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The Baptism in the Holy Spirit 2013, Chris MacKinnon www.chrismackinnon.

.com Gateway Assembly 11 Argyle Street Campbellton, NB E3N 1G3 www.gatewaycampbellton.com

Unless otherwise noted, Scripture taken from the New King James Version. Copyright 1982 by Thomas Nelson, Inc. Used by permission. All rights reserved. Scripture quotations marked ESV are from The Holy Bible, English Standard Version (ESV), copyright 2001 by Crossway, a publishing ministry of Good News Publishers. Used by permission. All rights reserved. Scripture quotations marked HCSB are taken from the Holman Christian Standard Bible. Used by permission HCSB 1999, 2000, 2003, 2009 Holman Bible Publishers, Holman Christian Standard Bible, Holman CSB, and HCSB are federally registered trademarks of Holman Bible Publishers. Scripture quotations marked MSG are taken from The Message. Copyright 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 2000, 2001, 2002. Used by permission of NavPress Publishing Group. Scripture quotations designated NET are from the NET Bible copyright 1996-2006 by Biblical Studies Press, L.L.C. Scripture quoted by permission. http://netbible.com All rights reserved. Scripture quotations marked NIV are taken from the HOLY BIBLE, NEW INTERNATIONAL VERSION. Copyright 1973, 1978, 1984 International Bible Sociey. Used by permission of Zondervan Bible Publishers. All rights reserved. Scripture quotations noted NLT are from The Holy Bible, New Living Translation, copyright 1996. Used by permission of Tyndale House Publishers, Inc., Wheaton, Illinois 60189. All rights reserved. Italics in Scripture quotations reflect the authors added emphasis.

Parts of this Study

1. Introduction 2. The Baptism Revealed 3. A Second Experience 4. The Evidence 5. Tongues in Action 6. The Paraclete and the Baptized Endnotes

1 13 25 37 49 64 78

About this Study This Bible Study was originally taught during midweek services at a local church. As you read there are references to the fellowship this church belongs to, beliefs that this church considers fundamental, and statements such as this church. If you already have a church home, please consider this booklet a tool for your personal study. If you live in or visit our area, you are welcome to join us anytime.

The Baptism in the Holy Spirit. It is one of the most misunderstood and divisive issues in the Church. Churches split, pastors are asked to leave, denominations and fellowships are formed, television programs launched, and countless judgments are made because of the Baptism in the Holy Spirit. Despite all of the negativity and trouble surrounding the Baptism, it is one of the most necessary doctrines of the New Testament Church. It opens possibilities that would otherwise go ignored. To remove it entirely is to rob the people of God, and to take it too far is to do a great disservice to the Gospel. As a church within the fellowship of the Pentecostal Assemblies of Canada (PAOC), we align our beliefs with a basic foundational theology, The Statement of Fundamental and Essential Truths. Among other truths like the inspiration of Scripture, the Trinity, 1

the existence of angels and demons, and the sin and salvation of man, we find the Baptism in the Holy Spirit. Here is what the statement says:
The baptism in the Holy Spirit is an experience in which the believer yields control of himself to the Holy Spirit. Through this he comes to know Christ in a more intimate way and receives power to witness and grow spiritually. Believers should earnestly seek the baptism in the Holy Spirit according to the command of our Lord Jesus Christ. The initial evidence of the baptism in the Holy Spirit is speaking in other tongues as the Spirit gives utterance. This experience is distinct from and subsequent to the experience of the new birth.[1]

The PAOC marks the many supporting Scriptures for the Baptism in the Holy Spirit in their Statement of Fundamental and Essential Truths. We will be taking the time to look through these throughout our study, so we will not reference them individually here. Answering the early questions In this introductory chapter let us take the time to answer a few common questions and look at some of the primary Scriptural support for the Baptism in the Holy Spirit. Most of these questions arise from either a misunderstanding or misuse of the Baptism in the Holy Spirit.

1) Do I have to speak in tongues to be saved?

This is usually the first question asked when we begin to speak about the Baptism in the Holy Spirit. The short answer is No, you do not have to speak in tongues to be saved. There are many Christians around the world that are not baptized in the Holy Spirit but have a genuine relationship with our Lord Jesus Christ. To the church in Rome, Paul made the following statement about salvation:
if you confess with your mouth the Lord Jesus and believe in your heart that God has raised Him from the dead, you will be saved. For with the heart one believes unto righteousness, and with the mouth confession is made unto salvation. (Romans 10:9-10)

Paul believed in and promoted the use of speaking in tongues by the Holy Spirit. But at no time did he propose that it was necessary for salvation. We will discuss this later as we look at the Baptism in the Holy Spirit as being separate from and subsequent to salvation.
2) I have been seeking God for the Baptism in the Holy Spirit and do not believe I have received it yet. Why not?

I do not know, and no one can give you a good answer as to why not. In such cases I would ask you to consider the following actions and questions as you continue to seek the Baptism in the Holy Spirit. 3

Is there sin in your life? The very first place we must always look when there seems to be a wall between us and what God has promised to us is the possibility of sin. To say that there is no sin in our lives is to lie, for we battle daily with it. The question is whether we repent of our sin regularly, and whether there is any sin that we indulge in purposely. This is a deeply personal and reflective question that should not be avoided or skimmed over quickly. Why do you desire the Baptism in the Holy Spirit? You might be considering the resultant question, How could there be a negative motivation for seeking the Baptism in the Holy Spirit? If it is good for you, suggested to you by your pastor and promised to you in the Word of God, it should be good to desire it. Shouldnt it? Yet God looks intently upon our motivations when we ask Him for anything. The Book of Acts describes the conversion of a man named Simon in the city of Samaria. For years he amazed the people with magic. Through the preaching of Philip, Simon became a believer in Jesus. Later Peter and John came to Samaria. Simon noticed that as they ministered, they would lay hands on people who would then receive the Holy Spirit. When Simon asked to purchase the power they had, Peter rebuked him as having sin and a misunderstanding of the power of God.[2] Why do you seek the Baptism? Is it to speak in tongues? Is it to see people healed? Is it to finally have the boldness to bring people to Jesus? Is it to glorify God? Is it to be more spiritual? Is it 4

because of pressure from others? Your motivation is very important in the eyes of God. Are you sure you do not have it? One of the great dangers of seeking more of God is the constant feeling that you cannot receive it. Maybe you knew of sin in your life and understood that it could keep you from receiving the Baptism. If you repented of it, does something inside still say that you are not good enough? Satan would love to see believers in Christ remain fearful and powerless. He is known for being a liar. Scripture says, When he lies, he speaks his native language, for he is a liar and the father of lies (John 8:44 NIV). He may be lying to you, telling you that you have not received the Baptism in the Holy Spirit when you already have. Why would he do this? Imagine a soldier that is training for war. He is vital to a strategic battle being planned, so he must be sure to fully understand his training. What if, on the eve of that battle, he were to decide that he could not join the fighting force because he did not believe that he truly understood how to use his weapon, or what his objective was? The battle would go on without him as he remained in the training facility. The believer is at war against principalities, against powers, against the rulers of the darkness of this age, [and] against spiritual hosts of wickedness in the heavenly places (Ephesians 6:12). As the greatest liar in history, Satan can sideline soldiers that have the Baptism in the Holy Spirit by telling them that they do not. 5

If you have sought for a long while and wonder why you have not received, be certain that you have not. Open yourself to the use of the Holy Spirit. It may be that you are just uncomfortable or unsure, and that is natural. Read Scripture. Speak with your pastor. And continue to seek God.
3) Why should I seek the Baptism in the Holy Spirit? What is the big deal, anyway?

This is a fair question. If so many believers around the world are still saved and going to Heaven without the Baptism in the Holy Spirit, why should you bother with it? While such a question could be the result of pure curiosity, it may also reveal a terrible problem. The first reason we should seek the Baptism in the Holy Spirit is because Jesus told us to. If we claim to be followers of Jesus, should we not seek what He has told us to seek? Here are Jesus words to His Disciples.
Behold, I send the Promise of My Father upon you; but tarry in the city of Jerusalem until you are endued with power from on high. (Luke 24:49) And being assembled together with them, [Jesus] commanded them not to depart from Jerusalem, but to wait for the Promise of the Father, which, He said, you have heard from Me; for John truly baptized with water, but you shall be baptized with the Holy Spirit not many days from now But you shall receive power when the Holy Spirit has come upon you; and you shall be witnesses

to Me in Jerusalem, and in all Judea and Samaria, and to the end of the earth. (Acts 1:4-5, 8)

Jesus had already risen from the grave, His body transformed into the glorious body that we will one day receive. The Disciples already saw and believed, having walked with Him for forty days before He was taken in the clouds. Yet Jesus told them to wait and seek for more, for the Promise of the Father, the Baptism in the Holy Spirit. What they had already was good. They had His teachings, His life example and physical proof of His resurrection. Jesus told them to go for more.

There is always more The desire for more is a strange impulse. When it comes to money, relationships, power, fame, and many other elements of the world, we always want more. There is always something new and exciting. The old is continually replaced with the new. The horse and buggy are replaced by the automobile. The propeller is replaced by the jet engine. The computer of the 1950s that filled a multi-story building could be replaced by the iPhone. Why is it that when it comes to spiritual things we are so easily satisfied? Even this is a misrepresentation of the facts, for we often look for more and more of the spiritual in our lives. 7

Consider the acceptance and spread of stories that involve vampires, werewolves, zombies, demons, spiritual obsession, serial killers, spiritual gurus, psychics, sorcerers and witches. There is no end in sight of these impulses being satisfied. It seems that when it comes to desiring more we only have a lack of appetite when it comes to the God of the Bible. We get tired and fall into boredom when we read Scripture. Our minds wander and we fall asleep when it is time to pray. We schedule events and make commitments without consideration of times designated to come together for worship and the teaching of Gods Word. Jesus promised that those who hunger and thirst for righteousness shall be filled (Matthew 5:6), yet we seem to be satisfied with less and less. There are two stories of more that should challenge us to become discontent with what we have and seek more. Both are applicable to our discussion of the Baptism in the Holy Spirit. Elijah is perhaps the most famous of Old Testament prophets. He seemed to come out of nowhere in 1 Kings 17, and he appeared to tell Ahab, the King of the northern tribes of Israel, that there would not be any rain, except at my word. He was told to live by a stream where he ravens brought him bread and meat. When the stream dried up he found a widow and her son who thought that they were going to eat their last meal and die. After the son died, Elijah prayed and saw him come back to life. It was Elijah that mocked and defeated the prophets of Baal on Mount Carmel, calling down fire from the one true God. He 8

prayed on that same mountaintop until a puff of cloud signaled the coming downpour of rain. Angels fed him when he had given up all hope. He heard the wind, felt the earthquake, smelled the fire, but knew that God was in the still small voice. For all of the miracles that Elijah is known for, what if he could have done more? At first glance this seems like a difficult task. He could have done more? How? But those of us who know what happens next in Elijahs story are not surprised by the possibility of more. As Elijahs work was nearing its end, God told him to anoint his successor, Elisha. Three times Elijah directed Elisha to stay behind, but his student would never consent to leaving him. One day Elijah asked Elisha what the teacher might do for him before he was taken away. Elishas request was bold and should challenge us about what we think is enough.
And so it was, when they had crossed over, that Elijah said to Elisha, Ask! What may I do for you, before I am taken away from you? Elisha said, Please let a double portion of your spirit be upon me. So he said, You have asked a hard thing. Nevertheless, if you see me when I am taken from you, it shall be so for you (2 Kings 2:9-10a)

Elisha did not ask for the same anointing that Elijah worked in. He did not even just ask for more of the anointing that Elijah had. He asked for double the anointing. And because he was present 9

when Elijah was gathered up to Heaven, we believe that he did have that double anointing. Now think about more recent history. If you could choose one great name in the Church within the last one hundred years, who might you put forward? In most circles the name of one evangelist is either first choice or very close behind: Billy Graham. While studying at Wheaton College, Billy Graham took his first pastorate. After graduating in 1943 he moved to another church not too far away. When he was thirty years old he became president of Northwestern Bible College in Minnesota, the youngest sitting president of any college or university in the United States at that time. He joined Youth for Christ International and traveled as an evangelist throughout Europe and North America. Graham has been known to Presidents of the United States, from Dwight D. Eisenhower to Barack Obama. He has met with royalty and heads of state around the world. According to the Billy Graham Library,[3] he has preached to over 215 million people. That is more than six times the population of Canada[4] and 69 percent of the United States population[5] in 2011. Graham has spoken in more than 185 countries. What if he could have done more? What if there was more available to Billy Graham that he chose not to receive? In his book, The Holy Spirit (Word Publishing, 1978), Graham described an encounter where another pastor asked him when he was 10

baptized in the Holy Spirit. There Graham writes about a disbelief in a secondary experience of the Holy Spirit that we refer to as the Baptism in the Holy Spirit. (We will discuss at another point the distinction between receiving the Holy Spirit at conversion and receiving the Baptism in the Holy Spirit.) Is it is possible that Billy Grahams impact on the world might have been greater than it was? Could the Baptism in the Holy Spirit have added another dimension to even his ministry? If we are to believe that the Baptism opens the door to more for the believer, then the obvious answer is Yes.

What about you and me? Have we made ourselves available to the possibilities of the Holy Spirit? Or have we grown satisfied, content with enough? The purpose of this study is to encourage the hunger and thirst for more of God and more of His working in our lives. We are ignorant about some of the points in this study because they are rarely discussed. Other points we have grown too familiar with. We need the Baptism in the Holy Spirit as much now as they did in the book of Acts. May we be encouraged and challenged for more. May the waters that have settled be refreshed and the fires that have burned low be rekindled. The promise is that the Spirit will be poured out on all flesh (Joel 2:28; Acts 2:17). Spirit fall upon us. 11

When the topic of the Baptism in the Holy Spirit comes up, its discussion and teaching is charged. There are those who are hungry to learn about what is not mentioned enough, even in many Pentecostal congregations. At the same time there are many who set up their defenses or head for the back door because of baggage that has found itself attached to the Baptism. In the world today, the Baptism in the Holy Spirit is often equated with fanaticism, uncontrolled actions and unnatural expressions. Images of men and women hanging from chandeliers and terms like holy rollers fill the minds of many people. The doctrine of the Baptism in the Holy Spirit has been deemed as heresy in some circles and over-glorified in others.

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One cannot deny, though, that the Baptism in the Holy Spirit is biblical. Many questions about the Baptism can be answered by looking at the Scriptural texts that surround it. The Word reveals the promise of the Baptism, the details of its initial outpouring, and the continuance of that outpouring. The Promise The Baptism in the Holy Spirit is not some random condition that makes people act and speak differently. It is a spiritual experience, designed by God Himself. Nothing that God does is without purpose or plan. The Baptism in the Holy Spirit is no exception. Those believers that experienced the first Baptism on the Day of Pentecost were not bystanders at a dinner party or even a weekly prayer group. They were in that place because they were directed by Jesus to seek what He called, the promise of the Father. Luke was the author of the Gospel of Luke and of Acts. As he closed off one and began the other he shared with us Jesus final words to His Disciples.
Behold, I send the Promise of My Father upon you; but tarry in the city of Jerusalem until you are endued with power from on high. And He led them out as far as Bethany, and He lifted up His hands and blessed them. (Luke 24:49-50)

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And being assembled together with them, He commanded them not to depart from Jerusalem, but to wait for the Promise of the Father, which, He said, you have heard from Me; for John truly baptized with water, but you shall be baptized with the Holy Spirit not many days from now. . . . But you shall receive power when the Holy Spirit has come upon you; and you shall be witnesses to Me in Jerusalem, and in all Judea and Samaria, and to the end of the earth. (Acts 1:4-5, 8)

In Acts we see that Luke believed that the Promise of the Father and the Baptism in the Holy Spirit were one and the same. He used Jesus words about the Baptism as an explanation of the Promise the followers of Jesus were to wait for in Jerusalem. But the promise of the Baptism in the Holy Spirit began before the end of Lukes Gospel. At that time Jesus was already resurrected, having proven Himself to His Disciples by showing and letting them touch His scars, as well as eating and drinking before them. He explained the Scriptures and helped them understand all that had happened to Him. That was the end of Jesus earthly ministry. Yet before His ministry even began the Baptism in the Holy Spirit was promised. There was one who came before Jesus, a voice crying out in the wilderness. When the Pharisees and others came to question if John the Baptist was the one they were waiting for, John pointed them to another.

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Now as the people were in expectation, and all reasoned in their hearts about John, whether he was the Christ or not, John answered, saying to all, I indeed baptize you with water; but One mightier than I is coming, whose sandal strap I am not worthy to loose. He will baptize you with the Holy Spirit and fire. (Luke 3:15-16)

Long before any theologian had a chance to sit and think about it, John drew a crucial distinction between his baptism in water for repentance and Jesus baptism in the Holy Spirit and fire. John is also believed to be the last of the Old Testament prophets, speaking to the nation of Israel under the power of God. His words about a coming Baptism in the Holy Spirit were a promise made by God. We can trace this Promise of the Father back even further. On that fateful Day of Pentecost the people of Jerusalem wondered what all of the commotion was about. Peter stood up and announced the fulfillment of Gods promise through one of those Old Testament prophets.
But Peter, standing up with the eleven, raised his voice and said to them, Men of Judea and all who dwell in Jerusalem, let this be known to you, and heed my words. For these are not drunk, as you suppose, since it is only the third hour of the day. But this is what was spoken by the prophet Joel:

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And it shall come to pass in the last days, says God, That I will pour out of My Spirit on all flesh; Your sons and your daughters shall prophesy, Your young men shall see visions, Your old men shall dream dreams. And on My menservants and on My maidservants I will pour out My Spirit in those days; And they shall prophesy. (Acts 2:14-18)

It is believed that Joels prophetic ministry ended around 800 B.C. If the prophecy of Joel was the initiation of the Promise, it was long in coming. Just as in the case of the promised return of Christ, we must remember the truth written by Peter that, With the Lord a day is like a thousand years, and a thousand years are like a day. The Lord is not slow in keeping his promise (2 Peter 3:8-9 NIV). The Outpouring The Father made a promise to pour out His Holy Spirit. John promised that One greater than he would baptize with the Holy Spirit. Jesus directed the believers to stay in Jerusalem and wait for the Promise of the Father to be delivered. The fulfillment of the Promise came on the Day of Pentecost, a Jewish feast that started fifty days after the Passover. Passover had come the evening of Jesus death. In his Gospel the Apostle John tells how Pilate tried to release Jesus through his 16

regular custom of releasing a prisoner for Passover (John 18:39), and that Jesus was crucified on the Day of Preparation for the Passover (John 19:14). We are told that Jesus walked the earth for forty days after His resurrection, teaching about the Kingdom of God (Acts 1:3). That leaves 7 to 10 days between Jesus ascension to Heaven and the Day of Pentecost. Days that the believers spent in an upper room, tarrying, waiting for the Promise of the Father. Those days were not just prayer and worship and glory. Paul tells us that Jesus showed Himself to over five hundred believers after His resurrection (1 Corinthians 15:6), but Luke tells us that one point there were only one hundred and twenty in the upper room (Acts 1:15). One day Peter reminded them that Judas vacant place of leadership must be filled, followed by a nomination and the casting of lots for that replacement (Acts 1:15-26). The New Living Translation describes the group as constantly united in prayer, including the Disciples, Jesus mother and other women, even Jesus brothers (Acts 1:14) who at one time wanted to admit Him to a mental institution. Then came the fateful day.
When the Day of Pentecost had fully come, they were all with one accord in one place. And suddenly there came a sound from heaven, as of a rushing mighty wind, and it filled the whole house where they were sitting. Then there

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appeared to them divided tongues, as of fire, and one sat upon each of them. And they were all filled with the Holy Spirit and began to speak with other tongues, as the Spirit gave them utterance. (Acts 2:1-4)

A room of prayer, of seeking and waiting, became a room full of noise. The first sound was like a rushing mighty wind. It may be that the wind of the Spirit blew right through the city, for verse 6 tells how a sound drew out people from within the city to see what had happened. What they found was the second sound, the praises of God in multiple languages. The cloven fire that was once visible was there and then it was gone, having disappeared or being replaced with the Spirit-inspired and Spirit-enabled speaking of tongues. The Continuance The Day of Pentecost with the wind and tongues of fire, the praises of God in various languages, the preaching of Peter and the conviction of over three thousand in Jerusalem, announced a new reality. Before this day there were believers in Jesus. Now there were some believers who lived in the Baptism in the Holy Spirit. The Promise was fulfilled. The Holy Spirit was poured out in a new Baptism. As the believers formed together in unity, coming under authority, sharing with one another, speaking and believing the Gospel, the Church grew. With persecution the Church 18

spread out of Jerusalem into Judea, Samaria and the ends of the earth. With the Gospel and the believers went the promise of the Baptism in the Holy Spirit. Peter and John went to the Temple to pray one day, as they usually did, and they orchestrated the healing of a lame man, in the power of the Holy Spirit and in the name of Jesus. When the Jewish leaders heard about it they arrested Peter and John, interviewed them, and told them to stop speaking in the name of Jesus under threat of punishment. When they were released, they met with the other believers and told them what happened. Then they prayed.
Now, Lord, look on their threats, and grant to Your servants that with all boldness they may speak Your word, by stretching out Your hand to heal, and that signs and wonders may be done through the name of Your holy Servant Jesus. And when they had prayed, the place where they were assembled together was shaken; and they were all filled with the Holy Spirit, and they spoke the word of God with boldness. (Acts 4:29-31)

Philip, one of the first deacons chosen to serve the Church, was an evangelist who went north to Samaria to share the Gospel. Many responded to the Gospel he preached with evidence of miracles and they were baptized in water. The apostles decided to look into the great work in Samaria. 19

Now when the apostles who were at Jerusalem heard that Samaria had received the word of God, they sent Peter and John to them, who, when they had come down, prayed for them that they might receive the Holy Spirit. For as yet He had fallen upon none of them. They had only been baptized in the name of the Lord Jesus. Then they laid hands on them, and they received the Holy Spirit. (Acts 8:14-17)

That same chapter had opened with one Jewish mans approval of the death of the first Christian martyr. Saul was zealous for his God, so much so that he was willing to travel from city to city with directions from the high priest to imprison the believers of Jesus. On his way to Damascus, Jesus appeared to Saul. That appearance blinded him physically, and forever changed him spiritually. God spoke to a believer named Ananias in Damascus to help Saul. After debating with God, Ananias finally went to see Saul, convinced that God was at work.
And Ananias went his way and entered the house; and laying his hands on him he said, Brother Saul, the Lord Jesus, who appeared to you on the road as you came, has sent me that you may receive your sight and be filled with the Holy Spirit. Immediately there fell from his eyes something like scales, and he received his sight at once; and he arose and was baptized. (Acts 9:17-18)

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Peter was in the city of Joppa. One day he had a vision as he prayed on the rooftop of the house where he was staying. Coming down from the rooftop he was greeted by men who were not Jews that were looking for him. The Spirit told him to go with them, so they took him to the city of Caesarea, to the home of a Roman centurion named Cornelius. Peter and Cornelius told each other how God was leading them to each other. Cornelius had gathered many family and friends to hear Peter, who then spoke of Jesus, His death and resurrection, the coming judgment and the forgiveness of sins.
Even as Peter was saying these things, the Holy Spirit fell upon all who were listening to the message. The Jewish believers who came with Peter were amazed that the gift of the Holy Spirit had been poured out on the Gentiles, too. For they heard them speaking in tongues and praising God. (Acts 10:44-46a NLT)

On his way home from his second journey, which took him through the cities of Greece, Paul stopped in the city of Ephesus. He was only there long enough to speak to the Jews for a little, and declined an offer to stay longer. On his third journey, the first stop appears to have been Ephesus. Along the coastline he came across a group of believers. Their conversation somehow led to his asking if they had received the Holy Spirit, which they said they had not even heard about. They had only received the repentance baptism of John the Baptist. 21

Then Paul said, John indeed baptized with a baptism of repentance, saying to the people that they should believe on Him who would come after him, that is, on Christ Jesus. When they heard this, they were baptized in the name of the Lord Jesus. And when Paul had laid hands on them, the Holy Spirit came upon them, and they spoke with tongues and prophesied. (Acts 19:4-6)

Available to all As the Gospel spread, whether under the ministry of an evangelist, one of the Twelve Apostles, or under Paul and his fellow workers, it became expected that all would desire and receive the Baptism in the Holy Spirit. When the people gathered to investigate the commotion spilling out of the upper room on the Day of Pentecost, Peter preached about Jesus. The hearers were convicted and asked what they had to do to be saved.
Then Peter said to them, Repent, and let every one of you be baptized in the name of Jesus Christ for the remission of sins; and you shall receive the gift of the Holy Spirit. For the promise is to you and to your children, and to all who are afar off, as many as the Lord our God will call. (Acts 2:38-39)

One truth of the Baptism in the Holy Spirit is that it is available to all who believe. It was not just for the establishment of the church, for it spread throughout the known world. Neither 22

was it just for the Twelve, for Paul received, as did Jews and Gentiles from Jerusalem to Ephesus to Corinth and beyond. And the Baptism in the Holy Spirit is just as available today, to you and to me.

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Having looked at the Scriptural texts that detail several experiences of the Baptism in the Holy Spirit, we begin to see patterns arise. These patterns help form the theological foundation for discussion about the Baptism. Of course, there are always those cases where not all of the information is explained for us, or where vital steps in the process come so close together that you cannot always distinguish a timeline. One of these patterns is the separation between two experiences. The first experience is necessary as it marks the individual as a believer in the Gospel of Jesus Christ. It is salvation. The second experience is that of the Baptism. It is described as following salvation that results from faith in Christ.

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We understand from Scripture that everyone who believes in Christ receives the Holy Spirit. Many of the instantaneous works of salvation are completed in the power and work of the Holy Spirit. Is it possible to receive the Holy Spirit again? Salvation and the Holy Spirit The Holy Spirit has a powerful role in the salvation of the believer. In one of his letters, the Apostle John tells us that the Holy Spirit living within us is proof that we belong to God.
Now he who keeps His commandments abides in Him, and He in him. And by this we know that He abides in us, by the Spirit whom He has given us. (1 John 3:24) By this we know that we abide in Him, and He in us, because He has given us of His Spirit. (1 John 4:13)

The Holy Spirit comes to live inside of us when we believe in Jesus Christ. When we believe and are saved, the Spirit takes residence in our hearts. It is He who confirms in our hearts that we are children of God.
Or do you not know that your body is the temple of the Holy Spirit who is in you, whom you have from God, and you are not your own? (1 Corinthians 6:19) For you did not receive the spirit of bondage again to fear, but you received the Spirit of adoption by whom we cry out,

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Abba, Father. The Spirit Himself bears witness with our spirit that we are children of God (Romans 8:15-16)

It is the Holy Spirit within us that brings us life. As we live in the Spirit and not in the flesh, He is able to free us from sin and death.
There is therefore now no condemnation to those who are in Christ Jesus, who do not walk according to the flesh, but according to the Spirit. For the law of the Spirit of life in Christ Jesus has made me free from the law of sin and death. (Romans 8:1-2) And if Christ is in you, the body is dead because of sin, but the Spirit is life because of righteousness. (Romans 8:10)

As the Holy Spirit comes to live inside of us because of our faith, He is able to complete other important works of salvation. He washes us, cleansing us from the filth of our sins. By sanctifying us He sets us apart, special and holy unto God. When God looks at us He sees us as justified, made right because the Holy Spirit give us the righteousness of Christ. He continually renews us, transforming us into the image of Christ.
And such were some of you. But you were washed, but you were sanctified, but you were justified in the name of the Lord Jesus and by the Spirit of our God. (1 Corinthians 6:11)

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But when the kindness and the love of God our Savior toward man appeared, not by works of righteousness which we have done, but according to His mercy He saved us, through the washing of regeneration and renewing of the Holy Spirit, whom He poured out on us abundantly through Jesus Christ our Savior, that having been justified by His grace we should become heirs according to the hope of eternal life. (Titus 3:4-7)

The Holy Spirit is at work in our salvation and continues to work as He lives within the believer. Without Him we remain in sin and condemned to death. Without His fruit in our lives we are shown to be unbelievers. But with Him we are Gods children, redeemed and transformed. All or a Portion? It would appear that the Holy Spirits work in our lives is already extensive. Indeed, He already lives within us. How is that if the Holy Spirit lives inside of me that it is even possible that He can come to me more than He has? The question is related to whether or not we can have a portion of God. Is it possible for God to come to me only in part? Or does He always come with all of who He is and what He has? Here we tend to rely on human understanding instead of the evidence that God has put before us. We try to comprehend the vastness of God through our limited existence. 27

Paul told the Colossians, For in Christ lives all the fullness of God in a human body (Colossians 2:9 NLT). The fact that all of the fullness of God could reside in one body had to be unique, thus making Jesus the unique representative between God and man. If that fullness could reside within all of us, it would remove the uniqueness of Christ and take away from the unique sacrifice that He was able to make. So we cannot all contain the fullness of God. At the same time, since the fullness of God is in Christ, does that mean there is no part of God left to the rest of us? How can the Holy Spirit be within us at all if He is within Christ in all of His fullness? Turn that same idea around to us as individuals. If I have the fullness of God within me and He cannot be divided, does that mean that you cannot receive Him? This is part of the mystery of God. In a manner and form that we do not understand, God can be both full in one place and in part. Otherwise the Holy Spirit could not reside within each one who believes, or be able to continue His work in the world. Two Experiences When it comes to the question of two experiences of the Holy Spirit in the life of the believer, one has only to look at the Scriptures to see the evidence. Lets begin with reviewing what we have seen already, though only in passing.

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Acts 8 records that after the death of Stephen the believers began to spread the Gospel outside of Jerusalem and Judea. One of the first deacons, Philip, went to the city of Samaria. There many believed the Gospel of Jesus Christ, and we are told that they believed and were baptized (Acts 8:12). What do you think was the spiritual state of those who believed and were baptized under the ministry of Philip? Were they believers? To be a believer is to have salvation, and therefore to have the Holy Spirit living and at work inside of them. So why the rest of the story?
Now when the apostles who were at Jerusalem heard that Samaria had received the word of God, they sent Peter and John to them, who, when they had come down, prayed for them that they might receive the Holy Spirit. For as yet He had fallen upon none of them. They had only been baptized in the name of the Lord Jesus. Then they laid hands on them, and they received the Holy Spirit. (Acts 8:14-17)

The Apostles had learned from Jesus. They had heard His teaching about the Promise of the Father, about the One who was to come after and remind them of all truth, the Holy Spirit. For them there was a separation between believing in Jesus for salvation and the experience of the Baptism in the Holy Spirit. Why else would they have prayed for those who believed to be baptized? 29

How did the Apostles come to this conclusion? Why did they understand two separate experiences with the Holy Spirit? It was because they had experienced Him in such a way in their own lives. After Jesus resurrection He appeared to the Disciples. They were locked away, hiding from the Jews who might also come after them and have them beaten and killed. While they were there, Jesus appeared to them. It is the first time John records Him appearing to them, and he wrote that they were glad when they saw the Lord (John 20:20). Then Jesus did something that is often forgotten about when we talk about the Holy Spirit.
Then, the same day at evening, being the first day of the week, when the doors were shut where the disciples were assembled, for fear of the Jews, Jesus came and stood in the midst, and said to them, Peace be with you. When He had said this, He showed them His hands and His side. Then the disciples were glad when they saw the Lord. So Jesus said to them again, Peace to you! As the Father has sent Me, I also send you. And when He had said this, He breathed on them, and said to them, Receive the Holy Spirit. (John 20:19-22)

Jesus gave the Disciples the Holy Spirit in that closed room on the day of His resurrection. Apply the same question we asked about the Samaritans who believed the Gospel: What do you

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think was the spiritual state of the Disciples at this time? Did they have salvation? They certainly had all of the necessary building blocks for salvation. They were aware of Jesus coming, His death and resurrection for the forgiveness of our sins. If Jesus considered them worthy of the Holy Spirit, they would have to be believers in Him. But if these Disciples who are about to be known as Apostles received the Holy Spirit from Jesus Himself in that room, why would Jesus command them to wait for the Promise of the Father, the Baptism in the Holy Spirit? Clearly Jesus understood the separation between receiving the Holy Spirit through faith in Him for salvation and the Baptism in the Holy Spirit. Baptism in vs. Baptism of One reason for confusion around the Baptism in the Holy Spirit is the simple changing of one word that can have an intense impact on understanding. Throughout this study we are careful to speak of the Baptism in the Holy Spirit. We have to be careful not to change in to of, for we completely change the topic when we talk about the Baptism of the Holy Spirit. Only one word changes in each phrase, but that one word holds a great deal of meaning. To be in means to be surrounded by it, like in a cloud or in a pool of water. You are in it. But to be of means the source from which something comes. To be in the 31

Holy Spirit is to be surrounded, immersed, or clothed with Him. To be of the Holy Spirit means to come from Him. The New Testament describes three baptisms.[6] Taking a closer look at each baptism will help us understand the difference between the Baptism in the Holy Spirit, the topic of our study, and the Baptism of the Holy Spirit, which is still an important element of the Christian life, but is a separate work of the Spirit. Lets begin with the baptism we talk about and understand the most, water baptism.
Matthew 3:1-2; Acts 19:4; Romans 6:1-11 The Baptizer Baptized into Purpose(s) of Baptism
1.

Spiritual Leadership Water Demonstrate repentance 2. Declaration to the world 3. Identify with Jesus death & resurrection

Water baptism was initiated by John the Baptist. It was a sign to the person being baptized and to the world that saw him that he was repenting of sin (Matthew 3:1-2; Acts 19:4). Peter offered the crowd this baptism in Acts 2 separately from the Baptism in the Holy Spirit (Acts 2:38). Paul told the Romans how baptism immerses us in Christs death and then raises us into His life (Romans 6:1-11). In this way baptism is a symbol of the

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spiritual work of 1 Corinthians 5:17 that says we are new creations in Christ Jesus. Who baptizes the believer in this baptism? Where does it come from? A spiritual leader hears the believers confession of repentance and faith, and then performs the baptism. Into what is the believer baptized? The believer is baptized in water. This seems very basic and simple when we talk about water baptism. That is because it is explained more often to us, and the baptizer and means of baptism are clear. But what about Holy Spirit baptism?
1 Corinthians 12:13 The Baptizer Baptized into Purpose(s) of Baptism
1.

The Holy Spirit Jesus Christ Salvation 2. Membership in the Body of Christ

The first baptism work that involves the Holy Spirit occurs at the moment of salvation. This means that the Holy Spirit is the One who baptizes the believer. We are told that the Holy Spirit baptizes us into Jesus Christ.
For as the body is one and has many members, but all the members of that one body, being many, are one body, so also is Christ. For by one Spirit we were all

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baptized into one body whether Jews or Greeks, whether slaves or free (1 Corinthians 12:12-13)

When you believe in faith upon the Lord Jesus Christ we are saved. There the Holy Spirit ushers you into the Body of Christ by baptizing the believer in Christ. This is the Baptism of the Holy Spirit. It comes from Him. The second baptism that involves the Holy Spirit is our topic in this study, the Baptism in the Holy Spirit.
Luke 3:15-16; Acts 1:5, 8; Acts 2:4 The Baptizer Baptized into Purpose(s) of Baptism
1.

Jesus Christ The Holy Spirit Intimacy with God 2. Power to witness

Here the roles of the previous baptism are reversed. Now Jesus is the One who does the baptizing, it comes from Christ. Jesus baptizes us in the Holy Spirit. John the Baptist prophesied about the One to follow him Who would baptize with the Holy Spirit and fire (Luke 3:15-16). Jesus promised the Disciples that they would be baptized in the Holy Spirit and would receive power to witness (Acts 1:5, 8). And that Baptism in the Holy Spirit came for the first time on the Day of Pentecost (Acts 2:4).

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Scripture clearly identifies two separate and distinct works of the Holy Spirit. Jesus provided two experiences to His followers, one at their time of belief in His resurrection and the second on the Day of Pentecost. Those followers were not surprised to see the Spirits work unfold in two experiences, that of salvation and of the Baptism in the Holy Spirit. It may seem strange and unlikely, but the Holy Spirit comes to our lives in different ways. Salvation is one complete Holy Spirit experience. Yet there is another experience that followers of Christ considered so important that they encouraged new believers to receive the Baptism in the Holy Spirit. We must be careful to do the same, lest we rob the people of God from a powerful work in their lives.

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The Baptism in the Holy Spirit is biblical. While each believer receives the Holy Spirit at the moment they place their faith in the work of Jesus Christ, and the Spirits work begins in the life of the believer. Having believed in Jesus, being now a new creation and a child of God, the Baptism in the Holy Spirit is available and waiting. Eventually two related questions will come from the individual that believes in and seeks the Baptism in the Holy Spirit. The first question is simple: How do I know if I have received? The second will follow fast behind it: Why do I have to speak in tongues? When we read the texts of the outpouring of the Holy Spirit we find that the Apostles and their followers knew that it was 36

possible to tell if someone had received the Baptism. It was obvious to them. You either had it or you didnt. Imagine being one of those first Christian leaders. You spoke often about the life, death and resurrection of Jesus that you witnessed. People believed in the Gospel. You spoke about an experience of power through the Holy Spirit. People believed and wanted to receive. What do you do when someone asks, How do I know I have received the Baptism? A Way to Know When the Apostles in Jerusalem heard that there were believers in the city of Samaria they sent Peter and John to them. They saw that men and women were believers in Jesus but were without the Baptism in the Holy Spirit. How could they walk into the crowd of believers and know that they had not received the Baptism? There must be some clear, physical evidence that one has received Holy Spirit Baptism. A sign must exist that draws the line between having it and not having it. It must be specific and describable, not subjective. It is a clear yes or no. Either the Holy Spirit has come upon you with power or He hasnt. In some circles the debate continues over how one knows if they have received it. They put forth different possibilities for an evidence of the Baptism. The PAOC, and this church by its

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PAOC connection, holds to just one initial physical evidence. Our Statement of Fundamental and Essential Truths states,
The initial evidence of the baptism in the Holy Spirit is speaking in other tongues as the Spirit gives utterance.

When we say that it is the initial evidence we say that it is the sign that Baptism is received by a believer. Like holding the title to a car or a receipt from a store, tongues is the initial evidence of receiving the Baptism in the Holy Spirit. But what about To declare a belief that there is only one initial evidence of the Baptism in the Holy Spirit draws questions and critics. How could we place God in such a box? What about other spiritual indicators? Could tongues really be the only physical evidence of the Baptism? Many of the other evidences that others suggest are not really as spiritual as we might think. They may be spoken of or written about in Scripture with the word Spirit attached to them but are able to found in lives that are actually very far from God. Lets take a look at two common spiritual evidences that are suggested in place of tongues.

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1) Sensitivity to the Holy Spirit

For example, some claim that a sensitivity to the Holy Spirit is proof that someone has received the Baptism in the Holy Spirit. To be able to perceive and accept the work of Gods Spirit must be a sign that someone has a connection with that same Spirit. Israels first king was a man named Saul. On the day that the prophet Samuel anointed Saul as king, he passed a group of prophets of the road. The Spirit came upon Saul and he prophesied (1 Samuel 10:9-10). It sounds like Israels first king was going to be a great man of God. He was sensitive to the moving of the Holy Spirit and he even prophesied. But Sauls story is continually filled with jealousy, rage, rash decisions, and even witchcraft. King Sauls choices clearly took him far from the ways of God. At that point you would think that Saul was no longer sensitive to the Holy Spirit. God tormented him with an evil spirit. He ran to witchcraft instead of the leading of God. But in 1 Samuel 19 we read about a day when Saul was seeking David, most likely to kill him.
Now it was told Saul, saying, Take note, David is at Naioth in Ramah! Then Saul sent messengers to take David. And when they saw the group of prophets prophesying, and Samuel standing as leader over them, the Spirit of God came upon the messengers of Saul, and they also prophesied. . . .

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Then he also went to Ramah, and came to the great well that is at Sechu. So he asked, and said, Where are Samuel and David? And someone said, Indeed they are at Naioth in Ramah. So he went there to Naioth in Ramah. Then the Spirit of God was upon him also, and he went on and prophesied until he came to Naioth in Ramah. And he also stripped off his clothes and prophesied before Samuel in like manner, and lay down naked all that day and all that night. (1 Samuel 19:18-19a, 22-24a)

We are all spiritual beings. We are all sensitive to the moving of the Spirit because we all long for Him to touch us. God made us that way so that we could know Him on that spiritual plane and live forever with Him. The life of Saul is evidence that someone can live separated from God and His ways but sensitive to the Holy Spirit.
2) The Fruit of the Spirit

Others claim that if the Fruit of the Spirit is evidence in someones life, it must be evidence of receiving the Baptism in the Holy Spirit. If they are from the Holy Spirit, how can they exist in a life that is not infused with the power of the Holy Spirit? To help us answer this question, lets read the text of the Fruit of the Spirit from Galatians 5:

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But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, longsuffering, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, self-control. Against such there is no law. (Galatians 5:22-23)

If we look at this list honestly, we know that each and every one of these fruit can exist in a life that does not know God. If we are really honest we might say that there are unbelievers that are better at these than those who say they are servants of God. Homosexual partners remain faithful while others in their families marry and divorce. Does this mean they are baptized in the Holy Spirit? The Dalai-Lama seeks to build bridges of peace and goodness. Is he baptized in the Holy Spirit? Of course not. So why would we say that since a person displays an abundance of self-control or kindness or joy that they must have received the Baptism? The Fruit of the Spirit are not meant to be evidences of the Baptism, though they are byproducts of our relationship with God. He changes us from selfish to loving, from full of rage to longsuffering. Yet if we look back a few verses we read about the works of the flesh. These workings of sin in our lives trump every good that we might place hope in for our lives. For those who practice [the works of the flesh] will not inherit the kingdom of God (Galatians 5:21b).

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The Cessation of Tongues One objection to speaking in tongues as the initial evidence of Holy Spirit Baptism is the suggestion that tongues ceased following the establishment of the church or after the ministry of the Apostles. Those who believe in the cessation of tongues latch onto a verse from Pauls first letter to the Corinthians.
But whether there are prophecies, they will fail; whether there are tongues, they will cease; whether there is knowledge, it will vanish away. (1 Corinthians 13:8)

There are several problems with using this verse as the basis of a theology that tongues ceased at some time since the ministry of the Apostles. In the verses that follow verse 8 Paul talked about one day moving from the imperfect, shadowy world we live in to a perfect, vivid world. It is in the world to come, not this world, that tongues would cease. For the other actions spoken of in verse 8 continue today. God still speaks to His people through prophecy, and knowledge still exists. Why would one or two items in his list fail but the others remain? But when this world is replaced with Gods New Heaven and New Earth these things tongues, prophecy and knowledge will be unnecessary. In that day we will dwell in open, eternal communion with God. In the opening verses of the chapter, Paul shared the importance of love above all other spiritual activity. To speak in 42

tongues, prophesy, have knowledge, move in faith or give everything to the poor, but not have love, there is no value in what we have done. Love is the only foundation for works that God accepts and rewards. Pauls teaching at this time is not the cessation of tongues or prophecy or knowledge, but the endurance and power of love. Love is supreme and will endure forever. Though other elements of life and ministry that are necessary on Earth will be removed when we see clearly, face to face, love will continue. Why Tongues? Tongues, then, have not ceased for it is clear that they continue in those who speak. The word means language, so as long as there is diversity in language, the speaking of tongues by the Holy Spirit is still a sign to the non-believer and a means of prayer to the Father. So why must tongues be the initial evidence of the Baptism in the Holy Spirit? If it cannot be spiritual sensitivity or the Fruit of the Spirit, why choose tongues? For the Apostles to have a sense of what evidence drew the line between receiving and not receiving, they must have used their own experience as a guide. Being part of the group that first received, they would have judged every occurrence that followed through the events of the first day. Look again at the description of the Baptisms initial outpouring.

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When the Day of Pentecost had fully come, they were all with one accord in one place. And suddenly there came a sound from heaven, as of a rushing mighty wind, and it filled the whole house where they were sitting. Then there appeared to them divided tongues, as of fire, and one sat upon each of them. And they were all filled with the Holy Spirit and began to speak with other tongues, as the Spirit gave them utterance. (Acts 2:1-4)

Three physical signs accompanied the coming of the Promise of the Father on the Day of Pentecost: a sound like a mighty wind; divided tongues of fire; and, speaking with other tongues as the Holy Spirit gave them the ability to speak. We looked before at the Scriptural recordings of believers receiving the Baptism in the Holy Spirit in the book of Acts. When we look at those records it becomes obvious which signs were repeated among the believers after the Day of Pentecost. Only one of the signs that occurred on the Day of Pentecost occurred in Lukes descriptions of Baptisms following that day (see table on the next page). It was not the wind from Heaven or the cloven tongues of fire. It was speaking in other tongues. Some occurrences of the Baptism record no physical manifestations at all. While we might jump out and say that no evidence is required, it may only be unrecorded because of the acceptance of tongues as the initial evidence.

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Circumstances Acts 4:29-31 Believers in Jerusalem after the release of Peter and John Believers in Samaria as Peter and John prayed and laid hands on them Paul in the city of Damascus after his conversion and prayed for by Ananias Peter preaching Jesus in the home of the Roman Centurion, Cornelius Paul with believers in the city of Ephesus

Physical Signs The place was shaken None

Acts 8:14-17

Acts 9:17-18

None Speaking with tongues Praising God Speaking with tongues Prophesying

Acts 10:44-46

Acts 19:4-6

A Powerful Sign On Pentecost, when the crowd gathered outside of the upper room where all of the commotion was drawing their attention, their comments focused upon only one sign.
And there were dwelling in Jerusalem Jews, devout men, from every nation under heaven. And when this sound occurred, the multitude came together, and were confused, because everyone heard them speak in his own language. Then they were all amazed and marveled, saying

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to one another, Look, are not all these who speak Galileans? And how is it that we hear, each in our own language in which we were born? ... we hear them speaking in our own tongues the wonderful works of God. So they were all amazed and perplexed, saying to one another, Whatever could this mean? (Acts 2:5-8, 12)

It was obvious, even to those who had not received the Baptism in the Holy Spirit, that something unique and powerful had happened. It was not because of love, goodness, kindness, self-control or other Fruit of the Spirit. It was not because they recognized a sensitivity to Gods Spirit in their lives. It was because of the praises of God spoken in tongues that they could not have known. Those who seek the Baptism in the Holy Spirit must seek to speak in a tongue that they have not learned. It makes little difference whether the tongue is a heavenly language or an earthly one. What matters is that it is unknown to them. As they speak it they will likely consider it gibberish and nonsense because they have no idea what is being spoken through them. The greatest hindrance to speaking in tongues is fear. Fear of the unknown. Fear that they will not be speaking a language from God but only making up sounds. Fear that others will consider them strange and different. Fear that it is all hype and manipulation and not the work of the Holy Spirit of God.

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We must not give in to fear. Satan wins a great victory when he is able to paralyze the believer with fear. Though it may sound repetitive, allow God to speak through you as He understands, for we will not. Even if it is only one word or a phrase, repeat it and God will give you more. Tongues is not about understanding what is spoken, but about speaking as the Spirit uses you to speak. For those that have received and speak in tongues, pray often in tongues. Paul wrote to the Corinthians and said, I thank my God I speak with tongues more than you all (1 Corinthians 14:18). Are you exercising the gift God has given to you? Understand that the Baptism is not the end of the journey, but the beginning. There is more. Whether you have received or are still seeking, open yourself to more of God. He is infinite and we are empty. We need Him to fill us, and He desires to do so. As we grow He wants to give us more. With an open and genuine heart ask for more of Him, and He will pour Himself upon you.

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It is one thing to say that speaking in tongues as the Spirit enables one to speak is the initial evidence of the Baptism in the Holy Spirit. However this is just the beginning of what tongues brings to the life of the believer and the local assembly of which s/he is a part. One of the reasons tongues can be a divisive issue is because of the multiple roles that tongues fulfills in the Church. These roles get intertwined and confused as one and the same when they are distinctive. The Scriptural record is sometimes the cause of the confusion. While Paul went into detail in his directions to the Corinthians regarding tongues, he seems to jump back and forth between what he is talking about and what he was talking about.

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Reading the New Testament Letters It is important to remember as we read the books of the New Testament that follow the Gospels and Acts that these were written as letters. They are not theological textbooks, although they contain great theology. At their writing there were no chapter division or verse distinctions. It is unlikely that the composer of the letter sat down and worked out an outline before beginning its writing. Therefore these letters may seem to be disconnected and scatterbrained. With this in mind we should take the time to consider how we might read these books of the Bible in a way closer to what the author intended. When you write a letter to a friend or loved one, you would not want them to look over it and put in their own divisions so they can break up its reading. A few paragraphs today, a few more tomorrow, and Ill finish the letter on Friday. Yet this is how we read many of the letters of the New Testament. If we remember that the book is a letter that may refer to and complete thoughts that appeared several pages earlier we will read and understand them differently. From time to time it would be helpful to us to sit and read the full letter in as close to one setting as possible. This keeps all of the ideas fresh when they reappear in various places throughout the letter. For example, how do you typically read 1 Corinthians 12, 13 and 14? Chances are that you read them separately. Even if you 49

read them individually over three days your understanding would be different than if you read them all at once. Yet this is how it was written and how it is intended to be understood. Paul explained the purpose of the Gifts of the Spirit, reminded the Corinthians that no matter how spiritual their actions seemed they needed love above everything else, and then helped them see how those gifts operated in the life of the individual, in the local church and for the benefit of unbelievers. With this foundation we are better equipped to understand what Paul was saying about tongues in 1 Corinthians 14. It is here that we begin to see the two-fold work of tongues in our lives. Individual and Corporate Pauls letter to the Corinthians was an encouragement toward spiritual living, but also a rebuke and instruction. The believers in Corinth were so caught up in their spiritual activity that they were causing division and living in continued sin, bringing shame to the Name and Church of Jesus Christ instead of glorifying Him. Tongues appeared to be a hot issue within this church. In a gathering it was normal for many to get up and proclaim a message to the church in tongues that Paul had to give them very specific direction.
If prayers are offered in tongues, two or three's the limit, and then only if someone is present who can interpret what

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you're saying. Otherwise, keep it between God and yourself. And no more than two or three speakers at a meeting, with the rest of you listening and taking it to heart. Take your turn, no one person taking over. (1 Corinthians 14:27-30 MSG)

No one wanted to be outdone. If you delivered a message, your neighbor might follow you. Then a third, fourth or fifth might continue. Eventually everyone speaks in tongues and nothing is accomplished. Besides the obvious element of competition, no one understands what is being said. The church is not edified. Lost souls do not come to faith. The Corinthians understood that there was a benefit to tongues, but they were unaware of what that benefit was. So earlier in Chapter 14, Paul described the work of tongues within two realms: for the individual and for the local assembly.
1) Tongues and the Individual

As we recognize tongues as the initial physical evidence of the Baptism in the Holy Spirit, it should not surprise us that tongues have a role in the life of the individual. To speak in tongues, just like speaking any natural words, is an individual event. Even when no one is around to listen to or speak with him, the individual can speak. When the powerful and present Holy Spirit of the living God moves in such a tangible way in the ones life there are going to 51

be effects in that life. Paul describes three works accomplished by the individuals speaking in tongues.
For he who speaks in a tongue does not speak to men but to God, for no one understands him; however, in the spirit he speaks mysteries. . . . He who speaks in a tongue edifies himself, but he who prophesies edifies the church. (1 Corinthians 14:2, 4)

The words that we speak as the Holy Spirit gives us utterance are not for men, and are not even for ourselves. They are for God. We may know what we want to pray for, but we do not know the words that being spoken to God. For us, the words spoken are a mystery. As Paul says in verse 14, For if I pray in tongues, my spirit is praying, but I dont understand what I am saying (1 Corinthians 14:14 NLT). In the realm of the individual, the understanding of tongues is less important than the words that are being spoken. We will see that this is different when we move into a corporate environment. When we pray in tongues as the Spirit speaks through us, God is more interested in our prayer. Though we do not understand what is being said, though the Spirit cries out to the Father and we are only a vessel of His use, we benefit from praying in tongues. Those who do so are edified. The word for edified means to be built, strengthened or confirmed. According to the book of Jude it is our faith that is edified as we pray in the Spirit (Jude 20). 52

When an individual prays in the Holy Spirit, speaking in other tongues, s/he is built up in faith as s/he touches Heaven with prayers and requests that s/he may not understand.
2) Tongues and the Local Assembly

For the congregation that has joined for worship and instruction in the Word of God, the work of tongues is different. It is quite the opposite. In verse 22 Paul explains the purpose of tongues as a sign to those who do not believe. Instead of focusing on God as the recipient, the tongues spoken of here is meant to challenge and draw the unsaved soul to God.
Therefore tongues are for a sign, not to those who believe but to unbelievers ... (1 Corinthians 14:22a)

To those who considered that tongues were a sign of superiority and spirituality, Paul told them that speaking in tongues in public was worthless in and of itself. Only tongues that were spoken and then interpreted were a benefit to the congregation and those unbelievers that might be in their midst.
Therefore if the whole church comes together in one place, and all speak with tongues, and there come in those who are uninformed or unbelievers, will they not say that you are out of your mind? (1 Corinthians 14:23)

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Words spoken in tongues by the power of the Holy Spirit are not understood and therefore have no impact on those who hear them. If a preacher delivered his sermon in tongues, who would be encouraged or challenged? If a worship team sang in tongues, who would join in the praises of God? Tongues that are spoken within a group setting must be interpreted to be useful and fruitful. This takes us back to the role of tongues in the church. It is described with the same word as the work completed in the individual: edification, or a building up of the church. To speak in tongues in the church was not enough. It had to fulfill the purpose of edification. And so Paul admonished the Corinthians, Even so you, since you are zealous for spiritual gifts, let it be for the edification of the church that you seek to excel (1 Corinthians 14:12). Two Types of Tongues At times in this chapter Paul sounds conflicted and confused. Remember, Paul was not writing a theology book, but was explaining spiritual truth to the Corinthians. His goal was to explain the work of tongues is to take the individual believer, the local assembly, and those who do not believe, and to point them God. Tongues are not a sign of spirituality or superiority. They are the working of the power of God for His glory and our edification. 54

As we recognize the two very different roles of tongues we begin to make a distinction between two kinds of tongues. They are both empowered by the same Holy Spirit. Yet there are elements that separate them very clearly into different categories. Paul began to make this distinction in 1 Corinthians 14:5. When we read the entirety of the chapter in light of this verse we see which parts of his teaching fall into each category of tongues.
I wish you all spoke with tongues, but even more that you prophesied; for he who prophesies is greater than he who speaks with tongues, unless indeed he interprets, that the church may receive edification. (1 Corinthians 14:5)

Here Paul hints at the two types of tongues: Tongues, spoken by and for the individual; and, Tongues, spoken to the assembly, and then interpreted for understanding. The tongues spoken for the individual are the tongues that speak mysteries to God in languages that we do not understand. They edify the individual just as they are. The tongues spoken to the assembly or congregation and then interpreted for all to understand what was said are different. They edify the church and are a sign to the unbeliever. Here is where much confusion occurs in our churches. There are times in prayer and worship when an individual believes s/he is meant to speak in tongues to the assembly. The first place this person should turn is to the personal use of tongues. God wants 55

to speak through the individual to pray and touch the heart of God, but not necessarily for all to hear. This creates those awkward moments when someone bursts out in tongues and nothing follows. There is no interpretation. Paul says that this is not a benefit to the church. Yet it was a benefit to the believer. He only needed to pray in the Spirit for his own edification, or she was to offer God praise in the Spirit for her edification. That is not to say that the Spirit does not speak to the church. When He does speak, He moves on one to give the interpretation. The speaker should pray for the interpretation, although God might use another. We have already drawn a distinction in purpose for these two types of tongues. It is also possible to attach a certain label to each one to help identify their timing and use that best fits with the plan of God.
1) The Evidentiary Tongues

This is the speaking of tongues by the power of the Holy Spirit that is the initial physical evidence of the Baptism in the Holy Spirit. This tongue is for the benefit of the individual. It is spoken to God, for prayer and praise, and edifies the believer. Evidential tongues remain without interpretation, unless someone in the congregation has learned the language spoken.

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This would not be the gift of interpretation, but interpretation through earthly knowledge. A key distinction of evidentiary tongues is that the timing with which they are spoken is given to the believer. We can choose to speak in these tongues. As a believer prays, he can choose to pray in the Spirit or with understanding. As a believer sings, she can choose to sing in the Spirit or in her own language.
2) The Gift of Tongues

The Gift of Tongues is one the spiritual gifts spoken of in 1 Corinthians 12. These come only by the immediate work of the Holy Spirit. Though the speaker is still in control (14:32-33), it is the Holy Spirit that turns on the Gift of Tongues. They are separate from Evidentiary Tongues in purpose, which Paul made clear when he listed the Spiritual Gifts.
But the manifestation of the Spirit is given to each one for the profit of all: for to one is given the word of wisdom through the Spirit, to another the word of knowledge through the same Spirit, to another faith by the same Spirit, to another gifts of healings by the same Spirit, to another the working of miracles, to another prophecy, to another discerning of spirits, to another different kinds of tongues, to another the interpretation of tongues. (1 Corinthians 12:7-10)

The purpose of the Spiritual Gifts is for the benefit of all, not just the edification of oneself. Paul wrote of the Gift of Tongues 57

when he described them as being delivered to the congregation followed by interpretation. He considered this a plain sign to unbelievers to draw them to the Father. It should not be strange to think that God would make a distinction between Evidentiary Tongues and the Gift of Tongues, for there is another Gift of the Holy Spirit that exists in a dimension outside of spiritual empowerment: faith. Paul told the Romans, God has dealt to each one a measure of faith (Romans 12:3). Does that mean that everyone who has faith has the Gift of Faith? Certainly not, for the Gifts of the Holy Spirit are given to some and not to others, distributing to each one individually as He wills (1 Corinthians 12:11). Is it not also the same for wisdom and knowledge? God can even work miracles through those who do not know Him, such as the deliverance of demonic spirits by the Seven Sons of Sceva (Acts 19:13-14). God used a donkey to speak to Balaam (Numbers 22:21-28), which is prophecy. It is both within Gods power and within His will to move in these works without the person being given the Spiritual Gift.

All believers who receive the Baptism in the Holy Spirit then have the opportunity to edify their faith by praying in the Spirit as they use the gift. But the Gift of Tongues is given only as the Spirit wills. It is not universal, for there are some who do not 58

receive it. Yet all who receive the Baptism in the Holy Spirit speak in Evidentiary Tongues. This helps us clear up another important part of the discussion of tongues and the Baptism in the Holy Spirit. There are those who claim that since tongues is listed among the Gifts of the Holy Spirit, any Spiritual Gift that appears in the life of a believer may be a sign that s/he has received the Baptism. Yet we can quickly dispel such thoughts with the examples we just mentioned about the sons of Sceva and Balaams donkey. The confusion arises from a lack of understanding about the two types of tongues. One is personal and is the initial physical evidence of the Baptism in the Holy Spirit. The other, though spoken by an individual, is meant for the corporate to hear and understand. Greater than Tongues And yet, for all of Pauls teaching on the purposes and usage of these two variations of tongues, he had another point to make in Chapter 14. Evidentiary Tongues speak to God in mysteries and build the faith of the individual. The Gift of Tongues, when partnered with the Gift of Interpretation, speaks to the assembly and non-believers, building up the whole and edifying the church. But the great gift that the Corinthians should seek was not tongues. Yes, it is powerful, it comes only by the work of the Holy Spirit, but it is not the badge of spirituality that they 59

considered it to be. It is better to speak in prophecy. Consider the full context of the opening of Chapter 14.
Pursue love, and desire spiritual gifts, but especially that you may prophesy. For he who speaks in a tongue does not speak to men but to God, for no one understands him But he who prophesies speaks edification and exhortation and comfort to men. He who speaks in a tongue edifies himself, but he who prophesies edifies the church. I wish you all spoke with tongues, but even more that you prophesied; for he who prophesies is greater than he who speaks with tongues, unless indeed he interprets, that the church may receive edification. (1 Corinthians 14:1-5)

This is the clearest evidence that speaking in tongues fulfills an individual and a corporate role. For Paul, it was better in a group setting to say five words that everyone could understand than to blurt a thousand words in tongues that no one could comprehend, yet he told the Corinthians that he spoke in tongues more than all of them (1 Corinthians 14:18-19). Left on their own, without interpretation, tongues are powerful in the life of the believer. They infuse our praise and prayer with words and expression that only God can receive and comprehend. To speak in what sounds like foolishness and babble grows our faith as we reach out to God in a mode that can only come from Him.

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But to shout or sing in prayer or praise in the power of the Holy Spirit is of little benefit to the congregation. To the believer it is powerful for himself, but not for others. Since God desires to show the church and the world that He is able to speak through His people, the Spirit brings the Gifts of Tongues and Interpretation, working together to build them up and point those who do not know Him towards His infinite goodness. When we are able to make the distinction, we are able to be used in each role. Pray in tongues for the edification of your personal faith. During times of prayer and worship allow the Spirit to speak and sing mysteries to God. And when you are in the congregation, seek to build up the whole. Take advantage of the Spirits power that is continually available to those who have received the Baptism, and be open to the special work He may choose to do through you for the benefit of all.

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If you have received salvation through faith in Jesus Christ, and now you hear that there is an experience of Gods Holy Spirit that is available to you, what will that experience mean for your life? It is more than just speaking in tongues; that much we have made clear. What is the Baptism in the Holy Spirit for? What does it add to our lives? Since many either reject the Baptism in the Holy Spirit or are content to live without it, what makes it important to our lives? Our spirits are like fortresses. For years we are taught to protect and keep our spirits from harm. Your spirit (or soul) is the part of you that lives forever. It is you as you truly are. All of your actions and existence in the physical life flow out of your spiritual person. 62

There is a wall that surrounds our spirit-selves. We believe that we build it on our own to protect ourselves from emotional pain and abuse. Yet that wall exists because of sin. Instead of keeping evil and harm out, it actually keeps evil and harm in. The wall is the result of sin, and it separates us from the healing, lifegiving power of God. When we choose to believe in the Gospel we open the gate of that wall. We give God permission to enter our space and begin His work in our lives. Some elements of His work are instant while others take time. We become new creations, children of God, washed, renewed and sealed by the Holy Spirit. God enters our lives and makes us His own. This is a great miracle! It comes by faith alone, the gift of God. We should rejoice and be glad. Jesus stood at the door, knocked, we opened the door, and He came to be with us (Revelation 3:20). Yet Jesus said that there is more. He said to be baptized in the Holy Spirit, to be endued with power from on high. For this to occur we have to cry out to God for more than the miracle of salvation we have already received. At this point we give permission for God to do a new work on the walled fortresses of our spirits. When we believed in Christ we invited Him through the gate of the thick wall of the sinful nature. To ask for more of God, to open ourselves to the Baptism in the Holy Spirit, is to invite God to destroy the wall that surrounds our spirits and to take its place. 63

To be baptized means to be immersed or overwhelmed. This word was used to describe the action of putting a garment into dye, or of putting a bucket or jar into water.[7] It is not just touching or communicating, not just living or interacting with. When Christ baptizes us in the Holy Spirit, He completely immerses us in Him. God goes from entering through a small gateway, from leaking in, to having complete access of every facet of our lives. He does not erase who we are, but draws all that we are to Himself. He no longer has limited access to our lives that we control, but now has complete access. Perhaps this is why speaking in tongues is the initial physical evidence of the Baptism in the Holy Spirit, for it shows that we have surrendered to God even the use of our tongue. The Paraclete and the Baptism The longest section of the Gospel of John is centered on the Last Supper. From the time Jesus washes the Disciples feet until they leave for the Garden of Gethsemane covers five chapters in our Bible. That is almost one-quarter of Johns Gospel. Within these pages we see that Jesus spent a lot of time instructing the Disciples in their final hours together before His arrest and death. One topic appears repeatedly, the Holy Spirit. Jesus referred to Him as The Helper (NKJV, ESV), translated in

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other versions as Counselor (NIV, HCSB) and Advocate (NLT, NET). The original word is parakletos, or Paraclete. Before we look at the work of the Paraclete we have to identify if what Jesus describes here is related to the Baptism in the Holy Spirit. We can see this by comparing what Jesus says about the coming of the Holy Spirit in these verses and in Acts 1. In the book of John, Jesus explained that the Holy Spirit would come.
But the Helper, the Holy Spirit, whom the Father will send in My name (John 14:26) But when the Helper comes, whom I shall send to you from the Father... (John 15:26) However, when He, the Spirit of truth, has come (John 16:13)

The Paraclete, the Spirit of truth, was promised to come from the Father, sent by Jesus, in Jesus name. Now consider the verses we looked at earlier in the study, describing the promise of the Baptism in the Holy Spirit.
Behold, I send the Promise of My Father upon you; but tarry in the city of Jerusalem until you are endued with power from on high. (Luke 24:49)

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And being assembled together with them, He commanded them not to depart from Jerusalem, but to wait for the Promise of the Father, which, He said, you have heard from Me; for John truly baptized with water, but you shall be baptized with the Holy Spirit not many days from now. (Acts 1:4-5) But you shall receive power when the Holy Spirit has come upon you (Acts 1:8)

Jesus told the Disciples that the Holy Spirit had not yet come, even though He breathed the Holy Spirit upon them in John 20:22. He also reminded them that they had heard Him speak before of the Promise of the Father, the Baptism in the Holy Spirit. The Roles of the Paraclete Putting all of these verses together, Jesus must be speaking of the same coming of the Holy Spirit. While salvation opens us to the Spirits work and though He takes residence inside of us as proof that we are adopted into the family of God, these are works that we do not see yet believe by faith that they are completed. Through the Baptism in the Holy Spirit, being completed immersed and overwhelmed in Him, the Paraclete comes to work in different and powerful ways for the believer. 66

Jesus described three roles of the Paraclete to the Disciples: Teacher, Witness and Prophet. Another way to say it is Teacher, Testifier and Truth-Teller.
1) Teacher

The Paracletes first role in the life of the Baptized believer is to teach.
But the Helper, the Holy Spirit, whom the Father will send in My name, He will teach you all things, and bring to your remembrance all things that I said to you. (John 14:26)

There is a lot of value in reading and listening to what men and women of God have produced over the centuries to help us understand the Word of God. Yet we must be careful that we allow the Holy Spirit to teach us. To be sure that what we are learning is from God, we compare it to the Word God has already spoken through the Scriptures. But a good teacher does more than just teach. S/he reminds the student about what has been taught over time. This is one reason the Bible is so powerful in our lives. We tend to forget, yet God has spoken and His Word is always applicable to us. Jesus words are as potent in our lives today as they were when we first heard them, with as much power as when He first spoke them.

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2) Witness (Testifier)

Jesus also tells us that the Paraclete comes to testify, or witness about Christ.
But when the Helper comes, whom I shall send to you from the Father, the Spirit of truth who proceeds from the Father, He will testify of Me. (John 15:26)

When Jesus spoke of the Spirit as a witness, He was telling the Disciples how some will believe and follow them as they believed and followed Jesus, while others would reject them and their message just as they rejected His. Just as a person giving testimony in a court of law, the Holy Spirit speaks to the truth of Jesus. For those who do not believe that Jesus is the Messiah, is the Son of God, rose from the grave, or saves those who do believe, the Holy Spirit comes and testifies that these things are true. This easily fits with the Gifts of the Spirit described for us in 1 Corinthians 12.
for to one is given faith by the same Spirit, to another gifts of healings by the same Spirit, to another the working of miracles (1 Corinthians 12:8-10)

How does the Spirit testify? Through the work that He completes in and through the Baptized believer. Someone might see the effects of Gods power in a life and consider it the result 68

of a change of habits or willpower and not the work of the power of God. But the work of Gods power through a life cannot be explained away.
3) Prophet (Truth-Teller)

Finally, Jesus described the Paracletes role as being that of a prophet.


However, when He, the Spirit of truth, has come, He will guide you into all truth; for He will not speak on His own authority, but whatever He hears He will speak; and He will tell you things to come. He will glorify Me, for He will take of what is Mine and declare it to you. All things that the Father has are Mine. Therefore I said that He will take of Mine and declare it to you. (John 16:13-15)

We traditionally think of prophecy as speaking about the future. Yet if we look at the prophetic words in both the Old and New Testaments, prophecy also includes Gods description of the way things are. God did not just proclaim judgment on the people of Israel through the prophets, He also described the truth of their sin and offered them mercy for their repentance. Again, the Gifts of the Spirit align with the work of the Paraclete. He not only speaks the truth and the future to the Baptized believer, He uses that same believer to proclaim truth and the future.

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for to one is given the word of wisdom through the Spirit, to another the word of knowledge through the same Spirit, to another faith by the same Spirit, to another gifts of healings by the same Spirit, to another the working of miracles, to another prophecy, to another discerning of spirits, to another different kinds of tongues, to another the interpretation of tongues. (1 Corinthians 12:8, 10)

You Will Receive Power And so the Paraclete works in the life of the believer who has received the Baptism in the Holy Spirit in preparation to work through that believer. This sets us up for the revelation of the two-fold purpose of the power received through the Baptism in the Holy Spirit.
1) Witness to the World

Jesus told us the first purpose of the power that we receive in Spirit Baptism when He reminded the wait for the Promise of the Father.
But you shall receive power when the Holy Spirit has come upon you; and you shall be witnesses to Me in Jerusalem, and in all Judea and Samaria, and to the end of the earth. (Acts 1:8)

Jesus told the Disciples that after receiving power in the Holy Spirit they would be His witnesses. This is actually only a portion 70

of Jesus response to a question asked by the Disciples when told to wait for the Baptism.
Therefore, when they had come together, they asked Him, saying, Lord, will You at this time restore the kingdom to Israel? And He said to them, It is not for you to know times or seasons which the Father has put in His own authority. But you shall receive power when the Holy Spirit has come upon you... (Acts 1:6-8)

The Disciples had still managed to get stuck on the physical kingdom of Israel and the expectation that the Messiah was going to make it happen all at once. The suffering and death were done, fulfilling the plan of God revealed in the prophets. They believed it was time for Phase 2. But Gods plan was still different than they expected. God wanted to use them to build His spiritual Kingdom, and desires the same from us today. Though one day Christ will return and setup His throne on the Earth, we are called to build the Kingdom as we witness about Jesus to the world. To those who wonder how they must share that witness, explaining the Gospel of Jesus Christ, we find that the Paraclete comes and helps us. Just as the Holy Spirit moved upon (NKJV) or carried along (NIV) the prophets of old (2 Peter 1:21), the Spirit gives us the words to speak.

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But when they arrest you and deliver you up, do not worry beforehand, or premeditate what you will speak. But whatever is given you in that hour, speak that; for it is not you who speak, but the Holy Spirit. (Mark 13:11)

We are told how Peter, Stephen and Paul witnessed about Christ before many (Acts 4:8; 6:10; 24:24; 26:28). They did not memorize certain steps to share the Gospel, but allowed the power of the Holy Spirit to speak through them.
2) Service to the Body

We see here the promise of power in the Holy Spirit and the call to be witnesses. While these certainly go together, being a witness is not the sole use of Gods power in our lives. We have spoken already about Gods empowerment for us, through the Holy Spirit, to minister to the Body of Jesus Christ.
But the manifestation of the Spirit is given to each one for the profit of all: for to one is given the word of wisdom through the Spirit, to another the word of knowledge through the same Spirit, to another faith by the same Spirit, to another gifts of healings by the same Spirit, to another the working of miracles, to another prophecy, to another discerning of spirits, to another different kinds of tongues, to another the interpretation of tongues. But one and the same Spirit works all these things, distributing to each one individually as He wills

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Now you are the body of Christ, and members individually. And God has appointed these in the church: first apostles, second prophets, third teachers, after that miracles, then gifts of healings, helps, administrations, varieties of tongues. (1 Corinthians 12:7-11; 27-28)

Through the power of the Holy Spirit we are able to minister to the Body of Christ in Spiritual Gifts. But these Gifts of the Spirit are not meant to be utilized for personal gain or influence. No gift is greater or lesser, and all are necessary for the health of the Body.

All of this, and more, is available to the believer who chooses to desire more of God in life. We must want more than just the slow trickle that comes through the open door that Jesus promises to enter through if we open it to Him. We surrender ourselves to His power, not to be made mindless and robotic, but to give God access to all that we are. When we are Baptized in the Holy Spirit we are given the Paraclete, the Helper. He teaches and reminds us. He testifies of Jesus in and through us. And He speaks both the truth of what is and what will be. But there is more. For as much as we receive from the Spirit when we are Baptized in Him, we are meant to give. We share the Gospel with boldness. We allow the Spirit to speak from 73

Gods heart, through our mouths, to the heart of the one who needs Him. The Body is edified as we minister to and serve one another, the Body of Christ. And still there is more. For as we become the conduit that Gods power surges through, as we allow the Paraclete to work in and through us, as we pray in the Holy Spirit, our faith increases, and we are drawn closer and closer to God. God never promised intimacy and relationship to those who knew about Him, otherwise the Pharisees would have heard a much different message from Jesus. Instead God comes to those who hear, follow, and obey. When we cry out to Him, He hears us. When we surrender ourselves, He gives more of Him. Consider these lines from Smith Wigglesworth, a plumber turned healing evangelist in the early 1900s.
What a wonderful divine position God means us all to have, to be filled with the Holy Ghost. There is something so remarkable, so divine, as it were, a great open door into all the treasury of the Most High. As the Spirit comes like rain upon the mown grass, He turns the barrenness into greenness and freshness and life. Oh, Hallelujah! God would have you know that there is a place where you are dispensed with and where God comes to be thy assurance and sustaining power spiritually, till thy dryness is turned into springs; till thy barrenness begins to be floods, till thine whole life becomes vitalized by heaven, till heaven sweeps through you and dwells within and turns everything

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inside out, till you are absolutely filled with the divine possibilities that you being to live in a new creation.[8]

May this be our prayer before God. To be so consumed with Him that all of life dissipates and fades away. For His life and power to so fill us that our previous existence is proven dry and parched to the rivers of living water that flow in and through us. That we would all be immersed and overwhelmed in the Holy Spirit, and allow our lives to be the conduits of His mighty work.

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Endnotes
1. Statement of Fundamental and Essential Truths, Article 5 of the General Constitution and By-Laws adopted by General Conference, 1994.
[RETURN]

2. See Acts 8:9-24. [RETURN] 3. www.billygrahamlibrary.org, accessed 8 January 2013. [RETURN] 4. The population of Canada was 34,482,779 in 2011 according to the World Bank. www.google.ca/publicdata, accessed 8 January 2013.
[RETURN]

5. The population of the United States was 311,591,917 in 2011 according to the World Bank. www.google.ca/publicdata, accessed 8 January 2013 [RETURN] 6. The concept for this comparison came from George O. Wood, Living in the Spirit (Springfield, MO: GPH, 2009). I have rearranged Dr. Woods information and expanded the table with additional information. [RETURN] 7. W. E. Vine, Vines Complete Expository Dictionary of Old and New Testament Words (Nashville: Thomas Nelson Publishers, 1996), 50 (New Testament). [RETURN] 8. Roberts Liardon, Smith Wigglesworth: The Complete Collection of His Life Teachings (Tulsa, OK: Albury Publishing, 1996), 480.
[RETURN]

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