, I’m OK. But I want it to get better; I talk to them all the time, as much as I can.” TL: What about Don King? Tyson: “What about him? Hey look, I’m not mad at nobody. Bygones are bygones.” TL: Other than Cus, who has influenced you the most? Tyson: “A lot of people have done a lot for me. They’ve worked with me; unsung heroes. Like the drug rehab people and counselors. They really helped me.” TL: What advice would you offer young people today? Tyson: “Find somebody you admire and respect and look up to them. Make sure they have good moral standards and a compassion for kids and their wellbeing. Too many kids have no hope for a better life. Look at the kids in Chicago killing each other. If they had hope, they would do better with their lives.” TL: Ever been to Northeastern Pennsylvania before? Tyson: “Scranton, man, and Jessup. I fought there as an amateur. Scranton people are my kind of people; they’re real people, hard workers.” TL: Why should people go to your show? Tyson: “It’s a great show. I give it my all. People will like what I have to say.”

Here is a 10-round blow-byblow interview with Tyson:

PAGE 16A

SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013

N E W S

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

DOWNTOWN
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ARREST
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More downtown changes

City Economic Development Director Greg Barrouk points to other development activity in older buildings around the theater: • Several commercial tenants are slated to move into the Hampton Park building at the corner of East Northampton and South Washington streets, which is undergoing a $1.5 million rehab. Owner Nicholas Dye, of D&D Realty Group, said he’s already sold two of the 13 condominiums in the building without marketing them. • The city is preparing to issue a public request for proposals from private developers interested in overhauling three attached properties at the corner of South Main and Northampton streets, including the former Norton’s dress shop. The city purchased these properties, which face the Main Street lofts above the theater complex, at prior back-tax sales, projecting they would be a key part of downtown redevelopment. • Michael Taylor and his wife, Ilona, are opening Ocean Gold jewelry store in the former Frank Clark Jeweler building. “There’s some momentum here, and the momentum is undeniable,” said Larry Newman, executive director of the Diamond City Partnership, which supports downtown businesses. “There’s been a lot of good positive activity occurring in the vicinity of Northampton and Main.” Newman has a soft spot for this part of the downtown because it largely dodged demolition, particularly after the 1972 flood. “This section still has the pre-flood character of the older three- and four-story buildings, 20- to 25-feet wide,” Newman said. “Those are the buildings that have historic character.”

The kitchen area inside a condominium in the Hampton Park building in Wilkes-Barre.

The former Hampton House in Wilkes-Barre is currently being renovated.

PETE G. WILCOX PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER

Nicholas Dye, left, of D & D Realty Group in Scranton describes amenities found in the upscale apartments being built in the former Hampton House building on East Northampton Street in Wilkes-Barre. Looking on is Adam Donahue of Deadline Construction Co. of Scranton, a contractor working on the renovations.

Newman and Barrouk stressed the projects unfolding around the theater involve the private funding that was promised to result from past government investment toward the theater project. Dye said he wouldn’t put $1.5 million on the line for his project if he did not see an upswing. The sale of all 21 condominiums above the theater project was a driving factor in his investment. “We are excited about what is going on in downtown WilkesBarre,” he said. The Hampton building, which had been vacant about a decade, will have a mix of retail, office and residential space. The Ibop Coffee Company is set to open a coffee shop in the building in a week or two. An ophthalmologist also is locating there in the near future, and a beauty and wellness spa is opening this summer, he said. The building’s 3,700-squarefeet of office space will feature a hub allowing small businesses and entrepreneurs to rent individual suites with a shared receptionist to reduce overhead.

Private investment

A basement fitness center for building workers and tenants also is in the works. The condominiums on the second and third floors will range from 850- to 1,800 square feet and be sold for $130,000 to $220,000, he said. The units have spa-like bathrooms. “We’re really trying to create a high-end urban lifestyle at an affordable price,” he said. Luzerne County Councilman Rick Williams, an architect and one of the owners of the corner building next to the former tattoo parlor, said he’s “optimistic” the neighborhood is in a revival. “We’re thrilled these events are happening,” he said. “Like changes to county government, changes to the urban fabric come in incremental little steps.” Pat Reilly, who operates Downtown Dojo Karate in Williams’ building, which is owned by FCD Realty, said the tattoo parlor next door has been vacant since he opened his karate studio about four years ago. “I’m excited to hear that it sold. I’d love to see some foot traffic next door,” Reilly said. Reilly hopes the owners of

several empty storefronts in his row and nearby recognize the potential to attract college students, workers and theater goers and choose to invest in building improvements and marketing tenants. Michael Miscavage, the longtime owner of Top of the Slopes ski shop a few storefronts down from the karate place, said he’s encouraged by activity. He and his family own three buildings in the row, including the vacant five-story Allegheny Building. Miscavage said he was told the Allegheny was the “fanciest hotel in town” when it opened in 1912. He and his father operated a rooming house there. He recently updated the electrical service and has been making other improvements, though he hasn’t actively sought tenants. “The downtown was great, then it went downhill. It seems to be getting better with more money being pumped into the area,” he said.

Owner’s viewpoint

Michaelene Coffee, who owns the Place One women’s clothing store, celebrates the Taylors’ plans for the former Frank Clark

Jewelers next door and other activity around her but said the attached city-owned properties on the other side of her property are a concern. Coffee said she wants to invest thousands of dollars in a new awning with lighting for Place One, but not until the deteriorating roof of the Norton’s building is repaired. Shingles from the roof have been blowing off and ripping her awning. She said a bowling ball attached to the city-owned property by a prior owner for decorative purposes also dislodged and landed on the sidewalk in front of her store. Coffee opened her business in 1991 and doesn’t want to be anywhere else. She’s crossing her fingers a developer won’t be put off by the repairs required to renovate the adjoining properties. “It makes me sick having to look at my awning because I take great pride in my store, but I’m not going to invest that kind of money in a new one until the problems next door are addressed,” Coffee said. Barrouk said the proposals will determine if developers are interested in the city-owned

properties in a “prime location” near the theater. Real estate developer Joe Amato recently purchased the University Corners complex University Corners complex containing R/C Movies 14 and said he is attracting tenants for unoccupied storefront space, including Judd Shoval’s business, Ambit and Shoval. The loft-style condominiums above the complex are owned by a separate company. The city will look for mixeduse commercial and residential proposals for its properties at 69, 71 and 75 S. Main St., Barrouk said. The upper-level facades of the buildings in that cluster and the stretch containing the former tattoo parlor are “magnificent,” Barrouk said. “We want to keep the historical look of the rest of the block and match what’s been done at the movie theater site,” Barrouk said. “There’s a need and demand for more residential housing within the downtown, and that goes with the city’s philosophy of live, work and play in downtown WilkesBarre.”

is expected in court Monday. He faces up to life in prison, if convicted. The letters, which tests showed were tainted with ricin, were sent April 8 to Obama, Sen. Roger Wicker of Mississippi and Mississippi judge, Sadie Holland. Wicker spokesman Ryan Taylor said since the investigation was ongoing, the senator couldn’t comment. The first suspect fingered by the FBI was Paul Kevin Curtis, 45, an Elvis impersonator. He was arrested on April 17 at his Corinth, Miss., home, but the charges were dropped six days later and Curtis, who says he was framed, was released from jail. The focus then turned to Dutschke, who has ties to the former suspect, the judge and the senator. Earlier in the week, as investigators searched his primary residence in Tupelo, Dutschke told The Associated Press, “I don’t know how much more of this I can take.” “I’m a patriotic American. I don’t have any grudges against anybody. … I did not send the letters,” Dutschke said. Curtis’ attorney, Christi McCoy, said Saturday: “We are relieved but also saddened. This crime is nothing short of diabolical. I have seen a lot of meanness in the past two decades, but this stops me in my tracks.” Some of the language in the letters was similar to posts on Curtis’ Facebook page and they were signed, “I am KC and I approve this message.” Curtis’ signoff online was often similar. And Dutschke and Curtis were acquainted. Curtis said they had talked about possibly publishing a book on a conspiracy that Curtis insists he has uncovered to sell body parts on a black market. But he said they later had a feud. Curtis’ attorneys have said they believe their client was set up. An FBI agent testified that no evidence of ricin was found in searches of Curtis’ home. Curtis attorney Hal Neilson said the defense gave authorities a list of people who might have had a reason to hurt Curtis and Dutschke came up. Judge Holland also is a common link between the two men, and both know Wicker. Holland was the presiding judge in a 2004 case in which Curtis was accused of assaulting a Tupelo attorney a year earlier. Holland sentenced him to six months in the county jail. He served only part of the sentence, according to his brother. And Holland’s family has had political skirmishes with Dutschke. Her son, Steve Holland, a Democratic state representative, said he thinks his mother’s only other encounter with Dutschke was at a rally in the town of Verona in 2007, when Dutschke ran as a Republican against Steve Holland. Holland said his mother confronted Dutschke after he made a derogatory speech about the Holland family. She demanded that he apologize, which Holland says he did.

SEVEN-DAY FORECAST
TODAY
HIGH LOW

72° 49°
MON TUE

Clouds and sun

WED

Cooler with rain

60° 50° 60° 46° 64° 47°
THU FRI SAT

Rain and Clouds and drizzle breaks of possible sun

TEMPERATURES High/low Normal high/low Record high Record low PRECIPITATION 24 hrs ending 7 p.m. Month to date Normal m-t-d Year to date Normal y-t-d HEATING DEGREE DAYS

Wilkes-Barre/Scranton International Airport through 7 p.m. Saturday

ALMANAC

SUN & MOON
Sunrise Today 6:05 a.m. Sunset Today 7:58 p.m. Moonrise Today 11:29 p.m. Moonset Today 8:20 a.m.

ACROSS THE REGION TODAY
Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Syracuse 73/50

NATIONAL FORECAST
Seattle 58/45 Winnipeg 60/33 Billings 67/46 Minneapolis 77/51 Denver 79/46 Chicago 66/49 Kansas City 75/56 Montreal 70/50 Toronto 67/48 New York 72/54 Washington 71/55

69°/36° 64°/42° 93° (2009) 28° (2002) 0.00" 1.71" 2.99" 6.68" 9.94"

Albany 74/46

Binghamton 68/48 Towanda 71/46 Poughkeepsie 74/45

Detroit 59/52

Yesterday Month to date Season to date Last season to date Normal season to date RIVER LEVELS Susquehanna
Wilkes-Barre Towanda
In feet as of 7 a.m. Saturday.

Degree days are an indicator of energy needs. The more the total degree days, the more energy is necessary to heat.

12 432 5581 4777 5921

Stage
5.75 3.64 2.57 3.60

Chg
-0.06 -0.16 -0.04 -0.14

Fld Stg
22 16 16 18

68° 47° 68° 44° 63° 53°
Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2013

Times of sun and clouds

Mostly cloudy

Times of clouds and sun

Lehigh
Bethlehem Port Jervis

Delaware

Scranton 70/50 Wilkes-Barre Williamsport 72/49 New York May 2 May 9 70/50 72/54 Pottsville First Full State College 70/49 Allentown 64/50 70/48 Harrisburg Reading Philadelphia 71/49 May 18 May 25 69/51 71/54 THE POCONOS Highs: 63-69. Lows: 42-48. Times of clouds and sun today. A little rain late tonight. Cooler tomorrow with periods of rain. THE JERSEY SHORE Highs: 58-64. Lows: 46-52. Clouds and sun today. Mostly cloudy tonight. On-and-off rain and drizzle tomorrow afternoon. THE FINGER LAKES Highs: 70-76. Lows: 47-53. Sun followed by increasing clouds today. Mostly cloudy tonight with a little rain. NEW YORK CITY High: 72. Low: 54. Sun followed by increasing clouds today. Mostly cloudy tonight. Cooler tomorrow; a little afternoon rain. PHILADELPHIA High: 71. Low: 54. Clouds and sunshine today. A little rain late tonight. Cooler tomorrow with occasional rain and drizzle.

Last

New

San Francisco 69/50 Los Angeles 78/57

El Paso 83/59 Chihuahua 81/53 Houston 82/63 Monterrey 84/64

Atlanta 70/57

Miami 83/73

Summary: Thunderstorms will cause localized flooding from the Tennessee Valley through parts of the Southeast today. Meanwhile, temperatures will soar to near the 100-degree mark in the Southwest, with sunshine.
Anchorage Baltimore Boston Buffalo Charlotte Chicago Cleveland Dallas Denver

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation today. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Today 44/27/s 70/52/pc 67/47/s 71/52/pc 63/55/r 66/49/c 60/53/t 84/58/pc 79/46/s

Mon 41/33/pc 62/50/r 69/48/pc 65/52/sh 71/55/r 74/54/pc 66/53/c 86/63/pc 82/50/s

Honolulu Indianapolis Las Vegas Milwaukee New Orleans Norfolk Okla. City Orlando Phoenix

Today 87/69/pc 66/53/c 93/71/s 63/47/pc 77/62/t 68/56/c 81/57/s 85/64/pc 100/71/s

Mon 85/69/pc 74/55/pc 95/75/s 66/52/pc 80/63/t 67/60/r 85/60/s 84/66/t 102/72/s

Pittsburgh Portland, ME St. Louis San Francisco Seattle Wash., DC

Today 61/52/r 62/40/s 69/53/pc 69/50/pc 58/45/sh 71/55/pc

Mon 69/52/c 65/43/pc 80/61/pc 70/50/pc 55/39/sh 62/57/r

Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

THE TIMES LEADER

Sunday Extra
timesleader.com

SECTION B

SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013

Choreographer ran off, joined the circus, so to speak
By MARY THERESE BIEBEL mbiebel@timesleader.com

Heather Pitcavage’s first-grade students Andres Goodrich, Zoe Hakim, Adreanna Griffith, Isaiah Samuel, Madalyn Thomas and Leauna Byam slide recycled bottles onto pieces of wood to help build a section of a greenhouse wall.

CLARK VAN ORDEN PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER

green spirit
By MARY THERESE BIEBEL - mbiebel@timesleader.com

Dallas students bottling up the

allas Elementary School teacher Heather Pitcavage loves plants so much, she’s brought marigolds, ivy, geraniums and many other botanical specimens into her classroom. If you want to know what all this green goodness is like, just ask the firstgraders. “Some are shaped like spiders,” 7-year-old Carleigh Thomas said. “She has spikey ones!” another child added. “There’s one that looks like a tree!” Thanks to their science lessons, the students have been learning how plants help people and the environment. “They give us air,” 7-year-old Scarlett Hobson-Tomascik said. Soon the youngsters will have anoth-

D

Carleigh Thomas, 7, a first-grader at Dallas Elementary, collects plastic bottles that will go into building a wall of a greenhouse made from recycled plastic bottles.

er place to plant some greenery. With help from Dallas Elementary School staff and Misericordia University students, they are building a greenhouse using lots and lots of recycled water bottles. “We’ve got 2,500 already, and we can use more,” Pitcavage said on a recent Friday afternoon as her first-grade students and some helpers from other classes slid the empty bottles (bottles had been cut off by a grown-up) onto slender pieces of lumber. The plastic will have the same kind of effect as greenhouse glass in creating a warm place to nurture seedlings. “One of my goals is to beautify the school,” Pitcavage said. “I was a student here myself in fifth and sixth grade.”
See GREEN, Page 2B

If you’ve ever seen Fred Tallaksen somersault as he zips along on inline skates, you might wonder if he spent his youth wheeling around the hills of Scranton, where he grew up. “No,” the award-winning choreographer said with a laugh. “I did spend lots of time at the roller rink, but I was a dancer and singer before I learned how to do all kinds of crazy stunts.” Nowadays he designs movement, including some crazy stunts, for performers as diverse as dancers and musicians, aerialists and cheerleaders, BMX riders and skateTallaksen boarders — and even an entire circus. If you attend the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey show in Wilkes-Barre Township this weekend, you’ll see his work. The Northeastern Pennsylvania native is the man behind the big production numbers and even the way the two clowns, Anton and Victor, propel forward the arc of the circus’ “Fully Charged” story. “Anton keeps stealing the power, pulling the plug on the lights and causing all kinds of mischief,” Tallaksen said. “He learns you can’t hog all the energy for yourself. You have to learn to share.” Tallaksen has enjoyed sharing the limelight ever since his student days, when a part in the musical “Pippin” convinced him he really didn’t want to go into medicine (an earlier ambition) or computer science (his major field at the University of Scranton). Dance teacher Gail Ercoli of Jessup was the “Pippin” choreographer and convinced Tallaksen he had the talent to become a successful professional. “She really believed in me and helped me believe in myself,” said Tallaksen, who returned to Scranton this week for a hometown visit and to take his mother, Catherine Tallaksen, to the show. His mom and his late father, also named Fred Tallaksen, had envisioned a different kind of career for their son but later were happy for him as he garnered success. Tallaksen has worked one on one with Madonna and has coached a multitude of celebrities, including Selena Gomez, Gwyneth Paltrow, Enrique Iglesias, David Spade, Valerie Bertinelli, Marisa Tomei, Queen Latifah and many others. He’s been living on the West Coast for several years but now is considering a move to New York, he said. What’s next? “Maybe Broadway,” he said.

By MARK KENNEDY Associated Press Drama Writer

A cargo-truck stage highlights the peril of immigrants
NEW YORK — The air inside the theater gets heavy. It gets hot, too, and the seats are not comfortable at all. By the time the show is over, you walk out thankful for a breeze and solid ground. That’s the point. The off-Broadway company Working Theater is presenting an immersive experience that’s as timely as it is powerful: Its play about immigrants sneaking across the border is being staged inside a 48-foot-long cargo container. Audiences at “La Ruta” — only 30 can fit per show — sit in the parked trailer on cardboard boxes as actors tell the story of a harrowing crossing for three people hidden in the freight trailer. “At the end of the show, you are feeling slightly stifled — that is intentional,” says Mark Plesent, Working Theater’s producing artistic director. “It’s part of the experience — to really make people understand the trial and tribulations of people crossing the border.” The idea of using a trailer was dreamed up by the playwright Ed Cardona Jr., who also works at the Columbia University School of Social Work. His other plays have explored the lives of people who live in America illegally. “I felt an obligation to write something about the journey or the sacrifices and the risks these folks take just to get here,” he said. “The idea was to toss everybody into the trailer and to give the audience an immersive experience that they share together.” Now in its 28th season, Working Theater is dedicated to producing plays for and about the working men and women of the city. It is putting on “La Ruta” — Spanish for “the road” — in collaboration with the Magnum Foundation, which supports the photography of social justice issues. The 75-minute show, which also includes projections, sound effects and the feeling of motion, runs until May 12 and will have made stops in four of New York’s boroughs. The company hopes it might perform it one day in U.S. border states. The play comes as the topic

of immigration reform is heating up in the U.S. Senate, with new legislation being proposed that would dramatically remake how America treats the 11 million immigrants in the country illegally. Working Theater commissioned “La Ruta” as part of a recent push to produce works that examine immigrants on the margins — people like domestic workers and those toiling in upstate poultry slaughterhouses. “All of us, particularly in New York, rely on undocumented workers and we really never think about what it took for them to get here and what it meant for them to come here,” Plesent says. “I feel like they
See STAGE, Page 2B

Cast members perform on a ‘truck stage’ during ‘LaRuta.’ The off-Broadway company Working Theater is presenting a play about immigrants sneaking across the border inside a 48-footlong cargo container.

AP PHOTO

by
355 Market Street in Kingston, PA 570.763.0044 | ArchComfort.com Tues – Thur 10 A M - 7P M Fri, Sat, Mon 10 A M - 5 PM

PAGE 2B SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013

E X T R A

www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER
CLARK VAN ORDEN/ THE TIMES LEADER

enealogists have long looked to the Social Security Death Master File, often referred to as the Social Security Death Index, for information about ancestors. But in recent years, concerned about the costly and damaging problem of identity theft, some federal authorities have begun to push measures that would limit or even abolish public access to the file. Genealogy organizations nationwide have protested these moves, arguing that it would be more logical for federal authorities to use the master file themselves to check for fraudulent income tax returns and other scams. Some of the proposed limits, such as keeping Social Security numbers of recently deceased people out of the public area for several years, probably wouldn’t hurt genealogists. But some members of Congress have argued for keeping the entire file out of public view permanently. Various bills have been proposed so far in 2013. For a summary, go to www.bcgcertification.org/blog. Recent postings on this site also address proposals to restrict other forms of records. Additionally, President Obama’s proposed 2014 budget would give the Social Security Administration’s top officials broad powers to limit public access in the future, the blog “Family Tree Insider” has

Will security be fatal to genealogical tool? grEEN
G
OUT ON A LIMB

TOM MOONEY

reported (www.familytreemagazine.com/insider). Anyone worried about the loss of this resource should monitor the above websites, as well as www.thelegalgenealogist.com/blog. Resources: Both the Northeast Pennsylvania Genealogical Society and the Scranton-area Genealogical Research Society of Northeastern Pennsylvania are embarking on their 2013 schedule of monthly meetings, featuring expert speakers and informal conversations with local genealogists. If you want to make progress in your own family research, you should look into membership in these groups. Watch this column for news of upcoming meetings. The Luzerne County Historical Society offers a one-page listing of the earliest ethnic churches in the Wyoming Valley area. Stop by the society’s Bishop Memorial Library at 49 S. Franklin St. in Wilkes-Barre. If you’re not a member, ask about membership while you’re there. Interested in some continuing education? Look into “Building Solid Research Skills: The Genealogical Proof Standard,” a webinar to be held May 23 by the Genealogical Society of Pennsylvania. It’s just $10 for a non-member. For information and registration go to www. genpa.org. While you’re on that site, check out the society’s online store. One or another of

its publications might be just the ticket to solve problems in your research. Speaking of continuing education, Family Tree Magazine offers a range of online courses and webinars of interest to genealogists. Topics this year include using Google Earth, tracing English ancestors and using the cluster approach in your genealogy. For details visit www.familytreemagazine.com. News Notes: Hats off to the Northeast Pennsylvania Genealogical Society and the Genealogical Society of Pennsylvania for their recent statewide genealogical conference, held at Luzerne County Community College. The formidable lineup of speakers and the immense contributions of local genealogists, such as my “Living Library” colleague Tony Paddock, made it for the second year in a row a day to remember. The local group then capped off a super-busy week with an open house at its Hanover Township research library. The Nanticoke Historical Society is compiling a database on older residents of the area (Nanticoke city, Newport Township, Plymouth and West Nanticoke). It’s also looking for historic photographs to copy. Visit the society’s website www. NanticokePa.com. The Osterhout Free Library recently announced reduced hours. For information visit the library’s website at www. osterhout.lib.pa.us.
Tom Mooney is a Times Leader columnist. Reach him at tmooney2@ ptd.net.

Continued from Page 1B

The greenhouse will be 6 feet wide, 8 feet long and 7 feet high with a tilted roof and, thanks to the donation of some blue bottles, students will be able to fashion a large initial “D,” standing for Dallas, to decorate it. Building the greenhouse offers many advantages for the children, Pitcavage said, from giving them a chance to cooperate on a project to letting them interact with visiting adults. They’re also keeping lots of bottles out of the waste stream — which is an ecological benefit. “If you want to save the world,” the teacher said, “start with the little ones.”

Adreanna Griffith, Zoe Hakim and Isaiah Samuel slide plastic bottles on a 1-by-1 piece of wood that will be part of a wall for a greenhouse at Dallas Elementary School. The students are learning about plants and the environment.

sTagE
Continued from Page 1B

IF YOU GO
The Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus “Fully Charged” tour has one remaining performance at the Mohegan Sun Arena in Wilkes-Barre Township this weekend. For tickets to today’s 1 p.m. show, visit www. tickemaster.com or the arena box office.

are the invisible workers in our lives.” The theatrical work actually begins in a tent next to the trailer as patrons are told to sit and wait on pallets. The audience overhears the smugglers discuss the trip — it will involve other stops to pick up and drop off drugs — and then they are marched into the vehicle. Three actors playing immigrants clamber into a small stage area in the back of the truck — a young woman fleeing Mexico, an older woman trying to get back to her family in Arkansas after being deported, and an ex-gang member from El Salvador.

A low-level smuggler, jugs of water, a gun and a duffel bag full of drugs joins them. “Next stop Dallas!” the audience is told and then the truck is locked. The action switches from the front of the rig, where the driver and lead smuggler eat Twizzlers and debate the fate of their cargo, to the back,

where the immigrants share their stories by flashlight. The story does not have a happy ending. The cast includes Brian D. Coats, Zoe Sophia Garcia, Annie Henk, Sheila Tapia, Bobby Plasencia, Gerardo Rodriguez and Jacob Alden Roa. The director is Tamilla Woodard. Tickets are $25. The vehicle — a real used cargo truck bought by Working Theater from an upstate warehouse — will be put in storage after it gets too hot this summer to perform the play. “I don’t want to sell it. I feel like we’ve done a lot of work on it,” says Plesent. “We made it into a theater.”

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C O M M U N I T Y

N E W S

SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013 Page 3B

Forty Forty United Methodist Church holding ham dinner
The Forty Fort United Methodist Church, Wyoming and Yeager avenues, is sponsoring a ham dinner from 4:30-7 p.m. on Saturday. Dinner includes ham, scalloped potatoes, green beans, homemade pickled cabbage, homemade pineapple souffle and cake or pie for dessert. Ticket prices are $8 adults; $4 children 5-12; and free for children younger than 5. Take outs are available from 4-7 p.m. Tickets can be purchased at the door or by calling the church office at 287-3840. Committee members, from left, first row, are Roy Phillips, Donna Phillips, Ruth Davis, Dawn Kraintz, Charles Kraintz, Linda Degillio, Jeanne Hostetler, Theresa Thomas, Ruth Rauscher, Lois Jean Schwartz, Betsy Amo and Marbeth Rudolph. Second row: Barbara Spriggs, Ray Spriggs, Paula Keener, Jeanne Elias, Elaine Semanski, Ruth Gavenus, Greg Amos, Sharon Armstrong, Donna Delaney, Bill Pierce, Mary Ermel and John Ermel.

Birchwood Nursing and Rehabilitation Center recently hosted a country western day for staff and residents. A special luncheon was held and D.J. Rockin’ Rich provided music for karaoke in the evening. Some of the participants, from left: Carla Krakowski, activities director; Ken Dean, certified nursing assistant; and Morgan Sorber, activity aide.

Birchwood Nursing hosts country western day

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PAGE 4B SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013

O C C A S I O N S

www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER

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Sorber, McGeehan

indsey Sorber and John McGeehan, together with their families, are pleased to announce their engagement and approaching marriage. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Mr. David Sorber, Shickshinny, and Mrs. Laurie Joyce, Pittston. She is the granddaughter of Mrs. Patricia Sulkowski and the late John Sulkowski, Sugar Notch, and the late Robert and Vera Sorber, Shickshinny. She is the great-granddaughter of Mrs. Catherine Clements, Wilkes-Barre. Lindsey is a 2005 graduate of Pittston Area High School. She is a 2009 graduate of the University of Pittsburgh, where she earned a Bachelor of Science degree in chemistry. She earned a Master of Science degree in 2012 from Marywood University. Lindsey is employed as a physician assistant. The prospective groom is the son of Ms. Laura McGeehan, Dallas. He is the grandson of Mrs. Cleda Shelby and the late David Shelby, Dallas. John is a 2004 graduate of Dallas High School. He is a 2008 graduate of Dickinson College, where he earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in economics. John is employed by Morgan Stanley, Wilkes-Barre. A September 2013 wedding is planned.

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Carrighan, Knorr

nnouncement is made of the engagement and upcoming wedding of Lena Knorr and Paulmichael Carrighan, both of Olyphant. The bride-to-be is the daughter of John and Nancy Knorr, Hunlock Creek. She is a graduate of Northwest Area High School. She is employed by Bayada Home Heath. The prospective groom is the son of Paul and Margaret Carrighan, Jermyn. He is a graduate of Lakeland High School. He is employed by the Pennsylvania Department of Corrections. The wedding date is set for Oct. 5, 2013.

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Stoodley, Heller
icole Stoodley and Christopher A. Heller were united in marriage on April 5, 2013, by Mayor James J. Brodginski, brother of the groom. The bride is the daughter of Cyril and Sandy Stoodley, Sugar Notch. She is the granddaughter of Thomas and Bonnie Padden; the late Cecelia Padden; and Emily Stoodley and the late Ivor Stoodley. The groom is the son of Christopher and Andrea Heller, Warrior Run. He is the grandson of Andrew and Marlene Kratz and the late Frederick and Theresa Heller. The bride was given in marriage by her father. She chose her sister, Cassandra Stoodley, as her maid of honor. Ave Maria Lesh, niece of the groom, was flower girl. The groom chose his brother, Tony Giannelli, as his best man. Thomas B. Wallace, nephew of the bride, was the ring bearer. The bride is a 2010 graduate of Hanover Area High School and is attending Luzerne County Community College in the Dental Hygiene Program. She is employed at Wegman’s. The groom is a 2010 graduate of Hanover Area High School and is enlisted in the U.S. Navy. The couple honeymooned at Cove Haven Resort in the Poconos.

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ina Nardone and Nicholas Shegda, together with their families, are very excited to announce their engagement and upcoming marriage. Gina is the daughter of James Nardone and Sonya Nardone. She graduated from Wilkes University in 2008 with a Bachelor of Science degree in business administration with a minor in marketing. She is employed at Kraft Foods as a trainer for the Sales Service Organization. Nicholas is the son of Katrina and Robert Simonetti and Thomas Shegda. He graduated from Penn State in 2009 with a Bachelor of Science degree in business with a minor in finance. He is employed at Kraft Foods as a customer service coordinator for the Order Management Department. The couple is having a destination wedding at the Iberostar Resort in Riviera Maya, Mexico, on June 11, 2013.

Shegda, Nardone

ttorney and Mrs. David Mankuta, Hollywood, Fla., announce the engagement and approaching marriage of their daughter, Miss Marni Lynn Mankuta, to Attorney Michael Anthony Falcone, son of Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Falcone, Pittston, Pa. Marni is the granddaughter of the late Sol and Mildred Mankuta, Oceanside, N.Y., and the late Jerome and Miriam Nagelbush, Hollywood, Fla. Michael is the grandson of the late Salvatore and Salvatrice Falcone and the late Edward and Jean Hart, all of Pittston, Pa. The bride-to-be is a graduate of Hollywood Hills High School and the University of Maryland. She earned her Master of Arts degree in industrial/ organizational psychology from George Mason University. Marni is a Human Capital Consultant for Federal Management Partners in Alexandria, Va. The prospective groom is a graduate of Pittston Area High School and Misericordia University. He earned his Juris Doctor from Widener University School of Law, Wilmington, Del. Michael is a supervisory attorney for the Department of Homeland Security, Immigration and Customs Enforcement. He serves as the Deputy Chief Counsel for the Washington Office of the Chief Counsel in Arlington, Va. The couple will be wed on June 22, 2013, in Delray Beach, Fla.

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Mankuta, Falcone

ethAnn April Feist and Drew Edward Brislin were united in marriage on May 5, 2012, at Edgewood in the Pines by brother of the bride, Emil Feist Jr. The bride is the daughter of Emil and Dianne Feist, Wilkes-Barre. BethAnn is a 2003 graduate of GAR Memorial High School and a 2009 graduate of Temple University, where she earned her Doctor of Pharmacy degree. She is employed by CVS/Caremark. The groom is the son of Edward Brislin and Jane Davenport and the grandson of Rita Brislin, all of WilkesBarre. Drew is a 2003 graduate of GAR Memorial High School and is a student at Luzerne County Community College. He is employed by Alexandria Moulding. Given in marriage by her father, the bride chose her sister-in-law, Christine Feist, as matron of honor and Jessica Hodle as maid of honor. Bridesmaids were Amber Griffies, Jessica Wiencek, Megan Cleary, Jennifer Roman, Amanda Magda and Kaycee Hughes. Nicole Miller, sister of the groom, was a junior bridesmaid. BethAnn chose her niece and nephew, Braylen and Kaegan Feist as flower girl and ring bearer. Brian, Robert and William Feist, brothers of the bride, served as ushers. The groom chose best friend, Dennis Eastman, as best man. Groomsmen were Bruce Feist, brother of bride; Jason Brislin, brother of groom; Jon Wiencek; Pete Wiencek; Corey Kosek; Anthony Cibello; and Charles Koulik. Junior groomsman was Zander Feist, nephew of the bride. The couple honeymooned in the Bahamas and resides in Mountain Top. They welcomed a baby boy, Lucas Michael, into their family on Jan. 25, 2013.

Feist, Brislin

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renda Prado and Stanley Wychock exchanged wedding vows on Feb. 16, 2013. The ceremony was performed by Pastor Andrew Jerome at Parsons Primitive Methodist Church, Parsons, Pa. The bride is the daughter of Shirley and Michael McDonald, Dupont, Pa. The bride chose her best friend, Debbie Myers, Nanticoke, Pa., as her matron of honor. The groom chose his son, Stanley Wychock, as his best man. A reception dinner was held at the home of Stanley and Carla Wychock, Mountain Top. The couple will honeymoon in June.

Prado, Wychock

The Amorys

Filipczyk, Loftus

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Valenti, Shovlin

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an Nichols and Joy Buisch will be getting married on May 25 at the Downtown Arts building, 47 N. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre. Dan is a pastor at Restored Church in downtown Wilkes-Barre. Joy is the assistant manager at Sweet Frog in Wilkes-Barre Township.

Nichols, Buisch

andice Valenti and Christopher Shovlin, Kingston, are happy to announce their engagement and upcoming marriage. Candice is the daughter of Irene Valenti, Kingston, and James Valenti, Las Vegas, Nev. She is the granddaughter of Zanobia and Chumagali Ali, Brooklyn, N.Y. Christopher is the son of Mark and Marie Shovlin. He is the grandson of Marie Showanes and the late Bernard Showanes and the late Laura Gene Jones and John Shovlin, all of Wilkes-Barre. The bride-to-be is employed as a drug and alcohol counselor in Dallas. She has three sons. The prospective groom is a full-time student completing his bachelor’s degree in business administrative and pursuing his career as a basketball player. He has three sons. The wedding will be held on Sept. 14, 2013, at St. Maria Goretti Church.

oni Marie Filipczyk and Robert Joseph Loftus were united in marriage on June 30, 2012, at Christ the King Chapel on the campus of King’s College, Wilkes-Barre. The Mass was celebrated by the Rev. James Alco, the Rev. John Ryan and the Rev. Thomas O’Hara. The bride is the daughter of Paul and Mary Filipczyk, Mountain Top. She is the granddaughter of Marie Filipczyk and the late Anthony Filipczyk, Edwardsville, and the late Donald and Theresa Williams. The groom is the son of Joseph and Lorraine Loftus, Wilkes-Barre, and the grandson of the late Thomas and Helen Cavan and Joseph and Anna Loftus. Given in marriage by her father, the bride chose her sister, Sherrie Casey, as matron of honor. The groom chose his brother, Joseph Loftus, as his best man. The flower girl was Madison Casey, niece of the bride. The ring bearer was Ryan Schmidt, nephew of the bride. Readings were given by Dr. Raymond Joseph, Thomas Nicholls and Daniel Hughes, friends of the groom. The rehearsal dinner and wedding reception were held at The Westmoreland Club, Wilkes-Barre. The bride is a 2000 graduate of Crestwood High School. She graduated from Wilkes University, where she earned a bachelor’s degree in 2005 and master’s degree in 2010 in education. She is employed as a teacher at Wyoming Seminary Lower School. The groom is a 1991 graduate of Meyers High School. He graduated from King’s College in 1995, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in accounting. He is employed as an account executive at WNEP-TV. The couple resides in Mountain Top.

T

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Amory, Lexington, S.C., formerly of Parrish Street, Wilkes-Barre, are celebrating their 50th wedding anniversary. The couple was married on April 28, 1963, by the Very Rev. Herbert G. Nahas in St. Mary’s Antiochian Orthodox Church, Wilkes-Barre. Before retirement and moving to South Carolina, Mr. Amory was the owner and operator of Bob’s Barber Shop, Wilkes-Barre. Mrs. Amory was employed at the Luzerne County Courthouse in the Recorder of Deeds office. The couple has two sons, Dr. Robert M., Pittsburgh, and David J., Coopersburg. They also have three grandchildren, Anthony, Samuel and Nikolas. The couple will celebrate the occasion with a trip to Aruba.

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Morris, McLaughlin

elly Marie McLaughlin and Thomas Robert Morris were united in marriage on Sept. 28, 2012, at St. Maria Goretti Church, Laflin, by the Rev. Monsignor Neil Van Loon. The bride is the daughter of John and Maureen McLaughlin, Scranton. She is the granddaughter of the late William and Jeanne Zwick and the late Jake and Marie McLaughlin, all of Scranton. The groom is the son of Thomas and Roberta Morris, Larksville. He is the grandson of the late Robert and Emily Novack, Plains Township, and the late David and Lillian Morris, Wilkes-Barre. The bride was given in marriage by her father. She chose her sister, Erin McLaughlin, as her maid of honor. The groom chose his father as his best man. An evening reception was held at The Colonnade in Scranton. The bride is a graduate of Scranton Preparatory High School and earned a bachelor’s degree in international business from The University of Scranton. Kelly is a contract administrator for Topp Business Solutions, Scranton. The groom is a graduate of Bishop Hoban High School and earned a bachelor’s degree in business administration from King’s College. He works as a management consultant. The couple resides in Laflin.

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The Zeras

r. and Mrs. Walter J. Zera Jr., Bear Creek Township, will celebrate their 45th wedding anniversary on May 4. They were married in St. John the Baptist Church, Exeter, by the late Rev. A. A. Ziemba, assisted by the late Rev. Roy T. Henwood, former pastor of the Firwood United Methodist Church, Wilkes-Barre. The couple has two sons, Walter J. III, Swoyersville, and Adam L., Plains Township. They are also the proud grandparents of Alexander, Benjamin and Conner. Mrs. Zera is the daughter of the late Alvan and Irene Dalon. Mr. Zera is the son of the late Walter and Adelle Zera. Mrs. Zera is employed as administrative assistant at Celtic Healthcare. Mr. Zera is president of a family owned business, Northeastern Security Systems.
Drop off articles at the Times Leader or mail to: The Times Leader People Section 15 N. Main St. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711 Questions can be directed to Kathy Sweetra at 829-7250 or e-mailed to people@timesleader. com.

SOCIAL PAGE GUIDELINES
The Times Leader allows you to decide how your wedding notice reads, with a few caveats. Wedding announcements run in Sunday’s People section, with color photos, free of charge.

Articles must be limited to 220 words, and we reserve the right to edit announcements that exceed that word count. Announcements must be typed or submitted via

www.timesleader.com. (Click on the “people” tab, then “weddings” and follow the instructions from there.) Submissions must include a daytime contact phone number and must be received within 10 months of the wedding date. We do not run first-year anniversary announcements or announcements of weddings that took place more than a year ago.

(Wedding photographers often can supply you with a color proof in advance of other album photographs.) All other social announcements must be typed and include a daytime contact phone number. Announcements of births at local hospitals are submitted by hospitals and published on Sundays.

Out-of-town announcements with local connections also are accepted. Photos are only accepted with baptism, dedication or other religious-ceremony announcements but not birth announcements. Engagement announcements must be submitted at least one month before the wedding date to guarantee publication and

must include the wedding date. We cannot publish engagement announcements once the wedding has taken place. Anniversary photographs are published free of charge at the 10th wedding anniversary and subsequent five-year milestones. Other anniversaries will be published, as space allows, without photographs.

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

O C C A S I O N S

SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013 Page 5B
Wright, Alissa and Michael Negron, Wilkes-Barre, a son, April 13. Sherwood, Alaisha and Tom Michell, Noxen, a daughter, April 13. Engle, Chelsea and Aaron Setzer, Sweet Valley, a son, April 14. Robertson, Leanne and James, Avoca, a daughter, April 14. Tobin, Jonelle and Kurt, Hunlock Creek, a son, April 15. Williams, Adrienne and Thomas, Dallas, a daughter, April 15. Pisano, Laurie and Eugene III, Exeter, a son, April 16. Beutel, Michelle and Matthew, Dallas, a son, April 16. Eden, Kristen and Jeremy, Slocum Township, a son, April 16. Reynolds, Angela and Edward Benzeleski, Old Forge, a daughter, April 16. Tereska, Sharon and Patrick Colleran, Kingston, a daughter, April 17. Hooper, Stephanie and Mark Mercadante, Zion Grove, a son, April 17. Walker, Amber and Michael, Plymouth, a daughter, April 17. Steblinski, Ashlilyn and Steve Kowalski, Nanticoke, a daughter, April 18. Nesbitt Women’s and Children’s Center at Wilkes-Barre General Hospital Novack, Jessica and Brian Stritzinger, Plains Township, a daughter, April 16. Cosgrove, Ashley and Brian, Freeland, a daughter, April 16. Marcus, Teresa and David, White Haven, a daughter, April 16. Morse, Diane and Edward, Dallas, a son, April 17. Matreselva, Nicole and Paul, Swoyersville, a son, April 18. Reynolds, Kate and Brian, West Pittston, a son, April 19. Spring, Adonica and Adam, Pittston, a son, April 19. Ent, Stephanie and Eric Conahan, Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, April 22.

The Kachuraks

The Loyacks

homas and Christine Kachurak, Plymouth Township, celebrated their 40th wedding anniversary on Oct. 7, 2012. They were united in marriage in St. Stephan’s Church, Plymouth, by Monsignor Vincent J. Grimalia and the late Rev. Charles W. Rokosz. The maid of honor was Lydia Adjemian. Bridesmaids were Ute Lange and Kim Kelly. The best man was Michael Kachurak. Ushers were Paul Kachurak and David Kachurak. Mrs. Kachurak is the daughter of the late Frank and Mary Tomaszewski Yustat. She is a township supervisor in Plymouth Township. Mr. Kachurak is the son of the late Joseph and Margaret Capitan Kachurak. He is a retired pharmacist. The Kachuraks celebrated their anniversary with a trip to Hawaii from February to March, 2013, a gift from their sons, Frank and Adam.

T

Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center Miller, Cassandra and Josue Hernandez, Nanticoke, a son, April 1. Garcia, Indira and Pat Kreidler, Wilkes-Barre, a son, April 1. Daniels, Malinda and Kurtis Tracy, Montrose, a daughter, April 1. Perez, Yajaira and Wilfred Yajaira, Hazleton, a son, April 1. Maciejczak, Melanie and Jason, Swoyersville, a son, April 2. Carr, Kaitlyn and Judd, Kingston, a daughter, April 3. Richmond, Amanda and Thomas, Mountain Top, a son, April 4. Wilce, Vanessa and Stephen Zona, Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, April 4. Thompson, Melanie and Brad Thacker, Laceyville, a daughter, April 4. Ridall, Jennifer and David Letteer, Hanover Township, a son, April 4. Slevin, Elizabeth, Hanover Township, a daughter, April 5. Jones, Maria and Kyle, Duryea, a daughter, April 6. Jimmerson, Brittney and Kerry Nesbitt Jr., Ashley, a son, April 7. Robinson, Brittany and Carlyle, Wyoming, a daughter,

BIRTHS

April 7. Isbel, Brittany and Kevin, Sweet Valley, a son, April 7. Contreras, Patricia and Antonio Sosa, Wilkes-Barre, a son, April 7. Hischak, Holly and William, Mountain Top, a daughter, April 7. Leiva, Jenna Lyn and Jimmy Jorje, Duryea, a daughter, April 8. Ritts, Sarah and Jeffrey Hivish, Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, April 8. Lefkoski, Ashley and Randy, Exeter, a son, April 8. Comparetta, Sarah and Robert, Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, April 9. Rockwell, Nikki and Allen Scheuch, Wilkes-Barre, a son, April 9. Mathes, Monica and Eric, Shavertown, a daughter, April 10. Dunn, Rachael and Steve, Dallas, a daughter, April 11. Lawson, Christina and Edwin Zagorski, Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, April 12. Latona, Lisa and Sean P. Steele, Jenkins Township, a daughter, April 12. Potsko, Amanda and Richard, Hanover Township, a son, April 12. Gardner, Sheryl and Clayton Yeust, Tunkhannock, a son, April 13.

OUT-OF-TOWN BIRTHS
Geisinger Medical Center, Danville Daum, Brooke and Tyler Bolmer, Berwick, a son, April 16. Grandparents are Lisa Bolmer, Kingston; Dave Miller; New Jersey; and Beth Daum and Randy Daum, both of Berwick. Great-grandparents are Michele Wildoner and Chuck Wildoner, both of Glen Lyon; Sandy Thomas and Scott Thomas, both of Berwick; and Harold Daum Sr., Berwick.

illiam and Lucille Loyack, Exeter, are celebrating their 50th wedding anniversary. A Mass was held at St. Anthony’s Church of the St. Barbara’s Parish, Exeter, by the Rev. Phillip Massetti, followed by a cocktail and dinner reception given by their children at the Fox Hill Country Club. They were married in Holy Rosary Italian Church on Apr. 27, 1963, by the late Rev. Anthony Noviello, the late Rev. Andrew Porro and the Rev. Constantine Siconolfi. Attendants were Jane Puleri Gritman and Joseph Gregor. Bridesmaids were Lucille Chiampi Morgan, Diane Loyack Ambrose, Helen Alansky, Jeanne Walter Gagliardi, Kathy Nichols Shelton, and junior bridesmaid, Ann Marie Bolin Lawrence. Flower girl was Andrea Mauriello. Ushers were Patrick Gagliardi, Carmen Mauriello, Charles Gagliardi, Anthony Petrucci and Chester Faleski. Junior usher was Carmen Bolin. Lucille is the daughter of the late Patrick J. and Rose J. Pannella Gagliardi, Wilkes-Barre. William is the son of the late William J. and Helen C. Litman Loyack, Wyoming. They have been blessed with two children, son William P. Loyack, Wilkes-Barre, and daughter Patricia Ann Loyack, Philadelphia.

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Girl Scout Service Unit 313 celebrated World Thinking Day on Feb. 23 at Westminster Church, Wilkes Barre. The event was coordinated by Alisha Kravabloski, local girl scout leader. The theme was ‘Together we can save children’s lives!’ The girls visited various stations and learned about ways to keep children healthy. Topics included germs and sanitation, diseases and immunization and nutrition and poverty. The stations included hand washing, oral hygiene, clean water, fire safety, eating healthy, poisons, childhood illnesses and celebrating reaching the age of five. At the event, from left, first row, are Sarah Gallagher, Angelena Mendola, Analiese Bagley, Katelin Kwarcinski, Lily Grymko, Jayme Brennan and Emily Raub. Second row: Jamee Mazonis, Samantha Mazonis, Amy Berry, Jyanna Mendola, Esabella Mendola, Krystal Haertter, Karlee Yuscavage, Kaori Scavone and Taylor Farrell. Third row: Breena Kravabloski, Sarah Langan, Shauna Rustay, Samantha Ashford, Emily Druby, Rhiannon Legg, Rosalyn Partington, Veronica Gorka and Sue Pons. Fourth row: Grace Donovan, Jennifer Llewellyn, Eleanor Shuleski, Elizabeth Kosik, Kaia Stets, Reaghan Donovan, Taylor Malloy, Laci Kostelnick, Suzy Hannigan, Haley Jendrzejewski and Eva King. Fifth row: Chris Pons, Elizabeth Novak, Therese Young, Ariana Hooper, Sarah Azaizeh, Caitlin Burns, Savannah Smith, Erycka Keblish, Maria Gereda, Katie Flanagan, Teagan Staudenmeier, Erica Shay and Katie Middleton. Victoria Downey also participated.

Girl Scouts celebrate World Thinking Day

J

Josephine Lazzari celebrates 100th birthday
Senior and Social Club when they celebrated St. Joseph’s Day by honoring members and attendees named Joseph or Josephine. It was held at St. Joseph Marello Parish. There was a birthday party given to celebrate the occasion by the Altar and Rosary Society of St. John the Evangelist Church. The Blooms and Bubbles Chapter of the Red Hat Society honored her at their monthly meeting at the Fox Hill Country Club. On her birthday, April 27, her family held a party for family and friends at the VFW in Dupont. Josephine was presented a citation at the City of Pittston’s council meeting naming April 27 Josephine Lazzari Day in the City of Pittston. They also presented her with a letter of congratulation from Governor Tom Corbett. The noon Mass today, April 28, was in honor and thanksgiving for Josephine’s 100th birthday and an amazing life of a very special person.

M

The Berlots

r. and Mrs. Alvin Berlot will celebrate their 56th wedding anniversary on May 4, 2013. They were married on May 4, 1957, at St. Francis Roman Catholic Church, Nanticoke, by the Rev. John Bell. Alvin is the son of the late Joseph and Josephine Berlot, Miners Mills section, Wilkes-Barre. He retired as a painting and wallpaper contractor and an employee of Certain-Teed, Mountain Top. Alma, the daughter of the late Edward John Salvadore and Elizabeth Salvadore, retired as a nurse specializing in Alzheimer’s and mentally challenged children and adults. The couple was blessed by Almighty God with four children: Dr. Alvin J. Berlot and wife, Sally, and children Ashley and Erica; attorney Melissa McCafferty and husband, Brian, and son, Cole; Gina Bunchalk and husband, Rich, and two daughters, Brianna and Lauren; and Madonna Trombetta and son, Samuel Trombetta. The couple celebrated their anniversary with a trip to historic Williamsburg. They toured colonial Williamsburg, the Jamestown settlement, Yorktown and Busch Gardens. The trip was given as a present by Dr. Alvin Berlot and family. The couple will celebrate the First Holy Communion of their sixth grandchild on May 4 with a dinner reception given by daughter, Melissa and husband, Brian.

osephine Lazzari celebrated her century birthday April 27. She is a lifetime resident of Pittston and is the daughter of the late Ignazio and Theresa Emma. Vincent Lazzari, her husband of 27 years, died in 1963. Josephine is the loving mother of Cataldo Lazzari and his wife, Earlene, Wilkes-Barre; the grandmother of Vincent K. Lazzari and his wife, Theresa, Hughestown, and Theresa N. Lazzari, Wilkes-Barre; and the great-grandmother of Anthony Michael Lazzar, 4, Hughestown. She was employed as a supervisor at Consolidated Cigar Corp. before her retirement. She is a member of The Parish Community of St. John the Evangelist Church and is a member of their Altar and Rosary Society. Josephine also belongs to the Ladies of Charity, San Cataldo Society and the Blooms and Bubbles Chapter of the Red Hat Society. Josephine is an active, social person who enjoys dancing and has a great love for people, especially her family. Josephine was given special recognition of her 100th birthday at the St. Joseph

HONOR ROLL
GAR Memorial Junior and Senior High School Colleen Robatin, principal, GAR Memorial Junior and Senior High School, recently announced the members of the second quarter Honor Roll. Grade 12: Highest Honors: Edoukou Aka-Ezoua, Jian Chi, Douglas Delescavage, Brian Klapat, Kaitlyn Kuren, Julianna Leco, Tyler Mulvihill, Nicolas Oldziejewski, Yazmin Ramirez, Jerry Reyes, Veronika Segear, Kyle Smith, Brittney Thomas, Rachel Vitale, Victoria Wallace. High Honors: Jone’e Davis, Cassandra Dyanick, James Gallagher, Candice Hartman, Carilda Hernandez, Tanya Luton, Frank Maloney, Jaleel McNeil, Monika Missal, Corey Moore, Alec Niemiec, Nayan Patel, Bryant Placencio, Kiyawnna Powell, William Richardson, Antigoni Silva, Marena Spence, Hailey Williams, Chantelle Wilkins, Colleen Zaleski. Honors: Natasia Alexander, Joseph Andrascavage, Cyndal Burke, Derek Domanski, Jennifer Flynn, Brittany Edwards, Angie Lezama, Genesis Ocasio, Vincent Phan, Amanda Roper, Marquise Sampeur, Joseph Sipsky, Willie Winstead. Grade 11: Highest Honors: India Brooks, Jahlil Harvey, James Holmes, Alvaro Izaguirre, Breana Mosier, Melissa Ponce, Joseph Snipas. High Honors: Bridget Buchan, Rebecca Glaude, Tiarra Lawton, Sarah Petro, Kaitlyn Raineri, Jacob Revak, Michael Rowe, Tree Strickland, Jocelyne Vazquez, Brittany Wolovich, Richard Yost, Marissa Yurchak. Honors: Yan Mary Abreu-Tejeda, Joseph Arcelay, Breah Cooper, Joseph Evans, Michelle Huertero, Jonathan Hynes, Leticia Izaguirre, Doreen Kiernan, Austin Mashinski, Alexis McClure, Madisen Nichol, Joseph O’Day, Erickson Taveras, Steven Tyson. Grade 10: Highest Honors: Anissah Baht-T’om, Vanessa

Alice Winters celebrates 95th birthday

lice Winters celebrated her 95th birthday with family and friends on April 27. She was joined by her son, Ralph Winters, and daughter, Maryalice Chorba, along with grandchildren, great-grandchildren, nieces and nephews for a celebration at Mercy Center, where she has been a resident since November, 2011. Alice was the wife of Harold Winters who passed away in 1980.

A

Castillo, Yoldine Clerveaux, Zachary Faust, Kariana Goicoechea, Katelyn Oldziejewski, Garvin Paisley, Racheal Paisley, Aaron Pekar, Raquel Sosa, Shawn Washington, Rachel Wielgopolski. High Honors: Jimmy Donovan, Paige Elmy, Alexander Flippines, Karina Gonzalez, Jeremy Klapat, Samantha Peterson, Shianne Roberts, Jaqueline Rocha, Edwin Sosa, Larissa Stucker, Anna Sulitka, Sean-Paul Williamson. Honors: Oscar Barrientos Jr., Corey Casterline, Christina Cherkis, Stell Chery, Samantha Conahan, Kelvin Dircio, Devon Harris, Jasmine Hernandez, Gabrielle Hynes, Shawn Kennedy, Katlin Kofchak, Ambar Lumbi, Dominick Marino, Majeedah Nealy, Luke Pesta, Hannah Raineri, Derric Raspa, Brittany Stephenson, Marilyn Tapia, Anthony Tlatenchi, Giavanna Twyman, Darius Washington. Grade 9: Highest Honors: Tristino Altavilla, Shaquan Everett, Banessa Flores, Dylan Frame, Austin Kochanski, Nathan Mattey, Rofiat Oseni, Robert Petrovich, Liz Quispe, Tatiana Reed, Isell Reyes-Martinez, Erin Scafella, Jacen Sterling, Jessica Valencia. High Honors: Mabel Awuah, Jeremy Erhardt, Paige Gartin, Avery Harris, Giselle Huertero, Diance McCloe-Hall, Hayden Moody, Mckenzie Nichol, Lindsey Quinn, Skye Reese, Josmarlyn Rivas Adon Jr., Asanteasia Rivers, Marie Skrepenak, Winnie Tu, Kayla Unvarsky, Michelle Vergara, Brittany Vital. Honors: Gabrielle Acciai, Michael Bodosky, Brian Cruz, Kimberly Dircio, Antwone Easter, Dylon Faller, Asamichelle Frost, Dominick Harvey, Diamond Meza, Jackyla Moye, Kathiria Ocasio, Michael Paisley, Angel Reese, Giselle Reyes Guadarrama, Noah Schoettle, Briee Shovlin, Mohamed Toure. Grade 8: Highest Honors: Guadelupe Canongo, Cody Dzurisin, Luan Hoang, Andri Laureano, Tina Nguyen, Nataliya Scarantino, Bridget Seabrook, Ashlee

Shaver, Jackie Tang. High Honors: Dhamiere Adams, Gabriel Bell, Miranda Brazinski, Josafat Brito, Tatianna Davis, Jeanette Evans, Breonna Hanahan, De Andre Hollis, Roselyn Kosich, Timothy Lavelle, Samaura McCloe, Samara McDaniels, Damien Phelps, Zoe Phillips, Sierra Quinn, Rachell Ramcallian, Justin Remphrey, Jaeline Reyes, Tabitha Schneider, Jayson Scott, Anna Shaver, Rachael Stucker, Chelsea Sypniewski, Guadalupe Vivar, Asher Wielgopolski. Honors: Joshon Bradford, Andrew Campbell, Patricia Dapas, Emmanuel Edoukou, Alison George, Joshua Goodwin, Mitchell Hall, Armani Hankins, Sean Haughney, Christopher Kolativa, Paul Leco, Evadney McNeil, Angelo Najera, Kevin Nichols, Robert Reimiller III, Jonathan Seabrook, Robert Shinal, Michael Suquilanda, Moises Tlatenchi, Taylor Woods. Grade 7: Highest Honors: Mai Bach, Richie Clerveaux, Khira Cook, Jarod Engle, Meghan Moyer, Simon Peter Jr., Isabel Ponce, Margaret Schmidt, Kayla Secter, Myya Swainbank. High Honors: Sufyan Burroughs, Lesly Cruz, Ariana Dale, Jacob DeLaney, Vanessa Everett, Oneisha Garallues, Zachary Koshinsky, Luis Morel, Victor Robles, Yohanser Rosario, Danielle Schmidt, Kaylee Smith, Olivia Stortz, Kadin Taylor, Ny’Sira Thomas, Prodius Townes, Rohan Watson, Alexis Whiting, Tawanna Winstead. Honors: Tayia Bauer, Anthony Blake, Serenity Bonk, Ariel Boyer, Al-Quan Cade Jr., Dominique Cropp, Diamond Currie, Christopher DePaula, Wendy Espinoza, Meghan Flynn, Heavyn Garey, Emely Genao, Stephanie Gribble, Simone Harris, Ti’Ahnna Hollis, Cody Hummell, Tali Michaels, Tyler Montgomery, Ronald Peguero, Ronald Pesci, Alexa Read, Amanda Tulanowski, Michael Vreeland, Ryan Wielgopolski, Charles Witczak, Michael Woychio.

PAGE 6B SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013

c o m m u n i t y

n e w s

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NAMES AND FACES
Paola Bianco, associate professor of Spanish, at Wilkes University, recently published a new Spanish textbook in advanced conversation for university students. “Conversando con literatura” includes short stories and poetry from a vast selection of Hispanic writers. Bianco spent a year on sabbatical to complete the book, traveling overseas to interview several of the writers. The book offers a wide range of topics and universal themes that engage students in conversations and discussions. Bianco was born and spent her childhood in Italy. She later moved to Santiago, Chile, where she attended most of high school. She is an American citizen from birth because her father was an American. Bianco earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in French and a master’s degree in Italian and French from the State University of New York at Binghamton. She earned her doctorate degree in romance languages, specializing in Italian and Spanish, from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Bianco has published several books of Italian and Hispanic literature. She also serves as Wilkes University’s coordinator for the study abroad program in Spain. Ian Nelson, a senior at West Side Career and Technology Center, was selected as the Student of the Month

Bianco

Nelson

Korea

Careyva

for March. Nelson, a student in the Computer Maintenance Program, was chosen based on his outstanding attributes in and out of the classroom. He plans on attending basic training for the National Guard and majoring in computer technology in college. He is the son of Darcy and Stephanie Nelson, Forty Fort. Matthew Eric Korea, son of George and Karen Korea, Hunlock Creek, was named as Northwest Area’s Student of the Month for April. Korea has been a member of National Honor Society throughout high school and received numerous awards from the Business, Social Studies, Science and Wellness Departments. He has been a member of the varsity basketball and baseball teams and senior legion baseball. Korea is a Little League baseball umpire and worked at the Little League World Series. He has been a videographer and statistician for Northwest sports and every Thanksgiving he volunteers at the Shickshinny food drive. His future plans include attending a four-

year university to major in biology. He hopes to become a dentist. Jeffrey Careyva, a junior at MMI Preparatory School, placed fourth in the junior level of the 65th annual Luzerne County Council of Teachers of Mathematics Contest recently held at Wilkes University. The contest was open to juniors and seniors from Luzerne County high schools and Tunkhannock High School. Careyva, the son of Edward and Jill Careyva, Ringtown, received a calculus book for his fourth-place finish. Drew Harding, a junior at Dallas Senior High School, was selected as the annual essay winner from the Dallas American Legion Post 672. He was honored at a recent awards ceremony, where it was announced that he was

also chosen as Pennsylvania’s District 12 winner. The topic for the essay contest was, “Should the Supreme Court Be Appointed or Elected?” HardHarding ing received a certificate, a medal and a cash award at the American Legion awards ceremony. This is the second consecutive year that Harding’s essay has received the top honor. He is the son of Brian and Dawn Harding, Dallas. Cayle Spencer, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Don Spencer, Sweet Valley, has been selected to join 250 leaders representing high schools from throughout central and northeast Pennsylvania at the Central Pennsylvania Hugh O’Brian Youth Leadership Seminar from May 16-19 at Shippensburg University. Spencer will be representing Lake-Lehman High School. The seminar brings together sophomore students to interact with leaders in business, government and education.

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C O M M U N I T Y
perfect harmony.” Meetings are for members only, but newcomers are welcome to join one free meeting. The Holistic Moms Network is a non-profit support and resource network for parents interested in holistic health and green living. Fathers and children are also invited to attend. Members pay a tax-deductible fee of $45 per year. For more information contact Nicole at 570-466-1347 or hmnwyomingvalley@hotmail. com or visit www.wyomingvalleypa.holisticmoms.org. SCRANTON: The planning committee for the 23rd annual Komen NEPA Race for the Cure® is hosting a team captain kick-off party from 6-8 p.m. on Thursday at the Hilton Scranton and Conference Center. The event will feature refreshments, raffles and a cash bar. The kick-off party provides

N E W S
contest winners. Commander John Emil Sr. will preside. For more information contact Emil at 570-762-3184 or emilsrjo@wmconnect.com. WILKES-BARRE: Holy Resurrection Orthodox Cathedral, 591 N. Main St., has announced the schedule for Orthodox Easter services: • Today: 9 a.m. Palm Sunday, Divine Liturgy with Bishop Mark.; 4 p.m. Bridegroom Matins. • Monday: 6 p.m. Bridegroom Matins. • Tuesday: 6 p.m. Bridegroom Matins. • Wednesday: 6 p.m. Holy Unction, healing service. • Thursday: 8 a.m. Great and Holy Thursday, Vespers with Liturgy of Saint Basil; 6 p.m. reading of the Passion gospels. • Friday: 8 a.m. Great and Holy Friday, Royal Hours; 3 p.m.

SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013 Page 7B
Vespers with placing of the Holy Shroud into the tomb; 7 p.m. Matins with procession of the Holy Shroud. • Saturday: 9 a.m. Great and Holy Saturday, Vespers with Liturgy of Saint Basil; 11:30 p.m. Pascha, nocturnes, Resurrection Matins, Paschal Divine Liturgy; 2 a.m. blessing of Pascha food baskets; 2:30 a.m. Agape Feast in the cathedral parlors. • May 5: 11 a.m. Paschal Vespers with procession. • May 6: Bright Monday, Paschal Divine Liturgy. The cathedral will be open to visit the tomb of Christ from 8 p.m. to midnight on Great and Holy Friday and 8 a.m. to 11:30 p.m. on Great and Holy Saturday.

IN BRIEF
DALLAS: Blue Chip Farm Animal Refuge is holding its inaugural Motorcycle Run to raise funds on May 12. The run will start and end at the Getaway Lounge, Plymouth Township. Registration is from 11 a.m. to noon. Kickstands up at 12:15 p.m. sharp, rain or shine. Cost is $20 per rider and $10 per passenger. There will be live bands, food, prizes, surprises, commemorative T-shirt sales and more after the run. Donations are always appreciated. Checks can be made payable to Blue Chip Farm Animal Refuge, 974 Lockville Road, Dallas, PA 18612. For more information call 570-333-5265. DURYEA: The Frances Dorrance Chapter of the Society for Pennsylvania Archaeology will

meet at 7 p.m. on Tuesday in the Duryea Municipal Building, 311 Main Street. The meeting is open to the public and the presentation is free. Jim Wosochlo, president of Chapter 14 Forks of the Delaware SPA, will make a presentation on The Blacksmith Site, which includes prehistoric and historic elements and is located on his family farm in Schuylkill County. KINGSTON: The Holistic Moms Network of Wyoming Valley is hosting a presentation on “Gardening in Small Spaces, Containers and our Community” from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Saturday at the Hoyt Library, 284 Wyoming Avenue. Guest speakers will be Jo Robbins, who will talk about gardening in small spaces and containers, and Jeremy and Beth Connor, who will share information on their community garden project, “1

team captains with the tools they need to form teams for the race on Sept. 21. Attendees will receive a team captain toolkit and hear from other team captains on how to recruit team members. Prospective captains will learn about race registration options, new pre-race and race day events, 100 ways to raise funds and how to rally team members. For more information, call the Komen NEPA Affiliate office at 570-969-6072 or e-mail admin. info@komennepa.org. WILKES-BARRE: District 12 American Legion, Luzerne County, Department of Pennsylvania, will meet at 2 p.m. today at the Hanover American Legion Post 609, 320 Lee Park Avenue. All posts are urged to send a representative. The district will be giving awards for the American Legion District 12 essay and oratorical

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C O M M U N I T Y

N E W S

SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013 8B

HAPPY BIRTHDAY!

Sofia M. Colarusso
Weston Von Medvetz, son of Daisha and Chris Medvetz, Mountatin Top, celebrated his ninth birthday April 25. Weston is a grandson of JoAnn and Al Weston, Mountain Top, and Helene and Jim Medvetz, Sheppton. He has a sister, Jenna, 6.

Weston V. Medvetz

Sofia Mary Colarusso, daughter of Mike and Jaime Colarusso, Exeter, is celebrating her fifth birthday today, April 28. Sofia is a granddaughter of Jim and Debbie Lampman, Pittston, and Joe and Bev Colarusso, Pittston Township. She is a great-granddaughter of John Brogna, Pittston. Sofia has a brother, Mikey, 3.

Timmy Walsh, Camera for a Cure, and members of his fourth-grade class at Wyoming Seminary Lower School recently planted a pinwheel garden in the Monet Garden at the school in honor of abused children in northeast Pennsylvania and in honor of April being Child Abuse Prevention Month. Walsh is a supporter of the Children’s Advocacy Center (CAC) of NEPA and he wanted to share the importance with his friends and classmates. The CAC provided the pinwheels, ribbons and information for the pinwheel garden. For more information on Camera For A Cure, visit www.cameraforacure.com. For more information on the CAC, visit http://cacnepa.org. At the event, from left, are Max Kraus, Ethan Meuser, Vincent Baldassano, Cody Turner, Lukas Swanson, Zach Kane, Scott Myers, John Coates, Luke Racicky, Walsh, Ethan Kruger and Evan Hromisin.

Pinwheel garden planted at Wyoming Seminary

Blue Cross of Northeastern Pennsylvania sponsored the Susquehanna Warrior Trail 5K race and fun walk that was held on April 6 and included 327 participants. The event is the trail’s only fundraiser. At the check presentation, from left, are Max Furek, race director, Susquehanna Warrior Trail, and Dave Repshas, representative, Blue Cross of Northeastern Pennsylvania.

Blue Cross sponsors 5K race and fun walk

Emily Ruth Griglock, daughter of Joseph Griglock, WilkesBarre, and Holly Rau-Griglock, Laflin, is celebrating her fifth birthday today, April 28. Emily is a granddaughter of Donald Rau, Kingston; the late Ruthellen Rau; and Anthony and Eleanor Griglock, Jenkins Township. She has a brother, Ethan Joseph, 2.

Emily R. Griglock

Alexis J. Katcavage

Alexis Jayne Katcavage, daughter of Suzanne and Charles A. Katcavage Jr., Hackettstown, N.J., is celebrating her fourth birthday today, April 28. Alexis is a granddaughter of Marjorie and Charles A. Katcavage Sr., Bear Creek Village, and Harold and Jayne Corney, Glen Rock, N.J. She is a great-granddaughter of Rachel Henning, Blakeslee. Alexis has a brother, Ryan Charles, 20 months.

Trans-Med donates candy for Easter egg hunt

Trans-Med Ambulance recently donated Easter candy to Golden Living East Mountain for the annual Easter egg hunt. With the donations, from left, are Sheryl Sandor, Debbie Taylor and David Prohaska.

The Pittston Knights of Columbus recently held its annual children’s Easter party. Visiting the Easter Bunny, from left, first row, is Parker Stoss. Second row: Nicholas Bednar, Connor Miller, Matthew MacRae and Brooke Wilson. Third row: A.J. Bednar and Brianna MacRae.

Pittston Knights host children’s Easter party

Drew M. Ricko

Drew Matthew Ricko, son of Donald and Kelly Ricko, Wyoming, is celebrating his second birthday today, April 28. Drew is a grandson of Donna and Donald Ricko Sr., Hanover Township, and Terry and Barbara McCreary, Beverly, W.Va. He is a great-grandson of Francis Conklin, Hanover Township, and Elizabeth Ricko, Kingston. Drew has a brother, Cole, 4.

Gordon Mark Williams, son of Gordon and Regina Williams, White Haven, celebrated his second birthday April 26. Gordon is a grandson of Mark and Joan Lippi, Jersey City, N.J., and Gordon and Cecilia Williams, WilkesBarre. He is a great-grandson of Jane Chilson, Dallas; Ettore Lippi, West Pittston; and Mary Rudolph, Scranton.

Gordon M. Williams

GUIDELINES

Children’s birthdays (ages 1-16) will be published free of charge
Photographs and information must be received two full weeks before your child’s birthday. Your information must be typed or computer-generated. Include your name and your relationship to the child (parent, grandparent or legal guardians only, please), your child’s name, age and birthday, parents’, grandparents’ and great-grandparents’ names and their towns of residence, any siblings and their ages. Don’t forget to include a daytime contact phone number. Without one, we may be unable to publish a birthday announcement on time. We cannot guarantee return of birthday or occasions photos and do not return community-news or publicity photos. Please do not submit precious or original professional photographs that require return because such photos can become damaged, or occasionally lost, in the production process. Email your birthday announcement to people@timesleader.com or send it to: Times Leader Birthdays, 15 North Main St., WilkesBarre, PA 18711-0250. You also may use the form under the People tab on www.timesleader.com.

Trinity Learning Center supports SPCA
Alex Harrison from the SPCA of Luzerne County brought the dog, Ryder, to visit the children at Trinity Learning Center, Dallas. Harrison taught the children about the humane treatment of man’s best friend. The children collected and donated food and other supplies to the shelter to help support the animals. More than 80 children were invited to participate in the project, which they have been doing for 10 years. Some of the participants, from left, first row, are MacKenzie Morreale, Anna Vincelli and Teagan Orrson. Second row: Josh Phillips, Rebecca Zuranski, Sydney Banks, Mayah Kulinovsky and Erin Duffy. Third row: Julian Wallace, Emma Fostock, Zachary Hodakowski, Harrison holding Ryder, Isabella Evans and Molly Walsh.

Thirty-four students from Luzerne County Community College will be included in the 2012-13 edition of ‘Who’s Who among Students in American Junior Colleges.’ Students are selected based on academic achievement, service to the community, leadership in extracurricular activities and potential for continued success. Some of the participants, from left, first row: Tom Walter, Dallas; Hayden Schutz, Wilkes-Barre; Leah Kowalski, Nanticoke; and Melissa Lohman, Luzerne. Second row: Thomas P. Leary, president, LCCC; Ryan Joyce, Avoca; Richard Irving, Wilkes-Barre; Michael A. Maul, Glen Lyon; David Fox, Drums; and Rosana Reyes, dean, enrollment management and student development, LCCC. Also selected were: Jamie Gerhard, Weatherly; Jessica Brennan, Pottsville; Nicole Maximowicz, Kingston; Jillian Falkowski, Pittston; Beth Stroup, Bloomsburg; Katelynn Voelker, Berwick; Jason Allabaugh, Edwardsville; Mark Beleski, Nanticoke; Kyle Billings, Glen Lyon; Marla Brown, Kingston; Matthew Crandall, Wilkes-Barre; Elizabeth Edwards, Mountain Top; Andrew Gialanella, Dallas; Juanly Gomez, Hazleton; Chris Healey, Edwardsville; Erik Kordsmeier, Plymouth; Cody McClintock, Kingston; Christopher Olcheski, Nuangola; Matthew Otte, Hazleton; Marius Pasca, Hazleton; Justin Pliska, Hazle Township; Travis Shultz, Danville; Michael Stepanski, Wilkes-Barre; Christopher Twardowski, Pittston; Michael Vandermark, Mountain Top; and Patrick Majusiak, Beaver Meadows.

LCCC students selected for ‘Who’s Who’ program

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B O O K S

SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013 Page 9B

Isabel Allende’s latest novel still satisfying for fans of magical realism
By Amy driScoll The Miami Herald

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F

ate distancing from the deep historical context and magical realism that have marked her work and charmed her readers across generations and national borders. “Maya’s

Narrated by troubled 19-year-old Maya, the novel traces the young woman’s descent from “Maya’s Notebook” by Isabel Allende; HarperCollins (400 an offbeat childhood in a rambling house in pages, $28.99) rom the start, Isabel Allende’s new novel Berkeley with her grandparents to a nightmarish life on the Las Vegas streets mixed up feels like a break from the past, a deliberwith thugs, drugs, prostitution and assassins.
mysteries of her life. Allende, who was born in Peru, raised in Chile and now lives in California, has said she wrote this book with her six grandchildren in mind, realizing she couldn’t protect them from all the evils of the world. And indeed, Maya’s character is written with an undertone of sympathy. She’s an open-hearted mess: angry, impulsive, funny, tumbling from one disastrous situation to another, the hot-headed runaway with scrappy appeal. Watching her character evolve from defiant kid to humbled but clear-eyed young woman is a compelling journey. You want to see her emerge on the other side, older and wiser but still true to herself. Allende is kind to her readers, starting the story as Maya heads to the island, the grandmotherly rescue already a fait accompli. The flashbacks of drug overdoses, rape and criminality are brutal — they’re conveyed as entries in Maya’s notebook — but readers already know she survived to tell the tale. That’s not to say there’s no suspense. Maya’s voyage of self-discovery leads to detective work involving her own family. Upping the tension is the fact that Maya is cut off from the world — no email or phone calls — because law enforcement agencies and killers are trying to track her down. Eventually, just as Maya begins to understand her past and adapt to the tiny, slow-paced society of the island, her two worlds collide with potentially catastrophic results. Allende’s old magic works its way into Maya’s story through her grandmother and the island people. As Maya opens herself to the possibilities of the island, she’s invited to a midnight meeting with a group of women who may or may not be witches. She falls in mind-boggling love, feels herself dying and being re-

Notebook” is a gritty, violent, cautionary tale set firmly in the present, with a tough-talking teen in the lead role and enough bad guys to fill an Elmore Leonard book.
But even with its relentlessly modern viewpoint, which might disorient some longtime Allende fans, the book offers enough familiar markers to reassure the internationally lauded author’s most faithful followers while also winning her some new converts. The writing is still all Allende: driven by emotion, informed by her own multi-cultural life, framed by her brand of lyrical description. And there’s historical context, too, although it’s less central and more personal than in some of her previous books. Narrated by troubled 19-year-old Maya, the novel traces the young woman’s descent from an offbeat childhood in a rambling house in Berkeley with her grandparents to a nightmarish life on the Las Vegas streets mixed up with thugs, drugs, prostitution and assassins. The painful and degrading fall is set off by the death of her beloved grandfather — and a reminder of how easy the young and vulnerable can slip over the edge. Eventually, her grandmother comes to the rescue, a Chilean émigré with a mystical bent who packs Maya off to live with an old friend on a remote island off the coast of Chile. That’s when Maya begins to grow up, figure out what ails her and tackle some of the central

born. Sees new horizons where once there were none. And that’s where Allende uses her reliable literary tools to fresh advantage. The magical touches, which could have felt like a retread of previous books, seem new again as they play out through Maya’s eyes. Some of the earlier criticisms of Allende’s work still apply here. She’s not the most subtle of writers, embracing high drama every time. Love and violence, themes she has embraced before, are once again center stage. But there’s a lot to like here, starting with Maya. She reminds us of the central role that luck or lack of it can play in our lives. And her slow return to a more surefooted existence shows us that sometimes, we can triumph anyway.

Elegant writing, narrative twists mark Rash’s stories
By AmAndA St. AmAnd St. Louis Post-Dispatch

When a prisoner on a chain gang is sent to the nearest farmhouse to fetch water in the backwoods of North Carolina, author Ron Rash sets the scene for a sterling collection of short stories in “Nothing Gold Can Stay.” They span a range of years and an even wider range of emotions. Rash’s 14 stories are broken into three sections and set in a variety of eras and places. He introduces a would-be hippie in the 1960s; college-bound sweethearts of today and their sad evolution into meth-heads; and a spare but touching tale of the working-class parents of a young woman serving in Afghanistan. In his opening story, “The Trusty,” readers are taken back to the Depression to meet a young thief facing a five-year

sentence, and a y o u n g f a r m e r ’s wife facing a sentence of her own in a loveless marriage to a much older man. And soon enough, the trusty — aptly named Sinkler — is sinking his claws and plans into young Lucy as he plots their dual escape. “An hour would pass before anyone started looking for him, and even then they’d search first along the road. … The suddenness of the opportunity unsettled him. He should take a couple of days, think it out. The grit in the gears would be Lucy. Giving her the slip in Asheville would be nigh impossible, so

Rash’s 14 stories are broken into three sections and set in a variety of eras and places.

he’d be with her until the next stop.” But the hallmark of some of Rash’s stories are twists you don’t see coming, and he gives readers a doozy in his opening story. In “Twenty-Six Days,” the title spells out the amount of time before Kerrie, the narrator’s daughter, gets to come home from her military service in Afghanistan. Her father is a janitor at the local college, and her mother is a waitress at a diner. They depend on the kindness of a family doctor to talk to their daughter via Skype and accept books for her from one

of the college professors with a heart — a rarity among most of the anti-war intellectuals served by both the mother and father. It is Rash’s elegant understatement that gives the parents life: “Over at the ATM machine, students pull out bank cards like winning lottery tickets. Probably not one of them ever thinks that while they’re sitting in a classroom or watching basketball games kids their own age are getting blown up by IEDs.” Each of the stories in this collection comes to life under the power of Rash’s muscular way with words, and that’s what makes this book sing. Whether it’s a tale of a woman’s dowry or the fallout from a young girl’s drowning, the author creates a slice of life so authentic you can hear the rushing water and see the falling tears.

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C O M M U N I T Y

N E W S

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C O M M U N I T Y

N E W S

SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013 Page 11B

WVW students win awards at journalism conference
Journalism students from Wyoming Valley West High School recently attended the 13th annual Tom Bigler Conference at Wilkes University. The school’s paper, West Side Story, won the Overall Excellence Award. Individual awards were presented to Summer McDonnell for Young Journalist of the Year, feature photography and feature writing; Nathan Gurtis for sports writing, opinion writing and news writing; and Emily Luff and Wesley Pashinski for newspaper layout. Cathy Podolak is the journalism teacher and newspaper and yearbook adviser at the high school. At the event, from left, first row, are Luff, Pashinski, McDonnell and Gurtis. Second row: Julia Mericle, Morgan Fulton and Kaylee Caprari. Third row: Elizabeth Koch, Melissa Payavis, Joshua Brody,Tara Crawford, Daniel Damaso and Jordan Donovan.

WSCTC holds homecoming semi-formal
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PAGE 12B SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013

T R A V E L

www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER

Hard-core hiking in Yosemite backcountry
By JOHN PAIN The Associated Press

OSEMITE NATIONAL PARK, Calif. — A few loose, fist-sized rocks tumbled by as we hiked down a steep mountain pass over unstable terrain, off trail deep in Yosemite’s wilderness. We tightly gripped the solid rock holds on the side of Stanton Pass to steady ourselves when our feet slipped out from under us.
Our guides were two of the world’s most accomplished hikers, Andrew Skurka and Brian Robinson. We were far enough from help that Skurka had reminded everyone that a serious injury here would probably mean the most expensive helicopter ride we would ever have. This was fun. Our group of six hikers had several goals for the weeklong trip. One was to get into the backcountry to be in pristine landscapes, far from the traffic and crowds of Yosemite National Park’s developed areas. But more importantly, we wanted to learn skills from our guides to safely traverse wild areas where there are no trails to follow and conditions are rough. Skurka was recognized as adventurer of the year by both National Geographic and Outside magazine and is known for his solo adventures, such as a sixmonth, 4,700-mile journey by foot, skis and pack raft in Alaska and the Canadian Yukon, and the 7,775-mile Sea-to-Sea Route from the Atlantic to the Pacific. Robinson was the first person to hike the Appalachian, Continental Divide and Pacific Crest Trails all in one calendar year: 7,400 miles in 11 months. Skurka, 32, decided that he wants to share the lessons he learned on those trips, so he started a guiding business. With the help of assistant guides such

Y

as Robinson, he teaches everything from what to do when a grizzly bear is charging you at close range to how to keep your feet healthy after punishing them with long distances on rocky, uneven terrain. He also espouses the philosophy of only taking what you need on hiking trips. Because he likes to hike 30-plus miles during 12 to 16 hours of travel a day, that usually means carrying much less than the average backpacker. He also wants hikers to depend less on gear and more on their brains to make sure they have safe fun when venturing off trail. A few months before the trip last September, the planning began via a Google group. Skurka gave us spreadsheets to list everything we would take with us and how much it weighed, down to how many ounces a few sheets of toilet paper would add to our packs. We estimated how many calories we would realistically need to eat and took dense foods, such as protein bars, trail mix with nuts and even olive oil, which let us feel full without having too much to carry. With Skurka’s help, we also researched the climate, terrain, route hazards and more, so that we would know exactly what to bring. By doing so, we knew what we needed to be prepared for and were able to stay comfortable without relying on extra gear that we’d packed “just in case.” Skurka is a meticulous planner, so even though we had “homework” before the trip, he took care of all the complicated details such as printing maps, getting permits and buying and packing meals. The group going on the trip was intimidating to me for their fitness: an ultra-runner in his 30s who competes in 50- and 100mile races, another ultra-runner in his 50s who barely had any body fat, a mountain climber, a man in his 50s who runs marathons in well below three hours. I’ve done a lot of hiking and exercise regularly and intensely, but I spend most of my days sitting at a desk.

Banner Peak is shown in the Ansel Adams Wilderness outside Yosemite National Park in California.

But it wasn’t long after we met in Yosemite’s Tuolumne Meadows in the High Sierra mountains that we were joking with one another and realizing there were no overzealous egos in the group. And despite their status in the hiking community, Skurka and Robinson were laid back and fun to hike with. Because we were confident that we could avoid getting lost by “staying found” through expert navigation, we left the trail system and explored seldom visited parts of Yosemite. We got to see places as awe-inspiring as the more famous sights in Yosemite, but there were few signs of civilization around. After about six full days’ hiking, we covered more than 80 miles, much of it off trail, with about 21,000 feet of elevation gain. Fortunately, we all walked out on our own, with Skurka giving some wilderness medical treatment of cuts. I ate the biggest double burger I’d ever had when we got back to Tuolumne

A slice of a fallen sequoia is displayed outside the museum in Yosemite Village, its age marked by world events. The giant sequoias of Yosemite National Park in California are among the largest, oldest trees on earth.

Tourists take photos of Yosemite Falls in Yosemite National Park in California. Beautiful scenery ranging from waterfalls to mountain views is easily accessible to visitors at Yosemite, which is one of the country’s most-visited national parks.

AP PHOTOS

if You go
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C

SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013

Hodges, Mauti reunited in Minnesota
Penn State linebackers both selected by Vikings on final day of draft.
By DEREK LEVARSE dlevarse@timesleader.com

The wait, Gerald Hodges said, was getting a little frustrating. That held true for all of Penn State’s seniors on Saturday. But at the end of the final day of the 2013 NFL Draft, Hodges was reunited with Michael Mauti, as both linebackers were selected by the Minnesota Vikings. It just took a little extra time for it to happen. Hodges went in the fourth round with the 120th overall pick. Minnesota followed that up late in the day by snagging Mauti in the seventh round with the 213th overall pick. The duo Hodges joined defensive tackle Jordan Hill, who was drafted on Friday in the third round by the Seattle Seahawks. The group that formed the heart of Penn State’s defense gave the school 332 players drafted into the NFL all-time. A handful of other Penn State seniors will look to catch on as free agents in the next few days. Center Matt Stankiewitch and cornerback Stephon Morris were among the most wanted of
See REUNITED, Page 7C

Kolarik’s goal gives Penguins OT victory
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton steals home ice in opener of Best-of-5 series.
By TOM VENESKY tvenesky@timesleader.com

A H L P L AY O F F S

Jordan Reed of Florida loses the football as Penn State’s Kevion Latham (44) and Michael Mauti (42) converge on Reed in the 2011 Outback Bowl at Raymond James Stadium in Tampa, Fla. Mauti was selected by the Minnesota Vikings in the seventh round of the NFL Draft on Saturday.

PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER

Eagles take USC’s Barkley to lead QB run in 4th round
By BARRY WILNER AP Pro Football Writer

NEW YORK — This was one rush quarterbacks embraced. Starting with Matt Barkley, the fourth round of the NFL draft was the landing spot for quarterbacks who carried hopes of going much higher. Philadelphia traded up with Jacksonville to get the Southern California QB with the opening pick Saturday. “I try not to get stressed about things I can’t control,” Barkley said when asked about his drop in the draft from likely first-rounder in 2012 to No. 98 overall. “I’m just glad I know where my home is and I can’t wait to hit the playbook.” Yes, it was three rounds later than Barkley hoped for. Same thing for Ryan Nassib of Syracuse, Landry Jones of Oklahoma and Tyler Wilson of Arkansas, the other quarterbacks chosen in Round 4. “We’re going to take the best value on the board,” coach Chip Kelly said, adding the Eagles rated Barkley in the top 50. “There’s a prime example. The best value on the board by far was Matt. He’s an extremely mature young man, intel-

“To be honest with you, I blacked out. I didn’t get everything,” Nassib said. “What I did get from him was that first off I had to cut my ties with the Philadelphia Eagles and switch, which won’t be a problem.”

Ryan Nassib On going to the Giants

ligent, articulate. He has that ‘it’ factor.” Perhaps. But he seemed to have a lot more of it last year, but Barkley opted to return to school. He and the Trojans slumped, Barkley injured his shoulder, and his stock plummeted. He will join quarterbacks Michael Vick and Nick Foles in Philadelphia. The New York Giants, hardly in need of a quarterback with Eli Manning in his prime, still dealt with Arizona to move up for Nassib. Nassib, from the Philadelphia suburbs, took a call from Giants coach Tom

Southern California’s Matt Barkley was chosen with the 98th overall pick in the fourth round of the NFL draft by the Philadelphia Eagles on Saturday.

AP PHOTO

Coughlin, but wasn’t sure what Coughlin told him. “To be honest with you, I blacked out. I didn’t get everything,” Nassib said.

“What I did get from him was that first off I had to cut my ties with the PhiladelSee BARKLEY, Page 7C

BINGHAMTON, N.Y. – Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins goaltender Jeff Zatkoff was the only reason why Game 1 of the Eastern Conference Quarterfinals against the Binghamton Senators didn’t end in a regulation loss. And Chad Kolarik was the reason why it ended in an overtime 3-2 win for the Penguins. After Binghamton dominated most of the game, PENGUINS including overtime, Kolarik won it with a SENATORS wrist shot from the slot for his second goal of the night. After jumping out to a 2-0 first period lead, the Penguins allowed Binghamton to take control and even things up 2-2. After the Senators’ scored their second goal at the end of the second period, Zatkoff stopped a flurry of pucks throughout the second half of the game to maintain the tie. In the second and third periods alone, Binghamton outshot the Penguins 27-14, and Zatkoff stopped all but one. In overtime he was equally sharp, including a heads-up save on a redirect between the legs by Binghamton’s Hugh Jessiman, and later a four-on-two rush that culminated in a save on a David Dziurzynski shot. Kolarik won it at 8:18 of the overtime period when he rushed up the ice with his linemates, pulled up in the slot and shot. The goal was his fourth overtime tally this year, including three during the regular season. “Good players are supposed to rise to the top,” Kolarik said. “I know it’s cliche, but it’s the truth. That’s what I get paid for and if I’m not doing it, then I’m

3

2

See PENGUINS, Page 6C

Game’s latest talented catchers are able to do it all
Position is evolving with continued changes throughout baseball.
By JANIE McCAULEY AP Baseball Writer

MAjOR LEAgUE BASEBALL

Do-everything catchers like San Francisco Giants star Buster Posey show remarkable versatility from the crouch and the batter’s box.

AP PHOTO

SAN FRANCISCO — Fifteen years ago, shortstops such as Derek Jeter, Alex Rodriguez and Nomar Garciaparra changed the perception of their position from slick fielders with little pop to run producers who could still hold their own with the glove. Now, it’s do-everything catchers such as Buster Posey, Yadier Molina and Joe Mauer, along with up-and-coming youngsters Wilin Rosario, Matt Wieters and Salvador Perez, showing remarkable versatility from both

the crouch and the batter’s box. Ex-shortstop Alan Trammell, former catchers-turned-managers Bob Melvin, Jim Leyland and Bruce Bochy have each seen all kinds of trends during decades in the game, and right now they’re all impressed with the latest crew of catchers. “It’s a lot different than when I played. Johnny Bench started it, and Yogi (Berra) before,” said Leyland, manager of the Detroit Tigers. “Years ago, offense wasn’t as prevalent with catchers as in today’s world. Similar to shortstop. Way back when, you wanted a shortstop who caught everything and you really didn’t care how much they hit. Now the shortstops have become offensive players. It’s just a change in the time.”

Five-tool catchers have become commonplace. Their success shows in the numbers at this early stage of the season, too. For the first time since 1977, when Hall of Fame backstops Gary Carter, Carlton Fisk, Johnny Bench were manning the position, catchers are outhitting the rest of the league. “The catching position is one that for a few years here, maybe the last decade, wasn’t the most prominent position,” said the Oakland Athletics’ Melvin, reigning AL Manager of the Year. “It’s good to see so many good catchers you have to worry about not only defensively but offensively.
See CATCHERS, Page 6C

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PAGE 2C SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013

S P O R T S L AT E S T L I N E
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL FAVORITE Philadelphia Miami at St. Louis LINE -110/+100 -105/-105 -175/+165 UNDERDOG at NewYork Chicago Cincinnati Pittsburgh Milwaukee Colorado Toronto Houston at Minnesota at Chicago FAVORITE at Boston FAVORITE New York Miami San Antonio Denver at Oakland at Seattle Interleague at Detroit -135/+125 NBA Playoffs LINE O/U UNDERDOG 2 10 (182) at Boston 8½ (195½) at Milwaukee (189½) at L.A. Lakers NHL LINE -180/+160 UNDERDOG Ottawa 1½ (212) at Golden State Atlanta -130/+120 -110/+100 Baltimore Los Angeles at Kansas City (G2)-125/+115 Cleveland
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. ___ Saturday's Games New York 2, Toronto FC 1 Montreal 2, Chicago 0 Vancouver 2, FC Dallas 2, tie Philadelphia at New England, late D.C. United at Columbus, late Portland at Sporting Kansas City, late Los Angeles at Real Salt Lake, late San Jose at Chivas USA, late Today's Games Colorado at Houston, 5 p.m. Thursday, May 2 New England at Portland, 10:30 p.m. Saturday, May 4 Seattle FC at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. Montreal at San Jose, 4 p.m. New York at Columbus, 4 p.m. Toronto FC at Colorado, 9 p.m. Vancouver at Real Salt Lake, 9 p.m. Sunday, May 5 Chivas USA at Sporting Kansas City, 5 p.m. Houston at Los Angeles, 11 p.m.

www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER
Nanticoke Area Little League will hold its monthly meeting May 1 at High School Cafe at 7:30 p.m. Board Members are to meet at 7 p.m. Wyoming Area Boys Soccer Parents will have a meeting Tuesday, April 30, at 6 p.m. at the Secondary Center. Wyoming Area Baseball Diamond Club will hold a meeting on Tuesday, April 30, at 7 p.m. in Room 129 of the Secondary Center. REGISTRATIONS/TRYOUTS Bear Creek Bobcats Youth Soccer Registration for the fall will be held today from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Bear Creek Community Charter School. Players must be at least 4 years old by July 31, and born on or after Aug. 1, 1995. Players do not need to reside in Bear Creek Twp. If you have any questions, email Billie Jo at bmondulick@gmail.com or John at jjkozerski@gmail.com. Ed-Lark Hurricanes Football and Cheer Signups are on the following dates: today from 12:303 p.m.; Monday, May 6, from 5-7 p.m.; Thursday, May 16, from 5-7 p.m.; Monday, June 3, 5-7 p.m.; Saturday, June 15, from noon to 4 p.m.; Thursday, June 20, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Signups will be at the Edwardsville Borough building. The cost is $40 for the first child and $5 for each additional child. Heights Packers Football and Cheerleading Registrations for boys and girls between the ages of 6-12 will be held at Stanton Lanes today between 2-4 p.m. Participants must be 6 years old by Aug. 1 and provide a copy of a birth certificate and a physical form completed by the first practice. If you have any questions, email heightspackers68@ yahoo.com. The cost for registrations before April 30 are as follows: $30 for one child, $45 for two children and $60 per family. For more information, visit www. heightspackers.webs.com. Kingston Youth Soccer will have registrations for the fall season May 8 from 5-8:30 p.m. at the Kingston Rec. Center. Registration can also be completed online at www.kingstonlightning.org. For more information, call Benn Miller at 332-0313. Plains American Legion Baseball Teams will hold tryouts at Hilldale Park in Plains. Tryouts with ages 13-15 will be today from 1-3 p.m. and May 4 from 1-3 p.m. Tryouts for ages 16-19 will be May 4, 5 and 11 if necessary from 4-6 p.m. All interested players are eligible to attend. Players residing in Plains, Laflin, Bear Creek, Parsons, Miners Mills, North End, East End, Avoca, Dupont, Jenkins Twp. and Pittston Twp. east of the bypass may participate. South Wilkes Barre Mini Mohawks will hold cheerleading and football registration on May 4, 11, and 18 from 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. and May 24th from3 - 5 p.m. All registrations will take place at Minor park, next to Kistler Elementary. Parents must provide a copy of their child’s birth certificate. The cost per child is $70 and $90 per family. UPCOMING EVENTS/OTHER Backyard Wiffle Ball League will host a horseshoe tournament in conjunction with its 9th Annual BWBL Charity Classic to benefit local resident Dan Peck. Peck recently underwent heart transplant surgery and a liver transplant. The two tournaments will help defray some of the medical costs for Peck. The horseshoe tournament is for two-person teams and is $20 for entry, with a guarantee of at least three games. There will also be food, drinks and snacks available with all proceeds benefiting the Dan Peck Team for the American Heart Walk. For more information, call Kevin Sickle at 704-8344 or visit www.bwbl.net, www.facebook.com/BackyardWiffleBallLeague and www.facebook. com/DiamondCityPark. Hanover Area Quarterback Club will hold nominations for board members for the upcoming season. Anyone interested should call Sharon at 510-9190. The club is also looking for volunteers for fundraisers and concessions. Hanover Township Fire District is holding a golf tournament at Edgewood in the Pines Golf Course, Drums, on Saturday, May 11. It is a four-person scramble, captain-and-crew format, with play starting at 8 a.m. Registration is open to the first 128 golfers. Entry fee is $80 for golf and cart, refreshments, awards dinner and a number of prizes. Hole sponsorships are also available, starting at $35. For more information, contact Joe Nealon at 5928126 or irishj38@aol.com, or Ron Priestman Jr. at 762-7015. WB Girls Softball League will hold a field clean up today from 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. at the complex between Simpson and Willow Sts. in South WB. Coaches and parents are urged to volunteer.

POST TIME 6:30 p.m. All races one mile First-$12,000 Cond.Pace;n/w 1 pm race life 1 Certified Ideal A.McCarthy 7-3-2 Takes the opener 7 Art Obsession J.Morrill 7-3-5 Lightly raced youngster 5 I Know Right T.Jackson 4-4-5 Steve Cook trainee 4 Beach Treasure E.Carlson 3-5-6 Winless in 11 prior tries 3 Upfront Magic J.Taggart 6-7-5 Taggart having rough start 2 Come On Cala J.Antonelli 4-5-6 Eaten alive 8 Patty Absolut H.Parker 8-6-7 Stay away Second-$6,000 Clm.Trot;clm.price $7,500 9 Northmedogoldngirl J.Morrill 3-2-1 Swoops over the field 2 Che B.Simpson 5-5-6 Should better from inside 3 My Cinnamon Girl T.Buter 6-8-7 Best late trot of rest 6 Winners Streak M.Kakaley 2-3-3 Can wing it off the gate 1 Twin B Caviar H.Parker 6-7-9 Kakaley opted off 7 Cutty M.Simons 5-2-1 Shuffled out last week 4 Master Hanover T.Jackson 6-7-6 Demoted 5 Grace N Charlie A.Siegelman 4-6-6 Sent by team Siegelman 8 Mackgun Mamie J.Taggart 9-7-3 Gunned down Third-$4,500 Clm.Pace;clm.price $5,000 2 Really Showing Off M.Kakaley 1-7-2 Comes right back 7 Thomas John N M.Simons 3-1-1 Sets the early tempo 6 Keystone Neptune T.Jackson 8-8-5 Jackson owns-trains-reins 5 Jazz Band A.Napolitano 8-8-3 Class of the field 8 Kel’s Return B.Simpson 9-3-2 Again saddled outside 1 Maybe I’m A Rei T.Buter 7-5-7 Inside draw a plus 3 DJ Wonder M.Romano 6-6-7 Just 1 win over last 2 years 4 Lifetime Louie M.Miller 6-5-8 Lundstrom training at .028 9 Lies Lies Lies J.Taggart 7-7-6 Drops, but well off the pace

By Mark Dudek Times Leader Correspondent Two more legs of the Bobby Weiss Series, tonight for the threeyear old filly trotters, top a sixteen race slate this evening at The Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs. Also on the agenda is very competitive Mares Preferred Pace carded as race ten on your program. So be sure to get out and enjoy a beautiful night of action at the Downs! BEST BET: HIGHLAND HELLION (11TH) VALUE PLAY: NEW RELEASE (9TH)
3-1 4-1 9-2 7-2 10-1 8-1 12-1 4-1 9-2 6-1 7-2 3-1 10-1 8-1 15-1 20-1 5-2 7-2 5-1 4-1 6-1 8-1 10-1 15-1 20-1 4-1 3-1 9-2 10-1 6-1 7-2 8-1 15-1 20-1 5-2 4-1 15-1 5-1 3-1 6-1 10-1 12-1 20-1 3-1 7-2 4-1 9-2 8-1 15-1 6-1 10-1 20-1 5-2 3-1 4-1 5-1 6-1 12-1 10-1 20-1 15-1 7-2 5-2 3-1 9-2 9-2 8-1 6-1 12-1 6-1 5-1 3-1 5-2 12-1 4-1 10-1 15-1 20-1 3-1 7-2 5-2 9-2 6-1 8-1 12-1 5-2 3-1 4-1 12-1 5-1 6-1 15-1 10-1 10-1 3-1 4-1 9-2 6-1 7-2 8-1 15-1 10-1 20-1 3-1 6-1 4-1 8-1 7-2 9-2 15-1 10-1 20-1 4-1 3-1 7-2 9-2 6-1 10-1 15-1 8-1 3-1 7-2 4-1 9-2 6-1 8-1 10-1 15-1 20-1 7-2 4-1 3-1 8-1 5-1 9-2 10-1 12-1

ON THE MARK

at Washington -115/+105 at Los Angeles -180/+170 at Arizona at New York at Boston Texas Tampa Bay -150/+140 -110/+100 -190/+180 -130/+120 -140/+130

San Francisco -115/+105 at San Diego American League

at Kansas City (G1)-125/+115 Cleveland
TGC — PGA Tour, Zurich Classic, final round, at New Orleans 3 p.m. CBS — PGA Tour, Zurich Classic, final round, at New Orleans TGC — LPGA, North Texas Shootout, final round, at Irving, Texas 1 p.m. TBS — Toronto at N.Y. Yankees WPIX, WQMY – Philadelphia at N.Y. Mets 2 p.m. ROOT – Pittsburgh at St. Louis WGN — Tampa Bay at Chicago White Sox 8 p.m. ESPN — Atlanta at Detroit 1:30 p.m. SE2 – New Hampshire at Reading

HOCkEY
National Hockey League
EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA z-Pittsburgh 47 35 12 0 70 157 116 x-N.Y. Rangers 48 26 18 4 56 130 112 x-N.Y. Islanders 48 24 17 7 55 139 139 Philadelphia 48 23 22 3 49 133 141 New Jersey 48 19 19 10 48 112 129 Northeast Division GP 47 47 47 47 48 W 28 28 26 24 21 W 27 24 19 18 15 L OT Pts GF GA 13 6 62 129 105 14 5 61 145 125 16 5 57 144 129 17 6 54 112 102 21 6 48 125 143 L OT Pts GF GA 18 3 57 149 130 21 3 51 128 144 24 4 42 125 152 26 4 40 148 150 27 6 36 112 171

TENNIS
WTA Tour Porsche Grand Prix Results
Saturday At Porsche-Arena Stuttgart, Germany Purse: $795,707 (Premier) Surface: Clay-Indoor Singles Semifinals Maria Sharapova (1), Russia, def. Angelique Kerber (3), Germany, 6-3, 2-6, 7-5. Li Na (2), China, def. Bethanie Mattek-Sands, United States, 6-4, 6-3. Doubles Semifinals Mona Barthel and Sabine Lisicki, Germany, def. Darija Jurak, Croatia, and Katalin Marosi, Hungary, 6-3, 6-4. Bethanie Mattek-Sands, United States, and Sania Mirza, India, def. Angelique Kerber and Andrea Petkovic, Germany, 6-4, 7-5.

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL

MINOR LEAGUE BASEBALL NBA BASKETBALL

Fourth-$9,000 Cond.Trot;n/w $4,000 last 5 9 Fortissimo R.Pierce 4-7-2 Takes very wide-open group 5 Broadway Victory C.Norris 4-6-4 Norris makes rare steer 3 Missy Goldfire M.Kakaley 9-6-7 First time lasix user 4 Baileys Photo E.Mollor 8-1-8 Has to stay on feet 1 Orphan Victor M.Simons 7-7-4 Tries to save all the ground 2 Around And Over A.NapolitanoComes from a cold barn 7 Jaded Tim G.Napolitano 9-8-5 Rough spot for maiden 6 Abundamax A.McCarthy 6-6-7 Gapper 8 Broadway’s Heir T.Jackson 5-4-6 Going in reverse Fifth-$6,000 Clm.Pace;clm.price $7,500 1 Court Jester G.Napolitano 2-3-1 Fires down the road 2 Zarachino J.Morrill 2-8-7 Looms large 3 Touch Of Steel M.Kakaley 9-6-4 Note the driver change 5 Lost Bliss J.Pavia 1-4-3 Finally got monkey off back 6 Caviart Spencer A.McCarthy 4-1-2 Raced poorly as the chalk 9 Golden Time T.Jackson 1-2-3 Claimed last two starts 8 Four Starzzz King A.Siegelman 6-5-2 Cash burner 7 Booze Cruiser E.Carlson 8-3-3 One drink short 4 Western Dog M.Romano 6-8-10 Lacks bark Sixth-$9,000 Cond.Trot;n/w $4,000 last 5 1 Mr Mcrail G.Napolitano 2-7-8 Money from the wood 4 Marion Miss Julie T.Jackson 4-4-5 Nap opted for ace instead 2 Money Man K M.Kakaley 3-7-5 Grabs another check 3 Bullvillcomeonjohn J.Pavia 3-1-7 In the picture early on 8 Casanova Lindy A.Napolitano 4-4-3 Lacks needed rally 5 Rome J.Morrill 2-6-5 Florida invader 9 Shibboleth Hanover M.Romano 5-3-3 Post knocks 6 Lady Love Hanover M.Miller 2-6-5 Fails to post a bid 7 No Money Fun R.Pierce 5-4-3 Out of cash Seventh-$4,500 Clm.Pace;clm.price $5,000 1 Ideal Joe A.McCarthy 5-2-2 Finds a nice spot 4 Laguna Beach S.Allard 2-8-6 Was favored last two starts 2 Master Of Wars G.Napolitano 1-3-4 Goes for new connections 6 Hickory Louie R.Pierce 4-9-7 Failed since the claim 5 The Real Dan J.Morrill 8-5-1 Morrill the new pilot 8 Heza Character E.Carlson 2-1-2 Monti invader 7 Absolutely Michael M.Romano 3-5-5 Matty brings the bombs 9 Mr Delite M.Kakaley 5-7-7 No frosting available 3 Air Mcnair A.Siegelman 6-8-4 Off target Eighth-$15,000 Bobby Weiss Series 3 Lady Broadway J.Morrill 3-3-1 Haven’t seen best yet 2 Classic Martine A.Miller 1-1-2 Loves to win 4 NF Happenstance T.Buter 4-1-1 Looking to rebound 1 Quiet Snow R.Pierce 6-1-3 Tops solid entry 1A Queen Of More M.Simons 2-2-3 Chocolatier filly 7 Southwind Diva M.Kakaley 4-3-4 Hoping to make final 5 Bouncing Bax H.Parker 5-3-5 Bounced around 6 A Girl Named Tim T.Jackson 5-8-5 Rounds out the field Ninth-$6,000 Clm.Pace;clm.price $7,500 9 New Release R.Pierce 2-9-5 Darkhorse of the night 7 Whataorse G.Napolitano 1-2-5 Been very good at Meadows 6 Lucky Land A.McCarthy 7-5-6 Raced better at the Big M 5 Donnie Bop J.Morrill 2-2-3 13yr old still going strong 2 Captain Greg T.Jackson 2-4-4 No slouch 8 Ar Ed A.Napolitano 1-5-5 No from out here 3 Theetownlittleguy M.Kakaley 3-6-5 Stomped 1 Shark Income J.Pavia 4-7-8 Save your bank account 4 Artsbred Camotion M.Simons 5-4-8 Doesn’t make a move Tenth-$25,000 Mares Preferred Pace 3 Lorrie Please E.Carlson 5-1-2 Looked great in last visit 7 Unred Hanover R.Pierce 3-1-2 Must be respected 5 Rhapsody Rose T.Buter 1-3-1 Very speedy mare 6 Sweet Hedge J.Morrill 2-2-2 Up a notch in class 2 Naughtytiltheend M.Miller 1-1-2 Raced super uncovered 4 Arctic Fire N A.McCarthy 1-3-1 Just won at 33-1 odds 1 Sissy Bar G.Napolitano 7-2-2 Fills out the group Eleventh-$8,500 Clm.Pace;clm.price $10,000 1 Highland Hellion E.Carlson 1-2-1 The best bet 5 Sham’s Big Guy B.Simpson 2-2-7 Simpson’s newest pacer 8 Logan M A.McCarthy 2-1-1 Bumps up off purchase 2 Jersey Dan M.Kakaley 5-7-6 Reynolds off to slow start 7 Here Comes Brandon M.Romano 4-2-5 Been racing at Freehold 6 Harmony Oaks Rengo R.Pierce 5-5-6 Does pick up Pierce 3 Royal Cam-Hall A.Siegelman 4-7-1 I’ll pass on 4 Western Artwork A.Napolitano 7-9-9 No Picasso 9 Dial A Dragon A.DeFranceso III 5-5-6 Take another number Twelfth-$11,000 Cond.Trot;n/w $6,000 last 5 1 Dr Cal G.Napolitano 7-5-7 Done well with George before 4 Hoboken Sonny H.Parker 1-4-8 Very good, when right 7 Nordic Adventure M.Simons 3-4-6 Moves out of claimers 5 On The Tab M.Kakaley 8-5-8 Yet to hit his stride 2 Keystone Tempo E.Carlson 3-3-2 Retains Carlson in bike 8 Master Begonia R.Pierce 1-3-4 Much tougher company 9 Ginger Tree Wanda A.Siegelman 4-1-6 Lack of speed a killer 6 Mr Caviar J.Morrill 6-7-1 Running on E 3 Somolli Crown B.Simpson 8-9-6 Stops abruptly Thirteenth-$15,000 Cond.Pace;n/w 4 pm races life 5 Lights Go Out J.Morrill 3-6-1 Turn on the high beams 4 Panera Hanover A.Miller 2-1-4 NJSS filly 1 Donna Party E.Carlson 1-9-9 Never better 6 Spotlight On T.Buter 4-1-8 Note the driver change 3 Ideal Ginny M.Miller 7-3-3 Drops from Weiss Series 2 Gramercy Hanover M.Kakaley 5-3-8 Grey lady 9 Rescue Team A.McCarthy 1-3-1 Bet heavily in Florida 7 Terror In Motion R.Pierce 2-7-2 Tiring 8 Gypsy Cards T.Jackson 3-4-6 Auto toss Fourteenth-$8,500 Clm.Pace;clm.price $10,000 2 Winbak Prince A.Napolitano 1-4-1 Winner three of last four 5 Medoland Big Cam A.Miller 8-8-1 Surick-Miller strong team 3 Artomatic Pilot J.Morrill 4-3-5 Finishes off the trifecta 6 Needles And Pins M.Kakaley 2-6-7 Was a good 2nd at 23-1 8 Urbino Hanover M.Miller 3-3-6 Used up early on 7 American Romance E.Carlson 3-8-5 Couldn’t beat cheaper 4 Thunderfist A.Siegelman 6-3-5 Beat down 1 Must Be The Bunny M.Romano 10-5-6 Never involved Fifteenth-$12,000 Cond.Trot;n/w 1 pm race life 9 Crystal Phenom M.Vanderkemp 4-2-x Reason Vanderkemp is here 1 Mustodian M.Kakaley 6-4-5 Benefits from the rail 2 Hep M.Miller 2-2-9 Comes off long layoff 6 Prince Lauxmont W.Long 1-2-5 Raced fairs last season 3 Marion Mad Dash M.Romano 2-8-9 Another off leave of absence 5 Order By Road T.Jackson 2-2-2 Sits in 8 Shermans Creek A.Napolitano 8-5-7 Longtime maiden 4 Bouncer J.Morrill 6-x-x First timer 7 More Proof A.McCarthy 4-7-3 One more race to go Sixteenth-$12,000 Cond.Pace;n/w 1 pm race life 3 Steal Her Thunder R.Pierce 1-2-3 Steals the nightcap 1 Naughty Marietta A.Miller 5-6-3 Bettor’s Delight 3yr old 5 Somekindamonster S.Allard 2-7-8 Goes out for team Allard 7 Annakate A.McCarthy 3-3-8 Superfecta player 4 Destiny’s Desire M.Kakaley 2-7-4 Green girl 6 Jolting Jen E.Carlson 5-2-4 Slow in final quarter mile 2 Justhaventmetuyet J.Taggart 6-5-6 No one is picking her up 8 Regal Rock T.Jackson 3-2-7 See you on Tuesday

x-Boston x-Montreal x-Toronto x-Ottawa Buffalo

1 p.m. ABC — Playoffs, first round, game 4, N.Y. Knicks at Boston 3:30 p.m. ABC — Playoffs, first round, game 4, Miami at Milwaukee 7 p.m. TNT — Playoffs, first round, game 4, San Antonio at L.A. Lakers 9:30 p.m. TNT — Playoffs, first round, game 4, Denver at Golden State 7 p.m. NBCSN — Ottawa at Boston

Southeast Division GP y-Washington 48 Winnipeg 48 Carolina 47 Tampa Bay 48 Florida 48

NHL HOCKEY SOCCER

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA z-Chicago 47 36 6 5 77 154 99 x-St. Louis 47 28 17 2 58 126 114 x-Detroit 48 24 16 8 56 124 115 Columbus 48 24 17 7 55 120 119 Nashville 48 16 23 9 41 111 139 Northwest Division GP 47 47 47 48 47 GP 47 47 47 47 48 W 26 25 18 19 16 W 30 26 25 20 22 L OT Pts GF GA 14 7 59 125 114 19 3 53 119 126 22 7 43 118 132 25 4 42 128 160 24 7 39 115 149 L OT Pts GF GA 11 6 66 137 113 16 5 57 130 116 15 7 57 122 113 18 9 49 120 128 22 4 48 130 142

BOxING
Figh Schedule
May 2 At Omega Products International Outdoor Arena, Corona, Calif., Mauricio Herrera vs. Ji-Hoo Kim, 10, light welterweights; Miguel Acosta vs. Miguel Gonzalez, 10, lightweights. May 3 At the Cosmopolitan Resort, Las Vegas (FSN), Francisco Vargas vs. Jose Aguiniga, 10, for the vacant NABF super featherweight title. At TBA, Thailand, Yota Sato vs. Srisaket Sor Rungvisai, 12, for Sato’s WBC super flyweight title. May 4 At Mannhein, Germany, Wladimir Klitschko vs. Francesco Pianeta, 12, for Klitschko’s IBF-IBOWBO-WBA Super World heavyweight titles. At the MGM Grand, Las Vegas (PPV), Floyd Mayweather Jr. vs. Robert Guerrero, 12, for Mayweather’s WBC welterweight title; Daniel Ponce De Leon vs. Abner Mares, 12, for Ponce De Leon’s WBC featherweight title; J’Leon Love vs. Gabriel Rosado, 10, middleweights. May 6 At Tokyo, Takashi Uchiyama vs. Jaider Parra, 12, for Uchiyama’s WBA junior lightweight title; Kohei Kono vs. Liborio Solis, 12, for Kono’s WBA junior bantamweight title. May 8 At Osaka, Japan, Kazuto Ioka vs. Wisanu Kokietgym, 12, for Ioka’s WBA World junior flyweight title; Ryo Miyazaki vs. Carlos Velarde, 12, for Miyazaki’s WBA World minimumweight title. May 10 At Niagara Falls, N.Y. (ESPN2), Patrick Hyland vs. Eric Hunter, 10, featherweights; Leon Moore vs. Cornelius Lock, 10, featherweights. At Buffalo Run Casino, Miami, Okla. (SHO), Dierry Jean vs. Cleotis Pendarvis, 12, IBF junior welterweight eliminator. May 11 At Keepmoat Stadium, Doncaster, England, Jamie McDonnell vs. Julio Ceja, 12, for the vacant IBF bantamweight title. At Hannover, Germany, BJ Flores vs. Francisco Palacios, 12, for the interim WBA cruiserweight title. May 17 At Crocus City Hall, Myakinino, Russia, Denis Lebedev vs. Guillermo Jones, 12, for Lebedev’s WBA World cruiserweight title. May 18 At Boardwalk Hall, Atlantic City, N.J. (SHO), Devon Alexander vs. Kell Brook, 12, for Alexander’s IBF welterweight title; Lamont Peterson vs. Lucas Martin Matthysse, 12, for Peterson’s IBF light welterweight title; Shawn Porter vs. Phil Lo Greco, 10, welterweights. At The Grand Oasis, Cancun, Mexico, Shane Mosley vs. Pablo Cesar Cano, 12, welterweights; Roberto Manzanarez vs. Oscar Arenas, 10, lightweights. May 24 At Mohegan Sun Casino, Uncasville, Conn. (ESPN2), Delvin Rodriguez vs. Freddy Hernandez, 10, junior middleweights; Issouf Kinda vs. Chris Howard, 10, junior welterweights. May 25 At O2 Arena, London (HBO), Carl Froch vs. Mikkel Kessler, 12, for Froch’s IBF and Kessler’s WBA Super World super middleweight titles; Tony Bellew vs. Isaac Chilemba, rematch, 12, WBC light heavyweight eliminator. At Bell Centre, Montreal (HBO), Jean Pascal vs. Lucian Bute, 12, for Pascal’s NABF light heavyweight title. June 1 At The BB&T Center, Sunrise, Fla. (FOXSN), Braulio Santos vs. Derrick Wilson, 10, featherweights; Daquan Arnett vs. Irving Garcia, 10, welterweights. June 8 At The Bell Centre, Montreal (HBO), Chad Dawson vs. Adonis Stevenson, 12, for Dawson’s WBC light heavyweight title; Yuriorkis Gamboa vs. Darley Perez, 10, lightweights. At Home Depot Center, Carson, Calif. (SHO), Marcos Maidana vs. Josesito Lopez, 12, for Maidana’s WBA Inter-Continental welterweight title; Erislandy Lara vs. Alfredo Angula, 12, light middleweights; Sakio Bika vs. Marco Antonio Periban, 12, for the vacant WBC super middleweight title.June 14 At Sands Casino Resort, Bethlehem, Pa. (NBCSN), Bryant Jennings vs. Franklin Lawrence, 10, heavyweights. June 22 At Barclays Center, Brooklyn, N.Y. (SHO), Paul Malignaggi vs. Adrien Broner, 12, for Malignaggi’s WBA World welterweight title; Johnathon Banks vs. Seth Mitchell, 12, for Banks NABO and WBC international heavyweight titles.

5 p.m. ESPN2 — Mexican Primera Division, Atlas at Puebla (same-day tape)

TRANSACTIONS
American League CHICAGO WHITE SOX — Sent LHP Leyson Septimo to Charlotte (IL) for a rehab assignment. NEW YORK YANKEES — Placed C Francisco Cervelli and RHP Ivan Nova on the 15-day DL. Recalled C Austin Romine from Scranton/WilkesBarre (IL). Selected the contract of LHP Vidal Nuno from Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). Transferred SS Derek Jeter from the 15-day to the 60-day DL. SEATTLE MARINERS — Sent OF Michael Saunders to Tacoma (PCL) for a rehab assignment. TORONTO BLUE JAYS — Designated LHP Aaron Laffey for assignment. Selected the contract of RHP Justin Germano from Buffalo (IL). National League CINCINNATI REDS — Placed LHP Manny Parra on the 15-day DL, retroactive to April 24. Reinstated LHP Sean Marshall from the 15-day DL. NEW YORK METS — Optioned LHP Josh Edgin to Binghamton (EL). Reinstated RHP Shaun Marcum from the 15-day DL. WASHINGTON NATIONALS — Sent C Wilson Ramos to Harrisburg (EL) for a rehab assignment. United League RIO GRANDE VALLEY WHITEWINGS — Named Chris Paterson manager. National Basketball Association PHILADELPHIA 76ERS — Purchased the operating rights to the Utah Flash (NBADL), will relocate the club to Newark, Del., renamed them the Delaware 87ers and named Aaron Moszer team president. National Hockey League BUFFALO SABRES — Announced the retirement of F Jochen Hecht. NASHVILLE PREDATORS — Recalled Fs Daniel Bang and Kevin Henderson from Milwaukee (AHL) under emergency conditions. WASHINGTON CAPITALS — Re-signed G Michal Newvirth to a two-year contract.

y-Vancouver Minnesota Edmonton Calgary Colorado

BASEBALL

Pacific Division y-Anaheim x-Los Angeles x-San Jose Phoenix Dallas

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division z-clinched conference Friday's Games Buffalo 2, N.Y. Islanders 1, SO Colorado 5, Phoenix 4, SO Edmonton 6, Minnesota 1 Chicago 3, Calgary 1 Saturday's Games N.Y. Rangers 4, New Jersey 0 Detroit 3, Dallas 0 Columbus 3, Nashville 1 Florida 5, Tampa Bay 3 Washington 3, Boston 2, OT Philadelphia 2, Ottawa 1 Montreal at Toronto, late Minnesota at Colorado, late Carolina at Pittsburgh, late Chicago at St. Louis, late Phoenix at Anaheim, late. Vancouver at Edmonton, late San Jose at Los Angeles, late Sunday's Games Ottawa at Boston, 7 p.m. Monday's Games No games scheduled

BASKETBALL

HOCKEY

American Hockey League Playoff Glance

BASkETBALL
FIRST ROUND (x-if necessary) (Best-of-7) EASTERN CONFERENCE Miami 3, Milwaukee 0 Sunday, April 21: Miami 110, Milwaukee 87 Tuesday, April 23: Miami 98, Milwaukee 86 Thursday, April 25: Miami 104, Milwaukee 91 Sunday, April 28: Miami at Milwaukee, 3:30 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 30: Milwaukee at Miami, 7 or 8 p.m. x-Thursday, May 2: Miami at Milwaukee, TBA x-Saturday, May 4: Milwaukee at Miami, TBA New York 3, Boston 0 Saturday, April 20: New York 85, Boston 78 Tuesday, April 23: New York 87, Boston 71 Friday, April 26: New York 90, Boston 76 Sunday, April 28: New York at Boston, 1 p.m. x-Wednesday, May 1: Boston at New York, TBA x-Friday, May 3: New York at Boston, TBA x-Sunday, May 5: Boston at New York, TBA Indiana 2, Atlanta 0 Sunday, April 21: Indiana 107, Atlanta 90 Wednesday, April 24: Indiana 113, Atlanta 98 Saturday, April 27: Indiana at Atlanta, late Monday, April 29: Indiana at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m. x-Wednesday, May 1: Atlanta at Indiana, TBA x-Friday, May 3: Indiana at Atlanta, TBA x-Sunday, May 5: Atlanta at Indiana, TBA Chicago 3, Brooklyn 1 Saturday, April 20: Brooklyn 106, Chicago 89 Monday, April 22: Chicago 90, Brooklyn 82 Thursday, April 25: Chicago 79, Brooklyn 76 Saturday, April 27: Chicago 142, Brooklyn 134, 3OT Monday, April 29: Chicago at Brooklyn, 7 p.m. x-Thursday, May 2: Brooklyn at Chicago, TBA x-Saturday, May 4: Chicago at Brooklyn, TBA WESTERN CONFERENCE Oklahoma City 2, Houston 0 Sunday, April 21: Oklahoma City 120, Houston 91 Wednesday, April 24: Oklahoma City 105, Houston 102 Saturday, April 27: Oklahoma City at Houston, late Monday, April 29: Oklahoma City at Houston, 9:30 p.m. x-Wednesday, May 1: Houston at Oklahoma City, 8 or 9:30 p.m. x-Friday, May 3: Oklahoma City at Houston, TBA x-Sunday, May 5: Houston at Oklahoma City, TBA San Antonio 3, L.A. Lakers 0 Sunday, April 21: San Antonio 91, L.A. Lakers 79 Wednesday, April 24: San Antonio 102, L.A. Lakers 91 Friday, April 26: San Antonio 120, L.A. Lakers 89 Sunday, April 28: San Antonio at L.A. Lakers, 7 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 30: L.A. Lakers at San Antonio, 8 or 9:30 p.m. x-Thursday, May 2: San Antonio at L.A. Lakers, TBA x-Saturday, May 4: L.A. Lakers at San Antonio, TBA Golden State 2, Denver 1 Saturday, April 20: Denver 97, Golden State 95 Tuesday, April 23: Golden State 131, Denver 117 Friday, April 26: Golden State 110, Denver 108 Sunday, April 28: Denver at Golden State, 9:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 30: Golden State at Denver, 8 or 9 p.m. x-Thursday, May 2: Denver at Golden State, TBA x-Saturday, May 4: Golden State at Denver, TBA L.A. Clippers 2, Memphis 2 Saturday, April 20: L.A. Clippers 112, Memphia 91 Monday, April 22: L.A. Clippers 93, Memphis 91 Thursday, April 25: Memphis 94, L.A. Clippers 82 Saturday, April 27: Memphis 104, L.A. Clippers 83 Tuesday, April 30: Memphis at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m. Friday, May 3: L.A. Clippers at Memphis, TBA x-Sunday, May 5: Memphis at L.A. Clippers, TBA

National Basketball Association Playoff Glance

CONFERENCE QUARTERFINALS BEST OF 5 EASTERN CONFERENCE Hershey 1, Providence 0 Friday, April 26: Hershey 5, Providence 2 Sunday, April 28: Hershey at Providence, 3:05 p.m. Saturday, May 4: Providence at Hershey, 7 p.m. x-Sunday, May 5: Providence at Hershey, 5 p.m. x-Wednesday, May 8: Hershey at Providence, 7:05 p.m. Syracuse vs. Portland Saturday, April 27: Portland at Syracuse, late Sunday, April 28: Portland at Syracuse, 7:30 p.m. Thursday, May 2: Syracuse at Portland, 7 p.m. x-Friday, May 3: Syracuse at Portland, 7 p.m. x-Sunday, May 5: Portland at Syracuse, 7:30 p.m. Springfield vs. Manchester Saturday, April 27: Manchester at Springfield, late Sunday, April 28: Manchester at Springfield, 4 p.m. Thursday, May 2: Springfield at Manchester, 7 p.m. x-Saturday, May 4: Springfield at Manchester, 7 p.m. x-Sunday, May 5: Manchester at Springfield, 4 p.m. Penguins 1, Binghamton 0 Saturday, April 27: Penguins 3, Binghamton 2, OT Sunday, April 28: Penguins at Binghamton, 5:05 p.m. Thursday, May 2: Binghamton at Penguins, 7:05 p.m. x-Saturday, May 4: Binghamton at Penguins , 7:05 p.m. x-Monday, May 6: Penguins at Binghamton, 7:05 p.m. WESTERN CONFERENCE Charlotte 1, Oklahoma City 0 Friday, April 26: Charlotte 4, Oklahoma City 3, OT Saturday, April 27: Charlotte at Oklahoma City, late Wednesday, May 1: Oklahoma City at Charlotte, 7 p.m. x-Friday, May 3: Oklahoma City at Charlotte, 7 p.m. x-Saturday, May 4: Oklahoma City at Charlotte, 7 p.m. Toronto 1, Rochester 0 Saturday, April 27: Toronto 2, Rochester 1 Sunday, April 28: Rochester at Toronto, 3 p.m. Wednesday, May 1: Toronto at Rochester, 7 p.m. x-Thursday, May 2: Toronto at Rochester, 7 p.m. x-Saturday, May 4: Rochester at Toronto, 3 p.m. Houston 1, Grand Rapids 0 Friday, April 26: Houston 3, Grand Rapids 0 Sunday, April 28: Grand Rapids at Houston, 6:05 p.m. Wednesday, May 1: Houston at Grand Rapids, 7 p.m. x-Friday, May 3: Houston at Grand Rapids, 7 p.m. x-Saturday, May 4: Houston at Grand Rapids, 7 p.m. Texas 1, Milwaukee 0 Friday, April 26: Texas 3, Milwaukee 2, OT Saturday, April 27: Texas at Milwaukee, late Wednesday, May 1: Milwaukee at Texas, 8:30 p.m. x-Friday, May 3: Milwaukee at Texas, 8:30 p.m. x-Saturday, May 4: Milwaukee at Texas, 8 p.m.

LOCAL CALENDAR
COLLEGE BASEBALL Wilkes at Keuka, DH, 1 p.m. COLLEGE SOFTBALL Marywood at Wilkes, DH, 1 p.m.

TODAY’S EVENTS

HIGH SCHOOL BASEBALL (4:15 p.m.) Wyoming Area at Wyoming Valley West Tunkhannock at Hazleton Area Crestwood at Lake-Lehman Dallas at Coughlin Holy Redeemer at Pittston Area HIGH SCHOOL SOFTBALL (4:15 p.m.) Berwick at Nanticoke Dallas at Wyoming Valley West Lake-Lehman at Coughlin MMI Prep at Holy Redeemer Tunkhannock at Hazleton Area Wyoming Area at Crestwood HIGH SCHOOL BOYS LACROSSE Delaware Valley at Woodbury (N.Y.), 4 p.m. HIGH SCHOOL GIRLS LACROSSE (all games 4:15 p.m.) Lake-Lehman at Crestwood Wyoming Seminary at Pittston Area HIGH SCHOOL BOYS VOLLEYBALL Crestwood at Hazleton Area Delaware Valley at Lake-Lehman Hanover Area at Tunkhannock HIGH SCHOOL BASEBALL (4:15 p.m.) Northwest at GAR Nanticoke at Hanover Area Meyers at MMI Prep HIGH SCHOOL SOFTBALL (4:15 p.m.) MMI Prep at Hanover Area Northwest at Meyers Wyoming Seminary at GAR

MONDAY, APRIL 29

HIGH SCHOOL BOYS LACROSSE (All games 4:15 p.m. unless noted) Dallas at North Pocono Scranton Prep at Delaware Valley Lake-Lehman at Crestwood, 5:30 p.m. HIGH SCHOOL TRACK AND FIELD (All meets 4:15 p.m.) Hanover Area at Meyers Nanticoke at Northwest Pittston Area at Berwick Wyoming Area at Lake-Lehman HIGH SCHOOL BOYS VOLLEYBALL Coughlin at Wyoming Valley West Dallas at North Pocono Holy Redeemer at Nanticoke COLLEGE BASEBALL Wilkes at Scranton, 4 p.m.

BULLETIN BOARD
CAMPS/CLINICS Dallas Mountaineer Aquatic Club is hosting a Fitter and Faster Clinic with Peter Vanderkaay on Saturday, May 11, at the Dallas Middle School natatorium. Vanderkaay is a three-time Olympian and was the 2012 Olympic swim team captain. For more information, visit www.dmacswimming.org or call Beth Redington at 239-3575. LEAGUES John Leighton Men’s Open Basketball League applications are now being accepted. The league will be played Monday and Tuesday nights beginning May 28 at Miner Park. Monday and Tuesday leagues will be separate leagues. Any team interested in signing up can call John Leighton at 4308437. The deadline to enter will be May 19. MEETINGS

W H AT ’ S O N T V
2 p.m. ESPN2 — NHRA, Spring Nationals, at Baytown, Texas Noon BTN — Purdue at Michigan State 3 p.m. ESPN — South Carolina at LSU

SOCCER
Major League Soccer
EASTERN CONFERENCE W L Montreal 5 1 New York 4 4 Sporting Kansas City 4 2 Houston 4 2 Philadelphia 3 2 Columbus 2 2 Toronto FC 1 3 Chicago 2 5 New England 1 3 D.C. 1 5 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L 6 1 3 1 3 3 2 1 3 3 2 3 2 3 2 4 1 3 T 1 2 2 1 2 3 4 1 2 1 T 2 2 2 4 1 3 3 2 2 Pts 16 14 14 13 11 9 7 7 5 4 Pts 20 11 11 10 10 9 9 8 5 GF 9 15 8 11 10 9 10 6 2 4 GA 5 13 5 8 10 7 12 14 6 10

AUTO RACING

COLLEGE BASEBALL

3 p.m. BTN — Michigan State at Michigan

COLLEGE SOFTBALL EQUESTRIAN

TUESDAY, APRIL 30

4 p.m. NBC — Rolex Championships, at Lexington, Ky. (same-day tape) 9 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Ballantine’s Championship, final round, at Seoul, South Korea (sameday tape) 1 p.m. CBS — Champions Tour, Legends of Golf, final round, at Savannah, Ga.

GOLF

FC Dallas Los Angeles Real Salt Lake Portland Chivas USA Vancouver San Jose Colorado Seattle

GF GA 15 9 10 4 7 7 11 9 10 9 9 11 6 9 6 8 3 5

TiMeS leADer www.timesleader.com

R ail R iders E xtra
LAST WEEK’S GAMES THIS WEEK’S GAMES
Sunday Syracuse W, 5-1 Monday Syracuse W, 8-1 Tuesday Columbus W, 2-1 Wednesday Columbus L, 4-5 Thursday Columbus L, 1-4 Friday Columbus L, 2-3 Saturday at Charlotte (n) Today Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday at Charlotte at Charlotte at Charlotte OFF at Gwinnett at Gwinnett at Gwinnett 2:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 6:05 p.m. 7:05 p.m. 7:05 p.m.

WWW.TIMESLEADER.COM/SPORTS

SUNDAY, April 28, 2013 pAge 3C

Team STaTS
BATTING Thomas Neal.................................................339 David Adams.................................................333 Austin Romine..............................................333 Corban Joseph.............................................272 Zoilo Almonte............................................. .265 Addison Maruszak..................................... .255 Luke Murton .................................................237 Gil Velazquez ................................................235 Melky Mesa.................................................. .234 Dan Johnson ............................................... .158 Bobby Wilson.................................................156 Cody Johnson ...............................................139 HOME RUNS Corban Joseph................................................. 3 Melky Mesa........................................................ 3 Bobby Wilson.................................................... 2 Five with ..............................................................1 RBI Thomas Neal....................................................14 Bobby Wilson.................................................... 11 Zoilo Almonte..................................................10 Dan Johnson .................................................... 9 Corban Joseph................................................. 6 Melky Mesa........................................................ 5 David Adams..................................................... 4 Addison Maruszak........................................... 4 Austin Romine.................................................. 4 Luke Murton ..................................................... 3 DOUBLES Corban Joseph................................................. 6 Thomas Neal..................................................... 6 Zoilo Almonte................................................... 5 David Adams..................................................... 3 Dan Johnson .................................................... 2 Addison Maruszak........................................... 2 Luke Murton ..................................................... 2 Bobby Wilson.................................................... 2 TRIPLES Melky Mesa..........................................................1 STOLEN BASES Melky Mesa........................................................ 2 Zoilo Almonte.....................................................1 Dan Johnson ......................................................1 Corban Joseph...................................................1 Thomas Neal.......................................................1 PITCHING Chris Bootcheck.................................2-0, 0.50 Vidal Nuno............................................2-0, 1.54 Ryan Pope ............................................. 1-0, 3.18 Chien Ming-Wang..................................1-1, 0.75 Graham Stoneburner .......................... 1-1, 1.80 Cody Eppley.......................................... 1-1, 3.86 Dellin Betances ...................................1-2, 8.04 Brett Marshall......................................0-2, 7.36 Jim Miller.............................................0-2, 9.64 Mark Montgomery .............................0-1, 0.90 Josh Romanski.................................0-1, 45.00 SAVES Preston Claiborne ........................................... 2 Cody Eppley........................................................1 STRIKEOUTS Vidal Nuno.......................................................26 Brett Marshall..................................................19 Dellin Betances ...............................................16 Mark Montgomery .........................................16 Chris Bootcheck..............................................14 Jim Miller.......................................................... 13 Sam Demel....................................................... 12 Preston Claiborne ........................................... 8 Three with ......................................................... 7

Adams of great value to organization

SWB RailRiders infielder David Adams is among the team leaders with a .333 batting average this season.

PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER

On baseball’s rollercoaster
infielder moving around, doing whatever he can to reach his major league goals with Yanks.
By DAVE ROSENGRANT drosengrant@timesleader.com

InternatIonal league north Division
Buffalo (Blue Jays) Pawtucket (Red Sox) raIlrIDerS (Yankees) Lehigh Valley (Phillies) Syracuse (Nationals) Rochester (Twins) South Division Durham (Rays) Norfolk (Orioles) Gwinnett (Braves) Charlotte (White Sox) West Division Indianapolis (Pirates) Columbus (Indians) Louisville (Reds) Toledo (Tigers) W 15 13 9 8 8 8 l 5 9 11 13 13 14

STaNDINGS
Pct. .750 .591 .450 .381 .381 .364 gB — 3 6 7½ 7½ 8 gB — 2 3½ 8½ gB — 3½ 5½ 9

W 15 13 12 7 W 16 12 10 7

l 7 9 11 16 l 7 10 12 16

Pct. .682 .591 .522 .304 Pct. .696 .545 .455 .304

MOOSIC – Take a look at David Adams’ stats so far in 2013 and you will think he’s been one of the top players all season for Scranton/Wilkes-Barre. Turns out his season has gone as smoothly as his career so far to this point. Adams’ rollercoaster journey to this season started on a day in late March when he went from one of the top prospects in New York’s organization to being out of a job. But the Yankees think highly of Adams — which was evident in 2010 when they didn’t want to send him to Seattle in a trade that would have brought pitcher Cliff Lee to New York. Because of the admiration the club has for Adams, he wasn’t unemployed too long as the infielder re-signed a minor league deal with the club a few days after getting released. Still, there was an uncertainty in Adams’ mind. “(It was) a whirlwind of emotions. Initially I was upset at myself, frustrated that I let it get to that,” said Adams, who is now the starting third baseman for the Scranton/WilkesBarre RailRiders. “And after that, you just get to the bottom of it and I never looked back.” The 25-year-old has used the short recess from baseball as more motivation for the 2013 season. He got off to a slow start in the team’s first seven games, but since then has been one of

the best players in the entire International League. He recently concluded a team-high seven-game hitting streak in which his batting average skyrocketed from under .200 to his current mark of .333 “It’s just getting into a rhythm. I think that’s a big key,” he said. “It’s just constantly putting in the work and just trusting that the Lord has a plan and everything will play out the way it’s supposed to.” That’s a similar road he’s happened to come across in other years as well, starting in 2010 when he got his first taste of Double-A ball. After being drafted in 2008 out of the University of Virginia, he skyrocketed through the organization before his 2010 campaign was derailed by an ankle injury only getting in 39 games. The same thing happened in 2011 as he was limited to just 29 games and didn’t advance past High-A Tampa. “I think everyone prays that injuries aren’t part of their career and that’s one thing I try not to think about,” the 25-year-old Adams said. “I think anyone would say the same. I feel good and I do everything to keep myself healthy. I try to just go out and play.” Once he got past the latest setback, he showed his potential last year for Trenton and then in the Arizona Fall League. First he hit .306 for the Thunder with 48 RBI and an on base percentage of .385 in 86 games. When he went to Arizona, he continued to impress batting .286 with three longballs and 15 RBI for Scottsdale to earn recognition of an AFL Rising Star. “It’s a nice relaxing environment going up there. You don’t play every

“i think to get to the big league level at any position is the goal. Then once you get there hopefully solidify a spot.”

Our weekly look at the work of RailRiders president Rob Crain, who has given us back our baseball — with a side order of promotions and entertainment. Have any ideas, or feedback on a recent promotion, share it with us at tlsports@timesleader.com. BEST OF THE WEEK: A staple of minor league baseball is nights for causes. The RailRiders had their first official cause night Thursday during Autism Awareness Night. You can never go wrong when you have promotions that serve your community. MISSED OPPORTUNITY: We wanted to stay away from fireworks jokes, but we saw Friday fireworks and ’70s Night together and thought of the most infamous promotion ever — Disco Demolition Night. It was July 12, 1979, when between games of a doubleheader at Comiskey Park in Chicago, thousands of disco records were blown up. At the time, a struggling White Sox team hoped to get their stadium to half-capacity. Instead, they filled the place and had thousands outside trying to get into the stadium for the shindig. When they blew up the records, an overflow of wild fans stormed the field. Fires were set. Havoc ensued. It was the 70s. OK, Rob, thanks for not going there. That might have been too much. How about a WKRP-style turkey drop instead? We didn’t get it during ’70s Night, but it would make a fantastic spectacle when the Mud Hens or Red Wings come to town later in the season. COMING UP: The Riders are back the first full week of May, and Thursday, May 9, against the Indianapolis Indians is a full slate. Get there early for Thirsty Thursday. If you’re there early and are one of the first 1,000 fans, you benefit from the Team Logo Socks Giveaway. That’s a particularly good thing, as it’s also Lost Sock Memorial Day. It was not specified if you have to lose your socks at the game or not.

CRaIN Game

David Adams RailRiders infielder

day but you know when you’re going to play every week and you just go out and have fun,” he added. “Playing against the talent out there, it’s nice but at the same time you don’t have to overdo it. You just go out and play baseball and that’s what it should be.” One potential roadblock in Adams’ way of reaching the Majors was taken care of last year when he moved from second to third base. With Robinson Cano locked in as second baseman for New York, Adams was moved to third. Sure, the Yankees currently have Alex Rodriguez under contract through 2017 at the hot corner, but it’s still more versatility for the youngster. Plus, Adams hasn’t mastered the position yet and he admits he still has learning to do over there. “Reading hops is still tough. I think that’s the toughest part about playing third is the hops and angles, mastering those,” he said. “But I’d like to think I’m getting better every day. “I think to get to the big league level at any position is the goal. Then once you get there hopefully solidify a spot.” Until then, he’s hoping the thrilling ride has reached its peak and is ready for smooth sailing.
SWB RailRiders infielder David Adams throws to first base during a recent game against the Columbus Clippers.

It’s the first southern swing of the season -- eight games below the MasonDixon Line -- that will take the RailRiders into May. Here’s a closer look at this week’s upcoming opponents for the Scranton/ Wilkes-Barre RailRiders. Scranton/Wilkes-Barre began an eightgame, nine-day road trip to International League South Division opponents on Saturday in Charlotte. The series with the affiliate of the Chicago White Sox continues through Tuesday before the first scheduled off day of the season. The Knights are planted in last place in the division and are losers of seven of their last 10 games despite having a few prospects ranked highly in the organization according to Baseball America. The highest-rated by the publication is 20-year-old infielder Carlos Sanchez, who is No. 3. But he’s had problems so far this season batting .211 with just three extrabase hits, 15 hits and 13 strikeouts. Andre Rienzo, a 24-year-old right-hander, is the No. 7 prospect in the organization and has also got off to a rocky start. He’s allowed at least four runs in three of his four starts this season resulting in a 1-2 record and an ERA of 7.70. Catcher Josh Phegley has hit four home runs this season for Charlotte and has driven in 10 runs, while outfielder Jim Gallagher is batting .346, good for ninth in the league. Once the RailRiders leave Charlotte and finish their day off festivities on Wednesday, they will take a three-hour ride to Gwinnett to visit the Triple-A affiliate of the Atlanta Braves from Thursday through Sunday. Gwinnett is in third place in the South. And like Charlotte, the club possesses a highly-ranked prospect by Baseball America. The Braves’ best prospect on the club is left-hander Sean Gilmartin, who is rated fourth. Unlike the Knights’ top arm, Gilmartin has been solid so far this season for the G-Braves. In five starts, he’s 2-0 with a 2.40 ERA. Gwinnett’s best pitcher to date in the campaign has been Omar Poveda, who’s posted a 1.75 ERA in four starts with a 2-0 record and a 0.70 WHIP. There’s also a few familiar faces on the Braves’ roster in former SWB Yankee Jordan Parraz. The outfielder played for Scranton/Wilkes-Barre in 2011 and hasn’t been in top form so far batting just .151 with three home runs in 20 games. Luis Nunez, a shortstop for Gwinnett, also played for SWB in 2008, 2009 and 2011. He’s seen minimal time for the G-Braves this season. Atlanta all-star catcher Brian McCann began a rehab assignment over the weekend playing for the Rome Braves. Atlanta manager Fredi Gonzalez said Friday that the catcher needs two weeks of rehab. So he could make a few appearances for Gwinnett later this week. Outfielder Joey Terdoslavich has been the team’s most consistent batter so far this season hitting .333 with four home runs and 15 RBI. And don’t forget about slugger Ernesto Mejia, who leads the I.L. in home runs (8) and RBI (23), while batting .289.

WeeK aHeaD

Charlotte Knights

Gwinnett Braves

Friday’s games Columbus 3, Scranton/Wilkes-Barre 2 Buffalo 8, Pawtucket 4 Gwinnett 2, Louisville 1 Rochester 4, Syracuse 2 Durham 5, Toledo 4 Norfolk 11, Charlotte 4 Indianapolis 5, Lehigh Valley 1 Saturday’s games Buffalo at Rochester, (n) Columbus at Pawtucket, (n) Lehigh Valley at Louisville, (n) Durham at Syracuse, (n) Gwinnett at Indianapolis, (n) Toledo at Norfolk, (n) Scranton/Wilkes-Barre at Charlotte, (n) Sunday’s games Toledo at Norfolk, 1:05 p.m. Columbus at Pawtucket, 1:05 p.m. Buffalo at Rochester, 1:05 p.m. Gwinnett at Indianapolis, 1:35 p.m. Durham at Syracuse, 2 p.m. Lehigh Valley at Louisville, 2:05 p.m. Scranton/Wilkes-Barre at Charlotte, 2:15 p.m.

PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER

PAGE 4C SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013

B A S E B A L L M L B S TA N D I N G S • S TAT S
East Division Boston Baltimore New York Tampa Bay Toronto Central Division Kansas City Detroit Minnesota Chicago Cleveland West Division Texas Oakland Los Angeles Seattle Houston
AP PHOTO

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N AT I o N A L L E A G U E

AMERICAN LEAGUE W 16 15 14 10 9 W 11 12 10 10 8 W 16 13 9 9 7 W 15 13 10 11 5 W 14 14 11 13 8 W 15 13 13 11 7 L 7 9 9 13 16 L 8 10 10 12 11 L 8 12 13 16 16 L 8 11 12 14 18 L 9 10 10 12 14 L 8 10 10 11 15 Pct .696 .625 .609 .435 .360 Pct .579 .545 .500 .455 .421 GB WCGB — — 1½ — 2 — 6 4 8 6 GB WCGB — — ½ 1½ 1½ 2½ 2½ 3½ 3 4 L10 7-3 8-2 6-4 6-4 3-7 L10 5-5 5-5 6-4 5-5 4-6 L10 7-3 2-8 5-5 3-7 3-7 L10 3-7 5-5 3-7 5-5 3-7 L10 7-3 7-3 8-2 5-5 4-6 L10 6-4 5-5 4-6 4-6 5-5 Str Home W-3 9-5 W-3 7-5 W-3 8-4 L-2 8-4 L-3 5-8 Str Home W-1 4-2 W-2 7-3 W-1 6-6 W-3 7-5 L-1 2-6 Str Home L-1 7-2 L-4 6-7 W-1 6-6 L-1 5-7 L-2 4-8 Str Home L-3 6-2 W-3 9-6 L-3 7-7 W-2 6-8 L-2 2-9 Str Home L-1 5-2 W-1 8-4 L-2 7-5 L-3 12-4 W-2 3-5 Str Home W-1 9-3 L-1 6-5 L-3 8-4 W-2 5-5 W-2 3-7 Away 7-2 8-4 6-5 2-9 4-8 Away 7-6 5-7 4-4 3-7 6-5 Away 9-6 7-5 3-7 4-9 3-8 Away 9-6 4-5 3-5 5-6 3-9 Away 9-6 5-6 4-5 1-8 5-9 Away 6-5 7-5 5-6 6-6 4-8

East Division Atlanta Washington New York Philadelphia Miami Central Division St. Louis Pittsburgh Milwaukee Cincinnati Chicago Colorado Arizona San Francisco Los Angeles San Diego

Pct GB WCGB .667 — — .520 3½ 2 .409 6 4½ .360 7½ 6 .304 8½ 7 NATIONAL LEAGUE Pct .652 .542 .455 .440 .217 GB WCGB — — 2½ ½ 4½ 2½ 5 3 10 8

Philadelphia Phillies’ Domonic Brown, left, celebrates with teammate Ryan Howard after hitting a three-run home run in the fifth inning of Saturday’s game. Mets catcher John Buck watches.

Brown and Mayberry power Phillies over Mets
two-run homers, and Rick Porcello bounced back from a nightmarish start last weekend to pitch into the seventh inning, helping the Detroit Tigers to a 7-4 win over the Atlanta Braves on Saturday. Infante’s homer off Kris Medlen (1-3) broke a 3-all tie in the fourth. Porcello (1-2) allowed three runs in 6 1-3 innings. He didn’t make it through the first last Saturday at Los Angeles, when he gave up nine runs to the Angels. Atlanta’s Justin Upton hit his major league-leading 12th homer in the eighth, but Infante doubled home a run in the bottom half and scored to make it 7-4. ST. LOUIS — Russell Martin hit a two-run home run to highlight a four-run seventh inning and the Pittsburgh Pirates rallied to beat the St. Louis Cardinals 5-3 on Saturday. The comeback gave A.J. Burnett (2-2) his second victory over St. Louis in 10 days. He gave up two runs and five hits in six innings. His six strikeouts expanded his team record for month of April to a leagueleading 48. The Pirates had three consecutive hits against Joe Kelly (0-1) to lead off the seventh and were aided by a hit by pitch.

Nationals 6, Reds 3

NEW YORK — Domonic Brown and John Mayberry Jr. hit consecutive home runs to break open a close game and the Philadelphia Phillies beat the New York Mets 9-4 on Saturday, sending Jonathan Pettibone to his first major league win. Ryan Howard knocked in two runs, Jimmy Rollins scored twice and Michael Young had three hits — two that never left the infield — for the second straight day. Pettibone (1-0) pitched his way out of an important jam to help Philadelphia improve to 4-1 against the Mets after losing the season series last year.

The Associated Press

Pct GB WCGB .636 — — .565 ½ — .524 2 1 .520 2 1 .364 6 4½ West Division Pct GB WCGB .652 — — .565 2 — .565 2 — .500 3½ 1½ .318 7½ 5½

Pirates 5, Cardinals 3 St. Louis ab r h bi ab r h bi SMarte lf 4 1 1 0 MCrpnt 3b 4 1 1 0 Tabata rf 4 0 1 0 Curtis ph 1 0 0 0 McCtch cf 4 0 0 1 Beltran rf 5 0 2 1 GJones 1b 4 0 1 1 Hollidy lf 5 0 0 0 JMcDnl 2b 0 0 0 0 Craig 1b 4 0 1 0 Inge 2b 4 0 1 0 YMolin c 4 0 1 0 Melncn p 0 0 0 0 Jay cf 2 1 1 0 WRdrg ph 1 0 1 0 Rosnthl p 0 0 0 0 Grilli p 0 0 0 0 Rzpczy p 0 0 0 0 PAlvrz 3b 5 1 2 0 Salas p 0 0 0 0 RMartn c 4 2 2 2 Wggntn ph 1 0 0 0 Barmes ss 3 1 2 0 Boggs p 0 0 0 0 AJBrnt p 2 0 0 0 Kozma ss 3 0 1 1 JMcDnl ph 1 0 0 0 Descals 2b 2 0 0 0 Watson p 0 0 0 0 Westrk p 2 0 0 0 GSnchz ph-1b 0 0 0 1 J.Kelly p 0 0 0 0 SRonsn cf 1 1 1 0 Totals 36 511 5 Totals 34 3 8 2 Pittsburgh 000 000 410— 5 St. Louis 100 001 001— 3 DP—Pittsburgh 1, St. Louis 1. LOB—Pittsburgh 10, St. Louis 9. 2B—R.Martin (5), Beltran (2), Craig (8), Y.Molina (6), Jay (3). HR—R.Martin (3). SB— Jay (1), Kozma (1). SF—G.Sanchez. IP H R ER BB SO Pittsburgh A.J.Burnett W,2-2 6 5 2 2 3 6 Watson H,6 1 0 0 0 1 2 Melancon H,9 1 1 0 0 0 1 Grilli S,10-10 1 2 1 1 0 1 St. Louis Westbrook 6 6 0 0 0 6 J.Kelly L,0-1 BS,1-1 .1 3 4 4 1 1 Rosenthal .2 0 0 0 1 0 Rzepczynski .1 1 1 1 1 0 Salas .2 0 0 0 0 1 Boggs 1 1 0 0 1 0 HBP—by A.J.Burnett (Jay), by Rosenthal (Tabata). WP—Rosenthal, Salas. Umpires—Home, Mike Winters; First, Mark Wegner; Second, Laz Diaz; Third, Tim Timmons. T—3:42. A—40,909 (43,975). Pittsburgh

Angels 6, Mariners 3 Seattle ab r h bi ab r h bi Bourjos cf 5 2 2 0 Bay lf 4 0 1 0 Trout lf 3 0 1 0 Seager 3b 5 1 1 0 Pujols 1b 3 0 1 2 KMorls dh 4 0 1 0 Hamltn dh 4 1 1 0 Morse rf 4 0 0 0 Trumo rf 4 1 1 2 Smoak 1b 4 0 1 0 HKndrc 2b 3 0 0 0 Shppch c 4 1 2 1 BHarrs ss 3 1 2 0 Andino 2b 3 1 2 0 Romine pr-ss 0 0 0 0 Ackley ph-2b 2 0 1 0 Conger c 4 1 1 2 EnChvz cf 3 0 1 1 LJimnz 3b 4 0 0 0 Ryan ss 2 0 1 1 Totals 33 6 9 6 Totals 35 311 3 Los Angeles 122 000 100— 6 Seattle 000 102 000— 3 E—Trout (2). DP—Los Angeles 1, Seattle 1. LOB—Los Angeles 6, Seattle 13. 2B—Bourjos (1), B.Harris (3), Andino (3). HR—Trumbo (3), Conger (1). SB—Trout (4). S—Ryan. SF—Pujols 2, En.Chavez. IP H R ER BB SO Los Angeles C.Wilson W,2-0 5.1 7 3 3 2 9 S.Burnett H,3 .2 0 0 0 1 0 D.De La Rosa H,2 .2 2 0 0 0 1 S.Downs H,4 1.1 2 0 0 1 1 Frieri S,3-3 1 0 0 0 1 0 Seattle Harang L,0-3 3 6 5 5 2 1 Noesi 3.1 2 1 1 2 3 Furbush .1 0 0 0 0 1 Medina 2.1 1 0 0 0 3 HBP—by C.Wilson (Shoppach). WP—Harang, Noesi. Umpires—Home, Scott Barry; First, Wally Bell; Second, Mike Everitt; Third, Marty Foster. T—3:34. A—31,543 (47,476). Los Angeles Padres 2, Giants 1 San Francisco San Diego ab r h bi ab r h bi Pagan cf 4 1 2 0 EvCarr ss 4 0 0 0 Scutaro 2b 3 0 0 0 Venale cf 4 0 0 0 Kontos p 0 0 0 0 Headly 3b 3 1 1 0 Sandovl 3b 4 0 0 0 Quentin lf 4 0 1 1 Posey c 4 0 2 0 Amarst lf 0 0 0 0 Arias pr 0 0 0 0 Alonso 1b 3 0 1 1 Pence rf 4 0 0 0 Denorfi rf 3 0 1 0 Belt 1b 4 0 2 0 Gyorko 2b 3 0 1 0 BCrwfr ss 4 0 0 0 JoBakr c 2 0 0 0 GBlanc lf 2 0 1 0 Cashnr p 1 1 1 0 Torres ph-lf 1 0 0 0 Thtchr p 0 0 0 0 Linccm p 2 0 0 0 Thayer p 0 0 0 0 Noonan ph-2b 1 0 0 0 Blanks ph 1 0 0 0 Grgrsn p 0 0 0 0 Street p 0 0 0 0 Totals 33 1 7 0 Totals 28 2 6 2 San Francisco 100 000 000— 1 San Diego 002 000 00x— 2 DP—San Francisco 1, San Diego 1. LOB—San Francisco 6, San Diego 6. SB—Pagan (2), Cashner (1). S—Cashner. IP H R ER BB SO San Francisco Lincecum L,2-1 7 6 2 2 3 9 Kontos 1 0 0 0 0 0 San Diego Cashner W,1-1 6 5 1 1 1 5 Thatcher H,2 .2 0 0 0 0 2 Thayer H,3 .1 0 0 0 0 0 Gregerson H,4 1 0 0 0 0 0 Street S,4-4 1 2 0 0 0 1 WP—Cashner 2. Umpires—Home, Greg Gibson; First, Hunter Wendelstedt; Second, Mike Estabrook; Third, Jerry Layne. T—2:19. A—34,929 (42,524).

Friday’s Late Boxes
Cardinals 9, Pirates 1 St. Louis ab r h bi ab r h bi SMarte lf-cf 3 0 1 0 MCrpnt 2b 4 2 2 1 Snider rf 4 0 1 0 Beltran rf 4 2 2 3 McCtch cf 3 0 0 0 Hollidy lf 3 2 2 1 JHughs p 0 0 0 0 Craig 1b 4 0 2 3 GSnchz ph 0 0 0 0 YMolin c 4 0 1 0 Inge 2b 0 0 0 0 Freese 3b 4 0 0 0 GJones 1b 3 1 1 0 Jay cf 4 1 2 0 Walker 2b 2 0 0 0 Kozma ss 3 1 1 1 Mazzar p 0 0 0 0 Lynn p 2 0 0 0 PAlvrz 3b 3 0 0 1 Boggs p 0 0 0 0 RMartn c 4 0 1 0 Choate p 0 0 0 0 Barmes ss 4 0 0 0 Wggntn ph 1 1 1 0 JSnchz p 0 0 0 0 J.Kelly p 0 0 0 0 JGomz p 2 0 0 0 Tabata lf 2 0 1 0 Totals 30 1 5 1 Totals 33 913 9 Pittsburgh 000 001 000— 1 St. Louis 201 020 04x— 9 E—Barmes (2). DP—Pittsburgh 2, St. Louis 1. LOB—Pittsburgh 10, St. Louis 7. 2B—G.Jones (6), Jay (2). HR—M.Carpenter (3), Beltran 2 (6). SB—S.Marte (6). CS—Jay (1). S—Lynn. SF—P. Alvarez. IP H R ER BB SO Pittsburgh J.Sanchez L,0-3 0 3 2 2 0 0 J.Gomez 4.1 3 3 3 3 3 J.Hughes 2.2 2 0 0 2 3 Mazzaro 1 5 4 4 0 1 St. Louis Lynn W,4-0 7 2 1 1 3 9 Boggs .1 1 0 0 1 1 Choate H,3 .2 0 0 0 0 0 J.Kelly 1 2 0 0 0 1 J.Sanchez pitched to 4 batters in the 1st. HBP—by J.Sanchez (Craig), by Boggs (G.Sanchez), by Lynn (S.Marte, S.Marte). WP—J. Gomez, Mazzaro. Umpires—Home, Tim Timmons; First, Mike Winters; Second, Mark Wegner; Third, Laz Diaz. T—3:16. A—44,090 (43,975). Rockies 6, Diamondbacks 3 Colorado Arizona ab r h bi ab r h bi Fowler cf 5 1 2 0 GParra rf 3 1 1 0 Pachec 1b 4 2 3 0 Prado 2b 5 0 0 0 CGnzlz lf 5 1 1 0 Gldsch 1b 4 0 0 0 Tlwtzk ss 4 0 1 3 MMntr c 4 0 1 0 Cuddyr rf 4 0 1 2 ErChvz 3b 4 1 1 1 Rosario c 4 1 2 1 Pollock cf 4 1 0 0 Nelson 3b 4 0 0 0 Gregrs ss 2 0 1 0 Brignc 2b 4 0 1 0 Pnngtn pr-ss 0 0 0 0 Nicasio p 2 1 0 0 AMarte lf 4 0 2 1 Wheelr ph 1 0 0 0 McCrth p 2 0 0 0 Outmn p 0 0 0 0 Sipp p 0 0 0 0 Belisle p 0 0 0 0 C.Ross ph 1 0 0 0 Brothrs p 0 0 0 0 Ziegler p 0 0 0 0 EYong ph 1 0 0 0 MtRynl p 0 0 0 0 RBtncr p 0 0 0 0 Hinske ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 38 611 6 Totals 34 3 6 2 Colorado 200 031 000— 6 Arizona 021 000 000— 3 E—Nelson (3), Tulowitzki (1). DP—Colorado 1. LOB—Colorado 6, Arizona 8. 2B—Pacheco (2), Tulowitzki (5), G.Parra (9), A.Marte (3). HR—Rosario (5), Er.Chavez (3). SB—Goldschmidt (1). IP H R ER BB SO Colorado Nicasio W,3-0 5 4 3 1 1 2 Outman H,2 1 1 0 0 0 0 Belisle H,6 1 0 0 0 1 1 Brothers H,4 1 1 0 0 1 3 R.Betancourt S,8-8 1 0 0 0 0 0 Arizona McCarthy L,0-3 6 9 6 6 0 7 Sipp 1 1 0 0 0 0 Ziegler 1 0 0 0 0 0 Mat.Reynolds 1 1 0 0 0 0 Outman pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. HBP—by Outman (Gregorius), by Sipp (Pacheco). WP—Nicasio. Umpires—Home, Vic Carapazza; First, Gary Cederstrom; Second, Lance Barksdale; Third, Kerwin Danley. T—3:08. A—28,801 (48,633). Pittsburgh Dodgers 7, Brewers 5 Los Angeles ab r h bi ab r h bi Aoki rf 4 0 1 1 Crwfrd lf 4 2 2 2 Segura ss 5 0 2 2 M.Ellis 2b 3 1 1 0 Braun lf 5 1 1 1 Punto 2b 1 1 0 0 Lucroy c 4 0 2 0 AdGnzl 1b 4 0 2 3 Weeks 2b 3 0 0 0 Kemp cf 2 0 0 0 CGomz cf 4 0 1 0 Ethier rf 4 0 1 1 YBtncr 3b 4 1 1 1 A.Ellis c 4 0 0 0 AlGnzlz 1b 4 3 3 0 Uribe 3b 2 0 0 0 Burgos p 1 0 0 0 Belisari p 0 0 0 0 LSchfr ph 0 0 0 0 L.Cruz ph-3b 1 1 1 0 Badnhp p 0 0 0 0 Sellers ss 4 2 2 0 McGnzl p 0 0 0 0 Beckett p 2 0 0 0 Kintzlr p 0 0 0 0 Guerrir p 0 0 0 0 Lalli ph 1 0 0 0 PRdrgz p 0 0 0 0 HrstnJr 3b 1 0 0 1 League p 0 0 0 0 Totals 35 511 5 Totals 32 7 9 7 Milwaukee 000 120 101— 5 Los Angeles 101 010 22x— 7 E—Hairston Jr. 2 (2), League (1), Kemp (4). DP—Los Angeles 2. LOB—Milwaukee 7, Los Angeles 7. 2B—Ad.Gonzalez 2 (7), Sellers (1). HR— Braun (7), Y.Betancourt (4), C.Crawford (2). SB— Segura (7). CS—Aoki (2). S—Burgos, L.Schafer, Hairston Jr.. IP H R ER BB SO Milwaukee Burgos 6 4 3 3 2 3 Badenhop H,2 .1 1 1 1 0 0 Mic.Gonzalez L,0-2 BS,2 2.2 1 1 2 0 Kintzler 1 3 2 2 0 0 Los Angeles Beckett 5.1 7 3 3 2 5 Guerrier .2 1 1 1 0 0 P.Rodriguez .1 1 0 0 0 0 Belisario W,2-2 1.2 0 0 0 0 3 League S,7-8 1 2 1 1 0 1 Guerrier pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. HBP—by Burgos (C.Crawford). WP—League. Umpires—Home, Angel Hernandez; First, Doug Eddings; Second, John Tumpane; Third, Eric Cooper. T—3:16. A—44,930 (56,000). Milwaukee Orioles 3, Athletics 0 Oakland r h bi ab r h bi Markks rf 0 0 1 Crisp dh 4 0 1 0 Machd 3b 0 1 0 CYoung cf 3 0 0 0 A.Jones cf 0 1 0 Reddck rf 4 0 0 0 C.Davis 1b 0 0 0 Lowrie 2b 4 0 1 0 Wieters c 0 0 0 Dnldsn 3b 4 0 0 0 Hardy ss 2 2 0 DNorrs c 2 0 0 0 Reimld lf 0 1 0 Freimn 1b 3 0 1 0 Dickrsn pr-lf 1 0 0 C.Wells lf 3 0 0 0 Pearce dh 0 2 1 Rosales ss 3 0 0 0 ACasill 2b 0 0 0 McLoth ph 0 0 1 Flahrty 2b 0 0 0 Totals 3 7 3 Totals 30 0 3 0 Baltimore 000 000 102— 3 Oakland 000 000 000— 0 E—Lowrie (4), Reddick (2), Donaldson (2). DP—Oakland 1. LOB—Baltimore 8, Oakland 5. 2B—Machado (7), Pearce (1), Lowrie (10), Freiman (1). SB—Machado (2). SF—Markakis. IP H R ER BB SO Baltimore W.Chen W,2-2 8 2 0 0 2 5 Ji.Johnson S,9-9 1 1 0 0 0 1 Oakland Milone L,3-2 6.1 6 1 0 1 5 Doolittle 1.1 0 0 0 0 3 Cook .2 1 2 1 2 1 Neshek .1 0 0 0 0 0 Umpires—Home, Jim Reynolds; First, James Hoye; Second, John Hirschbeck; Third, Bob Davidson. T—2:48. A—16,944 (35,067). Baltimore ab 4 5 4 3 4 4 3 0 3 3 1 0 34

Tigers 7, Braves 4

WASHINGTON — Bryce Harper homered and singled, Dan Haren had his best start of the young season Saturday and the Washington Nationals beat the Cincinnati Reds 6-3. Denard Span and Jayson Werth each had two hits for Washington, which has won the first three games of the fourgame set. Brandon Phillips had three singles and Shin-Soo Choo homered for Cincinnati, which has lost four of five. DETROIT — Omar Infante and Jhonny Peralta both hit

Pirates 5, Cardinals 3

AMERICAN LEAGUE Friday’s Games Detroit 10, Atlanta 0 N.Y. Yankees 6, Toronto 4 Boston 7, Houston 3 Chicago White Sox 5, Tampa Bay 4 Texas 4, Minnesota 3 Cleveland at Kansas City, ppd., rain Baltimore 3, Oakland 0 L.A. Angels 6, Seattle 3 Saturday’s Games Detroit 7, Atlanta 4 Baltimore 7, Oakland 3 N.Y. Yankees 5, Toronto 4 Minnesota 7, Texas 2 Cleveland at Kansas City, (n) Houston at Boston, (n) Tampa Bay at Chicago White Sox, (n) L.A. Angels at Seattle, (n) Sunday’s Games Toronto (Dickey 2-3) at N.Y. Yankees (P.Hughes 0-2), 1:05 p.m. Houston (B.Norris 3-2) at Boston (Lackey 0-1), 1:35 p.m. Cleveland (Masterson 4-1) at Kansas City (Guthrie 2-0), 2:10 p.m., 1st game Tampa Bay (Price 0-2) at Chicago White Sox (Axelrod 0-1), 2:10 p.m. Texas (Ogando 2-1) at Minnesota (Correia 2-1), 2:10 p.m. Baltimore (Mig.Gonzalez 2-1) at Oakland (Colon 3-0), 4:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (Vargas 0-2) at Seattle (Iwakuma 2-1), 4:10 p.m. Atlanta (Minor 3-1) at Detroit (Fister 3-0), 8:05 p.m. Cleveland (Kluber 1-0) at Kansas City (W.Smith 0-0), 8:10 p.m., 2nd game Monday’s Games Houston at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m. Minnesota at Detroit, 7:05 p.m. Cleveland at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m. L.A. Angels at Oakland, 10:05 p.m. Baltimore at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.

NATIONAL LEAGUE Friday’s Games Detroit 10, Atlanta 0 Washington 1, Cincinnati 0 Chicago Cubs 4, Miami 2 Philadelphia 4, N.Y. Mets 0 St. Louis 9, Pittsburgh 1 Colorado 6, Arizona 3 L.A. Dodgers 7, Milwaukee 5 San Diego 2, San Francisco 1 Saturday’s Games Detroit 7, Atlanta 4 Washington 6, Cincinnati 3 Philadelphia 9, N.Y. Mets 4 Pittsburgh 5, St. Louis 3 Chicago Cubs at Miami, (n) Colorado at Arizona, (n) San Francisco at San Diego, (n) Milwaukee at L.A. Dodgers, (n) Sunday’s Games Chicago Cubs (Villanueva 1-0) at Miami (Nolasco 1-2), 1:10 p.m. Philadelphia (Hamels 0-3) at N.Y. Mets (Niese 2-1), 1:10 p.m. Cincinnati (Cingrani 1-0) at Washington (Detwiler 1-1), 1:35 p.m. Pittsburgh (Locke 2-1) at St. Louis (S.Miller 3-1), 2:15 p.m. Colorado (Garland 2-1) at Arizona (Corbin 2-0), 4:10 p.m. Milwaukee (Lohse 1-1) at L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 2-2), 4:10 p.m. San Francisco (Vogelsong 1-1) at San Diego (Marquis 1-2), 4:10 p.m. Atlanta (Minor 3-1) at Detroit (Fister 3-0), 8:05 p.m. Monday’s Games N.Y. Mets at Miami, 7:10 p.m. Washington at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m. San Diego at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m. Pittsburgh at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m. Cincinnati at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m. San Francisco at Arizona, 9:40 p.m. Colorado at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.

By JEFF SCHULER The Morning Call (Allentown)

Ruiz ready to get back with team
READING — After a long day in the Florida sun the last several weeks, Carlos Ruiz would retire to his hotel room and tune in to see how his once and future team was doing without him. “It definitely wasn’t easy,” the Phillies catcher said, leaving unclear whether the difficult part was not being able to participate — or whether it was just hard to watch the product the team has put on the field over the season’s first four weeks. If the difficulty was simply watching the Phillies play without him, that will end Sunday, when the popular 34-year-old rejoins the team in New York after his 25-game suspension for violating baseball’s drug policy. If it was the way the team have been playing … well, he hopes to help change that as well. “We’re not playing good baseball right now,” Ruiz said Friday before the first of his two rehab games with Reading at FirstEnergy Stadium. “When I come back I want to do my best and see what I can do.” “There’s no question we’re struggling and more than anything else he brings a lot of leadership to our club,” Phillies general manager Ruben Amaro Jr. said of Ruiz’s impending return. “Particularly last year, I think Chooch stepped up as more of a leader on the club, and I think having him back there [behind the plate] and adding his energy will help us. It certainly can’t hurt us.” Ruiz, who played two games with Single-A Clearwater earlier this week, made the first of two scheduled appearances with Double-A Reading on Friday night before a supportive crowd of 8,110 at FirstEnergy Stadium. Hitting third, Ruiz was 0-for-4 with two flyouts, a groundout and a line out to second in his final at-bat. “I feel great,” Ruiz said. “I feel good behind home plate, [and] for me that’s very important. Hitting, I think I tracked the ball better the last two at-bats, so I feel real good.” Coming off an all-star season in which he set career-highs in 10 offensive categories including average (.325), home runs (16) and RBI (68), Ruiz was suspended in November for testing positive for Adderall, a banned stimulant prescribed for the treatment of attention deficithyperactivity disorder.

AMERICAN LEAGUE

Hafner’s big hits leads N.Y. past Jays for the 3rd straight
The Associated Press

NEW YORK — Travis Hafner hit a three-run homer, then lumbered around the bases for a goahead triple in the seventh inning that sent CC Sabathia and the New York Yankees over the Toronto Blue Jays 5-4 Saturday. Vernon Wells delivered another key hit against his former team as the Yankees beat Toronto for the third straight day. With Mariano Rivera getting a day off to rest, Joba Chamberlain worked around a pair of one-out singles in the ninth for his first save since 2010. Jose Bautista and Brett Lawrie homered for the Blue Jays, who dropped to 1-5 on their seven-game road trip. Hafner wiped out a 3-0 deficit with his sixth home run, a long drive to center field in the fourth off J.A. Happ. A few innings later, the slugging designated hitter broke a 4-all tie. A double by Robinson Cano and an RBI single by Wells evened it in the seventh against Esmil Rogers (1-2). Toronto brought in lefty reliever Brett Cecil to face the lefty-swinging Hafner with two outs and Wells on third. Hafner hit a high drive that ticked off center fielder Rajai Davis’ glove as he approached the padded wall. The 35-yearold Hafner kept running and pulled into the third with a standup triple. Hafner exhaled as he stood on the bag. Captain Derek Jeter, one of several injured Yankees, laughed along with Hafner and his teammates from the dugout. Hafner has hit three triples in the last six seasons — the other two came last year with Cleveland.

Orioles 7, Athletics 3

Sabathia (4-2) allowed three earned runs and nine hits in eight innings. He walked none, struck out four and improved to 14-4 overall against Toronto. Bautista hit his seventh home run, a leadoff drive in the fourth. He had been 1 for 20 lifetime against Sabathia with eight strikeouts before connecting. The Blue Jays scored another run in the fourth. Edwin Encarnacion tagged up at third on Lawrie’s fly ball to right fielder Ichiro Suzuki, and was safe at the plate when catcher Chris Stewart dropped the ball while making the tag for an error. Bautista nearly homered again in the eighth, but center fielder Brett Gardner caught his fly at the top of the wall.

Phillies 9, Mets 4 New York ab r h bi ab r h bi Rollins ss 4 2 2 0 Baxter rf 3 0 1 0 Utley 2b 5 1 1 1 Rice p 0 0 0 0 MYong 3b 4 2 3 0 RTejad ss 3 1 1 0 Howard 1b 4 1 1 2 DnMrp 2b 4 0 0 0 Brown lf 5 1 2 3 DWrght 3b 4 1 2 1 Mayrry cf 4 1 1 1 Duda lf 3 0 1 0 L.Nix rf 4 0 1 1 Hwkns p 0 0 0 0 Quinter c 4 0 0 0 Lagars cf 1 0 0 0 Pettion p 2 1 1 0 Buck c 3 1 1 1 Frndsn ph 1 0 0 0 I.Davis 1b 3 1 1 1 Valdes p 0 0 0 0 Vldspn cf-lf-rf 4 0 1 1 Galvis ph 1 0 0 0 Marcm p 1 0 0 0 Durbin p 0 0 0 0 Turner ph 1 0 0 0 Horst p 0 0 0 0 Carson p 0 0 0 0 Cowgill cf-lf 2 0 0 0 Totals 38 912 8 Totals 32 4 8 4 Philadelphia 003 050 100— 9 New York 010 110 001— 4 E—Baxter (1). DP—Philadelphia 2. LOB—Philadelphia 7, New York 5. 2B—Rollins (9), Utley (4), R.Tejada (5), D.Wright (4), I.Davis (1), Valdespin (2). HR—Brown (3), Mayberry (2), Buck (8). CS— Mayberry (2). SF—Howard, I.Davis. IP H R ER BB SO Philadelphia Pettibone W,1-0 5 7 3 3 2 4 Valdes 2 0 0 0 0 2 Durbin 1 0 0 0 0 1 Horst 1 1 1 1 0 0 New York Marcum L,0-1 4 5 3 3 2 3 Carson 1 4 5 5 1 1 Hawkins 2 2 1 0 0 1 Rice 2 1 0 0 1 2 HBP—by Pettibone (Baxter). WP—Marcum. Umpires—Home, Fieldin Culbreth; First, Bill Welke; Second, David Rackley; Third, Adrian Johnson. T—3:03. A—29,248 (41,922). Philadelphia Tigers 7, Braves 4 Detroit ab r h bi ab r h bi Smmns ss 4 1 1 0 AJcksn cf 2 1 2 0 Uggla 2b 3 0 0 1 TrHntr rf 4 0 1 0 J.Upton lf 4 1 1 2 MiCarr 3b 5 0 2 2 FFrmn 1b 4 0 2 1 Fielder dh 5 0 1 0 CJhnsn 3b 4 0 0 0 VMrtnz 1b 4 1 1 0 Gattis c 4 0 0 0 JhPerlt ss 4 1 1 2 BUpton cf 4 0 1 0 Tuiassp lf 3 0 1 0 JFrncs dh 3 1 1 0 D.Kelly lf 1 1 1 0 JSchafr rf 3 1 1 0 Avila c 3 1 0 0 Infante 2b 4 2 3 3 Totals 33 4 7 4 Totals 35 713 7 Atlanta 003 000 010—4 Detroit 021 200 02x—7 LOB—Atlanta 4, Detroit 9. 2B—D.Kelly (1), Infante (2). HR—J.Upton (12), Jh.Peralta (2), Infante (1). SB—Infante (1). CS—B.Upton (2). S—A. Jackson. IP H R ER BB SO Atlanta Medlen L,1-3 5.1 10 5 5 2 3 Walden 1.2 0 0 0 0 2 Avilan .1 2 2 2 1 0 Gearrin .2 1 0 0 0 0 Detroit Porcello W,1-2 6.1 5 3 3 2 5 Smyly H,3 .2 0 0 0 0 2 Benoit H,4 1 2 1 1 0 1 Valverde S,2-2 1 0 0 0 0 2 HBP—by Medlen (Tor.Hunter). Umpires—Home, Brian Knight; First, Dan Iassogna; Second, Mark Carlson; Third, Mike Muchlinski. T—2:55. A—42,881 (41,255). Twins 7, Rangers 2 Texas Minnesota ab r h bi ab r h bi Kinsler 2b 4 0 2 0 Dozier 2b 3 1 1 1 Gentry cf 3 0 1 0 Mauer 1b 4 0 0 0 LMartn ph-cf 1 0 0 0 Wlngh lf 4 2 2 2 Beltre dh 4 0 0 0 Doumit c 4 0 1 0 N.Cruz rf 3 1 1 0 WRmrz rf 4 1 1 1 Przyns c 3 1 1 0 Arcia dh 3 2 1 0 JeBakr 3b 3 0 1 0 Hicks cf 4 1 1 2 DvMrp lf 4 0 0 0 EEscor 3b 4 0 2 0 Morlnd 1b 4 0 1 2 Flormn ss 3 0 0 1 LGarci ss 4 0 1 0 Totals 33 2 8 2 Totals 33 7 9 7 Texas 000 000 002— 2 Minnesota 001 002 13x— 7 E—Moreland (2). LOB—Texas 7, Minnesota 4. 2B—Kinsler 2 (5), Moreland (6), Doumit (7), Hicks (1). HR—Willingham (4). SB—Kinsler (3), Willingham (1). CS—Gentry (1). SF—Dozier. IP H R ER BB SO Texas D.Holland L,1-2 7 5 4 3 1 6 Kirkman 1 4 3 3 0 1 Minnesota P.Hernandez W,1-0 5 5 0 0 1 3 Swarzak H,2 1.1 1 0 0 0 2 Duensing H,4 .2 0 0 0 0 1 Burton 1 1 0 0 0 2 Perkins 1 1 2 2 2 2 WP—D.Holland 2. Umpires—Home, Alfonso Marquez; First, Mike DiMuro; Second, Dan Bellino; Third, Ted Barrett. T—2:51. A—37,503 (39,021). Atlanta

Baltimore McLoth lf Machd 3b Markks rf A.Jones cf C.Davis 1b Wieters dh-c Hardy ss Flahrty 2b Tegrdn c Tillman p Matusz p O’Day p Reimld ph Strop p JiJhnsn p Totals Baltimore Oakland

Orioles 7, Athletics 3 Oakland ab r h bi ab 5 1 3 2 Crisp cf 4 4 2 2 0 Jaso c 5 4 1 2 2 S.Smith dh 5 4 1 1 1 Lowrie ss 4 2 1 0 1 Moss 1b 3 4 0 0 0 Dnldsn 3b 4 4 0 1 1 Reddck rf 2 4 1 1 0 CYoung lf 4 2 0 0 0 Sogard 2b 2 1 0 0 0 Rosales ph-2b 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 35 710 7 Totals 34 000 400 021— 011 000 010—

r 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0

h bi 0 0 3 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 4 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0

310 3 7 3

DP—Baltimore 1, Oakland 1. LOB—Baltimore 4, Oakland 10. 2B—Machado (8), Flaherty (2), Donaldson 2 (9), C.Young (5). HR—McLouth (1), Markakis (3), A.Jones (4). CS—Donaldson (1). SF—C.Davis, Reddick. IP H R ER BB SO Baltimore Tillman W,1-1 6 7 2 2 2 7 Matusz H,4 1.1 1 1 1 1 1 O’Day .2 1 0 0 0 1 Strop 0 0 0 0 1 0 Ji.Johnson S,10-10 1 1 0 0 0 0 Oakland Griffin L,2-2 7 5 4 4 2 7 Blevins 1 3 2 2 0 0 Resop 1 2 1 1 0 0 Strop pitched to 2 batters in the 9th. HBP—by Strop (Rosales). WP—Tillman, Strop, Resop. Umpires—Home, James Hoye; First, John Hirschbeck; Second, Bob Davidson; Third, Jim Reynolds. T—2:59. A—31,292 (35,067). Yankees 5, Blue Jays 4 New York ab r h bi ab r h bi RDavis cf 5 0 1 1 Gardnr cf 5 0 1 0 MeCarr lf 5 0 1 0 J.Nix 3b 4 0 1 0 Bautist rf 4 1 1 1 Cano 2b 4 1 2 0 Encrnc 1b 4 1 1 0 V.Wells lf 3 2 1 1 Arencii c 4 0 0 0 Youkils 1b 3 1 0 0 Lawrie 3b 4 1 1 1 Hafner dh 4 1 2 4 DeRosa dh 3 0 1 0 ISuzuki rf 4 0 2 0 Rasms ph 1 0 0 0 Nunez ss 4 0 1 0 MIzturs ss 4 1 3 0 CStwrt c 4 0 1 0 Kawsk pr 0 0 0 0 Bonifac 2b 4 0 2 0 Totals 38 411 3 Totals 35 511 5 Toronto 001 201 000— 4 New York 000 300 20x— 5 E—C.Stewart (1). LOB—Toronto 7, New York 8. 2B—Bonifacio (7), Cano (8). 3B—Hafner (1). HR—Bautista (7), Lawrie (2), Hafner (6). SB—V. Wells (2). IP H R ER BB SO Toronto Happ 6 8 3 3 2 5 E.Rogers L,1-2 BS,1-1 .2 2 2 2 0 0 Cecil 1.1 1 0 0 0 1 New York Sabathia W,4-2 8 9 4 3 0 4 Chamberlain S,1-1 1 2 0 0 0 1 PB—C.Stewart. Umpires—Home, Jeff Kellogg; First, Chris Conroy; Second, Paul Schrieber; Third, Chad Fairchild. T—2:53. A—40,258 (50,291). Toronto Nationals 6, Reds 3 Washington ab r h bi ab r h bi Choo cf 3 1 1 1 Span cf 5 0 2 1 Cozart ss 4 0 1 0 Espinos 2b 4 1 0 0 Votto 1b 4 1 1 0 Harper lf 3 2 2 2 Phillips 2b 4 0 3 1 Werth rf 3 1 2 0 Bruce rf 4 1 1 0 LaRoch 1b 4 0 0 0 Heisey lf 1 0 0 0 Dsmnd ss 3 1 1 1 Paul lf 2 0 0 0 Rendon 3b 3 1 1 0 Hannhn 3b 3 0 1 0 KSuzuk c 4 0 1 0 Hoover p 0 0 0 0 Haren p 3 0 1 1 Marshll p 0 0 0 0 Duke p 0 0 0 0 CIzturs ph 1 0 0 0 Clipprd p 0 0 0 0 Mesorc c 4 0 0 0 Storen p 0 0 0 0 Leake p 1 0 0 0 Lmrdzz ph 1 0 0 0 Simon p 1 0 0 0 RSorin p 0 0 0 0 Frazier ph-3b 2 0 1 1 Totals 34 3 9 3 Totals 33 610 5 Cincinnati 000 101 100—3 Washington 022 200 00x—6 E—Hannahan (1), Espinosa (1). DP—Washington 3. LOB—Cincinnati 6, Washington 8. 2B—Votto (2). HR—Choo (4), Harper (9). CS—Harper (2). IP H R ER BB SO Cincinnati Leake L,1-1 3 6 4 3 3 1 Simon 3 4 2 2 2 1 Hoover 1 0 0 0 0 1 Marshall 1 0 0 0 0 2 Washington Haren W,2-3 6 6 2 2 0 5 Duke 2-3 0 1 0 1 1 Clippard H,4 1-3 1 0 0 1 0 Storen H,4 1 2 0 0 0 0 R.Soriano S,7-8 1 0 0 0 0 2 Umpires—Home, Rob Drake; First, Sam Holbrook; Second, Paul Nauert; Third, Andy Fletcher. T—3:04. A—38,903 (41,418). Cincinnati

Twins 7, Rangers 2

OAKLAND, Calif. — Nick Markakis and Adam Jones hit back-to-back home runs in the fourth inning, Chris Tillman pitched six innings for his first win of the season and the Baltimore Orioles beat the Oakland Athletics 7-3 on Saturday. Nate McLouth also homered for Baltimore, which is 3-0 on its 11-game road trip and in position for its first four-game sweep in Oakland since 1987.

MINNEAPOLIS — Pedro Hernandez pitched five shutout innings for his first major league win, Josh Willingham homered and the Minnesota Twins beat the Texas Rangers 7-2 Saturday to end a three-game slide. Anthony Swarzak, Brian Duensing and Jared Burton each work a scoreless inning before Glen Perkins struggled in the ninth, giving up a two-run double to Mitch Moreland.

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Developing Northeastern Pennsylvania’s I-81 Corridor Since 1985

PAGE 6C SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013

S P O R T S

www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER

NfL DRAfT

cowboys will be judged by lineman after draft move
By SCHUYLER DIXON AP Sports Writer

penguins
Continued from Page 1C

IRVING, Texas — Jerry Jones flubbed the initial explanation of a first-round draft move that puzzled analysts and angered fans. The Dallas Cowboys owner and general manager made it sound better a day later, when the team’s draft performance got stronger reviews. Now the question is whether Wisconsin center Travis Frederick will play a big part in giving quarterback Tony Romo an “extra half second” — part of Jones’ rationale for trading down and grabbing a lineman not really considered a first-rounder. If Frederick fails, Jones will add to an already substantial list of bad drafts that help explain why the Cowboys have a .500 record and one playoff win since 1996. “We needed and were going to get us a foundation for our offensive line,” Jones said. “We were concerned with going with another pick at another position there and still staying in play to get the ‘last of the Mohicans’ that can do this for us, and that was Frederick. “Romo called and said, ‘Thank you for my extra half second.’ That is going to mean more to us than anything I can say.” Pundits didn’t have a huge problem with the pick. They questioned why the Cowboys felt like they had to take him at No. 31 — even Frederick said he considered himself a secondrounder — and why San Francisco didn’t have to give up something more than a third-round pick to jump 13 spots. Draft value charts that the Cowboys helped invent were suddenly be-

Dallas Cowboys fans react after Dallas selected Georgia Southern’s J.J. Wilcox 80th overall in the third round of the NFL draft Friday at Radio City Music Hall in New York.

AP PHOTO

ing used against them, with executive vice president Stephen Jones flatly rejecting as “not accurate” assertions that Dallas got fleeced by an old rival in the 49ers, who were coming off a Super Bowl trip, no less. The Cowboys also got hammered for not taking Florida defensive tackle Sharrif Floyd when he slid all the way to No. 18 after some projected him as high as the top five. Dallas is switching to the 4-3 defense and figures to need more options in the front seven. But Dallas projected Floyd as more of a nose tackle, and the Cowboys

already have an expensive one in Jay Ratliff. Besides, they see the defensive line as a position of strength with eighth-year veteran Jason Hatcher and a pair of young players they consider promising in Sean Lissemore and Tyrone Crawford. The Cowboys coveted offensive guards Jonathan Cooper of North Carolina and Chance Warmack of Alabama, but both went in the top 10. “It’s never going to be popular when you move down,” Stephen Jones said. “To me, you don’t play for the hoopla. You’ve got to manage your draft,

and we felt like the best decision for us when certain players were off the board was to go down and do the right thing and pick up a pick, which we needed, and take a player that fits for what we need in the first round.” The key to the Dallas argument could end up being the player they got with San Francisco’s third-round pick — Baylor receiver Terrance Williams at No. 74. Williams was a first-team All-American who led the nation with 1,832 receiving yards and had 12 touchdowns.

cheersforrg3’scalisthenicsduringdraftappearance
By JOSEPH WHITE AP Sports Writer

ASHBURN, Va. — Robert Griffin III did a few jumping jacks, did some running in place and bounced up and down on the stage. The fans cheered. And chanted his name. And cheered some more. For many of the thousands gathered at the stadium, nothing the Washington Redskins did during the three days of the NFL draft meant more than the brief appearance by the franchise player on Saturday. The Redskins made some intriguing choices. They cornered the market on ball hawks and Florida State players who’ve been through careerthreatening injuries, then took a chance with Bacarri Rambo, who failed two drug tests in college. But how much it matters will likely hinge on how quickly Griffin recovers from his surgically reconstructed right knee. “I’m good. You guys saw me jump-

ing. I mean, I can run a little bit,” he said, running in place some more. “I’ll be good. No worries. I’ll take it slow, but at the same time I’ll be ready to go.” More cheers. Meanwhile, back at Redskins Park, coach Mike Shanahan and the front office continued to add to a team than won the NFC East last season and hopes to become a Super Bowl contender with Griffin under center. The primary task to improve was the secondary, and the Redskins landed a unique haul. They selected the last two players to lead major college football in interceptions, along with the player who finished second in picks two years ago. Cornerback David Amerson grabbed 13 with North Carolina State to lead all FBS players in 2011; he was taken in the third round on Friday night. Safety Phillip Thomas had eight last year with Fresno State; he was chosen in the fourth round

on Saturday. Rambo, a safety from Georiga, was runner-up to Amerson with eight in 2011; he went in the sixth round on Saturday. All are now members of a defense that allowed 4,511 yards passing last year, third worst in the NFL. “I know that we needed a safety,” Thomas said. “I’ve been a Redskins fan my whole life.” Thomas had an anxious wait before getting the call at No. 119 overall, even though he was a consensus firstteam All-American. “I feel like I’m going to be the steal of the draft,” he said. Thomas sat out the 2011 season with a broken left leg and dislocated ankle, but he returned last year to anchor a Bulldogs secondary that transitioned to a more aggressive 3-4 scheme. He grew up in California and went to college there, so his favoritism for the Redskins is pretty random. “I saw them play one day on TV when I was younger,” he said. “And

that was my team ever since then.” Rambo fell even farther than Thomas, going at No. 191 — well below the projected slot for the 6-foot, 211-pound defensive back. Rambo failed drug tests was in 2011 and 2012, missing the season opener two years ago and the first four games last year. His high school coach said both failed tests resulted from inadvertent brushes with marijuana, adding that Rambo unknowingly ate marijuana-laced brownies last year. “It was a very selfish decision, but I grew from it,” Rambo said. “It just helped me put my priorities in order and just take every moment as it comes. It helped me be a better person and be mentally strong.” Still, he paid the price by falling to the back end of the draft. “I thought everybody had forgot about me, man. … It was very hard because I felt like a lot of those guys wasn’t near the guy I was,” he said.

Penguins 3 Binghamton 2 Penguins 2 0 0 1—3 Binghamton 1 1 0 0—2 First Period Scoring – 1. WBS, Brian Gibbons 1 (Dumoulin, Nesbitt) power play 10:58. 2. WBS, Chad Kolarik 1 (Smith, Holzapfel) 16:41. 3. BNG, Shane Prince 1 (Wideman) power play 19:12. Penalties – BNG, Cannone (tripping) 9:16; WBS, Grant (high-sticking) 18:19. Second Period Scoring – 4. Mark Stone 1 unassisted 17:03. Penalties – BNG, Jessiman (slashing) 1:24; BNG, Grant (tripping) 1:56; WBS, Nesbitt (high-sticking) 1:59; WBS, Payerl (holding) 11:58. Third Period Scoring – Penalties – BNG, Dziurzynski (tripping) 7:31; WBS, Peters (slashing) 11:05; BNG, Cowick (cross-checking) 13:40. Overtime Scoring - 5. WBS, Chad Kolarik 2 8:18. Penalties - None. Shots on goal Penguins – 11-8-6-8-33; Binghamton – 3-14-13-6-36 Power-play Opportunities Penguins – 1 of 5; Binghamton – 1 of 4 Goaltenders Penguins – Jeff Zatkoff 1-0 (34 saves-36 shots); Binghamton – Nathan Lawson 0-1 (30-33) Attendance – 3,501

not doing my job.” During regulation, the Penguins scored twice in the first period thanks to hard work and a little deception. Brian Gibbons connected during the Penguins first power play of the night. Brian Dumoulin gained possession at the point and sent a shot that was veering wide of the net. Gibbons raced into the crease as the puck arrived and redirected it past Binghamton goaltender Nathan Lawson for a 1-0 lead at 10:58. It was the first postseason goal of Gibbons’ career. Five minutes later Kolarik made it 2-0 after two Binghamton defenders converged on Trevor Smith as he skated the puck into the low slot. Kolarik snuck in wide open, picked up the lose puck and whipped it over Lawson. The Senators made it 2-1 on their first power play with less than a minute remaining when Shane Prince skated out in front and backhanded a shot past Jeff Zatkoff. Binghamton almost evened this up when rookie Cody Ceci blasted a slapshot from the point that deflected off Zatkoff’s skate just after the buzzer sounded to end the period. While Ceci’s shot didn’t beat the whistle at the end of the first period, the Senators did squeeze a crucial goal in at the end of the second. While both teams exchanged plenty of scoring chances during an up-tempo period, the Penguins coughed the puck up one too many times. At the midway point Brian Gibbons allowed a turnover right in front of the net but was bailed out by a nice save from Zatkoff. With less than three minutes remaining, Binghamton’s Mark Stone stripped the puck away from Philip Samuelsson in front of the net and slid the puck between Zatkoff’s skate and the post to even thing up, 2-2. Head coach John Hynes excused Samuelsson for the miscue. “Those things happen in a game. Guys aren’t going to be perfect for 60 minutes,” he said. “But I really like the way he rebounded.” The Senators pressured in the first half of the third period, but Zatkoff kept them off the board, stopping a Price shot in close and a Brett Lebda point shot through traffic. The Penguins struggled to get going through the first 12 minutes as Binghamton beat them to pucks, forced turnovers and outshot Wilkes-Barre/Scranton 10-2. The pressure resulted in a Binghamton power play when Warren Peters was whistled for slashing at 11:05. The Penguins killed off the power play but Binghamton kept the pressure on, but Zatkoff stood tall and stopped all 13 shots in the period to force overtime.

catchers
Continued from Page 1C

On-base percentage plus slugging percentage (OPS) for catchers through Wednesday’s games was .732, compared to .712 for all players. And catchers’ slugging percentage of .417 is the second highest ever for the position since at least 1974, the first year STATS broke out statistics by position. “To me, it’s the best crop of catching probably in I don’t know how many years,” said Bochy, the San Francisco skipper. “When you look around baseball and see all the great catchers in the game today, it’s changed a little bit. They’re better athletes now, they’re better offensive players. It’s always fun to see the gifts and talents of guys like Posey and Molina.” For a 34-year span from 1978 to 2011, catchers underperformed their counterparts with an OPS of .707 compared to .737. Over the last two seasons, however, they have been nearly equal — .720 for catchers, .723 for everyone. Nine catchers had batting averages .300 or above in the first month through Wednesday. Sure, it’s a small sample size, yet this group of backstops has people taking notice. “There seems to be a little run right now for catchers,” Diamondbacks bench coach Trammell said. “It’s good for baseball. As a fan of the game, you appreciate the talent. Everyone in baseball will tell you the No. 1 component behind the pitcher is the catcher. If you’ve got a good one, you’d better keep him.” Coaches and managers also point to

the improved athleticism and strength at the position. In the 26-year-old Posey’s case, the Giants are building their franchise around him. They gave him a $167 million, nine-year contract before the season began. “Buster is the top of that class,” Rockies veteran first baseman Todd Helton said. “If you have a good catcher, their hitting is just a bonus. It’s kind of like having a shortstop batting fourth for you, like we have (Troy Tulowitzki). It doesn’t happen that often, and when it does, it’s just a luxury. You have guys at those positions that are usually just defensive positions that are now offensive threats. As a fan it makes the game that more fun to watch, and I’m sure it makes it a heck of a lot easier to manage if you’re the manager.” He doesn’t have to tell Bochy. After Posey started 111 games at catcher last season and another 29 at first base, Bochy can envision Posey playing even more behind the plate this year — though the Giants aren’t inclined to change much from what “worked well last year,” Bochy said in reference to spelling Posey with the starts at first. “It seems like there’s a decent amount of catchers that are swinging the bats well and playing good defense,” Posey said. “I think you’re kind of seeing more guys, offensive catchers, playing a little bit of first or outfield, which probably helps in the long haul.” Posey, the reigning NL MVP and batting champion, has set the bar as far as opposing managers are concerned, especially those in the NL West who see him regularly. The 2010 NL Rookie of the Year suf-

fered devastating, season-ending left leg and ankle injuries in May 2011, then came back better than ever last season to help San Francisco capture its second World Series championship in three years. Even Bochy was surprised by Posey’s resiliency. Then, to hit .336 and become batting champion and MVP. “Being a catcher, I appreciate the gift that he has and how hard he works to leverage the gift he has and continue to try to get better as a player,” Bochy said. “It’s hard to imagine that can happen, but it can with this guy, and he’s just going to have a tremendous career — a guy that’s going to be talked about for a long time.” The Cardinals know they have a pretty good one themselves in Molina. Among the first things St. Louis pitcher Shelby Miller did following his second career start April 6 at San Francisco was thank Molina for guiding him through the rough innings on the way to a win. The Cardinals catcher insists that’s just one part of his job — a mindset shared by others who pride themselves in being well-rounded. It’s no longer just about signaling balls and strikes, or running out to the mound to offer a pitcher a pep talk. This bunch throws out base runners and bats in key spots. “Baseball changed,” Molina said. “Right now, we’re trying to do it on both sides.” When St. Louis visited AT&T Park for the first matchup between the clubs since the Giants’ Game 7 clincher in the NL championship series last fall, Molina made a point to find Posey. “I told him congratulations on ev-

Fifteen years ago, shortstops such as Derek Jeter, Alex Rodriguez and Nomar Garciaparra changed the perception of their position from slick fielders with little pop to middle-of-lineup run producers. Now, it’s do-everything catchers like Baltimore Orioles catcher Matt Wieters, above, showing remarkable versatility from the crouch and the batter’s box.

AP PHOTO

erything — on the MVP, on the World Series, on the contract. It’s well-deserved,” Molina said. Rosario, Colorado’s second-year starting catcher who clobbered 28 home runs last season, admires Posey and Molina from the opposite dugout. He aspires to keep up. Rosario also points to Minnesota’s Mauer, retired 14-time All-Star and 13time Gold Glover Ivan Rodriguez and former Yankees star Jorge Posada for setting the example of catchers contributing in multiple ways. Rodriguez finished his 21-year big league career as a .296 hitter with 311 home runs, while Posda batted .273 with 275 homers in 17 seasons.

“Joe Mauer, Pudge Rodriguez and Jorge Posada, they started to hit very well, and now things changed,” Rosario said. “Other catchers they came to the majors for good defense, not for good offense. Young catchers or rookie catchers, we need to hit.” Steady hitting is just one more thing on a long list of responsibilities along with handling pitchers. “Just follow a catcher around from the beginning of spring training until the end of the season. They’re tough, not just physically but mentally,” Arizona manager Kirk Gibson said. “It’s kind of a thankless job. These guys go out and run the show. They’re special people, they really are.”

TiMeS leADer www.timesleader.com

N F L

D R A F T

SUNDAY, April 28, 2013 pAge 7C

By RICHARD ROSENBLATT AP Sports Writer

Goodell does spot for movie
NEW YORK — Lights, camera, action. A few minutes before the real NFL draft began its final day Saturday, Commissioner Roger Goodell stepped to the podium and announced: “With the first pick in the 2014 NFL draft, the Cleveland Browns select Vontae Mack, linebacker, Ohio State.” Huh? For good measure, he did it a second time, too. Relax, Browns fans, it’s for a movie. A film crew has been hanging out at Radio City Music Hall, along with a few actors, to record scenes for the picture. The movie is about the general manager of the Cleveland Browns (Kevin Costner) struggling to gain the No. 1 pick in the draft to save the franchise. Also featured in the film are Jennifer Garner, Ellen Burstyn, Denis Leary, Frank Langella and Chadwick Boseman — currently appearing as Jackie Robinson in “42” — as Vontae Mack. ••• WILLIAMS WORLD: In case anyone wondered, there were more than enough players drafted with the last name of Williams to put together an 11-player unit. A total of 14 Williams were picked — 10 who play defense, four who play offense. None has the same first name. Any public address announcer would enjoy introducing this lineup: — Sylvester Williams, defensive end (No. 28, Denver) — Terrance Williams, wide receiver (No. 74, Dallas) — Shawn Williams, strong safety (No. 84, Cincinnati) — Brennan Williams, offensive tackle (No. 89, Houston) — Brandon Williams, defensive tackle (No. 94, Baltimore) — Duke Williams, free safety (No. 105, Buffalo) — Trevardo Williams, defensive end (No. 124, Houston) — Jesse Williams, defensive tackle (No. 137, Seattle) — Steve Williams, cornerback (No. 145, San Diego) — Tourek Williams, defensive end (No. 179, San Diego) — Vince Williams, linebacker (No. 206, Pittsburgh) — Michael Williams, tight end (No. 2011, Detroit) — Nicholas Williams, defensive end (No. 223, Pittsburgh) — Kerwynn Williams, running back (No. 230, Indianapolis) ••• ANOTHER PERFECT PASS ROUTE: Josh Boyce is one lucky wide receiver. He caught passes from Robert Griffin III in high school (Copperas Cove in Texas) from Andy Dalton in college (TCU) and now he’ll be a target for Tom Brady. The speedy wideout was New England’s fourth-round pick on Saturday, No. 102 overall, and Boyce knows he’s one fortunate pass catcher. “All three of them are great guys, great quarterbacks,” Boyce said. “I’ve been blessed to play with great quarterbacks my whole career.” ••• ROLL IVY: This was one special draft for the Ivy League. Known for turning out doctors, lawyers, economists and presidents, the league saw three of its players picked in the three-day NFL draft. That may not sound like many, but consider this: in the past six draft, NFL teams picked a total of three players from the league, And the winners are: — Cornell tackle J.C. Tretter, a fourth-round pick (No. 122) by Green Bay. — Harvard running back Kyle Juszczyk, a fourth-round compensatory pick (No. 130) by Baltimore. — Princeton linebacker Mike Catapano, a seventh-round pick (No. 207) by Kansas City.
Penn State linebacker Gerald Hodges does an interview during 2011 media day in State College. Hodges was a fourth-round pick, No. 120 overall, by the Minnesota Vikings.
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

T e A M - B Y-T e A M S e l e C T i O N S
ArizonA 1 (7) Jonathan Cooper, g, North Carolina. 2 (45) Kevin Minter, lb, LSU. 3 (69) Tyrann Mathieu, db, LSU. 4 (103) Alex Okafor, lb, Texas. 4 (116) Earl Watford, g, James Madison. 5 (140) Stepfan Taylor, rb, Stanford. 6 (174) Ryan Swope, wr, Texas A&M. 6 (187) Andre Ellington, rb, Clemson. 7 (219) D.C. Jefferson, te, Rutgers. AtlAntA 1 (22) Desmond Trufant, db, Washington. 2 (60) Robert Alford, db, SE Louisiana. 4 (127) Malliciah Goodwin, de, Clemson. 4 (133)-x Levine Toilolo, te, Stanford. 5 (153) Stansly Maponga, de, TCU. 7 (243)-x Kemel Ishmael, db, UCF. 7 (244)-x Zeke Motta, db, Notre Dame. 7 (249)-x Sean Renfree, qb, Duke. BAltimore 1 (32) Matt Elam, db, Florida. 2 (56) Arthur Brown, lb, Kansas State. 3 (94) Brandon Williams, dt, Missouri Southern. 4 (129) John Simon, lb, Ohio State. 4 (130)-x Kyle Juszczyk, rb, Harvard. 5 (168)-x Ricky Wagner, g, Wisconsin. 6 (200) Kapron Lewis-Moore, de, Notre Dame. 6 (203)-x Ryan Jensen, c, Colorado State-Pueblo. 7 (238) Aaron Mellette, wr, Elon. 7 (247)-x Marc Anthony, db, California. BuffAlo 1 (16) EJ Manuel, qb, Florida State. 2 (41) Robert Woods, wr, Southern Cal. 2 (46) Kiko Alonso, lb, Oregon. 3 (78) Marquise Goodwin, wr, Texas. 4 (105) Duke Williams, db, Nevada. 5 (143) Jonathan Meeks, db, Clemson. 6 (177) Dustin Hopkins, k, Florida State. 7 (222) Chris Gragg, te, Arkansas. CArolinA 1 (14) Star Lotulelei, dt, Utah. 2 (44) Kawann Short, dt, Purdue. 4 (108) Edmund Kugbila, g, Valdosta State. 5 (148) A.J. Klein, lb, Iowa State. 6 (182) Kenjon Barner, rb, Oregon. ChiCAgo 1 (20) Kyle Long, g, Oregon. 2 (50) Jon Bostic, lb, Florida. 4 (117) Khaseem Greene, lb, Rutgers. 5 (163) Jordan Mills, ot, Louisiana Tech. 6 (188) Cornelius Washington, de, Georgia. 7 (236) Marquess Wilson, wr, Washington State. CinCinnAti 1 (21) Tyler Eifert, te, Notre Dame. 2 (37) Gio Bernard, rb, North Carolina. 2 (53) Margus Hunt, de, SMU. 3 (84) Shawn Williams, db, Georgia. 4 (118) Sean Porter, lb, Texas A&M. 5 (156) Tanner Hawkinson, g, Kansas. 6 (190) Rex Burkhead, rb, Nebraska. 6 (197) Cobi Hamilton, wr, Arkansas. 7 (240)-x Reid Fragel, ot, Ohio State. 7 (251)-x T.J. Johnson, c, South Carolina. ClevelAnd 1 (6) Barkevious Mingo, de, LSU. 2 Exercised in supplemental draft. 3 (68) Leon McFadden, db, San Diego State. 6 (175) Jamoris Slaughter, db, Notre Dame. 7 (217) Armonty Bryant, de, East Central. 7 (227) Garrett Gilkey, ot, Charon State. dAllAs 1 (31) Travis Frederick, c, Wisconsin. 2 (47) Gavin Escobar, te, San Diego State. 3 (74) Terrance Williams, wr, Baylor. 3 (80) J.J. Wilcox, db, Georgia Southern. 4 (114) B.W. Webb, db, William & Mary. 5 (151) Joseph Randle, rb, Oklahoma State. 6 (185) DeVonte Holloman, lb, South Carolina. denver 1 (28) Sylvester Williams, dt, North Carolina. 2 (58) Montee Ball, rb, Wisconsin. 3 (90) Kayvon Webster, db, South Florida. 5 (146) Quanteras Smith, de, Western Kentucky. 5 (161) Tavarres King, wr, Georgia. 6 (173) Vinston Painter, ot, Virginia Tech. 7 (234) Zac Dysert, qb, Miami (Ohio). detroit 1 (5) Ziggy Ansah, de, BYU. 2 (36) Darius Slay, db, Mississippi State. 3 (65) Larry Warford, g, Kentucky. 4 (132)-x Devin Taylor, de, South Carolina. 5 (165) Sam Martin, p, Appalachian State. 6 (171) Corey Fuller, wr, Virginia Tech. 6 (199) Theo Riddick, rb, Notre Dame. 7 (211) Michael Williams, te, Alabama. 7 (245)-x Brandon Hepburn, lb, Florida A&M. green BAy 1 (26) Datone Jones, de, UCLA. 2 (61) Eddie Lacy, rb, Alabama. 4 (109) David Bakhtiari, ot, Colorado. 4 (122) J.C. Tretter, ot, Cornell. 4 (125) Johnathan Franklin, rb, UCLA. 5 (159) Micah Hyde, db, Iowa. 5 (167)-x Josh Boyd, de, Mississippi State. 6 (193) Nate Palmer, lb, Illinois State. 7 (216) C.J. Johnson, wr, Grand Valley State. 7 (224) Kevin Dorsey, wr, Maryland. 7 (232) Sam Barrington, lb, South Florida. houston 1 (27) DeAndre Hopkins, wr, Clemson. 2 (57) D.J. Swearinger, db, South Carolina. 3 (89) Brennan Williams, ot, North Carolina. 3 (95)-x Sam Montgomery, de, LSU. 4 (124) Trevardo Williams, lb, UConn. 6 (176) David Quessenberry, ot, San Jose State. 6 (195) Alan Bonner, wr, Jacksonville State. 6 (198) Chris Jones, db, Bowling Green. 6 (201)-x Ryan Griffin, te, UConn. indiAnApolis 1 (24) Bjoern Werner, de, Florida State. 3 (86) Hugh Thornton, g, Illinois. 4 (121) Khaled Holmes, c, Southern Cal. 5 (139) Montori Hughes, dt, UT-Martin. 6 (192) John Boyett, db, Oregon. 7 (230) Kerwynn Williams, rb, Utah State. 7 (254)-x Justice Cunningham, te, South Carolina. JACksonville 1 (2) Luke Joeckel, ot, Texas A&M. 2 (33) Johnathan Cyprien, db, FIU. 3 (64) Dwayne Gratz, db, UConn. 4 (101) Ace Sanders, wr, South Carolina. 5 (135) Denard Robinson, rb, Michigan. 6 (169) Josh Evans, db, Florida. 7 (208) Jeremy Harris, db, New Mexico State. 7 (210) Demetrius McCray, db, Appalachian State. kAnsAs City 1 (1) Eric Fisher, ot, Central Michigan. 3 (63) Travis Kelce, te, Cincinnati. 3 (96)-x Knile Davis, rb, Arkansas. 4 (99) Nico Johnson, lb, Alabama. 5 (134) Sanders Commings, db, Georgia. 6 (170) Eric Kush, c, California (Pa.) 6 (204)-x Braden Wilson, rb, Kansas State. 7 (207) Mike Catapano, lb, Princeton. miAmi 1 (3) Dion Jordan, de, Oregon. 2 (54) Jamar Taylor, db, Boise State. 3 (77) Dallas Thomas, ot, Tennessee. 3 (93) Will Davis, db, Utah State. 4 (104) Jelani Jenkins, lb, Florida. 4 (106) Dion Sims, te, Michigan State. 5 (164) Mike Gillislee, rb, Florida. 5 (166)-x Caleb Sturgis, k, Florida. 7 (250)-x Don Jones, db, Arkansas State. minnesotA 1 (23) Sharrif Floyd, dt, Florida. 1 (25) Xavier Rhodes, db, Florida State. 1 (29) Cordarrelle Patterson, wr, Tennessee. 4 (120) Gerald Hodges, lb, Penn State. 5 (155) Jeff Locke, p, UCLA. 6 (196) Jeff Baca, g, UCLA. 7 (213) Michael Mauti, lb, Penn State. 7 (214) Tarvis Bond, g, North Carolina. 7 (229) Everrett Dawkins, dt, Florida State. new englAnd 2 (52) Jamie Collins, lb, Southern Miss. 2 (59) Aaron Dobson, wr, Marshall. 3 (83) Logan Ryan, db, Rutgers. 3 (91) Duron Harmon, db, Rutgers. 4 (102) Josh Boyce, wr, TCU. 7 (226) Michael Buchanan, de, Illinois. 7 (235) Steve Beauharnais, lb, Rutgers. new orleAns 1 (15) Kenny Vaccaro, db, Texas. 2 Forfeited. 3 (75) Terron Armstead, ot, Arkansas-Pine Bluff. 3 (82) John Jenkins, nt, Georgia. 5 (144) Kenny Stills, wr, Oklahoma. 6 (183) Rufus Johnson, lb, Tarleton State. new york giAnts 1 (19) Justin Pugh, ot, Syracuse. 2 (49) Johnathan Hankins, dt, Ohio State. 3 (81) Damontre Moore, de, Texas A&M. 4 (110) Ryan Nassib, qb, Syracuse. 5 (152) Cooper Taylor, db, Richmond. 7 (225) Eric Herman, g, Ohio. 7 (253)-x Michael Cox, rb, UMass. new york Jets 1 (9) Dee Milliner, db, Alabama. 1 (13) Sheldon Richardson, dt, Missouri. 2 (39) Geno Smith, qb, West Virginia. 3 (72) Brian Winters, ot, Kent State. 5 (141) Oday Aboushi, ot, Virginia. 6 (178) William Campbell, g, Michigan. 7 (215) Tommy Bohanon, rb, Wake Forest. oAklAnd 1 (12) D.J. Hayden, db, Houston. 2 (42) Menelik Watson, ot, Florida State. 3 (66) Sio Moore, lb, UConn. 4 (112) Tyler Wilson, qb, Arkansas. 6 (172) Nick Kasa, te, Colorado. 5 (181) Latavius Murray, rb, UCF. 6 (184) Mychal Rivera, te, Tennessee. 6 (205)-x Stacy McGee, dt, Oklahoma. 7 (209) Brice Butler, wr, San Diego State. 7 (233) David Bass, dt, Missouri Western. philAdelphiA 1 (4) Lane Johnson, ot, Oklahoma. 2 (35) Zach Ertz, te, Stanford. 3 (67) Bennie Logan, dt, LSU. 4 (98) Matt Barkley, qb, Southern Cal. 5 (136) Earl Wolff, db, N.C. State. 7 (212) Joe Kruger, de, Utah. 7 (218) Jordan Poyer, db, Oregon State. 7 (239)-x David King, db, Oklahoma. pittsBurgh 1 (17) Jarvis Jones, lb, Georgia. 2 (48) Le’Veon Bell, rb, Michigna State. 3 (79) Markus Wheaton, wr, Oregon State. 4 (111) Shamarko Thomas, db, Syracuse. 4 (115) Landry Jones, qb, Oklahoma. 5 (150) Terry Hawthorne, db, Illinois. 6 (186) Justin Brown, wr, Oklahoma. 6 (206)-x Vince Williams, lb, Florida State. 7 (223) Nick Williams, db, Samford. st. louis 1 (8) Tavon Austin, wr, West Virginia. 1 (30) Alec Ogletree, lb, Georgia. 3 (71) T.J. McDonald, db, Southern Cal. 3 (92) Stedman Bailey, wr, West Virginia. 4 (113) Barrett Jones, c, Alabama. 5 (149) Brandon McGee, db, Miami. 5 (160) Zac Stacy, rb, Vanderbilt. sAn diego 1 (11) D.J. Fluker, ot, Alabama. 2 (38) Mantei Te’o, lb, Notre Dame. 3 (76) Keenan Allen, wr, California. 5 (145) Steve Williams, db, California. 6 (179) Tourek Williams, lb, FIU. 7 (221) Brad Sorenson, qb, Utah State. sAn frAnCisCo 1 (18) Eric Reid, db, LSU. 2 (40) Cornellius Carradine, de, Florida State. 2 (55) Vance McDonald, te, Rice. 3 (88) Corey Lemonier, de, Auburn. 4 (128) Quinton Patton, wr, Louisiana Tech. 4 (131)-x Marcus Lattimore, rb, South Carolina. 5 (157) Quinton Dial, dt, Alabama. 6 (180) Nick Moody, lb, Florida State. 7 (237) B.J. Daniels, qb, South Florida. 7 (246)-x Carter Bykowski, ot, Iowa State. 7 (252)-x Marcus Cooper, db, Rutgers. seAttle 2 (62) Christine Michael, rb, Texas A&M. 3 (87) Jordan Hill, dt, Penn State. 4 (123) Chris Harper, wr, Kansas State. 5 (137) Jesse Williams, dt, Alabama. 5 (138) Tharold Simon, db, LSU. 5 (158) Luke Willson, te, Rice. 6 (194) Spencer Ware, rb, LSU. 7 (220) Ryan Seymour, g, Vanderbilt. 7 (231) Ty Powell, lb, Harding. 7 (241)-x Jared Smith, g, New Hampshire. 7 (242)-x Michael Bowie, ot, Northeastern State (Okla.) tAmpA BAy 2 (43) Johnthan Banks, db, Mississippi State. 3 (73) Mike Glennon, qb, N.C. State. 4 (100) Akeem Spence, dt, Illinois. 4 (126) William Gholston, de, Michigan State. 5 (147) Steven Means, de, Buffalo. 6 (189) Mike James, rb, Miami. tennessee 1 (10) Chance Warmack, g, Alabama. 2 (34) Justin Hunter, wr, Tennessee. 3 (70) Blidi Wreh-Wilson, db, UConn. 3 (97)-x Zaviar Gooden, lb, Missouri. 4 (107) Brian Schwenke, c, California. 5 (142) Lavar Edwards, de, LSU. 6 (202)-x Khalid Wooten, db, Nevada. 7 (248)-x Daimion Stafford, db, Nebraska. wAshington 2 (51) David Amerson, db, N.C. State. 3 (85) Jordan Reed, te, Florida. 4 (119) Phillip Thomas, db, Fresno State. 5 (154) Chris Thompson, rb, Florida State. 5 (162) Brandon Jenkins, lb, Florida State. 6 (191) Bacarri Rambo, db, Georgia. 7 (228) Jawan Jamison, rb, Rutgers. (x-compensatory selection)

reUNITeD
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available Nittany Lion, as both are reportedly set to sign with the New England Patriots. Other Penn State free agents include QB Matt McGloin, FB Michael Zordich, OT Mike Farrell, DE Sean Stanley, DE Pete Massaro and DT James Terry. But Saturday was about the linebackers. And it started with Hodges. Never bashful about his NFL aspirations, Hodges was getting particularly antsy on this afternoon. Rated as a potential second-day selection in the second or third round coming out of the combine, the dynamic linebacker was still on the board when Friday night ended. As the first handful of picks went by on Saturday, Hodges got sick of watching the TV and waiting for his phone to ring. So to relieve some stress, he went to take a quick shower. And naturally… “As I’m getting out of the shower, I hear my phone ringing,” Hodges said in a

conference call with Minnesota media. “And I wasn’t in a rush to get to my phone because I didn’t know what it was. I get over here and I see Minnesota, and I looked at the board and saw Minnesota was up in two picks. “And I just started crying. I just couldn’t believe it. It’s a blessing.” He would be even happier a few hours later when learning his running mate Mauti would be joining him. Mauti’s talent and leadership could have earned him as high as a second-round selection, right in the same range as successful predecessors Paul Posluszny and Sean Lee. All of that was overshadowed by three ACL surgeries in five years for Mauti at Penn State, the latest coming in late November. And while Mauti has had an especially speedy recovery by all indications, it wasn’t enough to overcome that sort of injury history. “He’s the guy who held it all together up there … he’s deserving of a chance in this league,” former Buffalo Bills and Indianapolis Colts architect Bill Polian said on ESPN. “Tough, hard-nosed player.

Smart. Very, very tough.” Mauti said Saturday that he expects to be ready to go full speed by the time training camp opens in July. “That’s my goal, and that’s where I plan on being,” Mauti said on a separate conference call. Hodges and Mauti give Penn State nine active linebackers in the NFL, joining Posluszny, Lee, NaVorro Bowman, Dan Connor, Tim Shaw, Josh Hull and Nate Stupar. And now two of them will be playing together in Minnesota, coached by Hall of Fame linebacker Mike Singletary, their new position coach. “I think it should be illegal for me and Mauti to be on the same team again,” Hodges exulted on his Twitter account. “But hey I don’t make the rules we just abide by them!”

Add one more to the list

One other familiar name came had his name called on Saturday. Former Penn State wideout Justin Brown was drafted in the sixth round by the Pittsburgh Steelers with the 186th overall pick. Brown transferred to Oklahoma over the summer.

Syracuse quarterback Ryan Nassib (12) was drafted by the New York Giants in the fourth round of the NFL Draft on Saturday.

DrAFT TrADeS
1, Oakland traded its first-round pick (No. 3) to Miami for the Dolphins’ first- (No. 12) and secondround (No. 42) picks. Miami selected Dion Jordan, de, Oregon. Oakland selected D.J. Hayden, db, Houston and Menelik Watson, ot, Florida State. 2, Buffalo traded its first- (No. 8) and third-round (No. 71) picks to St. Louis for the Rams’ first- (No. 16); second- (No. 46); third- (No. 78) and seventhround (No. 222) picks. St. Louis selected Tavon Austin, wr, West Virginia and T.J. McDonald, db, Southern Cal. Buffalo selected EJ Manuel, qb, Florida State; Kiko Alonso, lb, Oregon; Marquise Goodwin, wr, Texas and Chris Gragg, te, Arkansas. 3, Dallas traded its first-round pick (No. 18) to San Francisco for the 49ers’ first- (No. 31) and thirdround (No. 74) picks. San Francisco selected Eric Reid, db, LSU. Dallas selected Travis Frederick, c, Wisconsin and Terrance Williams, wr, Baylor. 4, St. Louis traded its first-round pick (No. 22) and a 2015 seventh-round pick to Atlanta for the Falcons’ first- (No. 30); third- (No. 92); and sixth-round (No. 198) picks. Atlanta selected Desmond Trufant, db, Washington. St. Louis selected Alec Ogletree, lb, Georgia; Stedman Bailey, wr, West Virginia and traded pick No. 198 to Houston. 5, New England traded its first-round pick (No. 29) to Minnesota for the Vikings’ second- (No. 52); third- (No. 83); fourth- (No. 102) and seventh-round (No. 229) picks. Minnesota selected Cordarrelle Patterson, wr, Tennessee. New England selected Jamie Collins, lb, Southern Miss.; Logan Ryan, db, Rutgers; Josh Boyce, wr, TCU and traded pick No. 229 to Tampa Bay. 6, San Francisco traded its second-round pick (No. 34) to Tennessee for the Titans’ second- (No. 40) and seventh-round (No. 216) picks and a 2014 third-round draft pick. Tennessee selected Justin Hunter, wr, Tennessee. San Francisco selected Cornellius Carradine, de, Florida State and traded pick No. 216 to Green Bay. 7, Arizona traded its second-round pick (No. 38) to San Diego for the Chargers’ second- (No. 45), and fourth-round (No. 110) picks. San Diego selected Mantei Te’o, lb, Notre Dame. Arizona selected Kevin Minter, lb, LSU and traded pick No. 110 to the New York Giants. 8, Green Bay traded its second-round pick (No. 55) to San Francisco for the 49ers’ second- (No. 61) and sixth-round (No. 173) picks. San Francisco selected Vance McDonald, te, Rice. Green Bay selected Eddie Lacy, rb, Alabama and traded pick No. 173 to Denver. 9, Seattle traded its second-round pick (No. 56) to Baltimore for the Ravens’ second- (No. 62), fifth(No. 165) and sixth-round (No. 199) picks. Baltimore selected Arthur Brown, lb, Kansas State. Seattle selected Christine Michael, rb, Texas A&M and traded picks (No. 165) and (No. 199) to Detroit. 10, Cleveland traded its fourth- (No. 104) and fifth-round (No. 164) picks to Miami for the Dolphins’ fourth- (No. 111) and seventh-round (No. 217) picks and WR Davone Bess. Miami selected Jelani Jenkins, lb, Florida and Mike Gillislee, rb, Florida. Cleveland traded pick No. 111 to Pittsburgh and selected Armonty Bryant, de, East Central. 11, New York Jets traded its fourth-round pick (No. 106) to New Orleans for RB Chris Ivory. New Orleans traded pick No. 106 to Miami. 12, Miami traded its third-round pick (No. 82) to New Orleans for the Saints’ fourth-round (No. 106) and (No. 109) picks. New Orleans selected John Jenkins, nt, Georgia. Miami selected Dion Sims, te, Michigan State and traded pick No. 109 to Green Bay. 13, Green Bay traded its third-round pick (No. 88) to San Francisco for the 49ers’ fourth- (No. 93) and seventh-round (No. 216) picks. San Francisco selected Corey Lemonier, de, Auburn. Green Bay traded pick No. 93 to Miami and selected C.J. Johnson, wr, Grand Valley State. 14, Green Bay traded its third-round pick (No. 93) to Miami for the Dolphins’ fourth- (No. 109), fifth- (No. 146) and seventh-round (No. 224) picks. Miami selected Will Davis, db, Utah State. Green Bay selected David Bakhtiari, ot, Colorado; traded pick No. 146 to Denver and selected Kevin Dorsey, wr, Maryland. 15, Jacksonville traded its fourth-round pick (No. 98) to Philadelphia for the Eagles’ fourth- (No. 101) and seventh-round (No. 210) picks. Philadelphia selected Matt Barkley, qb, Southern Cal. Jacksonville selected Ace Sanders, wr, South Carolina and Demetrius McCray, db, Appalachian State. 16, Oakland traded its fourth-round pick (No. 100) to Tampa Bay for the Bucs’ fourth- (No. 112) and sixth-round (No. 181) picks. Tampa Bay selected Akeem Spence, dt, Illinois. Oakland selected Tyler Wilson, qb, Arkansas and Latavius Murray, rb, UCF. 17, Arizona traded its fourth-round pick (No. 110) to the New York Giants for the Giants’ fourth- (No. 116) and sixth-round (No. 187) picks. New York selected Ryan Nassib, qb, Syracuse. Arizona selected Earl Watford, g, James Madison and Andre Ellington, rb, Clemson. 18, Cleveland traded its fourth-round pick (No. 111) to Pittsburgh for the Steelers’ 2014 third-round pick. Pittsburgh selected Shamarko Thomas, db, Syracuse. 19, Denver traded its fourth-round pick (No. 125) to Green Bay for the Packers’ fifth- (No. 146) and sixth-round (No. 173) picks. Green Bay selected Johnathan Franklin, rb, UCLA. Denver selected Quanteras Smith, de, Western Kentucky and Vinston Painter, ot, Virginia Tech. 20, Detroit traded its fifth-round pick (No. 137) to Seattle for the Seahawks’ fifth- (No. 165) and sixthround (No. 199) picks. Seattle selected Jesse Williams, dt, Alabama. Detroit selected Sam Martin, p, Appalachian State and Theo Riddick, rb, Notre Dame. 21, Cleveland traded its fifth-round pick (No. 139) to Indianapolis for the Colts’ 2014 fourth-round pick. Indianapolis selected Montori Hughes, dt, UT-Martin. 22, Chicago traded its fifth-round pick (No. 153) to Atlanta for the Falcons’ fifth- (No. 163) and seventh-round (No. 236) picks. Atlanta selected Stansly Maponga, de, TCU. Chicago selected Jordan Mills, ot, Louisiana Tech and Marquess Wilson, wr, Washington State. 23, Houston traded its fifth-round pick (No. 160) to St. Louis for the Rams’ sixth-round (No. 184) and (No. 198) picks. St. Louis selected Zac Stacy, rb, Vanderbilt. Houston traded (No. 184) to Oakland and selected Chris Jones, db, Bowling Green. 24, Oakland traded its sixth-round pick (No. 176) to Houston for the Texans’ sixth- (No. 184) and seventh-round (No. 233) picks. Houston selected David Quessenberry, ot, San Jose State. Oakland selected Mychal Rivera, te, Tennessee and David Bass, dt, Missouri Western. 25, New England traded its seventh-round (No. 229) pick and RB Jeff Demps to Tampa Bay for RB LaGarrette Blount. Tampa Bay traded pick No. 229 to Minnesota. 26, Minnesota traded its sixth-round pick (No. 189) to Tampa Bay for the Bucs’ sixth- (No. 196) and seventh-round (No. 229) picks. Tampa Bay selected Mike James, rb, Miami. Minnesota selected Jeff Baca, g, UCLA and Everrett Dawkins, dt, Florida State. AP PHOTO

barkley
Continued from Page 1C

phia Eagles and switch, which won’t be a problem.” Oakland, which acquired Matt Flynn from Seattle in the offseason to be its starter, followed two picks later at No. 112 overall with Wilson. Three spots after that, Pittsburgh grabbed Jones, probably hoping to groom him behind Ben Roethlisberger. “I just think it was time to start grooming a new player, freshen up the room if you will,” quarterbacks coach Randy Fichtner said. “I get to learn from one of the best quarterbacks to play the game,” Jones added. Before Saturday’s surge, quarterbacks were rare — only one was chosen in each of the first three rounds: Florida State’s EJ Manuel by Buffalo in the first round; West Virginia’s Geno Smith by the Jets in the second; and North Carolina State’s Mike Glennon by Tampa Bay in the third. A former quarterback,

Denard Robinson of Michigan, is headed to Jacksonville, which had one of the league’s worst offenses the last two years. Robinson will be switched to running back or receiver by the Jaguars; he set the NCAA record for career yards rushing (4,495) by a quarterback. “A lot of people have put me at different positions,” he said. “Now it’s time to go to work.” South Carolina running back Marcus Lattimore, who would have been a high pick if healthy but is coming off a second severe knee injury, went to the 49ers 131st overall. San Francisco can afford to “redshirt” Lattimore because it has a strong stable of runners, including Frank Gore, Kendall Hunter and LaMichael James. “We really haven’t even talked about that, so I don’t have any clue,” Lattimore said about possibly sitting out 2013 to heal completely. “My main goal right now is to go in there and work hard, go in there and learn the offense, and if I’m ready to play, I’m going to play, and if I’m not, I’m not.”

Lattimore, who dislocated his left knee and tore three ligaments last season, said he spoke with Gore during his rehab. “And now I’m with the 49ers, and it’s just a great, great situation for me,” Lattimore said. Special teamers finally got the call when three kickers went in the fifth round: punters Jeff Locke of UCLA to Minnesota and Sam Martin of Appalachian State to Seattle, and placekicker Caleb Sturgis of Florida to Miami. National champion Alabama, which had four players chosen previously — three in the first round — had four more go on the final day: linebacker Nico Johnson to Kansas City with the pick after Barkley was taken; guard Barrett Jones, who can play all offensive line positions, to the Rams; and DTs Jesse Williams to Seattle and Quinton Dial to San Francisco. ——— AP Pro Football Writer Rob Maaddi and Sports Writers Tom Canavan, Will Graves and Mark Long contributed to this story.

PAGE 8C SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013

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The Times Leader staff

Dallas boys lacrosse plays DH at Crestwood
wRIGhT TwP. — The Dallas boys lacrosse team played two games on saturday at Crestwood, but unfortunately came away empty in both games losing to selinsgrove and Danville. In the first game, the mountaineers were defeated by the seals 11-7 despite getting three goals from Corey metz, two from omar nijmeh and a goal apiece by Jesse Goode and Aaron kliamovich. In the second game, Dallas dropped a 14-9 decision to Danville. metz tallied two goals, while nijmeh added two. Goode, matt Ross and George Pfeiffer also scored.

GOinG uP fOR a GOOd cauSe

CoLLEGE RoUNDUP

Misericordia is top seed for upcoming Freedom baseball tournament
The Times Leader staff

north added two goals apiece.

GIRLS LACROSSE Lewisburg 10, Dallas 4
kelsie Davis, madeline mulhern, Cara Pricher and Jill Viercinski all had goals for in the mountaineers.

DALLAs — The misericordia baseball team swept a doubleheader from wilkes on saturday afternoon winning 14-0 in the first game before winning 5-1 in the night cap. with the victories, coupled with a king’s win over Desales, the Cougars (18-3 Freedom Conference) locked up the no. 1 seed for next weekend’s conference tournament being held in Quakertown. evan Robaczewski pitched seven innings in the first win allowing one hit while striking out four to collect the victory. In the process, he became the school’s all-time wins leader with 18 and the single-season strikeout leader with 62. Patrick Condo pitched all six innings in game two allowing five runs on six hits while striking out three.

MEN’S LACROSSE King’s 9, FDU-Florham 8 OT

kieran mcmahon scored two minutes into overtime to propel king’s to the as the team clinched its second straight trip to the Freedom Conference playoffs. mike o’Brien paced the king’s offense with three goals and one assist for four points.

Misericordia 6, Arcadia 5

misericordia secured the second seed in the upcoming Freedom Conference Championships with the win as P.J. Johnson led the defense with 11 saves and sean mcGuigan added a goal and an assist, including his 100th career point.

SOFTBALL Wilkes, Misericordia split
emily mcGrath hit a walk off home run with two outs in the bottom of the tenth to give wilkes a 5-4 win in Game 1 of the double header. In the second game, the Cougars won 5-4.

Kings, DeSales split

BOYS TRACK AND FIELD Dallas 113, Crestwood 39
Drew harding set a new school record that was held for 17 years in pole vault in the mountaineers victory over the Comets on Friday.

Sir Issac White of Houston, Texas, hangs on the rim to a cheering crowd after his successful slam dunk, during the slam dunk contest. The contest was part of the third annual Clifton R. Lewis Good Life Foundation’s celebrity basketball game, a fundraiser to help people with muscular dystrophy.

AMANDA HRYCYNA/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

3200 Relay: 1. DAL Ehret, Deluca, Dyrli, Borland 8:46; 110 H.H: 1. DAL Harding 16.3; 2. CRE Walsh 16.6; 3. DAL L. Lewis 19.7; Triple Jump: 1. DAL Kezbowski 40’ 2’/4; 2. DAL Kalo 37’ 4’/2; 3. CRE Sheridan 36’ 11’/4; 100 M-Dash: 1. DAL DeAngelo 12.0; 2. DAL DeAngelo 12.0; 3. DAL L. Lewis 12.1; 1600 Run: 1. DAL DeLuca 4.55; 2. DAL Mattson 4.59; 3. DAL Borland 5.0; Shut Put: 1. DAL Simonovich 47’; 2. DAL Bullock 42’ 10’/2; 3. DAL Mihal 40’ 4’/4; 400 M-Relay: 1. DAL Zunchak, Zatak, L. Lewis, DeAngelo 45.5; 400 M-Run: 1. DAL Ehret 53.9; 2. CRE Ritz 54.9; 3. DAL Morris 55.3; 300 M.I.M.: 1. CRE Walsh 44.5; 2. DAL L. Lewis 46.4; 3. CRE George 46.9; Discus: 1. DAL Simonovich 125’; 2. DAL Mihal 124’6”; 3. DAL Bullock 114’9”; 800 M-Run: 1. DAL Borland 2.13; 2. CRE Quinn 2.16; 3. DAL Sod 2.20; 200 M-Dash: 1. CRE Mack 24.5; 2. DAL Morris 24.8; 3. DAL L. Lewis 25.1; Long Jump: 1. CRE Kozloski 19’ 2’/2”; 2. CRE Merges 19’2”; 3. DAL Kalo 18’4”; 3200 Run: 1. DAL DeLuca 10.44; 2. DAL Mattson 10.53; 3. CRE McGuire 10.54; 1600 Relay: 1. DAL Michole, Ehret, Dyrli, Morris 3.49; High Jump: 1. CRE Walsh 5’8”; 2. DAL Morris 5’6”; 3. DAL Lewis 3’6”; Javelin: 1. DAL Kozloski 164’; 2. DAL Simonovich 153’4”; 3. CRE Truschol 148’6”; Pole Vault: 1. DAL Harding 14’; 2. CRE Lukasheutski 11’6”

Victory comes easy at Cause 5K
By ROBERT MINER For The Times Leader

RUNNING

king’s defeated Desales 5-4 in the first game before dropping the nightcap 14-4. Anthony Lizzi led the way in game one by going 3-for-4 with two RBI while eric Bohem was 2-for-4 with two RBI In game two, Chris sweeney went 2-for-4 for king’s, finishing the season with a schoolrecord .496 (60-121) batting average while Cody krupa was 2-for-2 and Rob Lemoncelli was 2-for-3.

DeSales sweeps King’s

GOLF Freedom Conference Championships

GIRLS TRACK AND FIELD Dallas 104, Crestwood 45
The mountaineers had runners finish first in 13 out of 17 events to defeat the Comets in Track & Field on Friday.

32oo Relay: 1. DAL Mattson, Rome, Grose, Oremus 9:46; 110 H.H.: 1. DAL Adams 17.0; 2. CRE Woinai 17.6; 3. DAL Spencer 17.8; Triple Jump: 1. DAL Van Deutsch 35’5”; 2. DAL Grose 30 2’/4”; 3. CRE Dow 28’9; 100 M-Dash: 1. DAL Gawlas 12.8; 2. DAL Darbenzio 13.5; 3. CRE Reyes 14.1; 1600 Run: 1. DAL Rome 5.24; 2. DAL Oremus 5.30; 3. DAL Grose 5.30; Shot Put: 1. DAL Kochanski 33’3; 2. CRE Bonnevier 30’2; 3. CRE Womer28 10’/2; 400 M-Realy: 1. DAL Darbenzio 52.1; 400 M-Run: 1. CRE Krupski 64.0; 2. DAL Mattson 64.5; 3. CRE Traficane 67.1; 300 M.I.M.: 1. CRE Bennett 52.4; 2. CRE Kendra 53.3; 3. DAL Adams 53.5; Discus: 1. CRE Bonnevier 84’2; 2. DAL Kochanski 74’9; 3. DAL Kravits 73’7; 800 M-Run: 1. DAL Oremus 2.33; 2. CRE Krupski 2.36; 3. DAL Gross 2.37; 200 M-Dash: 1. DAL Gawlas 26.8; 2. CRE Reyes 28.4; 3. DAL Darbanzo 28.6; Long Jump: 1. DAL Van Deutsch 15’3”; 2. CRE Dow 13 9’/2; 3. CRE Knorr 13 2’/4; 3200 Run: 1. DAL Grose 12.08; 2. DAL Rome 12.09; 3. CRE Rachel 12.45; 1600 Relay: 1. DAL Mattson 4.32; High Jump: 1. DAL Kravitsky 4’8”; 2. DAL Atherholt 4’8”; 3. DAL Menzel 4’8”; Javelin: 1. DAL Krupski 109’1”; 2. CRE Bonneuel 90’8”; 3. CRE DeLuca 87’11”; Pole Vault: 1. CRE Benntt 10; 2. DAL Spencer 8.6

nAnTICoke — Tony korch and katie Charles ran to easy victories in the Race for a Cause 5k Run on saturday at Luzerne County Community College. korch, 53, of nanticoke, used the hills to his advantage en route to his win in 18 minutes and 27 seconds. he outran second-place finisher, nick weron, 20, also of nanticoke, by 1:04. wade Joline, 18, of Berwick, finished third, eight seconds behind weron. “I didn’t push the first downhill,” said korch. “I let everybody go. Then there is an uphill, about a half mile in length. That’s when I pushed and took the lead about a quarter of a mile into the race.” korch continued to push. “I pushed the rest of the way,” korch said. “I wanted to put as much distance between myself and the rest of the field so I had a good lead in case things got close down the home stretch.” As it turned out, korch had nothing to worry about. “I had (korch) in my sights for a while,”said weron, who ran cross country for nanticoke Area high school and now runs the same sport for LCCC. “But at mile 2, he started pulling away. There was no catching him.” There was no catching Charles — another runner who knows how to run hills — either. The 26-year-old from Atlanta

won the female division of the race in 22:49. she held off second-place finisher, Lizzie Dyer, 15, of Berwick, for a 14-second win. emily Crawford, 20, of Bloomsburg, finished third, 16 seconds behind Dyer. “hills!, said Charles. “This is my first race in over a year. I ran Boston last year. But I’ve been out of action for a long time. I ran 5ks in college in 19 (minutes). Today, I just ran as good as I could. I have to get back in shape.” Charles was in town for her grandmother’s ( marion wilson) funeral and dedicated the win to her. “It’s hilly — like Atlanta,” said Charles, who ran the steeplechase for kennesaw state University. “we’re known for hills and humidity in Atlanta. In fact, I work for the Big Peach running store. And the store’s motto is, “heat, hills and humidity — welcome to Atlanta.” Charles had good things to say about her young opponent. “(Dyer) is a good runner,” Charles said. “she passed me about a mile and a half into the race. I thought she had me there for a while. But I was able to catch and pass her around mile 2.” notes: Dyer runs cross country and track for Berwick high school. her specialty is the 1miler. Crawford ran track for Central Columbia. korch didn’t run in school. he’s been running for about 20 years.

wade Joline just finished his final season running cross country for Columbia montour Vocational Tech. his 15-yearold brother, marcus, also runs cross country for the Rams. Proceeds from the race go to local charities. Charles — after landing at the airport in Philadelphia — was impressed with the City of Brotherly Love’s beautiful buildings. she said, “The scenery, on the way up to wilkesBarre, was beautiful. But, then we’re in the Poconos, right?”
Race for a Cause 5k Run results. Top 3 finishers 1. Tony Korch, 53, Nanticoke, 18:27 2. Nick Weron, 20, Nanticoke, 19:31 3. Wade Joline, 18, Berwick, 19:39 Male award winners: Overall: Korch. Age group winners: 19 & under: 1. Wade Joline, 19:39; 2. Marcus Joline, 20:19; 3. Austin Matschat, na. 20-29: 1. Nick Weron, 19:31; 2. Tyler Angeli, 20:01; 3. Mike Kennedy, 20:22. 30-39: 1. Phil Kiefer, 20:45; 2. Flash Barchik, 21:12; 3. Mike Stanik, 23:36. Masters division: 40-49: 1. Steve Housenick, 19:49; 2. Donnie Nelson, 21:04; 3. Don Shearer, 21:23. 50-59: 1. Jeff Baran, 23:38; 2. Mark Hulme, 27:15. 60-69: 1. Tom Walski, 25:55. 70 & over: 1. Willis Balliet, 41:53; 2. Harold Reynolds, 41:54. Top 3 females 1. Katie Charles, 26, Atlanta, 22:49 2. Lizzie Dyer, 15, Berwick, 23:03 3. Emily Crawford, 20, Bloomsburg, 23:19 Female award winners: Overall: Charles. Age group winners: 19 & under: 1. Lizzie Dyer, 23:03; 2. Sam Dyer, 23:51; 3. Sophie Rittenhouse, 25:44. 20-29: 1. Emily Crawford, 23:19; 2. Sam Matschet, 24:46; 3. Tara Lynn, 26:58. 30-39: 1. Heather Proctor, 25:26; 2. Liz Sargent, 28:01; 3. Melissa Berry, 28:38. Masters division: 40-49: 1. Pam Curtis, 24:48; 2. Angie Hughes, 28:50; 3. Melissa James, 29:21. 50-59: 1. Jill Hildebrand, 24:37; 2. Carmella DiPippi, 26:34; 3. Patty Phillips, 27:29. 60-69: 1. Dee Walski, 38:01; 2. Kate Clemente, 47:06. Field: 99 finishers (run) and 10 walkers. Official starter and timing: Doug Alter. Results: Miranda Costa and Joan Beyer (race director and assistant respectively). Schedule Sunday, May 5: Wyoming Valley Striders’ 39th annual Cherry Blossom 5 Mile Foot Race and 1 Mile Fun Walk “Tim Thomas Memorial” at Kirby Park at 10 a.m. Info: Vince Wojnar, 474-5363. Sunday, May 12: Wyoming Valley Striders’ 22nd annual Spring Trail (5.3 mile) Run — an age group handicap race) at the pavilion, near the boat launch area, of Francis Slocum State Park, Kingston Twp., at 1 p.m. Info: Vince Wojnar, 474-5363. Sunday, May 19: Jewish Community Center of Wyoming Valley’s River Street 3 Mile Run/ Walk at the JCC, S. River Street, Wilkes- Barre at 10:30 a.m. Info: Bill Buzza, 824-4646.

misericordia finished the first day of the Freedom Conference Championships tops among local schools sitting in fifth place at the hershey Country Club. Jeff slanovec led the Cougars with an 81 and is tied for sixth while Leo moran is tied for 18th after shooting 86. wilkes’ Jeremy nolt also shot an 81 as the Colonels are in sixth after the first day. king’s is currently in eighth with Ryan hettes’ 82 being tied for tenth leading the way, while Joe Caffrey carded 86.

In a doubleheader that would decide the top seed for next weekend’s Freedom Conference Tournament, Desales won the first game 14-1 in five innings and the nightcap 5-3. kayla Rutkoski had a double and Amy kowalczyk followed up with a single in game one for the Lady monarchs, while Amanda Cardone finished the second game 2-for-4 with two RBI.

MEN’S TENNIS Arcadia 8, Misericordia 1
Tony Goodall was the lone winner for misericordia. The monarchs scored wins from doubles teams of Tony Bevevino and Jake Rohring, Bobby Buttafofo and Chris Dimino, and Ryan hegarty and P.T. Romano. Connor Peckham secured the win for the Colonels with a 7-6 (9-7), 6-3 win in singles competition.

King’s 9, Eastern 0

Wilkes 5, Elizabethtown 4

WOMEN’S LACROSSE FDU-Florham 16, King’s 15 OT

Chelsea manes led the way for king’s with six total points on five goals and one assist, while Amanda harney finished with four goals and one helper.

WOMEN’S TENNIS Misericordia 9, Arcadia 0
michelle Cameron, Cassie Foy, Breanne Phillips, emily Boro, emily Gherghel and emily hullings all won twice for the Cougars.

Wilkes 22, Manhattanville 15

The Colonels earned their first 10-win season and secured the third seed in next week’s Freedom Conference Tournament with the win as Carley smith laced six goals and madeleine Brownsey found the net on five occasions.

King’s 8, Eastern 1

Arcadia 17, Misericordia 11

Jenny Perucca and melina Juliano each scored three goals to lead the Cougars (0-16, 0-6 Freedom) in their finale, while emily hegner and Brooke

The Lady monarchs swept the doubles matches with wins by sara Lynn and madeline Griffin, emily Biffen and Liz Demko and kaitlyn Rossowski and nicole molino. Griffin, Biffen, Demko, Rossowski and molino also scored wins in singles matches. Amanda holyk earned a 6-1, 6-0 win at no. 4 singles to secure the win for wilkes.

Wilkes 5, Elizabethtown 4

Got a cycling injury? Well, there is an app for that now
Anyone who knows me knows I’m a bit of a geek when it comes to technology. If there is a gadget that can make my life easier, there is a good chance I already have it. so each year around the start of the cycling season, I check all the app stores and online to see if there are any new apps out there for cycling. of course, I’m well versed with both mapmyRide and strava and use them both. I wrote about each of them last year. In short, if your looking to turn your $500 smart phone into a cycling computer, they both do the job fine. neither, really does much to improve your health and make you a

cyclinG Scene

joe soprano

better cyclists. But now, there is an app for that. myoCycle promises to be just the tool to keep cyclists healthy and on their bikes. “The app demonstrates how to prevent (common cycling) injuries through preventive exercises through preventive exercises as well as treat ten through corrective and therapeutic exercises and stretches,” myomedic’s Ally Lancaster said in an email. myoCycle is the brainchild of professional cyclist Brett Lancaster, who rides for the oRICA-Greenedge team, and his therapist Cher hetherington. It’s based on myotherapy. myotherapy has been around since the 70s.

As you would expect from Lancaster description of the app, it involves a lot of stretching and massaging. when launched the app displays a picture of Brett Lancaster with links on key areas that can be clicked for information. “The app is designed to be used by cyclists of all levels,” Ally Lancaster said. myoCycle is available from the iTunes store for $2.99. According to Ally Lancaster, an Android version is in the works.

methodology behind training as well as the dynamics of triathlon racing. I had a chance this week to talk to sickler’s Phil Cable about cycling season. There is plenty planned, according to Cable. There is the Tour of scranton today and habitat for humanity’s spencer martin memorial Bike Ride is set for may 5 in the Back mountain. (For more on the habitat ride go to www. bikeforhabitat.org.) The Pennsylvania state Championship Time Trial will be coming to the nicholson on July 21. And the Great 100 ride will return in the fall. There may even be another century ride centered the Fourth of July weekend.

Races and rides planned

And, of course, Cable was quick to point out that sickler’s hosts a variety of weekly rides. The best way to stay on top of all the local events planned? other than reading Cycling scene, of course, is befriending you favorite bike shop on Facebook.

Send us your stories

Robbins speaking at Sicklers

on of the area’s top triathletes will be stopping by sickler’s in exeter for a talk at 6 p.m. on may 6. sean Robbins, a veteran Ironman racer and a two-time Greater wilkesBarre Triathlon winner, will discus the

Getting ready for your first century? Planning on riding across the state to raise money for charity? or maybe you just have a interesting bike. whatever your story is we want to share it.

Joe Soprano is a page designer for The Times Leader and an avid cyclist. His Cycling Scene column appears every other Sunday. Reach him at jsoprano@timesleader.com or 829-7164.

TiMeS leADer www.timesleader.com

WWW.TIMESLEADER.COM/SPORTS

SUNDAY, April 28, 2013 pAge 9C

A T P lay
WVW’s Good heading to Bloomsburg Spartans’ Le to play at Bloomsburg

Wyoming Valley West senior Brett Good has signed a Letter of Intent to play football at Bloomsburg University in the fall. Good, a two-time All-WVC selection, finished his high school career with more than 300 tackles. Front row: Celeste Good, mother; Brett Good; John Good, father. Back row: Assistant coach John Baranski; athletic director Sandy MacKay; coach Patrick Keating; principal Erin Keating; assistant principals Christopher Lazor and David Robbins.

PHOTO PROVIDED

Wyoming Valley West football standout Tony Le has signed a Letter of Intent to play football at Bloomsburg University in the fall. Front row: Thao Nguyen, mother; Tony Le; Vinh Le, father; Vinny Le, brother. Back row: Assistant principal Christopher Lazor; assistant coach John Baranski; athletic director Sandy MacKay; coach Patrick Keating; assistant coach Chuck Suppon; principal Erin Keating; assistant principal David Robbins.

PHOTO PROVIDED

Boich signs with Boston College

Warnagiris to play volleyball at Lock Haven

Holy Redeemer senior Fallyn Boich, front center, signs a National Letter of Intent for track and field at Boston College on Tuesday morning. Front row, from left: Yvonne Boich, Fallyn Boich, Daryl Boich. Back row: Principal Anita Sirak, assistant coach Jim Mihal, head coach Kevin Walters, assistant coach Matt Austin, athletic director J.P. Aquilina.

BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Holy Redeemer senior Sarah Warnagiris, front center, signs for volleyball at Lock Haven University on Tuesday morning. Front row, from left: Fran Warnagiris, Sarah Warnagiris, and Robert Warnagiris. Back row: Principal Anita Sirak, athletic director J.P. Aquilina.

BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Gymnasts combine for 10 titles

Shelp earns black belt

Foland, Evans earn promotions

Eight gymnasts from Shooting Starz Gymnastics competed for 40 individual titles at the Level 4 state meet in Downingtown recently. They earned 10 state championships, three secondplace finishes and five thirds. Bailey Flannery took top honors on bars with a 9.7 and floor to give her the all-around state title with a score of 37.1. Calli Ogurkis, first place on beam and bars, and Mia Reinert also won first place all-around honors in their age groups, both with scores of 37.275. Erin Garnet was first on beam, scoring 9.05. Olivia Delevan won vault with a 9.5 and Madison Pertl’s 9.45 won the floor exercise. April Brogan finished second on beam and Fiona Goeckel added her highest all-around score to medal.

PHOTO PROVIDED PHOTO PROVIDED

Recently, the Hapkido Taekwondo Institute of Kingston held promotion tests. Promoted to first degree junior black belt in the North American Hapkdio Taekwondo Federation was Hayden Foland and second degree junior black belt was Xavier Evans. Pictured: Xavier Evans, Hayden Foland, master Vince Sperduto,master Pete Canavan, Nick Jula, Brian Kaschak, Joe D’agostino, Dino Cussatt.

PHOTO PROVIDED

Recently the Hapkido Taekwondo Institute of Kingston held a promotion test. Promoted to second degree black belt in the North American Hapkdio Taekwondo Federation was Pete Shelp. He had been affiliated with the school for fours years, and resides in Forty Fort with his family. Shelp is a branch manager with Janney Montgomery Scott in their Kingston office. Pictured: Master Pete Canavan, Pete Shelp, master Vince Sperduto.

PHOTO PROVIDED

The Times Leader will accept photos, standings and stories from readers about youth and adult recreation activities. We’re also encouraging anyone in a league – darts, pool, Frisbee, etc. – to submit standings and results to us. E-mailed photos should be sent in a jpeg format. Those that are not in a jpeg format might not be published. All submitted items should have contact information as well to ensure publication. Items will not be accepted over the telephone. They may be emailed to tlsports@timesleader.com with “At Play” in the subject, faxed to 831-7319, dropped off at the Times Leader or mailed to Times Leader, c/o Sports, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-0250.

AT p l AY p O l i C Y

Yerashunas honored by NFF
Hayden Yerashunas received a scholar-athlete award from the National Football Federation at an awards banquet in Baltimore. Yerashunas is a sophomore at Stevenson University in Owings Mills, Md., and a starter on the team’s offenisve line. He is the son of Arla and Ron Tomasko, Plymouth. The 2011 graduate of Wyoming Valley West is pictured with head coach Ed Hottle, left, and line coach Clayton Beard, right.

PAGE 10C SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013

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PAGE 12C SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013

N B A

www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER

Bulls sack Nets in triple OT
The Associated Press

Grizzlies 104, Clippers 83

CHICAGO — Nate Robinson scored 34 points, and the Chicago Bulls wiped out a 14-point deficit late in regulation and beat the Brooklyn Nets 142-134 in triple overtime Saturday and take a 3-1 lead in the first-round playoff series. The Bulls were trailing 109-95 with less than 4 minutes to go in the fourth quarter when Robinson put the Bulls on his back and carried them to the wild victory. He scored all but five of his points after the third quarter, including the first 12 in a 14-0 run that wiped out that deficit. Then, with 2 seconds left in the first overtime, he banked in what looked as if it would the winning jumper over Deron Williams. Instead, Joe Johnson answered with one of his own to tie it at 121 and send it into a second overtime. The Bulls had a chance to win it in the closing seconds, but Joakim Noah got blocked, and the game went to a third overtime tied at 127. The Bulls then finally took control for good after Williams (32 points) drove for a layup to pull Brooklyn to 133-130 — the only points for him after regulation — with 3 minutes left in the game. Luol Deng answered with a basket to make it a five-point game, and Nazr Mohammed came up with two baskets in the final 32 seconds to help preserve the win. He scored on a jump hook, then grabbed the rebound and scored with 19 seconds left after Carlos Boozer made a free throw and missed the second, making it 140-134.

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Referee Eric Lewis (42) and referee Ron Garretson (10) try to break up a scuffle between Chicago Bulls’ Nate Robinson and Brooklyn Nets’ C.J. Watson during the first half in Game 4 of their first-round series Saturday in Chicago.

AP PHOTO

SPECIAL

Butler went a combined 0 for 10 from the floor in being shut out. Game 5 is Tuesday night in Los Angeles. The team that controls the boards has won each game of the series so far, with Memphis owning a 45-28 advantage in Game 4. That led to a 22-2 scoring difference in second-chance points, boosted by a 13-5 edge on offensive boards. The Grizzlies used their prowess on the glass to beat the speedy Clippers when it came to fast-break points, 18-6. Memphis’ biggest advantage is its big men, and Randolph and Gasol each took turns helping the Grizzlies turn this into a best-of-three series. Randolph had 16 points and seven rebounds in the first half as Memphis got off to a quick start, leading 33-25 after the first quarter. Gasol scored 18 in

the second half, using an effective jumper to avoid the paint after picking up his third foul with 7:54 left in the third. Randolph got his third 7 seconds later. It didn’t matter. The Clippers never lead by more than two, the last at 60-58 on a pair of free throws by Paul with 5:58 left in the third. Gasol then hit a 23-footer that beat the shot clock and made a pair of free throws to put Memphis ahead. Ronny Turiaf’s layup tied it for the sixth and final time. Gasol found Randolph for a layup that put Memphis ahead to stay at 64-62 on the 10th and final lead change with 3:21 left in the third. Memphis blew it open with a 19-5 surge at the beginning of the fourth and went up as much as 20, the first on a drive by Pondexter with 3:45 left.

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MEMPHIS, Tenn. -- Marc Gasol had 24 points and 13 rebounds, and the Memphis Grizzlies beat the Los Angeles Clippers to even their first-round series at 2-all. Zach Randolph finished with 24 points and nine rebounds as the Grizzlies won their second straight to ensure another stop in Memphis for Game 6. Mike Conley had 15 points and 13 assists, and Tayshaun Prince scored 15 in his best game of the series. Chris Paul and Blake Griffin had 19 points apiece for the Clippers, and Griffin also grabbed 10 rebounds. Los Angeles’ reserves outscored its counterparts again, 43-16. But DeAndre Jordan was the only other starter to score for Los Angeles, and he had two points. Chauncey Billups and Caron

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N H L

SUNDAY, April 28, 2013 pAge 13C

Rangers avoid 8th place, top Devils
The Associated Press

NEW YORK — Henrik Lundqvist made 20 saves in coasting to his second shutout of the season, and Rick Nash scored twice for the playoff-bound New York Rangers in a 4-0 victory over the New Jersey Devils on Saturday in the regular-season finale for both teams. The Rangers still had to wait to find out who they will face in the first round of the playoffs, but they know it won’t be the top-seeded Pittsburgh Penguins. The Rangers avoided finishing eighth in the Eastern Conference and will be either the No. 6 or 7 seed. Derek Stepan and Ryan Callahan both had a goal and assist in the first period against backup goalie Johan Hedberg, who gave Martin Brodeur a rare game off. One year after reaching the Stanley Cup finals, the Devils will head home early after failing to make the playoffs. Unsympathetic Rangers fans serenaded the Devils with chants of “Season’s Over” as the final minutes ticked down. Lundqvist was hardly tested in earning his 45th NHL shutout. The Rangers, who wrapped up their third straight playoff berth with a win at Carolina on Thursday, went 10-3-1 in their final 14 games. Hedberg made 17 saves in

the matchup of Swedish goalies. New Jersey was shut out for the fourth time, all in the final 12 games. The Rangers started quickly, seemingly determined to get out of eighth place and avoid the Penguins in the first round. Callahan picked up right where he left off Thursday when he scored the overtime goal that got New York back into the postseason. The Rangers’ captain moved back and forth behind the New Jersey net and shifted the puck from backhand to forehand before throwing the puck out front to the waiting Stepan, who unleashed a lightning-fast one-timer that beat Hedberg just 2:37 in for his 18th goal. The pair would team up again in the final minute of the period while Taylor Pyatt served a questionable hooking penalty. Stepan intercepted the puck from Devils defenseman Marek Zidlicky and send a lead pass ahead to Callahan for the shorthanded breakaway. Callahan darted from side to side as he raced in on Hedberg, and deked enough to open up the goalie’s pads to slip the puck in with 58.8 seconds left in the period. It was Callahan’s 16th goal of the season, and nearly his second short-handed tally of the game. Just over 6 minutes in, while

Jones could be top pick

Rangers forward Carl Hagelin was off for tripping, Callahan got past Ilya Kovalchuk in the New Jersey zone and came in alone on Hedberg, but his stuff attempt was denied at the right post. The Rangers look much better while killing penalties than on their one power-play chance in the first. After taking a 7-1 lead in shots early in the period, New York finished with only a 9-8 edge. Nash garnered the Rangers’ third short-handed break of the game with 6:55 left in the second, but his rush was thwarted by the back-checking Kovalchuk, who got his stick in on Nash’s hands — forcing the Rangers forward to his knees and having him push the puck wide of the net. Nash would connect with 2:37 remaining after the Rangers won a faceoff in the New Jersey end. Brad Richards sent a pass from behind the net out to Nash, who snapped off a wrist shot from the edge of the left circle for his 20th goal of the season. Nash made it 4-0 at 5:30 of the third when he whipped a shot from the slot past Hedberg off a feed from Mats Zuccarello. CHICAGO -- Amid a hectic week as a Nets assistant coach,

New York Rangers’ Derek Stepan (21) celebrates with his teammates after scoring a goal during the first period Saturday against the New Jersey Devils at Madison Square Garden in New York.

AP PHOTO

helping the team through a tough playoff series, Popeye Jones did have a few moments to be a proud father. His son, Seth, a defenseman, was officially named the No. 1 North American prospect for the National Hockey League draft by the Central Scouting Bureau. That put the younger Jones, 18, in position to be the first African-American to be hockey’s top overall draft pick. All three of Jones’ sons took up hockey when he was playing for the Nuggets and the family

lived in the Denver suburbs. “All of the kids played street hockey. When it got cold, all the kids said they were going inside to play ice hockey,” the dad said. “Just being a sports guy, growing up playing basketball, football and baseball, it didn’t matter what sport they played. Sports are meant to be fun.” Seth quickly became a stand-

out. This season, he led the United States to the World Junior Championship in Russia. His Portland Winterhawks team also is in the playoffs, having made the WHL finals. He is considered a complete player -good skater, physical defender, hard shooter, solid passer. Popeye thinks the 6-4, 205-pounder could have been a point guard.

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PAGE 14C SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013

WWW.TIMESLEADER.COM/SPORTS

www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER

oUTDooRS NoTES
The Stanley Cooper Sr. Chapter of Trout Unlimited will host an Introduction to Fly Fishing for Adults program on Saturday, May 11, at the American Legion Post in Mountain Top (off of Church Road). The program is for men and women 18 and older and begins at 10 a.m. The handson course includes an introduction to fly fishing (rods, reels, lines and flies), fly casting, fly tying, knot tying and fly fishing in a stream and pond. Cost is $25 and includes all equipment needed, lunch and a one-year membership to the chapter. The event is free to SCTU members. For more information, call Jay Downs at 8146998. A bus tour highlighting seven sites throughout Luzerne County that showcase a variety of management techniques, such as native plants, riparian buffers, rain gardens, parking lot bio-infiltration, grass parking pads, green roofs, pollinator gardens, native grassland meadows, community gardens and more will be held May 31, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The tour is organized by the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, Penn State Cooperative Extension, and PA Environmental Council. Participants will begin at the Kirby Park Natural Area where they will board a charter bus and travel to the Plains Animal Hospital, Lands at Hillside Farm, Butler Township Community Garden/ Center for Landscape Stewardship and Design, Life Expression Wellness Center and Nescopeck State Park. The cost for the program is $20, which includes the bus tour, lunch, raffle prizes and a tour booklet highlighting the stops. Tour sponsorships are also available. For more information, contact the Penn State Cooperative Extension at 825-1701. The Factoryville Sportsmen’s Club will host the annual Fred Loch Memorial Scholarship Shoot on Sunday, May 5, at the club grounds located on Lake Winola Road. This shoot is to help fund the club’s scholarship program for graduating seniors at Lackawanna Trail and Tunkhannock high schools. Graduating senior children of any club member may also apply from any other school district. Scholarship winners in 2012 were: Adam Martin, Valley View HS; Julie Vaccaro, Cumberland Valley HS; Cassandra Williams and Theodore Frear, Tunkhannock Area HS; and Graham Williams, Lackawanna Trail HS. Shooting on the clay bird sporting clays course begins at 9 a.m. and a full steak dinner with all the fixings will be
See NOTES, Page 15C

O utdoors

SOariNg iNTO ExTiNcTiON?
Northern flying squirrels are close to becoming extinct in Pennsylvania, due to habitat loss and competition from the southern flying squirrel

OUTDOORS

TOM VENESKY

Problems with Susquehanna are all wet

PGC hopes to reverse alarming trend
By TOM VENESKY tvenesky@timesleader.com

Officials aren’t sure exactly how many northern flying squirrels remain in Pennsylvania, but they do know there aren’t many. And they’re also concerned that in the near future, there could be none. The diminutive creature is one of two flying squirrels in the state. The southern flying squirrel, which is smaller, has been expanding its range northward and creating a multitude of problems for the northern species. Greg Turner, an endangered species biologist with the Pennsylvania Game Commission, said the northern flying squirrel has been found in only three locations -- the Poconos, and Potter and Warren counties. Although he isn’t sure exactly how many remain, Turner said that, since 2001, only 38 have been captured out over more than 700 nest boxes that biologists use to live trap the squirrels. Still, Turner said more data needs to be collected before a thorough population analysis can be performed. For now, he can only base his conclusions on the current surveys of nest boxes, which is giving a glimpse at the severity of the situation. “When you look at the survey effort that it took to capture an individual in Pennsylvania and compare it to other states where they survey, such as West Virginia, our ef-

“When you look at the survey effort that it took to capture an individual in Pennsylvania and compare it to other states where they survey, such as West Virginia, our effort to capture an animal is five to 10 times greater than the work it takes to capture one in West Virginia. That indicates our populations are lower.”

Greg Turner PGC endangered species biologist

Dr. Mike Steele, right, a biology professor at Wilkes University, has conducted extensive research on flying squirrels in the state.

PHOTOS PROVIDED

fort to capture an animal is five to 10 times greater than the work it takes to capture one in West Virginia,” Turner said. “That indicates our populations are lower.” Turner added that the northern species, which prefers older growth forests with a

heavy coniferous component such as red spruce or hemlock, used to be found across the entire northern tier of the state. “Now, despite increased survey effort, we’re finding them at only a few sites,” he said. “That suggests they’re pretty rare.” The reasons for the decline are many. Turner points to habitat loss as a main contributor. As forests become more managed, northern flying squirrel densities have become lower, he said. The changes in the forest have reduced the amount of natural cavities and the mycorrhizal fungi that is their main food source. That loss of old growth coniferous habiSee SOARING, Page 15C

AFTer reAdiNG The Chesapeake Bay Foundation’s report on problems facing smallmouth bass in the Susquehanna river, my conclusion was the same as it’s always been. it’s the water. here’s a quick recap on the situation: • Over the last 10 years, fish kills of smallmouth bass in the river have been documented. Populations have plummeted, disease has devastated young-of-year bass and adults have been found covered with black spots, sores and lesions. • According to the report, a parasite has been found in dead juvenile bass in the river. The parasite’s possible host is a bottom-dwelling worm that may thrive in the raised levels of phosphorous and nitrogen pollution. • The smallmouth bass population has collapsed in the river from Sunbury to Maryland. While the north branch hasn’t seen the same degree of devastation, dead fish and those with black spots have been found here. • Not surprisingly, catch rates of smallmouth bass in the river have fallen by 80 percent from 2001-05 in some areas.The Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission has been forced to restrict the fishery in some lower counties to catch-and-release only. That’s troubling from an environmental and an economic standpoint. Phosphorous and nitrogen pollution levels are extremely high in the areas of the river where dead and/or sick fish have been documented. That’s a correlation. in the Susquehanna river and its tributaries, average phosphorus pollution levels in 12 of 24 sites monitored by the U.S. Geological Survey between 2007-11 were among the worst in the Chesapeake Bay watershed. And 11 of these 24 sites had total nitrogen pollution levels that were among the worst in the region. Scientists link these pollution levels to an increase in the growth of parasites, along with feeding algae blooms that in turn raise ph levels and lower dissolved oxygen in the water. Those factors can kill bass. But if environmental reasons aren’t enough to motivate action, perhaps money is. The report states that smallmouth bass fishing generates $630 million annually in Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia and West Virginia. Additionally, smallmouth bass are responsible for $193 million annually in salaries and wages for about 5,700 people employed in fishing-related jobs and $41 million in state and local tax revenues. That’s significant. recently, the state department of environmental Protection said it would increase efforts to study pollutants in the river, which is fine. But the agency needs to do more. it has to declare the Susquehanna
See WET, Page 15C

Caught on camera
Capture anything interesting on your handheld or trail camera? A nice buck, bear, coyote or anything unique? We’d love to see it. Each week, we’ll run a photo from a reader’s trail camera on the Sunday Outdoors page. Email your photo, along with date and area it was taken (township is fine) and any other details to tvenesky@ timesleader.com. While we’re on the subject of flying squirrels this week, Fredrick Voelker captured this one on his trail camera one April night in Bear Creek Township. Voelker admits he didn’t know what the creature was at first,

but the eyes and tail gave it away. Still, I didn’t know if the animal was the endangered northern flying squirrel or the more common southern variety, so I asked PGC biologist Greg Turner

to solve the mystery. He was pretty confident the squirrel is the southern variety. By the way, flying squirrels are nocturnal, which is why the photo was captured at night.

TiMeS leADer www.timesleader.com

S P O R T S golf

SUNDAY, April 28, 2013 pAge 15C

NASCAr

trD recalls engines after Kenseth’s penalty
By JENNA FRYER AP Auto Racing Writer

glover extends his lead at Zurich Classic
The Associated Press

RICHMOND, Va. — A parts review by Toyota after Matt Kenseth’s penalty led the manufacturer to pull three engines from Michael Waltrip Racing’s inventory as a precautionary move. All three engines recalled were earmarked for Clint Bowyer. One was his engine for Saturday night’s race at Richmond; the other two were his primary and backup engines for Talladega. The review found that there was at least one connecting rod in each of the three Bowyer engines that left TRD uncomfortable in the wake of Kenseth’s issue. NASCAR found this week that one of the eight connecting rods in Kenseth’s race-winning engine from Kansas did not meet the minimum weight requirement. The engines are made by TRD out of Costa Mesa, Calif., and then shipped to Joe Gibbs Racing and Michael Waltrip Racing in North Carolina. The teams unpack the engines and install them in the cars, and have no access to the parts or pieces inside. Still, NASCAR levied harsh penalties against Kenseth and JGR that essentially stripped the team of everything but the trophy.

Tanner Berryhill (17) spins out in front of Regan Smith (7) during the NASCAR Nationwide race at Richmond International Raceway on Friday. At press time, the Sprint Cup race was ongoing. Look for coverage at timesleader.com and in Monday’s print edition.

AP PHOTO

Keselowski rallies in nationwide race
By HANK KURZ Jr. AP Sports Writer

RICHMOND, Va. — Brad Keselowski ducked underneath Kyle Busch to take the lead with 10 laps to go Friday night and won a wild NASCAR Nationwide Series race at Richmond International Raceway. Keselowski had to hold off a final charge from Kevin Harvick, but after Harvick closed within a few car lengths, Keselowski kept him at bay and slightly expanded his margin in the final laps to win the three-way dual among some of NASCAR’s most aggressive and daring drivers. “You’re racing the best and you know if you make a mistake, they’re going to beat you,” Keselowski said. The dueling included Keselowski passing Harvick on the

outside with about 40 laps to go, and Busch passing them both on the outside for the lead with about 25 laps to go before the last two of eight cautions, the final one ending with 11 laps to go. “I thought it was pretty darn good,” Keselowski said. “I was grinning the whole time. I had fun and Kyle raced me really well, and so did Kevin. I think this is what racing is supposed to be like — side-by-side and just little touches, but not big ones. It was a great race all the way around.” The victory was the 21st of Keselowski’s career in the series and second on the 0.75-mile oval. “We had a fast car at the end,” Keselowski said. “It was just a matter of putting it in the right position.”

Harvick, who led four times for a race-high 96 laps, was followed across the finish line by Busch, whose streak of three consecutive victories in the series came to an end. Brian Vickers was fourth, followed by Regan Smith. “All in all, it was a fun night,” Harvick said. “He just had a better car for the short runs.” The duel with Busch and Keselowski seemed as enjoyable to be part of as it was to watch. “On any night it’s fun when you can race like that,” Harvick said. The race finished with a skirmish on pit road between the teams of season-long rivals Brian Scott and Nelson Piquet Jr., with Scott saying his team was upset because Piquet ran him into the wall while fighting for 15th place late in the race.

AVONDALE, La. — Lucas Glover increased his lead to two strokes in the Zurich Classic to remain in position for his first victory in two years. The 2009 U.S. Open winner shot a 2-under 70 on Saturday to reach 14 under at TPC Louisiana. Kyle Stanley, Jimmy Walker, Billy Horschel and D.A. Points were tied for second. Stanley had a 65, Walker and Horschel shot 66, and Points had a 70. Guan Tianlang, the 14-yearold Chinese amateur, shot a 77 to drop to 2 over — last among the 71 players who made the cut. He tied for 58th two weeks ago in the Masters after becoming the youngest player to make the cut at Augusta National, and will play in a U.S. Open qualifier in two weeks. Kevin Stadler was 11 under after a 65 — matching Stanley for the best round of the day. Boo Weekley, a stroke behind

Glover entering the round, salvaged a 73 with a two-putt birdie on the 18th to finish at 10 under.

North Texas Shootout

Legends of Golf

IRVING, Texas — Carlota Ciganda shot a 5-under 66 to take a two-stroke lead over the world’s No. 1 player and an LPGA Tour rookie into the final round of the inaugural North Texas LPGA Shootout. Ciganda had only one bogey in the third round. Even after driving right into a concrete drainage ditch on No. 12, the Spaniard hit the half-submerged ball out of the water to about 10 feet and made the birdie putt. She was at 11-under 202 after her second 66 of the week. SAVANNAH, Ga. — Roger Chapman and Jay Don Blake teamed to shoot an 11-under 61 to take a one-stroke lead in the Champions Tour’s Legends of Golf better-ball tournament.
throughout the year, the May and June events call more attention to the importance of fishing in the lives of many Pennsylvania families. Through the events, former and new anglers can try fishing at no cost. We know that once people try it, particularly kids, they will see that fishing is a great recreational activity and they will want to do it more.” Family Fishing Festivals are educational events designed for families with little or no fishing experience to have fun fishing together. Families will learn basic fishing skills and have an opportunity to practice those skills while fishing during the program. Family Fishing Festivals will be hosted by the PFBC at these locations: May 4 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.: Gifford Pinchot State Park, York County. May 11 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.: Blue Marsh Lake, Berks County. May 18 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.: Keystone State Park, Westmoreland County, Pavilion No. 1. June 8 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.: Bald Eagle State Park, Centre County. June 22 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.: Lake Arthur, Moraine State Park, Butler County. June 29 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.: Lackawanna Lake, Lackawanna State Park, Lackawanna County. The PFBC is waiving the fishing license requirement during the program for registered Family Fishing Festival participants 16 and older. The program is open to all ages, including children ages 5 and up. The PFBC is providing equipment, bait and tackle. PFBC staff will be present to teach skills and assist those who fish. Advance registration is required. Visit www.TakeMeFishingPa. com to register or learn more about these events. Space is limited, and there will be no registrations accepted the day of the event. In addition, PFBC partners will be hosting events throughout the month. These events can also be viewed at this website.

notes
Continued from Page 14C

two rCr crew members arrested for post-race fight
The Associated Press

RICHMOND, Va. — Nelson Piquet Jr. was involved in a postrace altercation that led to the arrest of two crew members for Richard Childress Racing, his team said Saturday. Piquet and RCR driver Brian Scott tangled on the track during Friday night’s Nationwide Series race and in the pits after. Crews for both drivers confronted each other when Scott went over to Piquet’s car, and Piquet

shoved him and then kicked Scott in the groin. “When I went to talk to him, he just pushed and shoved me and then kicked me below the belt,” Scott said after the race. “It’s just a chicken move.” Henrico County police said there was a fight in the motorhome lot that led to the arrests of two crew members. Michael Searce was arrested on two charges of misdemeanor assault, and Thomas Costello was

arrested on one count of misdemeanor assault. They were released early Saturday. “Several members of another race team confronted a group that included Nelson Piquet Jr., resulting in the arrest of two individuals from the other race team,” Turner Scott Motorsports said in a statement. Team owner Richard Childress said his crew members were on their way home when the incident occurred.

“Our team members were walking to their cars and words were exchanged with members from another team, which led to an altercation,” Childress said. “I am still learning all the exact details and, because it did happen outside of the track, and local authorities became involved. We are working with them to resolve this matter. “We are now concentrating on winning the Sprint Cup race (Saturday night).”

soaring
Continued from Page 14C

wet
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tat -- from timber practices or disease such as wooly adelgid, has led to another problem - the expansion of the southern flying squirrel. Turner said the species out-competes its northern counterpart for habitat and carries a roundworm parasite that is deadly. “I’ve noticed through research I’ve done that this parasite is found in every southern and a good number of northern flying squirrels here, but where there aren’t any of the southern species, the northerns in those areas don’t have the parasite,” Turner said. Dr. Mike Steele, who is a biology professor at Wilkes University, has conducted extensive research on flying squirrels and said the expansion of the southern species is creating yet another dilemma for the endangered northerns. Hybridization. In areas where the southern and northern species overlap, Steele said genetic testing conducted in Ontario and Pennsylvania indicated that the two species are hybridizing. “The loss of red spruce and the hemlock to wooly adelgid has brought the southerns and northerns in closer contact,” Steele said. “It’s an indication of how the environment is changing in Pennsylvania.” And it’s why Steele is alarmed at the fact that around three dozen northern flying squirrels have been found in Pennsylvania over the last 15 years. So what can be done? Turner said the PGC is trying to increase red spruce in areas inhabited by the northern flying

Officials have documented approximately three dozen northern flying squirrels in the state since 2001. The species is on the state’s endangered list.

PHOTO PROVIDED

squirrel and expand the coniferous growth to provide more habitat and increase the amount of fungi in the forest. Steele said more funding is needed to conduct additional research to find existing populations and protect them. In 2011 Steele published a book, “Terrestrial Vertebrates of Pennsylvania: A Complete Guide to Species of Conservation Concern” that includes 133

species in the state that are at risk. He said when it comes to severity, the northern flying squirrel is in the top three among mammals. “The northern flying squirrel is a state endangered species and it was always restricted to certain habitats,” Steele said. “But now it’s declining to the point where we’re close to losing it in the state.”

River -- at the very least the lower segment, as impaired under the federal Clean Water Act. Such a move would direct more resources needed to solve and address the problem and, hopefully, save the smallmouth bass. It’s a move that should’ve been done long ago. For the last couple years PFBC executive director John Arway has been pleading with DEP to list the river as impaired. The action would confirm what we all know there is something wrong with the water. When you have fish covered in sores and lesions, unprecedented algae blooms, skyrocketing levels of phosphorous and nitrogen and a fishery on the verge of collapse, there is only one place to look. The water. With the summer fishing season right around the corner, there is almost 100 miles of the lower Susquehanna River where bass season will be pretty quiet. It’s an area that was once a world-class smallmouth fishery, and one that could expand into our region. The next step to prevent and remedy the situation is simple: admit that there is something wrong with the water, declare the river impaired and put more money and time toward fixing the problem. The Chesapeake Bay Foundation’s report is yet another plea to get this done.
Tom Venesky covers the outdoors for The Times Leader. Reach him at 9707230 or tvenesky@timesleader.com.

served at 11:30 a.m. Dinner will be provided for shooters by the club as part of the entry fee. Shotguns are also available if needed. The entry fee is $25 per shooter for 50 birds or $45 for 100 birds. In both cases shooters will need to supply their own ammunition. This year’s sporting clays course will again feature automatic traps. If you aren’t available to shoot, you can sponsor a shooter or a shooting station for $25 Donations of any size are also appreciated. Scholarship applications will be available in the guidance offices at both high schools and at the Factoryville Sportsmen’s Club. For additional information, call Carl Tylutki at 9453137 or Fred Rose at 903-5755 by April 29. You can also visit www.fscweb.org. Join Conservation Volunteer Dave Kruel for an early morning birdwalk on Saturday, May 25, at 8 a.m., at Nescopeck State Park. This walk is suitable for beginners and will focus on the beautiful songbirds that have made their migration north after the long winter. Meet at the park office. Binoculars will be available for to borrow as supplies last. Free of Charge. Please register by calling the park office at 4032006. The Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission has scheduled several opportunities in May and June for families to learn fishing skills and enjoy fishing. The PFBC is holding three Family Fishing Festivals in May and three in June. These events lead up to the two statewide Fish-for-Free Days -- Memorial Day, May 27, and Independence Day, July 4. “Family Fishing Festivals are a convenient way to introduce friends and family to the sport of fishing,” said PFBC executive director John Arway. “While we offer family fishing programs

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Dear Neighbors,
As a part of the Dallas Township and Luzerne County communities since 2005, Masonic Village is proud to serve those within and beyond our walls. Whether it is through financial support or as a site for community members and residents to learn and grow, Masonic Village seeks to use its resources to help those who need it most. As a not-for-profit organization, we have the benefit of being tax-exempt. Thanks to the benevolence of our donors and our desire to contribute to our community, we were able to sign a payment in lieu of taxes (PILOT) agreement with Dallas Area School District, Dallas Township and Luzerne County in 2012. This agreement ensures that these three authorities will receive more than $680,000 over the next 18 years.

About Masonic Villages
Masonic Villages provides retirement living and other services to individuals in Elizabethtown, Lafayette Hill, Sewickley and Warminster, Pa. In 2012, through the charity of Pennsylvania Freemasons and their families and others who have contributed to its Mission, the Masonic Villages provided services worth more than $27.3 million across the state to individuals unable to pay for their care.

Also through this agreement, Masonic Village will make its meeting facilities available for use by staff from the school district, township and county. Working with local schools and universities, we welcome students seeking internships and job shadow experience. If you have a question or suggestion about any of Masonic Village’s community or resident services, please contact us at the phone number above or through our website, www.masonicvillages.org. We look forward to opportunities to work with and support our broader community in the future.

Noah Davis, executive director

2012 COMMUNITY BENEFITS SUMMARY 
  In 2012, Masonic Village generated expenditures of more than $42,800 in the local economy through contracts with 16 businesses. Although a not-for-profit organization, Masonic Village financially supports other charitable groups, including the Meadows Nursing Center Auxiliary and Dallas Fire and Ambulance, Inc., as well as local schools. In October, Masonic Village hosted a free Medicare 101 workshop open to the community in time for the annual Medicare enrollment period. Throughout the year, in partnership with Misericordia University and Genesis Rehabilitation Services, Masonic Village coordinated a free Healthy Aging Series which covered topics including the Modernization of Alzheimer’s Disease, Fit and Healthy Basics and Maintaining Balance. The community was also invited to take part in a flu vaccination clinic, estate planning seminar and a “Tai Chi for Arthritis®” program. Residents contributed to community service projects, including Trinity Presbyterian Church’s Backpack Project to benefit the Child Development Center. The program gives children a backpack full of food to take home for the weekend to ensure they have enough to eat until they return to school on Monday. It also provides gifts during the holiday season, such as warm clothing. Additionally, residents volunteered to bake for St. Vincent de Paul Kitchen, help with Meals on Wheels and play piano for the Good Time Singers and at local long-term care and rehabilitation communities. “Throughout my internship, I was given the opportunity to build my professional portfolio with multiple informative pieces which I created, along with gaining experience in planning and executing events. Some of these events revolved around the residents and engaging them in various community activities. Other events were aimed at bringing in potential new residents through social mixers and open houses. Something truly unique to Masonic Village at Dallas is the sense of community between the staff and residents. Joy Hubshman and the rest of the staff at Masonic Village at Dallas treated me very well and allowed me independence in my work. They treated me as an equal and made my time with them extremely enjoyable.” Kaitlyn Molteni, a senior communications major at Misericordia University, interned with Masonic Village’s marketing department during the summer of 2012. She is shown above with residents Morgan and Maureen Lewis during a photo shoot for Masonic Village. “I can’t overstate the importance of [volunteer] work both to the community and in our lives. Keith and I have been blessed in many ways and we know that it is our duty to help those who are in need. But, for us, the duty is a pleasure and we get more back than we can ever give. For many of the [Meals on Wheels] clients, I am the only person they will talk with that day. To see needy people sit down to a delicious meal prepared and served by friendly, smiling folks gives more me joy than I can say.” Masonic Village at Dallas resident Annie Smith and her husband, Keith, volunteer approximately 21 hours a month assisting Meals on Wheels and baking cakes for St. Vincent de Paul Kitchen.

Mission Statement
Our caring communities and services assist individuals, families and children in realizing their potential and enjoying the highest possible quality of life through the traditions of Freemasonry. OUR VISION IS TO BE A CENTER OF EXCELLENCE. OUR “MISSION OF LOVE” VALUES: Quality of Life Respect for the Individual Quality Service Outreach 

MASONIC VILLAGE AT DALLAS AT A GLANCE
Resident population as of Dec. 31, 2012: 108 Retirement living apartments: 45 Retirement living villas: 38 Number of employees as of Dec. 31, 2012: 7

THE TIMES LEADER

Business
timesleader.com

SECTION D

SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013

Pamela yiP

personal finance

to feel young longer, change your mind
Business partners emmy Preiss, left, and Harriet Mills launched Wine and Design in 2010 and gave in to demand and started offering franchise opportunities.
MCT PHOTO

franchises give small-business owners chance for growth
By ViRGiNiA BRidGES MCT Wire Service

emmy Preiss and Harriet Mills launched their wine and Design franchising empire after a road trip to south Carolina that involved at least two bottles of wine and two great paintings. “we went and had a girls’ weekend there,” Mills said. “and the rest is history.” That history includes opening the first wine and Design in Raleigh, n.C., in March 2010 and franchising the business a year later. since then, Preiss, 31, and Mills, 32, have acquired 26 franchisees in north Carolina, south Carolina, Virginia and new york. Franchising is one path that smallbusiness owners can take to expand their business. “Franchising is perhaps a faster way to grow than growing based on their own capital and the credit market,” said Ritchie Taylor, an attorney and shareholder with Manning Fulton, a Raleigh law firm. Franchising includes replicating a business through manuals, software and other systems, meeting state and federal requirements, and recruiting franchisees who invest their own capital. successful franchisers constantly work to improve their brands, create and test new products, and support franchisees, Taylor and others said. “when you become a franchiser, you are making a massive commitment to other people to help them get up and provide for their families and their children and their wealth building,”
See frAncHiSeS, Page 2D

3-d technology
By WAiLiN WONG - MCT Wire Service

Some of the pieces that have been made in the r&D lab at inventables are displayed. Zach Kaplan, ceO and founder of inventables, a chicago startup company that runs an online hardware store for manufactures, shows off his headquarters.

MCT PHOTOS

reshapes face of manufacturing
he machine, no larger than a coffee maker and encased in black like Darth Vader’s helmet, hums at a whisper.
swinging open the shell’s door reveals a slim metal nozzle moving smoothly over a platform, putting down melted black filament in thin layers that form a set of simple chess pieces. The plastic figures might not look like much, but to Zach Kaplan, the 3-D printing technology creating them represents the early promise of digital manufacturing, powered by desktop machines, user-friendly design software and creative people tinkering away in basements and garages. as Ceo of Chicago-based Inventables, an online retailer of materials for product designers and artists, Kaplan is finding new customers among small businesses and budget-strapped hardware startups. He and other proponents

T

inventables ceO Zach Kaplan, left, and edward ford, director of digital manufacturing, use technology to create low-cost skateboards out of Baltic birch.

of digital fabrication say the technology’s increasing accessibility is emboldening a new generation of participants in the manufacturing sector, reinvigorating the industry

as the creation of a single item or a small batch of products becomes as affordable as mass production. The 3-D printer making the chess set at Inventables costs $899 on the company’s website, and one spool of filament, enough to make 360 pieces, is $39. The accompanying design software can be run on a basic computer connected to the printer with a UsB cord. “Inventables used to only be able to service the most well-funded R&D groups,” said Kaplan, who launched his business in 2002 to cater to big corporations. “now we’re servicing R&D labs in garages all over the world.” Unlike previous generations of 3-D printers, milling machines and laser cutters, many of today’s models fit on a desktop and are designed for micromanufacturing. That means a custom job or small run, from one to 1,000 units, can be as inexpensive as outsourcing production but without the fear of giving up quality control to an overseas manufacturer. Inventables has a U.s. customer, for exSee TecHnOLOGY, Page 2D

I always enjoy reading The Sunday Times Leader and one of my favorite inserts is the always interesting Parade magazine. This week, in addition to the challenging Kennections, and a cover story on Martha stewart, there’s a coupon on page 11 that will score you a free two-piece boneless combo from KFC when you purchase one for $4.99. Two can eat for $5. That’s a tasty lunch at a value price. Make sure you stop at CVS this week and scan your extra Care Card at a coupon center machine. you’ll get a coupon for 99 cents off a Mars brand candy bar. They just happen to be on sale this week for 99 cents, so you’ll pay nada. This may be a good movie watching week. Head to Red Box with this code to get half off the checkout cost: “j664TVT5.” just select a movie, and at checkout select “Rent with Promo Code,” enter code, and continue to check out.

a parade of deals including another giveaway to snack on
steals & deals
andrew seder
This code is valid through Friday. For those of you that use vitamins and supplements, GNC has a good coupon available here: http://content.gnc.com/coupons/CoUPon_ nonGC_20793.pdf It will get you $10 off a $20 purchase. There is small print, so read it before using it. If you shop OldNavy.com use the code onsaVe20 at checkout through May 6 to get an extra 20 percent off nearly everything except gift cards and everyday steals merchandise. There are plenty of buy-one, getone — or at Price Chopper, buy-one, get two — free deals this week. Weis has some really nice meat included in this offer such as Purdue chicken breasts, plain or marinated center cut pork fillets, From the Smokehouse ham steak and black angus top round london broil. Shur Save has Martin’s potato chips and varieties of Butter-Krust breads BoGo. our friends at Annie’s Organics have always been good to our readers and their customers. whenever they’ve rolled out a new product they’ve given readers of this column the chance to win a sample pack of the item. well the company will soon introduce two new products that are perfect for summer camp, camping, vacation snacks or just everyday snacking. Hitting the shelves of local retailers this summer, including Target, will be certified-organic Graham Crackers available in Honey and Cinnamon varieties. They’re made with eight grams of whole grains per serving, and in addition to being healthy, if past annie’s products are any benchmark, they’ll be yummy too. want to win a sample pack? send me an email before 5 p.m. Tuesday with “annie’s contest” in the subject line and include your name and address in the email. I’ll draw

a winner at random from all entries received by the deadline. you’ll get your name put in the drawing twice if you include a picture of yourself or a friend or family member holding any annie’s product. Good luck! luck must have been on the side of Debra skripkunis of exeter last week. she was among more than three dozen people who correctly knew that on aug. 28, 1859, Col. edwin l. Drake and George Bissell were the first men to successfully use a drilling rig on a well drilled especially to produce oil at a site near Titusville. Her correct answer netted her a free oil change at Will-Eeze Speedy Lube on Route 309 in wilkes-Barre. The gift certificate is in the mail. Tell willie that steals and Deals says hi and thank you for providing the prize.
Andrew M. Seder, a Times Leader staff writer, may be reached at 570-829-7269. If you know of any local steals or deals email them to aseder@timesleader.com and follow him on Twitter @TLAndrewSeder

THe PHRase “aGe is a state of mind” holds more truth than you think. when I was younger, I had a 50-year-old friend who viewed each minor ache and pain as a precursor to a visit from the Grim Reaper. Then there’s 82-year-old sanford alberts. He works out every day; reports to work at Baylor Regional Medical Center in Plano, Texas, at 4 a.m. on Tuesdays to greet those scheduled for surgery; and two years ago engaged in tandem sky diving at a fundraising event for The senior source, where he volunteers. The Dallas resident also teaches safe driving for aaRP and is a volunteer at the DFw ambassador program, which assists travelers at Dallas/Fort worth International airport. For alberts, life couldn’t be happier during these senior years. “I consider it a good time of my life, that I have good health,” he said. “when you have good health, everything is possible. you have quality of life.” If you want to live a healthy life in old age, how you view aging can make a significant difference. experts and studies say certain “age stereotypes” held by seniors can affect their health — for better or worse. For example, when seniors see themselves as useless, helpless or devalued, they’re less likely to seek preventive medical care and more likely to suffer memory loss and poor physical functioning and to die earlier. “a person who’s depressed might not be eating properly, they may not take their medication properly, they may fail to pay their bills on time, and that can all influence their health and their ability to maintain independent living,” said Debi weiner, coordinator of gerontology services at jewish Family service of Dallas. In a study reported on last year in the journal of the american Medical association, researchers at the yale school of Public Health and the yale school of Medicine found that older people with “positive age stereotypes” were 44 percent more likely to “fully recover from a severe disability than those with negative age stereotypes.” “a lot of how old someone acts and how old someone physically is has a lot to do with how old they feel they are mentally,” said Katie Dickinson, associate executive director at the senior source, who conducts a presentation on “living to be 100.” “There are lots of studies that say that people who feel that they’re healthy … are healthier.” Bert Hayslip, a psychology professor at the University of north Texas, said seniors should think positively about how their years have made them wise and experienced. “Here’s someone with these unique skills, these unique qualities, who may have internalized this sense of ‘well, what I can expect? I’m old,’ ” said Hayslip, who specializes in gerontological counseling. It’s important they see aging “in a more positive but realistic manner,” appreciating what is unique about them and what they can contribute to other people, he said. “you might serve as a mentor to someone who’s younger,” Hayslip said. That also addresses another critical need for seniors — social engagement and interaction. “The only way you’re going to have things to look forward to is if you get out and do things,” Dickinson said.
See finAnce, Page 2D

4under$200

Wyoming Valley Motors
126 Narrows Rd. Larksville, PA 570-288-7411 wyomingvalleymotorsvw.com

*2013 Tiguan 2.0T S, auto transmission. $199 per month lease. MSRP $25,835. Lease for 36 months and 12,000 miles per year, $199 per month with $2,999 due at signing. $750 regular VCI bonus enhancement. Excludes tax, title, license, and other fees. Subject to VW credit approval. 2013 Passat 2.5L S with appearance, auto transmission. MSRP $23,740. Lease for 36 months and 12,000 miles per year, $199 per month with $2,349 due at signing. Excludes tax, title, license, and other fees. Subject to VW credit approval. 2013 Jetta 2.0L S, manual transmission. MSRP $1 7 ,470. Lease for 36 months and 12,000 miles per year, $1 59 per month with $1 ,999 due at signing. Excludes tax, title, license, and other fees. Subject to VW credit approval. 2013 Beetle 2.5L, manual transmission. MSRP $20,790. Lease for 36 months and 12,000 miles per year, $199 per month with $2,349 due at signing. Excludes tax, title, license, and other fees. Subject to VW credit approval. Offer expires 04/30/2013. The Volkswagen Carefree Maintenance Program covers the vehicles scheduled maintenance for three years or 36,000 miles, whichever occurs first, on all new 2009 or newer models. Coverage is during the term of new vehicle warranty at no additional charge. Some limitations apply. The Toureg 2 TDI program covers the vehicle’s 5k, 1 5k, 25k and 35k AdBlue refills. The Routan program covers 6k, 12k, 18k, 24k, 30k, and 36k scheduled maintenance. Does not include routine wear and tear on parts such as breaks, tires, wipers, blades, light bulbs, etc. See dealer or vehicle maintenance program booklet for details.***All MPG estimates are EPA highway estimates.

PAGE 2D SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013

B U S I N E S S

www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER

Continued from Page 1D

franchises

Kerlavage

Polites

Rinehimer

Quillettes

Montoro

Esoda

Tagert

Benyo

Palermo

honors and awards
John C. Metz, Jr., chief executive officer, executive chef and co-founder of Sterling Spoon Culinary Management, Wilkes-Barre, has been honored as a 2013 Silver Plate Award recipient by the International Facility Management Association, which recognizes excellence in eight segments of foodservice operations. His father, Metz Culinary Management founder and Executive Chairman John C. Metz, was named an IFMA Silver Plate Award recipient in 1979. Blue Cross of Northeastern Pennsylvania has been named by PPL Electric Utilities to the E-power Energy-Smart Business Honor Roll in recognition of their energy efficiency efforts. Businesses were recognized for demonstrating awareness and commitment to better energy and environmental practices. Penn State Wilkes-Barre information sciences and technology students Tyler Kerlavage of Hanover Township, Harriet Polites of Wilkes-Barre and Brendan

Rinehimer of Pocono Pines competed in and placed first in the 11th Annual Great Valley Technology Alliance Entrepreneurship Institute for their project: Accountability For Students In Transit, an RFID and GPS based project tracking students through a bus route. The same students earned both first place in the IST category and first place overall in the 2012 7th Annual Undergraduate Research and Scholarship Fair. Frouke de Quillettes, Penn State Wilkes-Barre Information Sciences and Technology professor, served as project advisor. Petty Officer 3rd Class Andrew Kudasik, of Harding, a Navy reservist based in Avoca, has earned Tobyhanna Army Depot’s Warfighter of the Quarter award. The award recognizes military personnel for outstanding service. Kudasik was presented the fiscal 2013 second quarter award by Depot Commander Col. Gerhard P.R. Schröter and Depot Sgt. Maj. Juan Rocha for his years of distinguished military service and community support. Mary Montoro, a paralegal with The

Perry Law Firm in Scranton, has passed the bar exam and will be a practicing attorney with the firm. Montoro is a graduate of Marywood University and Widener School of Law. Northeast PA Industrial Resource Center and its Industrial Resource Center Network have been recognized by the Pennsylvania Senate for their outstanding accomplishments. A copy of Senate Resolution 54, declaring March 13, 2013 as Pennsylvania Industrial Resource Center Day, was presented to Executive Director Eric Joseph Esoda. Steve Tagert, president of Aqua Pennsylvania, Inc., received a “Special Recognition” award from the Board of Directors of the Pennsylvania Chapter of the American Water Works Association. Tagert was acknowledged for his special effort, work experience, and leadership. Kathleen Benyo, has been selected as the recipient of the 2013 Greater Hazleton Chamber of Commerce Athena Award, sponsored by Berger Family Dealerships. Benyo holds a BS and MS from

Bloomsburg University, an administrative certificate from the University of Scranton, and a PhD from Walden University. This award is presented each year to a Hazleton area businesswoman for outstanding professional achievement. Greater Hazleton Chamber of Commerce President Donna Palermo was recently recognized by MTC/Keystone Job Corps Center in Drums as its “Community Supporter of the Year.” Bohlin Cywinski Jackson, an architecture and design firm with an office in Wilkes-Barre and four others nationwide, has been awarded the Good Design is Good Business Lifetime Achievement Award in recognition of exceptional contributions to bettering organizational performance through architecture. The award, only the second time it’s been awarded in its 15 year history, was recently presented by Architectural Record in association with the American Architectural Foundation at the annual Accent on Architecture Gala, held at the Andrew W. Mellon Auditorium in Washington, D.C.

technology
Continued from Page 1D

ample, that uses a digital milling machine for a skateboard business, cutting three longboards from a $30 sheet of Baltic birch in 40 minutes. The technology’s flexibility and forgiving economics are particularly attractive to hardware startups that are using digital manufacturing for rapid prototyping and small-scale production of their goods. They say making a prototype with a 3-D printer can save thousands of dollars over handing off the work to a design company. “It’s awesome,” said Alan Hurt, founder of Light Up Africa, a local startup whose device attaches to a moving object, such as a bicycle, and captures enough kinetic energy to charge a cellphone. “I never knew it was possible to make products at little or no cost.” Hurt borrowed a 3-D printer from Inventables to make prototypes of his product while participating in Impact Engine, a Chicago-based accelerator program for startups with a social or environmental mission. The digital fabrication technology he used was a major improvement over his earliest efforts, which involved fashioning a lunchboxsize case from plastic clipboards that he bought at Wal-Mart and cut apart. The ability to quickly and inexpensively make quality prototypes also allows startups to experiment without running up a huge bill. “There’s something about being able to hold and physically interact with a design that feels more real and allows you to get feedback more directly than looking at a 3-D image on a screen,” said Eduardo Torrealba, co-founder and CEO of Oso Technologies, a company started by engineering graduate students at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Oso makes sensors that measure soil moisture content and send alerts to a computer or mobile phone when plants need to be watered. The startup went through nearly 10 versions of its Plant Link sensor prototype using the 3-D printer at UI’s mechanical engineering laboratory. In February, Oso raised nearly $97,000 on crowd-funding website Kickstarter. The startup will use 3-D printing to create a small run of Plant Link sets for Kickstarter donors who want to get their hands on the products sooner. But Oso will mass-produce the majority of its sensors through an Illinois manufacturer. The proceeds from the Kickstarter campaign will pay for the injection mold needed for that process. “We haven’t totally thrown away the idea of doing production in Asia at some point,” Torrealba said. “But for the short term we want to stay local and keep production in the United States, if it’s possible economically. People respond to that.”

solar panels puzzle would-be buyers
By Troy WolverTon San Jose Mercury News

This house is an example of ultra efficient home design, meaning a home that is so energy efficient it can support a family of four for a year with no energy costs.

MCT PHOTO

ith solar panel prices plunging and generous tax credits and incentives still available, now may be as good a time as any to go solar. But shopping for a solar power system can be a tough task. Consumers face a bewildering array of options. There are thousands of different solar panel models from dozens of manufacturers. In some regions, consumers can choose from among hundreds of different panel installers. And once they pick their panels and a contractor, they have to figure out how to pay for their system from among several different methods. “It can be pretty daunting and overwhelming with the number of installers that are installing solar systems these days,” said Drew Lowell-Britt, an energy specialist with EcoMotion, a consulting firm that advises cities, companies and other organizations that are considering or trying to promote solar power. Solar power experts and those who have shopped for systems have plenty of suggestions on how to make the process more manageable. The first thing to assess, they say, is just how much energy you’re using and the extent to which you can reduce that amount. The size of the system you’ll install is largely determined by how much energy you use. By reducing your energy consumption, you can get away with a smaller — and less costly — system. That’s what San Jose, Calif., resident Brian Friss found when he shopped for a solar power system. Just by being more conscious of turning off lights and the television and unplugging portable electronics when they’re done charging, Friss said his family has reduced its power bill by about $100 a month. And now they are looking at getting a significantly less expensive solar power system than they initially expected. “Our big mistake early on was not understanding our usage,” said Friss,

W

SOLAR SHOPPING TIPS

Shopping for a solar system can be a daunting process. Here are some things to consider. Sizing up your needs: With solar power systems, their size, cost and the time needed to recover your investment are largely determined by how much power you use. You can save money by reducing your consumption before installing a system. Picking panels: Panels are rated by their efficiency. More efficient panels tend to be more expensive, but you can potentially use fewer of them or they can take up less space on your roof. Other things to consider are how quickly they are expected to degrade, the length of their warranties and what the warranty covers. Choosing a contractor: Manufacturers’ websites list contractors by ZIP code. You can check with your state to see which contractors are licensed. Because regulations differ by city, finding a contractor with experience in your area can be important. Experts suggest comparing bids from three or more contractors and checking their references. Figuring out financing: Consumers can pay for a system up front, take out a loan or sign a long-term lease agreement. Many experts recommend buying over leasing, because the time to pay off is shorter. But leasing agreements often involve no upfront costs and can offer immediate savings on electrical costs.
SOURCE: San Jose Mercury News research

39, the co-founder of Digistor, a professional data storage company. Panels are rated for their efficiency and their electrical output. Today’s panels tend to range in efficiency — which measure the percent of solar energy that the systems convert into electricity — from about 14 percent to 20 percent or more. If you go with more efficient panels, you can use fewer or smaller panels than if you use less efficient ones. But the more efficient panels tend to cost significantly more than the less efficient ones. But efficiency and output aren’t the whole story. Consumers can also take a look at panels’ degradation rates and their warranties. As they age, solar panels typically produce less electric-

ity; each model has an expected degradation rate, which manufacturers also provide. Theoretically a more efficient panel could end up generating less electricity than a less efficient one in a few years if it degrades more rapidly. While 25-year warranties are starting to become the norm, consumers should check “the terms of the warranty, what it includes and what it doesn’t,” said Mike Foster, acting manager for green building and energy programs for the City of San Jose. In terms of picking a contractor, experts suggest that consumers talk with at least three before settling on one. Because each city has its own regulations and permitting process for solar installations, it’s important to find a contractor who has experience in a particular area, experts say. They also recommend checking references and consumer review sites such as Yelp to find the right installer. Most experts suggest that consumers buy their systems, rather than choosing other payment options. The payoff for doing that tends to be much shorter, and consumers can immediately start enjoying free electricity. But the vast majority of systems these days are installed under leases or power-purchase agreements, where homeowners don’t own the panels placed on their roofs, but instead agree to purchase power generated by them from the installer. Such plans are attractive, because often they don’t require consumers to pay any money up front, but offer the promise of lower electricity rates immediately and in the future. Experts caution consumers, though, to carefully examine the terms of such contracts, which can last 20 years. Many include charges that escalate over time, which could leave consumers paying more money for their power than they would if they stuck with their regular utility. “Certainly not all customers can save money this way,” said Mindy Spatt, a spokesperson for The Utility Reform Network, a consumer advocacy group. “Some may. For others, they may be a really bad deal.”

said Doug Schadle, chief executive and co-founder of Rhino7, a franchise sales and development firm in Apex, N.C. Before exploring franchising, small business owners need to polish their business models and systemize what they are doing, Taylor said. They should also be prepared to spend time and money to create the required documents and support systems for franchisees. Franchisers can spend between $20,000 and $100,000 in startup expenses and a legal process that takes three to six months, Taylor said. “It is not an insignificant investment,” Taylor said. “But the opportunity is cheaper also than opening up a second location on your own.” When small business owners are ready to franchise, they should start by reaching out to a qualified franchise attorney or consultant to discuss the suitability of their concept and read books on franchising, said Taylor, who recommends “Franchising for Dummies,” co-authored by Wendy’s founder Dave Thomas. Franchising is a regulated industry, governed by federal and state franchise relationship laws, and if a business owner fails to make the proper disclosures, he or she could face civil and criminal penalties, Taylor said. The process includes building the required franchise disclosure agreement, which must be provided to prospective franchisees; establishing franchisee fees and royalties that make sense for both the franchiser and the franchisees; and creating a variety of business systems and training programs. The most successful franchisers in the U.S. are models in which the owner doesn’t deliver the service directly but manages the process of delivering a strong service or product, Schadle said. In 2009, Preiss was a stay-at-home mom who had previously worked for her husband’s college housing business, and Mills was laid off from her job at Vietri, a Hillsborough, N.C., dinnerware company. During a trip to Charleston in January 2010, Mills and Preiss went to a paint and party business. After drinking some wine while painting, Mills, who describes herself as unartistic, said she painted better than Preiss, who often paints. “If I can do this, then we are taking this back to Raleigh so anybody can do this,” Mills recalls she said. The duo opened Wine and Design with the goal of creating a party atmosphere with music and adult beverages, “but at the same time, we wanted everybody to leave with a good painting,” Mills said. In the fall of 2010, Preiss and Mills opened a second location in Wilmington, N.C., but the pair had a hard time managing a store so far away while raising kids, they said. They later sold the business to a franchisee. That December, Mills and Preiss decided to give in to the ongoing franchise inquiries. “There was so much interest, we just decided, ‘Hey, why not take a shot at this?’ ” Mills said. The pair met with Taylor and spent the next three months creating the more than 150-page franchise disclosure document and related manuals. “Now it is the ‘Wine and Design for Dummies’ manual,” Mills said, describing the document. “You can have that manual and literally open up within 60 days.”

finance
Continued from Page 1D

“Once you get out and do things, you’ll have things to look forward to, and that’s going to make you feel better mentally, and it will also make you feel better physically because you’re more involved.” If a senior is homebound and can’t get out to see other people, they have to come to him or her, Weiner said. “Family members and communities need to remember that people need contact,” she said. “They need social contact with other people, and if someone is unable to get out, then people need to come in.” Alberts said he has a rich social life that includes seeing his grandchildren and members of the opposite sex. “I’m single. I have women in my life,” he said. “I go to dinner, I don’t have financial problems.” He said he dates several women, but only “one at a time.” “You have to create your life,” Alberts said. “You just can’t wait for things to happen.” Alberts is considering going to the Philippines this summer to volunteer at an orphanage. “When you serve others, you serve yourself, and you get back more than you give,” he said. “I look for opportunities to serve others.”“

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

B U S I N E S S

SunDAy, ApRIL 28, 2013

pAGE 3D

MarketPulse
TECH DIVIDENDS The stereotype of tech companies as money-losing playgrounds for foosball players is dead. Check out the list of the country’s top dividend payers. Apple pays $11.5 billion annually in dividends, enough to cover the New York Yankees’ opening-day payroll 50 times over. Of the 20 biggest dividend payers, five are technology companies, according to S&P Dow Jones Indices: Apple, Microsoft, Intel, Cisco Systems and IBM. To send checks out to shareholders every three months means the companies need to be generating lots of cash. Apple reported net income of $9.5 billion last quarter, and Microsoft made $6.1 billion. Top dividend payers in billions
Apple (AAPL) Exxon Mobil (XOM) AT&T (T) General Electric (GE) Chevron (CVX) Microsoft (MSFT) 7.0 6.9 Source: S&P Dow Jones Indices 7.9 9.9 $11.5 11.3

BIG CARTS To describe Amazon.com requires a lot of big numbers. It generated $61.1 billion in revenue last year and purports to have “Earth’s biggest selection” of products. But its big size means Amazon.com needs to find new markets to move the needle on its revenue growth. It’s a lesson that Apple is learning: the iPhone maker has grown so big that its $4.4 billion in revenue growth last quarter was its weakest since 2009 on a percentage basis. So, what new markets are big enough? Maybe grocery deliveries, say Nomura analysts. They’re looking for Amazon.com to roll out its Amazon Fresh business, which it has been testing in the Seattle area.

SMALLER BITES Saving for kids’ future college tuition bills can feel like an impossible task. At least 529 accounts are getting cheaper. These accounts help savers avoid taxes on investment gains, and the expense ratios for mutual funds found inside them have been dropping. The average large-cap value stock fund in a 529 account has an expense ratio of 1.40 percent, down from 1.52 percent in 2011, says Morningstar. The mutual-fund researcher cites two reasons for the decline: an increased emphasis on index funds, which tend to have lower costs, and aggressive negotiations by the states that sponsor the plans for lower expenses.
AP

Long road back InsiderQ&A

Ann Miletti
Title: Manages two Wells Fargo mutual funds, Advantage Common Stock (SCSAX) and Advantage Opportunity (SOPVX). Outlook: Corporate executives will remain cautious about hiring.

A three-month grounding of Boeing’s 787 “Dreamliner” may be drawing to a close. The company is installing redesigned batteries in its flagship plane and is aiming to resume deliveries in early May. The 787 was grounded worldwide in mid-January because no one could explain the smoldering batteries on two planes. Once the Federal Aviation Administration approves the battery fix on individual planes, airlines can start flying them again. Planes that can’t fly sounds about as bad as it gets, yet Boeing stock is up 22 percent this year. That’s twice the 11 percent rise of the Standard & Poor’s 500 index.

Boeing: clear skies?

Yields, mortgage rates fall

At the time of the grounding, only 50 787s had been delivered, limiting any compensation owed to customers for the planes being out of service. Despite the 787’s troubles, Boeing reported Wednesday that its net income rose 20 percent in the first quarter. Long term, Boeing has plenty going for it. There's growing demand from the world’s airlines for more planes to expand their operations or replace older planes with modern, fuel-efficient aircraft. The company has a steady stream of revenue locked in with a backlog of orders for more than 4,400 planes. That includes 840 787s.

InterestRates

Treasury yields sank last week following a weaker-than-expected report on economic growth, and the yield on the 10-year note fell to its lowest level since December. Lower Treasury yields tend to pull down rates on various consumer loans, and the average rate on a 30-year fixed mortgage dropped last week to 3.4 percent. That’s its lowest level in 14 weeks, according to Freddie Mac.
MIN INVEST PHONE

PRIME FED Taxable—national avg RATE FUNDS Selected Daily Govt Fund/Cl D FRIDAY 3.25 .13 Tax-exempt—national avg 6 MO AGO 3.25 .13 Alpine Municipal MMF/Inv 1 YR AGO 3.25 .13 FRIDAY YIELD 1.76 3.72 2.63 4.03 5.39 0.96 FRIDAY YIELD 0.05 0.14 0.08 0.21 0.68

Money market mutual funds

YIELD

0.01 0.16 $ 10,000 min (800) 243-1575 0.01 0.12 $ 2,500 min (888) 785-5578 52-WK HIGH LOW 2.11 4.02 3.43 4.55 8.15 1.18 1.56 3.22 2.62 3.89 5.39 0.80

U.S. BOND INDEXES Broad market Lehman Triple-A corporate Moody’s Corp. Inv. Grade Lehman Municipal Bond Buyer U.S. high yield Barclays Treasury Barclays

1WK 0.00 0.07 0.00 -0.02 -0.20 -0.02

CHANGE 1MO 3MO 1YR t t t t t t t t t s t t -0.35 -0.26 -0.70 -0.49 -1.80 -0.08

Taking flight
$90

Boeing’s steep climb has helped fuel a 12 percent rise in the Dow Jones industrial average this year.

Look at the latest jobs numbers and it’s clear the economy is making a slow comeback. March’s gain of 88,000 jobs was the smallest in nine months. The unemployment rate fell to a four-year low. But the decline was only because more people stopped looking for work and were no longer counted as unemployed. One reason hiring slowed was the across-the-board government spending cuts that kicked in last month. So when will hiring really start to pick up? Ann Miletti isn’t expecting a hiring boom anytime soon, based on her frequent conversations with executives at mid-sized companies. Miletti manages two mutual funds, Wells Fargo Advantage Common Stock and Advantage Opportunity. In her search for investment opportunities, Miletti routinely visits corporate executives to see what they’re thinking. What have you been hearing about economic expectations during your recent meetings? Management teams are somewhat cautious because they still see a slow growth environment. But we’ve been hearing a bit more of an optimistic tone. Certain industries have picked up recently, mainly housing and energy. Why won’t that translate into a surge in hiring? Managers are typically saying, “We’re comfortable our business is the right size with the right number of people. We’re focused on our profit margins. If we’re going to remain in a slow-growth environment, the stock market will punish us for spending in anticipation of growth that won’t materialize.” On the positive side, I’m hearing fewer executives talk about uncertainty on health care policy, and the expenses from President Obama’s health care overhaul. It’s less of an excuse than it once was to hold off on hiring. The excuse I’m hearing now is, “We need to see better growth, and maybe then we’ll feel better about hiring people.” You recently visited Texas, which is experiencing growth as a result of new energy drilling technologies. Do you see the energy boom as a catalyst to increased hiring? I can see energy becoming a much bigger part of the U.S. economy going forward, depending on what plays out in the expansion of pipeline networks. If the government lifts some restrictions on new pipelines, you may see more jobs created. Energy is an area where we continue to see investment opportunity, and energy stocks are relatively undervalued compared with the broader market. What about the housing recovery? Do you see that as a catalyst? We won’t return anytime soon to the level of housing activity we saw at the housing market’s peak in the middle of the past decade. But employers could become more comfortable about hiring if excess housing inventory diminishes and housing starts return to a normal level. Answers edited for content and clarity.
AP

Boeing (BA)
Dec. 31, 2012 $77.07

Thursday’s close: $91.67
Feb. 22 A fix for the battery problems proposed to the FAA

Dividend yield 2.1% Total return
Boeing S&P 500
YTD 1-yr 10-yr*

80

Jan. 7 Battery pack on a Japan Airlines 787 catches fire April 19 Boeing cleared to install the redesigned batteries M A

22% 11

22% 15% 16 8 83.7 billion 4.1 billion

TREASURYS 3-month T-Bill 1-year T-Bill 6-month T-Bill 2-year T-Note 5-year T-Note

1WK 0.00 0.00 0.00 -0.02 -0.03 -0.04 -0.02

CHANGE 1MO 3MO 1YR t t t t t t t t t t t t -0.03 -0.05 -0.05 -0.05 -0.15

52-WK HIGH LOW 0.12 0.25 0.15 0.32 0.91 2.06 3.26 0.01 0.14 0.08 0.21 0.54 1.39 2.45

2012 revenue
$81.7 billion

est. 2013

70

Jan. 16 The FAA grounds all 787s ’13 J F

2012 net income
$3.9 billion

est. 2013

10-year T-Note 1.67 30-year T-Bond 2.86 Money fund data provided by iMoneyNet Inc.

t -0.27 t -0.26

P/E ratio^ 18
Joshua Freed; J. Paschke • AP

Source: FactSet ^ trailing 12 months’ results *annualized

MutualFunds
GROUP, FUND TICKER FRIDAY NAV 22.07 12.98 56.84 40.42 43.21 44.85 37.58 19.50 33.58 33.68 34.83 20.98 13.94 36.91 137.26 84.60 102.40 44.24 56.09 2.35 2.37 22.43 13.61 13.56 64.54 12.77 10.53 11.34 11.34 11.34 11.34 29.46 40.95 7.21 63.01 9.88 145.97 145.96 10.90 145.04 145.05 35.92 14.42 83.63 10.82 14.13 25.35 14.55 11.09 11.09 15.65 39.65 39.66 39.64 61.26 36.62 63.25 58.34 32.86 13.51 American Funds BalA m ABALX American Funds BondA m ABNDX American Funds CapIncBuA m CAIBX American Funds CpWldGrIA m CWGIX American Funds EurPacGrA m AEPGX American Funds FnInvA m ANCFX American Funds GrthAmA m AGTHX American Funds IncAmerA m AMECX American Funds InvCoAmA m AIVSX American Funds NewPerspA m ANWPX American Funds WAMutInvA m AWSHX BlackRock GlobAlcI MALOX Dodge & Cox Income DODIX Dodge & Cox IntlStk DODFX Dodge & Cox Stock DODGX Fidelity Contra FCNTX Fidelity GrowCo FDGRX Fidelity LowPriStk d FLPSX Fidelity Spartan 500IdxAdvtg FUSVX FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m FKINX FrankTemp-Franklin Income C m FCISX FrankTemp-Mutual Euro Z MEURX FrankTemp-Templeton GlBond A mTPINX FrankTemp-Templeton GlBondAdv TGBAX Harbor IntlInstl d HAINX PIMCO AllAssetI PAAIX PIMCO LowDrIs PTLDX PIMCO TotRetA m PTTAX PIMCO TotRetAdm b PTRAX PIMCO TotRetIs PTTRX PIMCO TotRetrnD b PTTDX T Rowe Price EqtyInc PRFDX T Rowe Price GrowStk PRGFX T Rowe Price HiYield d PRHYX T Rowe Price MidCpGr RPMGX T Rowe Price NewIncome PRCIX Vanguard 500Adml VFIAX Vanguard 500Inv VFINX Vanguard GNMAAdml VFIJX Vanguard InstIdxI VINIX Vanguard InstPlus VIIIX Vanguard InstTStPl VITPX Vanguard MuIntAdml VWIUX Vanguard PrmcpAdml VPMAX Vanguard STGradeAd VFSUX Vanguard TgtRe2015 VTXVX Vanguard TgtRe2020 VTWNX Vanguard Tgtet2025 VTTVX Vanguard TotBdAdml VBTLX Vanguard TotBdInst VBTIX Vanguard TotIntl VGTSX Vanguard TotStIAdm VTSAX Vanguard TotStIIns VITSX Vanguard TotStIdx VTSMX Vanguard WellsIAdm VWIAX Vanguard Welltn VWELX Vanguard WelltnAdm VWENX Vanguard WndsIIAdm VWNAX Vanguard WndsrII VWNFX Wells Fargo AstAlllcA f EAAFX

WK CHG

4WK +2.1 +1.0 +3.4 +2.9 +2.1 +1.9 +1.6 +2.4 +3.0 +1.7 +2.7 +1.5 +.9 +2.8 +1.7 +1.3 +1.9 +2.1 +1.3 +1.8 +1.3 +1.4 +1.3 +1.2 +1.7 +1.7 +.6 +1.2 +1.2 +1.3 +1.2 +1.0 +1.3 +1.7 +.4 +1.3 +1.3 +1.3 +.8 +1.3 +1.3 +1.0 +1.0 +3.0 +.3 +1.2 +1.2 +1.3 +1.2 +1.2 +1.8 +1.0 +1.0 +1.0 +1.8 +1.9 +1.9 +2.0 +1.9 +2.2

RETURN/RANK 1YR 5YR +14.1/A +4.5/D +14.9/A +18.1/A +12.2/D +16.3/B +15.8/A +15.5/A +16.7/A +14.8/B +16.5/C +9.2/C +5.6/C +17.2/A +23.3/A +11.2/B +7.9/C +17.3/B +15.5/B +15.7/A +15.0/A +18.1/B +11.3/A +11.5/A +10.8/E +10.8/B +4.5/A +7.3/B +7.4/B +7.7/B +7.4/B +18.9/B +8.2/C +14.3/A +12.4/B +5.1/C +15.6/B +15.4/B +2.2/C +15.6/B +15.6/B +15.8/B +4.6/B +23.3/A +3.3/B +9.8/B +10.7/B +11.6/B +3.8/D +3.8/D +12.6/D +15.7/B +15.7/B +15.6/B +11.3/A +14.0/A +14.1/A +17.5/B +17.4/C +10.9/ +6.3/A +4.5/E +3.7/B +1.8/C +.4/A +3.6/C +3.4/D +5.9/A +4.2/C +3.7/B +4.8/B +3.7/B +7.1/B +.3/A +3.7/C +5.3/B +6.6/A +7.8/A +4.8/B +5.9/B +5.4/B +2.0/A +9.5/A +9.8/A -.1/B +7.3/A +4.8/A +7.7/A +7.8/A +8.1/A +7.8/A +4.7/B +5.7/B +10.2/A +8.0/A +6.5/C +4.8/B +4.7/B +5.8/A +4.9/B +4.9/B +5.5/A +5.6/B +6.4/A +4.2/B +4.8/A +4.6/A +4.3/A +5.9/D +5.9/D -1.5/C +5.5/A +5.5/A +5.4/A +8.4/A +6.3/A +6.4/A +4.9/B +4.8/B +4.6/

LocalStocks
COMPANY Air Products Amer Water Works Amerigas Part LP Aqua America Inc Arch Dan Mid AutoZone Inc Bank of America Bk of NY Mellon Bon Ton Store CVS Caremark Corp Cigna Corp CocaCola Co Comcast Corp A Community Bk Sys Community Hlth Sys Energy Transfer Eqty Entercom Comm Fairchild Semicond Frontier Comm Genpact Ltd Harte Hanks Inc Heinz Hershey Company Lowes Cos M&T Bank McDonalds Corp Mondelez Intl NBT Bncp Nexstar Bdcstg Grp PNC Financial PPL Corp Penna REIT PepsiCo Philip Morris Intl Procter & Gamble Prudential Fncl SLM Corp SLM Corp flt pfB TJX Cos UGI Corp Verizon Comm WalMart Strs Weis Mkts TICKER APD AWK APU WTR ADM AZO BAC BK BONT CVS CI KO CBU CYH ETE ETM FCS FTR G HHS HNZ HSY LOW MTB MCD MDLZ NBTB NXST PNC PPL PEI PEP PM PG PRU SLM TJX UGI VZ WMT WMK 52-WK RANGE FRIDAY $CHG %CHG %CHG %RTN RANK %RTN LOW HIGH CLOSE 1WK 1WK 1MO 1QTR YTD 1YR 1YR 5YRS* PE YLD 76.11 7 32.75 9 37.00 8 21.63 9 24.38 0 6.72 0 19.30 9 3.50 0 43.08 0 39.01 0 35.58 9 25.38 7 20.71 9 34.00 0 4.74 9 11.14 3 3.06 5 13.06 0 5.14 6 51.91 0 61.87 9 24.76 9 90.34 42.53 46.00 33.28 34.28 12.94 29.13 14.99 58.50 66.94 42.96 42.61 29.95 48.59 60.24 8.42 15.75 5.15 18.80 9.81 72.70 91.99 39.98 85.59 41.16 44.01 31.41 33.47 12.42 27.89 15.30 57.73 65.81 42.10 41.37 28.57 43.53 58.87 8.00 12.48 4.08 18.63 7.66 72.45 87.57 37.70 99.82 31.56 19.97 24.53 68.10 33.03 20.16 82.51 95.31 77.10 59.25 20.52 60.75 48.40 40.38 53.63 79.04 40.76 -0.12 -0.85 -0.67 -1.64 1.29 0.76 1.05 2.30 -0.27 0.66 -0.56 0.81 0.13 1.62 -0.42 0.19 0.63 0.05 0.78 0.39 0.00 -2.81 -0.26 1.07 0.97 -0.13 -0.86 2.63 2.87 0.46 1.12 -0.26 3.36 -3.73 3.48 0.20 -0.19 1.40 -0.24 1.38 0.75 0.16 -0.1 -2.0 -1.5 -5.0 4.0 7.5 6.5 3.9 17.7 -0.5 1.0 -1.3 2.0 0.5 3.9 -0.7 2.4 5.3 1.2 4.4 5.4 0.0 -3.1 -0.7 1.1 1.0 -0.4 -4.1 12.0 4.4 1.4 5.9 -0.3 3.7 -4.6 6.2 1.0 -0.3 3.0 -0.6 2.6 1.0 0.4 t t t t t s s t s s s s t t t s s t s s t s r t t s s t s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s t s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s t s s s s t t s s t s s s s s s s s s s s s s s 1.9 +2.24 10.9 +22.33 13.6 +17.44 23.6 +43.45 22.2 +10.17 14.8 +3.30 7.0 +50.67 8.5 +19.96 19.4 +31.24 23.1 +38.46 16.1 +13.97 10.7 +39.06 4.4 +4.77 41.6 +82.57 29.4 +52.84 14.6 +30.93 -4.7 +9.54 20.2 +27.10 29.8 —4.42 25.6 +40.80 21.3 +33.95 6.1 +21.99 1.4 +17.47 14.4 +8.35 24.0 +26.10 -1.5 +.29 3 2 2 1 3 3 2 1 1 3 1 3 1 1 1 3 2 4 1 1 2 2 3 2 4 3 2 1 2 3 2 4 1 2 1 1 1 4 -1.0 16.4 13.8 -5.0 26.9 -7.2 13.7 8.0 8.7 9.5 17.4 5.7 2.3 16.1 -4.0 -0.8 -5.6 9.9 -7.6 11.8 22.1 9.0 3.8 13.6 12.0 1.8 32.7 1.0 -3.6 -0.7 6.5 16.2 5.5 -3.1 3.8 0.0 24.9 11.2 8.2 7.4 18 21 22 15 16 29 20 ... 19 12 22 18 14 15 48 13 83 31 23 ... 24 28 22 12 19 37 14 29 12 13 ... 21 18 19 63 8 ... 19 21 16 13 3.3 2.4 7.3 2.2 2.3 ... 0.3 2.2 1.3 1.6 0.1 2.7 1.9 3.8 ... 4.4 ... ... 9.8 1.0 4.4 2.8 1.9 1.7 2.8 3.1 1.6 4.0 2.0 2.6 4.5 3.6 2.6 3.6 3.1 2.7 2.9 3.4 1.2 2.7 3.8 2.4 2.9

11.8 \>99

341.98 0 402.10 406.73 28.30

1 -18.0

25.8+144.88 1

CMCSA 28.09 0

t -13.3—11.68 4

76.92 8 105.90 24.05 0 18.92 3 6.00 9 53.36 0 26.91 0 11.81 0 65.68 0 81.10 0 59.07 8 44.47 9 12.85 0 39.46 0 26.30 0 38.41 0 57.18 0 37.65 4 32.10 22.89 27.38 69.65 32.96 20.29 84.32 96.60 82.54 61.94 21.02 62.97 48.83 41.07 53.33 79.50 45.96

83.31 9 103.70 100.89

s 131.6+217.65 1 16.8 +3.75 15.4 +25.92 14.3 +44.18 20.6 +27.56 14.0 +11.38 13.6 +18.72 11.1 14.6 -.10 ... 19.8 +41.62 14.0 +16.97 23.4 +50.87 23.9 +38.70 15.8 +36.90 4.1 —5.96

SLMBP 42.35 9

12.7 \>99

+.31 +.03 +1.10 +1.02 +1.07 +.82 +.60 +.29 +.73 +.71 +.60 +.29 +.03 +1.09 +3.16 +1.61 +2.32 +1.06 +.97 +.04 +.04 +.86 +.01 +.01 +1.84 +.12 +.02 +.04 +.04 +.04 +.04 +.59 +.69 +.05 +1.36 +.02 +2.52 +2.52 +.01 +2.51 +2.51 +.65 +.01 +1.23 +.01 +.17 +.35 +.22 +.02 +.02 +.41 +.72 +.73 +.72 +.52 +.54 +.94 +1.36 +.76 +.19

Notes on data: Total returns, shown for periods 1-year or greater, include dividend income and change in market price. Three-year and five-year returns annualized. Ellipses indicate data not available. Price-earnings ratio unavailable for closed-end funds and companies with net losses over prior four quarters. Rank classifies a stock’s performance relative to all U.S.-listed shares, from top 20 percent (far-left box) to bottom 20 percent (far-right box).

Rank: Fund’s letter grade compared with others in the same performance group; an A indicates fund performed in the top 20 percent; an E, in the bottom 20 percent.

Stock Screener

Investors looking for income often focus on stocks with high dividend yields. But they should also pay attention to how much cash those companies are generating, suggests J.P. Morgan strategist Thomas Lee. A strong cash flow means the company has greater ability to increase its dividend in the future, buy back stock or invest in future growth. Apple, for example, has generated $35.9 billion in

Free flowing

COMPANY

CLOSE

52-WK LOW HIGH

1-YR STOCK CHANGE

DIVIDEND YIELD

P/E RATIO*

CA (CA) Apple (AAPL) Ford Motor (F) MetLife (MET) Time Warner Cable (TWC) International Paper (IP) Rockwell Automation (ROK) Boeing (BA) Phillips 66 (PSX) J.M. Smucker (SJM) Comcast (CMCSA) Wyndham Worldwide (WYN) Macy’s (M) Aetna (AET)

$26.03 408.38 13.47 38.91 92.19 47.58 86.85 91.67 61.90 102.23 40.75 62.60 44.78 56.88

$21 385 9 28 74 27 61 67 29 73 28 47 32 35

$28 705 14 41 102 49 92 93 71 105 43 65 45 57

-1.7% -33.1 14.8 8.2 12.2 41.8 15.0 18.9 78.1 29.8 37.4 27.8 12.1 15.2

3.8% 3.0 3.0 2.8 2.8 2.5 2.4 2.1 2.0 2.0 1.9 1.9 1.8 1.4

13 9 9 35 13 26 17 18 10 22 18 23 14 12

p p p p

Dow industrials
WEEKLY

+1.1%
Nasdaq

cash from its operations over the last six months. It also said last week that it will increase its dividend 15 percent and boost its stock buyback program by $50 billion. This screen from J.P. Morgan shows dividendpaying, large-cap stocks that have strong cash flow per share. J.P. Morgan analysts also rate each of the stocks as “Overweight” and expect each to report stronger revenue in 2013 than in 2012.

p p p p p p q p

+0.9%

MO
+12.3%

YTD
+0.4%

+2.3%
WEEKLY

MO
+8.6%

YTD
+0.8%

LARGE-CAP

S&P 500
WEEKLY

+1.7%
Russell 2000

MO
+10.9%

YTD

SMALL-CAP

-1.7%

* based on traing 12 months’ results

Data through April 25 Source: FactSet

WEEKLY

+2.5%

MO
+10.1%

YTD

PAGE 4D SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013

B U S I N E S S

www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER

Ask the Fool
What are the pros and cons of I Bonds? — P.M., Shenandoah, Iowa I Bonds are savings bonds offered by the federal government, with inflation-adjusted interest payments. They feature limited risk (the U.S. government is known to be reliable), tax advantages, small investment amounts (as little as $25) and protection against inflation. Interest can even be taken tax-free if used for educational expenses. On the downside, the bonds’ interest rates are low these days — at 1.76 percent recently and due for a semiannual adjustment on May 1. That beats most savings accounts or CDs, though. You’ll also lose some moolah if you cash out early (within five years), and over the long haul, money tends to grow much faster in stocks than in bonds. Per data from the folks at FundX, stocks outperformed bonds in every 25-year period between 1925 and 2011, with stocks averaging an 11.4 percent annual return and bonds averaging 4.3 percent. Still, bonds remain a valuable way to diversify and strengthen a portfolio. I Bonds can protect your money, but they’re not likely to make you rich. Learn more about bonds at treasurydirect.gov, bondsonline.com and investinginbonds.com. *** How can I find out what Social Security benefits to expect in retirement? — T.N., Manteo, N.C. The Social Security Administration (SSA) used to annually mail out a record of your earnings history and estimates of the benefits you may qualify for now or later. Those mailings have now ceased for folks under 60, but you can look up the information at ssa.gov/mystatement. Remember that you can get bigger or smaller payments by starting your benefits later or earlier than your expected retirement age. Get more guidance on how to retire well at fool.com/retirement/index.aspx.

Q A

The I Bond Scoop

The Motley Fool
Fool’s School

®

Beware of the Experts
Some have accused professional mutual fund managers of being no better at picking stocks than a dartthrowing chimp. That’s insulting to chimps, though. In any given year, the majority of professional fund managers underperform their benchmark index — a virtual certainty given a limited amount of return to capture and an unlimited amount of fees to charge. For example, in 2011, 84 percent of U.S. stock fund managers underperformed the S&P 500 index, according to Standard & Poor’s. That’s bad enough, but dig deeper and it gets far worse. It turns out that the overwhelming majority of professional fund managers focused on the minority of stocks that underperformed the market. It takes skill to be that bad. (Per S&P Capital IQ data, the average stock that rose more than 2.07 percent returned 20.4 percent, while the average stock below that threshold fell 16.6 percent.) This isn’t rare, and it extends beyond fund managers to Wall

Street analysts. According to Bloomberg, “The 50 stocks in the S&P 500 with the lowest analyst ratings at the end of 2011 posted an average return of 23 percent (in 2012), outperforming the index by 7 percentage points.” Meanwhile, fees make the situation worse. In one report, IBM concluded that global money managers overcharge investors by $300 billion a year for failing to deliver returns above a benchmark index. Vanguard cites data by the Financial Research Corp. showing that the single best predictor of a fund’s future performance is its expense ratio (essentially an annual fee). A common rebuttal is that, while money managers underperform an index, they are better at managing risk and lowering volatility. But studies have shown that the average mutual fund closely tracks the ups and downs of the overall market. Some professional managers can beat the market and earn their fees. The majority can’t. If you don’t have the time or inclination to manage your own money, you’re likely to do best buying a passive, lowcost index fund.

To Educate, Amuse & Enrich

My Dumbest Investment

The Motley Fool Take

Plowed Under
In 1968, during a lunch with three salesmen at an airport, we sat next to some Japanese men. They recommended investing in shares of Toyota. I bought 5,000 shares at a dollar apiece, and the stock soon began paying 5 percent dividends annually. In the early 1980s, my Toyota investment had grown to $38,000, and I sold it and invested in some friends’ farmland in Arkansas. Well, due to mismanagement, I lost all that money in Arkansas. I’m not sure I really want to know, but I do wonder what I would have made leaving the money in Toyota. — A.J.M., Normal, Ill. The Fool Responds: You would definitely have been better off sticking with Toyota. Its stock has averaged annual gains of about 7 percent over the past 20 years. A key lesson here is the danger of putting too many of your eggs in one basket. If you weren’t sure about the future performance of either Toyota or the farmland, you might have split the money between them — or instead sought some investments in which you had greater confidence. Do you have an embarrassing lesson learned the hard way? Boil it down to 100 words (or less) and send it to The Motley Fool c/o My Dumbest Investment. Got one that worked? Submit to My Smartest Investment. If we print yours, you’ll win a Fool’s cap!

Big Green From Big Blue
Shares of IBM (NYSE: IBM) rarely trade at bargain levels, but it’s a great company trading at a reasonable valuation these days — with a 1.6 percent dividend yield, to boot. It’s also one of the most valuable brands in the world. More than 100 years old, IBM is the original information-technology company, adept at adapting to changing times. It has morphed from a hardware company to one focused more on software and services, earning higher profit margins. Some see IBM primed to become a leader in cloud-computing-based IT services now, and CEO Ginni Rometty is also moving the company into mobile computing technology. Its shareholders can’t complain, as the company’s stock has averaged returns of 9.5 percent annually over the past 30 years, and 16.5 percent over the past 20. It earns high marks for social and environmental responsibility, and provides energy- and water-management software solutions to other companies. IBM isn’t perfect, though, as its long-term debt does top $20 billion. That’s not ideal, but it’s generating more than $15 billion in free cash flow annually. The company has been buying back lots of shares, too, thereby boosting the value of remaining shares. (The Motley Fool owns shares of IBM.) Oops! Department: We recently said that Microsoft’s Windows 8 system is in the works. We should have said Windows Blue.

Q

Name That Company
I trace my roots back to 1902 and the Dayton Dry Goods Co., which later became Dayton’s department store. In 1962 I launched a discount chain that bears my current name. Its logo evoked marksmanship or perhaps hypnosis. Today, based in Minneapolis, I have more than 1,800 stores in the U.S. and Canada and more than 360,000 employees. I rake in more than $70 billion annually. Since 1946, I’ve donated 5 percent of my pretax profits via community grants and programs — that tops $4 million per week. I pay a lot of attention to design in my offerings. Who am I?
Know the answer? Send it to us with Foolish Trivia on the top and you’ll be entered into a drawing for a nifty prize!

A

LAST WEEK’S TRIVIA ANSWER
I trace my roots back to 1886, when an Atlanta pharmacist mixed a caramel-colored liquid with carbonated water and people bought it for 5 cents a glass. I sold about nine drinks a day that year, and now people around the world quaff more than 1.8 billion servings of my beverages each day. My 500plus brands include Fanta, Sprite, Minute Maid, vitaminwater, DASANI, Barq’s, Dr Pepper, Evian, FUZE, Odwalla, Monster and Juan Valdez. More than 62 million people like me on Facebook. My stock has grown by 15 percent annually, on average, over the past 30 years. Who am I? (Answer: Coca-Cola) Write to Us! Send questions for Ask the Fool, Dumbest (or Smartest) Investments (up to 100 words), and your Trivia entries to Fool@fool.com or via regular mail c/o this newspaper, attn: The Motley Fool. Sorry, we can’t provide individual financial advice.

Got a question for the Fool? Send it in — see Write to Us

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TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

B U S I N E S S
also completed a fellowship in endovascular neurosurgery and interventional neurosurgery at Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center.

SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013 Page 5D
while protecting their products and intellectual property. Experts in the finance, legal, logistics, and ecommerce fields will provide tips and advice on leveraging international payment terms and developing a reliable shipping and logistics strategy. One-on-one consultations will be arranged during break-out sessions to address specific export related concerns for your business. The event will be held from 8 a.m. to 4 a.m. and the cost to attend is $45. To register go to: http://export.gov/ pennsylvania/philadelphia/ upcominglocalevents/safeguardingexports/index.asp If you have any questions, call 215-597-6101 or email office. philadelphia@trade.gov Secretary of Revenue Dan Meuser will offer a perspective on Gov. Tom Corbett’s 2013-14 proposed state budget and other initiatives on May 10 during a Pennsylvania Economy League forum. The event runs from noon to 1:30 p.m. at Genetti Hotel and Conference Center, 77 W. Market St., Wilkes-Barre. Call 824-3559 for more information and to RSVP. Cost is $15. A Health Options Plan meeting is scheduled for May 16 at 9:30 a.m. Intended for all retired school employees and their spouses, the meeting will be at Costello’s Restaurant, 67 S. Wyoming Avenue, Edwardsville. A registration fee of $10 is required and it’s payable at the door. A breakfast buffet is included. A speaker from the Pennsylvania State Employee Retirement System will be on hand to answer questions regarding the health options plan. To reserve a seat, call June Seely at 3844407 or email her at seely@ pa.metrocast.net. Reservations are due by May 14.

CORPORATE LADDER
REGIONAL HOSPITAL OF SCRANTON
Dr. Akash D. Agarwal, a Neurosurgeon and an assistant professor of Neurosurgery at Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center in Hershey, has joined the medical staff and is accepting patients at his office in Suite 101 on the first floor of the hospital’s General Services Building at 743 Jefferson Avenue, Scranton. Dr. Agarwal has also rejoined the Neuroscience Team at Wilkes-Barre General Hospital

and the staff of Penn State Hershey Neurosurgery at Wyoming Valley. Boardcertified in neurosurgery, Agarwal Dr. Agarwal earned his bachelor’s degree in biology from Boston University and his medical degree from Boston University School of Medicine. He completed a residency in neurosurgery at Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center and served an internship in general surgery at New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center, New York City. He

BUSINESS AGENDA
The Northeast Pennsylvania Manufacturers and Employers Association will hold a Mentor Development Training on Tuesday at the Top of the 80’s Restaurant, West Hazleton, running from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Nathan Andrews, a process improvement and IT specialist for the association, will instruct. The cost of the training is $205 for members and $410 for non-members. Completion of this training will result in 6 PHR/SPHR/GPHR (general) recertification credits. To learn more about this training or to sign up, please call the office at 622-0992 or email crobbins@maea.biz. The Mid-Atlantic District Export Council, in cooperation with Partnership for Progress, will be hosting a workshop called “Safeguarding Your Exports,” on Tuesday at the Federal Reserve Bank in Philadelphia. The event is meant to help regional businesses expand internationally

TMG HEALTH
Margaret Manley, of Mountain Top, has been appointed director of performance measurement and reporting. Manley holds a bachelor’s degree in Accountancy from Wilkes University, and an associate’s degree in Information Systems Technology from Luzerne County Community College. She is a Certified Public Accountant and a Chartered Global Management Accountant.

offiCe CoaCh

Employee free to leave abusive boss
By Marie G. Mcintyre McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Q: The verbal abuse that I receive from my boss has been escalating for several years. About once a week, he begins shouting, cursing and banging on my desk. He starts criticizing my work, then brings up issues from my personal life. Every time this happens, he eventually calms down and wants to work things out. We always reach an agreement about how he is going to change, but before long he blows up again. His erratic behavior is beginning to affect my performance, which only makes the situation worse. I have tried to resign for the past three years, but he always talks me out of it. He owns the business, so there is no one else who can help. I am feeling very depressed and don’t see how I can endure this much longer. a: Has it occurred to you that this relationship is exactly like an abusive marriage? Your boss bullies you, you threaten to leave, he promises to change, you agree to stay, then he bullies you again. This is the same vicious cycle that abused spouses experience. The big difference, however, is that leaving a job is much easier than leaving a marriage.

Perhaps, like many abused spouses, you have developed an enmeshed relationship with your abuser. Or maybe he has made you feel so worthless that you fear no one else will hire you.
Therefore, the real key to your problem lies in the statement, “I have tried to resign for the past three years.” In reality, you are free to depart whenever you like, so staying must provide some kind of emotional payoff. Perhaps, like many abused spouses, you have developed an enmeshed relationship with your abuser. Or maybe he has made you feel so worthless that you fear no one else will hire you. But regardless of the reason for your reluctance, you need to screw up your courage and get out of there, because no one should tolerate that kind of treatment. Q: I have a co-worker with a very bad attitude who routinely shirks her job duties. My boss frequently complains about “Jackie” and asks me for advice on how to handle her. This week, he went one step further and said that I am now responsible for monitoring

Jackie’s performance. How am I supposed to do that when I’m not her supervisor? a: I don’t know whether your manager is wimping out or making a reasonable attempt to solve a problem. But I do know that turning you into a monitor will never work unless everyone clearly understands your role. And since Jackie is unlikely to welcome this peer oversight, she deserves an explanation from her boss. First, you must ask your manager exactly what he wants you to observe, how he expects you to do so, and how frequently he would like feedback. Then he needs to meet with you and Jackie together to clarify his expectations and answer any questions she may have. When Jackie has performance issues, as she undoubtedly will, your boss is the one who should discuss them with her. But if you are expected to handle these coaching conversations, then you have become her supervisor and should be given an official promotion.

If your business-related organization has an event on the horizon that you would like publicized in this weekly Sunday Times Leader Business Section feature, email it to tlbusiness@ timesleader.com at least two weeks prior to the event to assure publication. Please include a description of the event, date, location, cost and contact information.

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E DITORIAL

SERVING THE PUBLIC TRUST SINCE 1881

SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013 PAge 6D

OUR OPINION: CURRENT EVENTS

S

ome thoughtS on ever put on these buildings? the past week: mellow was an elected official, Take a breath not a hero deserving recogniWilkes-Barre had its tion or a benefactor who used third fatal shooting of the year hard-earned money to endow thursday night, reportedly fol- institutions with capital. mellow lowing a scuffle after a basket- was elected to work for taxpayball game in Coal Street Park. ers. he steered taxpayers funds Wilkes-Barre and surrounding throughout the state. communities have more than mellow’s name should not enough trouble with criminals have been on these buildings buying and selling drugs, as well and the public shouldn’t conas people in gangs. their ilk have done such grandiose, misplaced no respect for the community or gestures. It creates the the law or other people. When conappearance of a conflict Frankly, violence from of interest, of the posfrontation them isn’t a surprise. sibility of preferential however a pick-up comes a treatment, even for an game of basketball elected official whose shouldn’t end with a call knocking, be credibility hasn’t been to the coroner and a pool the bigger challenged. of blood in the street. And that goes for there’s no winner man. Walk buildings and parks here: not the city, not the away. named for disgraced exneighborhood. Not the Congressman Daniel J. families and friends on Flood. either side of this fight. honor the heroes. there’s little hope that honor the dead. honor virtue, hot heads read editorials much fidelity and integrity. Carve that less take advice, but we offer it in stone. nonetheless. Leave the adrenaSalute to the flagman line and bravado on the basketCongratulations to Jim Walsh, ball court. And when confrontaa Wilkes-Barre resident who retion comes a knocking, be the fused to surrender in his efforts bigger man. Walk away. to get more American flags on Honor the honorable on Wednesday the name of display in Wilkes-Barre. on tuesday, Walsh announced disgraced ex-state Sen. Robert J. at Wilkes-Barre City hall in front mellow was removed from buildof the police station the u.S. ings on the campuses of marywood university, Lackawanna American Flag Committee Fund College and Keystone College. to raise money to purchase flags Last month council members for display in the city. there are in mellow’s home borough of several phases to the plan to Blakely voted to remove mel- have more flags on the market low’s name from a park in the Street Bridge, Public Square, Peckville section of the commu- North and South main streets nity. and Coal Street. the removals are warranted. Walsh has been strident in mellow is serving 16 months in his mission to have a stronger a federal prison after he pleaded show of patriotism in the comguilty to conspiracy to commit munity. he’s hounded city hall; mail fraud for using his state he’s badgered this newspaper Senate staff to do political work with visits, calls and letters. he for himself and friends. A state certainly deserves credit for his grand jury report charged mel- perseverance. low with corrupt organizations, And if you agree with him, bribery and conspiracy, among make a donation to the fund or other offenses. show your support by displaying But the question should be an American flag on your own asked why mellow’s name was home or business.

Have some honor here at home

State of the union: A nation filled with hatred, contempt
oRDINARILy, I’D thank you for writing. But truth is, I am not grateful you wrote; your note last week was one of the more troubling things I have read. I do not blame you for leaving it unsigned. “We stand together,” I had written. “We stand defiant. And we stand with Boston.” you disagreed. “your wrong pal we do not StAND togetheR. oh my goD we need a CIVIL WAR. the American people against the LIBeRAL DemACRAt SCum that we have let allow SCumBAgS like those that would BLoW uP people in BRoAD DAyLIght to be here … We NeeD A CIVIL WAR. those demacrats that happen to still be breathing after that CIVIL WAR will have a choice. BeCome NoRmAL or you are LeAVINg with the 11 million illegals that ARe goINg home … thIS IS So CLoSe to hAPPeNINg thAt eVeRy LIBeRAL IN thIS CouNtRy ShouLD StARt LoSINg SLeeP … theRe IS A CLeAR ReASoN Why We ARe ARmeD to the teeth …” And you know, there was a time, not so long ago, I’d have laughed off your semicoherent, misspellings-riddled rant. But I don’t laugh so much anymore, because you concretize a question with which I have been struggling: Is America sustainable? Can a nation pulling so energetically in opposite directions survive? We call it hyper-partisanship, polarization, balkanization. But those are SAt words, polysyllabic expressions that make abstract what they describe. So let us face what you embody and call it by name. It is

LEONARD PITTS JR.
hatred. And it is contempt. It’s not just you. It’s Arkansas state legislator Nate Bell tweeting, “I wonder how many Boston liberals spent the night cowering in their homes wishing they had an AR-15 with a hi-capacity magazine?” as the hunt for bombers closed that city down. Before that, it was that man in Florida who committed suicide because Barack obama was re-elected. And so-called “patriots” in the woods plotting against the government. And a sign promising death to the first lady and her “two stupid kids.” It’s the true state of the union, the America we have come to be. yes, I know. Bill maher once called Sarah Palin a crude and sexist name. Shame on that smarmy little man. But no, that does not suggest an equivalence of hatred and contempt. In volume, vociferousness and pure venom, maher and the handful of other leftwing pundits who mistake namecalling for argument and coarseness for wit have nothing on the army of hannitys, Coulters, Savages, Santorums, Limbaughs, Palins, Bachmanns, malkins, Nugents, trumps and Becks trolling the sewers of American disunion. Now, to them, we add you, my nameless countryman, advocating for war. War. And I am struck by the fact that I am not struck by the fact. even this is just business as usual now. A nation is more than common geography. It is also common values, a common way of looking at the world — not that everyone agrees on everything always, but that we are at least tethered by similar

COMMENTARY

In volume, vociferousness and pure venom, Maher and the handful of other leftwing pundits who mistake namecalling for argument and coarseness for wit have nothing on the army of Hannitys, Coulters, Savages, Santorums, Limbaughs, Palins, Bachmanns, Malkins, Nugents, Trumps and Becks trolling the sewers of American disunion.
understanding of who we are and what that means. It is that test this country fails now with regularity. We can’t even agree on who we are anymore, so swamped are we by the rage red holds for blue. the road to Civil War began 153 years ago as Southern states, led by South Carolina, passed ordinances of secession from the union. But, as a nation is more than just geography, so, too, is secession therefrom. the act represents a tearing away that is as much spiritual and emotional as it is geographic. maybe even more. So if the likes of you and mr. Bell are right, if it is really beyond us now even to stand shoulder to shoulder with stricken fellow citizens, then we have lost more than bombs could ever destroy. And secession has already occurred.
Leonard Pitts Jr., winner of the 2004 Pulitzer Prize for commentary, is a columnist for the Miami Herald, 1 Herald Plaza, Miami, Fla. 33132. Readers may write to him via email at lpitts@ miamiherald.com.

OTHER OPINION: CRIME

he BoStoN marathon bombings have reminded Americans that we can never let down our guard against terrorism. But mayor Nutter has rightly pointed out that the daily carnage from violent crime in the nation’s cities also demands attention. Nutter wants to see violent crime, like terrorism, attacked from a national as well as a local perspective, opening the door for more federal aid for municipal police. America hasn’t done much at the federal level to address violence since President Bill Clinton won congressional approval of the 1994 Violent Crime Control and Law enforcement Act. the bill was passed with support from law-and-order Republicans before Clinton was crippled by the monica Lewinsky scandal. the legislation provided $30 billion to fight crime, including funding to help cities hire 100,000 police officers. It also banned the sale and possession of 19 kinds of assault weapons. Clinton worked hard to garner Republican votes to ban the guns, knowing that many of his fellow Democrats feared the wrath of the National Rifle Association. Such an accomplishment

t

National response to another terror

would be more elusive for President obama. even after the Newtown, Conn., shootings that left 20 first graders dead, obama couldn’t pool the bipartisan support needed to pass a modest bill subjecting more gun purchasers to background checks. Nutter says more cooperation on crime might be achieved through a national commission similar to the panels created to respond to President John F. Kennedy’s assassination, the civil rights riots, and the 9/11 attacks. the u.S. Conference of mayors, which Nutter heads, has also proposed a crime commission. Nutter noted that since the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks killed nearly 3,000 people, more than 100,000 have been murdered in our cities. All those murders, however, have not led to the creation of a federal agency like the post-9/11 Department of homeland Security. Nutter says a national crime commission could hold public hearings and coordinate efforts among federal, state, and local officials. In these days of sequestered budgets, it’s difficult to get such proposals off the ground. But a consistent national strategy for fighting violent crime would make sense.
The Philadelphia Inquirer

No secret password needed to connect with community
thIS IS probably not something I should admit so publically, but it really isn’t much of a secret especially among my friends and co-workers, that I am a very low-tech guy. In fact, despite some of my best efforts, it is safe to say new technology and I really just don’t get along. Whether it is the laptop, smart phone, iPad, Kindles or tiVo, the problem I have with all these “life-changing” gadgets is that if you don’t press the right buttons or icons in the right order, the darn things just don’t work the way you want them to. At one point in the mid-nineties, I had even hoped that the Internet was just a passing fad. No such luck. thanks, Al gore. Despite a number of protests and painful experiences along the way, I am thankful that my skills have slightly improved over the years. technology has certainly changed the way we communicate and I really did not have much of a choice but to get on board. I even created my own Facebook account recently. So with improved competency and proficiency, I can now search for information, communicate with my bank, utilities and insurance companies, manage my calendar, shop online, pay bills, and interact with friends across the country. As great as all this is, I have encountered another new problem -- the endless need

BILL JONES

COMMENTARY

Editorial Board
PRASHANT SHITUT President and CEO JOSEPH BUTKIEWICZ Vice President/Executive Editor

for passwords! everything you do these days seems like you need a darn password to do it. Best practices tell us not to write them down for security reasons, but who can remember a dozen or more passwords. I have to reset my sign-ons all the time. It’s so frustrating! thankfully, though, there are still things in life that you can do without a password. As the united Way of Wyoming Valley prepares for its Annual Day of Caring in may, it occurs to me that you don’t need a password for many of the things that improve our community and make us better neighbors to each other. you don’t need a password to be compassionate, to care, to be charitable or to serve others in need. you certainly don’t need a password to brighten someone’s day or lighten another’s burden. the united Way’s 21st Annual Day of Caring will be on Wednesday, may 29. there are plenty of projects to be completed, and we hope a number of employers will allow and encourage their employees to form a work group and participate. Individuals are welcomed as well. For more information on how to be involved, please see our website at www.unitedwaywb.org. martin Luther King Jr. told us that “anybody can be great because anybody can serve. you do not need a college degree to serve; you don’t even need your subject

As the United Way of Wyoming Valley prepares for its Annual Day of Caring in May, it occurs to me that you don’t need a password for many of the things that improve our community and make us better neighbors to each other. You don’t need a password to be compassionate, to care, to be charitable or to serve others in need.
and verb to agree to serve. All you need is a heart full of grace and a soul generated by love.” At the united Way, we would like to invite those of you who have hearts full of grace and souls generated by love to continue to serve and support the community we call home. During our Day of Caring and throughout the year, through the united Way, you can volunteer, donate and even be lifechanging. Should you choose to do so, I am quite certain you can make a meaningful difference without knowing what order to push any icons or needing yet another dreaded password.
Bill Jones is the President and CEO of the United Way of Wyoming Valley. He can be reached at 829-6711 ext. 230.

TIMeS LeADeR www.timesleader.com

F O R U M

SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013 PAge 7D

It was Bush’s perseverance that allows us to prevail
CLare Boothe Luce liked to say that “a great man is one sentence.” Presidents, in particular. The most common “one sentence” for george W. Bush (whose legacy is being reassessed as his presidential library opens) is: “He kept us safe.” not quite right. He did not just keep us safe. He created the entire anti-terror infrastructure that continues to keep us safe. That homage was paid, wordlessly, by Barack obama, who vilified Bush’s anti-terror policies as a candidate, then continued them as president: indefinite detention, rendition, warrantless wiretaps, special forces and drone warfare and, most notoriously, guantanamo, which obama so ostentatiously denounced — until he found it indispensable. Quite a list. Which is why there was not one successful terror bombing on U.S. soil from 9/11 until last week. The Boston Marathon attack was an obvious failure, but there is a difference between 3,000 dead and three. and on the other side of the ledger are the innumerable plots broken up since 9/11. Moreover, Bush’s achievement was not just infrastructure. It was war. The afghan campaign overthrew the Taliban, decimated al-Qaeda and expelled it from its haven. Yet that success is today derogated with the cheap and lazy catchphrase — “He got us into two wars” — intended to spread to afghanistan the opprobrium associated with Iraq. as if afghanistan was some unilateral Bush adventure foisted on the american people. as if obama himself did not call it a “war of necessity”; and Joe Biden, the most just war since World War II. The dilemma in afghanistan was what to do after the brilliant, nine-week victory? There was no good answer. even with the benefit of seven years’ grinding experience under his predecessor, obama got it wrong. His afghan “surge” cost hundreds of american lives without having changed the country’s prospects. It turned out to be a land too primitive to democratize, too fractured to unify. The final withdrawal will come after obama’s own six years of futility. Iraq was, of course, far more problematic. Critics conveniently forget that the invasion had broad support from the public and Congress, including from those who became the highest foreign-policy figures in the obama administration — Hillary Clinton, John Kerry, Chuck Hagel and Biden. and they forget the context — crumbling sanctions

ANOTHER VIEW

Photo by Pete G. Wilcox words by Joe Butkiewicz

CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER

COMMENTARY
that would in short order have restored Saddam Hussein to full economic and regional power, well positioning him, postsanctions, to again threaten his neighbors and restart his WMD program. Was the war worth it? Inconclusive wars never yield a good answer. Was Korea worth it? It ended with a restoration of the status quo ante. now 60 years later, we face nuclear threats from the same regime that was not defeated in a war that cost 10 times as many american lives as Iraq. The Iraq War had three parts. The initial toppling of the regime was a remarkable success — like afghanistan, rapid and with relatively few U.S. casualties. The occupation was a disaster, rooted in the fundamental contradiction between means and ends, between the “light footprint” chosen by gen. george Casey and the grand reformation attempted by Paul Bremer, who tried to change everything down to the coinage. Finally, the surge, a courageous Bush decision taken against near-universal opposition, that produced the greatest U.S. military turnaround since the Inchon landing. and inflicted the single most significant defeat for al-Qaeda (save afghanistan) — a humiliating rout at the hands of Iraqi Sunnis fighting side-by-side with the american infidel. as with Lincoln, it took Bush years of agonizing bloody stalemate before he finally found his general and his strategy. Yet, for all the terrible cost, Bush bequeathed to obama a strategically won war. obama had one task: Conclude a statusof-forces agreement and thus secure Iraq as a major regional ally. He failed utterly. Iraq today is more fragile, sectarian and Iranian-influenced than it was when Bush left office. Like Bush, Harry Truman left office widely scorned, largely because of the inconclusive war he left behind. In time, however, Korea came to be seen as but one battle in a much larger Cold War that Truman was instrumental in winning. He established the institutional and policy infrastructure that made possible ultimate victory almost a half-century later. I suspect history will similarly see Bush as the man who, by trial and error but also with prescience and principle, established the structures that will take us through another long twilight struggle, and enable us to prevail.
Charles Krauthammer’s email address is letters@charleskrauthammer. com.

T

he rules are a little different, but in the end the boys and girls both play a game with bats and balls. They are separated more by time than experience, each sharing the challenge of a season and the triumph known only to champs. They share their glory days on a field in Plains Township, where children still come to play, and dream.

Marathon bombing reminder of era’s danger and terror
Danger. Terror. I remember an interview in a bad Detroit neighborhood. When I approached a couch in the small front room, the mother said to me, “Don’t sit there. They can shoot you through the window.” Danger. Terror. In Leipzig, east germany, I had a young female translator. When we approached my hotel, she froze. “I cannot go in,” she said. “Why not?” I said. “That’s for foreigners. If I go in there, they will arrest me.” “Don’t be silly. We need to work.” “Please.” She began to cry, then shriek. “I cannot go in! They will hurt me!” Danger. Terror. There’s a group in Israel called ZaKa, dedicated to picking up pieces of the dead. Whenever there is a bombing or a terror attack, ZaKa arrives with incredible speed to collect anything — an ear, an arm, skin — believing the body needs to be buried intact, that a human being is entitled to at least that dignity. Danger. Terror. I’ve seen children in Haiti too afraid to sleep inside once they knew an earthquake could strike again. Been told in Mexico to hide any jewelry and get quickly into a friend’s car, lest you become a kidnap target. Been in train stations around the world that post warning signs for stray backpacks or packages that might contain explosives. and once, more than 30 years ago, I ran

MITCH ALBOM

COMMENTARY

the Boston Marathon. at the end of the race, I crossed the finish line in Copley Square, nearly four hours after the thing started — or around the time that bombs went off in that spot last Monday — and I never thought that something might explode and kill me. But now, if I did it again, I would. Danger. Terror. It is a fact of life in today’s world. anyplace. anywhere. You can be shot, blown up, kidnapped, arrested. The world is an increasingly scary place. The question is: What to do in the face of it? I read a quote from a female spectator in Boston, who suffered minor injuries and who told Cnn, “I personally will never participate in an event of this nature in a city in fear that something like this could happen again. … Seeing terrible things … all over the world on TV, my heart would always go out to those directly affected. But I never imagined in a million years I would be a spectator at the Boston Marathon running for my life.” This is a very telling statement. She admits she has seen terror happen all over the world, yet says she could never have imagined running for her life. Why? If it happens all over the world, why couldn’t it happen to her? She also says she will never participate in an event like the marathon for fear it

could happen again. Yet things like this had been happening for decades, and it didn’t stop her from coming to Boston that day. and it shouldn’t stop her in the future. as the details of the bombing suspects spilled out into the weekend, one thing remained abundantly clear: There is simply no way to guard against everybody. You cannot predict every deviant behavior, protect every space in every gathering, survey all faces in a crowd or gauge the contents of every bag, pocket, shoe or human body. We can attack the training bases of terror, but that won’t prevent another aurora, Colo., or oklahoma City. We can X-ray every inch of people on a plane, but that won’t ensure someone won’t blow up a train station. The numbers are impossible. everyone is a potential terrorist; not everyone is a police officer. I think about my Boston Marathon finish, being so happy at Copley Square. and it’s tragic that maybe no one ever will feel so carefree there again. But while this latest trepidation is real and awful, it is no different than the Detroit woman who lived in fear of her window every day. We can be killed anytime, anywhere, doing anything. We live in an age of miracle and wonder; we live in an age of danger and terror. The only sure thing is that some days it will feel more like one than the other.
Mitch Albom is a columnist for the Detroit Free Press. Readers may write to him at: Detroit Free Press, 600 W.Fort Street, Detroit, Mich. 48226, or via email at malbom@freepress.com.

MAIL BAG | LETTERS FROM READERS

Writer feels Obama is ordained by God I

Two-party system has failed America I

more careful look at who we allow in our country. The Boston tragedy was only partially linked to guns, but the main weapon wasn’t a non-convenn response to M.L nichols’ telltional weapon at all; a pressure ing us to go to the Bible for the cooker, which has the initial truth instead of listening to the known capability of cooking. president, I offer this. My main point in this letromans 13:1: Let every soul ter: These two suspects were be subject unto the higher powalready on an FBI list of possible ers. For there is no power but terrorists, and were not investiof god: the powers that be are gated closely enough, prior to ordained of god. this incident. Therefore, everything obama Yes, they were american endorses is true, holy and good. citizens, but slipped through the He is, after all, ordained by god. Mike Mozeleski cracks of screening. ask yourself this, out of the Mountain Top 11,000,000 illegal immigrants who are allowed to remain on american soil, what are the odds that one of them will try something dangerous to america in the near future? Maybe n view of the recent tragedy the overwhelming majority are in Boston, a sad day for all of good people who just came to us who love america and her america for a better life, but people, the liberals in charge of how can they be screened and our government “still don’t get processed if they sneak over the it.” It’s not the restrictions we place border? If you can’t obey our national on certain hardware, such as laws in the first place, my anguns and firearms, but a closer,

swer to this problem is that they be deported. obama, the liberals in Congress and the liberal media press need to put our national security above politics. Keep your eyes on the 2016 presidential primary in new Hampshire; there is a proamerica Independent ready to surface. The republicans and Democrats have both failed america! Someone has to protect our Second amendment rights. The two-party system has failed america, and has catered to the lobbyists who finance their bloated war chests.

Reader disputes abortion trial letter A

of Sugarloaf is proof. Skuba claims there has been a lack of media scrutiny regarding Dr. Kermit gosnell. My Internet search revealed more than 50 pages of links regarding Dr. gosnell’s trial and the initial arrest more than two years ago. Skuba claims that the Planned Parenthood office in Wilmington, Del., is a similar “house of horrors.” Yet the only sources I could find to support this claim were all pro-life sites. Planned Parenthood of Delaware officials say they welcome the review and have made personnel changes. Skuba claims that five John C. Cordora patients at the clinic have been Luzerne rushed to emergency rooms following botched abortions. However, articles listed two incidences of ambulances being called, one for a woman who was having difficulty breathing, s the website Snopes.com the second for a woman sufferproves, there are many urban ing heavy bleeding — then the legends, i.e. nontruths, available article (from a prolife source) for people to gullibly swallow mocks the facility for contacting then regurgitate without check- outside medical personnel, suging out the facts. The recent let- gesting the women should have ter to the editor from Ken Skuba been treated by the Planned

Parenthood staff. Skuba also claims that the facility is closed. This is not true: they have discontinued surgical abortions but outpatient medical abortions continue. Skuba denounces Dr. gosnell’s clinic as a tragedy. on this, we agree: prochoice supporters are appalled by the conditions of this facility too. However, we recognize that if abortion does become illegal, these hidden, uninspected facilities are where desperate woman will be turning to terminate their pregnancies. Check for yourself: http:// www.snopes.com/politics/ crime/gosnell.asp

Virgin Mary play is contrary to Bible I

faithful of our area who traveled to a new York City theater. Some 80 percent of americans are Christian (according to an aBC poll,) and most would find it offensive to read of the glorification of this play, “Testament of Mary” and its actress. This so called “expression of art” depicts blasphemy by the lack of reverence for a religious deity or holy person. This play is totally contrary to the new Testament of the Bible. advertising for the play states “The truth should be spoken at least once in the world.” The truth was spoken by Jesus Christ more than 2000 years ago and can be found in the Heather H. Ruseskas new Testament as written by Plymouth witnesses to his life and his holy mother’s. Believers of this day and age still stand up for the truth by protesting and praying where distortion and deception occur. no doubt such religious inn response to your Sunday sults would never reach Broadapril 21 story “Unholy outcry way if it were about a faith other over depiction of Virgin Mary,” than Christianity. the day after your publication Nancy Restaino there was a holy outcry by the Shavertown

PAGE 8D SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013

P E R S P E C T I V E S

www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER

The imporTanT movie “42” opened recently, reminding us of the historical significance of how Jackie robinson and the Brooklyn Dodgers finally integrated america’s national pastime. it’s hard to imagine now, but even after that special day in 1947, baseball retained segregated teams until 1959 when the Boston red Sox became the last team to integrate. Baseball’s story is a crucial reminder that throughout our nation’s history, large pools of talent have been ignored or undervalued – often due only to racial, religious, gender or other irrational prejudices. of the 205 players in the hall of Fame today, 18 spent at least some of their playing days in segregated baseball. Teams that integrated quickly were reward-

The economics of baseball also played a role in integration
DAVID GARGONE AND TIM KEARNEY
ed with better performances on the field and at the turnstiles, according to our research. The story of Jackie robinson and the integration of the national pastime is a timely reminder about the cost of ignoring or undervaluing the talents of our fellow citizens. it is important to note that baseball was a late integrator among the major sports. Though largely forgotten today, George poage won two bronze medals at the 1904 olympic Games in St. Louis, mo. Boxing began to be fitfully integrated in the early 20th century. By 1908, Jack Johnson (himself immortalized by James earl Jones in the 1970 film, “The Great White hope”) won the heavyweight boxing championship. nCaa football began to be integrated in 1918, and Fritz pollard and Bobby marshal integrated the nFL in 1920. Jackie robinson himself was a

COMMENTARY

four-sport letterman at UCLa and was an officer in the U.S. army. But since major League Baseball was, and still remains, protected by federal anti-trust legislation, it was able to deny blacks the right to compete on the playing field. By intentionally discriminating against black ball players, major League Baseball chose an inferior labor force and fielded a lesser product. This approach eventually affected the bottom line for many of the teams’ owners. When World War ii took 13 million ablebodied men into the armed forces, baseball had an opportunity to tap into a broader talent pool. Like many businesses, the economic losses of baseball from the Great Depression in the 1930s to World War ii in the 1940s put pressure on ownership to end segregation. The exploits of blacks in the war reinforced the trend to desegregate. The obstinate owners, though, insisted on keeping the

game segregated, which led to war-time appearances by players who had failed to qualify for military service. These inconsistences intersected with the sacrifices made by black troops. president Truman’s ultimate decision to integrate the military made it impossible to keep segregation in baseball. The seeds were sprouting even before Jackie robinson’s historic breakthrough. in the war years, the phillies foundered, especially when compared with the philadelphia athletics of Connie mack fame. according to baseball lore, baseball impresario Bill Veeck made a strong bid to buy the phils, but also made the mistake of informing the national League that he intended to integrate the team. Veeck’s bid was rejected, but he went on to purchase the Cleveland indians and broke the american League color barrier just a few months after Jackie robinson did in 1947 when Larry Doby pinch hit.

We are not discounting the importance of the moral imperative towards integration. however, Dodger General manager Branch rickey himself famously said that the greatest font of untapped talent was in the negro Leagues. “The negroes will make us winners for years to come. and for that i will bear being called a bleeding heart and do-gooder …,” he once said. Consider the results we found during our research into what led to desegregation. The teams that integrated first tended to be organizations that had long periods of poor attendance and poor performance on the field, according to our research. Discrimination is a costly way to do business. The obvious answer was to integrate, which proved to be profitable as economics predicts. The Dodgers only had one postseason appearance in the decade before integration. They integrated quickly and in turn won four of the next seven

national League pennants. Similarly in Cleveland, the indians were in the bottom half of the league in attendance for nearly a decade before signing Doby. Shortly after he joined the Tribe, the team shot up the standings and more than doubled attendance to 2.6 million in 1948 when they won the World Series. economics and free competition oftentimes push broader change in business and in society. We believe that this impulse – the need to win and attract fans – made a valuable contribution in this case. it’s an important lesson to keep in mind as we remember Jackie robinson, Larry Doby, Branch rickey and Bill Veeck, and what they accomplished in 1947.

Timothy F. Kearney, an avid New York Mets fan, is the chair of the Department of Business at Misericordia University, and David Gargone, an ardent New York Yankees fan, is the director of the Sport Management Program at Misericordia University.

J ANNEY M ONTGOMER Y S COTT

LLC

Valley Tennis & Swim Club

PROFESSIONAL INVESTMENT ADVICE

Family/Friend F amily/Fri iend end F Fun un P Pack ack
HEATED POOL
(4 People*)

R ETIREMENT

AND

F INANCIAL P LANNING

I NVESTMENT P ORTFOLIOS R EVIEWS A NNUITY R EVIEWS L IFE I NSURANCE R EVIEWS

*One of the primary cardholders must be present with any three (3) guests. Guests can change daily.

Swim Only Membership
More than 4 People Add $99 Per Person

First Vice President / Wealth Management
ARCADE PARTIES COMING SOON!
570.283.8140 | 800.643.5021 270 Pierce Street, Ste 108 | Kingston, PA 18704 570.963.9203 | 800.638.4417 72 Glenmaura Nat’l Blvd | Scranton, PA 18507

KEITH R. KLEINMAN

211 Harris Hill Road, Shavertown 570-696-2769 RockRec.org

kkleinman@janney.com | www.KeithRKleinman.com Janney Montgomery Scott LLC | Member NYSE FINRA SIPC

            
             

HATS OFF TO THE DERBY .
ENJOY THE BIGGEST KENTUCKY DERBY PARTY AROUND. MAY 4TH
KENTUCKY DERBY 139 Party Details First Post Time of 11:00 a.m.
· “Run for the Roses Hat Revue” (registration 2:30-5:30 p.m. in lobby) · Champagne Brunch (Reservations required 570-831-2100) from 11a.m. – 3 p.m.*

TIME TO SHINE.

Derby Post Time of 6:25 p.m.
More exciting live racing immediately following the Derby.

AT POCONO DOWNS

*Two reservations are required if you are coming to Brunch,and then coming to Derby.

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

MARKETPLACE
412 Autos for Sale

SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013 PAGE 1E

CALL TO PLACE 24/7

570.829.7130 800.273.7130
SEARCH: TIMESLEADER.COM/CLASSIFIED EMAIL: CLASSIFIEDS@TIMESLEADER.COM

110

Lost

2013 Chevy Silverado 1500 Ext Cab 4x4
$

100 ANNOUNCEMENTS
110 Lost

$

SALE PRICE STARTING AT

- 11,841
$

39 ,840 MSRP

INCLUDES $1500 ALL STAR PACKAGE SAVINGS

200
$
OR LEASE FOR ONLY
**
Per Month for 39 Mos.

OVER

Silverados In Stock
Extended Cabs Crew Cabs 250 0’s 350 0’s Duramax Diesels Commercial

12 Available

269 27 ,999
Stk. #13569, Vortec 5.3L V8 6 Speed Automatic, Locking Rear Differential, Stabilitrak, Trailering Pkg., Aluminum Wheels, Dual Zone A/C, Bluetooth, CD w/ USB Port, Deep Tinted Glass, Off Road Suspension Pkg., PW, PDL, EZ-Lift Tailgate, Onstar, XM Satellite, Cruise & More

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120

Found

0%
60
On Most 2013 Trucks

APR

MONTHS AVAILABLE

2-YR/24,000-MILE
SCHEDULED MAINTENANCE†

2013 SILVERADO 1500

FOUND. Cat, black, white and orange in area of St Benedict’s Church, Austin Ave., Parsons. light green flea collar. 570-822-9561

*Price plus tax & tags. Price includes all applicable rebates - trade-in bonus cash (if applicable); Business Choice rebate (if applicable); All Star Edition (if applicable); Conquest private offers (if applicable); Truck Loyalty bonus cash (if applicable); LOW APR in lieu of certain rebates; Silverado (#13569) **Lease of $269 per month for 39 months plus tax, 10K miles per year, $2,999 plus tax & tags (cash or trade) due at lease signing (includes Owner Loyalty) to well qualified buyers; † See Dealer for Details; Artwork for illustration only. Not responsible for typographical errors. Must take delivery by 4/30/13.

VALLEY CHEVROLET
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601 Kidder Street, Wilkes-Barre, PA

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FOUND. Cat, black, white and orange in area of St Benedict’s Church, Austin Ave., Parsons. light green flea collar. 570-822-9561

BEST PRICES IN THE AREA CA$H ON THE $POT, Free Anytime Pickup 570-301-3602

4under$200
26 MPG
***

The 201 3 Volkswagen

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2

32 MPG

***

The 201 3 Volkswagen

Passat 2.5L S

3

$199 *
# WVGAV3AX6DW597950

Lease for Only
PER MONTH
#1VWAP7 A38DC058490

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31 MPG
***

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PER MONTH

34 MPG

***

The 201 3 Volkswagen

Jetta 2.0L S

4

The 201 3 Volkswagen

Beetle 2.5L

5

$159 *
Wyoming Valley Motors
126 Narrows Rd. Larksville, PA 570-288-7411 wyomingvalleymotorsvw.com

Lease for Only
PER MONTH

$199 *

Lease for Only
PER MONTH

*201 3 Tiguan 2.0T S, auto transmission. $199 per month lease. MSRP $25,835. Lease for 36 months and 12,000 miles per year, $199 per month with $2,999 due at signing. $750 regular VCI bonus enhancement. Excludes tax, title, license, and other fees. Subject to VW credit approval. 201 3 Passat 2.5L S with appearance, auto transmission. MSRP $23,740. Lease for 36 months and 12,000 miles per year, $199 per month with $2,349 due at signing. Excludes tax, title, license, and other fees. Subject to VW credit approval. 201 3 Jetta 2.0L S, manual transmission. MSRP $1 7 ,470. Lease for 36 months and 12,000 miles per year, $1 59 per month with $1 ,999 due at signing. Excludes tax, title, license, and other fees. Subject to VW credit approval. 201 3 Beetle 2.5L, manual transmission. MSRP $20,790. Lease for 36 months and 12,000 miles per year, $199 per month with $2,349 due at signing. Excludes tax, title, license, and other fees. Subject to VW credit approval. Offer expires 04/30/201 3. The Volkswagen Carefree Maintenance Program covers the vehicles scheduled maintenance for three years or 36,000 miles, whichever occurs first, on all new 2009 or newer models. Coverage is during the term of new vehicle warranty at no additional charge. Some limitations apply. The Toureg 2 TDI program covers the vehicle’s 5k, 1 5k, 25k and 35k AdBlue refills. The Routan program covers 6k, 12k, 18k, 24k, 30k, and 36k scheduled maintenance. Does not include routine wear and tear on parts such as breaks, tires, wipers, blades, light bulbs, etc. See dealer or vehicle maintenance program booklet for details.***All MPG estimates are EPA highway estimates.

811543

PAGE 2E 120

SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013 Found 135 Legals/ Public Notices 135 Legals/ Public Notices 150 Special Notices 380 Travel 412 Autos for Sale
343-1959

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com 412 Autos for Sale
Excellent running condition, maintenance free. $3,200. 570-287-0600

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

LIKE NEW
Used Tires & Batteries for $20 & Up

Legal Notice Berwick Area School District is soliciting bids for “Expansion of the Wireless Network”. More information can be found under the current bid opportunities on our website: www.berwicksd.org

LEGAL NOTICE DEADLINES
Saturday 12:30 on Friday Sunday 4:00 pm on Friday Monday 4:30 pm on Friday Tuesday 4:00 pm on Monday Wednesday 4:00 pm on Tuesday Thursday 4:00 pm on Wednesday Friday 4:00 pm on Thursday Holidays call for deadlines You may email your notices to mpeznowski@ civitasmedia.com or fax to 570-831-7312 or mail to The Times Leader 15 N. Main Street Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711 For additional information or questions regarding legal notices you may call Marti Peznowski at 570-970-7371 or 570-829-7130 FICTITIOUS NAME REGISTRATION Notice is hereby given that an Application for Registration of Fictitious Name was filed in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania on March 20, 2013 for CGK INVESTMENTS located at 2 Fenwood Dr., Dallas, PA 18612. The name and address of each individual interested in the business if Ronald Smith, 2 Fenwood Dr., Dallas, PA 18612. This was filed in accordance with 54 PaC.S. 311 LEGAL NOTICE Notice is hereby given that the personal contents in the leased space of the individual(s) below will be sold in order to satisfy liens held by Dallas Self Storage. Sealed bids will be accepted on May 1, 2013 from 10:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. at 3297 SR 309, HWY Suite 101, Dallas, Pa 18612 (Across from Frontier Communications). Phone number 570-675-8833 Unit(s): J31 Jacqueline Imler 13 Janell Lane Dallas, PA 18612 Unit(s): L109 Richard Musick 397 Walnut St. Luzerne, PA 18709 Unit(s): J14 Clark D. Robbins II 90 Echo Valley Dr. Shavertown, PA 18708-9363 FICTITIOUS NAME REGISTRATION Notice is hereby given that an Application for Registration of Fictitious Name was filed in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania on March 18, 2013 for The Trucker’s Edge located at 164 Main Street, Freeland, PA 18224. The name and address of each individual interested in the business is Gary L. Williams, 164 Main Street, Freeland, PA 18224. This was filed in accordance with 54 PaC.S. 311.

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NYC Sat. May 18 Kips Bay Showhouse Roosevelt Island Via Tram/ FDR Memorial NYC Fathers Day Sun., June 16th Sneaker Sunday Brooklyn Flea Ground Zero Chelsea Market

406

ATVs/Dune Buggies

570-760-2035 570-542-2277 Free Pick up!
PURSUANT To section 128.85 of the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture Title 7 regulations Growmark FS, LLC hereby gives notice of ground application of “ Restricted Use Pesticides” for the protection of agricultural crops in municipalities in Pennsylvania during the next 45 days. Residents of contiguous property to our application sites should contact your local GROWMARK, FS, LLC facility for additional information. Concerned Citizens should contact Michael Layton, MGR. Safety & Environment, mlayton@ growmarkfs.com Growmark FS, LLC 308 N.E. Front Street., Milford DE 19963. Call 302422-3002

Only used for 50 hours Looks like new $3,500, OBO. $3,500. 570-702-6023

HONDA`05 450R

409

To place your ad call...829-7130
135 Legals/ Public Notices

135

Legals/ Public Notices

NYC Tues. July 16 High Tea & Tour of Gracie Mansion Morgan Library COMING UP Oct. 5 & 6 Frank Lloyd Wright’s Falling Water/ Shanksville 9/11 Memorial ———————— ———— for more info 570-655-3420

Autos under $5000

CHEVROLET `97 LUMINA LS Fully equipped, cold
air conditioning. New tires. 68,000 miles. $1,975 570-299-0772

LEGAL NOTICE ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS The Northwest Area School District, 243 Thorne Hill Road, Shickshinny, Pennsylvania 18655, is soliciting bids for the Toilet Room Renovations at Northwest Area Senior High / Middle School, 243 Thorne Hill Road, Shickshinny, Pennsylvania 18655. Bids will be received for the following prime contract(s): Contract No. 1: General Construction Contract No. 2: Plumbing Construction Contract No. 3: HVAC (Mechanical) Construction Contract No. 4: Electrical Construction The Owner will receive bids until 1:00 p.m. on Wednesday, May 8, 2013, in the District Administration Office, located at 243 Thorne Hill Road, Shickshinny, PA, Attention: Dr. Ronald Grevera, Superintendent. Bids received after that time will not be accepted. All bids will be opened publicly at that time. All bids shall be enclosed in envelopes (inner and outer) both of which shall be sealed and clearly labeled with the words "SEALED BID FOR TOILET ROOM RENOVATIONS AT NORTHWEST AREA SENIOR HIGH / MIDDLE SCHOOL”, and the name and Prime Contract Number bid on, name of bidder and date and time of bid opening, in order to guard against premature opening of the bid. Facsimile bids will not be accepted or considered. Copies of the Bidding and Contract Documents on a compact disk, in .pdf format, may be obtained by Prime Contractors at the office of Quad Three Group, Inc., 37 North Washington Street, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 18701; Telephone 570-8294200, Extension 275, Attention: Lynn Duszak. The disk may be obtained for non-refundable sum of $50.00 each, plus cost of shipping and handling, via pre-payment or providing Bidder’s Federal Express or UPS Account Numbers. Paper copies of the drawings and specifications are available for a non-refundable sum of $75.00, plus cost of shipping and handling. No partial sets of documents will be obtainable. All checks for Bidding and Contract Documents shall be made payable to the Architect, Quad Three Group, Inc. Cut-off date for issuing Bidding and Contract Documents shall be Friday, May 3, 2013 at 4:00 p.m. All bids shall remain firm for sixty (60) days following opening of bids. Each contractor and each sub-contractor shall be licensed in the community where the work will occur. The Contract will be written to retain 10% for each request for payment. When the Contract is 50% completed, one-half of the amount retained shall be returned to the Contractor. However, the Architect must approve the Application For Payment. The Contractor must be making satisfactory progress and there must be no specific cause for greater withholding. The Owner-Contractor Agreement will be the Standard Form of Agreement Between Owner and Contractor, AIA Document A101, 2007 edition. The Owner requires that all Bids shall comply with the bidding requirements specified in the Instructions To Bidders. The Owner may, at its discretion waive informalities in Bids, but is not obligated to do so, nor does it represent that it will do so. The Owner also reserves the right to reject any and all Bids. Under no circumstances will the Owner waive any informality which, by such waiver, would give one Bidder a substantial advantage or benefit not enjoyed by all other Bidders. Bonding companies for Performance and Payment Bonds must be listed in the U.S. Treasury Circular No. 570. A Bid Bond made payable to the Northwest Area School District in the amount of 10% of each Base Bid shall accompany each bid, executed by the Contractor and a surety company licensed to do business in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, as a guarantee that, if the bid is accepted, the bidder shall execute the proposed contract and shall furnish and pay for a Performance and Payment Bond in the amount of 100% of the Contract Price as security for the performance of the Contract and payment of all costs thereof, upon execution of Contract. If, after fifteen (15) days the bidder shall fail to execute said Contract and Bond, the Bid Bond shall be forfeited to the Owner as liquidated damages. The Bid Bond of all bidders, except the three low bidders, will be returned within ten (10) days after the opening of the bids. The Bid Bond of the three low bidders for each prime contract will be returned within three days after the executed Contracts and required bonds have been approved by the Owner. The successful Bidder will be required to file a Stipulation Against Mechanic's Liens prior to commencing work. Bidders will be permitted to access the site by appointment only. Contact the Owner’s Representative listed in the Project Manual. The Bidding Documents and Forms of Proposal may be examined at the following site during regular business hours: Quad Three Group, Inc., 37 North Washington Street, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 18701, telephone 570-8294200, facsimile 570-829-3732. Dodge Editorial of NEPCA, 1075 Oak Street, Suite 3, Pittston, PA 18640, telephone 570-655-5905, facsimile 570655-5960. Pre-Bid Conference: A Non-Mandatory Pre-Bid Conference will be held at 10:00 a.m. on Thursday, May 2, 2013, in the Auditorium of the Northwest Area Senior High / Middle School, located at 243 Thorne Hill Road, Shickshinny, PA 18655. All Bidders to meet at the main entrance, located on Thorne Hill Road prior to start of Pre-Bid Conference .

FUN GETAWAYS!
SENECA LAKE Wine & Cheese Weekend Apr. 27 & 28 YANKEES vs. Orioles 4/14 vs Blue Jays 4/28 New Reduced Price Mention code “BASE” for more savings. Peddler’s Village Strawberry Festival May 4 Sight & Sound “Noah” Dinner @ Hershey Farm May 18 Philadelphia Sightseeing & Eastern State Penitentiary Tour 5/18 Niagara Falls June 7-9, includes 2 cruises, tours and 5 meals 1-800-432-8069 4 door, 4 x4 LT Power windows & locks. Auto, 2 owners. Not a Nicer One! $3,995

CHEVY ‘00 BLAZER

AUDI S5 CONV. Sprint blue, black / brown leather int., navigation, 7 spd auto turbo, AWD 10 CHEVY IMPALA LT silver, V6, 50k miles 08 PONTIAC GRAND PRIX blue, auto, V6 07 NISSAN SENTRA S black, auto, 4 cyl.. 07 BUICK LUCERNE CXL, silver, grey leather 06 AUDI A8L grey, blue leather, navigation AWD 05 AUDI A6 All Road. Green 2 tone, leather AWD 05 VW JETTA GLS grey, black leather, sunroof, alloys 04 CHEVY MALIBU LT Blue 04 NISSAN MAXIMA LS silver, auto, sunroof 03 SUZUKI AERO Silver, 5 speed 01 VOLVO V70 CROSS OVER SW, blue, blue leather, AWD 73 PORSCHE 914 green & black, 5 spd, 62k miles.

11

www.acmecarsales.net

800-825-1609

beige leather, moon roof. 73K Warranty $10,900.

CADILLAC ‘05 DEVILLE DTS Metallic green,

VITO’S & GINO’S
288-8995
‘00 Toyota Corolla 4 door, 4 cylinder, automatic. Runs great. $2,995 Grand Cherokee V8. Runs great. Power windows & doors. $2,495 ‘96 F150 Pickup. auto, runs good. $1,995 Pontiac ‘96 Grand Prix. White, air, power windows & brakes, 4 door, runs good, 106K. $2,395 ‘01 Ford Taurus SES 4 door, air, power doors & windows. $2,995 ‘99 Chevy S10 Blazer 4 door, power windows, doors & seats. 126,000 miles. $2,995 ‘03 Ford Windstar 4 door, all power options. 96,000 miles. $3,400 ‘04 Nissan Armada, 7 passenger. 4wd. Excellent condition. $10,900 ‘09 Mercedes GL450, 7 passenger. Too many options to list. 30K miles. Garage kept. Cream puff. $42,500 FINANCING AVAILABLE Auto Sales 949 Wyoming Ave, Forty Fort

570-288-6227
444 Market St. Kingston

MAFFEI Auto Sales

ALL JUNK CARS! CA$H PAID

WANTED!

570-301-3602
Coupe. 1 Owner. Extra clean. $10,999

DODGE `02 INTREPID

MERCEDES ‘01 BENZ CLK 320
MAFFEI Auto Sales

570-288-6227
444 Market St. Kingston

White, 4 door, good condition. 151,000 miles. Asking $2,700 570-954-7459

windows & locks, CD- perfect inside and out. $9,000 firm. 287-1150 or 301-4102

NISSAN ‘07 ALTIMA SEDAN Automatic, power

310

Attorney Services

BANKRUPTCY

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MARTZ CURBSIDE EXPRESS TO NYC Only $25 round trip

miles, 4 cylinder, great on gas $4,495

DODGE ‘99 STRATUS 71,000 original

08 JEEP PATRIOT SPORT black, 4 cyl. 5 speed 4x4 07 GMC YUKON 4X4 DENALI black, 3rd seat, Navigation 07 DODGE CARAVAN SXT green, 4 door, 7 pass mini van 06 HYUNDAI SANTA FE GLS grey V6 AWD ’06 PONTIAC MONTANNA AWD blue, entertainment center 7 pas senger mini van 06 HONDA PILOT EX silver, 3rd seat, 4x4 06 CHEVY 1500
SILVERADO REG CAB

SUVS, VANS, TRUCKS, 4 X4’s

DODGE ‘06 STRATUS
4 door, 4 cylinder. Excellent gas mileage. $5,495

NISSAN ‘01 ALTIMA GXE TOYOTA `00 CELICA GT

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

Black, V6 auto, 82,000 miles, all power, Good condition. $3,700. 570-868-6321

FORD `98 MUSTANG FORD ‘08 FOCUS SE

4 cyl. 5 speed. ECONOMY! $2995. 570-696-4377

back, motor replaced. Including trailer hitch. Reduced to $995 (570)333-4827

FORD `87 ECONOLINE 350 CARGO VAN With 11’ extended

black, V6, 4x4 06 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LAREDO, gold, V6 4x4 06 JEEP COMMANDER black, 3rd seat, entertainment center, 4x4 06 DODGE DAKOTA black, 4 door, V8, 4x4 truck 06 DODGE RAM 1500 QUAD CAB, Black, V8, 4x4 truck 06 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER LS, SILVER, 4X4 05 DODGE DURANGO SXT blue, 3rd seat, 4x4 05 CHEVY COLORADO CLUB CAB grey 4x4 truck 05 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY TOURING, blue, 7 passenger mini van 05 MITSUBISHI ENDEAVOR XLS silver, V6, 4x4 05 MERCURY MARINER PREMIUM. Seafoam green, leather, V6, FWD 05 MERCURY MARINER PREMIER white, tan leather, AWD 05 FORD ESCAPE XLT Red, V6 4x4 05 TOYOTA SIENNA LE gold, 7 passenger mini van 05 HYUNDAI TUSCON LX green auto, AWD 04 FORD EXPLORER XLT green 3rd seat 4x4 04 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LAREDO silver V6, 4x4 04 CHEVY AVALANCHE LT green, grey leather, 4 door 4x4 truck 03 MITSUBISHI OUTLANDER XLS red, V6, 4x4 03 FORD F150 XLT SUPERCREW 4x4 truck, gold 02 DODGE DURANGO SLT blue, 3rd seat 4x4 02 TOYOTA TUNDRA SR5 XCAB TRUCK white 4x4 01 DODGE DAKOTA CLUB CAB SPORT blue, V6, 4x4 truck 01 FORD RANGER REG CAB TRUCK white, V6 2WD 01 DODGE RAM 1500 QUAD CAB SLT 5.9 liter, brown, 8’ box 4x4 truck 99 FORD F150 SUPER CAB, silver 4x4 truck
QUAD CAB SLT

06

truck red, 4x4

NISSAN XTERRA

Silver, black interior. 4 door sedan. Power windows and locks, CD. 104k highway miles. Runs excellent. $6800 negotiable. 570-578-9222

leather, moon roof, 99k. Warranty. $8,495

HONDA ‘03 ACCORD EX-L V6, , black/tan

Buying Junk Cars Used Cars & Trucks 574 -1275
sun roof, alloys, dk. blue, 62k. Warranty. $9,200

5 speed manual transmission. 193k miles. Runs well, as is. REDUCED to $850, OBO. 570-240-7539

Highest Prices Paid

HONDA ‘05 CIVIC EX 5 speed manual,
MAFFEI Auto Sales

570-288-6227
444 Market St. Kingston

MAFFEI Auto Sales

HONDA ‘12 ACCORD LX
4 cylinder, grey, 9K. Factory Warranty. $18,995

570-288-6227
444 Market St. Kingston

112K miles. Blue, 5 speed. Air, power windows/locks, CD/cassette, Keyless entry, sunroof, new battery. Car drives and has current PA inspection. Slight rust on corner of passenger door. Clutch slips on hard acceleration. This is why its thousands less than Blue Book value. $6,500 OBO. Make an offer! Call 570-592-1629

TOYOTA ‘04 CELICA GT

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!
SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY Free Consultation. Contact Atty. Sherry Dalessandro 570-823-9006

Line up a place to live in classified!
NEW SHOPPERS SPECIAL NYC Wed. & Sat. Broadway Shows JERSEY BOYS 5/22 $99. MATILDA SMASH HIT 6/29 $155. CINDERELLA 5/22 $144. WATKINS GLEN WINE FESTIVAL 7/14 $69. RAINBOW TOURS 570-489-4761
LEAVE FROM PARK & RIDE Rt. 309 or Rt. 315

570-288-6227
444 Market St. Kingston

MAFFEI Auto Sales

KIA `10 RIO LX 4 door sedan, auto,

Electric blue metallic. One owner. Leather, moonroof. Excellent condition. $4,295 MANUAL Honda, 1999, CR-V manual, $2,800. 736-6555

FORD ‘02 TAURUS SEL

air, CD, 51,470 miles, Runs great, good gAs mileage, excellent condition. $9,000. (570) 459-0360

One owner, auto, air. Warranty. $6,900

TOYOTA CAMRY

570-288-6227
444 Market St. Kingston

MAFFEI Auto Sales

330

Child Care

AUTO SERVICE
DIRECTORY

412 Autos for Sale

In my Kingston home. Licensed. Infant to 6 years. 570-283-0336

DAYCARE

360

Instruction & Training

Silver, 106K, looks & runs like new. $3,300, OBO 570-702-6023 570-814-2344

SATURN `01 LS1

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 888-220-3984 www.Centura Online.com

412 Autos for Sale

ESCORTED GROUP CRUISE
New Lower Rates and Past Passenger Specials 9/14-9/22/2013 Sat. to Sun. Carnival Splendor to Turks, HalfMoonCay and Nassau Bus to NYC, Baggage Handling, All Taxes Plus the “The Chatter” Band performs From $799. per person

LEO’S AUTO SALES 93 Butler Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA 570-825-8253 BMW ‘99 323 is 2 door, 6 cyl, auto, 82,000 original miles. One owner. excellent condition $5,995. Ford ‘97 Explorer Sport 2 door, 6 cylinder auto, 4 WD. Clean in & out! Good condition. $1,750. Current Inspection On All Vehicles DEALER

472

Auto Services

460 AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE DIRECTORY
462 Auto Accessories

$ WANTED JUNK $ VEHICLES LISPI TOWING
We pick up 822-0995

MANAGER BLOWOUT SALE
2010 Dodge Challenger SRT
6-Speed

$

33,400
11K Miles

380

Travel

Black Lake, NY
Come relax & enjoy great fishing & tranquility at it’s finest. Housekeeping cottages on the water with all the amenities of home.

150 Special Notices
ADOPT A loving couple dreams of becoming a family. A life filled with love & opportunity awaits your newborn. Expenses paid. Nadine & Jeff 1-866-936-7580 ADOPTING YOUR NEWBORN is our dream. Endless love, joy, security awaits. Maryann and Matt 888-225-7173 Expenses Paid < < < < < <

NEED A VACATION?

(315) 375-8962
daveroll@black lakemarine.com www.blacklake4fish.com

Call Now!

ASK ABOUT THE NEW DRINK PACKAGE

Only 45,000 miles. Well appointed & well maintained, Well, what are you waiting for? Call to see it. 570-287-0384 $10,200

BUICK `07 LUCERNE Clean & Classy.

SUNVISORS, Lund. 94-03 Dodge, $125, 99-06 Chevy Silverado, $150, 94-01 Dodge ram, $125. after 3pm 655-3197

468

Auto Parts

All Junk Cars & Trucks Wanted
Highest Prices Paid In CA$H
FREE PICKUP

2009 Chevy Silverado Crew Cab LTZ
$

29,899
Leather, Roof

2011 Toyota 4Runner SR5
$

34,500
10K Miles

VITO & GINO’S
GET THE WORD OUT with a Classified Ad. 570-829-7130

2012 Chevy Avalanche
$

BROADWAY SHOW BUS TRIPS
Sat. May 25th $169 Orchestra Seats

CINDERELLA

Space Limited Call this week! 570-288-8747 1-800-545-7099

LAW DIRECTORY
Don’t Keep Your Practice a Secret!

LIKE NEW USED TIRES & BATTERIES $20 & UP
570-288-8995 Forty Fort

38,800

2012 Buick Lacrosse
Premium Package

$

570-574-1275
Cars & Full Size Trucks. For prices... Lamoreaux Auto Parts 477-2562

24,700
35K Miles

WANTED

2008 Audi A-4 2.0T Quattro
$

couple dreams of adopting a baby. Promises secure endless love. expenses Paid Alana & Ed 1-888-456-6648

ADOPTION: A loving devoted

19,999

MATILDA July 17 $140 (Mezz Seats) MOTOWN ON BROADWAY
Orchestra Seats

NEPA TOURS Travel more. Do more BROADWAY 5/26 Jersey Boys Bus, Orchestra Seats, Post Theater Dinner Packages Starting @ $160 Dave Matthews Band @ Montage 5/29 Bus-Ticket-Tailgate Double Reservation @ $90 Kenny Chesney 6/8 Bus-Ticket-Tailgate Best Prices & Seats in Town! @ $220 www.NepaBus Tours.com 570-239-0031

Call 829-7130 To Place Your Ad
310 Attorney Services 310 Attorney Services 150 Special Notices 150 Special Notices
BANKRUPTCY
FREE Bankruptcy Consultation Payment plans. Carol Baltimore 570-822-1959 SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY Free Consultation. Contact Atty. Sherry Dalessandro 570-823-9006

2012 GMC Yukon XL
Leather, 16K Miles

$

36,800

Wed. Aug 7th $159

JERSEY BOYS
Wed. Aug. 7th $129
(Front Mezz)

Blossom appliqués are the new wedding dress trend this spring and summer season. bridezella.net

ALL SHOWS INCLUDE BUS & SHOW TICKETS

Guaranteed Low Fees Payment Plan! Colleen Metroka 570-592-4796
Mention this ad when you call!

FREE CONSULT

375 W Main St, Plymouth, PA 18651

Octagon Family Restaurant
570-779-2288

2009 Acura TL
Technology Package

$

19,800

W eekend S pecial
Dine in only. Valid Saturday & Sunday. One coupon per party/table. Cannot be combined with any other offers.

CALL ROSEANN @ 655-4 4247
To Reserve Your Seats

DIVORCE No Fault $295 divorce295.com Atty. Kurlancheek 800-324-9748 W-B

GET THE WORD OUT with a Classified Ad. 570-829-7130

$13.95 for a Large Plain Pie & a Dozen Wings

2012 Chevy Suburban LTZ
$60K New, Every Option!

$

46,300

*Prices Plus Tax & Tags.

Home of the Original ‘O-Bar’ Pizza

662 WYOMING AVE., KINGSTON

288-0319

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

K E N P OL L OCK N IS S A N
2013 N IS S A N S E N TRA 1.8S M /T 2 A T TH IS P R IC E
STK#N 23416 M O D EL# 12063 V IN # 689662 M SR P $17,710

SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013 PAGE 3E

H U R R Y IN! O FFER S END A P R IL 30TH

2013 N IS S A N A L TIM A 2.5S S E DA N 2 A T TH IS P R IC E
4 Cyl, CVT , A/C, PW , PDL , Zer o Gr a vit y S ea t s , F lo o rM a t s & S p la s h Gu a r ds
STK#N 23471 M O D EL# 13113 V IN # 243717 M SR P $23,925

4 Cyl, 6 S p eed M a n u a l, PW , PDL , Pr ot ect io n Pkg, F lo o r Mat s & S p la s h Gu a r ds

BUY$ FOR

W / $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H

16,595
OR

$0 DO W N LEA SE!

*

BUY$ FOR

SA VE SIM ILA R $$ O N A LL SENTR A S IN STO C K O NLY

L EAS E FO R

$

* $199 Perm o n t h p lu s t a x, 36 m o p eryea r ; Res id u a l= $11157.30; N M AC @ T ier1; 0 Ca s h D o w n o r egis t r a t io n f ees ; T o t a l d u

19 9
3 A T TH IS P R IC E

*

SA VE $3000 O R M O R E O N A LL 2013 A LTIM A SEDA NS IN STO C K O NLY

20 ,925
W / $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H

$0 DO W N LEA SE!

*

P ER M O.
P lu s Ta x.

n t h lea s e; 12,000 m iles M u s tb e a p p r o ved t hr u rT r a d e E q u it y (+ ) p lu s e @ d eliver y= 0.

2013 N IS S A N A L TIM A 2.5S COUP E
STK#N 22778 M O D EL# 15113 V IN # 140942 M SR P $27,430

W HE

LEA SE W /O NLY $2000 TO TA L DO W N!

4 Cyl, CVT , Co n v Pkg, PW , PD L , Cr u is e, T ilt , Allo ys , Blu et o o t h & M u ch M o r e

SA VE $3400 O R M O R E O FF M SR P O N A LL 2013 A LTIM A C O U P ES IN STO C K O NLY !

COM E IN YOU W IN!
ODDS AR E YOU’ LL SAVE BIG $$$
You rPen n sylva n ia M ASSIV E IN V EN TO RY!

F O D L E

L EAS E $ FO R

* $249 Perm o n t h p lu s t a x, 36 m o p eryea r ; Res id u a l= $14594.25; N M AC @ T ier1; 0 Ca s h D o w n o r egis t r a t io n f ees ; T o t a l d u

2 4 9 P ER M O.
P lu s Ta x.
n t h lea s e; 12,000 m iles M u s tb e a p p r o ved t hr u rT r a d e E q u it y (+ ) p lu s e @ d eliver y= 0.

OR

*

2013 N IS S A N M A XIM A 3.5S S DN
3 A T TH IS P R IC E
LEA SE W /O NLY $2000 TO TA L @ DELIVER Y !

STK#N 23095 M O D EL# 16113 V IN # 817180 M SR P $34,440

LS EA

V6, CVT , A/ C, PW , PD L , Cr u is e, T ilt , Allo ys , F lo o r Ma t s , & M u ch, M u ch M o r e!

BUY$ FOR
L EAS E FO R

W / $10 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE & $5 0 0 N M AC B O N U S CAS H

23,995
$

*

BUY$ FOR
L EAS E FO R

* $269 Perm o n t h p lu s t a x, 39 m o n t h lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r ; Res id u a l= $14537.90; M u s tb e a p p r o ved t hr u N M AC @ T ier1; $1790.50 Ca s h D o w n o rT r a d e E q u it y (+ ) p lu s r egis t r a t io n f ees ; T o t a l d u e @ d eliver y= $2,000.

269

OR

W / $3 0 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE & $5 0 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H

27,995
OR

SA VE O VER $6000 O FF M SR P O N A LL 2013 M A XIM A S IN STO C K O NLY

*

*

P ER M O.
P lu s Ta x.

$

* $299 Perm o n t h p lu s t a x, 39 m o n t h lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r ; Res id u a l= $19630.80; M u s tb e a p p r o ved t hr u N M AC @ T ier1; $1790.50 Ca s h D o w n o rT r a d e E q u it y (+ ) p lu s r egis t r a t io n f ees ; T o t a l d u e @ d eliver y= $2,000. $1000 N is s a n L ea s e Reb a t e In clu d ed .

2 9 9 P ER M O.
P lu s Ta x.

*

S P E CIA L E DITION !
SIM ILA R SA VING S

2013 N IS S A N ROGUE S A W D
14 A T TH IS P R IC E
O N A LL 2013 R O G U ES IN STO C K

2013 N IS S A N P A THFIN DE R S 4X4
2 A T TH IS P R IC E
SA VE $3000 O R M O R E O N A LL NEW 2013 P A TH FINDER S IN STO C K O NLY

100

$0 DO W N LEA SE!
STK#N22669 M O DEL# 22213 V IN# 108387 M SRP $26,020

4 Cyl, CVT , AW D, Allo ys , S p ec E d tPkg, A/C, PW , PDL , Cru is e, T ilt , a n d M u ch, M u ch M o re!

BUY$ FOR

W / $150 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE, $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H , $50 0 CU S TOM ER B ON U S CAS H & $50 0 N ER B ON U S CAS H

21,520

*

LEAS E $ OR FOR

259
$

*

PER M O.
P lu s Ta x.

500
B U Y FO R
*

N EW V EH ICL ES AV AIL ABL E

LEA SE W /O NLY $2000 TO TA L DO W N!
STK#N23017 M O DEL# 25013 V IN# 608503 M SRP $31,170

V6, CVT , Allo ys , All New Des ign , 3 Ro w S ea t in g, PW , PDl, Cru is e, T ilt , a n d M u ch, M u ch M o re!

BUY$ FOR

* $259 Perm o n t h p lu s t a x, 39 m o n t h lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r ; Res id u a l= $14571.20; M u s tb e a p p r o ved t hr u N M AC @ T ier1; 0 Ca s h D o w n o rT r a d e E q u it y (+ ) p lu s r egis t r a t io n f es ; T o t ald u e@ d eliver y= 0. $1100 N is s a n L ea s e Reb a t e, $500 Cu s t o m erBo n u s Ca s h & $500 N E R Bo n u s Ca s h.

70 Altim a sAva ila b le 120 Rogu esAva ila b le 45 Pa th fin d ersAva ila b le 25 Ju k esAva ila b le
Th e

STK#N 23232 M O D EL# 20213 M SR P $23,050

2013 N IS S A N JUK E S A W D

28 ,170

*

LEAS E $ OR FOR

W / $5 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE

* $299 Perm o n t h p lu s t a x, 39 m o n t h lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r ; Res id u a l= $18,702; M u s tb e a p p r o ved t hr u N M AC @ T ier1; $1790.50 Ca s h D o w n o rT r a d e E q u it y (+ ) p lu s r egis t r a t io n f ees ; T o t a l d u e @ d eliver y= $2000.

299

*

PER MO.
P lu s Ta x.

LEA SE W /O NLY $2000 TO TA L DO W N!

SIM ILA R SA VING S O N A LL 2013 NISSA N JU KES IN STO C K O NLY

Tu r b o 4 Cyl, Au t o , A/ C, Allo ys , PW , PDL , Cr u is e, T ilt , F lo o rM a t s & S p la s h Gu a r ds

10 A T TH IS P R IC E

W / $75 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE & $5 0 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H

19 ,9 9 9

OR

$

* $219 Perm o n t h p lu s t a x, 39 m o n t h lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r ; Res id u a l= $13138.50; M u s tb e a p p r o ved t hr u N M AC @ T ier1; $1790.50 Ca s h D o w n o rT r a d e E q u it y (+ ) p lu s r egis t r a t io n f ees ; T o t a l d u e @ d eliver y= $2000.

2 19

L EAS E FO R

100’ S MO RECARS,
TRUCK S, & SUV S TO CH O O SEFRO M!

*

P ER M O.
P lu s Ta x.

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®

PAGE 4E

SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013 427 Commercial Trucks & Equipment 451 Trucks/ SUVs/Vans 451 Trucks/ SUVs/Vans 451 Trucks/ SUVs/Vans 451 Trucks/ SUVs/Vans 630 Money To Loan
“We can erase your bad credit 100% GUARANTEED.” Attorneys for the Federal Trade Commission say they’ve never seen a legitimate credit repair operation. No one can legally remove accurate and timely information from your credit report. It’s a process that starts with you and involves time and a conscious effort to pay your debts. Learn about managing credit and debt at ftc. gov/credit. A message from The Times Leader and the FTC.

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com 708 Antiques & Collectibles 710 Appliances 716
REFRIGERATOR. Whirlpool. 6 years old. Excellent condition. $150 570-709-6664 VACUUMS, two, Bissell, upright, less than 2 years old. Excellent condition. 12 amps with onboard tools and 12” lighted glide path. Uses #7 filtrate bags. $40, OBO. Royal Hand, like new with onboard tools. Bagless, powerful suction. Needs filter cover. $35, OBO. 570-357-7926

412 Autos for Sale

VOLKSWAGEN `03 BEETLE TURBO Blue, leather heated seats. 100,000 miles, automatic, all power. Runs 110% $5,000, OBO (570)362-0581

Building Materials

VW ‘04 JETTAS CHOOSE FROM 2 Starting at $7,350.
Leather or cloth, moonroof & warranties

behind. Turnkey operation. $14,000. 570-899-8478

TRAILER ‘09 FOOD CONCESSION 6’ X 12’, tow

TOYOTA ‘07 TACOMA Regular cab, 4 x 2,
1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park 1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park 4 cylinder, white. 27K. Warranty. $10,595

439

Motorcycles

570-288-6227
444 Market St. Kingston

MAFFEI Auto Sales

415 Autos-Antique & Classic

original 350 engine, black with white stripes, 63,000 miles. $23,500. 570-825-6259

CHEVROLET `70 CAMARO Z28 Arizona car, auto,

Standard.UNDER 5K MILES. Chrome engine, lower forks, primary covers, sprocket, matching flame grips/pegs, Sampson exhaust, mini sissy bar, power commander /high flow air cleaner, garage kept and new rear tire, Chopper Blue paint. Asking $10,900 obo. call Tony @ 570-905-7066 HARLEY DAVIDSON, 883. $2,500. 570-736-6555

HARLEY ‘06 SOFTAIL

CHEVY ‘04 SILVERADO 2WD, 6 cyl. One

owner. Extra Clean $5995. 570-696-4377

LIKE NEW! $3995. 570-696-4377

FORD ‘00 WINDSTAR SEL Leather,

570-288-6227
444 Market St. Kingston

MAFFEI Auto Sales

JEEP ‘04 GRAND CHEROKEE LIMITED
108k, V8, AWD, leather, moonroof. Stunning! $7,995

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

DRESSER, low curved, $100, Secretary warm gold finish, $125, Dresser, tall with mirror, $150, Vanity, Petite style dresser, mirror, $125, Bed, full size, rounded footboard, $125, pair leather turn of the century rockers, $150, copper boiler, %65, cocoa cola clock, $30, pastel braided Pottery Barn rug, $60. Will email photos, call for details. 570-675-2057 VANITY, Antique with mirror and 6 drawers. Good condition. $150 570-446-8672 WHEELBARROW with steel front wheel, $25 OBO. LOG ROLLING tool, $40. SHOVEL, old coal, $25. 693-1918 YEARBOOKS. Coughlin (30) ‘282000. GAR -(18)) ‘37-’06, Meyers (15) ‘53-’03, Pittston (6) ‘67-’75, WVW (12), 1967-2000,Kingston (11) ‘32-’52, Hazleton, (8) ‘40-’61, Plains, (3) ‘66-’68, Hanover ‘51-’74. Prices vary depending on condition. $20-$40 each. Call for further details & additional school editions. 570-8254721 arthurh302@ aol.com

STORM DOOR, wooden glass, with screen. 30”X80” and wooden screen door, 30” X 80” both open on left, both for $25. WOOD PIECES, (2) pressure treated 2” X8” X6”, average, 25 pieces for $20. OBO 570-693-1918 WINDOWS Replacement new 116”x27.5” & 118”x27” white vinyl double hung insulated glass 1/2 screen $55. each or 2 for $100. (2) 16”x16” concrete chimney caps $10. each. Soffit panels, white 41 pieces, $115, Call for details. 570-735-7658

712

Baby Items

CHEVY ‘04 SILVERADO Z71 4x4 Contractor’s
cap. One Owner. NICE CLEAN TRUCK! $7995. 570-696-4377

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

garage kept. 58,000 original miles. asking $8500. 570-8146091 or 825-8195

FORD `95 MUSTANG GT Mint condition.

SUZUKI ‘01 VS 800 GL INTRUDER
Garage kept, no rust, lots of chrome, black with teal green flake. Includes storage jack & 2 helmets. $3600 570-410-1026

Fiberglass cap. ONE OWNER $7995. 570-696-4377

FORD ‘05 SUPER CAB 4X4

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

457 Wanted to Buy Auto

700 MERCHANDISE
702 Air Conditioners

BEDDING & DECOR Nursery, comforter, bed skirt, bumper, lamp and wall hanging, like new. $40, CAR SEAT, Evenflo, $20, ROCKER, Oak, Excellent, $25 570-256-0962 BOOSTER SEAT, Fisher Price deluxe, $6. DIAPER GENIE, $6. BABY BATH, $6. All in new condition. 570-788-0621 STROLLERS Graco Metro-Lite, blue /gray pattern. Chicco Capri, tangerine color. Both lightweight & easy to fold. Like new. $20 each. Call 570-883-7049.

726

Clothing

cloth interior, excellent condition. 88,000 miles. Dallas area. $9,000 570-690-4363

DODGE `05 DAKOTA SPORT Two door. 4 WD,

GET THE WORD OUT with a Classified Ad. 570-829-7130

JEEP ‘10 GRAND CHEROKEE LAREDO V6, 4x4, 29k, white.
Factory Warranty. $20,495

1 owner, garage kept, 65k original miles, black with grey leather interior, all original & never seen snow. $7,995. Call 570-237-5119

MAZDA `88 RX-7 CONVERTIBLE

442 RVs & Campers

four burner stove with oven, bath with sink, shower & toilet, heat, awning. $975, good condition. 570-388-6926

SUNLINE ‘82 17’, sleeps six,

Newer tires, ideal delivery van, or for flea markets $1,000 (570) 287-8410

DODGE `98 CARAVAN

GMC ‘03 ENVOY 4X4, V6, DVD, 3rd
row seat, LIKE NEW! $5995. 570-696-4377

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

570-288-6227
444 Market St. Kingston V6, light green/tan leather, one owner. Fully serviced. Extended Warranty. $9,850

MAFFEI Auto Sales

All Junk Cars & Trucks Wanted
Highest Prices Paid In CA$H
FREE PICKUP

COMMUNION SUIT, Boys. Navy, size 8 reg. comes with off white dress shirt. Excellent condition. $45. 570-609-5012 JACKETS, women’s, $2 each. 570-823-6986 MATERNITY CLOTHES. Summer. XL. 13 shirts, 1 dress, 3 pants. All for $30. Will deliver. 570-762-6322 RAIN COAT, ladies, size M, 1/2 length. for fishing and casual wear. Reversible. New. $5. 696-1927

AIR CONDITIONER, Haier 5000 BTU, used April 2012October 2012. Works great. $50. 570-357-7926 AIR CONDITIONER. Carrier, through the wall. 16,000 BTU 220v. $50 570-430-9077 MICROWAVE. Whirlpool. Over stove mount. Very good condition. $100. 570-406-5661

714

Bridal Items

LEXUS ’03 ES 300

710

Appliances

418

Auto Miscellaneous

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

AUTOMOTIVE PARTS, 1950’s pumps, fans, carbs, dist. caps, coils, etc., $800. 570-883-4443

421

Boats & Marinas

171/2 ft. with outboard 85hp motor. Bikini top, trailer included. Runs excellent. $2,500, OBO. 570-714-3300 570-675-8693

BAYLINER ’88 CAPRI

Runs great! 211,000 miles, 4x4, new windshield, alternator, front wheel studs, spark plug wires, ignition module, brakes, throttle body gasket, 3 oxygen sensors, fuel pump, tank, & filter. New tires with alloy rims. New transmission. $4,000, OBO. 570-793-5593

CHEVROLET `98 SILVERADO 1500 EXTENDED CAB LS

DODGE ‘06 DAKOTA CLUB CAB
6 speed, 2WD. EXTRA SHARP! $5995. 570-696-4377

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

Power steering and power brakes, rebuilt engine with less than 10,000 miles. Good condition. $2,450 (570)885-0418

FORD `93 RANGER

2006, white. Engine, 4.7L, V8, 16V, 4WD, premium wheels, air, alarm system, ADJ AM/FM/CD, Sunroof, third seating, ABS brakes, onstar, towing package, safari wrap, and MUCH MORE! 88,000 miles, never off-road. Excellent condition. $13,600 (570)709-7210

COMMANDER, LIMITED

JEEP `06

570-288-6227
444 Market St. Kingston

MAFFEI Auto Sales

708

Antiques & Collectibles

DRYER. GE electric. 5 cycle, heavy duty, extra large capacity. $175. 735-8730 FREEZER. Kenmore upright. 22x57, 6.5 cu ft. New in box, never opened, sacrifice $225. 570-457-7854

WEDDING DRESS White beaded halter type. Pearls, full sip and veil included. Size 9/10. $120 for all. 570-655-1414

730

Computer Equipment & Software

716

570-574-1275

Building Materials

MASTERCRAFT ‘95 JET DUO Kraze jet ski with

CHEVROLET PICK UP`99 S-10 ZR2 132,000 miles, red
in color, new tires, runs good. R-title, Must See! $3,200 Call after 3:30. (570) 825-0429

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!
Very Low Mileage, 52,000. Car was garaged kept, and owned by a nonsmoker. $17,000. (570) 474-0595

SUBARU `10 OUTBACK

6 cylinder, 4x4. Select Trac, silver, 105k. Very good condition. Fully Serviced. Warranty. $7,995

JEEP ‘04 GRAND CHEROKEE LAREDO

owner, garage kept. Michelin Tires, Owner is unable to drive anymore. $12,995 570-706-5033

TOYOTA `03 HIGHLANDER 55,000 miles, one

600 FINANCIAL
610 Business Opportunities

Old Toys, model kits, Bikes, dolls, guns, Mining Items, trains & Musical Instruments, Hess. 474-9544

To place your ad Call Toll Free $ ANTIQUES BUYING $ 1-800-427-8649
MICROWAVE, white, 900 watts. $20. 570-675-0005 MICROWAVE. Amana. Small. $20 570-545-7006 MIXER, Sunbeam Mix Master, brown trim with all stainless steel metal, 12 speed, two bowls, small and large. 225 watts, beater and dough hooks. Excellent condition. $70 570-824-9049 REFRIGERATOR. Black, Frigidaire Gallery. 18 cu. ft. with icemaker. New in Dec. ask $600 570-288-5801

DOORS, (6) solid wood. Oak. $150 ea. MAILBOX, handmade, solid wrought iron. $100 570-735-8730 KITCHEN REMODEL items. cabinets, island, formica countertops, table and chairs, $125, Light fixture, fluorescent, $80, Sink, S/S double, $50, Chandelier, $50 Electric range, ceramic countertop, 1.5 ovens $500. Bifold doors, $40 (2). Avail 5/22-make appt to see now. 570-779-3653

MONITER , HP, almost new, $10. PRINTER, HP, $15. 570-288-4847

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!
PRINTER, A10 HP, two years old, touch screen, easy to operate. Excellent condition. $35. 570-357-7926

TOYOTA ‘05 HIGHLANDER
V6, AWD, red leather, sunroof. 95K, mint condition. Warranty. $12,995

trailer & custom cover. $1,000. OBO. 570-840-4112

570-288-6227
444 Market St. Kingston

MAFFEI Auto Sales

570-288-6227
444 Market St. Kingston

MAFFEI Auto Sales

VISUAL COMMUNICATIONS BIZ FOR SALE B to B Services Repeat Client Base Low Overhead Great Location High Net to Gross No Experience Necessary Finance & Training Available 1-800-796-3234

BASEBALL CARDS, (800) 1994 Topps, $8. Boston Red Sox, (150), $5. N.Y. Yankees, (150), $5. Very nice for a young baseball collector. 570-313-5214 or 570-313-3859 BOOKS. War History collection on all wars of the United States and Foreign. 15 books. $30 Call Jim at 655-9474 bing1124.1@ netzero.com

732

Exercise Equipment

GET THE WORD OUT with a Classified Ad. 570-829-7130

PVC SEWER PIPE 10”LX3”D, 4 pieces $12. each. Heavy duty steel shelving, like new, 8 sections 8’lx39”w. made in USA $200 Per section. 570-902-5273

HARD CORE GYM, Plate loaded cable pulley machine; lat pull down, chest press, pec deck, leg ext, lower pulley for curling. $150. 570-868-6024
Say it HERE in the Classifieds! 570-829-7130

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TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013 PAGE 5E

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

Style, Class, Excellence
#1 Luxury Vehicle Destination
MOTORWORLD

North Eastern Pennsylvania’s y
CADILLAC

WWW.MOTORWORLDGROUP.COM

MOTORWORLD DRIVE, JUST OFF INTERSTATE 81, WILKES-BARRE
SALES HOURS: MONDAY - FRIDAY: 9AM-8PM SATURDAY: 9AM-5PM SUNDAY: OPEN FOR OUTDOOR BROWSING NOON - 5PM

New 2013 Mercedes-Benz

C300 Sport Sedan 4MATIC® AWD
LEASE FOR

0.9% APR 1.9% APR
FINANCING FOR 24 TO 36 MONTHS FINANCING FOR 37 TO 60 MONTHS ON ALL NEW ACURA 2013 ILX, TSX, TL & RDX MODELS*
NEW 2014 Acura

$369*
NEW 2013 LEXUS RX350 AWD

$42,355 MSRP Plus Tax for 27 Months

$4,063 Total Due at Delivery. SECURITY DEPOSIT INCLUDED. $2,899.00 Cap Cost. 10K MILES PER YEAR. RESIDUAL $30,072.00.

27 MONTHS Plus Tax + Tags*

LEASE FOR

$

439
MSRP $46,800

E350 Sedan 4MATIC® AWD
LEASE FOR

New 2013 Mercedes-Benz

RL X
IN STOCK

NOW GET $1,000
NEW 2013

CADILLAC ATS AWD STANDARD COLLECTION 2.0T
$1,500 CADILLAC LUXURY LEASE CONQUEST OR $1,500 GM LEASE LOYALTY REBATE
STOCK # - C3776

LEXUS FINANCIAL BONUS CASH**

$599*

$58,405 MSRP Plus Tax for 27 Months

*LEASE IS BASED ON 27 MONTHLY PAYMENTS AT 10K MILES PER YEAR WITH $3,439 DOWN PLUS TAX, TAGS, TITLE AND $129 DEALER PROCESSING CHARGE DUE AT LEASE SIGNING. $0 SECURITY DEPOSIT REQUIRED. PAYMENT INCLUDES $1,000 LFS CASH. RESIDUAL IS $31,356.00. **$1,000 LEXUS FINANCIAL BONUS CASH AVAILABLE WHEN FINANCED OR LEASED WITH LFS WITH APPROVED CREDIT.

NOW!
NEW 2013 Acura
MODEL # YD2HCJNW

$4,444 Total Due at Delivery. SECURITY DEPOSIT INCLUDED. $3,050.00 Cap Cost. 10K MILES PER YEAR. RESIDUAL $40,884.00.

NEW 2013 LEXUS IS250

LEASE FOR ZERO DOWN $

MDX
LEASE FOR $

PLUS TAX/TAGS FOR 36 MONTHS*
*LEASES ARE BASED ON 36 MONTHLY PAYMENTS AT 10K MILES PER YEAR WITH $0 DOWN. INCLUDES $1,500 LUXURY LEASE CONQUEST OR $1,500 GM LEASE LOYALTY REBATE.

329

27 MONTHS Plus Tax + Tags*

LEASE FOR

$

329

GLK350 SUV 4MATIC® AWD
LEASE FOR

New 2013 Mercedes-Benz

MSRP: $39,767

NOW GET $2,000
LEXUS FINANCIAL BONUS CASH**
*LEASE IS BASED ON 27 MONTHLY PAYMENTS AT 10K MILES PER YEAR WITH $2,809 DOWN PLUS TAX, TAGS, TITLE AND $129 DEALER PROCESSING CHARGE DUE AT LEASE SIGNING. $0 SECURITY DEPOSIT REQUIRED. PAYMENT INCLUDES $2,000 LFS CASH. RESIDUAL IS $27,439.00. **$2,000 LEXUS FINANCIAL BONUS CASH AVAILABLE WHEN FINANCED OR LEASED WITH LFS WITH APPROVED CREDIT.

$419*

$44,195 MSRP Plus Tax for 30 Months

$4,713 Total Due at Delivery. SECURITY DEPOSIT INCLUDED. $3,499.00 Cap Cost. 10K MILES PER YEAR. RESIDUAL $28,727.00.

425

PLUS TAX & TAGS FOR 36 MONTHS*

- 6CL I VTECH ENGINE - 6 SPEED AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION WITH GRADE LOGIC

- LEATHER INTERIOR - POWER MOONROOF - BLUETOOTH

- VEHICLE STABILITY ASSIST - ADVANCED COMPATIBILITY ENGINEERING

NEW 2013

CADILLAC SRX LUXURY COLLECTION AWD
$1,500 CADILLAC LUXURY LEASE CONQUEST OR $1,500 GM LEASE LOYALTY REBATE
STOCK # - C3726

NEW 2013 LEXUS ES350

New 2013 Mercedes-Benz

GAP INSURANCE INCLUDED IN LEASE

*LEASE IS BASED ON 36 MONTHLY PAYMENTS AT 10K MILES PER YEAR WITH $999 DOWN PAYMENT PLUS TAX, TAGS, TITLE, $129 PROCESSING FEE AND FIRST MONTHS’ PAYMENT DUE AT LEASE SIGNING WITH APPROVED CREDIT THRU DEALER DESIGNATED LENDER. GAP INSURANCE INCLUDED. RESIDUAL $24,296.25.

27 MONTHS Plus Tax + Tags*

LEASE FOR

$

359
MSRP: $39,782

ML350 SUV 4MATIC® AWD
LEASE FOR

$619*

$54,375 MSRP Plus Tax for 30 Months

NEW 2013 Acura

TSX
299

MODEL # CU2F4CJW

ZE O DOWN ZER ZE DO DO ZERO $

LEASE FOR

PLUS TAX/TAGS FOR 36 MONTHS*
*LEASES ARE BASED ON 36 MONTHLY PAYMENTS AT 10K MILES PER YEAR WITH $0 DOWN. INCLUDES $1,500 LUXURY LEASE CONQUEST OR $1,500 GM LEASE LOYALTY REBATE.

499

$5,313 Total Due at Delivery. SECURITY DEPOSIT INCLUDED. $3,899.00 Cap Cost. 10K MILES PER YEAR. RESIDUAL $34,256.00. *LEASE IS BASED ON 27 MONTHLY PAYMENTS AT 10K MILES PER YEAR WITH $3,729 DOWN PLUS TAX, TAGS, TITLE AND $129 DEALER PROCESSING CHARGE DUE AT LEASE SIGNING. $0 SECURITY DEPOSIT REQUIRED. RESIDUAL IS $27,450.00.

NEW 2013 LEXUS CT200H

Buying a Mercedes-Benz is an investment. Here’s an exceptional opportunity.

LEASE FOR $
PLUS TAX & TAGS FOR 36 MONTHS*

- 201HP I VTECH ENGINE - 5 SPEED AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION WITH GRADE LOGIC

- LEATHER INTERIOR - POWER MOONROOF - BLUETOOTH

- VEHICLE STABILITY ASSIST - ADVANCED COMPATIBILITY ENGINEERING

NEW 2013 NE

GAP INSURANCE INCLUDED IN LEASE

*LEASE IS BASED ON 36 MONTHLY PAYMENTS AT 10K MILES PER YEAR WITH $999 DOWN PAYMENT PLUS TAX, TAGS, TITLE, $129 PROCESSING FEE AND FIRST MONTHS’ PAYMENT DUE AT LEASE SIGNING WITH APPROVED CREDIT THRU DEALER DESIGNATED LENDER. GAP INSURANCE INCLUDED. RESIDUAL $18,843.00.

COLLE CADILLAC XTS X LUXURY COLLECTION XT ECTION FWD
$1,500 CADILLAC LUXURY LEASE CONQUEST OR $1,500 GM LEASE LOYALTY REBATE
STOCK # - C3734

27 MONTHS Plus Tax + Tags*

LEASE FOR

$

309
MSRP $33,808

AVAILABLE FOR UP TO 60 MONTHS**

1.9% APR FINANCING

ON YOUR CURRENT MERCEDES-BENZ FINANCIAL SERVICES LEASE WITH THE PURCHASE OF A NEW 2013 OR 2014 MERCEDES-BENZ.
*Eligible customers will receive up to 3 months’ payment credit on their current lease with a lease or finance of any new 2013 or 2014 Mercedes-Benz vehicle through Mercedes-Benz Financial Services. Certain exclusions apply. See dealer for details.

PAYMENT CREDIT*

UP TO 3 MONTHS’

NEW 2013 Acura

ILX
PREMIUM

MODEL # DE1F5DJNW

LEASE FOR ZERO ZER ZE ZER E O DOWN DO DO $

*LEASE IS BASED ON 27 MONTHLY PAYMENTS AT 10K MILES PER YEAR WITH $1,29 DOWN PLUS TAX, TAGS, TITLE AND $1,829 DEALER PROCESSING CHARGE DUE AT LEASE SIGNING. $0 SECURITY DEPOSIT REQUIRED. RESIDUAL IS $23,666.00. **FINANCING ON SELECT MODELS WITH APPROVED CREDIT THRU DEALER DESIGNATED LENDER. 1.9% APR FINANCING FOR 60 MONTHS = $17.50/$1,000 FINANCED.

LEASE FOR $

239

PLUS TAX/TAGS TAX/TA FOR 36 MONTHS*
- I VTECH ENGINE - AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION WITH GRADE LOGIC - DUAL ZONE AUTO CLIMATE CONTROL - POWER MOONROOF - BLUETOOTH - VEHICLE STABILITY ASSIST - ADVANCED COMPATIBILITY ENGINEERING - XENON HEADLIGHTS - MULTI VIEW REAR CAMERA
*LEASES ARE BASED ON 36 MONTHLY PAYMENTS AT 10K MILES PER YEAR WITH $0 DOWN. INCLUDES $1,500 LUXURY LEASE CONQUEST OR $1,500 GM LEASE LOYALTY REBATE.

569

IT’SYOURTURN
THE CPO SALES EVENT
ENDS JULY 1

Certified Pre-Owned Low APR Rates
As low as 1.9% for 36 mos. & 2.99% for 66 mos. Available On: C, E, CLS, CLK, M, S 2008 MERCEDES-BENZ C300 SEDAN 4MATIC® AWD STK# C3773A, 8,198 MI................................................................................... SALE PRICE $29,999 2010 MERCEDES-BENZ C300 SEDAN 4MATIC® AWD STK# BP16059, 9,527 MI ................................................................................ SALE PRICE $31,999 2010 MERCEDES-BENZ GLK350 SUV 4MATIC® AWD STK# BP16005, 22,871 MI............................................................................... SALE PRICE $33,999

PLUS TAX & TAGS FOR 36 MONTHS*

GAP INSURANCE INCLUDED IN LEASE

*LEASE IS BASED ON 36 MONTHLY PAYMENTS AT 10K MILES PER YEAR WITH $999 DOWN PAYMENT PLUS TAX, TAGS, TITLE, $129 PROCESSING FEE AND FIRST MONTHS’ PAYMENT DUE AT LEASE SIGNING WITH APPROVED CREDIT THRU DEALER DESIGNATED LENDER. GAP INSURANCE INCLUDED. RESIDUAL $16,344.95.

NEW NE EW 2013

CADILLAC CTS C LUXURY COLLECTION CT COLLE ECTION AWD
$1,500 CADILLAC LUXURY LEASE CONQUEST OR $1,5 $1,500 GM LEASE LOYALTY REBATE
STOCK # - C3739

NEW 2013 Acura

TL

MODEL # UA8F2DJW

LEASE FOR $

329

ZERO ZE O DOWN ZER DO DO $
- I VTECH ENGINE - 6 SPEED AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION - LEATHER INTERIOR - POWER MOONROOF - BLUETOOTH - VEHICLE STABILITY ASSIST - ADVANCED COMPATIBILITY ENGINEERING - SEQUENTIAL SPORT SHIFT AUTOMATIC WITH PADDLE SHIFTERS - FULLY INDEPENDENT SPORT-TUNED SUSPENSION

LEASE FOR

NOW GET 1.9% APR FOR 48 MONTHS OR 2.9% APR FOR 60 MONTHS!*
2010 LEXUS ES350 STK# T31113A, 42K MI,LEATHER SUNROOF............................................................................ SALE 2010 LEXUS IS250 STK# L12088A, 37K MI, LEATHER, SUNROOF, AWD.................................................................. SALE 2010 LEXUS RX350 STK# L12023, 42K MI, LEATHER, SUNROOF, AWD.................................................................... SALE 2012 LEXUS RX350 STK# L11918A, 7K MI, LEATHER, SUNROOF, AWD.................................................................... SALE 2011 LEXUS GX460 STK# L12120A, 23K MI, LEATHER, SUNROOF, 4X4................................................................... SALE PRICE $25,999 PRICE $27,222 PRICE $37,314 PRICE $41,479 PRICE $47,999

2011 MERCEDES-BENZ C300 SEDAN 4MATIC® AWD STK# BP16004, 25,654 MI .............................................................................. SALE PRICE $34,995 2010 MERCEDES-BENZ E350 SEDAN 4MATIC® AWD STK# BP16051, 24,063 MI............................................................................... SALE PRICE $39,999 2010 MERCEDES-BENZ S550 SEDAN 4MATIC® AWD STK# BP15974, 44,831 MI............................................................................... SALE PRICE $53,999 2013 MERCEDES-BENZ E350 WAGON 4MATIC® AWD STK# BS0502, 6,457 MI .................................................................................. SALE PRICE $58,999

PLUS TAX & TAGS FOR 36 MONTHS*

TAX/TA FOR 36 MONTHS* PLUS TAX/TAGS
*LEASES ARE BASED ON 36 MONTHLY PAYMENTS AT 10K MILES PER YEAR WITH $0 DOWN. INCLUDES $1,500 LUXURY LEASE CONQUEST OR $1,500 GM LEASE LOYALTY REBATE.

439

GAP INSURANCE INCLUDED IN LEASE

*LEASE IS BASED ON 36 MONTHLY PAYMENTS AT 10K MILES PER YEAR WITH $999 DOWN PAYMENT PLUS TAX, TAGS, TITLE, $129 PROCESSING FEE AND FIRST MONTHS’ PAYMENT DUE AT LEASE SIGNING WITH APPROVED CREDIT THRU DEALER DESIGNATED LENDER. GAP INSURANCE INCLUDED. RESIDUAL $22,080.00.

MotorWorld Acura 1-866-356-9383
*ALL OFFERS SUBJECT TO MANUFACTURER CHANGES. PRIOR SALES EXCLUDED. FINANCING ON SELECT MODELS WITH APPROVED CREDIT. 0.9% APR FINANCING FOR 36 MONTHS = $28.18/$1,000 FINANCED. 1.9% APR FINANCING FOR 60 MONTHS = $17.50/$1,000 FINANCED. PHOTOS ARE FOR DISPLAY PURPOSES ONLY. DEALER IS NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. PAYMENTS INCLUDE ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. ALL OFFERS EXPIRE 4/30/13.

150 Motorworld Drive, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18703

MotorWorld Cadillac 1-866-356-9383
*PRICES & PAYMENTS ARE PLUS TAX, TAGS, TITLE AND $129 DEALER PROCESSING CHARGE. PHOTOS ARE FOR DISPLAY PURPOSES ONLY. DEALER IS NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. ALL PRICES INCLUDE APPLICABLE REBATES AND/OR INCENTIVES. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. PRIOR SALES EXCLUDED. ALL OFFERS SUBJECT TO MANUFACTURER PROGRAM CHANGES. PRICES ARE AVAILABLE ON ADVERTISED VEHICLES ONLY. MILEAGE CHARGE OF $.25/MILE OVER 30K MILES. LESSEE PAYS FOR EXCESS WEAR. NOT AVAILABLE WITH SOME OTHER OFFERS. SECURITY DEPOSIT IS NOT REQUIRED AT TIME OF DELIVERY. TO QUALIFY FOR CONQUEST REBATE YOU MUST BE IN A NON-GM LEASE. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. ALL OFFERS EXPIRE 4/30/13.

150 Motorworld Drive, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18703

MotorWorld Lexus 1-866-356-9383
*PHOTOS ARE FOR DISPLAY PURPOSES ONLY. DEALER IS NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. PRIOR SALES EXCLUDED. ALL PRICES AND PAYMENTS ARE PLUS TAX, TAGS, TITLE AND $129 DEALER PROCESSING CHARGE. LEASES ARE ALL WITH ZERO SECURITY DEPOSIT. 1.9% APR FINANCING FOR 48 MONTHS = $17.95/$1,000 FINANCED. 2.9% APR FINANCING FOR 60 MONTHS = $21.67/$1,000 FINANCED. ALL OFFERS ARE SUBJECT TO CREDIT APPROVAL. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. OFFERS EXPIRE 4/30/13.

150 Motorworld Drive, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18703

*ALL PRICES AND PAYMENTS, PLUS TAX, TAG AND TITLE. PHOTOS ARE FOR DISPLAY PURPOSES ONLY. DEALER NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. PRIOR SALES EXCLUDED. FINANCING AVAILABLE WITH APPROVED CREDIT. MINIMUM FINANCED $15K WITH APPROVED CREDIT THRU DESIGNATED LENDER. SUBJECT TO MANUFACTURER PROGRAM CHANGES. FINANCING ON SELECT PRE-OWNED MODELS. QUALIFIED CUSTOMERS ONLY. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. ALL OFFERS EXPIRE 4/30/13.

150 Motorworld Drive, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18703

MotorWorld 1-866-356-9383

www.motorworldacura.com

www.motorworldgm.com

www.motorworldlexus.com

www.motorworldgroupmercedes.com

Certified Cadillac's Available • Rates Starting @ 0.9%

2011 CTS AWD by Cadillac

6 to choose From $ Leather, XM, Onstar, Premium Car 5Yrs/50,000 mi
2006 325 XI by BMW
Sunroof, Leather, Heated Seats, All Wheel Drive

2005 SRX AWD by Cadillac
White Diamond/ Leather, Ultraview Sunroof, Memory Settings, Heated Seats, XM, OnStar

2006 SRX AWD by Cadillac
Sand Storm/Leather, Ultraview Sunnroof, Heated Seats, Memory Settings, XM, OnStar

2011 Insight Hybrid by Honda
PW, PL, Hybrid

25,991
2010 Wrangler Sport 4X4 by Jeep
Red Rock Crystal, Hard Top, Automatic

$10,995
2012 Focus SEL by Ford

$12,996
2012 Captiva’s by Chevrolet
1-LT, 1-LS, 1-LTZ In Stock

$13,996
2008 SRX AWD by Cadillac
Gold Mist/ Leather, 3rd Seat, Ultraview sunroof, Navigation, 18” Wheels, XM, OnStar

$15,991
2009 DTS Luxury by Cadillac
Radiant Silver/ Titanium Leather, Heated & Cooled Seats, XM, OnStar, Sensors

$17,990
2009 DTS Luxury by Cadillac
White Diamond/ Shale Leather, Sunroof, Chrome Wheels, Heated Seats, Memory Settings, XM, OnStar, Only 40,150 Miles

$17,992
by Cadillac
White Diamond/ Leather, Only 24,731 miles, Chromes, XM, OnStar, Heated Seats, Memory Seats

Sonic Blue/ Leather, Sunroof, Navigation, Heated Seats, Satellite Radio

From $18,992
2 to Choose From

$

18,998

$

18,999

$

24,999

2009 DTS

2009 CTS Luxury AWD

White Diamond/ Cashmere Sunroof, Heated & Memory Settings, All Wheel Drive, XM, Onstar, Only 22,087 Miles in the word

2009 CTS Luxury AWD by Cadillac
White Diamond/ Shale Leather, Sunroof, Heated Seats, Memory Settings. XM, OnStar

2010 SRX AWD Performance by Cadillac

2007 S550 by Mercedes-Benz
Sunroof, Navigation, Chromes, Memory & Heated Seats

2011 STS AWD by Cadillac
Vanilla Latte/ Shale Leather, AWD, XM, OnStar, Memory & Heated Seats Only 19,455 miles

$

26,999

$

26,999

FROM

$

27,999

Black/Black Leather, 20 Inch Chromes, Ultraview Sunroof, Heated & Memory Seats, OnStar, XM, Navigation

$

29,990

$

29,997

$

31,991

2011 SRX Luxury AWD by Cadillac
Black/Black Leather, Ultraview Sunroof, Memory & Heated Seats, XM, OnStar. Only 8,991 Miles

2013 CTS Luxury AWD by Cadillac
Blue/Leather, Heated & Memory Seats, Only 8,906 Miles

2011 CTS Performance Cpe AWD by Cadillac
White Diamond/ Cashmere Heated & Memory Settings, All Wheel Drive, XM, Onstar, Navigation, Only 10,997 Miles

2012 SRX Performance AWD by Cadillac

2012 Escalade AWD by Cadillac
Black/Black Leather 22” Chrome Wheels, Navigation, XM, Onstar, Sunroof

2013 CTS-V by Cadillac
Black Diamond, Only 168 Miles, 6-Speed Original MSRP $72,800

White Diamond/ Shale Leather, 22” Chrome Wheels, Navigation, XM, OnStar, Heated & Memory Settings

$

33,991

$

33,993

$

35,991

$

38,992
EXPWAY

$

59,992

$

63,993

Mon-Thurs 9-8 • Fri 9-5 • Sat 9-4

*TAX & TAGS EXTRA NC + Non-Certified

81

(570) 342-0107 • 1-888-880-6537 • www.rjburnecadillac.com

1205-1209 Wyoming Avenue, Scranton

R.J. BURNE

1205 Wyoming Ave. RJ Burne Cadillac
From Wilkes-Barre to Scranton Expressway 8 Blocks on Wyoming Avenue

WYOMING AVE.

PAGE 6E

SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

Take on Mother Nature. With a whole lot of style.
2013 328i xDrive Sedan 
+.&  3$/
(, 01-")   *(1$/ ,*(,$ "6*(,#$/ $,&(,$  0.$$# 21-+ 1("  '-/0$.-4$/  4(,-4$/ 12/!- 1$"',-*-&6

*$ 0$ %-/

$  

+-,1'
 +(*$0 .$/ 6$ / *$ 0$  +-,1'        #-4, . 6+$,1  0$"2/(16 #$.-0(1   " 0' -, #$*(3$/6 *20 1 5 ,# 1 &0 #2$ 1 0(&,(,& (, ,"(,& 3 (* !*$ 1'/-2&'  , ,"( * 0$/3("$0 5.(/$0   

369* .$/ +-,1'  1 5

$750 Loyalty Cash Included

WYOMING VALLEY BMW
811547

570-287-1133 wyomingvalleymotorsbmw.com

811544

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013 PAGE 7E

339 HIGHWAY 315 IN PITTSTON

Everything is Priced to Move!!!

LOW FINANCE RATES! • TOP TRADE VALUES!

Weekend Sales Event

Sale Ends Tuesday, April 30th @ 8pm

2012 Toyota Yaris Sedan

2011 Mitsubishi Endeavors AWDs

Automatic, Power Windows & Locks, 1-Owners, Stk# P15052

$

3 YEAR/100,000 MILES WARRANTY ON*
PLATINUM CERTIFIED VEHICLES
$
Stk# P14930, V6, Work Truck Pkg., OR Automatic

13,499

Power Windows & Locks, Automatic, A/C, Stk# P15056

* OR $

187

PER MO.**

$

STARTING AT

17,999
$

* OR $

259 PER MO.**

2009 Chevy Silverado $11,999 * Reg Cab 2WD PER

165MO.**

Stk# P14941, Heated Leather, Rear View OR Camera, Power Seat

$ * 2007 Nissan Murano SL AWD 13,999 PER $

207 MO.**

Stk# P14992, Power Windows & Locks, Alloys, Automatic, 4WD

2010 Ford Escape 4WD

* 16,499 PER OR $ 236 MO.** * 16,899 PER OR $ 244 MO.** $ * 16,999 PER OR $ 242 MO.** $ * 17,999 PER OR $ 259 MO.** $ * 18,499 PER OR $ 269 MO.** $

Stk# P15022, Alloy Wheels, Soft Top, Manual Trans, Ready For Some Fun!

2011 Jeep Wrangler $19,999* 2DR 4x4 PER
OR

$

293 MO.**

Stk# 14881, Popular Package, Auto, Alloys, Power Windows & Locks, 1 LEFT

2012 Fiat 500

* 12,999 PER OR $ 181 MO.** $ * 12,499 PER OR $ 176 MO.** $ * 12,599 PER OR $ 174 MO.** $

Stk# P14916, Remote Start, Spoiler, Alloys, Power Seats, 1-Owner

$ * 2012 Chevy Impala LT Sedan 14,499 PER
OR

$

204 MO.**

Stk# P14901B, Alloys, Automatic, 3rd Row Seating

2010 Dodge Journey AWD

Stk# P14978, Alloy Wheels, Power Windows & Locks

2013 Kia Sportage SUV AWD

* 21,999 PER OR $ 332 MO.** $

Stk# P14925, Power Windows & Locks, CD, Great On Gas, 1-Owner

2009 Pontiac G6 Sedan

Stk# P14993, Automatic, Power Windows & Locks, CD, 1-Owner

2012 Nissan Sentra $14,499 * S Sedan PER
OR

$

205 MO.** 229 MO.** 234 MO.**

Stk# P15008, Sunroof, Automatic, Alloys, Power Windows & Locks

2012 Chevy Malibu Sedan

Stk# P14950, 5.3L V8, Alloy Wheels, Bed- OR liner, Power Windows & Locks

2013 Chevrolet Silverado $26,999* Crew Cab 4x4 PER
$

405 MO.**

Stk# P15045, Power Windows & Locks, CD, Factory Warranty

2011 Chevrolet HHR LT

Stk# P14968, Sunroof, Alloy Wheels, Tinted Windows, Automatic

2012 Ford Focus $15,799 * SE 5DR PER
OR

$

Stk# P15019, Power Windows & Locks, AM/FM/CD, Only 4K Miles

2012 Nissan Altima Sedan

Stk# P15032, Moonroof, Heated Leather, Spray In Bedliner, Only 18K Miles!

2010 Toyota Tundra Crew Max 4x4

* 36,499 PER OR $ 561 MO.** $ * 43,499 PER OR $ 665 MO.** $

Stk# P14972, Power Windows & Locks, OR Great Gas Mileage, Automatic

$ * 2009 Toyota Corolla LE Sedan 12,799 PER $

179 MO.**

Stk# P15012, 1-Owner, Power Windows & Locks, CD, Automatic

2012 Volkswagen $16,499 * Jetta Sedan PER
OR

$

Stk# P14952A, LE Package, Dual Power Doors, 3rd Row Seat, Great Family Vehicle

2010 Toyota Sienna Van

Stk# P15002, Rear DVD, 2nd Row Bucket Seats, 3rd Row, Leather, Sunroof, 20” Wheels

2013 Chevrolet Tahoe LT 4x4

2012 Volvo C30 R-Design
* 25,799 PER OR $ 383 MO.** $
Stk# P15048, R-Design Package, Navigation, Roof Rails, Leather

P L A T I N U M C E RT I F I E D H I G H L I N E
* 26,599 PER OR $ 399 MO.** $
2001 Dodge B1500 Cargo Van
Stk# P14970, Ladder Rack, Bin Package, Only 53K Miles!

Stk# P15062, Heated Leather, Moonroof, Alloys, Power Seat

2010 Mercedes GLK350 4Matic

2011 Lexus CT 200H Wagon
Stk# P14965, Hybrid, Leather, Navigation, Sunroof

2012 Infiniti G37X Sedan
Stk# P15061, Moonroof, Heated Leather, Alloys, Low Miles

2012 Mercedes 300 4Matic Luxury Sdn
Stk# P14942, All Wheel Drive, Leather, Sunroof, Sport Pkg, Sharp!

2001 Nissan Pathfinder 4x4
Stk# P14945A, Power Windows & Locks, Automatic, 4 Wheel Drive

VEHICLE VALUE OUTLET
2002 Chrysler Town & Country Van
Stk# P14988A, Power Windows & Locks, 3rd Row Seating, Low Miles

* 27,599 PER OR $ 418 MO.** $

* 29,999 PER OR $ 460 MO.** $

* 30,999 PER OR $ 465 MO.** $

* 48,399 PER OR $ 739 MO.** $

Stk# P14977, Heated Leather, 3rd Row, Navigation, Rear DVD, & Much More!

2013 Infiniti JX35 AWD

2011 Escalade Ext Pickup AWD
* 51,599 PER OR $ 799 MO.** $
Stk# P14949, Luxury Package, Navigation w/ Camera, 22” Wheels, Power Side Steps

$

*All prices plus tax, tags & fees. Artwork for illustration pursposes only. Dealer not responsible for typographical errors. 3 year/100,000 mile limited Powertrain Warranty on 2008 models and newer with less than 75,000 miles. 90 day/3,000 mile limited Powertrain Warranty on 2004 models and newer with less than 100,000 miles.**2007 models 72 months @ 4.69%; 2008 models 72 months @ 3.94%; 2009 models 72 months @ 3.14%; 2010/2011 models 72 months@2.89%; 2012/2013 models 72months @ 2.64%. All rates based on approved tier 1 credit. All payments include tax, tags and fees and $2,000 cash down or trade. Sale ends 4/30/2013.

4,999

*

$

5,799

*

$

5,999

2007 Saturn Vue AWD
Stk# P14746, All Wheel Drive, Automatic, Power Windows & Locks, CD

*

$

7,999

*

2005 Honda Accord EX Sedan
Stk# P14989, Automatic, Power Windows & Locks, Alloy Wheels, CD

$

8,699

2007 Nissan Altima Sedan
Stk# P15017, Automatic, Power Windows & Locks, CD

*

$

9,999*

A FULL SERVICE DEALERSHIP

1-800-223-1111

Hours: Monday-Friday 9-8pm ; Saturday 9-5pm

www.KenPollockCertified.com

PAGE 8E

SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013 PAGE 9E

AMERICA’S NEW CAR ALTERNATIVE
290 MUNDY STREET, WILKES-BARRE AT THE WYOMING VALLEY MALL • CALL 301-CARS

2012 NISSAN XTERRA

2012 TOYOTA YARIS
#19303 SPECIAL FLEET PURCHASE, 10 TO CHOOSE FROM

2012 KIA OPTIMA
#19339

$

2009 NISSAN VERSA

21,395 OR 323
* $
#19137A

#19226

* PER MO.

$

17,988*OR $272*PER MO.
2008 PONTIAC GRAND PRIX

STARTING AT

FLEET PURCHASE, 8 LEFT

2012 HYUNDAI TUCSON AWD

2012 TOYOTA CAMRY

$

9,986*

OR

$

PER MO. 156***

$

20,780*OR $313*PER MO.
2012 DODGE AVENGER
#19330

#19252

$

2012 VW JETTA
#19355,

PER MO. 16,896*OR $255*PER MO. $8,655* OR $140****

STARTING AT

FLEET PURCHASE, 4 LEFT

#19360

2012 FORD MUSTANG PREMIUM
$
#19290

2012 DODGE RAM SLT QUAD CAB 4X4

$

15,888 OR 233
* $

STARTING AT

FLEET PURCHASE, 9 LEFT

*PER MO.

$

14,896 OR 225
* $

STARTING AT

FLEET PURCHASE, 6 LEFT

*PER MO.

* 20,486*OR $309*PER MO. 23,965 OR 362 PER MO. $ * $
2008 CHEVY COBALT
2013 KIA SORENTO 4X4 V6

#19073

$

6,255*

#19135A

OR

$

PER MO. 99****

$

23,560*OR $355*PER MO.
2011 HYUNDAI ELANTRA GLS

#19105, 7 Passenger

BOUNCE IN THIS WEEK AND WIND UP WITH A GREAT DEAL.
2012 NISSAN ALTIMA
10 To Choose From, Fleet Purchase

$
2012 MAZDA 6
$

14,265 OR 216*PER MO.
* $

#18973

FREE WITH EVERY VEHICLE

15,895*OR $240*PER MO.
2012 NISSAN VERSA

#19342, FLEET PURCHASE

$

14,995*OR $227*PER MO.

STARTING AT

2012 CHEVY IMPALA
#19273, Some with Moonroof, Spoiler, Remote Start, Alloys

2012 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN

SPECIAL FLEET PURCHASE
11 TO CHOOSE FROM

$

13,826* OR $209*PER MO.
2011 DODGE DURANGO
$

#19346

$

18,595 OR 281
* $

#19220

* PER MO.

2012 NISSAN MURANO

2008 HONDA CRV

$

$

2012 HYUNDAI SONATA GLS

PER MO. 22,688 OR $343*PER MO. $15,416* OR $249****

*

#19213

2012 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT 4X4

0 DOWN
*
2008 HYUNDAI VERACRUZ LIMITED
#19363A

24,216

*

#19174A

OR

$

366*PER MO.

$

24,875 OR 375

2012 CHEVY EQUINOX LTZ AWD * $ *** PER MO.

2012 DODGE CHARGERS
W/ SPOILER & STRIPE PKG.

2012 TOYOTA COROLLA

#19299 SPECIAL FLEET PURCHASE, 5 To Choose From

SPECIAL FLEET PURCHASE, 8 To Choose From

$

15,380 OR 242**** PER MO.
* $
2012 HYUNDAI ACCENT

SPECIAL FLEET PURCHASE, 9 Left

$

15,532 OR 235*PER MO.
* $
2012 CHEVY IMPALA LT

#19325

2012 NISSAN MAXIMA

2011 FORD ESCAPE XLT 4X4

2012 HYUNDAI SANTA FE AWD

$

21,265 OR 321
* $

#19187

* PER MO.

$

16,675 OR 252
* $

$ * 11,683*OR $177*PER MO. $20,865*OR $315*PER MO. $14,970*OR $266*PER MO. PER MO.

#19323

#19204

Moonroof

2012 NISSAN SENTRA

2011 CHEVY MALIBU LT

$

14,425*OR $218*PER MO.
2013 FORD EDGE SEL AWD
#19271

#19313

$

14,639*OR $221*PER MO.
2007 GMC DENALI XL
$
#19249A

#19079

$

24,985*OR $377*PER MO.

HURRY, SALE ENDS THIS WEEKEND!

Monday-Friday 9am-8pm • Saturday 9am-5pm

nationwidecarsales.net

CHECK OUT OUR FULL INVENTORY

BUY NATIONWIDE AND SAVE THOUSANDS!

22,886*OR $369****

PER MO.

* 2011-12, 2.74% for 72 mos ** 2010, 3.24% for 72 mos *** 2009, 3.79% for 72 mos ****2008, 4.24% for 72 mos *****2007, 4.99% for 72 mos ******2006, 5.99% for 60 mos *******2004, 5.99% for 60 mos ******2003, 5.99% for 60 mos ********2002, 5.99% for 60 mos

*TAX & TAGS ADDITIONAL. NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. ASK SALESPERSON FOR DETAILS OF PROGRAMS. FINANCE RATE SUBJECT TO APPROVAL.

E A S Y • E A S Y • E A S Y • E A S Y

PAGE 10E

SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

WYOMING VALLEY AUTO SALES INC.

FINANCING AVAILABLE

THE BEST DEALS
07 FORD FOCUS
4 CYL, AUTO, A/C, CD, ONLY 70K

PERIOD!
OVER 75 TO CHOOSE FROM
02 FORD MUSTANG
6 CYL, AUTO, A/C, RALLY WHEELS

CELEBRATING OUR

Contact Us for Reliable • Quality Cars

32ND YEAR!
07 HYUNDAI ACCENT GLS

06 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY
4DR, 7 PASS., 88K MILES, AUTO, A/C

07 SUZUKI FORENZA
4 CYL, AUTO, A/C, ONLY 53K

08 DODGE CALIBER SXT
4 CYL, AUTO, A/C, ONLY 80K MILES

02 SUBARU OUTBACK
4 CYL, AWD, AUTO, A/C

Use your tax refund to buy.
FREE GAS when you finance a vehicle up to 36 months
(See sales representative for details)

Cars in Color
We Can Help
W Y O M I N G VA L L E Y
415 Kidder Street Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702

4 CYL, AUTO, A/C, ONLY 75K MILES

$6,875
07 CHEVY COBALT LS
4 CYL, AUTO, A/C, ONLY 65K MILES

$7,575
99 HONDA CIVIC DX
4 CYL, AUTO, A/C

$4,575
07 KIA RONDO EX
AUTO, A/C, MOONROOF, ONLY 88K MILES

$6,425
06 SCION xA
4 CYL, 5 SPD, FOLDING REAR SEAT

$8,950
01 VW JETTA
72K MILES ORIG, 4 CYL, AUTO, A/C, MOONROOF, MAG WHEELS

$5,400
05 PONTIAC SUNFIRE
4 CYL, AUTO, A/C, SPOILER

$7,595
03 NISSAN MURANO AWD
AUTO, LEATHER, MOONROOF, ONLY 85K MILES

570.822.8870
steve@yourcarbank.com www.wyomingvalleyautomart.com

$7,825

$3,950

$8,950

$6,950

$5,950
$7,425 $5,875

$4,925

$9,950
$9,450 $5,995 $4,250 $3,950 $3,950 $4,550

MORE VALUES!
00 VOLVO S70 GLT
5 CYL, AUTO, MOONROOF, LEATHER

03 VW PASSAT ST WGN

$4,250 $6,425 $7,950 $6,525 $4,425

07 KIA SPECTRA EX

EVEN MORE VALUES!

4 CYL, AUTO, A/C, ONLY 79K ....

06 PONTIAC G6

STILL MORE VALUES!

4 CYL, AUTO, A/C, ONY 38K MILES

4 CYL, AUTO, A/C, MOONROOF.......

07 SUZUKI RENO 4DR HATCH
4 CYL, 5 SPEED, A/C, 74K MILES 4 CYL, HATCHBACK, SHARP...............

01 CHEVY MALIBU LS

6 CYL, AUTO, A/C, WHEEL CHAIR LIFT, ONLY 51K MILES

Find your next vehicle online.

08 NISSAN VERSA 4DR HATCH 01 CHEVY CAVALIER 08 NISSAN SENTRA

4 CYL, AUTO, A/C ....................... 4 CYL, AUTO, A/C, ONLY 58K MILES

05 HYUNDAI ELANTRA 06 SATURN ION
4 CYL, AUTO, MOONROOF, CD ....

06 CHEVY AVEO LS 4DR HATCH
4 CYL, AUTO, A/C, ONLY 73K MILES . 4 CYL, AUTO, A/C, PW, PL, MOONROOF, ALLOYS

$4,550 $6,975 $5,275 $7,495

98 SUBARU LEGACY GT AWD 00 FORD WINDSTAR VAN
7 PASS., A/C, ONLY 80K MILES ..

4 CYL, AUTO, A/C .......................

01 HYUNDAI SONATA

4 CYL, AUTO, MOONROOF, 51K MILES .

00 CHRYSLER CIRRUS 00 HONDA CIVIC

4 CYL, AUTO, A/C, ONLY 71K MILES 4 CYL, AUTO, A/C, MOONROOF ..

$10,575

03 FORD MUSTANG CONV

LEATHER, ALLOYS, SPOILER ...........

Tax and tags additional, not responsible for typographical errors.

SEE OUR FULL INVENTORY AT WWW.WYOMINGVALLEYAUTOS.COM

AUTO SALES INC.

YOMING VALLEY

197 West End Road, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18706

timesleaderautos.com
732 412 Autos for Sale Exercise Equipment
LEG EXTENSION MACHINE Hammer Strength ISO-Lateral. 4 years old, plate loaded, platinum frame, navy upholstery. New condition. $1000. SEATED L E G C U R L MACHINE , Hammer Strength ISOLateral. 4 years old, plate loaded, platinum frame, navy upholstery, New condition. $1000. Call Jim 570-855-9172

825-7577

2009 CHEVY IMPALA 3.5L LT

VALLEY SALE
2010 CHEVY MALIBU LS
ONE OWNER

VALUES
in the
33K
MILES ONLY

W W W. VA L L E Y C H E V R O L E T. C O M
2005 SUBARU LEGACY 2.5I AWD

1998 CHEVY COR VETTE COUPE
#Z2965 • Torch Red • 5.7L V8 Automatic Transmission • Adjustable Sport Suspension • Leather • Power Options • Borla Exhaust • Air Conditioning • Cruise Control

26K
MILES

ONLY

#13164A, 4 Cylinder, Automatic, Air, PW, PDL, Alloy Wheels

736

Firewood

$

12 985*
,

SALE PRICE
2006 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LAREDO 4X4

$

20 800*
,

2006 BUICK LUCERNE CX

2012 SUZUKI SX4 AWD
21K
MILES ONLY

2008 SUBARU LEGACY 2.5I LTD AWD

FIREWOOD. Pine, large quantity for FREE. You Haul away. 570-472-3543 FIREWOOD. Several large trees cut down, pine and hardwood. Free if you cut and carry 570-788-4090

ONE OWNER

ONE OWNER

742
#13211A, 4 Cyl., AT, AC, PW, PDL, Cruise, Sunroof, Leather, Alloys, Spoiler

#12201A, 6 Cyl., AT, A/C, PW, PDL, Alloys, Cruise, CD, Power Seat, 1 Owner

#Z2906A, 4 Cyl., Auto., A/C, PW, PDL, Stabilitrak, Cruise, Power Seats, Low Miles

$

12 987*
,

$

12 999*
,

#13556A, V6 AT, A/C, PW, PDL, Traction Control, CD, Alloys, Pwr. Seat, Low Miles

Furnaces & Heaters

$

12 999*
,

#13451A, 6 Cyl., Auto., A/C, Alloys, Roof Rack, PW, PDL, Sunroof, Leather

$

13 950*
,

#13401A, Auto, 21K, MP3/CD, Power Windows, Locks, Mirrors, Cruise, AWD

$

13 987*
,

$

14 850*
,

2007 BUICK LACROSSE CX
ONE OWNER

2011 CHEVY CRUZE LS
ONE OWNER

2006 CHEVY EXPRESS STARCRAFT CONVERSION VAN
40K
MILES ONLY

2008 GMC CANYON EXT CAB 4X4 W/CAP

2010 CHEVY EQUINOX LT AWD
ONE OWNER LOW MILES

2010 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY TOURING
24K
MILES ONLY

AFFORDABLE, clean, safe and efficient wood heat. Central Boiler OUTDOOR WOOD FURNACE. Heats multiple buildings. B & C Wood Furnaces LLC 570-477-5692 FURNACE. 55,000 BTU hot air from mobile home. LP gas. $125 570-655-1399

25K
MILES

ONLY

21K
MILES

ONLY

ONE OWNER

#13336A, 6 Cyl., Auto., A/C, PW, PDL, Traction Control, AM/FM/CD, Cruise, Tilt

#Z2955, 4 Cyl., Auto., A/C, PW, PDL, CD, MP3, Keyless Entry, Traction Control

$

14 893*
,

$

15 987*
,

#13635A, V6 AT, A/C, Tinted Windows, PW, PDL, CD, Color Match Body Kit, Bench Seat Folds Into Bed, 1 Owner

#13170C, 3.7L, Auto., A/C, Alloy Wheels, Sunroof, Cruise, Sliding Rear Window, PW, PDL

#13674A, 2.4L 4 Cyl., Automatic, Air, Cruise, Graphic Interface Display, Remote Keyless Entry, PW, PDL

$

16 874*
,

$

17 863*
,

$

17 995*
,

$

#Z2911, 3.8L V6 Auto., Front/Rear A/C, PW, PDL, Dual Power Sliding Doors, Alloys, 3rd Row Seat

18 929*
,

2007 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER LT 4X4

ONLY 2010 DODGE 29K CHALLENGER SE MILES

2011 CADILLAC CTS4 AWD
LOW MILES

2011 JEEP WRANGLER SAHARA
ONE OWNER

2012 CHEVY TRAVERSE LT AWD

2012 CHEVY CAMARO CONVERTIBLE
14K
MILES ONLY

HEATER portable outdoor water heater. Battery operated with battery charger. Coleman model#2300700. Used only several times. Excellent condition $100. 570-825-2961 HEATER, portable, propane gas. Used as a back up source. $250. 570-693-3978

ONE OWNER

LOW MILES

#13206A, 4.2L SFI I6, Automatic, Leather, Sunroof, 6 Disc CD, Fog Lamps, Keyless Entry, PW, PDL, Power Adjustable Pedals, Cruise & More

#Z2885A, V6, AT, A/C, PW, PDL, Cruise, Keyless Entry

#Z2887, 3.0L V6, Automatic, Bose Stereo, CD, Power Options, Climate Control, Remote Keyless Entry & More

22K
MILES

ONLY

ONE OWNER
#Z2973, 3.6L 6 Cylinder, Automatic, Air, Power Options, Alloy Wheels, Remote Keyless Entry, Parking Sensors, 24K Miles

744

#13237C, 3.8L 6 Speed Manual, All Power Options

#Z2890, 3.6L V6 Auto. w/ Top Shift, P. Options, Air, Dual Exhaust Tips, Fog Lamps, Bluetooth, 1 Owner

Furniture & Accessories

$

18 987*
,

$

20 963*
,

Starting At Only

$

25 999*
,

$

26 873*
,

$

26 950*
,

$

26 984*
,

2009 CHEVY AVALANCHE LT 4X4
32K
MILES ONLY

*Prices plus tax & tags. Select pictures for illustration purposes only. Prior use daily rental on select models. Not Responsible for Typographical Errors. XM Satellite & OnStar Fees where applicable.

BAKER’S RACK gray steel with glass shelves & 4 stools. $195. Leave message for Florence. 570-474-5142 BED FRAME, polished brass, head board and footboard. 54”x75”, full size. Excellent condition. Free delivery within 10 miles. $300. 824-9049 TABLE. drop leaf, 4 chairs. Approximately 42” long. $250. 288-5801

#Z2943B, 5.3L 8 Cyl., Auto., Climate Control, Leather, All Power Options, Parking Sensors, Tow Pkg., Running Boards, Keyless Start & More

821-2772 • 1-800-444-7172 601 Kidder Street, Wilkes-Barre, PA
Mon.-Thurs.8:30-8:00pm; Friday 8:30-7:00pm; Saturday 8:30-5:00pm

VALLEY CHEVROLET

Scan From Mobile Device For More Specials

We Accept ALL Trades! Cars, Trucks, ATVs, Campers, Boats, Motorcycles...

$

31 997*
,

EXIT 170B OFF I-81 TO EXIT 1. BEAR RIGHT ON BUSINESS ROUTE 309 TO SIXTH LIGHT. JUST BELOW WYOMING VALLEY MALL.

You Bring It... WE WILL TRADE IT!

412 Autos for Sale

807600

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013 PAGE 11E

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013 PAGE 12E

w w w. M a t t B u r n e H o n d a . c o m

2013 Honda Civic LX Sedan
• Model #FB2F5DEW • 140-hp (SAE Net), 1.8 Liter, 16 Valve, SOHC i-VTEC® 4 Cylinder Engine • 5 Speed Automatic Transmission • Air Conditioning with Air Filtration System • i-MID with 5 inch LCD Screen and Customizable Feature Settings • Rear View Camera with Guidelines • Bluetooth® HandsFreeLink®3 • SMS Text Message Function4 • Power Windows and Door Locks • Vehicle Stability AssistTM (VSA®) with Traction Control • Anti-Lock Braking System (ABS) • Cruise Control • Illuminated Steering Wheel Mounted Cruise, Audio, Phone and i-MID Controls • 160-Watt AM/FM/CD Audio System with 4 Speakers • Pandora® Internet Radio Compatibility5 • Bluetooth® Streaming Audio3 • USB Audio Interface6 • MP3/Auxiliary Input Jack • Exterior Temperature Indicator • Security System with Remote Entry and Trunk Release

$0 DOWN PAYMENT

MPG 28 City 39 HWY

$

189
0
$
$0 DOWN PAYMENT

* P r Mo. Per
Lease L ea

*Lease 36 Months through AHFC. $0 Down Payment. 1st payment and tags due at delivery. Residual $12,458.25

Thank You To Our Customers APR FINANCING NOW AVAILABLE!

.9%
2013 ACCORD LX SEDAN
MPG 27 City 36 HWY
• Model #CR2F3DEW • 185-hp (SAE Net), 2.4-Liter, 16-Valve, DOHC i-VTEC® 4-Cylinder Engine with Direct Injection • Vehicle Stability AssistTM (VSA®) with Traction Control • Continuously Variable Transmission (CVT) • 16-Inch Alloy Wheels • Dual-Zone Automatic Climate Control with Air-Filtration System • Rearview Camera with Guidelines • Bluetooth® HandsFreeLink® • Pandora® Internet Radio Compatibility • USB Audio Interface • MP3/Auxiliary Input Jack • i-MID with 8-inch WQVGA (480x320) Screen and Customizable Feature Settings

*On select models to qualified buyers for limited term.

2013 PILOT EX 4WD
MPG 17 City 24 HWY
• Model #YF4H4DEW • 250-hp (SAE Net), 3.5-Liter, 24-Valve, SOHC i-VTEC® V-6 Engine • Variable Torque Management® 4-Wheel Drive System (VTM-4®) • 18-Inch Alloy Wheels • Power Windows/Locks • Fog Lights • Anti-Lock Braking System (ABS) • i-MID with 8-inch WQVGA (480x320) Screen, Customizable Feature Settings and Rearview Camera with Guidelines • Bluetooth® HandsFreeLink® • Tri-Zone Automatic Climate Control System with Humidity Control and Air Filtration • Driver’s Seat with 10-Way Power Adjustment, Including Power Lumbar Support • 229-Watt AM/FM/CD Audio System with 7 Speakers, Including Subwoofer • 2-GB CD Library • Bluetooth® Streaming Audio **Lease ase 36 Months through • USB Audio Interface 1st payment and tags due at

$0 DOWN PAYMENT

2013 Honda CR-V LX
MPG 22 City 30 HWY

$0 DOWN PAYMENT

339

* *Per Mo.
L ea Lease

$

ahfc ahfc. $0 Down Payment Payment. delivery. Residual $19,494.00

***Lease Lease 36 Months through ahfc ahfc. $0 Down Payment Payment. 1st payment and tags due at delivery. Residual $14,194.70

228

* ** Per Mo.
L ease Lease

• Model #RM4H3DEW • 185-hp (SAE Net), 2.4-Liter, 16-Valve, DOHC i-VTEC® 4-Cylinder Engine • Automatic Transmission • Real Time AWD with Intelligent Control SystemTM • Vehicle Stability AssistTM (VSA®) with Traction Control • Multi-Angle Rearview Camera with Guidelines • Bluetooth® HandsFreeLink • USB Audio Interface • Remote Entry System • 160-Watt AM/FM/CD Audio System with 4 Speakers ****Lease *Lease 36 Months through ahfc ahfc. $0 Down Payment Payment. • Pandora® Radio Compatibility 1st payment and tags due at delivery. Residual $15,920.00 • Bluetooth® Streaming Audio

$

279

*Per *** Mo.
L ease Lease

LEASES BASED ON APPROVED CREDIT TIER 1 THRU AHFC. MILEAGE BASED ON 2012 EPA MILEAGE ESTIMATES. USE FOR COMPARISON PURPOSES ONLY. DO NOT COMPARE TO MODELS BEFORE 2008. YOUR ACTUAL MILEAGE WILL VARY DEPENDING ON HOW YOU DRIVE AND MAINTAIN YOUR VEHICLE. OFFERS EXPIRE 4/30/2013.

MATT BURNE Honda PRE-OWNED CENTER

Call: 1-800-NEXTHonda

LOOK HERE
Honda’s
ACCORDS 08 ACCORD EX SDN Red, 54K ..........................NOW $14,950 11 ACCORD LX SDN Silver, 31K .........................NOW $17,500 10 ACCORD EX SDN Gray, 28K..........................NOW $18,500 11 ACCORD LXP SDN White, 22K......................NOW $18,500 10 ACCORD EXL SDN White, 19K......................NOW $19,500 11 ACCORD EXL SDN Black, 18K ......................NOW $20,950

For The Nicest Cars In The Valley!

View Prices at www.mattburnehonda.com

00 MAZDA MIATA CONV
Burgandy, 104K

00 LEXUS RX300 AWD
Now

Now

$7,500

$7,950

Gold, 124K

00 HONDA ACCORD EX CPE
11 11 11 11 11 11 11 12 PILOT PILOT PILOT PILOT PILOT PILOT PILOT PILOT LX White, 22K ..........................................NOW $24,500 LX Gray, 23K............................................NOW $24,500 EX Gray, 40K ...........................................NOW $24,950 EX Black, 36K ..........................................NOW $25,750 EX Silver, 36K ..........................................NOW $25,750 EXL Silver, 31K .......................................NOW $27,950 EXL Red, 25K .........................................NOW $29,500 EXL Pearl, 13K........................................NOW $32,500 PILOT 4WD
Now

08 CHEVY IMPALA LS SDN
Now

$7,950

Black, 84K

$9,250

White, 53K

10 ACCORD EXL SDN Red, 41K .......................NOW $16,950

HONDA ACCORD SEDAN
04 EX V6, Gray, 80K 04 EX, Gray, 50K 06 EXL, White, 56K

07 FORD FOCUS SE SEDAN
Now

06 HONDA CRV EX 4WD
Now

$9,750

Silver, 54K

$10,500

Black, 102K

$11,500 $12,500 $13,950

09 HYUNDAI SONATA GLS SDN
Now

09 NISSAN VERSA S 4DR
Now

$11,950

Brown, 47K

$11,950
CIVICS 10 CIVIC LX SDN Red, 31K..................................NOW $14,500 10 CIVIC LXS SDN White, 46K.............................NOW $15,400 10 CIVIC LX SDN Silver, 21K ................................NOW $15,950 11 CIVIC EX CPE Red, 20K..................................NOW $16,950 12 CIVIC LX CPE Black, 12K.................................NOW $17,950 12 CIVIC EXL SDN Gray, 33K..............................NOW $18,500 08 CIVIC LX SDN Navy, 49K.................................NOW $12,950 10 CIVIC LX CPE White, 35K ................................NOW $14,950 10 CIVIC LX SDN Navy, 27K.................................NOW $14,950 10 CIVIC LX SDN Titanium, 12K ............................NOW $15,750 10 CIVIC EX SDN Black, 24K................................NOW $15,950 10 CIVIC LX SDN Blue, 18K .................................NOW $15,950

Silver, 48K

CROSSTOUR 4WD 10 CROSSTOUR EXL V6 White, 42K................NOW $22,500

04 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER AWD
Now

TOYOTA COROLLA SDN
10 LE, Sdn, Silver, 58K 11 S, Sdn, Blue, 11K

$12,500

Silver, 85K

$12,950 $15,950

CRV 4WD 10 CRV EXL Titanium, 51K ........................................NOW $19,950 11 CRV LX Silver, 24K ...............................................NOW $20,950 11 CRV SE White, 25K...............................................NOW $20,500 11 CRV SE Titanium, 15K ...........................................NOW $20,950 10 CRV EXL NAVI Titanium, 49K ...........................NOW $20,950 11 CRV EXL Lt. Blue, 16K..........................................NOW $22,500 11 CRV EXL Titanium, 21K ........................................NOW $23,500 11 CRV EXL White, 18K............................................NOW $23,500 11 CRV EXL Black, 17K............................................NOW $24,500 10 CRV LX Gray, 28K................................................NOW $19,950 11 CRV SE Sage, 28K ...............................................NOW $20,500 11 CRV LX Gray, 28K................................................NOW $20,950

10 CHEVY AVEO LT 5
Now

08 MERCURY MILAN PREMIER SDN
Now

$11,950

White, 36K

$12,500

Sage, 48K

05 HONDA PILOT EXL 4WD
Now

06 SUBARU LEGACY AWD SDN
Now

$12,950

Gray, 89K

$13,950

Navy, 53K

07 HONDA CRV EXL 4WD
Now

11 SUBARU LEGACY LIMITED AWD
Now

$17,950

Blue, 73K

$18,250

Silver, 28K

ODYSSEY 11 ODYSSEY EXL Gray, 41K ....................................NOW $27,750 10 ODYSSEY TOURING RDVD/NAV Black, 24K.NOW $27,500 10 ODYSSEY EXL W/ DVD Black, 26K ...................NOW $25,950

07 HONDA PILOT EX4-DVD 4WD
Now

M MATT AT T B BURNE Honda onda URNE H

*Certified Hondas have 1 yr - 12k, Basic Warranty & 7yr - 100k Powertrain from orig. inservice date.

$19,750

Burgandy, 58K

10 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER AWD
Now

$24,950

Pearl, 15K

1110 Wyoming Ave, Scranton, PA Open Monday - Thursday 9-9 1-800-NEXT-Honda Friday & Saturday 9-5 570-341-1400

PAGE 13E 744

SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013 744 Furniture & Accessories
746 Garage Sales/ Estate Sales/ Flea Markets 746 Garage Sales/ Estate Sales/ Flea Markets 746 Garage Sales/ Estate Sales/ Flea Markets

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com 756 Medical Equipment 758 Miscellaneous
The Times Leader will accept ads for used private party merchandise only for items totaling $1,000 or less. All items must be priced and state how many of each item. Your name address, email and phone number must be included. No ads for ticket sales accepted. Pet ads accepted if FREE ad must state FREE. You may place your ad online at timesleader.com, or email to classifieds@ timesleader.com or fax to 570-831-7312 or mail to Classified Free Ads: 15 N. Main Street, WilkesBarre, PA. SORRY NO PHONE CALLS.

Furniture & Accessories

758 Miscellaneous
BOOKS, “The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich” 1959-1960, $28. HOLSTER, belt, holds 22 bullets, size 36-38. $60. CARS, Bruce Lee, 1:24, car still in the box $15. Star Wars, Episode 1, car still in the box, $23. 570-574-0271

758 Miscellaneous

758 Miscellaneous
POSTCARDS: Vintage folder, 1930’s. Harrisburg, Pa. 18 different views. like new, never mailed! $4. Laurel Line pictures. 3” x 5” copies of original postcards. 6 different showing stations at WilkesBarre, Pittston, Scranton & Rocky Glen. $5. all. Electric clothes iron repair kit by Rodale, 1940’s. 48 total parts (15 different) in original box & 3 victory (wwii) flat iron elements in original envelopes. all for $15.654-1622 RIMS set of 4 16” chrome rims with tires & lug nuts. Like new & ready to mount. Bought 1 year ago for $950 at Sears. 5 bolt pattern & locks sacrifice $350 Firm. 570-313-5538 SOFA, brown, $50. PICTURE LIGHT, motion and sound, $25. BREAD BOX, chrome front, $10. 570-675-0005 STOVE, Coal Burning, White Dickson. $550. CANES & WALKING sticks, over 30, made from slippery maple trees $5 each. Christmas & household items. over 200 items, Samsonite belt massager, luggage much more! all for $60! Telephone, used and working, $10 each. 735-2081 TIRE, BF Goodrich, 215/75/R14, $20, Tub, sone laundry $45, Cabinet, Curio, $75, Chair mat, heavy plastic 48x60, $30, Sofa, chair,and ottoman, $125.570-868-4444 TIRES (2) Winterforce snow. 175/70R/ 13, mounted on ‘92 Geo Prizm rims. Like new, $100 for all 570-825-8438 TIRES 17” Good used set of four265/70/17. Asking $25. for all (570) 675-0005 TIRES. (4) LT 26570-R17 $60 all, (2) 225-55-R17, $30 both. 570-690-2721

BEDFRAMES, (2) twin, steel. Included head and foot pieces. $60 KITCHEN TABLE, 3 ft. X 4 ft. with two chairs and extra leaf. $100. OBO 570-693-1918 CHAIRS, (2) Genuine leather, custom made recliners. Taupe color, like new. $550 each. 570-675-5046 CHAIRS. 2 Wing back with ottoman, $100, 2 heavy duty computer, $50 each. TV, Mitsubishi, 65” HDTV 3D. Limited hours, delivery available. $400 570-362-3626

We Beat All Competitors Prices! Twin sets: $159 Full sets: $179 Queen sets: $239 All New American Made 570-288-1898

MATTRESS SALE
Mattress Guy

Culver Street Sunday April 29th 7 am to 3 pm Look for signs! HARVEYS LAKE

BLOCK SALE

FORTY-FORT

SUGARLOAF
13 Twain CIrcle Saturday & Sunday Sat. 1-5, Sun. 9-1 Grandfather clock, universal body equipment, exercise bikes, Civil War items, china cabinet, much much more. WEST PITTSTON

WYOMING

CANE, aluminum, adjustable. $10. PORTA POTTY, $10. CRUTCHES, $10. SCOOTER, Pride Legend, 3 wheel, $500. OBO. 570-693-1918 LIFT CHAIR, electric, Rust colored, Velour, Tufted back and very good condition. $500. 570-693-3978 RECLINER LIFT CHAIR. Pride Mobility. Green. 375 lb weight limit. Seat is 22” wide. $300 FIRM. 696-2208. WALKER with folding seat & basket. Dolomite Maxi $50. 570-824-0248 WHEELCHAIR Electric, Jazzy 1113, 9 years old. Great shape, new wheels & batteries. Never used outdoors $1,300. 570-283-3157

FREE AD POLICY

570-301-3602

CALL US! TO JUNK YOUR CAR
BEST PRICES IN THE AREA
ON THE

CA$H

Line up a place to live in classified!
PATIO DINING SET. glass top table, 3 chairs and 2 swivel chairs. $250. 570-655-0792 SOFA BED, navy blue, microsuede, $75. LOVE SEAT, blue and white floral, $25. 696-0187 STOOL, four leg oak framed, legs with upholstered lift-up seat, 3” deep, 18” H by 15” seat. Neutral upholstery. Recently purchased, $125, sell for $30 firm. CARPET, crescent shaped persian look, black on beige. 36” by 24” at widest point, new. $10. FLOOR LAMP, Pottery Barn, modern, adjustable. Brushed nickel finish on steel. Very stable. 40” tall. $200 OBO. 570-357-7926 TABLE. Glass patio. 66 x 39. $80 570-545-7006 TABLE. Magazine. with marble top. $300.. KNEELERS, prayer, $50. 570-735-8730 WALL UNIT. Very good. 41/2x15x6. Top is glass enclosed, adjustable shelves, 2 large storage units. Very heavy, needs at least 2 people to move. Cash and carry. $70 570-779-2706

To place your ad call...829-7130
CURIO CABINET oak, large, light rounded glass front 7 shelves, claw feet excellent condition $400. Kitchen table with 4 upholstered chairs on wheels $200.570-654-2275

The Harveys Lake Beach Association is looking for vendors for our 4th annual “Arts on the Beach” and open house. Sunday, June 23 Noon - 4PM $10 per vendor space. Call 570639-2329 no later than May 15 to reserve your space!

VENDORS WANTED!

90 Monument Ave. Sat., 10-5 Sun., 12-4 Collectibles, antiques, housewares, antique slot machine.

Free Anytime Pickup 570-301-3602

$POT,

752 Landscaping & Gardening
Skag, walk or ride behind, with safety shield and grass catcher. Brand new Kohler motor, solid body, $1,600. 570-836-2765 LAWNMOWER 21” Craftsman, rear bagger - mulcher 4.5 hp engine, excellent condition. $40. 570-735-6638

CART, fold-up, wheeled. Great for groceries, laundromat. 38” height. $20. CHAIR, heavy duty, steel, folds up. Like new, $20 OBO. 570-357-7926 CROCHET COLLECTION, hand made crafts. Call for details. All for $15. 570-696-1927 ENCYCLOPEDIAs of United States History, set of four, $15. NURSING BOOKS, from Wilkes College 1978 to 1982, $2 a piece. DISHES, 8 piece place setting, $20. 570-822-9668 after 5 p.m. GIFT CARD for (2) white water rafting trips down the Lehigh from Lehigh Gorge State Park. Good Sun - Fri until 10/20/13. $35. 570-655-6770 GRILL, Char-Broil, never used. Full gas tank, also brand new grill utensils included. $150. SWING, with canopy, good condition. $100. 570-655-0330 GRILL, charbroil, charcoal, $35. LETTER FOLDER, Pitney Bowes, $25. WINDOWSCREEN, Anderson, $15. 570-288-4847 HOOD from ‘06 Tahoe burgundy, no dents will fit ‘00-6 Pickups, Suburbans, Tahoes $175. Hood from ‘00 S10 white $70. Auto trans from 00 Chevy Malibu, low miles $225. Leer fiberglass cap will fit 90-98 Chevy or GMC 6’ stepside boxes only $250. Auto trans from ‘01 Chevy cavalier low miles $250. 570-378-2886

LOG SPLITTER. Ryobi. Good condition. 4 ton split capacity, $250. POOL PUMP, Hayward above ground. Good condition, 1 HP, $300. 570-779-9432

LAWN MOWER

Say it HERE in the Classifieds! 570-829-7130
LUGGAGE, 45” expandable. Red. Brand new. $50 570-313-7590 LUGGAGE. 3 pieces, 24” 23” & 21” $10. AIR CONDITIONER. Haier, 5000 BUT, used 1 season. $50 570-779-3653

HUDSON

40 W. EXETER AVE EVERYTHING MUST GO!!! Saturday 4/27 10-5 Sunday 4/28 10-4 Furniture and household items, including an elliptical, holiday decorations, dining room table, chairs, fountain, arbor, and much more!!!

758 Miscellaneous
The Times Leader will accept ads for used private party merchandise only for items totaling $1,000 or less. All items must be priced and state how many of each item. Your name address, email and phone number must be included. No ads for ticket sales accepted. Pet ads accepted if FREE ad must state FREE. You may place your ad online at timesleader.com, or email to classifieds@ timesleader.com or fax to 570-831-7312 or mail to Classified Free Ads: 15 N. Main Street, WilkesBarre, PA. SORRY NO PHONE CALLS. BARBER CHAIR Early 1950’s Excellent Condition. $2,500. 570-288-8743 CHAR-BROIL, gas grill, $40 OBO. 570-262-9273 Ask for Jim.

DESK, 8 drawer with lock, $50. DRESSER, 4 drawer, $30. ENTERTAINMENT CENTERS, (2) $30 each. CHINA CABINET and buffet, $90. COFFEE TABLE, made of wood and glass, $40. DINING ROOM SET, wooden, $50. KITCHEN SET, 2 piece, $150. 570-736-6555 FLOOR LAMP with 2 matching table lamps. Arts & Crafts style. White frosted glass shades & taupe metal bases. Excellent condition $50 for all. 570-825-2961 FURNITURE. Outdoor patio. Glass top cast aluminum dining table with 6 chairs PLUS 2 teak Adirondack chairs with foot stools. $500 all. 570-696-1869 HUTCH, white metal with glass sliding doors on top and bottom cabinet. 65”Hx30”Wx20”D, $60. 570-655-1217

41 Martin Street Sat & Sun., 8-12 Lots of men’s 3XL clothing, baby & little girl clothing & toys.

Collect cash, not dust! Clean out your basement, garage or attic and call the Classified department today at 570829-7130!

WEST WYOMING
6th Street

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!
WINDMILL BLADES, (4) plastic, about 7” X 28”. Set of two for $25. 570-693-1918

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

FREE AD POLICY

All Junk Cars & Trucks Wanted
Highest Prices Paid In CA$H
FREE PICKUP

village.com (Former Walmart Bldg) Oak St. Pittston

MERCHANTS VILLAGE merchants

NANTICOKE

754

Machinery & Equipment

746

Garage Sales/ Estate Sales/ Flea Markets

117 East Kirmar Ave Sat.& Sun. 8 until 4 Something for Everyone!
PITTSTON TOWNSHIP

OPENSPACE YEAR ROUND ACE
SP AVAILABLE INSIDE & OUT Acres of parking

GENERATOR. New, still in box. Predator 4000 watt portable. 2 year warranty. $360 firm. 570-788-2388 SAWMILLS: From only $3,997.00Make & Save Money with your own bandmill- Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N TILLER, garden. Troy Bilt. 6.5 HP, very good condition. $450. 881-3929

570-574-1275
BIKES. (1) Recumbent, pro form, carb counter, programmable, built in face fan. CPT program, $65. (3) Boys, 20” tires, $15 each, HOCKEY TABLE, Wilson, barely used, $50, DRESSER, grey and white, 5’ tall, $10, (25) DVD cases, $5. 570-430-6434 FREEZER. Relatively new. $35. Exercise bike. $20 570-829-0841

30% off all inventory
owned by Merchants Village (Booth 262) Food, Home Goods, Health & Beauty Aids & Lots More! STOCK UP NOW! ON FRESH INVENTORY LAST CHANCE EVERYTHING MUST GO! 570-891-1972

GOING OUT OF BUSINESS

OUTSIDE SPACES $10
633 Suscon Rd Sat. & Sun. 9 until 5 Lots of Stuff!

ATTENTION VENDORS Decorative/Seasonal/Accent Pieces for sale. Purchase separately or all. Call 675-5046 after 6PM

Saturday 10am-2pm Sunday 8am-4pm

WE’LL HELP YOU

GET RID OF
PLACE YOUR

HIS STUFF BEFORE YOU GET RID OF HIM

GARAGE SALE AD
Package includes a sales kit, garage sale signs, a FREE unsold merchandise ad, your sale mapped FREE online and on our mobile app.

Plus a FREE BREAKFAST from McDonald’s.

8 LINES

1, 2, OR 3 DAYS

STARTING AT

$15

timesleader.com

OR VISIT TIMESLEADER.COM 24/7 TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD

CALL 800-273-7130

PAGE 14E

SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

www.TunkAutoMart.com
“Whether you are looking to change your oil or change your car....we are driven by you!”
E W

It’s Worth the Drive to Tunkhannock

SCORE BIG. SAVE BIG!
E W N N E W

2013 JEEP COMPASS LATITUDE 4X4

Now thru Tuesday Night Sign and Drive $0 Due at Delivery

For a Limited Time We are Offering Incredible Savings on our Entire Inventory. Don’t risk paying too much somewhere else, truck loads of vehicles will be sold at this event! 2013 JEEP PATRIOT 2013 DODGE DART LATITUDE 4X4 SXT
Now thru Tuesday Night Sign and Drive $0 Due at Delivery

N

Limited Oscar Mike Edition Now thru Tuesday Night Sign and Drive $0 Due at Delivery

Lease For As Low As

*Includes rebates and lease loyalty conquest rebate and $500 Military rebate. Restrictions apply. Payment is plus tax with approved credit. See dealer for details.

$239/

Stk#DD280769

per month 36 mos.*

Lease For As Low As

*Includes rebates and lease loyalty conquest rebate and $500 Military rebate. Restrictions apply. Payment is plus tax with approved credit. See dealer for details.

$199/

Stk#1360022

per month 36 mos.*
N

Lease For As Low As

*Includes rebates and lease loyalty conquest rebate and $500 Military rebate. Restrictions apply. Payment is plus tax with approved credit. See dealer for details.

$256/

Stk#DD236972

per month 36 mos.*

2013 RAM 1500 EXPRESS MSRP $38,815 QUAD CAB 4X4
5.7L Hemi w/ MDS, 6 Speed Automatic, Sirius XM Satellite Radio,Trailer Hitch, Remote Keyless Entry, Fog Lamps, 20” Alum Wheels

N E W

2013 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY L
Now thru Tuesday Night Sign and Drive $0 Due at Delivery

Stk#D5625449

Lease For As Low As

*36 mos. $2,495 due at delivery plus licensing, title and registration fees. No security deposit required. 10,000 miles per year.

$129/

per month 36 mos.*

MSRP ................. $38,815 TAM Discount ..... -$2,565 Rebate ................ -$1,750 Trade Assistance . -$1,000 Truck Bonus ........ -$1,000 Conquest ............ -$1,000 Ally Bonus.............. -$500 Military .................. -$500

E W

Stk#DR745521

N E W

2013 RAM 1500 EXPRESS MSRP $37,785 CREW CAB 4X4
5.7L Hemi w/ MDS, 6 Speed Automatic, Sirius XM Satellite Radio, Remote Keyless Entry, Fog Lamps, 20" Alum Wheels,Trailer Hitcha

$27,500

*Includes rebates and lease loyalty conquest rebate and $500 Military rebate. Restrictions apply. Payment is plus tax with approved credit. See dealer for details.

Lease For As Low As

$348/

per month 36 mos.*

Stk#1386046

Lease For As Low As
W

*36 mos. $2,495 due at delivery plus licensing, title and registration fees. No security deposit required. 10,000 miles per year.

$209/

per month 36 mos.*

MSRP ................. $37,785 TAM Discount ..... -$2,835 Rebate ................ -$1,750 Trade Assistance ... -$1,000 Truck Bonus ........ -$1,000 Conquest ............ -$1,000 Ally Bonus.............. -$500 Military ................... $500

ALL NEW FOR 2014

2014 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LAREDO 4X4
Now thru Tuesday Night Sign and Drive $0 Due at Delivery

N

E

W

2013 RAM 2500 TRADESMAN 4X4
Chrome Appearance Group, Heavy Duty Snow Plow Prep Group, Anti-spin Rear Differential, Trailer Brake Control, On/Off Road Tires, SiriusXM Satellite Radio

$29,200
N E W
Stk#1386050

Lease For As Low As

*Includes rebates and lease loyalty conquest rebate and $500 Military rebate. Restrictions apply. Payment is plus tax with approved credit. See dealer for details.

$397/

Stk#1423001

per month 36 mos.*

2013 JEEP WRANGLER UNLIMITED SPORT 4X4
Stk#1320070 Hard Top Automatic Transmission Limited “Oscar Mike” Edition Power Windows & Locks Security System NEW SHIPMENT Front Side Airbags OF WRANGLERS Heated Seats JUST ARRIVED! Alpine Premium Audio

N

E

Now As Low As
N E

$29,917
W
Stk# 1348001

MSRP .............$35,455 TAM Discount - $3,538 Rebate ..............- $500 Trade Assistance......- $1,000 Military .............- $500

Lease For As Low As

*$1,000 Conquest, $500 Military included in payment with $2,495 Down plus tax and tags, 10k per year. See Dealer for details.

N E

N E

2013 CHRYSLER 200 TOURING
Stk#1373002

2013 DODGE CHALLENGER

$369/
W
Stk#1351007

per month 36 mos.*

W

2013 CHRYSLER 300 AWD
All Wheel Drive Luxury Leather Seating Garmin Navigation system Bluetooth Streaming Audio w/ Voice Command Rear Back-up Camera Security Alarm Remote Proximity Keyless Entry

Est.31mpg/hwy Bluetooth Streaming Audio w/ Voice Command 6 Speed Automatic Transmission 18” Aluminum Wheels Security Alarm Front & Rear Side Curtain Airbags

MSRP .............. $23,485 Rebate ............ - $2,500 Retail Bonus .... - $1,000 Military .............. - $500 Conquest ........ - $1,000 TAM Discount ... - $885

$

Now As Low As

N E

MSRP ..............$26,880 Rebate ........... - $1,500 Conquest ...... - $1,000 Retail Bonus ..... - $500 Military ............. - $500 TAM Discount ... - $980

N

Stk#1381004

N E

E

2013 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SE

17,600

Leather Seating Power Sunroof GPS Navigation Remote Start V-6/5speed automatic Blue Tooth Streaming Audio w/Voice Command

MSRP ..............$32,165 Rebate ........... - $2,000 Conquest ....... - $1,000 Military ............. - $500 TAM Discount - $1,765

$

Now As Low As

Stk#DL627991

2013 JEEP WRANGLER SPORT 4X4
Automatic Transmission Air Conditioning SiriusXM Satellite Radio Fog Lamps Rear Folding Seat

26,900

Lease For As Low As

*$2,500 Rebate, $1,000 Conquest, $500 Military included in payment with $2,495 Down plus tax and tags, 10k per year. See Dealer for details.

$289/
Stk#DC673562

per month 36 mos.*
Power Sunroof Garmin Navigation System Third Row Seat V6 Rear Air & Heat

W

W

2013 DODGE DURANGO RALLYE AWD

W

7 DURANGOS AVAILABLE

Fold in Floor Rear Seating Rear Air/Heat Bluetooth Streaming Audio w/ Voice Command Aluminum Wheels Sunscreen Rear Privacy Glass

$

Now As Low As Lease For As

22,400

Low As

Tax, Documentation Fee and Registration Fee are extra. Chrysler Group retains the right to change incentives/rebates without prior notice. Lease Bonus Rebate is for eligible customers currently leasing a Chrysler Group Vehicle or returning from a Chrysler Group Vehicle Lease, Restrictions Apply. Military Rebates are for Military Members currently serving or retired Military Members with 20 years of prior service. Rebates are in lieu of low finance options such as 0% Ally (except on select models, see sales consultant). All prior sales offered excluded. All rebates have been applied to prices. Ally/Chase Rebates require financing thru Ally or Chase. All Subject to prior sales. Photos of vehicles are for illustration purpose only. Exp. Date 4-30-13. Some restrictions apply.

TUNKHANNOCK AUTO MART 888-323-6924
814288

*$1,000 Conquest, $500 Military included in payment with $2,495 Down plus tax and tags, 10k per year. See Dealer for details.

$269/

per month 36 mos.*

Lease For As Low As

*$2,500 Rebate, $1,000 Conquest, $500 Military, $500 Retail Bonus included in payment with $2,495 Down plus tax and tags, 10k per year. See Dealer for details.

$345/

per month 36 mos.*

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013 PAGE 15E

T’APP INTO IT.
758 Miscellaneous
TOOL BOX aluminum for pick-up truck. $100. Call Bob 570-822-2074 VACUUM, Hoover Deluxe, upright with attachments, mint condition, $40. MAILBOX, wallmount and lockable, new in the box, $10. 570-655-1217 VIDEO. Titanic A&E, 3 hours with historical newsreels, interviews, etc. New never opened. $5 570-654-1622 WHEELS, for stroller, carriage, wagon or lawn mower, (40) FREE. YEARBOOK, Kings College, (Regis) 1965, $20. BOTTLES, (30) very old, $.50 each. CANS, for beer, (200) very old, $.25 each. RECORDS, (50) each are $1 or less. OPENERS, for beer, (20) $.50 each. IRONS, (6) old electric, $1 each. MAGAZINES, (10) old, $1 each. FANS, (3) $3 each. OWNERS GUIDE, 1980 Ford, $1. 570-823-6986

Get the app ADVERTISERS: CALL 829-7100 right now. Scan our TO FIND HOW WE CAN CUSTOMIZE AN AFFORDABLE ADVERTSING PACKAGE FOR YOU QR Code.
THAT INCLUDES ADS ON OUR APP.

GET THE TIMES LEADER IPAD APP!
Available for FREE at the iPad store.
780 Televisions/ Accessories 815
TELEVISION. 24” LCD. Remote, hmi inputs. Excellent condition. $75 570-288-3352

Dogs

784

Tools

7 weeks, 1st shots, parents on site. $250. 570-864-3257

BORDER COLLIE PUPPIES 2 male, 2 female,

LADDER, extension, 36’, aluminum, heavier gauge. Dshaped rungs. Needs rope, $95. 570-696-1238 570-855-0095 LADDER. 24’ aluminum extension. Almost new. $85 Firm. 570-788-2388 STEP LADDER. 8’ wooden by Werner. Excellent condition. $20. 954-2029 TOOL CHEST Craftsman chest on wheels. Completely stocked with tools. $200. 825-2961 WRENCHES, (30) very old, $.25 each. BRACE AND BIT, $3. HAND AUGER, $3. CAR JACK, $3. FENCE CLAMPS, Galve (25) $.10 each. WHEEL BARROW, $4. 570-823-6986

DOBERMAN PUPPIES
Males and Females, red and rust, call Cooper’s Dobermans. 570-542-5158

AKC

CALL AN EXPERT
Professional Services Directory
Building & Remodeling 1054 Concrete & Masonry 1132 Handyman Services 1162 Landscaping/ Garden
Skid-Steer Mini Excavating New Landscapes/ Lawns. Retaining walls/patios. Call: 570-760-4814

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! 1000
Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!
1006

1024

1195

Movers

SERVICE DIRECTORY
A/C & Refrigeration Services

762

Musical Instruments

786 Toys & Games
BIKE girl’s 16” Barbie bike with training wheels $15. Step 2 naturally playful sandbox with lid $35. Picnic table for children L.T. fold n store $45. 570-696-4020 ULTIMATE EASY BAKE Oven-brand new, never used. $15. 570-883-7049.

ORGAN, Conn, with rhythm box and bench. $50. 570-822-9668 PIANO. Livingston upright player, pump style. 35 music rools. Ground floor removal. FREE 570-479-2322 PIANO, 1960’s STEINWAY UPRIGHT Recently tuned, in beautiful condition. Serial Number 45382331. $4,995. 570-714-9955

2 year health guaranteed, references available. $475. Call or Text: 570-765-1914

MALTESE POODLE MIX PUPPIES, MORKIE MIX PUPPIES

Ductless / Central Air Conditioning Free Estimates Licensed & Insured 570-332-0715

STRISH A/C

NEED A NEW KITCHEN OR BATH???? Seasonal Rooms
Home Renovating. Siding and More! Licensed and Insured. FREE ESTIMATES!! 570-237-7318 PA040387

Construction

HUGHES

All phases of masonry & concrete. Small jobs welcome. Senior discount. Free estimates. Licensed & Insured 288-1701/655-3505

D. PUGH CONCRETE

ALL PHASE HANDYMAN
SERVICE You Name It, We Can Do It! Over 30 Years Experience in General Construction Licensed & Insured

FOLTZ LANDSCAPING

BestDarnMovers Moving Helpers Call for Free Quote. We make moving easy. BestDarnMovers.com 570-852-9243

1249 Remodeling & Repairs

BK CONSTRUCTION
ALL TYPES OF RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION 570-760-9065

ROOFING

1204

WYOMING VALLEY MASONRY Concrete, stucco,
foundations, pavers, retaining wall systems, flagstone, brick work, chimneys repaired. Senior Citizen’s Discount 570-287-4144 or 570-760-0551

570-313-2262

KELLER’S LAWN CARE S C
Landscaping, mowing, mulching, trimming, planting. Commercial & Residential. 570-332-7016
PRING LEANUP

Painting & Wallpaper

Painting, drywall, plumbing & all types of interior & exterior home repairs. 570-829-5318

DO IT ALL HANDYMAN EVAN’S HOME IMPROVEMENTS

1015

Appliance Service

AKC registered. 1 sable male. Ready 4/24. 2 females, 3 males, black & party colored. 4/30. $550. Vet checked, first shots, wormed. 570-864-2643 ROTTIES HUSKIES Yorkies, Chihuahuas Labs & More Bloomsburg 389-7877 Hazleton 453-6900 Hanover 829-1922

POMERANIAN Puppies

We service all major brands.

A.R.T. APPLIANCE REPAIR 570-639-3001

Lending a hand since 1975. 570-824-6871

Shedlarski Construction H I
Licensed, insured & PA registered. Kitchens, baths, vinyl siding & railings, replacement windows & doors, additions, garages, all phases of home renovations. Free Estimates 570-287-4067
OME MPROVEMENT SPECIALIST

1057Construction & Building
FATHER & SON CONSTRUCTION Interior & Exterior Remodeling Jobs of All Sizes 570-814-4578 570-709-8826

1135

Hauling & Trucking

788

Stereo/TV/ Electronics

ENTERTAINMENT CENTER, Sauder, $75. 570-288-4847

768

Personal Electronics

790

TELEPHONE. Uniden one handset cordless phone. Almost new. $25 570-287-7911

Swimming Pools/Hot Tubs

845

Pet Supplies

LADDER, for a swimming pool, and a frame for a 4 ft. pool, $40. OBO 570-693-1918

CAGE, FERRET, Deluxe. $100 570-545-7006 CAGE. Bird, extra large. $50. 570-313-7590

772

Pools & Spas SPA

5 seats with lounge. Fiberglass sides, foam insulated. Easy lift, one person lid. 3 jet settings, 2 speeds each, foot massage with two waterfalls, includes two extra filters, chlorine and test strips. $2,000 570-836-2765

796 Wanted to Buy Merchandise

Why Spend Hundreds on New or Used Appliances? Most problems with your appliances are usually simple and inexpensive to fix! Save your hard earned money, Let us take a look at it first! 30 years in the business. East Main Appliances 570-735-8271 Nanticoke

GARAGE DOOR

A.S.A.P Hauling Estate Cleanouts, Attics, Cellars, Garages, we’re cheaper than dumpsters!. Free Estimates, Same Day! 570-855-4588

LAWN CUT? LEAVES RAKED? GENERAL YARD WORK? MULCHING? Responsible Senior student. Mountain Top, White Haven, Drums & Conygham area.

NEED HELP

A & N PAINTING SPRING SPECIAL $100 + materials for average size room. 18 years experience Power washing, sidewalks & decks, deck staining. 570-820-7832

1252

Roofing & Siding

Expert in Refinishing, Exterior Siding of any kind. You name it,we know how to paint it. Water Blasting, Many Ideas, Many Colors, 30 Years Experience. 570-313-2262 F & F PAINTING AND CONTRACTING SERVICES 30 Years Experience 570-793-7909

Advanced Paint Company

Your Roofing Specialist Free Estimates No Payment ‘til Job is 100% Complete 570-829-0239 570-824-6381 Roof Repairs & New Roofs. Shingle, Slate, Hot Built Up, Rubber, Gutters & Chimney Repairs. Year Round. Licensed/Insured ŠFREE EstimatesŠ *24 Hour Emergency Calls*

GILROY Construction

J.R.V. ROOFING

Call Justin 570-868-6134

1039

Chimney Service

Sales, service, installation & repair. FULLY INSURED HIC# 065008 CALL JOE 570-735-8551 Cell 606-7489

ALL KINDS OF HAULING & JUNK REMOVAL. SPRING CLEAN UP!

•Lawn Cutting •Shrub Trimming, •Mulching •Landscaping Services
25+ Years Exp. PA Landscaping & Lawn Service Inc. 570-287-4780

SPRING CLEAN UPS

or just want to freshen up your home or business? Let us splash your int./ext. walls with
some vibrant colors!

JACOBOSKY PAINTING Need a new look,

New Roofs & Repairs, Shingles, Rubber, Slate, Gutters, Chimney Repairs. Credit Cards Accepted FREE ESTIMATES! Licensed-Insured EMERGENCIES

570-288-6709

Jim Harden

1024

WANTED JEWELRY

776 Sporting Goods
BASEBALLS, (22) new, Wilson, in box $50. Trampoline springs, heavy duty, 5.5 inches long from hook to hook; 72 springs, $75 for all. OBO, 570-693-1918

WILKESBARREGOLD

pink trim accents & wheels, white tires. Front & rear brakes plus coaster foot brake. Good condition $25. 570-814-9574 BOWLING EQUIPMENT, (2) bowling balls, one 10.5 LB light blue, Ebonite with bag, $25, and one 15 LB black Brunswick with bag, $25. SHOES, Men’s size 10 1/2, $5 and women’s size 9, $5. 570-760-3883 G U N C A B I N E T. holds 6 guns, etched glass doors. $45 570-332-2715 SKIS, 2 sets, cases are included. $50. 570-736-6555

20” GIRLS MURRAY “DAZZLER” Powder blue with

BICYCLE

(570)48GOLD8 (570)484-6538

Find that new job.
The Times Leader Classified section.

Building & Remodeling

A-1 1 ABLE CHIMNEY Rebuild & Repair Chimneys. All types of Masonry. Liners Installed, Brick & Block, Roofs & Gutters. Licensed & Insured 570-735-2257

1078

Dry Wall
TREE/SHRUB REMOVAL REMOVAL DEMOLITION Estate Cleanout Free Estimates 24 HOUR SERVICE SMALL AND LARGE JOBS! 570-823-1811 570-239-0484 ALWAYS READY HAULING Property & Estate Cleanups, Attics, Cellars, Yards, Garages, Construction Sites, Flood Damage & More. CHEAPER THAN A DUMPSTER!! SAME DAY SERVICE Free Estimates 570-301-3754

Roofing, siding, gutters, insulation, decks, additions, windows, doors, masonry & concrete. Insured & Bonded.

1ST. QUALITY CONSTRUCTION CO.

Stainless Liners. Cleanings. Custom Sheet Metal Shop. 570-383-0644 1-800-943-1515 Call Now! CHRIS MOLESKY CHIMNEY SPECIALIST New, repair, rebuild, liners installed. Cleaning. Concrete & metal caps. Licensed & Insured 570-328-6257

CHIMNEY REPAIRS Parging. Stucco.

Hanging & Finishing Textured Ceilings Licensed & Insured Free Estimates

MIRRA DRYWALL
570-675-3378

TOUGH BRUSH & TALL GRASS Mowing, edging, mulching, shrubs & hedge shaping. Tree pruning. Garden tilling. Spring Clean Ups. Leaf removal. Weekly & bi-weekly lawn care. Accepting new customers. Fully Ins. Free Estimates 570-829-3261

Reasonable prices with hard workers. FREE ESTIMATES! 570-328-5083

Int/ Ext. painting, Power washing. Professional work at affordable rates. Free estimates. 570-288-0733

M. PARALIS PAINTING

McManus Construction Licensed, Insured. Everyday Low Prices. 3,000 satisfied customers. 570-735-0846

SPRING ROOFING

1165

Lawn Care

1084

Electrical

Senior Citizens Discount!

570-606-8438
ALL OLDER HOMES SPECIALIST 825-4268. Remodel / Repair Windows and Doors

State Lic. # PA057320

ECONOLECTRIC No Job Too Small. Generator Installs. Residential & Commercial Free Estimates Licensed-Insured PA032422

Care Service FREE ESTIMATES Mike 570-357-8074 Leave Message AFFORDABLE LAWN SERVICES Greater Pittston Area. Mowing, Mulching, Tilling & Deck Washing. Call 570-885-5858 or 570-954-0438 for Free Estimate

AFFORDABLE LAWN CARE Complete Lawn

Serra Painting Book Now For Spring & Save. All Work Guaranteed Satisfaction. 30 Yrs. Experience Powerwash & Paint Vinyl, Wood, Stucco Aluminum. Free Estimates You Can’t Lose! 570-822-3943

Licensed and Insured. 24 hour emergency services.

Shingled roofing, Rubber roofing, Gutters, Chimney Repairs. FREE ESTIMATES!

(855)768-7325.

SUMMIT PEAK ROOFING, INC. Toll Free:

www.summitpeakroofing.com
PA#096716

Spring Special 5%!

1297

Tree Care

1042

Highest Cash PayOuts Guaranteed
Open 6 Days a We e k 10am-6pm C l o s e d T h u r s d a ys 1092 Highway 315 Blvd. (Plaza 315) 315N, 1/2 mile before Mohegan Sun Casino

Cleaning & Maintainence

(570) 602-7840

April 26- 1,475.50 We Pay At Least 80% of the London Fix Market Price for All Gold Jewelry
WilkesBarreGold.com or email us at wilkesbarregold@ yahoo.com

London PM Gold Price

ASK HOW A BUILDING INDUSTRY MEMBERSHIP CAN BENEFIT YOU.
570-287-3331 FOR INFO or go to

DEB & PAT’S CLEANING SERVICE Free Estimates
570-793-4773

SLEBODA ELECTRIC Master electrician Licensed & Insured Service Changes & Replacements. Generator Installs. 868-4469

1093

Excavating

Hauling Junk & Trash from Houses, Garages, Yards, Etc

Mike’s $5-Up

COUNTRY GENTLEMAN
Lawns - Shrubs Tilling - Mulch Senior Discount Westside Specials Family Owned 570-287-3852

TOTAL YARD CARE

Exterior, Free estimates, 30 yrs experience 570-826-1719 OR 570-704-8530

WITKOSKY PAINTING Interior

APEX TREE AND EARTH Tree removal Pruning, Stump Grinding, Hazard Tree Removal, Grading, Drainage, Lot Clearing.Insured. Reasonable Rates
apextreeandearth.com
Serving Wyoming Valley, Back Mountain and Surrounding areas.

1054

Concrete & Masonry

CALL JANET

Licensed & Insured No job too small. Free Estimates.
DempskiMasonry.com

& CONCRETE 570-824-0130

DEMPSKI MASONRY

www.bianepa.com

All Types Of Excavating, Demolition & Concrete Work. Lot clearing, pool closing & retaining walls, etc. Large & Small Jobs FREE ESTIMATES (570) 760-1497

826-1883 472-4321

1213

Paving & Excavating

570-550-4535

1162 Landscaping/ Garden

CORNERSTONE
Roofing Siding Carpentry 40 yrs experience Licensed & Insured PA026102 Call Dan 570-881-1131 www.davejohnson remodeling.com Baths/Kitchens Carpentry A to Z

CONSTRUCTION

B.P. Home Repairs 570-825-4268 Brick, Block, Concrete, Sidewalks, Chimneys, Stucco. New Installation & Repairs COVERT & SONS CONCRETE CO.

1099

Fencing & Decks

780

Televisions/ Accessories

TELEVISION, standard 6 years old, 36” RCA entertainment series. Heavy Duty, sturdy with excellent crystal clear picture. Has a semi-flat screen and is Xbox ready. Asking $300. 570-736-6606 Ask for Sandy TELEVISION. 13” Zenith color with remote. $25 570-313-7590

800 PETS & ANIMALS
810 Cats

570-819-0681

All shots, neutered, tested,microchipped 824-4172, 9-9 only

& KITTENS CATS 12 weeks & up.
VALLEY CAT RESCUE

Call 829-7130 to place an employment ad.
ONLY ONL NLY ONE N LE LEA LEADER. E DER.
timesleader.com

All Types Of Work New or Remodeling Licensed & Insured Now Offering Plumbing, Heating/AC 570-406-6044

NICHOLS CONSTRUCTION

Discounts for Vets & Seniors Give us a Call, We’ll Beat Them All By 10% or More! 570-696-3488 or 570-239-2780 Stonework - stucco - concrete - patios - pavers - brick block - chimneys www.nepa masonryinc.com 570-466-2916 570-954-8308

All types concrete and masonry work, foundation and chimney repair specials.

Discounts on wood, vinyl, chain link, aluminum and more! Call today for a FREE ESTIMATE! 570-602-0432

ACTION FENCE SPRING SALE:

FREDERICK FENCE CO. Locally Owned
Vinyl, Chain Link, Aluminum, Wood. 570-709-3021

aerating, fertilizing, mulching, weeding, pruning, garden tilling. - Painting, fencing, stonewalls, power washing. - Tree and snow removal. Fully insured Credit cards accepted Commercial or Residential Please contact Roger: 570-760-7249 email: schichi@ptd.net Arbor Care & Landscaping Tree trimming, pruning & removal. Stump grinding, Cabling. Shrub & hedge sculpting & trimming. Spring cleanup, retaining walls and repair. Free Estimates Fully Insured 570-542-7265

BAREFOOT GROUNDS KEEPING - Grass Cutting,

Affordable, reliable, meticulous. Rates as low as $20. Emerald Green 570-825-4963

GRASS CUTTING

*DRIVEWAYS *PARKING LOTS *ROADWAYS *HOT TAR & CHIP *SEAL COATING Licensed and Insured. Call Today For Your Free Estimate

Removal, Trimming, Stump Grinding, etc. PA098936 570-574-5018

TREE SERVICE

1336

Window Cleaning

Specializing in grass cutting rates start at $20 Free Estimates 570-706-5035

LOW COST LAWN CARE SERVICE

pjswindowcleaning.com

PJ’s Window Cleaning & Janitorial Services Windows, Gutters, Carpets, Power washing and more. INSURED/BONDED. 570-283-9840

570-474-6329
Lic.# PA021520
Paving, Excavating, Sealcoating & Concrete. Fully Insured. Free Estimates. 570-417-5835

Brizzy’s

1129 Gutter Repair & Cleaning
Window Cleaning Pressure washing Insured 570-288-6794
Say it HERE in the Classifieds! 570-829-7130

We Will Till & Fertilize Your Garden & Flower Beds. SPRING SPECIAL Free Garden Starter Kit With Every Job! Call 328-2755

MR. TILLER

L & F, INC.

NEPA MASONRY, INC.

GUTTER CLEANING

1183

Masonry

1231 Pool & Spa Repair/Services
Pool openings, liner changes, and installations. Patios, Decks and fencing. Insured. 570-592-2321

Need a Roommate? Place an ad and find one here! 570-829-7130

50 Years Experience Stone mason, stucco, pre-cast stone, paving, custom cover & design. 570-301-8200

ATIE’S CONSTRUCTION

RK POOLS & MORE

Doyouneedmore space? Ayardorgaragesale in classified is thebestway to cleanoutyourclosets! You’rein bussiness withclassified!

PAGE 16E

SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

2014 m{zd{ CX-5
Sport All Wheel Drive
e Ov

s el od k M c -5 to CX in s ow! n

10

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$219*
PER MONTH

lease for onl y

Plus tax and tags. 36 months, 10,000 miles per year. $2,989 plus tax and tags due at signing. $3,401.17 total. Includes first payment, $595 MCS aquisition fee, $2,154.76 customer down payment. Valid upon credit approval.See dealer for details. Expires 04/30/2013.

VIN: JM3KEBE3E020017

2013 m{zd{3 I SV
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2013 m{zd{ CX-9
sport All wheel Drive
On
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5

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VIN: JMIBLITG4DI729925

VIN: JM3TB3BV3D0402660

was:

now onl y

$16,348*
for up to 60 months!
Plus tax and tags. Must be the current owner of a Mazda to qualify for owner loyalty. Offer valid upon credit approval. See dealer for details. Expires 04/30/2013.

$18,345 $ 497 $ 500 $ 1,000

was:
wvm discount APR Bonus Cash OWNER LOYAL TY

now onl y

$28,998*
for up to 60 months!
Plus tax and tags. Must be the current owner of a Mazda to qualify for owner loyalty. Offer valid upon credit approval. See dealer for details. Expires 04/30/2013.

$32,420 $ 1,672 $ 750 $ 1,000

wvm discount APR Bonus Cash OWNER LOYAL TY

Plus

0% Financing
Wyoming Valley Motors

Plus

0% Financing 

     570-288-7411  

SAVE EVEN MORE! 
   

CURRENT MAZDA OWNERS CAN

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013 PAGE PAGE 17G 17E

SUNDAY, APRIL 28 ,2013

SMARTER. BOLDER. FASTER. Smith Hourigan Group
Story by Hartt Lang Advertising Projects Writer This beautiful Mountain Top home is listed by Lisa Joseph of Lewith & Freeman for $349,000. It offers 2,849 square feet of space. Amenities include ceiling fans, deck, hardwood floors, whirlpool tub, master bath, master bedroom with walk-in-closet, mudroom, office, pantry and a porch. The seller is offering a $3,000 granite/new kitchen sink credit to the buyer. Buyer can pick color of their choice and installation can be arranged prior to closing. The exterior is stone and white vinyl, and the roof is comp shingle. This home is in very good condition. A paved, private driveway leads to a spacious, attached 2-car garage. A sidewalk leads to a charming covered porch and the front entrance of the home. A 2-story foyer with a large window on the second floor compliments the front entrance of the home. You will find a family room, kitchen, dining room, half bathroom, an office and a laundry room on the first floor. The family room measures 26.3 x 13.9. A beautiful stone fireplace is sure to get your attention. This room has hardwood floors and vaulted ceilings. Recessed lighting, a ceiling fan/light fixture, large windows, and ivory walls brighten the room. Nearby is a 20.2 x 13.10 modern kitchen. This room has tiled floors with ivory walls and stainless steel appliances. Recessed lighting is placed above wooden cabinetry. A

Visit Our Website

Century21SHGroup.com

Open House Today 1-3 P.M. in Mountain Top
center island provides extra counter space and a pantry is available for additional storage. A window above the kitchen sink, recessed lighting, and a ceiling fan/light fixture provide light for the room. Double doors in the kitchen lead to a large, rear deck that overlooks the backyard and a wooded area. Adjacent to the kitchen is a 14.8x13 dining room. This space has hardwood floors, crown molding, and chair rail molding throughout. Walls are ivory and a ceiling fan/light fixture is placed above the center of the room. The living room measures 14.6x13 and has hardwood floors throughout. A beautiful double window overlooks the front yard and brings in an abundance of natural light. — Continued

OPEN HOUSE TODAY 1:00-2:30
WE WILL SELL YOUR HOUSE OR ERA WILL BUY IT!*

LEADING RE IS LEWITH & FREEMAN’S WORLD WIDE NETWORK
National Sales Volume, 2011 shown in billions of dollars
$235

Lewith & Freeman Real Estate, Inc.
250 

         
$106 $101 $85

$166 $157

Grandeur flows through this historic mansion originally built for the Johnson & Johnson family. This architectural masterpiece centers on a stone & glass main home resting on a gorgeous manicured lakefront estate with a large boathouse poised along the tranquil shores of Crystal Lake.
For an exclusive tour contact;
Direct: 570.510.5840 Office: 570.587.9999 Sunita.Arora@ERA.com

HISTORIC FERN HALL

Leading Real Estate Companies of the World® Coldwell Banker RE/MAX Prudential Keller Williams Century 21 Sotheby’s Real Living ERA Realty Executives Better Homes & Gardens rdens

200

NATIONAL STRENGTH LOCAL COMMITMENT Top Seller In Luzerne County
Exposure on Over 600 Web Sites

829-6200 • www.atlasrealtyinc.com 1
FEATURED HOME
689 R WESTMINSTER RD., JENKINS TWP.
Very private 2 bedroom home located on 1.48 acres Central air, screened in porch, 1 1/2 baths, large living/dining room, extra 1 story building could be converted into 2 car garage. 16x8 screened in porch, fresh paint. For more information and photos visit www.atlasrealtyinc.com MLS #13-1622. Call Charlie 829-6200

Leading Real Estate Companies of the World
®

150

100

50

$46 $26

$21

17 $17

$9

0

www.lewith-freeman.com
Kingston-Cape Cod NEW LISTING!

Atlas Realty, Inc.
02:0 2:0 0

Don’t Make a Move Until You Talk To Us!
Kingston-Very Nice! NEW LISTING! Hunlock Creek-19.5 Acres NEW LISTING!

Larksville-Large Yard!

NEW LISTING!

Sunita Arora

ONE Mountaintop Office SOURCE 12 N Mountain Blvd. REALTY (570) 403-3000

ERA1.com

Deceptively large, all brick, Cape Cod design with 3 full levels of finished space. 2nd floor rec room plus 2 bedrooms. Finished basement with bar, office, family room and sauna. New windows, new baths, roof, carpeting and other updates. #13-1497 $149,500 Ted Poggi 283-9100 x25

Very nice 2-story with off-street parking, new front porch, fenced yard with a 2-level deck, mature plantings for privacy. Modern kitchen and bath, 3 bedrooms and a lower level family room. 2 free-standing gas stoves will help keep utility costs low! #13-1538 $94,500 Walter Belchick 690-0464

Work, reside and enjoy nature on this commercial/residential 19.5 acre property with 40x60 pole barn. 2-story home with Great room and stone fireplace. Master bedroom with vaulted ceiling & Jacuzzi tub in master bath. #13-1591 $259,000 Maribeth Jones 696-6565

Well maintained Larksville bi-level with large private backyard. Interior features modern kitchen with granite counter tops, 3 bedrooms, 1 full bath, attached 1-car garage, 3 season sun room & plenty of closet space. Private driveway. #13-1463 $166,900 DJ Wojciechowski 283-9100

$129,900

We Sell Happiness!
13-1315 Bring your grill and t s make it a point to see We t h i s conveniently located 3-bed r o o m, 1-bath family home with 1-c a r garage, above ground pool, & garden! Main bedroom has additional room for inside nursery or large walk-in closet. CALL CINDY E. 690-1621 $109,900

©2013 BRER Af liates LLC. An independently owned and operated broker member of BRER Af liates LLC. Prudential, the Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are registered service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license with no other af liation with Prudential Equal Housing Opportunity.

Two Of ces To Serve You Better: 1149 Wyoming Avenue, Forty Fort 570.283.9100 28 Carverton Road, Shavertown 570.696.2600 Visit our website: www.poggi-jones.com

g min Wyo

New Listing!
Wilkes-Barre 570-825-2468 • Shavertown 570-696-2010
info@mksre.com
YATESVILLE Better than new end unit townhouse with 3 bedroom, 2.5 baths, 1 car garage, modern kitchen with breakfast bar, dinning area and all appliances included. Master bedroom with beautiful master bath. Fenced yard with patio. Call Darren Snyder 570-825-2468 $219,900
WILKES-BARRE Elegant tudor with 4800 sq ft in Downtown Wilkes-Barre’s Historic District. The 1st floor office has 1860 sq ft w/ central air and 2 restrooms. The residence upstairs includes 5 bedrooms, 2 baths, custom kitchen w/ an island & sunny breakfast room, formal dinning room. The formal living room has a tray ceiling, picture windows and wet bar. Also, a cozy den. Private drive, OSP for 5 cars. $289,000 Call Darren Snyder 570-825-2468
Darren G. Snyder Broker/President

www.gordonlong.com
3138 Memorial Hwy., Dallas
Across From Agway
WILKES-BARRE Updated 4 bed, 4 bath, 2-car garage w/ a finished basement and in-ground pool located in Barney Farms. Tiled kitchen has oak cabinets, breakfast bar & sunroom. Formal LR & DR w/ HWF & French Doors leading to the large deck & private fenced yard. Family room has a Gas FP & built-in shelves. Master bedroom suite has WIC, double sinks & whirlpool tub. $249,900 Call Darren Snyder 570-825-2468 BEAR CREEK Immaculate 2-Story Colonial on 3 acres in Laurelbrook Estate complete with a finished lower level that walks out to a professionally landscaped yard and inground pool. 3 bedroom, 3 1/2 baths w/ oversized 2 car garage. Kitchen has stainless steel appliances, a center island and granit countertops with a tiled backsplash. Family room has a cathedral ceiling with a propane fireplace. $374,900 Call Darren Snyder 570-825-2468

(570) 675-4400

REDUCED PRICE

Price Reduced!
K n sto ing
12-4239 This brick a n d vinyl 3-bedroom 2-story on a nice, q u i e t Kingston s t r e e t feels l i k e h o m e. Beautiful remodeling begun, b u t is not q u i t e complete. Come & see what NEW PRICE: $125,000

NANTICOKE - EAST DEVELOPMENT *Marvelous* 4 Bedroom 3 Bath Ranch - Great open floor plan. Asking $175,500 Listing #12-3193 Call Richard direct 570-406-2438

you might do to finish it! CALL MICHAEL 760-4961

Attention Investors!
11-4263 Attention investors ... o u r seller i s m o t i v a t e d ! Exceptional double in move - in condition features 3-BRs each u n i t, outstanding woodwork, & front and back porches. Nice neighborhood & yard .... NOT in flood zone. Definitely worth seeing ... and owning! CALL SUSAN N. 736-6304 $88,500

le svil ard w Ed

837 Wyoming Ave., Kingston

288-1401

PR IC E

NE W

Se Habla ~ Espanol

263490

15 WYNDWOOD DRIVE, WILKES-BARRE 2 bedroom, 2 bath end unit townhome in Countrywood II. Living room with vaulted ceiling. Modern oak kitchen. Formal dining room. Central air. 1-car garage. MLS#11-3294 JOE MOORE $122,500

NE W
61 FOURTH STREET, LARKSVILLE Quality new construction! 2,400 sq.ft. of living space features flexible, open floor plan. 4 bedrooms; 2 1/2 baths.Vaulted ceilings; hardwood flooring. 2-zoned gas forced air heat with central air. Lower level family room(37’ x 12’6’’). 30-year roof. 1 year builder’s warranty. MLS#13-182 JOE MOORE $158,500

PR IC E

83 MALTBY AVENUE, SWOYERSVILLE 7 room (2 bedrooms); 1 1/2 bath home in great neighborhood. Modern kitchen. Newer roof, replacement windows, electrical panel box, gas forced-air heat with central air conditioning. Finished room in lower level. Screened porch. 1-car garage. MLS#13-1328 JOE MOORE $134,500

PAGE 18E SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

Mountain Top Continued from front page
A 9.8x5.5 half bathroom is modern and tiled throughout. A large mirror with lighting above sits atop a large wooden vanity. The office measures 13x9 and has hardwood floors. This room has crown molding and chair rail molding similar to the dining room. Also on the first floor is a 12.6x7 laundry room. This space has tiled floors and a closet for storage. Stairs lead to the second floor; here you will find the master bedroom with master bathroom, 3 additional bedrooms, and a full bathroom. The master bedroom measures 19x12.10. This room is carpeted throughout and has a ceiling fan/light fixture. A large double window with wooden molding brings in natural light. Attached to the master bedroom is a spacious 21.4x15.4 modern, master bathroom. This room is tiled throughout and walls match the master bedroom. This room has a whirlpool tub, double sinks, and a stand-up shower. A modern, full bath on the second floor measures 8.1x6.11. This room is tiled throughout with ivory walls. The second bedroom measures 13.6x12.6. Walls are ivory with an accent wall. This room is carpeted and has a ceiling fan. The third bedroom measures 12.2x10.11. This room also has a ceiling fan and ivory walls. The fourth bedroom measures 13.4x12.7 and is carpeted. Walls are light blue, and like the other bedrooms there is a ceiling fan. This home has public water and sewer systems. Heat fuel type and hot water heater are gas and heat type is forced air. This home has central air conditioning, as well. For more information or to schedule a showing, please contact Lisa Joseph at (570) 715-9335. Specifications: Type of home: 2 Story Price: $349,000 Square Footage: 2,849 Bedrooms: 4 Bathrooms: 3 Realtor: Lewith & Freeman Listing Agent: Lisa Joseph Office Phone: (570) 715-9335 Address: 55 Greystone Drive, Mountain Top, PA 18707 Directions: Take Route 309S to left on Kirby Ave (by Rite-Aid). Turn left on Greystone Drive (entering Greystone Manor). Home is on the right.

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale
DRUMS

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale
DURYEA

906 Homes for Sale
EDWARDSVILLE

906 Homes for Sale
SINGLE HOME 3 bedroom. Corner lot. Carport & 1.5 car detached garage. Gas heat, vinyl siding, 1.5 baths. Enclosed side porch. $67,000 570-779-5438 Leave Message.

906 Homes for Sale
For Sale by Owner. 229 Pringle Street Single home, 3 bedrooms. Remodeled, Kitchen & bath, concrete cellar, huge walk up attic, deck & new roof. 570-287-3927

BEAR CREEK
900 REAL ESTATE FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
Having trouble paying your mortgage? Falling behind on your payments? You may get mail from people who promise to forestall your foreclosure for a fee in advance. Report them to the Federal Trade Commission, the nation’s consumer protection agency. Call 1-877FTC-HELP or click on ftc.gov. A message from The Times Leader and the FTC. 6650 Bear Creek Blvd. A well maintained custom built two story home, nestled on two private acres with a circular driveway. Three bedrooms, large kitchen with center island, Master bedroom with two walk in closets, family room with fireplace, a formal dining room. $275,000 MLS#13-1063 Call Geri 570-862-7432 Lewith & Freeman 696-0888

ASHLEY $42,000

BERWICK

570-901-1020

DALLAS
68 N. Main St. MLS: 12-3845: Excellent investment property, 4 bedroom, large kitchen, living room, and dining room. Great price! Call Melissa 570-237-6384 VICTORIAN Beautiful details throughout include exquisite woodwork, hardwood floors, stained glass. Open staircase, 3 bedrooms, 2 full baths, 2 half baths. Second floor office, finished 3rd floor, in-ground pool & 3 car garage. MLS#12-698 $199,900 Call Patsy 570-204-0983

DALLAS TWP.

AVOCA $59,900

Priced to sell on West Center Hill Rd. 3 bedroom, 2 bath home with finished basement. MLS 13-770 $134,900 JOSEPH P. GILROY REAL ESTATE 288-1444 Call Brenda at 570-760-7999 to schedule your appointment

570-759-3300 DALLAS 902 William St. Corner lot in Pittston Twp., 2 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, move in condition. Newer gas furnace and hot water heater, new w/w carpet in dining room & living room. Large yard. www.atlasrealtyinc.com MLS 13-767 Tom Salvaggio 570-262-7716

To place your ad call...829-7130
DALLAS

REDUCED 2691 Carpenter Rd. Magnificent raised ranch on estate setting. Total finished four bedroom, 2 bath home. This house features hardwood floors throughout. Finished basement with working fireplace. Large deck with swimming pool, two car detached garage set on 2.4 acres. MLS# 12-3158 $277,900 Dave Rubbico, Jr. 885-2693

SUGARLOAF COUNTRY ESTATE Private 18 acre estate with southern exposure & panoramic views! Quality constructed & custom built, this New England split level offers 3-4 bedrooms, three baths, solarium with hot tub, two fireplaces, extra large gameroom & other attractive amenities! Matching 2 story brick barn, cozy “A” frame guest cottage & more......absolutely ideal for horses, mini farmette & children. 20 minutes from Wilkes-Barre & Pocono Resorts. Broker Owned Call Mike @ 570-455-9463 M.S. Pecora Realtor

570-829-6200 DURYEA REDUCED $85,900

316 Raspberry Rd. Blueberry Hills Like new 2 story home with first floor master bedroom and bath. Inground pool on nice corner lot with fenced in yard. Sunroom, hardwood floors, 2 car garage, full unfinished basement www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 13-610 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

P E N D I N G

226 Church St. Large 2 story with 3 bedrooms and 2 full baths. Extra large room sizes, stained glass and natural woodowork. Not flooded in 2011. MLS #13-190. For more information and photos visit atlasrealtyinc.com. Call Charlie 829-6200

DALLAS

This 4 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath Cape Cod style home has so much to offer! Plenty of room for everyone. Master bedroom with walkin closet and full bath, family room with fireplace, recreation room with half bath in lower level. Hardwood floors on 1st floor, new windows, above ground pool. MLS #13-1109 $184,900 Tracy Zarola 574-6465

OPEN HOUSE Sun., Apr. 28th, 1-3 Nestled in the trees on a 1.5 acre corner lot. 4 bedroom, 2 bath home in Glendalough. MSL#13-693 $220,000 JOSEPH P. GILROY REAL ESTATE 288-1444 Call Brenda at 570-760-7999 to schedule your appointment

3 Crestview Drive Sprawling multilevel, well-constructed and continuously maintained. 5,428 sq. ft. of living space. Living room and formal dining room with two-way gas fireplace and hardwood flooring. Eat-in kitchen with island. Florida room with flagstone floor. 5 bedrooms, 4 baths, 2 half-baths. Lower level recroom with fireplace and wet bar leads to heated, in-ground pool. Beautifully landscaped twoacre lot. $525,000. MLS#13-1309 Call Joe Moore 570-288-1401

DUPONT $84,895

To place your ad Call Toll Free 1-800-427-8649

DURYEA $79,00

Collect cash, not dust! Clean out your basement, garage or attic and call the Classified department today at 570829-7130!
EDWARDSVILLE

Rubbico Real Estate, Inc. 826-1600

DRUMS

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

137 Lidy’s Road Large 4 bedroom, 2 story home with new roof and chimney liner in April 2013. Plenty of living space for the price. www. atlasrealtyinc.com MLS 13-215 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

696-0723

4 bedroom home, new construction, with deck & patio. Public water & sewer, 2 car garage. $223,900 Lots Available Build To Suit Call 822-1139 or 829-0897

DALLAS

FOR SALE BY OWNER 9 Westminster Dr. 4 bedroom brick ranch. 2,800 sq. ft. Totally renovated. 2 1/2 car garage. Low taxes, corner lot. See ZILLOW for details. $274,000. Call 570-878-3150

DALLAS

PRICE REDUCTION! BEECH MTN. LAKES Charming 3 bedroom, 2 bath 1,800 sq. ft. home with lower level office, family room & laundry. Propane fireplace, 2 car garage. Quiet cul-de-sac, right near lake. MLS# 13-916 $167,500 Dana Distasio 570-715-9333

DURYEA OPEN HOUSE SUN MAY 5TH 12-2 1219 SOUTH ST Own this cozy 1/2 double for less than it costs to rent. $44,900 Ed Appnel 570-817-2500

AFFORDABLE P RENOVATED E You’ll HOME! enjoy N the space of the living D room/dining room I open floor plan with N hardwood G floors. Large trendy kitchen with new appliances. Spacious 2 bedrooms and bath with tiled jetted tub for relaxing. Peace of mind with new furnace, hot water heater & electrical box. Plenty of parking and nice yard. MLS 13-96 Michele Hopkins 570-540-6046

Beautiful, Large Brick Home with 5 bedrooms, 2 full baths, 2 car garage, large fenced-in yard, sunporch. Patio, lots of closets & storage. Hardwood floors, large kitchen with appliances, 1st floor bedroom suite. 2nd kitchen in basement. Was an old rectory so has much room to entertain. Must see this home to appreciate all it has to offer. No Water 2011 Flood. MLS# 12-1536 $184,500 Linnea Holdren 570-371-1798

570-654-1490

SELECT GROUP 570-455-8521 570-455-8521

805341

Line up a place to live in classified!

Beautiful home in a lovely setting in the Village of Orange. 2 or 3 bedrooms, 1st floor bedroom, hardwood flooring, large eat in kitchen, 1st floor laundry, 2nd floor cedar closet. Detached garage, barn style shed with loft, many upgrades. New furnace, kitchen floor & recently drilled private well & PIX plumbing. Don’t wait, make this home yours & enjoy serenity on the back deck. $119,900 MLS# 13-283 Call/text Donna Cain 947-3824 or Tony Wasco 855-2424

PRICE REDUCED Beautiful brick ranch. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, family room, multiple fireplaces, Large eat-in kitchen. $177,700. (570) 590-4442

DALLAS NEW GOSS MANOR 28 Highland Drive

DUPONT REDUCED $68,500

FORTY FORT

KINGSTON

baths. Completely restored from top to bottom. Excellent location. $235,000 570-829-2022 DALLAS

DALLAS SALE BY OWNER 4 bedrooms, 2.5

PRICE REDUCTION! BEECH MTN. LAKES Charming 3 bedroom, 2 bath 1,800 sq. ft. home with lower level office, family room & laundry. Propane fireplace, 2 car garage. Quiet cul-de-sac, right near lake. MLS# 13-916 $167,500 Dana Distasio 570-715-9333

424 Simpson St. Good condition Cape Cod. 3 bedroom, 1 full bath in quiet neighborhood. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-4357 Brian Harashinski 570-237-0689

DRUMS

Newberry Estate The Greens 4,000 sq. ft. condo with view of ponds & golf course. Three bedrooms on 2 floors. 5 1/2 baths, 2 car garage & more. $425,000 MLS# 12-1480 Besecker Realty 570-675-3611

DURYEA $339,900

76 Main St. $69,900 Newly remodeled two bedroom home. Kitchen is very nice with granite counters and tile floor, bathroom is modern with tub surround, tile floor and granite vanity. New vinyl windows throughout. Off street parking for 2 cars. MLS #123966 For more information and photos visit www. atlasrealt y i n c . c o m . Call Charlie 570-829-6200

P E N D I N G

This home has been totally renovated throughout & freshly painted on the outside! Moveright-in to this cozy home with 1 car detached garage, fenced yard & rear deck. Gas heat. Very nice. MLS#13-1399 $85,000 Lynda Rowinski 570-696-5418

GET THE WORD OUT with a Classified Ad. 570-829-7130

The Attorney To Call When Buying A Home
• Complete Real Estate Legal Services • Title Insurance • Rapid Title Search & Closing • Evening & Weekend Appointments

Smith Hourigan Group 570-696-1195

170 E. Thomas St. Remodeled, 3 bedrooms 1 bath. Large fenced in back yard. $110,000. (570) 239-8556

MINERS MILLS

Angelo C. Terrana Jr.
ATTORNEY AT LAW Suite 117 Park Building, 400 Third Avenue, Kingston, PA (570) 283-9500

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013 PAGE 19E 

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Company NMLS# 2743. Branch NMLS# 386319. Individual NMLS# 139699. Licensed by the Pennsylvania Banking Department. Guaranteed Rate, Inc. is a private corporation organized under the laws of the State of Delaware. It has no affiliation with the US Department of Housing and Urban Development, the US Department of Veterans Affairs, the US Department of Agriculture or any other government agency.

OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 1 TO 4 AT 7 RIVER SHORES COURT, WEST PITTSTON

River Shores Ranch

This West Pittston - RIVER SHORES home in a NEW SUBDIVISION of high end homes features one floor living with a great family room, 18 foot high vaulted ceilings, fire place, hardwood floors, three bedrooms, large master and master bath suite and walk in closet. Laundry room, two car garage. Hardwood floors through out with tile baths. Kitchen features a great appliance package and granite counters. On-Demand tankless hot water, gas heat, and an extra large lot that is nicely landscaped. This home comesNwith beautiful finished lower level with pool room, home theater, bedroom and full bath and a bar/ kitchenette lots of storage and a two car garage. PRICED COMPLETE AT $348,900 River Shores at the corner of Erie St and Susquehanna Ave in West Pittston

COME SEE THIS HOME.... SUNDAY 1 TO 4PM

Let’s Put This Patio!!

And This Grilling Porch!!

On Your House With This View!

CLIMB THE STAIRS TO SEE THE RIVER VIEWS FROM THE UPPER REC/BILLIARDS ROOM AND SECOND MASTER BR OUTSTANDING 3000 SQFT HOME WITH UNBELIEVABLE KITCHEN AND PATIO FIRE PIT AREA CALL TO MEET THE BUILDER AND SEE AVAILABLE LOTS FOR CUSTOM HOME DESIGN AND BUILD OPTIONS. ONLY THREE LOTS AVAILABLE !!!!!! CALL NOW!!!!!!!! BUILDER AVAILABLE FROM 11:30 TO 1PM AND AFTER 4PM ...CALL 881-2144 Eagle View turn toward the river off of Main Street, Pittston on Brady St. then Left two blocks to the new construction. (Between Pittston and the Eight St Bridge -near the old Pittston Hospital)

ALSO COME SEE THE SPEC HOME BEING COMPLETED IN EAGLE VIEW......

PAGE 20E SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale
GOULDSBORO

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale
NANTICOKE

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

EXETER $69,900

HARDING $249,900

HUGHESTOWN $72,500

KINGSTON $139,900

LAFLIN $109,000

LAFLIN

1156 Wyoming Ave. Large home with 4 bedrooms, yard with detached 2 car garage, private yard. Home needs a little updating but a great place to start! www.atlasrealtyinc.com MLS 13-865 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

BIG BASS LAKE REDUCED $120,000. This large Chalet has a full kitchen on the ground floor with full bath. Great for two families to share, or in-law’s quarters. In Big Bass Lake Community with indoor & outdoor pools, club house, gym & lakefront beaches. Conveniently located near Rts. 380, 435 & 307. Call Tom cell 516-507-9403

$89,900

EXETER

1385 Mt. Zion Rd. Great country setting on 3.05 acres. Move in condition Ranch with 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, inground swimming pool, hardwood floors. Finished basement with wet bar. 2 car garage, wrap around driveway. For more info and photos visit: www.atlasrealtyinc.com MLS 12-2270 Call Tom 570-262-7716

with master bedroom and bath on 1st floor. New gas furnace and water heater with updated electrical panel. Large lot with 1 car garage, nice location. www.atlasrealtyinc.com. Must be sold to settle estate MLS 13-294 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

64 Center St. Large 4 bedroom

129 S. Dawes Ave. Three bedroom, 2 bath cape cod with central air, new windows, doors, carpets and tile floor. Full concrete basement with 9' ceilings. Walking distance to Wilkes Barre. Electric and Oil heat. MLS #123283. For more information and photos visit www.atlasrealtyinc.com. Call Tom 570-262-7716

147 Haverford Drive Nicely kept 2 bedroom, 1.5 bath townhome in desirable neighborhood. Great looking family room in lower level. Spacious rooms with plenty of closets. Outdoor patio with pavers and trees for privacy. Carpet, tiled kitchen counter and AC unit are ALL NEW! Move in condition. www. atlasrealtyinc.com MLS 13-909 Call Terry 570-885-3041

HARDING 570-842-2300 HANOVER TWP. 19 Thomas St. 4 bedroom, 2 bath with 2 car garage on quiet street. Super yard, home needs TLC, being sold AS IS. www.atlasrealtyinc.com. MLS 13-317 Call Tom 570-262-7716

HUGHESTOWN REDUCED $189,900

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

LAFLIN $254,900

46 Old Mill Road Stunning English Tudor in a desirable neighborhood. Modern kitchen with cherry cabinets, granite countertops, stainless steel appliances, island with Jenn air and tile floor. Separate glass surrounded breakfast room. Family room with gas fireplace, and hardwood floors. Formal dining room with bay window. French doors throughout. Master bedroom suite with master bath, walk-in closet and separate sitting room. Lower level rec-room and office. Two car garage. MLS#13-1076 $325,000 Call Sandra Gorman: 570-696-5408

MOOSIC $92,900 OPEN HOUSE SUN. APRIL 28 NOON - 2PM

NANTICOKE REDUCED

R. 1104 Springbrook Cape Cod home with endless possibilities. 3-4 bedroom, 1 bath, central air, plenty of storage. Enclosed porch, garage with carport. Situated on 3 lots. Directions: 181, Exit 180 Moosic (Rt. 11) L. onto 502, straight 1/2 mile. Turn R onto 8th St., up hill, turn left, house 3rd on right. www.atlasrealtyinc.com MLS 13-607 Call Keri Best 570-885-5082

Lovely 1/2 double sitting high on the hill in the Honeypot section of Nanticoke. Nice hardwood floors, original woodwork, generous room sizes & high ceilings make this home feel grand. Off street parking for 2 cars in front, & room for additional parking or garage in rear. $40,000 Call Christine 332-8832

613-9080 NANTICOKE

1457 S. Hanover St. Beautiful Tudor style split level home. This home features 3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, recreation room with a bar, wood burning stove, 2 tier patio, storage shed, fenced yard and 1 car garage. Security system and more. MLS 12-3292 $179,900 John Polifka 570-704-6846 Five Mountains Realty 570-542-2141

NANTICOKE

EXETER

362 Susquehanna Avenue Completely remodeled, spectacular, 2 story Victorian home, with 3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, new rear deck, full front porch, tiled baths & kitchen, granite countertops. All cherry hardwood floors throughout, all new stainless steel appliances & lighting. New oil furnace, washer/dryer in first floor bath. Great neighborhood, nice yard. $174,900 (30 year loan, $8,750 down, $887/month, 30 years @ 4.5%) NOT IN FLOOD 100% OWNER FINANCING AVAILABLE Call Bob at 570-654-1490

209 Constitution Avenue OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 4/28 3 TO 5 Meticulously maintained 4 bedroom, 2 story, vinyl sided, 5 year old home situated on a generous lot. Large, modern kitchen, 3 baths, 1st floor family room, 2 car garage, deck and soooo much more! MLS #11-2429 $269,900 Call Florence Keplinger @ 715-7737

Cozy Cape Cod with eat-in kitchen. Gas heat, replacement windows and newer roof. Vinyl & brick exterior. Two car detached garage with driveway on each side of the house. In-ground pool with pool house. MLS# 13-6 $79,500 Sandra Gorman 570-696-5408

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!
24 Fordham Road Great Split Level in Oakwood Park, Laflin. 13 rooms, 4 bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths. 2 car garage and large corner lot. Lots of space for the large or growing family. www. atlasrealtyinc.com MLS 13-452 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

MOUNTAINTOP Smith Hourigan Group 570-696-1195

Smith Hourigan Group 570-696-1195

184 Rock St. Spacious brick Ranch with 3 bedrooms, large living room with fireplace. 3 baths, large Florida room with AC. Full finished basement with 4th bedroom, 3/4 bath, large rec room with wet bar. Also a cedar closet and walk up attic. www. atlasrealtyinc.com MLS 12-3626 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

KINGSTON

LAFLIN NEW PRICE $124,900

Smith Hourigan Group 474-6307

HARDING PRICE REDUCED $69,900

JENKINS TWP $89,900

Have a large family? Check out this 4 bedroom, 3 bath home. Living room with gas fireplace, formal dining space, fully finished basement with wet bar. AS IS sale. MLS#12-3933 PRICE REDUCED TO $124,900 Christine Pieczynski 696-6569

LAFLIN $262,000

Say it HERE in the Classifieds! 570-829-7130
HANOVER TWP. 2032 ROUTE 92 RIVER VIEWS PLUS EXTRA LOT ON RIVER. Just 1/4 miles from boat launch, this great ranch home is perched high enough to keep you dry, but close enough to watch the river roll by. Surrounded by nature, this home features large living room and eat in kitchen, 3 bedrooms, full unfinished basement. Ready to move right in and enjoy country living just minutes from downtown. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-79 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

KINGSTON
40 Friend St. MLS 12-3731 Well maintained 2story, 2 bedroom home, taxes less than $1,000 annually, large backyard, rear parking from access alley in back, large deck, modern kitchen. Call Melissa 570-237-6384 5 Fairfield Drive California style all brick Bi-level home with mountain views, gourmet kitchen, stainless steel appliances, gas fireplace, heated 2 car garage, 208 sq. ft. pool cabana with kitchen & bath. Built in stone BBQ, heated pool, covered patio & fire pit all in private picturesque setting. MLS 13-1628 Call Keri Best 570-885-5082

CONSTRUCTION 4 bedroom, 2.5 baths, Colonial 2 story. Upper scale neighborhood. 2 car garage, custom oak cabinets, granite countertops, Jacuzzi tub, 10x15 deck. Beautiful stone fireplace. $264,900 570-599-0825 EXETER TWP.

EXETER NEW

Custom built colonial two-story. 4 bedrooms, 4 baths, two vehicle garage. View of the Wyoming Valley. Located on a dead end, private street, just minutes from the Wyoming Valley Country Club, Hanover Industrial Park, & public transportation. Sun room, family room with wood burning fireplace, hardwood floors on 1st & 2nd floors, 1st floor laundry room & bathroom. Central cooling fan. Lower level recreation room with bar, lots of closets & storage, coal/wood stove, office/5th bedroom & bath. MLS #12-4610 PRICE REDUCED TO $269,900 Louise Laine 283-9100 x20

JENKINS TWP. $129,900

HARVEYS LAKE

NEW PRICE Stately brick 2 story, with in ground pool, covered patio, finished basement, fireplace & wood stove. 3 car attached garage, 5 car detached garage with apartment above. MLS #11-1242 $499,000 Call Joe 613-9080

283-9100 HANOVER TWP.

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

PRICE REDUCED! All ready for new owners! This home has been well cared for and will surprise you once inside. Spacious rooms with new sheet rock walls, soft carpeting. The basement is clean and dry with plenty of storage. Worth a look! #13-756 $67,000 Paul Pukatch 696-6559

PRICE REDUCED! 22 Wood Street Nice cottage with lake rights, close to the public boat dock. New kitchen & living room ceilings & insulation just completed. Enjoy this place during the Summer months or year round. Recently updated with new roof & floors. MLS# 12-3820 $64,900 Pat Doty 394-6901

689 R. Westminster Very private 2 bedroom home located on 1.48 acres. Central air, screened in porch, 1.5 baths, large living/dining room, extra 1 story building could be converted into 2 car garage. 16x8 screened in porch, fresh paint. www.atlas realtyinc.com. MLS 13-1622 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

NEW LISTING! 561 Mercer Ave. Very nice 2-story, off-street parking, new front porch, fenced yard, 2 level deck & mature plantings. Modern kitchen & bath, living & dining rooms, 3 bedrooms & a lower level family room. 2 free-standing gas stoves. For more details on this home & to view the photos online go to: w w w. p r u d e n t i a l realestate.com & enter PRU8N9T9 in the HOME SEARCH. Call today for an appointment. MLS #13-1538 $94,500 Walter Belchick 696-2600 ext. 301 Mary Ellen Belchick 696-6566

111 Laflin Road Nice 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath Split Level home with hardwood floors, 1 car garage, large yard and covered patio in very convenient location. Great curb appeal and plenty of off street parking. Rt. 315 to light @ Laflin Rd. Turn west onto Laflin Rd. Home is on left. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-2852 Keri Best 570-885-5082

P E N D I N G

LAFLIN PRICE REDUCED $360,000

54 LOOP ROAD, GLEN SUMMIT, MOUNTAIN TOP Sun., April 7, 12 - 2 Sun., April 28, 12-2 Beautifully appointed home on 2 acres. Community amenities include private lake with sandy beach, tennis courts, trails for hikling & biking. This home boasts perennial gardens and mature landscaping, fenced rear yard enclosing 20 x 40 heated in-ground pool, raised garden, custom dog house and run. Entertain and dine on the wrap around porch with mahogany flooring and electric hurricane shutters. The residence features hardwood flooring, French doors, cherry kitchen, 3-4 bedrooms, updated heating/air. Emerygency generator for inclement weather. DIR: Rt. 309 South into MountainTop, left at 1st light, at the end of the road make a right on Rt. 437, turn left into Lake Road, right on Loop. MLS# 12-1647 PRICED TO SELL AT $399,000 Maribeth Jones 696-6565

PRICE REDUCED 1,460 sq. ft house. 2 or 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, gas heat. Can convert to two 1 bedroom apartments with separate entrances. MLS#13-472 $27,500 Call Dana Distasio 570-715-9333

NANTICOKE

1472 S. Hanover St. Well maintained bi-level house features 2 bedrooms, 1 3/4 baths, recreation room with propane stove. Wall to wall, 3 season porch. Professionally landscaped yard. Storage shed, new appliances, ceiling fans. Close to LCCC. $153,900. Call 570-735-7594 or 570-477-2410

25 W. Washington Move right into this very nice 3 bedroom, 1 bath home. Lots of natural woodwork and a beautiful stained glass window. Newer kitchen appliances and w/w carpeting. Supplement your heating with a recently installed wood pellet stove. New roof installed 11/17/12. This home also has a one car detached garage. MLS 12-2171 $76,000 John Polifka 570-704-6846 FIVE MOUNTAINS REALTY 570-542-2141 NANTICOKE

PARSONS JUST LISTED $134,900 35 Wyndwood Dr. Like new 2 bedroom, 2 bath attached ranch. Upgraded kitchen, vaulted living room, sunroom, master bedroom www.35wyndwood .com Call Mark 215-275-0487 C-21 TRES 610-485-7200 ext 142

PITTSTON $114,900

696-2600, Ext. 210 LAFLIN

MOUNTAIN TOP
10 Fairfield Drive Exceptional & spacious custom built cedar home with open floor plan and all of the amenities situated on 2 lots in picturesque setting. Create memories in this 5 bedroom, 4 bath home with 18’ ceiling in living room, gas fireplace, granite kitchen, large 2 story foyer, huge finished lower level for entertaining with bar/full kitchen & wine cellar. Inground pool & hot tub. Directions: Rt 315 to Laflin Rd., right onto Oakwood Dr., right onto Fordham Rd, left onto Fairfield Dr., home is on the right. www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-4063 Call Keri Best 570-885-5082

KINGSTON

JENKINS TWP. $27,900

696-2468

696-2600

GLEN LYON

HARDING $224,900

Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!
HAZLETON

Always wanted an investment property but didn't know where to start??? Look no further! 5 unit!! Everything is updated in great condition. Beautiful apts, fully rented. This opportunity lets you buy, sit back & collect the rents. 2011 new roof, vinyl siding, cellulose insulation, refubished staircase, 2012 new carpet, stove & fridge in 3 apts, the list goes on. Don’t miss out. $109,999 MLS #12-3868 Cal/text Tony at 855-2424 or Donna @ 947-3824

605 Apple Tree Rd Brick Ranch that needs nothing, located on over 1 acre lot with 2 car attached garage and 3 car detached. Modern kitchen with center island and granite countertops modern tile bath, gas fireplace, central air, full basement. This home could qualify for 100% financing through a rural housing mortgage. www.atlas realtyinc.com. MLS 12-3522. Lu Ann 570-602-9280

901-1020

VALLEY VIEW TOWNHOMES State of the art Townhomes conveniently located to I 80 & 81. Gorgeous interiors with many upgrades that are standard features. Natural gas heat and central air. Limited edition “Ridge” homes available with a “million dollar” view. Two car garage. Located in Butler Township just off the Airport Beltway. 100% financing is available to the qualified. Ask for Cheryl or Donna. MLS# 12-484 M.S. Pecora, Realtor 455-9463 or 436-3790

151 E. PSaylor Ave. Fixer upper with E great potential in quiet N neighborhood. 3 bedrooms, D 1 bath with off street parking I and nice yard. Directions: Rt N 315, at light turn onto Laflin G Rd to bottom of hill. Turn right onto E. Saylor. atlasrealtyinc.co m MLS 12-3672 Call Keri Best 570-885-5082

Inviting 4 bedroom home in great location - Huge living room with stone fireplace & display shelves leads to elegant office with handsome oak built-ins - Kitchen & family rooms share a large granite counter & open to a bright eating area with skylights. Master has hardwood & huge walkin closet - Accent lighting & great details throughout Wonderful yard. MLS #13-724 $325,000. Call Rhea Simms for details 570-696-6677

3 bedroom Bi-Level situated on lovely lot with formal dining room, lower level family room with gas fireplace, central air, conveniently located to interstates & Casino. A must see! MLS # 13-1100 $199,000 Marie Montante 881-0103

5 Pine Tree Road Five bedrooms, 2.5 baths, family, living, dining & laundry rooms. Eat in kitchen, finished basement with storage room, attached 2 car garage. Asking $255,000. For appointment call 570-474-5463

265 Kirmar Parkway. 3 bedroom Cape Cod style home on large lot with off street parking. 1st floor master bedroom, 2 season sunroom, partial finished basement, fenced yard, lots of storage, large modern eat in kitchen. MLS 13-1077 $89,900 ANTONIK & ASSOCIATES, INC. Patricia Lunski 570-735-7497 NANTICOKE

67 Carroll St. The WOW factor! Move right in and enjoy this renovated home with no worries! 3 bedrooms with lots of closet space. 2 full baths including a 4 piece master bath with custom tile work, open floor plan with modern kitchen with island, corner lot with off street parking and nice yard. Come and take a look! www.atlasrealtyinc.com MLS 13-863 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

PITTSTON $119,900
38 E. Union Street Nice single, 3 bedrooms, gas heat, large yard. Central location. Affordable @ $64,900 TOWNE & COUNTRY REAL ESTATE Call 570-735-8932 or 570-542-5708 NANTICOKE

MOUNTAINTOP

288-9371 LAFLIN

570-696-3801

KINGSTON

OAKWOOD PARK If you like comfort & charm, you’ll love this sparkling 4,100 + sq. ft. 5 bedroom, 4 bath two story traditional home in perfect condition in a great neighborhood. Nothing to do but move right in. Offers formal living & dining rooms, 1st floor family room with fireplace, granite countertops in kitchen & baths, lower level recreation room with fireplace & wet bar. MLS #13-549 Only $335,000 Call Barbara Metcalf 570-696-0883

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!
LARKSVILLE

316 Cedar Manor Drive Bow Creek Manor. Meticulously maintained 4 bedroom, 3 1/2 bath, 2 story on almost 1 acre. Master bedroom suite. Two family rooms. Two fireplaces. Office/den. Central vac., security system. Many extras. Large deck overlooking a private wooded yard. 3 car garage. $355,000 MLS# 13-1360. Ask for Bob Kopec Humford Realty, Inc. 822-5126.

7 CONCORD DRIVE REDUCED PRICE! $229,900 Two story, 1,900 sq. ft., in Oakwood Park. 8 rooms, eat in kitchen, 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, large living room, family room with fireplace, dining room, sunroom with hardwood floors. Two car garage, central air. Lot 100’ x 125’. Move in Condition. Call Ed at 570-655-4294 for appointment.

LAFLIN

171 Third Avenue. COMPARE WHAT YOU GET FOR YOUR MONEY! Modern and meticiously maintained 3 bedroom town house with 2 1/2 baths (master bath). Central air conditioning, family room, security system. Very low gas heating cost. Deck and patio, fenced yard, garage, Extras! MLS # 12-3011. (PHFA financing: $3,500 down, $532 a month, 4% interest, 30 years). $115,000. Ask for Bob Kopec Humford Realty, Inc. 570-822-5126.

570-696-3801

LARKSVILLE For Sale by Owner Must see, move in condition 3 bedroom ranch, nice neighborhood behind State St. Elementary Center. All new carpet, paint, interior doors, new tile countertops, tile floor, stainless steel appliances, 3 season patio, beautiful 16x34 in ground pool. $144,900. Call 570-301-7291 More info & photos on Zillow.com

Immaculate home in move-in condition just waiting for a new buyer. Oversized Bi-Level has many perks i.e., new eat-in kitchen, dining room with French doors to 4 season sunroom. Nice sized bedrooms. Lower level hosts family room with fireplace, den, laundry room and 3 Season Sunroom. Built-in 1 car garage & attached 2 car carport for extra coverage, large fenced yard. MLS#13-1396 $190,000 Lynda Rowinski 570-696-5418

Sell your own home! Place an ad HERE 570-829-7130
MOUNTAINTOP

NEW LISTING 260-262 E. Green Street Double Block Plenty of parking with paved back alley. Close to LCCC. New roof installed in 2007 along with a kitchen & bath update in #260. MLS #13-694 $65,900 Call Dana Distasio 570-715-9333

25 Swallow St. Grand 2 story home with Victorial features, large eat in kitchen with laundry, 3/4 bath on first floor, 2nd bath with claw foot tub, lots of closet space. Move in ready, off street parking in rear. MLS 12-3926 Call Colleen 570-883-7594

Need to rent that Vacation property? Place an ad and get started! 570-829-7130

PITTSTON $134,900

PLAINS 15 High St. Well kept newly remodeled, 2 story home, with modern kitchen, central air, new triple pane replacement windows and custom made blinds for each window. Home is in move in condition, with plaster walls and design ceilings, plus much, much more. A MUST SEE! MLS 13-1088 Fred Mecadon 570-817-5792

Smith Hourigan Group 570-696-1195

Search No More! This five-year old home is totally energy efficient & exquisitely designed. Every room has gorgeous details & lots of upgrades. The landscape is breathtaking & the location could not be better. This home truly stands out in every way! MLS# 13-1359 $389,900 Robert Altmayer 570-793-7999 Rundle Real Estate 570-474-2340

Perfectly pretty two story, 3 bedroom starter home in immaculate condition on great street. MLS# 13-907 $59,500 Deanna Farrell 696-0894

696-3801

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale
SHAVERTOWN

SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013 PAGE 21E 906 Homes for Sale
SHAVERTOWN

906 Homes for Sale
SUGARLOAF

906 Homes for Sale
SWOYERSVILLE STEEPLECHASE

906 Homes for Sale
WAPWALLOPEN 359 Pond Hill Mountain Road

906 Homes for Sale
WHITE HAVEN

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

PITTSTON $89,900

PITTSTON TWP.
REDUCED $139,900

WILKES BARRE PRICE REDUCED $49,900

WILKES- BARRE $112,000

57 Dewitt St. Cute Cape Cod with 3 bedrooms, vinyl replacement windows, Pergo flooring and walk up attic. Put this one on your list. www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 13-1038 CALL CHARLIE 570-829-6200

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10 Norman St. Very nice, classic two story brick home with large rooms, 4 bedrooms, plenty of baths, large basement, open deck and covered deck. Large eat in kitchen, plenty of off street parking. MLS #11-2887. For more information and photos visit www.atlasrealtyinc.com. Call Colleen 570-237-0415

2 years old, open floor plan, hardwood floors 1st & 2nd floors. 2 story great room with floor to ceiling fireplace, 3 sides brick exterior. Lower level finished with French doors out to patio, breathtaking views, upgraded landscaping with 3 waterfalls. MLS #12-4215 PRICE REDUCED $585,000 Call Geri 570-862-7432 Lewith & Freeman 696-0888

NEW LISTING Miss the old fashioned front porch? Yesterday’s charm with today’s convenience can be found in this 3 bedroom, 1 bath traditional home on a quiet street. Offers formal living & dining rooms, kitchen & 1 car detached garage. MLS # 13-1111 $115,000 Barbara Metcalf 570-696-0883

Beautiful home in a beautiful location. 2003 custom built Cape Cod offers 4.89 cleared acres. Heated in ground pool, 3 full baths, 1st floor master bedroom & laundry & an updated kitchen. 2 car attached garage with bonus room above. Close to Humboldt Industrial Park & Eagle Rock Resort. MLS# 13-894 $309,000 Call/text Donna Cain 947-3824 or Tony Wasco 855-2424

570-696-3801 SHAVERTOWN SHAVERTOWN 570-901-1020

50 Grandville Drive Outstanding 3 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath townhouse out of the flood zone. Formal dining room, family room, master bedroom suite, private guest suite also on upper level. Central air and central vacuum. Deck, garage + many extras. Freshly painted and carpeted, so move right in! PHFA financing $5,200 down, monthly payment $797. interest rate of 4%. $172,000. MLS # 13-195. Ask for Bob Kopec Humford Realty Inc 570-822-5126 WEST PITTSTON

PITTSTON

PLAINS TWP $189,900
Nice building lot centrally located in the Back Mountain. Has it's own well and public sewer already in place. All set for you to start building! $47,000 Call Christine 332-8832 Newer 2 story with large eat-in kitchen, center island, hardwood floors, full basement, central air & maintenance free deck. $179,900 MLS#13-1232 Call Tony 474-6307 or 715-7734

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!
SWEET VALLEY MULTI-FAMILY Two houses for the price of one! Two story in front & double-wide in rear. Great for 2 families or investor opportunity. Off street parking & NOT in flood zone. MLS #13-970 $148,000 Call Cindy King Today! 570-690-2689
www.cindykingre.com

4 bedroom home features a great yard with over 2 acres of property. Situated across from a playground. Needs some TLC but come take a look, you wouldn’t want to miss out. There is a pond at the far end of the property that is used by all surrounding neighbors. This is an estate and is being sold as is. No sellers property disclosure. Will entertain offers in order to settle estate. MLS 11-962 $49,900 Call Karen Coldwell Banker Rundle Real Estate 570-474-2340 WEST PITTSTON

Nice home in Hickory Hill Community. Great bi-level with open floor plan and plenty of space for all your needs. Serene wooded lot and a stream that runs trough it. Make this your seasonal home or your permanent place to call home. House sold as is. Inspections for buyers information only. Owner willing to consider rent to own option. MLS #12-4331 $95,000 Call/text Donna 947-3824 or Tony at 855-2424

735 N. Washington Street Spacious 2 story, 3 bedrooms with 2 ca detached garage, good starter home, needs TLC. MLS #12 3887. For more information and pho tos visit www.atlasre altyinc.com. Call Tom 570-262-7716

43 Richmont Ave. Worth more than listed price, this 3 bedroom, 2 bath Cape Cod home has central air, hardwood floors, fenced yard, above ground pool, modern kitchen and baths. www.atlasrealtyinc.com MLS 13-789 Tom Salvaggio 570-262-7716

901-1020

WILKES BARRE PRICE REDUCED $42,000

WILKES BARRE REDUCED $39,900

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

Amazing Property!!! Five bedrooms, 4 with private bath. spectacular master suite with sitting room + 3 room closet. Four fireplaces All hardwood floors. Gazebo style ceiling in library. 3 car garage. Resort-like yard with in-ground pool with cabana & outside bath. Adult amenities, full finished basement. PREQUALIFIED BUYERS ONLY MLS# 12-1091 Call Nancy Answini 570-237-5999 Joseph P. Gilroy Real Estate 570-288-1444 PITTSTON

20 Nittany Lane Affordable 3 level townhome features 2 car garage, 3 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, lower level patio and upper level deck, gas fireplace, central air and vac and stereo system www.atlasrealtyinc.com MLS 13-871 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

613-9080 SHAVERTOWN

Smith Hourigan Group SHICKSHINNY LAKE

Collect cash, not dust! Clean out your basement, garage or attic and call the Classified department today at 570829-7130!
PLAINS

Room for all your needs! 4 bedroom home offers living & dining rooms AND an extra room for whatever you need. Separate laundry room on 1st floor, new carpeting in 3 bedrooms, new water heater in 2010, new Bath Fitter tub/shower. Recently re-graveled driveway, nice sized outdoor storage shed & plenty of off street parking. MLS #13-360 $95,000 Call/text Donna at 947-3824 or Tony at 855-2424

NEW LISTING Midway Manor Traditional 2 story, 2-3 bedrooms, great closet space, 1.5 baths, garage, laundry room, 3 season porch, inground pool, gas 2 zone heat. MLS #13-1383 #$144,000 Besecker Realty 675-3611 WEST PITTSTON

REDUCED! Great 3 bedroom, 1 bath with a large eat in kitchen & finished basement with a dry bar. Large fenced yard & extra lot included for additional parking. With-in walking distance of Wyoming Valley Mall! $129,000 MLS#12-2479 Dave Rubbico, Sr. 881-7877

Lake Front Property at Shickshinny Lake! 4 Bedrooms, 2.75 baths, 2 kitchens, living room, large family room. 2 sunrooms, office & laundry room. Two car attached garage with paved driveway, above ground pool, dock & 100' lake frontage. $375,000 MLS #12-860 Kenneth Williams 570-542-2141

Inviting home with 90’ of lakefront & beautiful covered dock. Huge great room opens to kitchen & features handsome stone fireplace, custom built-ins & long window seat offering great views of the lake. First floor master walks out to beautiful 3 season porch which is also lakefront. Two large upstairs bedrooms can hold a crowd. Huge laundry/pantry made for entertaining. MLS# 11-2958 $299,000 Rhea Simms 570-696-6677

Signature Properties

570-675-5100

Line up a place to live in classified!
WHITE HAVEN 501 Birch Lane

PRICE REDUCED! Mt. Zion Road. Single family two story - a place for kids! Four bedrooms & bath upstairs. 1st floor has formal dining room, living room, family room & laundry room. Master bedroom & bath added to the 1st floor. Good sized kitchen. 2,126 sq. ft. total on 1 acre. Wyoming Area School District. MLS # 13-700 $119,900 Call Ruth K. Smith 570-696-5411

WILKES-BARRE 61 Puritan Lane Are you spending more than $400/mo on rent?? Owning this home could cost you less! With 3 bedrooms and a fenced in yard, this home makes a perfect place to start your homeownership experience. Ask me how! MLS #12-1823. For more information and photos visit www.atlasrealtyinc.com. Call Colleen 570-237-0415

70 N. Meade 3BR, 1 bath in move in condition with new electric box, water heater, and plumbing. Off street parking in rear for 3 cars, good credit and your house, taxes & insurance would be under $400/month. MLS #12-3900. For more information and photos visit www.atlasrealtyinc.com. Call Tom 570-262-7716

Smith Hourigan Group 570-696-1195

WILKES-BARRE 68 Jones Street

570-696-3801 SWEET VALLEY Beautiful 4 bedroom, 3 bath. Enjoy the amenities of a private lake, boating, basketball courts, etc. The home has wood floors and carpeting throughout. French doors in the kitchen that lead you out to the large rear deck for entertaining. The backyard has 2 utility sheds for storage MLS 12-1695 NEW PRICE $174,900 Call Karen Coldwell Banker Rundle Real Estate 570-474-2340

WILKES-BARRE
This 2 story home features 3 bedrooms, 1 & 1.5 baths, an attached sunroom, private back yard, large living room all great for entertaining. Close to schools & shopping. $44,900. MLS 12-3211 Call Karen Coldwell Banker Rundle Real Estate 570-474-2340

YATESVILLE $139,900

PRICE REDUCED! Large move-in condition 2-story with 10 rooms, 4 bedrooms, 3 baths & off street parking. Located near Barney Farms. This is a well maintained home with a large eat-in kitchen with maple cabinets & a parquet floor. The furnace/central air conditioning is only 2 years old. Buy this home & enjoy your summer days & nights in your large screened in rear porch or in your fenced yard with a blacktop patio/basketball court. MLS# #13-69 $159,900 Karen Altavilla 283-9100 x 28

Five Mountains Realty
NEW LISTING! Charming chalet style home located on 4.05 acres in the beautiful Back Mountain area. House has been completely renovated. Living room has vaulted ceilings and new hardwood. With a two story Deck & small pond in the back yard. MLS #13-1222 $215,000 Call Dave, Sr. 881-7877

283-9100 617 Willowcrest Dr. End unit. 2 bedroom townhome with master bath on 2nd floor. Needs a little TLC. MLS 13-569 Call Tom 570-262-7716

112 Clear Springs Court Updated townhouse, new granite countertops & vanities, new hardwood floors, full, finished, walk out basement with fireplace. $159,900 Call Joe

WILKES-BARRE

Two bedroom single home, owner willing to hold mortgage inhouse. There are no closing costs or bank fees involved. $59,000 or $350 a month toward purchase. $900 security deposit required and 1st months rent. 570-288-9050 after 5 p.m.

PurebredAnimals? Sell themherewitha classifiedad! 570-829-7130

901-1020

Rubbico Real Estate 826-1600

613-9080

18 Prospect Street BY OWNER $26,900 3 bedroom,1 bath 570-970-0650 jtdproperties.com

Shavertown

REAL ESTATE

696-3801

(570) 696-0894

Deanna Farrell

Rubbico Real Estate 826-1600 SWOYERSVILLE $124,900

Sweetest All Brick Country Cape In Back Mountain

Remember: Market Analysis is Always Free. Call for Appointment

813905

6.56 Lushly Landscaped Emerald Acres are the Setting for this 4 Bed Cape w/ Gas Heat, Central Air, & 2 Car Heated Garage Office

38 Outlet Road, Dallas

115 Hemlock St. Lots of updates in this roomy Cape Cod in a desirable neighborhood. Large eat in kitchen with new flooring. Finished basement with theater/rec room. Large level yard. Priced to sell! MLS 12-4231 Call Kevin Sobilo 570-817-0706

SWOYERSVILLE 187 Shoemaker St.

Totally Redone! This cozy Cape Cod has 3 bedrooms, 1 bath. Modern kitchen with granite countertops, ceramic tile backsplash and floor, all new hardwood throughout, new furnace, new wiring, new windows, duct work in place for central air, much more! Vinyl siding, large unfinished basement, deck, Off street parking. 24 hour notice to show. Asking $135,000. Call Don at 814-5072 Smith Hourigan Group 570-696-1195

EAST END SECTION Great starter home, 3 bedrooms, 1 modern bath. Updated kitchen, new roof, windows & furnace. Off street parking, fenced in back yard. New back porch. All appliances included. $42,500 570-235-1210 after 5:30 pm.

WILKES-BARRE

PAGE 22E SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale
WILKES-BARRE

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com 906 Homes for Sale 909

906 Homes for Sale
WILKES-BARRE

WILKES-BARRE $72,900

YATESVILLE REDUCED $169,900

Income & Commercial Properties

909

Income & Commercial Properties

909

Income & Commercial Properties

909

Income & Commercial Properties

909

Income & Commercial Properties

909

Income & Commercial Properties

BEAR CREEK $149,900

EDWARDSVILLE

KINGSTON

NANTICOKE

PITTSTON $129,900

PITTSTON AREA $134,900

35 Hillard St. Hardwood floors, fenced in yard, large deck. Off street parking. 3 bedroom home with 1st floor laundry. Move in condition. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-1655 Colleen Turant 570-237-0415

NEW LISTING! Charming bungalow style Cape Cod home with a unique layout & character galore. Four bedrooms, two baths and second floor great room. Corner lot, two-car garage, nice South WilkesBarre location. MLS#13-1295 $99,900 Karen Ryan 283-9100, ext. 14

283-9100

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

WILKES-BARRE

WILKES-BARRE $87,500

NEW LISTING Charming 1,000+ sq. ft. 2 bedroom, 1/1/2 bath with separate driveway on a quiet street. Lower level was finished for former business - has separate entrance, 1/2 bath & electric baseboard heat (not included in total sq. ft). MLS #13-1592 $52,900 Dana Distasio 570-715-9333

PRICE REDUCED Located on quiet Westminster Street. One story ranch home in very good condition with nice yard & off street parking. This 2 bedroom, 1 bath home features an eat-in kitchen with new appliances, which are included, living & dining rooms. Roof is 2 years old & new water heater recently installed in full, unfinished, dry, concrete basement with included washer and dryer. Virtually all furniture is included, if desired. Directions: From S. Main to Hanover St. to Westminster. MLS# 13-32 $59,000 Call Jim Banos 570-991-1883 Coldwell Banker Rundle Real Estate 570-474-2340

603 Willowcrest Dr. Super end unit townhouse, no fees. 2 bedrooms, 3 baths, central air, electric heat, cathedral ceiling with skylights. Large family room with propane stove and it’s own ductless air. MLS 13-482 Call Tom 570-262-7716

909

Income & Commercial Properties

1255 Laurel Run P Rd. Bear Creek Twp., E large commercial N garage/warehouse on 1.214 D acres with additional 2 acre I parcel. 2 water wells. 2 newer N underground fuel tanks. May G zoning require approval. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-208 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

Landmark location ready for new life. Formerly used as a restaurant, can be converted into anything! Full bar area, & kitchen, multiple cool storage areas. Living & office space also available. Parking lot included. MLS#13-874 $115,900 Call Dave, Jr. 885-2693

Rubbico Real Estate 826-1600

Great opportunity for this 2,900 sq. ft. professional office building in high traffic area. Last used as a veterinary clinic, but is easily adapted for other uses. See how this space can be used for you! Open entry space, individual offices, full basement for storage, central air, and gas heat. Parking for 12 cars. MLS-12-416 $339,000 Call Rhea for details 570-696-6677

Newly remodeled, immaculate office building. 1,600 sq. ft, central air, plenty of parking, abundant storage areas, h a n d i c a p p e d accessible. MLS #13-667 $79,900 Dana Distasio 570-9333

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NANTICOKE

AVOCA $53,900

HAZLETON

KINGSTON

224 William St. Are you a hairdresser or barber? Need a space for an in home business? This might be just what you’re looking for. Well maintained 4 bedroom home with salon (previously a barber shop for 60 years). Very well established, high visibility location and additional home with 3 bedrooms currently rented to a tenant. Must be sold as one package. www.atlasrealtyinc.com MLS 13-216 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

Well established meat and deli store with large variety of specialty items for sale. Homemade sausage, porkettaprosciutto, to mention a few. Owners will sty on to teach. give recipes and contacts. Also a newly remodeled apartment above store and 4 car garage to help pay the mortgage. MLS 13-535 For an appointment call: Fred Mecadon 570-817-5792

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Best of both worlds...Commercial space plus 2-3 bedroom home complete with detached garage and off street parking with yard. Home has been nicely remodeled with 1 3/4 baths, hardwood floors, move in condition. Commercial space is 14x26 with endless possibilities. www. atlasrealty inc.com MLS 13-982 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

WILKES-BARRE

WYOMING OPEN HOUSE SUN. APRIL 28 1-3PM

936 William St. Very nicely kept 2 unit home with 2 bedrooms each side. Large yard with driveway for each side. Separate electric. Clean and neat, in move in condition. www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 13-1569 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

DURYEA REDUCED $34,900

LANDMARK FOR SALE All brick bar/ restaurant/attached ranch home.... Historic, ultra successful & updated throughout. Turn key, licenses, fixtures, etc. Owner retiring....possible owner financing. MLS #11-420 M. S. PECORA, REALTOR 570-455-9463 or Cheryl at 570-436-3790 HUNTINGTON MILLS Great Old 80 Acre Farm, Location Next to Northwest High School with approx. 35 acres of fields & 45 acres wooded. Small pond, barn, old farmhouse with out buildings(in poor condition - little or no value) plenty of road frontage. MLS #13-807 $359,000 Call Richard Long 406-2438

WILKES-BARRE $99,900

159 Gardner Ave. Big Family wanted!! Great 5 Bedroom, with 2.5 baths, very well kept, move right in. Outside was total updated, New furnace and hot water heater too!!! MLS #13-1342 $125,000 Call Dave, Sr. 881-7877

575 Susquehanna Avenue

FOR SALE BY OWNER
4 bedroom, 2 full bath in a great neighborhood. New windows entire home, finished lower level, detached garage, 4 season sunroom. Master suite has new full bath and large walk in closet. New above ground pool with deck. Must see! Motivated seller Reduced $173,000 570-885-6848

To place your ad Call Toll Free 1-800-427-8649
Commercial Building For Sale. 502 Market St, Kingston. 2000 Sq Ft $229,000 1-story, PRIME LOCATION with parking lot. Take a look. If interested, call 570-814-4940.

93 Main St. Four units. 3 residential and one storefront.Great corner location, flood damaged home being sold as is. For more info visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-1948 Call Tom 570-262-7716

341 Wyoming Ave. 3 story Victorian home located in a high exposure area. Has all the lovely signature woodwork of a grand VIctorian of yesteryear! Can be restored for use as a residential home or a landlord investment. Currently subdivided into multiple office spaces and 2 apartments. MLS 12-617 $149,000 Jay A. Crossin EXT. 23 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770 SWEET VALLEY 3.8 acres, zoned B2 commercial with home & pond. Priced for quick sale. High traffic area Located at the intersection of Rt. 118 & Main Road. $89,000 Call Richard Long 406-2438

R. 395 E. Washington St. Nice double block. Two bedrooms each side. Separate heat & electric. Close to College. Affordable @ $49,500 Towne & Country R.E. Co. 735-8932 or 542-5708

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified!

Collect cash, not dust! Clean out your basement, garage or attic and call the Classified department today at 570829-7130!

PITTSTON

PLYMOUTH $52,900

PITTSTON $115,000
68 William St. Great investment property with 3 units and separate utilities. Each unit has 2 entrances and washer hook up. Roof is 5 years old. For more info visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com. MLS 12-1897 $69,900 Call Tom 570-262-7716 New Listing! Affordable for you!. Set back off Main st., this double block has had many updates. Unit #1: formal dining room 2 bedrooms, 1 bath and deck. Unit #2: spacious open floor plan, large living room, formal dining room, genuine hardwood floors, 4 bedrooms with new carpeting, 1.5 baths, lots of closet space and enclosed balcony. MLS 13-1176 Michele Hopkins 570-540-6046

NEVER FLOODED

Rubbico Real Estate 826-1600 WILKES-BARRE

Need a Roommate? Place an ad and find one here! 570-829-7130

142-144 Carroll St. Well maintained, fully rented 4 unit investment property in quiet neighborhood. Owner took good care of this property. www.atlas realtyinc.com. MLS 12-4514 Call Terry 570-885-3041 or Angie 570-885-4896

675-4400 570-675-4400

GET THE WORD OUT with a Classified Ad. 570-829-7130

Heritage Homes Promise:
Competitive Pricing

77 Schuler St. NOTHING to do but move right in! This home has everything you need...3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, large fenced in yard, screened in porch, off street parking, quiet neighborhood. Home recently remodeled inside & out. www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 13-467 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

Collect cash, not dust! Clean out your basement, garage or attic and call the Classified department today at 570829-7130!

REDUCED PRICE $242,000 Beautifully kept split level in desirable Barney Farms. 3 car attached garage, finished basement & attic. Landscaped lot, covered deck with custom pull down shades. Hardwood living room, formal dining room, cathedral ceilings in living room & kitchen. Full wet bar in finished basement, walk out patio for your parties/cookouts. MLS#12-1874 Ann Devereaux 570-212-2038 Classic Properties 570-587-7000 790 Northern Blvd. Clarks Summit, PA 18411

YATESVILLE $69,900

2808 Scranton/Carbondale Highway Blakely, PA 18447 570-383-2981 • www.heritagehomesltd.com
HERITAGE HOMES INCLUDE: • Gas Warm Air Heat • Site Work Package • Central Air Conditioning • Concrete Front Porch • Andersen Windows • 1st Floor Laundry • Granite Kitchen Top • 2 Story Great Room • 2 1/2 Tile Baths • 1st Floor Master Bedroom • 12 Tile Kitchen, Eating • Poured Concrete Foundation
Featuring:

KINGSTON OFFICENTERS
Park Office Building 400 Third Ave.

9 Pittston Ave P home 2 story E located in a very N privet setting. 3 bedrooms, 1.5 D baths and workI shop attached N to living space, G great for home business or the hobbyist. Low taxes, great community. Garage has 1 detached space and 1 built in. www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 13-1009 CALL CHARLIE 570-829-6200

The Somerville - 2,210 sq. ft.
You’ve Got Dreams. We’ve Got Plans.
MODEL HOURS Weekdays 12-7 Sat & Sun 12-5 Closed Fridays

Scan Code and Visit Our Website:
1174 Wyoming Avenue Forty Fort, PA 18704-4016 Phone: (570) 283-3148 Fax: (570) 287-2813

Fairway Estates Phase II, Hanover
Officenter–250 250 Pierce Street
Home and lot packages available! Bring your house plan and choose your lot! Construction by: Premiere Home Builders, Inc. Dave & John Pieczynski HOME AND LOT PACKAGES AVAILABLE! Only 10 4 Lots Left!!!
For more information or to schedule an appointment, contact: Christine Pieczynski at 696-6569 DIR: South Main St., Hanover to right on Bunker Drive.

OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY, APRIL 28TH 1-3PM

Officenter–270 270 Pierce Street
28 Carverton Road, Shavertown, PA Phone: 696.2600 ext. 207 Fax: 696.0677 Direct: 696.6569 cpieczynski@poggi-jones.com www.poggi-jones.com

New Bridge Center 480 Pierce Street

© 2013 BRER Af liates LLC, An independently owned and operated broker member of BRER Af liates LLC. Prudential, the Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are registered service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license with no other af liation with Prudential Equal Housing Opportunity.

309 KOSSACK STREET SWOYERSVILLE, PA 18704 MOVE IN READY!! Completely remodeled home in a great neighborhood. This home boasts its new laminate flooring, modern kitchen, deck, fenced area, raised garden beds and optional off street parking. The motivated sellers are including stove, refrigerator, washer, dryer, 3 ac units, playyard, lawn mower, and new shed. $99,500 Directions: FROM LUZERNE, BACK ROAD (MAIN STREET)IN SWOYERSVILLE, TO RIGHT ON KOSSACK, PROPERTY ON THE LEFT Any questions please call Betsy Tribendis 239-0050

Officenter–220 220 Pierce Street

829-6200 • www.atlasrealtyinc.com
OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY, APRIL 28
0 12: 0-1 :30
Well kept 2 bedroom Cape Cod in excellent condition. New replacement windows, W/W carpeting, hardwood floors, cherrywood trim throughout the house. Owner moving to FL, any reasonable offer will be considered. MLS#12-3214 Dir: Susquehanna Ave to First St. to Sharpe

Atlas Realty, Inc.

Somerset Drive, Hanover Township

Maintenance Free Living In Ledgewood Estates!

4 SHARPE ST., WYOMING

Luxury Town Homes!
1 Ranch Unit Left! Buy now to customize! Starting at $209,000

Professional Office Rentals
Full Service Leases • Custom Design • Renovations • Various Size Suites Available Medical, Legal, Commercial • Utilities • Parking • Janitorial Full Time Maintenance Staff Available

MLS #11-2625 DIR: Middle Rd. towards Nanticoke; LEFT on McGovern Hill Road; RIGHT into Ledgewood. For more information or to schedule an appointment contact: Christine Pieczynski at 696-6569

For Rental Information Call:

1-570-287-1161 www.lippiproperties.com

REALTOR ASSOCIATE, SRES

Fred Mecadon

$89,900

We Sell Happiness!

28 Carverton Road, Shavertown, PA Phone: 696.2600 ext. 207 Fax: 696.0677 Direct: 696.6569 cpieczynski@poggi-jones.com www.poggi-jones.com

© 2012 BRER Af liates INc. An independently owned and operated broker member of BRER Af liates Inc. Prudential, the Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are registered service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license with no other af liation with Prudential. Equal Housing Opportunity.

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com 909 Income & Commercial Properties 912 Lots & Acreage
DALLAS Commercial Vacant Land

SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013 PAGE 23E 912 Lots & Acreage
SHICKSHINNY LAKE

912 Lots & Acreage
LAFLIN $32,900 Lot#9 Pinewood Dr

938

Apartments/ Furnished

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

EXCITING BUSINESS FOR SALE! Call if you have money. Call if you have experience in the restaurant business. This is one of the area’s most attractive & successful restaurant businesses. Turn key. $319,000 Maribeth Jones 696-6565

696-2600, ext. 210 WILKES-BARRE Owner Retiring Turn Key Night Club For Sale. Two full bars, game area. Four restrooms. Prime Location!!! Creative financing Available $80,000, Dave Rubbico, Jr. 885-2693

2.12 acres of commercial land in a prime Back Mountain location. Ideal spot to build an office or professional building. Corner wooded lot. Water, electric & gas available to be run to site. Call Rhea for details MLS#12-4281 570-696-6677 $249,900

Build your new home in a great neighborhood. Convenient location near highways, airport, casino and shopping

to laflin Rd; make left off Laflin Rd onto Pinewood Dr. Lot is on corner of Pinewood Dr. and Hickorywood Dr. MLS 13-23 atlas realtyinc.com Call Keri Best 570-885-5082 ATLAS REALTY, INC. 570-829-6200

156 X 110 X 150 X 45 DIRECTIONS Rt 315

DALLAS TOWNSHIP 63 acres with about 5,000’ roadfront on 2 roads. All Wooded. $385,000. Call Besecker Realty 570-675-3611 Campground Road 1 acre with 173’ road frontage. Base installed for 140’ ft driveway. Partially cleared, private lot. close to schools. Lot will pass perk test. Asking $52,000. 570-675-4594. Build your dream home on this five acre wooded lot off paved public road. 275’ frontage. Well and septic needed. Close to major highways. MLS#12-3134 $55,000 Sandra Gorman 570-696-5408

DALLAS TWP.

Rubbico Real Estate 826-1600

2.44 acres of land zoned R-3 for townhouse or could be used for single family building lots (with approval). Public water and sewer available. www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 13-1389 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

LAFLIN $99,500

CHOICE LOCATION A most unique & desirable lakefront property. This is an opportunity to purchase a centrally situated lot with an unmatched view of this beautiful lake. If you are looking for that special building site, this is it! MLS# 11-1269 $159,900 Call Dale Williams Five Mountains Realty 570-256-3343 SWOYERSVILLE 100 x 150, cleared, surveyed level building lot. Utilities are available. $24,900. Call: 570-288-4899 Level building lot. 50’ x 100’. All public utilities available. Asking $18.000 570-299-5415

1 BEDROOM ŠShort or long term ŠExcellent Neighborhood ŠPrivate Tenant Parking Š$600 includes all utilities. No pets. 570-822-9697

FULLY FURNISHED

WILKES-BARRE

Fully furnished, 1 bedroom, All appliances and most utilities included. Secure, private off street parking. Historic building is non smoking/no pets. Base rent $700/mo. Security, references required. View at houpthouse.com. 570-762-1453

WILKES-BARRE VICTORIAN CHARM 34 W. Ross St.

DALLAS MEADOWS APARTMENTS 220 Lake St. Housing for the elderly & mobility impaired; all utilities included. Federally subsidized program. Extremely low income persons encouraged to apply. Income less than $12,450. 570-675-6936, TDD 800-654-5984 8 am-4 pm, Mon-Fri. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE

Clean & bright 3 bedroom apartments. Heat, water, garbage & sewer included with appliances. Off street parking. No pets, non smoking, not section 8 approved. References, security, first and last months rent. $725/month 570-852-0252

HANOVER TOWNSHIP West End Road

KINGSTON

KINGSTON

WEST PITTSTON

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

floor. Off street parking. Heat, hot water & trash included. Coin op washer/dryer. $625/month, references, security & lease. No smoking. No pets Available May 1st Call 570-760-4830 1 bedroom, 2nd floor apt. Living room, kitchen, full bath, heat, hot water & garbage fee included. Tenant pays electric. $575/ month + security. Call or text 201-304-3469

FORTY FORT 2 bedrooms, 2nd

WEST NANTICOKE $139,900

DRUMS

30 E. Poplar St. Multi - Family 5 apartments and a 2 car garage, all rented. Off street parking for 8 cars. Great investment. www.atlasrealtyinc.com MLS 13-680 Tom Salvaggio 570-262-7716

REDUCED $28,500 Corner of Drake St. & Catherine, Moosic. 80x111 building lot with sewer & water available, in great area with newer homes. Corner lot. For more details visit www.atlasrealtyinc.com. MLS #12-1148. Call Charlie

MOOSIC BUILDING LOT

WYOMING/EXETER BUILDING LOTS FOR SALE $35,000 - $39,900

AVAILABLE NOW Modern 2 bedroom, 2nd floor. Off street parking. Washer/ dryer hook-up in basement. Appliances. Bus stop at the door. Water Included. $575 + utilities & security. No pets. TRADEMARK REALTY GROUP 570-954-1992

ASHLEY

GLEN LYON

APARTMENT 2 bedrooms, 1 bath, with newly renovated kitchen, bath, master bedroom with double closets, large living/dining room combo. Hardwood & tile floors throughout, washer/dryer. Storage. off street parking, 1 car garage available for an additional $50/mo. Gas heat, all utilities by tenant. Credit check required. $700 + security. Call Lynda at 262-1196.

HANOVER TWP. LUXURY

Architect Designed Bright modern apartment; 2nd floor, galley kitchen, dining area, living room, 1 bedroom & bath. Gas heat, central air, ample storage, coin-op washer/ dryer on premises, off-street parking. Outside maintenance provided. Heat & utilities by tenant. No Pets. No Smoking. 1 month security, 1 year lease

floor, 2 bedrooms, elevator, carpeted, entry system. Garage. Extra storage & cable TV included. Laundry facilities. Air Conditioned. Fine neighborhood. Convenient to bus & stores. No pets. References. Security. Lease. No smokers please. $785 + utilities. Call. 570-287-0900

E. WALNUT ST. Light, bright, 3rd

KINGSTON Recently remodeled 1st floor apartment with 1 bedroom, 1 bath & electric heat. Off street parking. No pets. Credit check & security deposit required. $575/month. Call Nicole Dominick @570-715-7757

Smith Hourigan Group 570-474-6307

Looking to buy a home? Place an ad here and let the sellers know! 570-829-7130
KINGSTON

ROSEWOOD REALTY
570-287-6822

DALLAS Available May 1st. 3
Build your new home here. 2 new developments, prices range from $35,000 to $39,900. Public water sewer & gas available. NOT in flood zone. Lot sizes range from 50x100 to 80x105. www.atlas realtyinc.com CALL CHARLIE 570-829-6200

bedroom, 2nd floor of century home in beautiful area. All appliances, heat & gas for dryer included. Lease, security & references required. No pets. $800/month. Call 570-675-2486

Smith Hourigan Group 570-696-1195 DURYEA

WEST SIDE

Well established Italian Restaurant on the West Side with seating for 75. Business only includes good will, all furniture and fixtures, all kitchen equipment and delivery van for $150,000. Building sold separately. Restaurant on 1st floor and 2 bedroom luxury apartment on 2nd floor for $250,000. www.atlasrealty inc.com MLS 12-3433 Call Charlie

LAND Two parcels being sold together totaling 2.26 acres. Suitable for any number of commercial uses. $59,900 Call Christine @ 332-8832

NANTICOKE Good Location. Level building lot with access to all utilities. Curbs and sidewalks in front of property. Close to schools & Community College. $15,000. MLS#08-2588 Sandra Gorman 570-696-5408

Smith Hourigan Group 570-696-1195 NEWPORT TWP.

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!
915 Manufactured Homes
GOULDSBORO EAGLE LAKE

230 Wyoming Ave., Suite 5 Kingston, PA 18704
email: gilroyre@yahoo.com

Everything is Ready! Just bring your business to this great location with over 15,000 sq. ft. of parking space. The building is equipped for fast food, restaurant, pizza, carry-out, etc. Will rent with option to buy. Excellent opportunity for the right party! $269,000 Call Ruth @ 570-696-1195 or 570-696-5411

HANOVER TWP Slope St. Nice building lot with utilities available. Ideal home site. Affordable at $12,900 TOWNE & COUNTRY RE CO 570-735-8932 570-542-5708 HARVEYS LAKE

*OPEN HOUSE* SUNDAY, APRIL 28TH • 2-4PM
KING OF THE MOUNTAIN! Truly a 360 degree view from the highest point of this property. 48.49 acres to be sold as one parcel. Build your dream house here or buy and sub-divide. Will require well and septic system. Just minutes from Highway 315, near the Casino but very private. www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-4142 Only $149,000 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

570-842-2300

924

Out of State Properties

OWNER Says Sell Price reduced!! THERE’S NO PLACE LIKE HOME: This Saltbox style home is nestled in the trees on a 1.5 acre corner parcel in the tranquil Glendalough Development. The house has 4 BR’s, 2 full baths and an office, cathedral ceiling, walkout basement & close to all amenities. MLS#13-693 Directions: 309 North to right on Hildebrandt Road, slight left onto Upper Demunds Road for .8 miles, right onto Glendalough Rd. 1st left driveway on right, corner lot.

16 GLENDALOUGH ROAD, DALLAS

Smith Hourigan Group

912 Lots & Acreage
BEAR CREEK

Don't miss this one! Partially cleared lot ready for you to build your home. It has the sewer permit already. Waiting for you to add the finishing touches to it. Great price!! MLS# 13-1291 $9,950 Call Pat Doty 394-6901

GET THE WORD OUT with a Classified Ad. 570-829-7130
SHAVERTOWN Beautiful 1 acre building lot located in established back Mountain sub-division. Buy now and start building your dream home in the spring. Lot has underground utilities, public sewer and private well. MLS #13-137 $62,400 Christine Pieczynski 696-6569

NY UPSTATE COUNTRYSIDE SPRING LAND SALE. $5,000 off each lot. 6 acres with trout stream $29,995. 3 acres So. Tier $15,.995./ 5/7 acres on the river $39,995. Beautiful & all guaranteed buildable. Financing available. Offers end 5/15/13. Call now 1-800-2297843 landandcamps.com

$220,000

NE

EAGLE ROCK RESORT Stone and vinyl exterior for this attractive ranch home. Open living area, living room, dining area and kitchen with island and pantry. Three bedrooms, two full bathrooms. Rear deck 20’x10’ and attached two car garage with finished room abo e garage. Heat pump with central A/C. Propane fireplace in the living room. The development boasts numerous amenities for property owners. HOA; gated community. Showings arranged by appointment. Two lots, #229 and #230. 60’x126.97 and 60’x126.97. Deed restrictions apply. 20-54844 $247,500.00

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• 61 +/- Acres Nuangola $88,000 • 46 +/- Acres Hanover Twp. $69,000 • Highway Commercial KOZ Hanover Twp. 3+/Acres 11 +/- Acres •Wilkes-Barre Twp. Acreage Zoned R-3 • Sugar Notch Lot $11,800 See Additional Land for Sale at: www.earth conservancy.org Call: 570-823-3445

Price Reduction

EARTH CONSERVANCY Land For Sale

1 mile south of L.C.C.C. Established developement with underground utilities including gas. Cleared lot. 100’ frontage x 158. $35,000. Lot 210 ‘ frontage 158’ deep on hill with great view $35,000. Call 570-736-6881

LOTS - LOTS - LOTS

HI-MEADOWS APARTMENTS 1075 Memorial Hwy. Low & Moderate Income Elderly Rentals Include: *Electric Range & Refrigerator *Off Street Parking *Community Room *Coin Operated Laundry *Elevator. *Video Surveilence Applications Accepted by Appointment 570-675-5944 8a.m. - 4 p.m. TDD Only, 1-800-654-5984 Voice Only, 1-800-654-5988 Handicap Accessible Equal Housing Opportunity

DALLAS

APARTMENTS 41 Depot Street Low and Moderate Income Elderly Rentals Include: * Electric Range & Refrigerator * Off Street Parking * Community Room * Coin Operated Laundry * Elevator * Video Surveilance Applications Accepted by Appointment 570-736-6965 8:00 a.m. - 4 p.m. TDD Only, 1-800-654-5984 Voice Only, 1-800-654-5988 Handicap Accessible Equal Housing Opportunity Newly remodeled 1 bedroom. New kitchen & bath. All new appliances, including washer & dryer. $500 + utilities. Call 570-881-0320

GLEN LYON KEN POLLOCK

Newly remodeled 1st floor, 1 bedroom, refrigerator & stove. All electric. $425/ mo. + utilities & security. Call Natalie at 570-357-1138

HANOVER TWP.

Nice second floor 2 2 bedroom apartment. Stove, fridge, washer & dryer. Lots of storage space. $670. Heat included. $25 application Fee. Call 570-592-7336 Viewing May 2nd

KINGSTON

317 N. Maple Ave. 2 story 2 bedroom, 1.5 bath @ $850. + utilities. Two story 3 bedroom, 2.5 baths @ $1,110. + utilities. Central heat & air, washer/dryer in unit, on site parking. 1 mo. security

EATON TERRACE

Newly remodeled, 1 bedroom, 2nd floor, own deck, all utilities included except cooking gas. No pets. Lake rights, swimming & boating. $650/month. 570-477-5001

LAKE SILKWORTH

570-262-6947

1 bedroom, wall to wall, off-street parking, coin laundry, water, sewer & garbage included. $495/month + security & lease. HUD accepted. 570-687-6216 or 570-954-0727

LUZERNE

COLDWELL BANKER RUNDLE REAL ESTATE
Tour Your New Home Today!

105 Years of Exceptional Real Estate Services
Coldwellbankerrundlerealestate.com

Visit

2 bedroom , wall to wall carpet, appliances, Lake rights. Off street parking. No pets. Lease, security and references. 570-639-5920

HARVEYS LAKE

275 Buck Blvd., White Haven

e-mail: rundlerealestate@coldwellbanker.com Hablamos Espanol

116 or 118 Main St. Near Kingston Corners. 2nd floor, newly remodeled, 4 rooms, bath, laundry room. Walk up attic, water, sewer & parking. No pets. No smoking. $525 & $575 + utilities. 570-288-9843

KINGSTON

Lovely, spacious 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath home with modern kitchen, over sized rec room, custom designed windows, and a large rear deck for relaxing. Home is on a very private 10.5 acres. Owner recently had basement waterproofed. Wonderful, private living, convenient to interstate and turnpike. MLS#12-3823 $230,000

GLEN LYON

Line up a place to live in classified!
Three rooms and bath. Includes, stove, wall to wall carpet, heat, water, sewage and trash. $450+security. No pets, No smoking. 570-829-0854

HANOVER GREEN

1 bedroom, 1st floor, stove & refrigerator. Washer/dryer hook up. $500/mo. + utilities, security & references 570-779-1684 This is a 2008 Park Model in beautiful Eagle Lake. Walk to the pool, tennis courts & basketball courts. This is the most beautiful Community in the Pocono's. Swim in the huge pool or lay in the sand at one of the lake front beaches. Call Tom 516-507-9403 Cozy 3 bedroom on 2 floors. $650/mo. 570-760-0511

FORTY FORT

2nd floor. Located in quiet neighborhood. Kitchen, living room, dining room, sunroom, bath, 3 bedrooms; 2 large & 1 small. Lots of closets, built-in linen closet & hutch. Hardwood & carpeted floors. Fireplace. Storage room. Yard. Washer / dryer, stove / fridge. Heat and hot water included. 1 year lease + security. $950 570-283-4370

KINGSTON E. W alnut St.

Call Karen Jastremski at 570-474-2340 ext.42
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PLAINS TWP. VACANT LAND

3 bedrooms, 1.5 bath, no pets. $850 + utilities, 1st month, last month + security deposit. Call 570-417-3427

HANOVER TWP.

First floor, one bedroom, freshly painted, new washer and dryer, off-street parking, no smoking or pets. $575+utilities, lease, one month security and references. Call (570) 332-3567

KINGSTON

PLYMOUTH Investment opportunity. Vinyl sided two story double. Open covered front porch. Eatin kitchen, living room, dining room, three bedrooms, one bath (each side). One stove and one refrigerator included. Gas heat. Public water and sewer. New vinyl siding and replacement windows. Ready to be rented. Corner lot, 40’x100’. Wyoming Valley School District. 20-54794 $110,000

KILLIAN REAL ESTATE
Each Century 21 Office is Independently Owned and Operated.

916 W. Front St. (Rt. 11), Berwick Office: 570-752-1300 Fax: 570-752-1282 www.ourhomesite.com/csvc21killn

288-1444

KILLIAN REAL ESTATE
Each Century 21 Office is Independently Owned and Operated.

CALL BRENDA PUGH 760-7999

916 W. Front St. (Rt. 11), Berwick Office: 570-752-1300 Fax: 570-752-1282 www.ourhomesite.com/csvc21killn

181 Prospect Road, Mountain Top #13-1494 $219,900

OPEN HOUSE! SUNDAY, APRIL 28 FROM 1:00 to 2:30
Well maintained bi-level on 1/2 acre level lot, features modern kitchen with granite counters and island. Hardwood floors in the kitchen and dining room. 3 bedrooms, 3 modern baths. The living room is on the main floor, family room in the lower level. Central air, large deck and patio. DIR: 81 North, exit 159. LEFT on Van Ave., RIGHT on Church Road, LEFT on Blytheburn Road, RIGHT on Prospect Road.

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Bear Creek Blvd. Wonderful opportunity! Beautiful 3.45 acre wooded building lot for your new home. 200' frontage. MLS #13-157 $39,900 Mary Ann Desiderio 570-715-7733

696-2468

938

156 X 110 X 150 X 45 To place your DIRECTIONS Rt 315 ad call...829-7130 to laflin Rd; make
GREENBRIAR ETIREMENT COMMUNITY Only eight lots left. Custom design you home the way you want it. Call 570-675-1300

Smith Hourigan Group 570-474-6307

Build your new home in a great neighborhood. Convenient location near highways, airport, casino and shopping

LAFLIN $32,900 Lot#9 Pinewood Dr

Apartments/ Furnished

696-2600 SHICKSHINNY 23+/- acres of wooded land and farmland with barn in good condition and a nice travel trailer. Well on property. MLS#12-2572 $115,000 Ken Williams 542-8800 Five Mountains Realty 542-2141 SHICKSHINNY 26 acres of mostly open land for a beautiful homesite near Shickshinny Lake. MLS #12-3394 $130,000 Ken Williams 542-8800 Five Mountains Realty 542-2141

APARTMENT FOR RENT ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED! PLEASE CALL 570-881-0636

PLYMOUTH

PRUDENTIAL POGGI & JONES, REALTORS 28 Carverton Road, Shavertown Mary Ellen and Walter Belchick Of ce:696-2600 ext. 211 Direct: 696-6566 mebelchick@poggi-jones.com

HUNTINGTON TOWNSHIP Corner location in a rural setting approximately 4 miles from Shichshinny. Located near the Northwest Area School District complex. Cape Cod offering eat-in kitchen and breakfast bar with butcher block counter top, oak cupboards, an antique cook stove, dining room and living room. Enclosed front porch. Three bedrooms and 1 and 1/2 baths. HW flooring. Three zone propane gas BBHW furnace. Well for water, septic on-site. One car detached garage, shed. 1.64 aces (two parcels). 20$90,000.00

KILLIAN REAL ESTATE
Each Century 21 Office is Independently Owned and Operated.

916 W. Front St. (Rt. 11), Berwick Office: 570-752-1300 Fax: 570-752-1282 www.ourhomesite.com/csvc21killn

COLDWELL BANKER RUNDLE REAL ESTATE
Tour Your New Home Today!

105 Years of Exceptional Real Estate Services
Coldwellbankerrundlerealestate.com

DALLAS R

left off Laflin Rd onto Pinewood Dr. Lot is on corner of Pinewood Dr. and Hickorywood Dr. MLS 13-23 atlas realtyinc.com Call Keri Best 570-885-5082

This scenic 2 acre building lot is perked and surveyed and ready for your dream home. This building lot package is $74,000. Located on Lake Louise Rd., within 1/2 mile of Twin Oak Golf Club. 570-820-5990

DALLAS SCHOOL DISTRICT

LEHMAN 9 Acres on Lehman Outlet Road. 470’ front, over 1,000’ deep. Wooded. $125,000. Call Besecker Realty 570-675-3611

Housing Available. Fully furnished move right in, all utilities included. 3 BEDROOM AVAILABLE $495 PER STUDENT Safe, secure premesis in great neighborhood. 3 minute walk to classes.Convenience and living at it’s best! Parents encouraged to visit home. 1 year lease beginning June 1st. Security, references and parental co-signer required. Call 570-592-3113 or email colleen5@ptd.net

WILKES STUDENT

Visit

Open House • Sunday, April 28th 1:00-2:30PM

501 Birch Lane, White Haven

e-mail: rundlerealestate@coldwellbanker.com Hablamos Espanol

Beautiful 4BR,3BA, home is situated in White Haven,in a very serene setting, but close to all major highways, schools, shopping centers. Enjoy the ammenities of a private lake, boating, basketball courts, etc. The home has wood floors and carpeting throughout. French doors in the kitchen that lead you out to the large rear deck for entertaining. The backyard has 2 utility sheds for storage. MLS#12-1695 $174,900 DIR: Kirby Ave to R on Woodlawn Ave, L onto Tunnel Rd, R on Red Shale Pit Rd,L on Middleburg, R on Weiss, R onto Aspen Rd. L on Ash. Home on the corner of Birch and Ash.

WATERTON HILL RD., SHICKSHINNY Raised ranch with brick & vinyl exterior, large deck (from the deck, view the morning sunrise over Lake Pine Crest). The view is magnificent! Three bedroom, 1.75 baths. OHW heat; central A/C, 200 AMP electric. All appliances are included for the buyer; stove, refrigerator, DW, microwave, washer, dryer & spa. Three seasons room & patio for your entertaining activities. One car integral garage. Northwest Area School District. Lot 150’x290.68’, 1 acre+. 20-53178 $179,900.00

KILLIAN REAL ESTATE
Each Century 21 Office is Independently Owned and Operated.

Call Karen Jastremski at 570-474-2340 ext.42

916 W. Front St. (Rt. 11), Berwick Office: 570-752-1300 Fax: 570-752-1282 www.ourhomesite.com/csvc21killn

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ODAY • 1:00-3:00 PM rry Dr., Mountaintop

OPEN HOUSE TODAY • 1:00-2:30 PM
10 DAKOTA DRIVE

OPEN HOUSE TODAY • 1:00-3:00 PM
853 ANTHRACITE AVE

MOUNTAINTOP

HARVEYS L

DALLAS DAKOTA WOODS - Carefree Condo -Bright & spacious w/3 BR’s, 1st flr master, study/library, kit w/granite & upscale app’ls, 2 car gar. MLS#11-3208 RHEA 696-6677 $379,000 DIR: Rt 309N to R into Dakota Woods

KINGSTON Location & convenience says it all! Home features 4BRs, 2 baths, beautiful kitchen, OSP & fenced backyard. MLS# 13-1079 ANNIE 905-0253 $139,900 DIR: Wyoming Avenue to Church St, L on Anthracite, house on R (see sign)

MOUNTAINTOP This spectacular home is 1yr old. 4-5BRs, inground pool; finished LL; loaded w/upgrades & backs to green area for added privacy! MLS# 13-1472 LISA 715-9335 $464,900

HARVEYS LAKE Immaculate 3BR, 2.5 bath in kitchen w/appliances open to LR w/FP & area & foyer; spacious MBR Suite; each BR floor laundry; garage; boat slip available. ML RAE 714-9234

4BR, 3bath 2 story s of HW & tile. Granin kit, MSTR Suite losets & tiled bath es, shower & whirllot packages availD. 715-9317

MOUNTAINTOP

SHAVERTOWN

DALLAS

BEAR CREEK

ght on S Main, Right on on Fairwood Blvd. to o Woodberry Manor. 1st

MOUNTAINTOP Gorgeous 3yr old 4BR, 5 bath home with upgrades galore. Includes 2-story FR, office, finished basement, 3 car garage. MLS# 13-1451 DANA 715-9333 $449,900

SHAVERTOWN Exquisite brick 2-story on large lot w/cathedral ceilings, oak & tile floors, granite kitchen, 1st floor Master Suite & more. MLS#13-1464 RENEE 585-0626 $538,000

DALLAS Newly renovated 2-story, 4BR beautifully appointed home on 4.8acres offers spacious rooms & outstanding amenities. A stunning kitchen w/top appliances, granite counters & center Island is a cooks dream - Master Suite w/marble bath & dressing area - Finished walk-out lower level opens to landscaped acreage. A must see! MLS# 13-511 RHEA 696-6677 $895,000

BEAR CREEK TWP. Sharp Laurelbro floors, 1st floor Master Suite, fireplac rity system, generator. MLS# 13-1159 ANITA 788-7501

OPEN HOUSES - SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013
Edwardsville Kingston Kingston Kingston Swoyersville Dallas Shavertown Trucksville Dallas Dallas Harveys Lake Dallas Trucksville Shavertown Dallas Mountain Top Mountain Top Mountain Top Mountain Top 163 Green St 11-12:30PM Classic Properties 39 Butler St 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan 579 Warren Ave 2:30-3:30 PM Lewith & Freeman 557 Meadowland Ave 1- 2:30 PMLewith &Freeman Plymouth Twp 360 W. Mountain Rd 12 – 2 PM Lewith &Freeman 309 Kossack St 1-3PM Walters Associates BACK MOUNTAIN & SURROUNDS 14 Rogers Lane 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan 2103 Hillside Rd 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan 37 Harris Hill Rd 12:30-2:30PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan 27 Marlington Ct 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan 10 Dakota Drive 1 – 2:30 PM Lewith & Freeman Pole 205 12-1 PM Lewith & Freeman 9 Greycliff Dr 2:30 – 4PM Lewith &Freeman 11 Harris Hill Rd 1 -2:30 PM Lewith & Freeman 159 Terrace Ave 2-3:30PM Weichert Real Estate 16 Glendalough Rd 2-4PM Gilroy Real Estate MOUNTAINTOP & SURROUNDS 227 Sutherland Dr 1:30-3:30PM Coldwell Banker Rundle 121 Sandwedge Dr 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan 55 Aleksander Blvd 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan 45 Pineview Estates 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan

PITTSTON/NORTH & SURROUNDS 55 Oak St 2-4PM Weichert Trademark 62 W 8th St 1-3PM Century 21 Signature Properties 4 Loop Road 12-2PM Prudential Poggi & Jones 03 Willowcrest Dr 12-1:30PM Atlas Realty, Inc 0 Norman St 12-1:30PM Atlas Realty, Inc Sharpe St 1-1:30PM Atlas Realty, Inc 00 New St 12-1:30PM Atlas Realty, Inc 00 Maple Lane 2-4PM Atlas Realty, Inc R1104 Springbrook Ave 12-2PM Atlas Realty, Inc 10 Lockville Road 1-3PM Atlas Realty, Inc 10 Charles St 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan 01 N Highland Dr 2-4PM Jane Kopp Real Estate nsignia Point Courtyards1 – 3 PM Lewith &Freeman 145 Lakeview Dr 1 -2:30PM Lewith & Freeman Unit #26 Insignia Point 1 – 3 PM Lewith & Freeman 8 Fairfield Dr 2 - 3:30 PM Lewith & Freeman 9 Fordham Rd 4- 5 PM Lewith & Freeman River Shores Ct 1-4PM River Shores 30 Everhart St 10-12PM Classic Properties KINGSTON/WEST SIDE & SURROUNDS 3 Turner St 1-2:30PM Classic Properties

Mountain Top 224 Patriot Circle 12-1:30PM Century 2 Mountain Top 8 Fawn Court 1-3PM Century 2 Mountaintop Lot 1 Woodberry Dr 1 -3 PM Mountaintop 62 Cherry Lane 1 -3 PM Nuangola 109 Nuangola Ave 12 – 1:30 PM HANOVER/ASHLEY/NANTICOKE & SURROU Hanover Twp 291 Vanessa Dr 12-2PM Coldw Nanticoke 225 Chestnut St 12-2PM Rea Hanover Twp 209 Constitution Ave 3-5PM Century 2 Plymouth Twp 360 W. Mountain Rd 12 – 2 PM Nanticoke 230 Pine St 1 – 2 PM HAZLETON & SURROUNDS Drums 108 Fairway Dr/Showcase Home 12-5PM Drums 11 Autumn Fern Court 1-3PM Coldw White Haven 501 Birch lane 1-2:30PM Coldw WILKES-BARRE & SURROUNDS Wilkes-Barre 419 New Grove St 1-3PM Wilkes-Barre 26 Brown St 1-3PM C Wilkes-Barre 67 Parrish St 1-3PM C Plains 60 Woodcrest Dr 12-2PM Century 2 Laflin 28 Fairfield Dr 2-3:30PM

OVER $100 MILLION SOLD IN 2012*
Why Gamble? Bet on a Proven Winner!
DEALING UNPARALLELED REAL ESTATE SERVICE TO THE NEPA REGION FOR OVER A DECADE
MULTIFAMILY ! ED IST
COMMERCIAL

v

(570) 4
HANOVER TWP .

MOUNT

MILY

JU

ST

L

ARRE

complex

Cedar Cape Cod, double lot

DRUMS

13-1457

$265,000 MLS#13-670

9-unit multi family, fully occupied

EDWARDSVILLE
$260,000 MLS#13-1634

$259,900 MLS#13-764

Blueberry Hill Estates

DURYEA

Large office space + 1 acre lot

HAZLETON

$199,999 MLS#12-3156

Oversized ranch w/ upgrades

WYOMING

$199,900 MLS#13-1388
MULTIFAMILY

All brick 4BR, 3 bath Splitlevel, HW floors, lower level FR w/FP . Corner lot/stream frontage. Very good room sizes. MLS# 12-3563 $189,000

New Construc bath Ranch w utilities. Paved & seeding. C/A car garage. MLS# 13-1269

NTOP
garage

Edgewood Terrace, 4BR

DRUMS

13-1171

$188,000 MLS#13-1563
MULTIFAMILY

Totally renovated top to bottom

FORTY FORT
MULTIFAMILY

$129,900 MLS#13-1340

4BR, bright large rooms, finished LL $129,000 MLS#13-1441

LAFLIN

3-stories, modern eat-in kitchen

PITTSTON

$120,000 MLS#12-4289
VACANT LAND

Huge double block, 4BR & 3BR

WILKESBARRE
$118,000 MLS#12-3753
MULTIFAMILY

MULTIFAMILY

Jim Graham Associate Broker

If you are buying or selling in the county, I can help Only if you call! Direct Line - Jim (570) 71

ESTATES

ownhouse

5BR, 2 kitchens, oversizetd garage

EXETER

12-3105

$114,900 MLS#12-4492

Renovated Multi-Family home

DURYEA

$104,900 MLS#12-4275

Duplex, new kitchens, new baths

DURYEA

$104,900 MLS#12-4278

3 acres, Laurelbrook Estates

BEAR CREEK
MULTIFAMILY

$98,550 MLS#13-145

Totally renovated multi family

DURYEA

$95,900 MLS#12-4246

MILY

Lewith & Freeman Real Est
Renovated ranch, finished LL

S

d 3BR units

DURYEA

13-519

$78,500 MLS#13-1455
MULTIFAMILY

Low traffic residential area

DURYEA

$69,000 MLS#13-1473

2-story, large eat-in kitchen

PITTSTON

$67,500 MLS#12-4279
VACANT LAND

Duplex, original woodwork

EDWARDSVILLE
$66,000 MLS#11-1607

3BR, Rolling Mill Hill section

WILKESBARRE
$65,000 MLS#13-1503
MULTIFAMILY

(570) 696-3801 • (570) 696-0883 Di metcalf@epix.net

Open House Sunday, 4/28 • 2:00-3:30PM

1755 MEMORIAL HIGHWAY, HIGHWAY Y, SHAVER 28 Fa Oakwo

ARRE

orches

Nice duplex, both apts 2BR

WILKESBARRE
$45,999 MLS#12-3922

NANTICOKE
$43,000 MLS#12-4329
Well cared for 3BR

1 acre, well, & septic in place

WHITE HAVEN
$40,000 MLS#12-1644

WILKESBARRE
4BR, finished 3rd level

11-1779

ntop (570) 403-3000
Clarks Summit Peckville Moscow Lake Ariel

ONE SOURCE REALTY

(570) 587-9999 (570) 489-8080 (570) 842-2300 (570) 698-0700

ERA1.com Toll Free 877-587-SELL
Mt Top Scranton Stroudsburg Lehighton

$39,000 MLS#12-4553

2 unit home, 1BR and 2BR

HAZLETON

$29,900 MLS#13-1267

If you like com this sparkling 2-story traditio tion in a great n but move in. O FR w/FP, grani baths, lower leve wet b DIR: 315 L on 1st R on Fordh Fairfield

(570) 403-3000 (570) 343-9999 (570) 424-0404 (610) 377-6066

Accredited Buyer Representative Certified Residential Broker, E-Pro Graduate Realtors Institute Seniors Real Estate Specialist

New Listing ~ Dallas
Sunita Arora
Broker/Owner

Larksville ll ~Birc

* = Based on adjusted year end statistics from Greater Scranton, Wilkes-Barre, Pike/Wayne, Carbon County and Pocono Mountain Board of Realtors. limitations apply; including but not limited to seller and house must meet specific qualifications, and purchase price will be determined solely by ERA Franchise Systems LLC, based upon a discount of the home’s appraised value. Additionally, a second home must be purchased through a broker designated by ERA Franchise Systems LLC. Call your local participating ERA® professional to review details. Not available in all areas. ms LLC. All Rights Reserved. ERA® and Always There For You® are registered trademarks licensed to ERA Franchise Systems LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated.

A friendly lifestyle is yours in this delightful 4-BDR cape cod in great family neighborhood. Home offers 1st flr. Mstr. BDR, modern KIT w/island & oak cabinets, hardwood flrs, nice front porch, large rear deck & 1-car attached garage. Call for an appt. today. MLS#13-1543 Only $145,000

Set apart from the rest of this a a delightful retreat. Close the M luxurious suite complete w/FP total of 4 BRs, 3 baths, attracti Florida room. MLS#1

PAGE 26E SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013 941 Apartments/ Unfurnished 941 Apartments/ Unfurnished 941 Apartments/ Unfurnished 941 Apartments/ Unfurnished 944 Commercial Properties 950 Half Doubles 953 Houses for Rent
Private setting, 3 bedroom, 2 bathroom home. Hardwood floors, area rugs, large kitchen, dishwasher, stove and refrigerator . Office and second floor bonus areas. Laundry hook up in basement, sewer and water included. Minimum outside maintenance. No Smoking, No Pets. $1,250/month and security, Lease and background check required. 570-678-5850

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

AVAILABLE 2ND FLOOR UNIT! 1 bedroom apartments for elderly, disabled. Rents based on 30% of ADJ gross income. Handicap Accessible. Equal Housing Opportunity. TTY711 or 570-474-5010 This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employer.

MOUNTAIN TOP IMMEDIATELY

SWOYERSVILLE 1st floor, 5 rooms +

basement cozy 1 bedroom, newly remodeled eat in kitchen, all appliances shared washer/dryer or hook up. Very energy efficient, Utilities by tenant Safe location, off street parking. Non-smoking, No pets. 1 year lease/security. $500 (267) 872 4825 SWOYERSVILLE 2 bedrooms, 2nd floor. Heat included, appliances & washer dryer included. $675/mo. MINERS MILLS: 2 bedrooms. No utilities. Appliances, Washer/dryer hookup. $575/mo. Both ready May 1. Prefer no pets. Jim 570.392.9434

WILKES-BARRE 1 bedroom, recently
refurbished, separate kitchen/ living room, tenant pays utilities. $465/480 + security. Call 570-401-9124

WILKES-BARRE Š1 bedroom water included Š2 bedroom water included Š3 bedroom single HANOVER Š2 bedroom 1/2 double. Š3 bedroom single Š4 bedroom double LUZERNE Š2 bedroom, water included. PITTSTON ŠLarge 1 bed room water included McDermott & McDermott Real Estate Inc. Property Management 570-675-4025 (direct line) Mon-Fri. 8-7pm Sat. 8-noon

No pets. Rents based on income start at $405 & $440. Handicap Accessible. Equal Housing Opportunity. 570474-5010 TTY711 This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer. 3 bedroom, all appliances included. No pets, no smoking. $650/ month + 1st, last & security. 570-578-8580

MOUNTAIN TOP WOODBRYN 1 & 2 Bedroom.

2 bedroom apartment. 1 bath. Eat in kitchen. Closed in terrace. Full usable attic. $625 + utilities & security. Call: 718-809-3338

WILKES-BARRE

SWOYERSVILLE NEW LISTING Busy, high visibility location. Body shop, garage, car lot. Situated on over 1 acre with 9,000 sq. ft. of Commercial Space. $389,900 Call Joe 613-9080

Large 3 bedroom with 2 full baths, includes Stove, Fridge, Washer & Dryer. Sewer and garbage also included. $750. a month. $40 application fee. 570-736-6068

NANTICOKE

MOUNTAINTOP

971 Vacation & Resort Properties

613-9080 WAREHOUSE/ OFFICE SPACE 5,000 sq. ft. with parking lot. Office, 1,000 sq. ft. with 2,000 sq. ft. warehouse. Off I-81, Exit 165. Call 570-823-1719 Mon. through Fri. 7 am to 3 pm.

apartment near General Hospital. No Pets. $525 + utilities, first, last + security deposit. 570-417-3427 264 Academy St. 1.5 bedrooms, newly renovated building. Washer & dryer available. $600/mo. includes heat, hot water & parking. 646-712-1286 570-855-4744

WILKES-BARRE 2 bedroom, 1 bath

WILKES-BARRE

WILKES-BARRE

NANTICOKE

WEST PITTSTON 2 bedroom, living &

Heat & water included. 1 bed room, 1st floor, off street parking, coinop washer/dryer on premises, no pets. $495. Call 570-287-9631 or 570-417-4311

NANTICOKE

dining rooms, enclosed porch. Plenty of storage room. Wall to wall carpeting. refrigerator & stove with modern kitchen & bath. Washer/dryer hook up. fenced in patio & off street parking. 1st floor. $660. Heat sewer & water included One month security with 1 year lease, no pets, references re- quired. Call Lou, Jr. 570-654-4040 or 570-446-7682

1 or 2 bedroom. Heat & hot water included. Rent based on income. Call 570-472-9118

* WILKES-BARRE *

944

Commercial Properties

WILKES-BARRE
425 S. FRANKLIN ST.

COMMERCIAL RETAIL PROPERTY FOR RENT:
900 Sq. Ft. STORE RETAIL SPACE Will be vacant as of January 1, 2013 200 Spring St. Wilkes-Barre Great for a Barber Shop! Call Michael at 570-239-7213

APARTMENTS FOR RENT!

BEST $1 SQ. FT. LEASES YOU’LL EVER SEE! Warehouse, light manufacturing. Gas heat, sprinklers, overhead doors, parking for 30 cars. Yes, that $1 sq. ft. lease! We have 9,000 sq.ft., 27,000 sq.ft., and 32,000 sq. ft. Can combine. There is nothing this good! Sale or Lease Call Larry @ 570-696-4000 or 570-430-1565 Lease 20,000 sq. ft. I-81 on Casey Ave. Zoned M-3 for manufacturing, warehouse storage. Electric, gas heat, sprinkler. HE lighting, 21’ ceilings, 1 drive in & 3 dock doors. Can be subdivided. Call Bob Post 570-270-9255

WILKES-BARRE

LUXURY DUPLEX This beautiful, completely renovated 2 bedroom luxury apartment could be yours! All new high end amenities include: hardwood floors, gorgeous maple kitchen cabinets with granite countertops & stainless steel appliances. Spacious great room with gas fireplace. Tile bath, stacked washer/dryer. Large screened-in porch. Many large, convenient closets. Central A/C. New gas heating system. Huge attic for storage. “Must See!” $1,000 + utilities, lease & security. NO PETS, NO SMOKING 570-793-6294 (1.5 miles North of Casino) 2 bedroom, 1/2 double, includes modern kitchen, bath and living room. Plenty of off street parking and large yard. $550/mo + utilities. NO PETS. 1 year lease & security Call Charlie 570-829-1578

PLAINS

Available Immediately

MOUNTAIN TOP Recently remodeled home with 3 bedrooms, 1 1/2 baths, washer/dryer. Full unfinished basement with workshop. Gas heat. No smoking. No pets. & Credit check security deposit required. 1 year lease. $1,150/ month. Call Nicole Dominick 570-715-7757

able, and will be accepting applications for membership. Gated Premises, adjoins public gulf course, 35 acre natural lake for fishing. Large shaded sites, with water and electric, showers and flush toilets. Nestled near orchards and produce farms in the hills between Dallas and Tunkhannock. For information and applications call: Call (570)-371-9770

PRIVATE COUNTRY CAMPGROUND Several sites avail-

Collect Cash. Not Dust.
Sell it in The Times Leader Classified section.

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

PLAINS TWP.

Smith Hourigan Group 570-474-6307

LEXINGTON VILLAGE 2 bedroom, 1 bath apartments. Refrigerator, stove, dishwasher & washer/dryer provided. Attached garage. Pet friendly. Water, sewer & trash included. 59 Agostina Drive 570-735-3500

NANTICOKE

room, washer/dryer, fridge and stove, dishwasher, central air, electric heat, no pets, $600 Call John 570-654-1909

WEST PITTSTON 2nd floor, 2 bed-

Heat and hot water incl. No pets, no smoking. $450$500 plus electric. Security deposit, references required 570-868-6177

PARSONS 1 or 2 bedrooms.

2nd floor, recently renovated 2 bedrooms, 1 bath. All new floors throughout. Stove included. Heat, water & sewer included. References required. No smoking. $575/month + security. 570-237-0195

WEST PITTSTON

For lease. Available immediately, washer/dryer on premises, no pets. We have studio, 1 & 2 bedroom apartments. On site parking. Fridge & stove provided. 24/7 security camera presence & all doors electronically locked. 1 bedroom - $450. 2 bedroom - $550. Water & sewer paid 1 month security deposit. Email obscuroknows@ hotmail.com or Call 570-208-9301 after 9:00 a.m. to schedule an appointment

WILKES-BARRE TWP.

Rte. 315 2,400 Sq. Ft. 1,200 Sq. Ft. Professional office space. Will divide office / retail Call 570-829-1206

DOLPHIN PLAZA

1 bedroom, 1 bath, living room, kitchen, 2nd floor, off street parking. Clean & neat. $440/month. New carpeting throughout, refrigerator & stove included. Available 5/1/13. Call Steve (570) 468-2488

PITTSTON

2nd floor, 4 rooms & bath. Washer/dryer hook up. Heat & hot water furnished. No smoking, no pets. Security & references. $695/mo. 570-654-1193

PITTSTON

2nd floor. 1 bedroom, living room, dining room, kitchen washer/ dryer hookup. Stove, fridge, no pets, no smoking. References. Off street parking. $550 & utilities, 1st & last month rent + security. 1 year lease. WYOMING AVE 2nd floor. 1 bedroom Includes stove & refrigerator. $600 month includes heat & water. Off street parking. No pets, no smoking. 1st & last month rent + security. 1 year lease. 570-655-9325 WEST PITTSTON Charming, spacious clean 1.5 bedroom. Washer/dryer hookup. Front porch, off street parking. Quiet neighborhood. No pets. $625/mo. includes water. 570-693-2148 or 570-654-6537 WEST PITTSTON GARDEN VILLAGE APARTMENTS 221 Fremont St. Housing for the elderly & mobility impaired; all utilities included. Federally subsidized program. Extremely low income persons encouraged to apply. Income less than $12,450. 570-655-6555 TDD 800-654-5984 8 am-4 pm Monday-Friday. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE

WEST PITTSTON BALTIMORE AVE

1 bedroom with study, off street parking, laundry facility. Includes heat and hot water, hardwood floors, appliances, Trash removal. $580/mo Call (570)821-5599

WILKES-BARRE 447 S. Franklin St.

OFFICE SPACE Newly remodeled 120 sq. ft. All utilities included, except phone. $250/month. Lease. Call 570-602-1550

EXETER

COMPLEX, Easy interstate access. Lease 132,500 s.f., will subdivide, 12 loading docks, 30ft. ceilings, sprinkler, acres of parking. Offices available. Call 570-655-9732, X312

WILKES-BARRE/ PLAINS TWP. WAREHOUSE LAIRD STREET

Large 1/2 double. Two large bedrooms, newly remodeled bathroom (used to be 3rd bedroom), large 3 car wide driveway, 1 1/2 bath. $650. month. Call Jeff 215 356-2338. 1/2 DOUBLE 3 bedroom, 1 bath off street parking 420 West Main St. $700 plus security and utilites. (570) 592-5030

PLAINS TWP.

Beautiful, spacious 1 family house, 3 large bedrooms + additional room, 3 baths, large living room, dining room, eat-in kitchen. Private parking. $750/month +1 month’s security. Available now. Call 609-356-8416

NANTICOKE

PLYMOUTH

Attractive 3 bedroom home. New kitchen & laminate floors. Gas fireplace & large back yard. $800/month + security. 570-239-3712

PITTSTON

The Times Leader Classified section.

Find that new job.

Looking for Work? Tell Employers with a Classified Ad. 570-829-7130

Duplex, 2nd floor apartment. 1 bedroom. Heat & hot water included. No smoking. No pets. $500 + security. Call 570-823-6829

WILKES-BARRE

roof & new garage doors. Over 1,200 sq. ft. $395/month. Call 570-881-0320

GLEN LYON GARAGE 3 bay garage, new

950

Half Doubles

LAFAYETTE GARDENS ! S
AVE MONEY THIS YEAR

WILKES-BARRE

Wyoming Avenue, Various sized spaces available; 500 sq. ft. to 1,500. sq. ft. 570-696-1600

KINGSTON

ASHLEY 1/2 double, 3 bedrooms, modern, new paint and carpet. $550 + utilities. security, references lease. No pets. 570332-1216/592-1328 2 bedroom, 6 rooms. Off street parking. Stove, fridge, washer & dryer. All gas. Modernized. No dogs. $600 + utilities. 570-417-5441

HANOVER TOWNSHIP

Modern 2 bedroom, 2nd floor. Includes stove & refrigerator. Laundry hook-up. Heated garage, off street parking. Heat, sewer, water & garbage included. $695/month + security & lease. No smoking or pets. 570-430-0123

PITTSTON

113 Edison Street Quiet neighborhood. 2 bedroom apartments available for immediate occupancy. Heat & hot water included. 1 Bedroom $550 2 Bedroom $650. Call Jazmin 570-822-7944

1st floor, 1 bedroom. total remodel, great neighborhood. Fridge, stove, washer/dryer hook up. Water & sewer included. No smoking. Security & reference. $525/month. Call 570-693-1468

PLAINS

WILKES-BARRE LODGE
Formerly The Travel Lodge 497 Kidder St., Wilkes-Barre Rooms Starting at: Daily $44.99 + tax Weekly $189.99 + tax Microwave, Refrigerator, WiFi, HBO 570-823-8881 www.Wilkes BarreLodge.com

court basketball court with hardwood floors, men’s & ladies room and changing room. Could be put to any related use ie: fitness gym, basketball camp or anything that requires a large open space. Lots of free parking, heat and utilities are included. Rent is is $3,000 per month Call Charlie 570-829-6200

LAFLIN GYM FOR RENT Set up as a full

HALF-DOUBLE 6 rooms. Newer gas stove and newer refrigerator. All windows are vinyl thermal pane. Steel insulated entry doors with dead bolts. Located on small quiet lane. Off street parking. Lease. $525 monthly + utilities. References checked. (570) 650-3803

HANOVER TOWNSHIP

Totally renovated 8 room apartment includes two bedrooms, 1.5 baths, laundry room, new spacious backyard deck. New gas heating system. Beautiful kitchen cabinets, wall to wall carpeting, ceramic floors, new windows, draperies, blinds. Washer/dryer, refrigerator, convection oven, build in microwave & snack bar with stools. Exterior of dwelling and other unit still under renovation. Walking distance to King’s College/Public square. No smoking. $750/month + utilities & security. (570)762-8265

WILKES-BARRE

lous contemporary 1 bedroom. Gas heat, air, fully furnished, fireplace, hardwood & tile flooring, carpeting. Carport & lovely garden. Most utilities included. $975/month. 570-881-0320

SHAVERTOWN Beautiful, meticu-

Call 829-7130 to place an ad.
ONLY ONL NL LY ONE N LE LEA L LEADER. E DER.
timesleader.com

home, 2 bedrooms, $675 a month.
570-864-2238

SHICKSHINNY AREA Country Ranch
THORNHURST

Call 829-7130 to place an employment ad.
ONLY ONL NLY ONE N LE LEA L LEADER. E DER.
timesleader.com

MUST SEE!!! 45 minutes west of the Gap. Large, 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, community pool, all appliances, garage, no pets. $900/month + utilities, 2 months security. Must have good references. 718-916-9872

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!
Apartments Unfurnishe

941

Apartments 941 Unfurnishe

Find the perfect friend.
The Classified section at timesleader.com

WYOMING 6 rooms completely

remodeled. Fenced yard, gas heat.$675 FORTY FORT 5 rooms, completely remodeled. $675 + utilities. No pets, no smoking. 570-693-3104

Small 1 bedroom with a bonus room, Four rooms. Stove and refrigerator included. $450 a month +security and references. (570) 855-6641 (585) 298-3858 PLYMOUTH Large 1 bedroom apartment. $500/ month + security deposit. Heat, water, sewer, fridge & range included. Call Bernie at

PLAINS

WEST WYOMING Second floor, 1 bedroom 1 bath, very nice. Gas heat, all appliances, washer & dryer, three season porch, off street parking. Nice neighborhood. No Pets. $565/month+utilities, security and references. 570-954-2972

2nd floor, 1 bedroom. Water included. $500 + utilities, security & lease. No pets. 570-472-9494

WILKES-BARRE PARK AVENUE

108 S. Main Street 3,000 square feet. Suitable for many businesses. Plenty of Parking $600/month + security. 570-540-0746.

PITTSTON

water view. $650/ month. (703)583-5067 KINGSTON 3 bedroom, 1 bath 1/2 double. Living room, dining room, eat-kitchen off street parking. No smoking, no pets. 1 year lease. $750. month + security. Call Rae 570-714-9234

HARVEYS LAKE 2 bedroom, deck,

953 Houses for Rent

3 bedroom single family home in quiet neighborhood with great neighbors. 1 ½ bath, gas heat, air conditioning, hardwood floors and carpeting. Driveway with 2 car garage. Large yard with privacy fence, shed, above-ground pool and swing set. $950. per month plus security and utilities. Please call 570-333-4700 or 570-592-3420

WILKES-BARRE

EAST MOUNTAIN APARTMENTS
The good life... Regions Best close at hand Address
• 1 & 2 Bedroom Apts. • 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts.

www.EastMountainApt.com

822-4444

www.GatewayManorApt.com

288-6300

Call 829-7130 to place your ad.
ONLY ONL NLY NL L ONE N LE L LEA LEADER. E DER D .
timesleader.com

1 BEDROOM APARTMENTS AVAILABLE

IN THE HEART OF WILKES-BARRE

MARTIN D. POPKY APARTMENTS
61 E. Northampton St. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701

941

Apartments Unfurnishe

Private, 3 bedroom ranch, patio, porch, appliances, work shop. $830 + utilities & security. Call 570-522-0084 Crestwood School, 7 minutes to 81. 3-4 bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths, with an above ground pool. $1,200/month, first and last months rent+security. Credit and background checks. Pets considered. Call Diane, 570-239-9633 LARKSVILLE PACE STREET Single family home with five rooms, 2+ bedrooms & 1 bath. Dining room, deck & yard. Pets allowed. $760/month + utilities. Call Barbara Mark 696-5414

BACK MOUNTAIN

Clean, 5 room 2 bedroom, carpeting, hookups, yard, electric heat. $525 + utilities. No pets. 868-4444

WILKES-BARRE

Say it HERE in the Classifieds! 570-829-7130

WILKES-BARRE

ROTHSTEIN REALTORS, INC.
288-7594

SHAVERTOWN One bedroom, living room & kitchen apartment. Security required. No pets. $500/month + utilities. Call Jolyn Bartoli 570-696-5425

Mayflower Crossing Apartments 570.822.3968 1, 2, 3 & 4 Bedrooms
- Light & bright open floor plans - All major appliances included - Pets welcome* - Close to everything - 24 hour emergency maintenance - Short term leases available

Very Nice 2 bedroom. 2nd Floor $540 + utilities. Security, References, Background check. 570-332-8792

WILKES-BARRE PARRISH ST

Lease Space Available, Light manufacturing, warehouse, office, includes all utilities with free parking. I will save you money!

PITTSTON COOPERS CO-OP

DORRANCE TOWNSHIP

Neighborhood Lovely 2 bedroom, $600 Plus all utilities, security & background check. No pets. 570-766-1881

WILKES-BARRE Safe

• Affordable Senior Apartments • Income Eligibility Required • Utilities Included! • Low cable rates; • New appliances; • Laundry on site; • Activities! •Curbside Public Transportation

Wilkeswood Apartments
1 & 2 BR Apts 2 & 3 BR Townhomes
www.liveatwilkeswood.com
KINGSTON

Please call 570-825-8594 D/TTY 800-654-5984

570-822-2711

3 bedrooms, 1.5 bath, large kitchen, dining & living rooms. Newly painted, gas heat. Close to shopping center. $750/month + utilities & security. 570-288-0510 KINGSTON

KINGSTON

962

Rooms

KINGSTON HOUSE
Nice, clean furnished room, starting at $340. Efficiency at $450 month furnished with all utilities included. Off street parking. 570-718-0331

CEDAR VILLAGE
Apartment Homes

STARTING AT $765!!
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Call for a special appointment

11 Holiday Drive “A Place To Call Home” Spacious 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts. Gas heat included 24 hr. on-site Gym Community Room Swimming Pool Maintenance FREE Controlled Access Patio/Balcony and much more...
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SDK GREEN ACRES HOMES

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Smith Hourigan Group 570-696-1195 SHAVERTOWN 1 bedroom apartment with living room & kitchen. Freshly painted & ready for you to move in. Utilities included. One month security required. No smoking or pets. $750/month. Call Jolyn @ 570-696-1195 or 570-696-5425

apartments. Starting at $440 and up. References required. Section 8 OK 570-357-0712 WILKES-BARRE

WILKES-BARRE SOUTH SECURE BUILDINGS 1 & 2 bedroom

PITTSTON TWP. $1,750/MONTH

965

Roommate Wanted

Call TODAY For AVAILABILITY!! www.mayflower crossing.com
Certain Restrictions Apply*

Studio 1, 2, 3 or 4 bedrooms, starting at $425. All utilities included. 570-826-1934

WILKES UNIVERSITY CAMPUS WYOMING

Smith Hourigan Group

floor, finished attic. $600/month + utilities. 570-299-5471

WEST PITTSTON 2 bedroom, 2nd

bedrooms. Includes all utilities, parking, laundry. No pets. From $390 to $675. Lease, security & references. 570-970-0847

WILKES-BARRE / KINGSTON Efficiency 1 & 2

2 bedrooms, 2nd floor, recently remodeled. Washer & dryer hookup. Off street parking. No pets. $550/mo. includes water & sewer. 570-714-7272

3002 N. Twp Blvd. Medical office for rent on the Pittston By-Pass. Highly visible location with plenty of parking. $1,800 sq. ft. of beautifully finished space can be used for any type office use. $1,750/ mo. plus utilities. MLS 13-098 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

Older charm, 1/2 double on residential street. 3 bedroom, bath, living & dining room combination. Updated kitchen with appliances (new gas range & dishwasher.) 1st floor laundry hookup. Gas heat. Attic storage space. Heat, utilities & outside maintenance by tenant. No pets. No smoking. 1 month security, 1 year lease.

Smith Hourigan Group 696-1195 3 bedroom, gas heat, stove and washer included. New rugs, yard, no pets. $750 plus utilities and security 570-430-7901

NANTICOKE Utilities included. 2nd floor bedroom. $400 per month references and security deposit. 570-574-7145

LUZERNE/KINGSTON

971 Vacation & Resort Properties
Furnished Summer Home. Starting June to end of August. College students welcome in Sept. Lake rights. Call for details. 570-639-5041

941

HARVEYS LAKE

Apartments Unfurnishe

WILKES-BARRE

ROSEWOOD REALTY 570-287-6822

2nd floor efficiency, 1 room, kitchen, bath, back porch, attic storage. Landlord pays cable TV, all utilities, but electric. $450 + security. 570-362-0055

WYOMING

315 PLAZA
1,750 SQ. FT. & 2,400 SQ.FT OFFICE/RETAIL 2,000 FT. Fully Furnished With Cubicles. 570-829-1206

HALF-DOUBLE Two bedrooms, new paint. Stove, refrigerator, washer/dryer included. NO Pets. $560 /month + security + utilities. References & credit check. 570-239-5322

NANTICOKE

Completely remodeled mobile home. 2 bedroom, 1 bath, attached laundry room. New rugs, all new energy efficient windows, new gas range.Tile floor in kitchen, bath & laundry room. Located 3 miles from 81. Private setting on 2.5 acres of land. Rap around porch 1 car garage. No smoking no pets. $850/ month + utilities & security. 570-868-5527

MOUNTAIN TOP

It's that time again! Rent out your apartment with the Classifieds 570-829-7130
OCEAN CITY . MARYLAND. Best selection of affordable rentals. Full/ partial weeks. Call for FREE brochure. Open daily. Holiday Real Estate. 1-800638-2102. Online reservations: www.holidayoc.com

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STUDIO, 1 & 2 BEDROOMS •Equipped Kitchen •Free Cable •Wall to Wall Carpeting

EXCELLENT DOWNTOWN LOCATION!!!

570-823-2776
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TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013 PAGE 27E

1112 Memorial Hwy, Shavertown Pa 18708 Office: 570-901-1020 Fax: 877-202-2103 E-mail: wesellfast@yahoo.com www.WeichertTradeMark.com
OPEN O OP E HOUSE • SUNDAY, APRIL 28TH EN
2:00-3:30 PM

159 TERRACE AVE., SHAVERTOWN You Must see this house. Large 4 bed, 2 bath, beautiful HW floors, formal DR, eat-in kitchen, large finished basement, garage, fenced yard, nice rear yard with deck and most of all affordable. DIR: RT. 309 to Carverton, R on Spring Garden, R on Terrace Ave, house on Left. Call Elena Katarsky 570-902-9990. MLS#13-913

$169,900

OPEN OP E HOUSE • SUNDAY, APRIL 28TH
2:00-4:00 PM

155 OAK ST., PITTSTON Spacious 4 bed home offers a LR, DR, plus an extra room for whatever you need. Separate laundry room on 1st flr, new carpeting in 3 bedrooms, nice sized outdoor storage shed, private driveway and plenty of off street parking. DIR: Pittston bypass, turn left on oak St, home on right. CALL BRENDA B SHARP 570-991-5452. MLS#13-360

$95,000

NEW!

HAZLETON 2 Family Home with separate gas, separate electric, separate water, 3 bedrooms each side, porch and 2 car garage. CALL IGNACIO BEATO 570-497-9094. MLS#13-562

$125,000

NEW!

WEST NANTICOKE Need an investment? Rehab this 3 unit and reap another income. 1st flr is gutted with a front and rear pouch. 2nd flr has 2 apartments. 2nd flr rear apt has access to a large walk-up attic. 2nd flr front has front porch. Rear yard has access from rear alley for extra off street parking. Lot is level with fenced rear yard. New roof. CALL DAVE SUDIMAK 570-406-1488. MLS#13-1536

$29,500

EAST STROUDSBURG Large 2 sty home with large backyard and plenty of off street parking, Newer home in need of some cosmetics but could be a good investment. Convenient location for commuters to NYC or NJ. One car garage, large living room with fireplace and so much more. CALL OFFICE 570-901-1020. MLS#12-4585

REDUCED! $90,000

HAZLETON Lovely ranch located in one of our nicest residential areas. 4 Bed, 2 bath, LR, DR, Kitchen, breakfast room, FR, 2 car garage and private driveway. Call Ignacio Beato 579-497-9094. MLS#13-382

$125,000

HAZLETON Great Investment Opportunity! Zoned residential and commercial. 7 Apartments fully occupied, operational restuarant with liquor license included. Large parking lot for restuarant. Close to all major local businesses and shopping. CALL IGNACIO BEATO 570-497-9094. MLS#13-347.

COMMERCIAL C O $650,000

SHAVERTOWN Brick - 2 Story Single - Move in Condition, LR, DR, Kitchen, FR with bar, possible office in lower level, 3 bedroom, full bathroom and a half bathroom, florida room and 2 car garage. Call George Sailus 570-407-4300. MLS#13-753

$146,000

SWEET VALLEY Time to build that dream home. This wooded 3.68 acre lot offers seclusion and the privacy you desire to escape the pressures of the business world and close enough to Route 118 for shopping and work. Located close to State Game Lands. Don’t wait, when it’s gone, it’s gone! CALL DAVE SUDIMAK 570-406-1488. MLS#13-1226

LAND $37,900

MOUNTAIN TOP Residential in Crestwood School District, 27.5 acres in Prime Location - Access to 309, All Utilities Available on 309 - NOT INTO SITE. CALL GEORGE SAILUS 570-407-4300. MLS#13-744

LAND $490,000

PAGE 28E SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SMARTER. BOLDER. FASTER.
Visit These Open Houses Today!
0 3:0 0 1:0
39 BUTLER ST

SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP
0 3:0 0 1:0
27 MARLINGTON COUR

0 3:0 0 1:0

121 SANDWEDGE DR

0 3:0 0 1:0

55 ALEKSANDER BLVD

13-38 KINGSTON $469000 5 BR, 4.5 bath Colonial in excellent cond. LR w/ built ins, formal DR, mod kit, HW flrs & more! RUTH S 696-1195 5 BR Dir: From Rutter Ave., Kingston, to one way on Butler St.

13-1375 DALLAS $413,300 The house you’ve been waiting for! HW flrs, eatin kit w/island, DR/office, fin LL & IG pool. SUE 696-1195 4 BR Dir: 415 to W Center Hill Road, R on Highland Blvd, R on Marlington Ct. House on cul de sac.

12-1449 MTP-ALBERDEEN AC $349900 The entertainer! Open flr plan w/lg kit. Lg patio/ deck overlooks IG pool. Unlimited possibilities. DAVE 474-6307 3 BR Dir: South Main Rd. to Alberdeen Rd. 1.5 miles to Alberdeen Acres/Blue Ridge GC on R. 1st L onto Sandwedge. House on R.

11-3704 MTP-POLONIA EST $314900 A great value! Nearly new, spacious 2 story. Lg kitchen, nicely fin walk out bsmt. Priced to sell! DAVE 474-6307 4 BR Dir: South Main Rd. to Nuangola Rd. 1/2 mile to Polonia Estates/Aleksander Blvd. on R. House on R.

0 5:0 0 3:0

209 CONSTITUTION AVE

0 3:0 0 1:0

14 ROGERS LANE

0 3:0 0 1:0

2103 HILLSIDE RD

:30 2 03 : 12

37 HARRIS HILL RD

11-2429 HANOVER TWP. $269900 Fantastic view! 4 yr old 4 BR, 2.5 bath immaculate home. Formal DR, patio, deck & more. FLORENCE 474-6307 4 BR Dir: East St. Marys Rd. to Liberty Hills on Independence. L on Constitution. Proceed to house on R.

12-3630 DALLAS $265900 Picture perfect! Pretty 3 flr Chalet overlooks Huntsville Reservoir. Room for all! Must see! CATHY T 696-1195 6 BR Dir: Sutton Rd. to Huntsville Dam. Straight onto Huntsville Rd. (Dam on R). 1/4 mi to L on Rogers Lane. House on L.

13-27 SHAVERTOWN $179900 Recently renovated 2 story on lg lot w/mod kit w/granite, LR & DR w/HW, oversized detíd 2 c gar. KEVIN 696-1195 3 BR Dir: Rt. 309 to Hillside Rd. Property on L.

12-4615 TRUCKSVILLE $152500 Classic home w/nat wood brim, many built-ins, mod kit, 2 car gar, great view, cent AC, new heat. CARL 696-1195 4 BR Dir: North on Rt. 309 to R on Harris Hill Rd. House on R.

0 2:0 :00 2 1

60 WOODCREST DR

:00 3 00 : 1

8 FAWN COURT

:00 3 00 : 1

210 CHARLES ST

0 1:3 :00 2 1

224 PATRIOT CIRCLE

13-1110 PLAINS $120000 Enjoy the daily convenience of iving the the vicinity of whats happening. Move in ready. Fin LL. ARLENE 696-1195 3 BR Dir: From Wilkes-Barre, Rt. 315 to L onto East Main St. R into Woodcrest Estates. L into culde-sac.

13-637 MTP-DEERFIELD $319900 Large 2 sty w/1.27 acres on cul-de-sac. 4 BR converted to 3 BR. Bonus room & full bath in LL. PAM M 474-6307 3 BR Dir: Rt. 309 to R @ triangle on South Main Rd. L on White Tail, L on Fawn Court

12-1980 OLD FORGE $114900 Walking distance to Main St! Well maintained 2 story w/LR, mod eat-in kit, lg fenced yard. CALL RUTHIE 287-1196 3 BR Dir: North Main Ave., Old Forge, to L on Oak, R on Stewart, L on Charles. Home on L.

13-1212 MTP TOWNHOUSE $110000 Very nice, clean, well kept 3 BR, 1.5 bath unit. Move in cond. Ready for immediate occupancy. MICHELLE 474-6307 3 BR Dir: South Main to Nuangola Rd. 6/10 mile to L on Burma Rd. L on Patriot. Stay L to unit on R.

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TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013 PAGE 29E

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PAGE 30E SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

10+ Prime Commercial Acres w/200+ff on RT 315 & 500+ff on Fox Hill Rd. Surrounded on 3 sides by Mohegan Sun Casino & Race Track. Easy access to RT 81 & PA Turnpike, (RT 476) MLS#12-3849 ANN LEWIS 714-9245

State of the art 34,000 SF office bldg w/open floor plan. Features 1000 SF data center, 8000 SF warehouse space & parking for 165 cars. Zoned C-4 Heavy Commercial. MLS#12-3565 JUDY RICE 714-9230 OR RHEA SIMMS 696-6677

High visibility for this 3.2 acre parcel! It is ideal for franchise, developer or retail use. Parcel has access from 2 roads and can accommodate several buildings MLS#12-2535 JUDY 714-9230 OR CHRISTIAN 585-0614

Great Investment Opportunity! Price reduced $905,000 from original list price. Currently priced below appraisal. MLS#11-1346 VIRGINIA ROSE 288-9371

Outstanding brick bldg! Parking for 7-10 cars. MLS#08-2790 PEG 714-9247

Large Commercial Warehouse & Office space. Over 3.5 acres overlooking the river & mountains. Developers need to see! Perfect for Townhouses! MLS#13-737 ANDY 714-9225

Retail, Office, Medical Whatever your need - This 4000 SF Bldg can accommadate it! Parking for 10. NEW PRICE! MLS#12-276 JUDY RICE 714-9230

Ideal bldg for retail sales or prof offices. High traffic location on Route 309S. Zoned Commercial. MLS#121534 MIKE JOHNSON 970-1100

High traffic location. 2900 SF professional office space w/basement storage. Pkg for at least 12 cars. MLS#12416 RHEA SIMMS 696-6677

5100 SF Masonry building zoned for lumber yard, machine shop, heavy equip, etc. Over an acre w/parking. MLS#12-3216 DEANNA 696-0894

PRIME LOCATION - Vacant land with Penn Dot access already in place. Close to everything! MLS#12-2517 DAVID 970-1117 or SANDY 970-1110

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY - NO REAL ESTATE. Turn key operation. Ice cream business. Owner will stay on to assist w/ transition. Retail bakery as sub-tenant. MLS#13-1390 SHARON 970-1106

Great opportunity! an operating US Post Office, plus a 3 bedroom apartment and 1 bedroom apartment on Main Rd. Priced to sell! MLS#12-4400 BOB 970-1107

Warehouse w/office area. 28,000 SF w/overhead door. Ample parking. Easy access to Rte 81. Motivated Seller! MLS#12-2947 JUDY RICE 714-9230

Bank owned Warehouse with loading dock, offices, 3 bathrooms. Additional pole building offers more space. Over 1 acre. MLS#13-355 TRACY 696-6674

2-Story masonry bldg on 96x180 lot w/pkg for 36 cars. Ideal for apts or small mfg business. MLS#12-1758 MIKE 970-1100 or MARGY 696-0891

3 BR, Ranch w/gar+ attached bldg. Zoned HWY COMM. Ideal for office or sm business. MLS#10-4367 RAE 714-9234

Former automotive repair/gas station w/tanks removed on .481 acre corner lot. High visibility, high traffic flow, easy access on/off Cross Valley, 2 rest rooms, 2 garage bays, parking for 30. MLS#13-917 CLYDETTE 696-0897

Currently set up for a business on 1st floor with 3BR apartment on 2nd floor. Rear is a large garage with storage above. MLS#13-735 ANDY 714-9225

Unique bldg currently used as single residence. May be converted to suit your needs (w/zoning approval). MLS#13-583 DAVID 970-1117

PRICE REDUCED- Former restaurant close proximity to turn pike, secluded location could be used as office. Visible from Rt 115. MLS#13-108 MIKE JOHNSON 970-1100

Auto repair & body shop w/state certified paint booth. 2nd flr storage. MLS#11-2842 ANDY 714-9225

This 2400 SF bldg features offices & garage w/overhead door. Across from Hollenback Golf Course. MLS#11-4561 JUDY RICE 714-9230

6000+ SF furniture store, plus apt. & lots more space. High traffic area. MLS#11-3865 RAE DZIAK 714-9234

Priced to sell! Former store perfect for a small business or offices! Plus 3 modern apartments for addtional income. Detached garage, OSP. High traffic area & convenient location! Don’t miss this one! MLS#12-3805 RAE DZIAK 714-9234

Large 8000 SF building looking for a new lease on life! Zoned Commercial. MLS#11-4058 SANDY 970-1110 or DAVID 970-1117

Former bar with 2 apartments, liquor license & equipment included, no kitchen in bar, osp for 12 cars. Let apartments pay the mortgage! MLS#13-784 ANDY 714-9225

2 Parcels sold as 1. Many uses for your new business! Plenty of parking on a busy street make this an ideal location! MLS#12-4522 MARY 479-0302

Flood damaged property1st floor gutted & ready to remodel! Prime location. Successful business location for years. MLS#12-4560 MARK N 696-0724

Spacious building in high traffic location with ample parking. Adaptable to many uses. MLS#12-3786 ANN LEWIS 714-9245

Newly remodeled immaculate office building. Plenty of parking. Reception areas, 5 offices, kitchenette. Handicap access. MLS#13-667 DANA 715-9333

Contemporary 1st floor space for LEASE. Approx 1100SF. Prime location. Plenty of parking. Lots of possibilities. Tenant pays utilities. MLS#13-1447 DEB 714-9251

Office or Store front in high traffic location. 1100SF nicely appointed w/office, open area, kitchen & restroom. MLS#12-4265 JUDY RICE 714-9230

It’s a clean slate! Owner will fit-out for your use. Ideal for Daycare, Professional or Medical Office, Salon, etc. MLS#12-4244 JUDY RICE 714-9230

Located in Central City - on site parking with loading docks, record storage space, climate controlled, secure building, metal racks available for organized storage. MLS# VIRGINIA ROSE

Prime Location 32,000SF, 1900SF - 12 pkg spaces. MLS#09- 30+ parking, including trailer spaces 3085 MLS#08-1305 MARGY 696-0891 VIRGINIA ROSE 288-9371

197 West End Road, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18706

AUTO SALES INC. A
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2003 Audi 225hp 87791 ......................... $12,990 2004 BMW 330Ci 80128 ..................... $13,499 2006 BMW 325xi 35196...................... $19,990 2006 BMW 330isport 66543 ........... $17,595 2006 Cadillac DTS 33265 ..................... $15,789 2002 Chevrolet Corvette 19123 ...... $24,649 2004 Chevrolet Venture 90840............ $5,400 2006 Chrysler PT Cruiser 63774 ........ $6,999 2005 Dodge SRT-4 98710 ....................... $8,995 2007 Ford E350 Pass 56256 ............. $13,999 2006 Ford F150 Crew 72345 ............ $17,999 2006 Ford Must Conv 110258 .............. $9,376 2007 Ford Must GT 32569 ................. $18,498 2005 GMC Canyon Z85 70275 .......... $13,999 2006 Honda CR-V AWD SE 73435 .. $13,990 2007 Hyundai SF SE 80013 .................$11,999 2006 Jeep Commander 4WD 68574 $13,495 2012 Mazda i Sport 3963 .................. $16,656 2003 Mercedes-B C230 84555 ........... $9,786 2007 Mercedes-B CLK550 45000 .. $26,999 2007 Mini Cooper S 46153 ................ $14,568 2006 Nissan Frontier SE 75941 ...... $14,999 2006 Pontiac Grand Prix 58656.......... $8,999 2003 Porsche Boxter S 26998 ......... $24,998 2009 Suzuki SX4 AWD 30482 ........... $12,999 2007 Toyota FJ Cruiser 4WD 56884 $21,756 2010 Volkswagen Tiguan SE 22065 $17,599 2008 Hummer H3 .................................. $20,890
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TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013 PAGE 31E

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PAGE 32E SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013

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C COCCIA OCCIA
18” ALUM. WHEELS
WAS........................$37,275 FORD REBATE.......................................... REBATE..........................................–– –– 2,500 FORD CREDIT REBATE........................... REBATE...........................–– –– 1,000 OFF LEASE REBATE.................................... REBATE....................................–– –– 500 FORD 5.0 LITER REBATE......................... –– 1,500 REBATE.........................–– FORD REGIONAL DISCOUNT OFF MSRP ..........–– .......... –– 1,500 COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP............–– MSRP............ –– 1,776

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

FINAL DAYS!

$

*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied including Off Lease Rebate. **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $645 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 4/30/13.

NEW 2013 FORD FIESTA SE
Auto., Air, CD, PL, Advance Trac w/Electronic Stability Control, PM, Side Curtains, Sirius Satellite, Tilt Wheel, Appearance Pkg., Rear Spoiler, Spoiler Cruise Control, 15” Alum. Wheels, SYNC, Keyless Entry with Keypad
O V E R

28,499
$ PLUS$
T TO O CH CHOOSE OOSE F FROM ROM

0 0
O V E R

% %

60 6 60 0
M O S.

APR

$ $
$ PLUS$

LEASE EASE FOR OR

0 06 60 60 0
% %APR

NEW 2013 FORD FOCUS
Auto, CD, Anti-Theft Sys., Side Curtain Air Bags, 16” Steel Wheels, Tilt Wheels, AC, Instrument Cluster, Message Center, PW, PL, Keyless Entry w/Keypad, Pwr. Side Mirrors, Fog Lamps, MyKey, SYNC

500 500

M O S.

0 060 6 60 0
% %APR

2 24 49 9
M O S.

75
TO T CHOOSE FROM FROM O CHOOSE
24 Mos.

OVER

ALL NEW 2013 FORD FUSION
% %APR

500 500

WAS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$17,090 FORD REBATE................................... REBATE...................................–– –– 750 OFF LEASE REBA REBATE.......................... TE..........................–– –– 500 FORD CREDIT REBATE................... REBATE...................–– –– 500 COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP.. . . . .–– –– 341

4 45 5

4 40 0
MPG MPG

$

*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied including off lease rebate. . **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $645 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 4/30/13.

14,999 14,999

$ $

L EASE F OR LEASE FOR

119 119
$ PLUS$

24 Mos.

$

WAS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$20,185 FORD REBA REBATE................................... TE...................................–– –– 1,750 FORD BONUS REBA REBATE...................... TE......................–– –– 500 OFF LEASE REBA REBATE............................ TE............................–– –– 500 COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP.......–– MSRP....... –– 736

45 4 5

TO TO CHOOSE OOSE CH FROM FROM

2.5L. Auto., CD, 16” Steel Wheels, Tilt, PW, PDL, Safety Pkg., Side Impact Air Bags, 1st & 2nd Air Curtains, Anti-Theft Sys., SYNC, Message Center, Cruise Control, Keyless Entry, Auto. Headlamps
O V E R

0 06 60 60 0
M O S.

40 40

*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied including off lease rebate. . **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $645 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 4/30/13.

16,699 699

$ $

L EASE F OR LEASE FOR

MPG MPG

129 129
PLUS $ $

WAS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$22,495 FORD REBATE.................................... REBATE....................................–– –– 1,500 OFF LEASE REBATE.............................. REBATE..............................–– –– 500 COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP........–– MSRP........ –– 496

65 6 5

T TO O CHOOSE OOSE CH F FROM ROM

24 Mos.

$

*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied including Off Lease Rebate. **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 4/30/13.

19,999 19

$ $

L EASE F OR LEASE FOR

37 MPG

179 179

24 Mos.

ALL NEW 2013 FORD ESCAPE
2.5L Engine, Auto., Remote Keyless Entry, PL, CD, PW, 17” Steel Wheels, SYNC, Cruise Control, Advance Trac w/ Roll Stability Control, Personal Safety Sys.
O V E R

0 060 6 60 0
% %APR

NEW 2013 FORD TAURUS SEL ALL NEW 2013 FORD C-MAX HYBRID
Auto., 3.5L V6, SYNC, CD, Keyless Entry with Keypad, PW, PDL, 18”Alum. Wheels, Anti-Theft Perimeter Alarm, Sirius Satellite Radio, Dual Climate Control, Remot e St art

500 500

M O S.

0 06 60 60 0
% %APR
M O S.

1750

HYBRID HY BRID, Auto., Speed Control Dual Zone Auto. Temp Control, 17” Alum. Wheels, Keyless Entry, Rear Spoiler, Electronic Traction Control, CD, 1st & 2nd Row Air Curtains
O V E R

47 4 7 MPG

WAS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$23,660 FORD REBATE.................................... REBATE....................................–– –– 1,500 REBATE........................–– FORD BONUS REBATE........................ –– 500 REBATE..............................–– OFF LEASE REBATE.............................. –– 500 F COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP....... MSRP.......–– –– 661

100

T TO O CH CHOOSE OOSE F FROM ROM

33
MPG MPG

33
MPG M PG
WAS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$29,595 FORD REBA REBATE.................................... TE....................................–– –– 2,500 FORD CREDIT REBATE........................ REBATE........................–– –– 750 OFF LEASE REBA REBATE.............................. TE..............................–– –– 500 COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP...... MSRP......–– –– 1,346

$

*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied including Off Lease Rebate. **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $645 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 4/30/13.

20,499 20

$ $

L EASE F OR LEASE FOR

169 169
% %
A P R

24 Mos.

$

*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied including Off Lease Rebate. **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $645 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 4/30/13.

23,999 23

$ $

L EASE F FOR OR LEASE

7

TO CH CHOOSE OOSE ROM F FROM

NEW 2013 FORD EDGE
Pwr. Windows, PDL, Air, CD, Advance Trac with Roll Stability Control, Remote Keyless Entry w/Keypad, MyFord, Convenience Group, Auto Headlamps, Reverse Sensing Sys.
O V E R

249 249

WAS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$25,995 FORD REBATE..................................... REBATE.....................................–– –– 750 OFF LEASE REBATE............................ REBATE............................–– –– 500 MSRP....... –– 246 COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP.......––

$
24 Mos.

*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied including off lease rebate. . **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $645 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 4/30/13.

24,499
10

$ $

L LEASE EASE F FOR OR

249 249

24 Mos.

0 60 60
PLUS

ALL NEW 2013 FORD FUSION HYBRID NEW 2013 FORD EXPLORER
2.0L HY BRID Engine, Auto. Headlamps, CD, 17” Alum. Wheels, Tilt, Safety Pkg., Side Impact Air Bags, 1st & 2nd Air Curtains, Anti-Theft Sys., Sirius Satellite Radio, Keyless Entry with Keypad, Pwr. Driver’s Seat, S Y NC
All Wh Wheel eel Drive, Driv e, 3.5L Engine, CD, MyFord Display, Auto. Climate Control, PL, Pwr. Mirrors, PW, 17” Steel Wheels, Keyless Entry, 3 rd Row Seat, MyKey, Cruise Control
O V E R

$ $

1 500 1500

M O S.

23 2 3 MPG

WAS....................$29,795 FORD REBATE.................................... REBATE....................................–– –– 1,500 FORD BONUS REBA REBATE...................... TE......................–– –– 1,500 OFF LEASE REBATE.............................. REBATE..............................–– –– 500 COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP........ MSRP........–– –– 796

2 20 0

T TO O CH CHOOSE OOSE F FROM ROM

30

47 4 7 MPG
WAS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$27,995 REBATE..................................... TE.....................................–– –– 500 FORD REBA COCCIA DISCOUNT..........................–– DISCOUNT.......................... –– 496

TO TO CHOOSE OOSE CH FROM FROM

$

*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied including Off Lease Rebate. **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $645 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 4/30/13.

25 2 5,499

$ $

L EASE F FOR OR LEASE

MPG MPG

219 219

24 Mos.

$

A SK F SK FOR OR B ARRY FOR ARRY OR OR L EN EN
S ATURDAY S SER ERVICE VICE HOURS 7 A.M.-1 P.M . SATURDAY SERVICE Overlooking Mohegan Sun 577 East Main St., Plains

1-800-8 11-800-817-FORD 800-817-F 17-FORD ORD
CALL NOW 823-8888

CREDIT HOTLINE

COCCIA

*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied including Off Lease Rebate. **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 4/30/13.

25,999

$ $

L LEASE EASE F OR FOR

279 279

WAS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$32,155 FORD REBA REBATE................................. TE.................................–– –– 2,000 OFF LEASE REBA REBATE............................ TE............................–– –– 500 COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP...... MSRP......–– –– 656

24 Mos.

$

*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied including Off Lease Rebate. **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $645 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 4/30/13.

28,999

$ $

L EASE F FOR OR LEASE

0 060 6 60 0
% %APR
M O S.

269 269

24 Mos.

Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B

FORD - LINCOLN

2012 PRESIDENT’S AWARD WINNER FOR OUTSTANDING CUSTOMER SATISFACTION ~ NINE TIME WINNER ~
1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1997, 1999, 2001, 2007, 2012

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