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WIRE ROPE HANDBOOK

COOKES

Wire Rope Manufacture at Cookes Factory in Auckland. The Only Manufacturer of Wire Rope in New Zealand.
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COOKES CONTENTS
About Cookes ................................................ 4 Cookes Product Range .................................. 6 Wire Rope Design & Construction .............. 10 Wire Rope Selection Engineering & General Purpose Ropes ....... 34 Logging Ropes ............................................. 38 Fishing Ropes .............................................. 44 Marine Ropes ............................................... 58 Crane Ropes................................................. 72 Elevator Ropes ............................................. 78 Stay Strand & Clothes Line ......................... 82 Services ........................................................ 86 Associated Products..................................... 90 Branches ...................................................... 98
Ropes in this catalogue are manufactured in accordance with: BS 302 Parts 2, 3, 6, 7 & 8. BS EN 12385-1-4-5:2002 I.S.O. 2408:1985 Minimum breaking loads (MBL) are quoted in this catalogue in kilo Newtons. kN x 0.10197 = tonne. tonne x 9.80665 = kN. 3

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New Zealands Most Extensive Industrial Support Service.


The firm of William Cooke & Company was founded in 1862 at Tinsley in the United Kingdom. An office was opened in Auckland in 1911 to handle the distribution of wire rope and associated products in New Zealand. Cookes are now part of the F. K. I. group of Companies that includes a number of the worlds leading lifting equipment manufacturers including Parsons Chain Co. (U.K.) and Crosby International (U.S.A.). Cookes operate New Zealands only wire rope manufacturing plant. Cookes operate websling and webbing load restraint manufacturing plants in both Auckland and Christchurch. Cookes Engineering Workshop manufactures cutting edges for supply throughout New Zealand.
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All products manufactured by Cookes meet worldwide standards such as Lloyds Register of Shipping, New Zealand Standards Association, British Standards and ISO 9002 Quality Assurance. Cookes head office and branches carry TELARC ISO 9002 accreditation. Cookes operate load testing facilities at most branches throughout New Zealand and on-site testing vehicles in both Auckland and Christchurch. In 1992 a manufacturing plant was installed to produce the Brifen road safety barrier system for highways throughout New Zealand and export. In 1994 a 150 tonne Rotary Swaging Machine was installed to produce swaged wire rope for the logging industry and later the fishing industry. In 2001 a second swager was added to handle the increased demand for this product.
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Product Range WIRE ROPE: Conventional, Swaged, Dyform, Dyswaged, Blue Strand, N. Z. manufacture up to 60 mm dia. Imported Casar and Korean TESTING SERVICES: Proof loading of all lifting equipment (Telarc Registered). 100 tonne test bed, non-destructive testing, telemetry load cells up to 100 tonnes. BLOCKS: Electric/manual chain blocks, pulley, crane and logging blocks,stainless steel pulleys. ESCO EARTHMOVING EQUIPMENT: Bucket teeth and adaptors, Super V, ripper shanks and tips, grader shanks and tips, end bits, cutting edges and plow bolts to suit. GRADER BLADES: Cutting edges, end bits and plow bolts. Mouldboard liners. CRUSHER PARTS: Jaws, mantles and hammers. SCREENS: Both wire and polyurethane. PENGO: Auger equipment, trencher teeth. LUBRICANTS: Brilube wire rope dressing. SLINGS: Wire and fibre rope, chain and web slings. LOG RIGGING EQUIPMENT: Marlin spikes, cee hooks, chokers, ferrules, pulley blocks, log grapples, rings, butt rigging. EYE BOLTS: Certified, all sizes available, threaded or blank. Stainless steel commercial eyebolts. 6

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COOKES Product Range AGRICULTURAL EQUIPMENT: Tractor accessories and 3-point linkage parts. HOISTS: Chain lever type, Supertil wire rope hoists, travelling trolleys, plate lifting clamps. HOOKS: Crane, eye and swivel hooks, marine certified. Cee, choker, stainless steel, snap and chain grab hooks. CHAIN: Galvanised, all sizes, mooring chain, load restraint, hi tensile, lifting chain, grade 80 & grade 100 chain, chain swivels, security chain and stainless steel chain. HYDRAULIC TOOLS: Enerpac hand and powered pumps, cylinders. Extra high pressure hose. Full range of product available. TRANSMISSION: V-belts, timing belts, transmission, conveyor, feeder, attachment and agriculture chain. Saw chain and accessories. Sprockets and pulleys, automotive V-belts, chain breakers, motorcycle chain. Aqua corrosion resistant chain. WEBBING AND CARGO EQUIPMENT: Manufacturers of webslings to NZS5227, truck tiedown restraints, recovery straps, mini tiedown restraints, curtainside webbing and fittings, boat and motorcycle straps, roundslings. HOSE AND COUPLINGS: Complete range hydraulic hose and couplings. Automotive and industrial hose. 7

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Product Range HIGH TENSILE LIFTING CHAIN: Kuplex, Weissenfels and Hercalloy chain. Complete range of fittings to suit all applications. LOADBINDERS: Lever and ratchet type chain twitches. MARINE PRODUCTS: Shackles, swivels, fibre ropes, boat trailer winch ropes, thimbles, turnbuckles, rigging screws, boat trailer winches, stainless steel rigging hardware, stainless steel chain, mooring and anchor chain. FIBRE ROPES: Full range of natural and synthetic fibre rope at wholesale prices. SHACKLES: Commercial or certified, galvanised or self colour, bow or dee. Hi-load alloy. Stainless steel dee. HEIGHT SAFETY EQUIPMENT: Full range of harnesses, lanyards, fall arrest devices and karabiners. WEARALLOY: High impact and abrasion resistant steel. All sizes available.

ASK OUR STAFF FOR FURTHER DETAILS

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This catalogue is designed to provide a non-technical guide to the selection of a suitable wire rope for various applications. Technical information is restricted to weights and breaking loads and a few formulae. Constructions and sizes shown here are those commonly available and used in New Zealand but there are many others and enquiries for special applications should be directed to your nearest Cookes branch. Wire Rope is a machine of many working parts and like most machines it must be made right, selected right for the application and used correctly in that application. Like many machines, there is a great variety of types of wire rope, each with different properties to suit its intended use. The internal combustion engine used to power a racing car is quite different to the one powering a large truck although they both may produce the same horsepower. Like many machines it is impossible to combine the advantages of each type into one single machine. The high horsepower and low weight of a racing engine would be great in a truck. The high fuel cost and short life would not. The same with wire rope, the attributes that make one construction eminently suitable for one application could well be a total disaster in another.

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WIRE ROPE DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION Wire ropes are composed of independent parts - wires, strands and cores - that interact with each other during service. Wire rope engineers design those parts in different steel grades, finishes and a variety of constructions to attain the best balance of strength, abrasion resistance, crush resistance, bending fatigue resistance and corrosion resistance for each application. To select the best wire rope for each application, one must know the required performance characteristics for the job and enough about wire rope design to select the optimum combination of wire rope properties. The following information is provided as a basic guide. Our expert in house staff and field service specialists are available to provide more specific recommendations.

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The three attributes of a wire rope to consider are: (1) Strength. (2) Flexibility. (3) Robustness. In all dynamic rope applications (as opposed to static applications such as guy wires etc.) the choice is invariably a compromise. Strength can be increased by increasing the diameter of the wire rope and/or increasing the tensile strength of the individual wires and/or increasing the cross sectional steel content (by decreasing the air voids between the wires) and/or using a steel core construction. Flexibility can be increased by using more wires of a smaller diameter and/or decreasing the tensile strength of the individual wires and/or using a fibre core. Robustness, or resistance to physical damage, can be increased by using fewer wires of a larger diameter and/or using a steel core and/or by increasing the steel area exposed to sources of external damage. Coatings such as galvanizing or others can be applied to protect against corrosion.

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In almost all cases improving one attribute distracts from another. In addition the wire ropes workplace is rarely ideal. Apart from the environment (dirt, dust, moisture and chemicals), the equipment to which the rope is fitted is rarely ideal and another set of compromises must be decided on. For example all wire rope suffers from being bent and the smaller the bend radius the shorter the rope life. For a 26mm wire rope to escape bend fatigue the winch drum or block sheaves over which it runs would need a minimum diameter of over 1.5 metres. This is clearly impractical in many applications, and unnecessary if bend fatigue does not cause the ultimate demise of the rope. Hardness of Wire Rope Brinell Rockwell C 425/510 45 400/425 43 380/425 41

Tensile 1770mpa 1570mpa 1420mpa

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TERMINOLOGY Wire rope consists of a number of strands laid up usually over a central core. Each strand is made from a number of individual wires. Wire Strand Rope

Core

CORES Almost all wire rope is laid up over a core, Fibre Core (natural or synthetic), Independent Wire Rope Core or Wire Strand Core (FC, IWRC or WSC):

Fibre Core

Independent Wire Rope Core

Wire Strand Core 13

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STRAND CONSTRUCTIONS. Strands are designed with various combinations of wires and wire sizes to produce the desired resistance to fatigue and abrasion. Generally, a small number of large wires will be more abrasion resistant and less fatigue resistant than a large number of small wires. Single Size The basic strand has wires of the same size wound around a centre. Large outer wires with the same number of small inner wires around a core wire. Provides excellent abrasion resistance but less fatigue resistance. When used with an IWRC, it offers excellent crush resistance over drums. Small wires fill spaces between large wires to produce crush resistance and a good balance of strength, flexibility and resistance to abrasion

Seale

Filler Wire

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Outer layer of alternately large and small wires provides good Warrington flexibility and strength but low abrasion and crush resistance.

Seale Filler Wire

Filler Wire Seale

Many commonly used wire ropes use combinations of these basic constructions

Warrington Seale

Multiple Operation

One of the above strand designs may be covered with one or more layers of uniform sized wires. 15

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LAY Regular Lay The most common lay in which the wires wind in one direction and the strands the opposite direction (right lay shown). Less likely to kink and untwist, easier to handle, more crush resistant than Lang lay. Lang Lay Wires in strands and strands of rope wind the same direction (right lay shown). Increased resistance to abrasion, greater flexibility and fatigue resistance than regular lay, will kink and untwist. Right Lay Strands wound to the right around the core (regular lay shown). The most common construction.

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LAY Left Lay Strands wound to the left around the core (regular lay shown). Used in a few special situations - cable tool drilling line, for example. Alternate Lay Alternate strands of right regular and right Lang lay. Combines the best features of regular and Lang lay for boom hoist or winch lines. WIRE ROPE SIZE The size of a wire rope is the diameter of a circle which will just enclose all the strands.

Wrong

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FINISH Bright finish is suitable for most applications. Galvanized finish is available for corrosive environments. Plastic jacketing is also available on some constructions. WIRE GRADES The most common steel wire grades are: 1420-1770 N/mm, and 1860N/mm. Stainless steels and other special grades are provided for special applications. Most wire ropes are made with round wires. Both triangular and shaped wires are also used for special constructions. Generally, the higher the strength of the wire, the lower its ductility will be. ABRASION AND BENDING Abrasion Resistance
DECREASES with smaller wires

Fatigue Resistance
DECREASES with fewer wires


INCREASES with larger wires

INCREASES with more wires

The X-Chart. Abrasion Resistance Vs Bending Fatigue Resistance. While there is a possibility, there is little likelihood that an application can be found for which there is a precisely suitable wire rope. 18

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As with all engineering design proplems, feasible solutions demand compromise to some degree. At times is becomes neccessary to settle for less than optimum resistance to abrasion in order to obtain the maximum flexibility: the latter being a more important requirement for a given job. A typical example of this kind of trade-off would be in selecting a highly flexible rope on an overhead crane. Conversly, in a haulage installation, a rope with greater resistance to abrasion would be chosen despite the fact that such ropes are markedly less flexible. Two compelling factors that govern most decisions as to the selection of a wire rope are abrasion resistance and resistance to bending fatigue. Striking a proper balance with respect to these two important characteristics demands judgement of a very high order. A graphic presentation of just such comparison of qualities between the most widely used rope constructions and others is given by means of an Xchart. Referring to this chart when selecting a rope, the midpoint (at the X) comes close to an even balance between abrasion resistance and resistance to bending fatigue. Reading up or down along either leg of the X, the inverse relationship becomes more apparent as one quality increases and the other decreases. See next page. 19

COOKES The X Chart

6 NUMBER OF OUTSIDE WIRES PER STRAND 9 10 12 12 12 14 16


LE AT E ST LE G RE RA SI O N AB TO ST AN CE RE SI AS T AS T RE SI AN ST CE TO BE ND IN G TI FA G UE G RE E AT ST

6x7 6x19S 6x21FW Flattened Strand 6x26FW 6x31WS 6x36WS 6x49FWS 6x64 SFWS

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EFFECT OF SHEAVE SIZE Wire Ropes are Manufactured in a great variety of constructions to meet the varying demands of wire rope usage. Where abrasion is an important factor, the rope must be made of a coarse construction containing relatively large wires. In other cases, the great amount of bending to which a rope is subjected is more important. Here, a more flexible construction, containing many relatively small wires, is required. In either case, however, if the rope operates over inadequate size sheaves, the severe bending stresses imposed will cause the wires to break from fatigue, even though actual wear is slight. The smaller the diameter of the sheave, the sooner these fatigue breaks will occur and the shorter rope life becomes. Another undesirable effect of small sheaves is accelerated wear of both rope and sheave groove. The pressure per unit of rope on sheave for a given load is inversely proportional to the size of the sheave. In other words the smaller the sheave the greater the rope pressure per unit area on the groove. Using the proper diameter sheave for the size and construction of rope can obviously prolong both sheave and rope life. Sheave diameter can also influence rope strength. When a wire rope is bent around a sheave, there is a loss of effective strength. 21

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This is due to the inability of the individual strands and wires to adjust themselves entirely to their changed position. Tests show that rope strength efficiency decreases to a marked degree as the sheave diameter is reduced with with respect to the diameter of the rope. Therefore, it is evident that a definite relationship exists between rope service and sheave size. As a guide to rope users, wire rope manufacturers have established standards for sheave sizes to be used with various rope constructions. To secure the most economical service, it is important that the suggested size of sheaves given on the following page be used. As a rope is run through a groove, both become smaller. A used groove can be too small for a new rope, thus accelerating rope wear. A compromise between rope life and machining frequency must be made. Grooves should have an arc of contact with the wire rope between 135 and 150 degrees. They should be tapered to permit the rope to enter and leave the groove smoothly. Field inspection groove gauges are made to the nominal diameter of the rope plus 1/2 of the allowable rope oversize tolerance. When the gauge fits perfectly, the groove is at the minimum permissible contour 22

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PROPER SHEAVE AND DRUM SIZES Construction 6x7 19x7 or 18x7 Rotation resistant 6x19 Seale 6x27 H Flattened strand 6x31V Flattened strand 6x21 Filler wire 6x25 Filler wire 6x31 Warrington Seale 6x36 Warrington Seale 8x19 Seale 8x25 Filler wire 6x41 Warrington Seale 6x42 Filler Suggested Minimum D/d* ratio D/d* ratio 72 51 51 45 45 45 39 39 35 41 32 32 21 42 34 34 30 30 30 26 26 23 27 21 21 14

*D = tread diameter of sheave. d = nominal diameter of rope. 23

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DRUM WINDING It is very important to have a rope wind evenly and tightly on a smooth drum. Due to lay direction and tension, rope has a tendency to rotate or roll as it approaches a winch drum. This characteristic is used to advantage by establishing the winding direction and dead end location so the rope will rotate in the direction of the preceding wrap. Tightly packed wraps on the all-important first layer will ensure proper winding for additional layers. If the drum attachment and direction of wraps are not correctly selected, the first layer of rope will not wind evenly or tightly, causing the second layer to pinch down between the wraps of the first layer. The resultant uneven winding will become worse with each succeeding layer and result in abnormal scuffing and abrasion. If there are sufficient layers the rope will pile up and fall over on itself with disastrous results. The hand rule is a convenient way to check the correct lay for an installation. The extended thumb points to the flange to which the rope is terminated while the extended forefinger represents the rope leaving the drum. A palm up hand represents underwind and palm down overwind. If the right hand meets the conditions, use right hand lay rope and vice versa. 24

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RIGHT HAND - RIGHT LAY ROPE Overwind Underwind

Right hand, palm down

Right hand, palm up

LEFT HAND - LEFT LAY ROPE Overwind Underwind

Left hand, palm down Left hand, palm up Left lay is not always readily available so design equipment to accept right lay if possible. 25

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FLEET ANGLE Excessive fleet angles can cause serious damage to wire rope, sheaves and grooved drums. Severe scuffing results when rope wears against groove walls, grinding them down causing the rope to become bruised and crushed. Fleet angles on equipment should preferably be kept between 1 and 1.5 and should not exceed 2 for smooth drums or 4 for grooved drums. To ensure the rope crossing back and starting the second layer properly without assistance the fleet angle should not be less than 1. The fleet angle is that angle between the centre line of the first fixed sheave and the centre line of the rope leading to the drum.

Fleet Angle Sheave C/line Rope C/line

Fleet Angle

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CALCULATION OF DRUM CAPACITIES Capacity in metres = (A+B) x A x C x N The value of N is taken from the table below Rope dia. 6 10 11 13 14 N 87.226 31.416 25.963 18.589 16.028 Rope dia. N 16 12.271 19 8.702 22 6.491 26 4.647 28 4.007 Rope dia. 32 35 38 40 44 N 3.068 2.565 2.176 1.963 1.623

ALTERNATIVE METHOD Rope length (m) = (A + B) x A x C x p x 106 d Where A, B & C are quoted in metres and d in mm 27

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MULTIPLE PULLEY SYSTEMS Under static conditions the tension in each part of a rope in a multi-reeved system will be the total load to be lifted divided by the number of parts supporting the load. When the load is raised it is necessary to take into account forces required to overcome friction in the sheave bearings and the resistance to bending of the rope as it passes over the sheave. These additional forces are cumulative and vary with the type of bearing and the sheave tread:rope diameter ratio. Sheave:rope Plain Ball/Roller dia ratio Bearing Bearing about 15:1 8%/sheave 5%/sheave about 20:1 6%/sheave 4%/sheave > 25:1 5%/sheave 3%/sheave Percent per Sheave 6% 5% 4% 1.040W 1.050W 1.060W 0.530W 0.538W 0.545W 0.360W 0.367W 0.374W 0.276W 0.282W 0.289W 0.225W 0.231W 0.237W 0.191W 0.197W 0.203W 0.167W 0.173W 0.179W 0.149W 0.155W 0.161W 8% 1.080W 0.561W 0.388W 0.302W 0.250W 0.216W 0.192W 0.174W

No of parts 3% 1 1.030W 2 0.523W 3 0.354W 4 0.269W 5 0.218W 6 0.185W 7 0.161W 8 0.143W 28

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SAFE WORKING LOADS The safe working load (SWL) of a wire rope or a sling made from it is calculated by dividing the particular wire ropes minimum breaking load (MBL) by the safety factor to be used. This safety factor depends on the application and may be determined by legislation or other codes of practice. A common safety factor is 5:1 which means the SWL of the rope is 1/5th of its MBL. Where the load is evenly supported by more than one length of rope the SWL can be increased as shown: Load carried on two parts at 90 = SWL x 1.4 Load carried equally on two parts at 30 = SWL x 2 at 60 = SWL x 1.8 at 90 = SWL x 1.4 at 120 = SWL x 1

Load carried on two parts = SWL x .8

Load carried on four parts at 90 = SWL x 2.1 29

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Incorrect installation or handling prior to installation can damage a wire rope and cause failure before it is even put to work. Care must be taken to avoid putting a kink in the rope and thus permanently damaging it. DO NOT lie the coil on its side or the reel on its flange and lift the wraps off the top! The following illustrations demonstrate correct methods:

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Ensure that wire rope always passes around winch drums and sheaves in the same direction (always clockwise or always anticlockwise) and ensure that the rope is loaded to equipment in the same direction as supplied i.e. top of reel (or coil) to top of winch drum or bottom to bottom, never top to bottom or vice versa:

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Wire Rope Selection

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Engineering & General Purpose Ropes

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Engineering & General Purpose Ropes


6 x 19 9/9/1 1770 N/mm 6 x 31 12/6&6/6/1 Fibre Core 1770 N/mm 6 x 36 14/7&7/7/1 1770 N/mm Galvanised 6 x 41 16/8&8/8/1 1770 N/mm Galvanised
Specifications facing page

IWRC

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Dia (mm)
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 16 18 19 20 22 24 26 28 32 35 36 38 40 44 48 52 54 56 60

MBL (kN*) FC IWRC


37.40 47.30 58.40 70.70 84.10 98.70 114.00 150.00 189.00 211.00 234.00 283.00 336.00 395.00 458.00 598.00 716.00 757.00 843.00 935.00 1131.00 1346.00 1579.00 1703.00 1832.00 2103.00 40.31 50.99 62.96 76.20 90.71 105.91 123.56 160.83 203.98 226.53 252.03 304.99 362.85 425.61 494.26 644.30 771.78 816.89 910.06 1008 1220 1452 1704 1737 1976 2268

Weight (kg/m) FC IWRC


.231 .292 .361 .437 .520 .610 .708 .924 1.17 1.30 1.44 1.75 2.08 2.44 2.83 3.70 4.42 4.68 5.21 5.78 6.99 8.32 9.76 10.53 11.32 13.00 .255 .322 .398 .482 .573 .673 .780 1.02 1.29 1.44 1.59 1.93 2.29 2.69 3.12 4.08 4.88 5.16 5.75 6.37 7.71 9.17 10.76 11.61 12.48 14.33

* kN x 0.10197 = tonne

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Logging Ropes

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Logging Ropes
6 x 19 IWRC 9/9/1 1770 N/mm Standard 6 x 31 IWRC 12/6&6/6/1 1770 N/mm Standard

6 x 26 IWRC 10/5&5/5/1 1770 N/mm Dyform

Specifications facing page

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Dia (mm) 13 14 16 18 19 20 22 24 26 28 32 35 38

MBL (kN*) Std. Dyform 106.00 120 124.00 140 161.00 185 204.00 236 227.00 258 252.00 295 305.00 350 363.00 415 426.00 481 494..00 560 645.00 732 772.00 910.00

Weight (kg/m) Std. Dyform .673 .78 .780 .90 1.02 1.17 1.29 1.48 1.44 1.66 1.59 1.82 1.93 2.17 2.29 2.66 2.69 3.13 3.12 3.59 4.08 4.69 4.88 5.75

* kN x 0.10197 = tonne

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Logging Ropes (Cont.)

Swaged
6 x 19 IWRC 9/9/1 6 x 26 IWRC 10/5&5/5/1 6 x 31 IWRC 12/6&6/6/1 1770 N/mm

Specifications facing page

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Dia (mm) 13 16 19 23 26 28 32

MBL (kN*) Swaged 147 237 340 437 574 659 812

Weight (kg/m) Swaged .84 1.2 1.5 2.1 2.9 3.3 5.2

Dyswaged available on request

* kN x 0.10197 = tonne

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Fishing Ropes

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Fishing Ropes
Standard 3 x 19F 12/6+6F/1 1420/1770 N/mm Galvanised 3 x 26 10/5&5/5/1 1420/1770 N/mm Galvanised 3 x 31 12/6&6/6/1 1420/1770 N/mm Galvanised
Specifications facing page

Dyform

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Dia (mm)
2.50 8.00 9.00 10.00 11.00 12.00 13.00 14.00 16.00 18.00 19.00 20.00 22.00 24.00 26.00 28.00

MBL (kN*) Std. Dyform


4.58 34.30 50.16 59.20 73.15 83.02 87.00 115.52 158.47 184.42 213.45 216.00 280.00 330.30 372.02 461.90

Weight (kg/m)
Std. .0233 .24 .30 .36 .44 .52 .62 .71 .95 1.20 1.30 1.48 1.78 2.04 2.41 2.85

Dyform

117.12 162.30 196.35 230.44 250.00 298.84 356.94 428.42 485.05

.744 1.00 1.23 1.42 1.55 1.90 2.30 2.79 2.99

* kN x 0.10197 = tonne

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Fishing Ropes (Cont.)


Swaged

Fibre Core 4 x 30 12/6+6/6/F 1420/1770 N/mm Galvanised

Specifications facing page

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Dia (mm) 10 12 14 16 18 19 20 22 24

MBL (kN*) 73.00 105.00 132.00 174.00 224.00 254.00 276.00 326.56 356.00

Weight (kg/m) .43 .58 .80 1.078 1.430 1.695 1.780 2.012 2.433

* kN x 0.10197 = tonne

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Fishing Ropes (Cont.)


Standard
6 x 15 7/7/1 6 x 17 8/8/1 6 x 19 9/9/1 6 x 21 10/5+5f/1 6 x 26 10/5&5/5/1 6 x 31 12/6&6/6/1 1420/1770 N/mm Galvanised
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Fibre Core

IWRC

Specifications facing page

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Dia (mm) 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 16 18 19 20 22 24 26 28 30 32

MBL (kN*) Fibre 33.13 47.31 54.00 68.20 82.70 87.60 102.00 133.00 179.00 187.00 207.00 251.00 298.00 350.00 406.00 468.32 567.97 IWRC 39.37 43.00 56.88 67.67 81.16 94.50 110.00 143.00 181.00 204.00 224.00 271.00 363.00 387.00 484.07 521.18 591.80

Weight (kg/m) Fibre 0.23 0.29 0.36 0.44 0.52 0.61 0.71 0.92 1.17 1.30 1.44 1.75 2.08 2.44 2.83 2.97 3.44 IWRC .24 .323 0.41 0.48 0.57 0.67 0.78 1.02 1.27 1.39 1.59 1.93 2.29 2.69 3.12 3.51 4.06

* kN x 0.10197 = tonne

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Fishing Ropes (Cont.)


Dyform

6 x 19 9/9/1 Fibre Core 6 x 26 10/5&5/5/1 6 x 31 12/6&6/6/1 1420/1770 N/mm Galvanised IWRC

Specifications facing page

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Dia (mm) 10 11 12 13 14 16 18 19 20 22 24 26 28 29 30 32

MBL (kN*) Fibre 57.86 72.12 82.88 89.84 122.00 143.00 193.27 204.54 231.55 278.18 328.99 402.00 442.45 464.00 515.50 574.77 IWRC 61.88 78.67 90.62 108.92 121.60 168.27 211.60 220.00 250.35 301.30 354.98 413.00 479.09 591.77 623.66

Weight (kg/m) Fibre .36 .449 .518 .621 .703 .963 1.21 1.37 1.51 1.91 2.13 2.52 2.85 3.25 3.40 3.69 IWRC .42 .521 .601 .722 .827 1.12 1.40 1.54 1.73 2.09 2.47 2.93 3.32 3.98 4.31

* kN x 0.10197 = tonne

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Fishing Ropes (Cont.)


Dy/Swaged

6 x 19 9/9/1 Fibre Core 6 x 26 10/5&5/5/1 6 x 31 12/6&6/6/1 1420/1770 N/mm Galvanised IWRC

Specifications facing page

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Dia (mm) 10 12 13 14 16 18 19 20 22 24 26 28 30 32

MBL (kN*) Fibre 65.20 92.94 110.22 128.33 165.32 222.30 229.30 266.03 313.82 364.12 451.98 497.72 570.02 671.27 IWRC 69.99 99.84 119.08 137.15 184.40 246.51 253.65 310.74 336.95 391.73 483.30 539.10 616.10 725.03

Weight (kg/m) Fibre .43 .613 .726 .848 1.09 1.45 1.50 1.74 2.08 2.40 2.98 3.56 3.78 4.53 IWRC .49 .694 .831 .998 1.25 1.64 1.73 1.97 2.36 2.72 3.36 3.8 4.3 5.13

* kN x 0.10197 = tonne

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Fishing Ropes (Cont.)


Combination Ropes

6 x Decitex/9/f 6 x Decitex/15/9/f Polyprop Core IWRC Galvanised

Specifications facing page

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MBL (kN*) Dia mm 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 60 Fibre 35.00 40.00 49.00 55.25 68.71 78.72 101.5 117.0 143.0 610.0 IWRC 50.00 53.50 59.54 69.09 101.0 115.0 161.0 176.0 213.0 904.0

Weight (kg/m) Fibre .268 .366 .380 .580 .688 .720 .880 1.02 1.61 4.68 IWRC .324 .460 .491 .620 .873 .950 1.10 1.32 1.61 6.42

* kN x 0.10197 = tonne

57

COOKES

58

COOKES

Marine Ropes

59

COOKES

Marine Ropes
Stainless 316

1 x 19 12/6/1

Specifications facing page

60

COOKES

Dia. (mm) 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 4.0 5.0 6.0 7.0 8.0 9.0 10.0 11.0 12.0

MBL (kN*) 1.8 3.3 5.2 7.4 13.1 20.6 29.7 40.4 52.8 66.8 82.4 101.0 118.6

Weight (kg/m) .011 .020 .031 .044 .079 .124 .178 .243 .317 .401 .495 .599 .713

* kN x 0.10197 = tonne

61

COOKES

Marine Ropes (Cont.)


Stainless 316

7x7 6/1

7 x 19 12/6/1 or 9/9/1

Specifications facing page

62

COOKES

Dia (mm) 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 4.0 5.0 6.0 7.0 8.0 10.0 12.0 13.0 14.0

MBL (kN*) 7x7 1.30 2.37 3.71 5.34 7.60 9.46 14.8 21.4 29.1 38.0 59.3 85.4 117.0 7 x 19 2.2 3.4 5.0 7.0 8.9 13.9 20.0 27.3 35.6 55.6 80.0 84.4 109.0

Weight (kg/m) 7x7 .0096 .0170 .027 .037 .049 .065 .094 .136 .185 .242 .378 .545 .741 7 x 19 .018 .026. .038 .050 .068 .093 .134 .182 .238 .372 .535 .579 .728

* kN x 0.10197 = tonne

63

COOKES

Marine Ropes (Cont.)

6 x 19 12/6/1 6 x 19 (9/9/1) 1420/1770 N/mm Galvanised

Fibre Core

IWRC

Note The above ropes can be manufactured with a P.V.C. covering up to 32:00mm outside dia.
Specifications facing page

64

COOKES

Dia (mm) 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 16 18 19 20 22 24 26 28 32

MBL (kN*) Fibre 33.13 41.91 53.89 65.86 77.43 87.42 101.79 132.72 167.65 186.61 206.57 250.47 297.38 349.27 405.16 544.35 IWRC 39.37 43.00 56.88 67.67 80.61 94.63 109.83 143.18 192.77 202.00 224.57 269.44 333.43 377.21 484.00 606.75

Weight (kg/m) Fibre 0.23 0.29 0.36 0.44 0.52 0.61 0.71 0.92 1.17 1.30 1.44 1.75 2.08 2.44 2.83 3.44 IWRC 0.24 0.32 0.41 0.48 0.57 0.67 0.78 1.02 1.27 1.39 1.59 1.93 2.29 2.69 3.12 4.06

* kN x 0.10197 = tonne

65

COOKES

Marine Ropes (Cont.)

6x7 6/1 7x7 6/1 1770 N/mm Galvanised

Fibre Core

WSC

Note The above ropes can be manufactured with a P.V.C. covering up to 32:00mm outside dia.
Specifications facing page

66

COOKES
MBL (kN*) 6x7 7x7 Fibre WSC 2.35 2.54 3.66 4.28 5.29 5.72 9.40 10.20 14.70 15.90 21.20 22.90 28.80 31.10 37.60 40.70 47.60 51.50 58.80 63.50 71.10 76.90 84.60 91.50 99.30 107.00 115.00 125.00 150.00 163.00 190.00 206.00 212.00 229.00 236.00 254.00 284.00 308.00 338.00 366.00 397.00 430.00 461.00 498.00 Weight (kg/m) 6x7 7x7 Fibre WSC .0138 .0152 .0196 .0236 .0311 .0343 .0554 .0610 .0865 .0953 .125 .137 .170 .187 .221 .244 .280 .309 .346 .381 .419 .461 .498 .549 .585 .644 .678 .747 .886 .975 1.12 1.23 1.25 1.38 1.38 1.52 1.67 1.84 1.99 2.19 2.34 2.58 2.71 2.99 67

Dia mm 2.0 2.5 3.0 4.0 5.0 6.0 7.0 8.0 9.0 10.0 11.0 12.0 13.0 14.0 16.0 18.0 19.0 20.0 22.0 24.0 26.0 28.0

* kN x 0.10197 = tonne

COOKES

Marine Ropes (Cont.)


Small Cords

6 x 19 & 7 x 19 9/9/1 & 12/6/1 1770 N/mm Galvanised

6 x 19 Fibre

7 x 19 or 6 x 19 WSC

Specifications facing page

68

COOKES

Dia mm 3.0 3.5 4.0 4.5 5.0 5.5 6.0 6.5 7.0 7.5

MBL (kN*) Fibre 4.89 6.64 8.69 10.98 13.60 16.40 19.60 22.95 28.60 30.50 WSC 5.29 7.85 9.40 12.95 14.70 19.42 21.20 27.07 30.90 36.00

Weight (kg/m) Fibre .0311 .0378 .0554 .0612 .0865 .0913 .125 .130 .177 .185 WSC .0343 .0465 .0610 .0762 .0953 .114 .137 .154 .195 .219

* kN x 0.10197 = tonne

69

COOKES

Marine & Lashing Ropes.


6 x 12 12/f 1420 N/mm Fibre Core

6 x 24 15/9/f 6 x 24 12/12/f 1420/1770 N/mm Galvanised


Note The above ropes can be manufactured with a braid cover.
Specifications facing page

70

COOKES

MBL (kN*) Dia (mm) 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 16 18 19 20 22 24 26 28 30 32 12/f 19.00 24.00 29.70 35.90 42.70 50.11 58.20 76.00 96.10 107.30 118.66 143.18 170.64 200.00 232.42 266.74 304.00 12/12/f 15/9/f 28.10 35.60 44.00 53.20 63.30 74.30 86.20 113.00 142.00 159.00 176.00 213.00 253.00 297.00 345.00 396.00 450.00

Weight (kg/m) 12/f .127 .160 .194 .254 .300 .346 .400 .643 .670 .745 .820 .974 1.145 1.380 1.590 1.800 2.120 12/12/f 15/9/f .200 .253 .314 .380 .457 .531 .616 .803 1.028 1.132 1.255 1.520 1.805 2.122 2.458 2.521 3.213

* kN x 0.10197 = tonne

71

COOKES

72

COOKES

Crane Ropes

73

COOKES

Crane Ropes

18 x 7 6/1 1770 N/mm

Dyform 18 18 x 19 9/9/1 1960 N/mm

Specifications facing page

74

COOKES

Dia (mm) 5.0 6.5 8.0 9.0 10 11 12 13 14 16 18 19 20 22 24 26 28

MBL (kN*)

Weight (kg/m)

18 x 7 Dyform 18 18 x 7 Dyform 18 14.02 0.10 23.73 0.16 37.12 0.25 46.91 0.32 58.10 .390 70.06 0.47 83.60 .562 124.00 97.90 0.66 0.83 113.77 135.33 0.76 0.85 148.69 193.00 1.00 1.18 1.49 187.61 213.00 1.26 1.66 209.57 226.00 1.41 232.00 285.00 1.56 1.85 280.42 353.00 1.89 2.28 334.00 413.00 2.25 2.68 391.18 475.00 2.64 3.08 441.00 2.96

* kN x 0.10197 = tonne

75

COOKES

Crane Ropes (Cont.)


EUROLIFT

Casar 40 x 7 6/1 1960 N/mm

Specifications facing page

76

COOKES
Dia (mm) 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 32 34 36 38 40 MBL (kN*) 89.6 108.8 130.8 152.7 179.1 204.0 230.6 257.9 293.9 329.0 362.2 396.1 441.4 471.8 524.3 567.9 614.9 654.2 712.9 754.6 817.4 930.0 1045.0 1185.0 1319.0 1462.0 Weight (kg/m) 0.49 0.593 0.705 0.821 0.949 1.091 1.257 1.406 1.601 1.768 1.956 2.142 2.373 2.609 2.813 3.076 3.285 3.530 3.846 4.062 4.347 5.011 5.641 6.306 7.081 7.831 77

* kN x 0.10197 = tonne

COOKES

78

COOKES

Elevator Ropes

79

COOKES

Elevator Ropes

8 x 19 9/9/1 1370/1770 N/mm

Natural Fibre Core

Specifications facing page

80

COOKES

Dia (mm) 9.5 11 13 16

MBL (kN) 39.71 53.20 74.30 113.00

Weight (kg/m) .310 .420 .586 .888

* kN x 0.10197 = tonne

81

COOKES

Horticultural High Tensile Galvanised Strand

Prefabricated loop. No tools required

82

COOKES

Stay Strand & Clothes Line

83

COOKES

Stay Strand & Clothes Line

1x7 Galvanised

Specifications facing page

84

COOKES

Strand Dia + (mm) 3.55 4.8 6.0 7.5 9.5 4.8 6.0 7.5 9.5 12.0

Wires/ Dia (mm) 5/1.25 7/1.6 7/2.0 7/2.5 7/3.15 7/1.6 7/2.0 7/2.5 7/3.15 7/4.0

MBL

Tensile Grade

kg/m

(kN*) 386 _ 1080 14.02 27.46 1200/1300 42.17 1200/1300 58.84 1200/1300 9.85 15.40 23.53 38.20 61.70 700/800 700/800 700/800 700/800 700/800

.057 .110 .170 .300 .430 .110 .170 .300 .430 .690

Equiv Wire Gauge 18G 16G 14G 12G 10G 16G 14G 12G 10G 8G

+ Approximate Diameter * kN x 0.10197 = tonne

85

COOKES

Services

1,000 tonne talurit press at Auckland rigging loft.

86

COOKES

Hand Splice

Mechanical Splice Mechanical Splice

87

COOKES

Hand Splice with Thimble

Mechanical Splice with Thimble

88

COOKES

Test bed for proof loading and certification of all types of lifting equipment. On site service includes installation, maintenance and non-destructive testing.
89

COOKES

Associated Products
Lubricating & protective coatings, each specially fomulated for particular wire rope applications

Turnbuckles & Rigging Screws Shackles Rope Grips Thimbles Twitches/ Load Binders

90

COOKES

Chain

Chain Blocks & Lever Hoists

91

COOKES

Wire Rope Hoists

Wire Rope Safety Fence

92

COOKES

Web Slings

Load Restraints & Webbing Hardware


93

COOKES

Height Safety & Fall Arrest Equipment

Synthetic & Natural Fibre Rope

94

COOKES

Whangarei Auckland

Branches
New Plymouth

Tauranga Rotorua Napier

Nelson

Wellington

Timaru

Christchurch Ashburton

Dunedin Invercargill

95

COOKES NOTES

96

COOKES NOTES

97

COOKES
BRANCHES
Head Office & Factory 6-10 Greenmount Dr East Tamaki P O Box 14-422 Panmure AUCKLAND Phone (09) 274-4299 Fax (09) 274-7982 Email: salesadmin@cookes.co.nz Whangarei Lower Port Road P O Box 708 Phone (09) 438-8964 Fax (09) 438-9272 Email: cookeswr@xtra.co.nz Tauranga 1 Marsh Street P O Box 14-204 Phone (07) 578-0605 Fax (07) 578-0604 Email: tausales @cookes.co.nz 98 Rotorua Marguerita Street P O Box 633 Phone (07) 348-3043 Fax (07) 346-3283 Email: rotsales@cookes.co.nz Napier 182A Hyderabad Rd P O Box 12-003 Ahuriri Phone (06) 834-0690 Fax (06) 834-0872 New Plymouth 18 Eliot Street P O Box 854 Phone (06) 758-0860 Fax (06) 758-0861 Email: nplysales@cookes.co.nz Palmerston North Resident Representative Phone (025) 453-902 Fax (06) 354-2418

COOKES
BRANCHES
Wellington 2 Udy Street P O Box 38-696 Petone Phone (04) 568-4384 Fax (04) 568-4381 Nelson Rogers Street P O Box 5030 Phone (03) 548-1351 Fax (03) 548-0105 Email: cookes-nsn@xtra.co.nz Christchurch 108 Carlyle Street Sydenham P O Box 7028 Phone (03) 366-0952 Fax (03) 366-3544 Email: cookes.chch@xtra.co.nz Ashburton 120 Moore Street P O Box 407 Phone (03) 308-9778 Fax (03) 308-3875 Timaru Cnr Frazer & Stuart Sts P O Box 918 Phone (03) 684-7494 Fax (03) 684-8476 Dunedin 2A Orari Street P O Box 626 Phone (03) 455-3966 Fax (03) 455-3966 Invercargill 137 Clyde Street P O Box 118 Phone (03) 218-4682 Fax (03) 218-4187

www.cookes.co.nz
99

WIRE ROPE HANDBOOK

PDF E HB-04-01-03 6.5.3.2.1 3.6 & 3.6.1.8.1 8.2.1.3.4.1 & 4.1.8.1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42

Handbook Steel Wire Ropes Type of Ropes, Rope Construction, Classification Characteristics of Wire Ropes Terms Symbols - Abbreviation EN 12385-2
Measured = m Aggregate = e Calculated = c
Nominal Rope Length = L

C:\ Handbook 04-Berechnung 01-01-03T01.doc 2003-09-15 Reduced = red

Values (3.9) Nominal = 0

Minimum = min Maximum = max Elements Wire- = (3.1) Outer-Wire- = a Stand- = dS Rope- = d Core- = dC Triangular Oval Trapezoidal Z-shaped H-shaped Built-up Centre Symbols (4.3.1) round flat Wire Shape no P V Q T Z H B Strand Shape no P V Q
Symbol (3.2.5) (3.2.3) (3.2.4)

Measured Rope Length = Lm

Rope Shape no P Flat Rope: P (3.6.1.10) Single stitched = PS Core


(3.3.1)

Rectangular = R Double stitched = PD Clamped = PN Solid Covered Polymer with Fibre


(3.3.4)

Braided = BR Filled

Fibre Core FC
(3.3.2)

Steel Core WC
(3.3.3)

Covered extruded
Polymer Covered

(4.3.3)

Natural Synthetic S Strand N NFC S SFC WSC

Steel Core
Independent parallel

C C

IWRC

PWRC
(3.6.1.4)

SPC SPC

EF EFIWRC

EP EPIWRC

CLM CLMWR

With compacted strands IWRC(K) PWRC(K) Cushioned Core (3.6.3.4) Polyamid = PA Polypropylen = PP Fibre Material: Natural Fibre = N Synthetic = S Rope Lay Strand (3.8.1) Rope (3.8.2)
Lay Direction (3.8) Right Lay Left Lay z s S Z

Polymer = P

Type of Lay (4.4.7)


Ordinary Lay (3.8.3) Right Lay Left Lay Lang Lay (3.8.4) Right Lay Left Lay Alternate Lay (3.8.5) Right Lay Left Lay

sZ

zS

zZ

sS

AZ

AS

Lay Angle: Rope = Strand = Lay Length: Rope = H (3.7.11) Preformed Rope: No Symbol (3.11.3)

Strand Clearance = qS (3.7.14) Rope Grade RR (3.10.11) Wire Tensile Strength Grade: R (3.1.10) Wire Tensile Strength: Rm (3.1.11) Finish of Coating: (3.1.12) Bright = U Zinc = B Zinc: A Alloy Strand/Wire Layers closed opposite = J Rotation Resistant: STR-RR Low Rotation: STR-LR Compacted: K (3.2.15) Spin Resistant: STR-SR Inserts = I (3.5) Natural Fibre = IN Synthetic Fibre = IS Profile = IC Solid Polymers = IC Covering = E Covered with Fibres = EN Coverer with solid Polymer (extruded) = EM (3.6.3.1) Solid Polymer covered Rope (3.6.3.1) Cushioned Rope (3.6.3.5) Cushioned Core Rope (3.6.3.4) Filled = L (3.6.3) Solid Polymer filled Rope = LM (3.6.3.2) Solid Polymer covered & filled = ELM (3.6.3.3) Ropes Covered & Filled with Solid Polymer (3.6.3.3) Solid Polymer filled Rope (3.6.3.2) Type of Strand Single Lay = no Symbol (3.2.6) Closing Parallel Lay = P (3.2.7) Seale = S (3.2.8) Warrington = W (3.2.9) Filler = F (3.2.10) Combined Parallel Lay: Seale-Warrington = SW (3.2.1.1.) Multiple Operation Lay Cross Lay = M, Compound Lay = N (3.2.1.3) Multi Layer Rope, Spiral Strand Rope: Contra Lay = J Multi-Layer Stranded Rope = STR-ML Rope Construction Connecting Symbols (4.4.3) Behind Number of Strands (x) Parallel (-) Crossing (/) Same Layer (+) Contra Lay (:) Behind Strand Construction (-) in front of Core (-IWRC) Covered Rope- /Rope- (4.2.2.) Spiral Rope =SPI (3.6.2) Spiral Strand Rope =SPI-STD (3.6.2.2.) Half-Locked Coil Rope=SPI-HLC (3.6.2.3) Flat Rope = P (3.6.1.10) Full-Locked Coil Rope=SPI-FLC (3.6.2.4) Cable-Laid Rope=CL (3.6.1.7) Braided Rope= BR (3.6.1.8) Rope = R Stranded Rope = STR (3.6.1)
Single Layer Stranded Rope: STR-SL
(3.6.1.2)

Wire Clearance = qW (q) Strand = h (3.7.10) Not Preformed: NON-PRE

Multi Layer Stranded Rope STR-ML

Rotation Resistant Rope=STR-RR


(3.6.1.3)

Conductors = DC (4.3.4) Electromechanical Rope = EM or Elec-R Parallel-Closed Rope (3.6.1.4) Ropes with Compacted Strands (3.6.1.5) Compacted (swaged) Rope (3.6.1.6)

Handbook/04-Berechnung/01/01-03T01.doc/Date: 14.08.2003/ Page 2 of 4

Rope-Class & Rope-Construction


Rope Class (3.12.1) Rope Construction (3.12.2) Half-Locked Coil Rope (3.6.2.3) For Guide Ropes = HLGR For Track Ropes for Aerial Rope Ways = HLAR Full-Locked Coil Rope (3.6.2.4) For Mine Hoist Ropes = FLHR For Track Ropes = FLAR For Bridge Ropes = FLBR

(3.12)

Lubricants & Preservation Agents (3.4)


Lubricants & Preservation Agents (3.4) Lubricant (3.4.1) Impregnating Agent (3.4.2) Preservation Agent (3.4.3)

(3.12)

Dimensions
Dimension of Round Wire = (3.71) Dimension of outer round Wire = (3.72) Dimension of Round Strand = dS (3.7.4) Dimension of Round Ropes = d (3.7.6) Dimension of Shaped Wire Z = h & w (3.73) Dimension of Shaped Strand = w & s (3.7.5) Dimension of Flat Rope P w & s (3.7.7) Dimension of Covered Round Rope d (e.g. 16/13) (3.7.8) Dimension of covered Flat Rope w & s (3.7.9)

(3.7.)

Rope Characteristics
Torque Turn Fully Preformed Rope

(3.11) (3.11.1) (3.112)

Wires
Outer Wires (3.1.1) Inner Wires (3.1.2) Layer of Wires (3.1.7) Stitching Wire or Strand (3.1.8) Wire Tensile Strength Grade = R (3.1.11) Finish & Quality of Coating (3.1.12) Filler Wires (3.1.3) Centre Wires (3.1.4) Core Wires (3.1.5)
Load Bearing Wires (3.1.6)

(3.1)

Serving Wire or Strand (3.1.9) Wire Tensile Strength =Rm Mass of Coating (3.1.13) 3.2 Triangular Strand = V (3.2.3) Oval Strand = Q (3.2.4)

Strand Types
Strand (3.2.1) Round Strand (3.2..2) Flat ribbon Strand = P (3.2.5) Single Lay Strand = E (3.2.6) Parallel Lay Strand (3.2.7) Combined Parallel Lay (3.2.11) Multiple Operation Lay (3.2.12) Compacted Strand = K (3.2.15)

Seale = S (3.2.8) Cross-Lay = M (3.2.13)

Warrington = W (3.2.9) Warrington-Seale = WS Compound Lay = N


(3.2.14

Core Types
Core = C (3.3.1) Fibre Core = FC = (3.3.2) Steel Core = WC (3.3.3) Solid Polymer Core = SPC (3.3.4) Natural Fibre Core = NFC Strand Core = WSC Parallel Laid = PWRC
Synthetic Fibre Core = SFC Independent Wire Rope Core =IWRC

3.3 3.3.1

Handbook/04-Berechnung/01/01-03T01.doc/Date: 14.08.2003/ Page 3 of 4

Lubricants and Preservation Agents


Rope Lubricants (3.4.1) Impregnating Agent (3.4.2) Preservation Agent(3.4.3)

3.4

Insert = I
Natural Fibre= IN Synthetic Fibre = IS Profile- Solid Polymer = IC

3.5

Rope Types
Stranded Ropes = STR (3.6.1) Single-Layer Stranded Rope = STR-SL (3,6,1,1) Multi-Layer Stranded Rope = STRML Rotation Resistant Stranded Rope Spin Resistant = STR-RR (3.6.1.3) Rotation Resistant Low Rotation

3.6

Parallel-Closed Stranded Rope


(3.6.1.4) (see Steel Core 3.3.3)

Compacted Rope Compacted Strand Stranded Rope (3.6.1.5) Cable Laid Rope = CL (3.6.1.7) Braided Rope = BR (3.6.18) Electro-mechanical Rope = EM
(3.6.1.9)

Compacted (swaged) Stranded Rope (3.6.1.6)

Flat Rope = FLAT (3.6.1.10) Spiral Ropes (3.6.2)

Ropes with Coverings and/or Filling (3.6.3)

Spiral Strand Rope = SPI-STD (3.6.2.) Half-Locked Coil Rope = Full Locked Coil Rope SPI-HLC (3.6.2.3) = SPI-FCL (3.6.2.4) Solid Polymer Covered Rope = EM Solid Polymer Filled (3.6.3.1) Rope = LM (3.6.3.2) Solid Polymer Covered and Filled Rope = ELM (3.6.3.3)

Single Stitched = PS Rivetted = PN Spiral Rope = SPI (3.6.2.1)

Double Stitched = PD

Cushioned Core Rope = (3.6.3.4) Cushioned Rope (3.6.3.5)

Handbook/04-Berechnung/01/01-03T01.doc/Date: 14.08.2003/ Page 4 of 4

Factors, Areas, Masses and Breaking Forces Fillfactor = f


Nominal Metallic Cross-Sectional area Factor = C

f =
C=

A Au

(3.10) (3.10.1)

(3.10.2)

4
n 1 2

Nominal Metallic Cross-Sectional area = A Calculated Metallic Cross-Sectional area = Ac

A=Cd Ac =

n 1

(3.10.3) (3.10.4)

Measured Metallic Cross-Sectional area = Ac Am = Rope Length Mass Factor = W Nominal Rope Length Mass = M Measured Rope Length Mass = Mm Breaking Force Factor = K K=

m2
2

(3.10.5)

M=Wd

f k

(3.10.6) (3.10.7) (3.10.8) (3.10.9)

Minimum Breaking Force = Fmin

4 d 2 Rr K Fmin = 1000

(3.10.10)

Rope Grade Rr Calculated Minimum Breaking Force = Fc.min Measured Breaking Force = Fm Minimum Aggregate Breaking Force = Fe.min Fe.min = Calculated Minimum Aggregate Breaking Force = Fe.c.min Reduced Minimum Aggregate Breaking Force = Fe.red.min Measured Aggregate Breaking Force = Fe.m Measured Reduced Aggregate Breaking Force = Fe.red.m Calculated Measured Breaking Force = Fmc Calculated Measured Aggregate Breaking Force = Fe.m.c Measured Total Spinning Loss Measured Partial Spinning Loss Spinning Loss Factor = k Measured Total Spinning Loss Factor = km Measured Partial Spinning Loss Factor = kp.m Outer Wire Factor = a Outer Wire Diameter = a

d 2 C Rr 1000

(3.10.11) (3.10.12) (3.10.13) (3.10.14)

(3.10.15) (3.10.16) (3.10.17) (3.10.18) (3.10.19) (3.10.20) (3.10.21) (3.10.22) (3.10.23) (3.10.24) (3.10.25) a = a d