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SEERSHIP!
THE MAGNETIC
PRACTICAL GUIDE TO XnOSE

MIRROIx
ASPIRE TO

WHu

CLAIRVOYANCE-ABSOLTJTJi:.

OJtIGINAL,

AND SELECTED FROM VARIOUS EUROPEAN AND


ASIATIC ADEPTS.

BY

PASCHAL BEVERLY RANDOLPH.

TOLEDO, OHIO:
K.
C.

RANDOLPH, PUBLISHER
189G.

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1874,


P.

by

B.

RANDOLPH,

In the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington.

THE INNER

SENSES.

CLAIBVOY

WITH
I TRUST I

may be pardoned

if I

make another attempt

to rescue

the subject of somnambulic vision from the charlatanry of the day. In these days clairvoyance, which is a natural power inherent in
the race, is regarded as a sort of forbidden, or rare, wonder,

mixed

up with mesmerism, fraud, circles, and so on, while it is also the garb under which more barefaced swindling is carried on than any
other one gift of
true, that

God to

civilized

man. I hold it

to

be emphatically

No

curtain hides from view the spheres elysian,


shells of half transparent dust;

Save these poor

While

all that blinds the spiritual vision

Is pride

and hate and

lust.

And
being
so
; ;

I believe clairvoyance to be the birthright of every

human

that

all will

one day possess

it

that children will be born

and that even now, coarse as we

are,
it

centage of the people

can develop
it

some of us a great perto a most surprising extent.

In the
rial

first

place let

be distinctly understood that there are two

sources of light
eyes^

solar, planetary,

and astral

adapted
is

to mateis

and

that,

independent of that, every globe in space

cushioned upon the ether, and that this ether

one vast

bil-

lowy sea of magnetic light, and sight, and the whole mystery is
this

is

the media of an inner sense of

at once cleared up,

and the clap-

trap of the charlatans at once exploded and exposed.

And

thus

wonderful power

is

resolved into the mere sensitive ability to

come en rapport with

this vast

ocean of inner

light,
1

which may

INTERIOR

VISION".

herein will as quite easily be done, patience. simply is required

be

briefly

shown.

All that

is

or cognizing knowing of facts, power and art the Clairvoyance is distinct from those totally usumethods by thing's, and principles, have to reduced claim It to a I attainment, their in
ally

pursued

heterogeneity to from have science evolved have system, and to new fields of opened investiconception, new thought, added new magnetic law, central underlj the discovered have gatiou, an d to somnambulie phenomena, of evolutions the and subtending
;

ing

present. herewith I which a brief resume of firs u stages of civithe of termination the approaching We are modes, its moods, many of opinto farewell bidding are lization,

and are entering procedures, upon and thoughts, sentiments, ions destined might, and to develop history human of epoch a new
powers
in

man, now latent mainly, but which will yet revolutionize

the globe.

On

earth

man

is

greatest,

mind the greatest part of

mind. part of greatest . Clair. . the clairvoyance and man, the condition of nerves and brain. peculiar a upon depends voyance
It is

compatible with the most robust health, albeit oftenest re-

sultina;

from disordered nerves.

The discovery

consists in the

knowledge of the exact method liow^ the precise spot wJiere^ and the proper time wJien^ to apply the specific mesmeric current to any
given person, in order to produce the
following of the rules herein laid

coma and lucidity. A careful down is generally sufficient to

enable the aspirant to attain his or her end.

At

the start let

it

be distinctly understood that fear, doubt, ner-

vous agitation, coarse habits, or bad intent, will retard success,

and may prevent

it

altogether.

When

a person cannot be mesmerized through the eye, head, or


will follow if the clothes

by reverse passes, success often


small of the back.

be wet

with slightly vinegared water, just over the pit of the stomach and
If an operator acts, let his left

hand cover the

rear wet spot, his right the front one, while the gazing process continues as before.
;

The brain is not the only seat of nervous power and we can often reach and subdue it by and through the nerves, nervous matter, and ganglia, situate along and within the backbone. If tractors or magnets are used, their points should
Rea^son
:

be placed just as would be the mesmerizcr's hands, and the experiment be continued as before.

INTERIOR VISION*

At

first,

clairvoyance, like any movement, nervous or muscular,

requires a special effort, but


tary, mechanical.

Keep AND tour soul AND INNER SENSES WILL MAKE GROOVES FOR THEMSELVES, AND CONTINUE TO MOVE IN THEM AS CARS ON RAILS OR WHEELS IN RUTS. I<et your groove be CLAin-voyance I
Lucidity
is

soon becomes automatic, involun^ your design constantly before you,


it

no

gift,

but a universal possibility


it.)

common

to the
still

human
cases.

race.

(Idiots can and do have

It is latent, or

mind-power, and can be brought to the surface in a majority of

Omnia

vincit labor!

All mental action comes through nervous action, but in these eases the result must be reached outside our usual mental habi-

tudes and paths.

The person who attempts

to reach clairvoyance,

and gets discouraged after a few trials, don't merit the power. If you begin, either by agents or mesmerists, keep right on. Every experiment lands you one step nearer success, and that, too, whether you aim at psychometry, lucidity, or any one of the fifty phases
or grades of occult power.

Eemember

that physical conditions influence, modifj^ and de-

termine mental states, whether these be normal or recondite and mysterious.

Nor

forget that pure blood gives pure power.

If your blood

is

foul with scrofula, pork fat, rum, venereal, suspended

menses (by

nursing, cold, or, perchance, pregnancy), don't attempt clairvoy-

ance

till

3^ou are free

from
;

it.

Artists prepare their paints,

you

must prepare your body else no good picture comes, no lucidity follow^s. Sound lungs, stomach, kidneys, liver, brain, blood, heart, urinal vessels, womb, and pelvic apparatus are not absolute essentials^ but good preparatives. Above all, the blood must be purified, vacated of its poisons, rheums (alkalies, acids in excess), and be toned up to concert pitch, if you would enjoy the music of the spheres, and know beyond your outer knowing. Food, digestion, drinks, sleep, must all be attended to. Mesthe devirs bridge. meric subjects at !Irst become quite passional, Look out ycu don't fall through it, for true clairvoyance is coincident only with normal appetites normally sated. Excess destroys
it.

Every passion, except the grosser, has a normal sphere. Clairvoyance is qualitative and quantitative, like all other menIt is limited, fragmentary, incomplete, in all, because

tal forces.

INTERIOR VISION

we

arelfimpef^6M
is like

no other being can occupy^your or my

vrorn b

grea so be or ground,

one exactly
world,

us

We
arid here, frozen there,

o-reen spots and deserts


;

fertile

sensiii

should cultivate our we therefore another in sterile sp'ot, in one attention to the^law: demands vigor Clairvoyant loves! special equals exercise." Rest Reis. vigor vital of equation

descril
Icctnn'

tect

The eternal member this, and

retain your power.

Clairvoyance

is

an

affair

of

being
land
are

health, rest, sunsleep, light, passion, love, drink, food, air, the quite blood, as liver, much lungs, exercise, labor, music, joy, shine,
for coma, magnetic and as of mesmerism
all

n<

paental operations are

tent,
ses,
s

physically conditioned.
like art, an is Clairvoyance

any other.

The elements

eke
exist, but

deal

hitherto been pursued. has It systemized. be must useful be to of a sort gymhabit, blind a as empirically, but rationally, not ever under inscarce and people, swindle a means to
nastics,
tellio-ent

who
olen

the
vap<

guidance like

the logical or mathematical

or

musical

albeit soul, the of faculties

more valuable than

either,

and

like

far-reaching, and, is It growth. of laws the them, too, subject to repays the time amply difficult, is road the once 'attained, though

car(

con
the

that knowland and labor spent. it_, and governing laws the demonstrate to edge, which enables me and understand me to enables also developed, by which it may be mystic This phenomena. aberrant its attend impart those which
It has

been the study of

my life,

me
vo^

ad
tei

ground has hitherto been the


attempt to reclaim
is
it

prolific hot-^bed
;

of a host of noxious,

dangerous superstitions and quackeries


the
first

and I believe

my own

is

to rational investigation.

wl
le
tl]

Clairvoyance

a generic term, employed

to express various de-

and cognize to enabled one is whereby perception, of modes grees and knowlcertain contact or to principles and things, facts, know
;

tc

avenues ordinary the of, independent and use, the without edges, difby degrees, various in attained produced or It is sense. of
ferent methods, and is of widely diverse grades

6]

and kinds, as
t

A.

Pyschometrt, or nervous sensitiveness, wherein the subject


all,

does not see at

but comes in magnetic contact with,

first,

the

peculiar material emanations or sphere given off

or object in existence,

and

is

from every person analogous to the power whereby a

dog

finds his

master in a crowd, or a bound hunts

down a

fugitive

having

garment once

INTERIOR
worn by that
fugitive.

VISION".

5
persons come en

By

this sense of feeling

rapport with others present, distant, dead, or alive, and when the sensitiveness is great, are enabled to sympathetically feel, hence

and intellectual condition, and, in extraordinary cases, can discern and detect diseases, both of mind, affections, and body, without, however,
being qualified to treat or cure said aberrations. Every city in the land abounds with persons claiming to be " clairvoyants," who
are not so in
tent,
ses,

describe, that person's physical, social, moral, amative,

any sense whatever, but


;

are, to a greater or less ex-

mere

sensitives at best

but, in

by

far the majority of ca-

such are rank impostors, fortune-tellers, and charlatans, who eke out a living by dint of a very little good guessing, and a great deal of tall lying. The majority are females of lax principles,
a lounge and drawn curtains,

who keep
olent of

pestilent vampyres, redwho


are loaded with

filth

moral, intellectual, and physical,

the exuviae of death, and charge a

man

or

woman

with the very

vapor of ruin
B.
carefallj^

itself.

PsYCHOMETRY cau bc deepened into sbsolnte perception by


noting
fi

contact with a person, letter, or object, and afterward ascertaining


the correctness of the verdict

come

to.

little

careful experi-

mentation will develop good results and demonstrate that clairvoyance is an attainable qualification, with proper patience and
active effort.

C.

Intuition

the highest quality of the human mind


all
;

is la-

tent in most people, developable in nearly

is

trainable, and,
It is the effort-

when
less,

active, is the highest kind of clairvoyance.

instantaneous perception of facts, principles, events, and

thinors. o

When
it

to test

at once.

In a brief time the perceptions will grow clearfull,

er, stronger,

more

frequent,

and

free.

D.
etry,

The

differences

between clairvoyance,
:

feeling, or

psychom-

and intuition, are these the first sees, the second feels, the third knows instantly. In our ordinary state, we see through a glass darkly in clairvoyance, we see with more or less distinctness in psychometry, intensity, and in intuition, we leap to feel
;
;

results at a single bound.

There are hundreds who imagine they


fiiculties

possess one or

all

of these

or qualifications, and arrogate

IXTERIOR VISION

visions or
be',

ideas have made a strong the because merely ch importance, mu have they seen one perhaps or two or minds their impression on are what they Such claim to flashes. or sparivs spectral
;

only in the wish.

thin"-

in

its

For clairvoyance is a whoever and would law, have and it rule, system, actual of conform to must the science complexity, or completeness

They need

training.

ly

ensue. to results good expect thereof, if they kinds various and of is degrees. Perception actual E. The development, for its for talents many brilliant require It does not spiritually, and organically, intellectualmorally, inferior seers are finely constituted and a person brilliant, more higher, the yet
;

clairvoyance they will develop. the is nobler and is power to hunt up the stolen beyond or get never subjects Some half-way house of telling the at forstop others property; lost
the hio-her

while plane, but a few scientific attain the reach number a tunes and vision that leaps intellect the of sweep magnificent that
;

world's barriers, forces the gates of death,

and revels

in the subr

lime mysteries of the universes.


the faculty, is the rule.

The purer

the subject, the better


is

Goodness, not mere knowledge,

power.

Remember
F.

this

No two

persons' clairvoyance is precisely alike.

Each one

has a personal idiosyncrasy that invariably determines his or her


specialty, and,

whatever that specialty

may chance

to be, should

be encouraged, for in that he or she will excel, and in no other.

The attempt
effort.

to force nature will

be so much lost time and wasted

I say this after an experience of

twenty years.

had a

specialty for the occult,

and an early friend,

whom I

loved tenderly,

became unhappy by reason of an accident that, for ten years, rendered him utterly wretched and miserable.
life

He

lost all taste for

because of his injury and

self-murder,
wife,
ica.

and was often tempted to and an estrangement sprang up between himself and
its effects,

one of the most beautiful and accomplished ladies in Amer-

A more

dei)lorable

wreck was never seen.

The

wife became
in hopes

morbid, and they used to visit


of a cure.

mediums and clairvoyants

had a mesmeric subject, and examined for two French physicians in New York, Drs. Toutain and Bergevin. Here I first saw and prescribed for the man, who afterward became my personal friend. Himself and lady were kind
that time, 1853, I

At

to

me, and kindness won

my undying

love.

I have had so

little

of

mTERIOR
it

VISION.

have so often been robbed, phmdered, and traduced, by so-called friends, that when a real one appeared, I hailed it as the Greeks hailed tlie sea. We sat one hundred and eighteen times
in this ^vorld,
for ray friend

and

his wife, searching for a

means of

cure,

made

costly experiments, and finally was rewarded discovery.

many

by a grand
and

And
pursue

so I say to
it

all

clairvoyant aspirants,
life.

Adopt a

specialty^

steadily during your


i

G.
\

When

(which

not advise)
success,

come a
the

and the subject sees

flashes, sparks, white clouds,

rolling balls of light vapor, or is partially lucid, the tendency of

mind should be carefully noted, and the future direction of the power or faculty be fully decided on, sought for, aimed at, and
strictly, persistently, faithfully followed, until a splendid

and neverIf

to-be-doubted triumph and success crown your efforts.

you

in-

tend to examine and prescribe for disease

" will-throwing," or
;

read people

to hunt

up

lost

goods

detect thieves
;

examinations,

in short, any special thing


will spoil

make business
and and become

cultivate that thing


light,

no other

else

you

your

sight,

dim your

a sort of Jack-at-all-trades, master of none.


also describe
thing,

You

cannot excel in

finding lost property, reading the love-life of amorous people, and

and prescribe for sick

folks.

No

the rule

is,

One

and that thing well. Let the rest alone. Again people are too impatient. They push a somnambule too fast and too far. Be careful, if you look for success. Go short journeys, at a slow pace, if you expect to hold out. While laboring for the French doctors, and others, in New York, I frequently not only examined fifty cases of disease a day, but
;

made

all sorts

of explorations in as

many

different directions

the

consequence of which was a chronic lassitude, dyspepsia, angularity, and great irritability of temper, by reason of the unwise
step and resultant nervousness.

H. There
ance
:

are various kinds^ as well as degrees, of clairvoy-

Natural, Intellectual, Medical, Ethereal and Divine, So-

cial, Practical,

and purely Mental.

Or a

clear-seeing of material

forms; lucidity of mind, generally; lucidity of special cerebral

organs

lucidity

upon certain

points,

as Medicine,

Prevoyance,

Religion, Philosophy, Science, Logic, Art, Love, etc.

There are

INTERIOR VISION
of ten in nine these, all pretenders to

many

whom

are rank im-

postors.

jection,

Inspection, and ProIntrospection, of clairvoyance There is a fields in the appropriate past, their have these and
;

present, and the future


perfected.

all

of which are easily developed and

mesmerically induced luor somnambulic common the There is however trance, or procoma the through comes also It cidity. that the patient necessary be means no by is it yet and duced lucidity. I know distinct the produce to order in fully entranced their never lost who conentranced were never who seers capital
; ;

sciousness for

a moment.

mon or usual.
objects alone,
power.
l'853,

This

first

from being comkind of vision exhausts itself on material

But such cases are

far

a mere

perception of things without penetrating


it

The next stage


4,
5,

reaches

is

that of mind-reading.

In

the writer hereof had this

power to a

rerrxarkable
;

tlegr

this

ited

and read books, blindfold and power caused him to be invited to visit Paris, where he exhibit to the astonishment of the savans^ and his own glorification.
is

[Practically, the thing is useless.

There

a perception, one grade higher than this last, which

'enables the subject to

come en rapport with the surface and esand it grows sence of things, as a tree, man, woman, herbs, etc. till the seer beholds and explains somewhat of the penetralia of
; ;

things

and

it

culminates in the condition wherein the mind, leap-

ing

all

the barriers of the outer senses

things altogether beyond their

and world, sees and knows ranges, and approaches the awful
lucid, soon succeeded

realms of Positive Spirit.


Special cerebral organs

become

by an

entire illumination of the brain.

This

is

a grand, a sublime, a

holy degree

for the subject sees, senses, feels, Jcnows^

by a royal
the upper in the
all

power

is

en rapport with a thousand knowledges.


is

A step further,
Power
true

a step inward, and the subject

in

harmony with both

and lower universes.

He

or she thenceforth is a

World
genius
is

All clairvoyants
clairvoyant.

may

not claim genius, but

Mere

talents are dry leaves, tossed

up and
;

down by gusts of
Genius
feet.

lies

and swept away but on the bosom of Memory, and Gratitude at hei
passion, and scattered

INTERIOR VISION
I.

al

Very few persons will fail who strictly conform to the generrules here laid down, and fewer still who follow the special

plans determined upon.


in every

As

a rule, I find

it

safe to declare, that


;

one hundred cases seventy-five can become partly lucid sixty-three can become sensitives forty-five can reach the second,
;

thirty-two the third, fourteen the fourth, five the fifth, and two the highest degree of clairvoyance their peculiar organization is capable of attaininoj. Of one hundred men, fifty-sis can become
seers
so.
;

of two hundred women, one hundred and eighty can become


is

Magnetic Clairvoyance

that induced by holding the head

and powerful horse-shoe magnetIt may be suspended from the ceiling and held to the head lying down, so that when let go it will spring away, or come in contact
(

close to the open horns of a large

do) so a3 to close the circuit.

quartz crystal
;

magnet Mesmeric Circles


all

nearly as good for this purpose as a horse-shoe but I prefer a bar magnet to either.
is

differ

from

all others, in
;

that to be proper,

who

are in one should be insulated

the chairs, and tables, and

footstools should rest on glass knobs


circles, the

made on

purpose.

In these

chances are ten to one that some will go off into the

mesmeric coma on the first trial. The circle must wish, will, desire, and favorable results are almost sure to follow. Have patience, if they

Note.
&

All

do not.
clairvoyants should, to be useful, successful, and
}/ deep

depends upon lung power^ nor can continued ability exist if this be neglected. All clairvoyants should feed on the best things attainable. Again, all clairvoyants must use great caution in
matters of sex.

Abstinence
is

is

good

totally so, is better, for

an

error in that direction

fatal to clear vision, or its perpetuity

when
I

possessed.
told

am

by a friend of mine,

in Paris, the best

male seer in

France, that carelessness in this respect cost him the loss of his
vision for a period of seven months.
If the party desires to de-

velop sensitiveness only, with a view of becoming a psychometrist,


this caution

does not apply with such force.

If a person

was to
more

ask me,

is it

best to try to be a clairvoyant or a good psychometrist,


all

I should unhesitatingly say the latter, by

means, for

it is

IXTEEIOR VISION.
an
are

ilvftf

the

lo"-*^, is qui*'^

as useful, if moTicy-

an
Id
nil

^oug^^ to be gained.

b*P>om'*, at ^rzt t::Al, true

wini? to peculiarities
^^^^-

in

a variety-

of w::ys,

induMual or c^lkotive, very few )tic c'libjeets; and some can never of organization. The matter can be
n^, for instance, the

usual

^*

passes

"

nmy
time,

be

subject

may lock

s^^id'i/ at a

If drow>v at the end of that

and

tl::

c-yv^alls

have a

ten^^'^ncy to roll up, the


is

person

is

Or breathe rapidl}-, If it makes you dizzy, j'ou arc a foruinlv, for ninety Mcc^^r"". mc?'^'^^. r t, and Cvin enter the somnambulic state in anj' one of a r: dozul^,.:.

ind

all t*:at is

required

patience.

"

en
to

Ti

operatic^n, often

repeated,

is

almost cortaiu

^fi, f^,o ^^or<p-.ii

Tr-;:net opr-ation, will

abUnir
gli

t^

1 /"*

person

aee

eves.

prove succc-sful in cuIn all cases the rooiu

'1

be quite dark.
pr*^
-v

(N

All magnetic, otlyllic, and mes-

are twenty times oftcner productive of

grand

results if CO' liictcd in a


tlally,
is

or by the snn,

dark chamber, than in one lighted arliQNext to a thorougiily dark room, moonlight
still.)

best,

and p^nHight better

If, at

the end of a few minliglit

,,fo,^

epnrk^, fl":hcs, streaks of quick

and lingering

are seen,
is

or phosphor clouds float before the

far^^,

then one of two things

immodin*"ly probable.

First, that the party


;

by contiuuanceand
not too
scar^/,

repetition can be clairvoyant

or,

second,

if

these
1

cbids and sparks may ro^olve themselves into beatified forms of


fru nds long gone, but unlost.

Forty-eight out of

fifty

mesmeric experiments

fail

because the

operator wastes, not saves, diflTuses, instead of focalizes, the mesmeric force that streams from the eye and fingers. Rules. Sub-

and
ion, size, stafnre, hair, eyes, build, and so on throughout, in order to bnng about the best results, without reference to all the talk

about pocitive and negative, which

is

mostly nonsense
^^^^'

for I

her great burly uncle, knocking a bull down with one stroke of h\

IZlt'lu^'lll^.'^^ efl-ectively mesmerize


was

'''
"f

''^^'

^'^ ^^'^'^

t^ thoroughly

and and

man

capable of
fist,

onderous

deck, ,nd

^
,

j-ct

the

little

-c^j.ui,a tuab ever iroa a quarter lady renclerea him not only helpless, bu.

INTERIOR VISION.
clairvoyant,

11

by

repeatedly manipulating his head while he held her

She had witnessed a few experiments, believed she could do the same, tried it on four times, and accomplished it in great glee on the fifth attempt. But the greatest miracle of all was, that the captain's nature

on

his lap in his daily calls.

became

entirely

changed, and to-day a better or a gentler man does not sail out of New York harbor Concentrate your attention on a single point in the subject's head keep it there. Do not let your thoughts wander. Gaze steadily at it, and it a!cne, gently waving
! ;

2A>

O
tirae^

peat the process at the same


sleep
is

& daily, for one hour,

Re
till

the

thoroughly induced.

When

are perfectly

satisfied of the fact,

you

will
it.

be strongly tempted to ask questions.

Deepen the slumber in seven sittings after perfect insensihility ensues! The eighth time you may ask a few questions, and but a few. Lead the subject slowly, tenderly, holily, gently along, step by step, one subject at a time, and that subject thorougJily^ not forgetting what I have said about " SDe*
it!

Don't you do

Resist

cialties.**

Persons ambitious to become clairvoyant must not forgec that a full habit, amorous pleasures, high living, and mental exJ.

citement,

all

are

disqualifications.
;

changed

the linen often

the skin,
;

must b^. especially the head and hair*


entire

The

diet

must be kept scrupulously clean

and, to insure speedy success*

the food should be very light; fruit, and tea, coffee, and milk

may
and
is

be freely used
little

but no chocolate,

fat,

oysters, pastr}'-,
fail

and

but very

sugar.

Nor

should the person

to think, wish,

will the

end aimed at continually.

Soft and plaintive music

a capital adjunct.

K. The experunents should always be made at first with but few spectators, in a darkened room and perfect trust should exist between operator and subject. And here let me state that
;

no woman should allow

herself to be mesmerized

by a man whose

principles she cannot fully trust to, for

any man can seduce any


clair-

woman whom he
voyance to the
tice.

sits

by, in magnetic rapport.

L. For some purposes I prefer the Oriental methods of


full
:

magnetism of European and American practhe mesmerist places a few drops of ink
it),

These are

first,

in a proper vessel;

gazes therein himself (magnetizing

and

12

INTERIOK VISION
Presently, the subject will behold a

bids the subject gaze also.


vision in
it,

and

will see pictures of

whatever

is

desired.

now
:

First

in the

method of thorough magnetization. Let the room be partly darkened. Let there be a mirror north end let the subject's back be toward that mirror, but
give the special
;

take care that he or she sits so that the reflected ray of light

(magnetism) from the operator's eye will strike the back of his or
her head, the subject receiving the reflected ray,
subject,

or, operator,

and mirror, forming a triangle, which any school-boy can arrange in a moment. Now the subject sits in a chair fully insulated, the feet being

on an insulated
stool, and, if

stool,

and no part of the

dress or chair touching the floor.


sits

on an insulated

The operator also stands or he is weak in nervous force,


If

should be fully charged with electricity, or from a battery.


spectators are present, seat

them

silently in the south, east,

and

west, but not a soul in the north.

No

silk,

not even a cravat,

must be allowed in the room. If a piano is there,'let some soft and tender chord be played but take care not to play more than that one on that evening. Previous to the experiment, two mag;

nets have been suspended, one north pole up, the other down, so as to embrace the subject's head without much pressure the poles ; must antagonize, and a current will be sent entirely through the

Noio he careful. You have already prepared a magnet, or magnetic bar, and when the subject is seated, and the magnets arranged, the operator looks steadily at that point of the lookingglass, whence the reflected ray will glance oflf and strike the back

head.

mag
and while doing so he points the bar magnet directly toward the open neck of the subject. In a few minutes there ought to be perfect magnetic slumber, and frequently the most surprising
net,

de

clairvoyance exhibited. It is still better if all the spectators grasp a cord on which a copper and iron wire has been bound, the ends being fastened to a chair, so that they point directly to the Bubject's body. If these directions be faithfully observed, success will follow nine times in every ten experiments. I may also observe that a slight alteration
will render this cir-

In such cases let all sit round a table itself, the chairs and stools being wholly insulated. the room be darkened, you may and probably will have curious

unequalled for different purposes.

INTERIOR VISION.
mental plicnoniena.
time
till

13
all

But

I advise the

chord to be played

the
sit

results sought for are obtained.

Again,

let

a person

facing the south, insulated, with the magnets in contact as before, the person being alone, and the results desired are almost cer-

tain to follow.
cle

But let me here say that no one in or out of a circan reach good and speedy results unless perfectly and abso-

lutely clean.

The bath

is

the very best of preparations for these

experiments, and cannot be neglected with impunity.

I have

known many

successes and

some

failures in conducting all of the

above experiments both in this country, England, and France, and I give it as my deliberate opinion that no one need fail in them,

and

will not, unless their

own

folly

and impatience ruin

all.

All phantasma are based upon the eternal


exists is something
;

fact, that

whatever

that thoughts are things, that spirit is real

substance, that
faces
;

all

things photograph themselves upon other sur-

that sensitives can see and contact these shadows, lights, impressions, and images, as abundantly demonstrated by Baron

Von Reichenbach
light, force

in his researches into the arcana of


;

chemism,
in all
(i

and magnetism

also

by thousands of others

and especially wherein it is said disbodied people project an image of themselves upon paper, the artist sketching the
lands,
outline with a pencil, thus producing pictures of the dead, recog-

i|

and blood. Now, the fact that dead people can and do project images of themselves upon the retinas of sensitives, upon the aura that surrounds certain people, upon similar emanations from houses (haunted!),
in flesh

nizable

by

all

who ever saw them when walking

so plainly that hundreds can see them clear as noonday,


ly established that fe^r are so hardy as to

is

so firm-

deny what

is

thus,

upon

the testimony of millions, in

all

ages, absolutely

and unequivocally
sneer, that for

demonstrated.
It is equally well established,

however

fools

may

of the loftiest mental power have used various agents as a means of vision, either to bring themselves in contact with the
supernal realms of the ether, or to
afford

ages

men

a sensitive surface
do^ temporally

upon which the attendant dead could, can, and


photograph whatever they choose
to,

or conditions permit.

During my travels through Africa, Egypt, Turkey, Arabia, Syria, and my intercourse with the Voudeaux of jSTew Orleans and Long Island, I became thorouglily convinced of the existeneo oi

"

u
magic of kinds t^TO
erned
t

INTERIOR YISIOX,
one good and beneficent, ruled and govother.

ful,

and malignant.

They antagonize each


;

The one

revels

passions the of saturnalia in the


t

the other, the true Rosicrucian,

Shadow

In the

host innumerable of viewless an by surrounded is adept one, the power, but and finally ends sap great to on him lead powers, who or her. him And destroy this acand ruin utterly and life, his out

by modern sensitives. The other leads its votaries through the glimmer toward the light, and unfolds at length that P'inal and CKO^VNING Clairvoycounts for

much of

ill

seen and experienced

ance, which

consists in

a clear perception of relations, causes,

connecting links, effects, and uses, by far the noblest and highest

aim to enable oththe true clairvoyant in But take notice ers to reach. THIS SUBLIME DEGREE MOVES AND ACTS ABOVE AND BEYOND THE TEMPESTUOUS REALM OF THE PASSIONS DEFIES THEIR UTMOST
attainable while embodied,

and

this it is that J
:

POWER.

Passion dims tue soul's best vision.

To

reach this

Ipfty eminence, the subject's physical

and proper preparation be made.

system ought to be purified Food, raiment, habits, thoughts,

im
to reach the greatest
right kind of effort

apex of possiMe mental power, unless the be first made. It is God's highest gift to indi-

vidual man, and cannot be

had without a struggle.


(

Since the

scribers, afterward

have been born into the world of letters, and everyone that I have seen, written by persons who have never known what
it

tations of

clairvoyance really

is

for it is a

demonstrable fact that but a very

small percentage are really lucid of all the vast throng that claim this divine and superlatively holy power.

The old-time mesmeric processes not the mere so-called " psychologizing: Phcebus, what a word! nor the "biological"
manipulations, once in such high repute wherever their "profes--" " sors heaven save the mark could procure a hall and a gul!

lible flock

of witnesses

but the good old-fashioned mesmeric

in-

duction, seems, in these latter singular times, to have come to an almost total stop and failure, for not one in every hundred experiments 18 a decided success according to the ancient standard of

INTEKIOR VISION.
ago and the universal complaint and testimony are that as soon as a subject is once fairly inducted into the hypnotic condition, he or she immediately passes from under the mesmerist's '' go it alone,'' or to determination announces a control, and either
twenty years
;

become the ^' subject" of some unknown power, at once entering the domain of mediumship, and thenceforth becoming wholly Now, I think there is no useless in a mesmeric point of view. real necessity for such a state of things, nor do I believe it would happen were it not that the operator is deficient in the prime elewithout both of which, the matter ments of resolution and will,

at

had better not be undertaken


r

Another reason for these frequent failures to produce magnetic states and the concurrent powers of lucidity results from the fact that men who mesmerize females become too susceptible to the powers and influences of lust^
all.

and during the operation of magnetizing are too full of lascivious imaginings and hopes to pay strict regard to the matter in hand^ and hence the subject spurns the control and acts independently^
or the invisible forces that hover about incontinently clap a stop-

and forthwith veto and annul the whole affair; for which kindly providence they merit and receive my most hearty thanks, and those of all other well-wishers of his kind, here or
per over
all,

over there.

Not

all invisible

onlookers, however, are to be counted in along

with seraphs and angels, nor do they always take a subject away
but it may happen from the mesmerist for that subject's good that obsessing forces of the ''Voodoo" grades step in to serve
;

their

own

peculiar ends.

People

may

laugh as much as they

please at the idea of wicked, mean, obsessing, tantalizing, tempt-

ing beings, or at the old notions of the alchemists and others of


that ilk
story.
;

but

my
it is

researches and experience


asserted that there
;

tell

a far different

When

is

no inner world of mystic


that th(^

forces under the sun

that there are no mysterious means whereby


ill

ends both good and


so called ''spells,"

can be wrought at any distance


are

mere notions, having no firmer foundation than superstition or empty air alone, then I flatly deny all such assertions, and aflirm the conclusions arrived at are so reached
ible

"charms" and "projects"

by persons wholly ignorant of the

invis-

world about
I

us,

and of the inner powers of the human mind.

Although

am

not called upon here to explain the rationale

IG

rS-TEEIOR VISIOX.
at department special
full length,

inrolred in this in direction the indicated clearly have

yet elsewhere

As weU
that*

tell

wL:::by two
-iredly so

which they are to be found. there are no that means as rise, don't sun me that the in contact, or brought be cannot persons dissevered

one person can which asof means by exist methods do not desired ends (of gain course to as another upon work

evil, the they be if even selfbut good, be to always said ends ought easily brought be into can and exists, power s^.ne principle and

ends said be those whether of matter no power), active play and and gain, of lust love or of revenge, jealousy, affection, love,
thing of in Asia, Afsort that much of too seen have power. I and Island, New Orleans, Long England, California, France, rica,

experience the and of years senses, my of evidences the doubt to of attentive study of this branch of the great magnetic law, to
doubt
it.

Indeed, so thoroughly convinced was I of the truth, that

I spent years in travel

and association with experts in order to be-

come master of the processes and the rather unpleasant secrets of In New Orleans noththe lower (as well as of the higher) kind.
ing
is

more common than for both

men and women

to

employ the

vouDEAUx to effect contact with loved or desired ones. I have never known a failure, albeit some experiments of acquaintances
of mine were rather expensive.

man

loves a

woman and

can-

not reach her, or vice versa; then comes in the Youd.


porsonal story to
ton, that
tell

I have a

on

this head,

with living witnesses in Bos-

would convince the most sceptical person living.


:

More

matter of sympathetic art I know that a pair of twin rings, containing each others' hair, one worn by the loved,
in this

than that

^he other

by the

lover, will blend the

two

in

magnetic rapport to magnetic (anoth

an astonishing degree.
)

The whole thing

is

business,

for,

although most of the charlatans


it

who pretend
is

to deal iu

them

are conscienceless swindlers, yet

possible to prepare and

charge certain materials so that they will retain the nerve aura of one person, and impart it to another, kindling up magnetic love between them, just as a little yeast will leaven a whole barrel of flour. Again, it will not do to tell me that one person cannot throw a spell upon another, and affect them favorably, or the reverse, at any distance Hundreds are living witnesses to-day of
!

my

public exposure

and defiance of the whole tribe of Voudeaux

INTERIOR VISION.
in

Orleans, at the School of Libertj^ in 1864-5, and it was from one of the Voudeaux queens (Alice n), and Mad-

New

ame

s,

a victim, that I gained

much
I have

of

my

knowledge
it

in

these occult points of black magic.


speculation,

known

to be prac-

tised for purposes of lust, passion, love, revenge,

and pecuniary

and always with a strange and marvellous success. Again, we are told that powers of evil guard hidden treasures, and successfully obfuscate and confuse the would-be finders. I believe it and also believe that said obfuscation can easily be overcome by a timely resort to powers of a higher grade. People are wont
;

to laugh at

and deride

all this,

as superstitious folly and blind

minds earth ever held, from Hermes Teismegistus, and the Alchemists, down the ages, to the last elected members of the Sarbonne, have believed, do believe it, and I glory in being found in such august company.

credulity, in spite of the fact that the loftiest

Napol & In corroboration of what I have written, I beg leave to introduce, without comment, the following article concerning " Voudooism,

African

Fetich Worship
:

Ne

from the " Memphis Appeal " *' The word Hoodoo, or Voudoo, is one of the names used in the Afr can dialects for the practice of the mysteries of the
(

3raft

common among
'

the worshippers of the fetich).


is

In the West
'

Indies the word

Obi'

universally used to designate the priests

or practisers of this art,

who

are called

'

Obi

'

men and

women.
the

In the southern portion of the United States,


Missis
rites are extensively practised

Louisiwhere

Obi

same

among

the negroes, and

where, under the humanizing and Christianizing influence of the blessed state of freedom and idleness in which they now exist, and
are encouraged by the Freedmen's Bureau, the religion
is

rapidly

under the name of Voudooism or Hoodooism. " The practisers of the art, who are always native Africans, are called hoodoo men or women, and are held in great dread by the
spreading.
It goes

negroes,

who apply

to

revenge for injuries,

them for tlie cure of diseases, to obtain and to discover and punish their enemies.
is

The mode of operations


2

to prepare a fetich,

which being placed


(

n'TERlOR VISION.
18
is farniturc) supposed the of to portion snug any in or door-'^" the upon victim, effects both terrible and dire most r^rodr-' v.. materials used for the fetich the Among mentally.
, c"'^y piivtti

a.

cats* teeth, clay and dogs' blood, colors, various of fcathr-^ are glass. of bits The broken chu' and beads, ^ i^-sheWs, c^rav-, from

i.

made

leathers,

with bound twine, rags, with and hair with into a" ball arranged as so to teeth, make dogs' or alligators', h '"^n,

animal of some an sort. to resemblance fancied the whole \n.iV a made aware generally that the is hoodooed be person to 'The in his mind created by terror this the and him, for ?^t' hoodoo is
'

knowlf.K-'e
is

is

f^enerally sufScicnt to

cause him to

fall sick,

and

it

a curious fact,

almost always to die in a species of decline. The

insidious vegetable the of hoodoos poithe of knowledge intimate ? that abound in the swamps of the South, enables them to use
t'

^0
*'

with great effect in

most instances.
our readers will better under(although we will

With
t!.>.

the above as introductory,


followinir,

stand
1

which we vouch for as strictly true in every


localit}'
sa}' that

'i'ir.

Names and exact


1

it

^
t

in

within a few miles of this city) are withheld at the re-

qu

of the lady,

whom we
a

will call

Mrs. A.
little

" Some mon^'^s since the only child, a


^.v,^ i>T,d
]

daughter of Mrs. A.,


ill

left

widow by the war, was taken

with what was

then

tl

" Tht
1

a slow malarious fever.

The family physician was

r"''-d in n-

prescribed for her, but in spite of his attentions she

grew
and

rr-^

^"ally worse,

" laimer

away

and seemed to be slowly but surely sinking Everything that medical skill could think of

was done, but in vain.


'

the

One evening, while Mrs. A. was w-atching by the bedside of little sufferer, an old negro woman, who had been many years
expre^^cd her belief that the child had been 'hoo-A.,
*

in the fimiu-,

'*~"'

^^'*-

wcs a Creole of Louisiana, and, having been from

was familiar with, and had not a few of their peculiar superstitions. In despair of v^^rivr^ J any benefit from the doctors, and completely baffled and
i

lie''*

inn\ncy

among

the negroes,

^^rn out with the peculiar lingering


"

nature of her child's illness,

'"rr:.ition of the

woman made a

-In
per

great impression on her mind.

the neighborhood were

two negroes who bore the reputar

^'^?; hoodoo
o

rNTERIOR VISION.
1860 or 1861,
brethren, these

19

As

usual with their more civilized professional

two hoocloos were deadly enemies, and worked against each other in every possible way. Each had his own particular crowd of adherents, who believed him to be able to make the more powerful grigats. " One of these hoodoos lived on or near Mrs. A.'s place, and, although she was ashamed of the superstition which led her to do
so, she sent for

him immediately

to

come over

to see her child.

The messenger

was the sorcerer's name) would come, but that Mrs. A. must first send him a chicken cock, three conch shells, and a piece of money with a hole
returned, and said that Finney (that
in
it.

"She complied with

his

demands, and he shortly afterward


i

appeared with the cock under his arm, fancifully decorated with strips of yellow, red, and blue flannel, and the three conches trigged up pretty much in the same manner. Placing the conches

on the

floor in the
it

shape of a triangle, he laid the cock down in the

centre of

on

its side.

He

then drew his hand across

it in

the

same direction three or four times. On leaving it the cock lay quiet and did not attempt to move, although it was loose and apparently could have done so had it wished. " After these preliminaries, he examined the child from head to
foot, and, after

doing so, broke out into a loud laugh, muttering


in

words to himself

an African

dialect.

Ml

was

all

anxiety, he told her that the child was hoodooed, that he

and
(

(Finney)
his per without hoodooing district his into come not could that he

mission.

then called the servants and every one about the place up, and ordered them to appear one by one before him. So great was although that, him, regarded they which with terror and respect the

"

He

failed to not one reluctance, with did so obviously them of many minutely, and closely one each regarded He summons. the obey

he or she had seen either a strange rooster, dog, or they questions which to days few past' the in house the around cat on the attended who chambermaid, The answers. various made

and asked

if

room

in which the child lay,

was one of those who were particulf

'

INTERIOR VISION.
20
before appear reluctant to

Inm

or to answer his questions.

He

re.

marked to ear from nJarly


!

this,

and _

inninf^ g'

so as to

show

his sharply filed teeth

car, he said,

'Ha,

gal, better

me

find

you out

buckra the than after and, night, at late was uThis

,.,.. making his rcconnoisance,'

prepared to and cock, go, telling the and conches his up picked he another room into and sufferer bed. little the move to A. Mrs morning, the in he early left back the be Avould he Promising that returned ho with morning a large next hour early At an
house.

incantations, he made peculiar into with a which, bundle of herbs, that and from hour it child, began the placed he bath, into which
to recover rapidly.

"

He

however, did not stop here.

He
;

determined to

find out

the hoodoo,

and how

it

had been

ii<^cd

so, after

asking permis-

and the bed in which the child forth brought a lot of and fetiches found he therein and lain, had fantastic the most forms, in together bound feathers of made burn them in the fire, her to and telling A., Mrs. gave to he which
pillows, the open ripped he sion

saying that as they had carefidly, chambermaid the watch to The girl, who burned and shrivelled up, so she would shrivel up.
had displayed from the
first

the most intense uneasiness, was

Hstening at the keyhole of an adjoining room,


injunctions.

and heard these

With a scream she rushed into the room, and, dropif

ping on her knees at Mrs. A.'s feet, implored her not to burn the
fetiches,

promising,

she would not, to

make

a clean confession

of her guilt.

"Mrs. A., by
the girl,

this

time deeply imprc^"^d with the strangeness

and mystery of the

was prevailed upon by the entreaties of and kept the 'fetiches* intact, and the chambermaid
affair,

confessed that she

doo man' to

had been prevailed upon by the other hooplace these fetiches in the bed of the child. She
'

protested she did not she wished to take

know

for

what reason, and that afterward


not dare to do so for fear of

them

out, but did

him.
((

As soon

as the family physician

came

in,

Mrs. A., completely


fetiches,

bewildered, told

him the whole


girl

affiir,

showing him the

and making the


cal

repeat her story to him.

He, being a

practi-

man, and having withal considerable knowledge of chemistry, took the bunches of feathers home with him, and on making a

INTERIOR VISION.

21

chemical examination of them, he found them imbued with a very

deadly poison,

two or three neighbors, and getting out a warrant for the arrest of the malignant hoodoo man, The bird had flown, however, the}^ went to the hut to arrest him. and could nowhere be found. Some of the neOToes had, no doubt, carried word to him, and he had thought it best to clear out from that neighborhood. The little patient, relieved from inhaling the poison in her pillow and bed, soon got well, and Mrs. A. has now in her possession the fetiches which came so near making her a
''Meanwhile, he told the
affair to

childless widow.

"

It

may

not be generally

known

to the public, but

it is

never-

theless a fact, that these barbarous African superstitions and

practices prevail, and are increasing

among
all

the 'freedmen,' not the Southern States.

only of

Memphis and Tennessee, but of


when
left to

It is the clearest proof of the inevitable tendency of the

negro to

relapse into barbarism

control himself."

So much for Youdooism. I believe this story to be true, for I have myself been a victim to the thing, but the '' doctor'' who analyzed the stuff, and found " poison," is both a cheat and a sham
to hide his utter ignorance.

There

ivas

no poison about

it.

The

w^hole thing is purely magnetic, as I can demonstrate at will, for I

from end to end, and speak by the card. But I have already exceeded the limits assigned to this part of my subject, and shall end it with a few words of advice to those who are mesmerized, who mesmerize others, and to that large

know

this thing

class of persons who, unable to be put into the magnetic state

themselves, or induce the sleep in others, yet have a constitutional

tendency

towards

the

occult,

peculiar idiosyncrasy

which

admirably adapts them to the investigation of the inner mysteries

and women, who -have strange prophetic impeople who feel strange pulses, weird and arabesque dreams mental depression without any apparent cause persons who are danger, and before whose or death impending of warned strangely
of existence,

men

the then vanish into deep and moment a glitter sparks eyes fiery through splendid seers the make persons such again, blank void

crystal globes, Japanese the Dee, and Artefius of magic crystals Trinue^ and mirrors of the magnetic splendid the still, better and

22

INTERIOR VISION
the

Cuilna seer, Armenian by country this into imported finer ones for selected and myself, used have I which of many ViLMARA, material any of loss the regretted think I never so deeply
others.

firstsplendid a of breaking accidental object so much as I did the I which but dollars, twenty-five class Trinue glass, which cost me

that times ten for with parted have would not

sum

for not only

surface, but magnetic charmed could I see five but of knew never it, I into of the hundreds who have gazed phantoraraas and will, at moving clouds who conld not see curious brilliant and noonday, as clear interesting, and beautiful strangely

strange scenes upon

its

ns polarized light

To

all

these classes of persons I say

Your

power depends upon your health, cleanliness, freedom from doubt, You must, if you would irritability, and above all, impatience. succeed in penetrating the dark pall which hangs between this
world and the under and over realms of light, yet mystery, cultivate firmness of purpose, steadiness of will, persistency in search
of the desired end, volume of lung power and
clearness of mind.

Mystery never opens her dark doors to the impatient seeker, has been the result of all my experience, and that of ever}^ true Rosicrucian that ever lived, from Thutli-Mor,

King of Egypt and high


explorer of the realms

priest thousands ofyears before the birth of the present materialistic

phase of civilization,
of Mystery.

down

to the
in
his

last

From Tiioth

palaces three
the

miles

square

humble student on the shores of grander Mississippi, each and both, and the links between, all tell the same story and recount the same experiencc that Mystery refuses knowledge to the impatient soul
ISile,

on the banks of ancient

to

and perceptive power cannot obtain it without a trial which tests the perseverance. They must endeavor to secure equable nervous, physical, and mental
health; for the

Always The persons who


!

seeks for interior light

"clairvoyance," falsely so called, which results

from sickness and morbid states of mind and body, is at best both unsafe and unreliable; but a psycho-vision, such as can without
be reached through processes herein laid down, and especially by means of a good glass such as Vilmara's, which, in my opmion, maugre all that table-rapping, planchetting, and other
difficulty

much

objnc^ors

may

urge,

is

incomparably a better, more rapid, and

INTERIOR VISION.
infinitely

23

more satisfactory means than any other known on earth

to-day, and, if necessary, I could give the


in their

names of scores of adepts


:

almost daily use.

ualism

is

Some may ask the question " Spiritnow an accredited fact why not, then, depend upon the
;

revelations obtainable from that source, for answers to all questions

concerning the interior senses and the invisible worlds about us?

What advantage can a person have by pursuing or her own person?" To w^hich I answer,
First.

the search in his

ten per cent, of what passes for spiritual intercourse has a higher origin than the " medium's " mind.

Not

Second.
her.

What one

sees, feels, hears, is positive proof to

him

oi

All spiritual communications come second-handed, but the


first

clairvoyant sees directly and reaches knowledge by the


tion.

inten-

Third. If a person

is

lucid (clairvoyant), he or she has a secret

personal positive power, and need not consult any other authority

whatever.

Mediumship" pla}' ed on and worked by


Fourth.
'^

is

automacy

a medium
it

is

a machine
;

others,

when

really exists

but the

knows, understands, learns, and grows in personal magnetic and mental power day by da}^ and while embodied makes the very best possible preparations for the certain and absoolairvoj^ant sees,
;

lute life

beyond the grave, which awaits us

all

when

this

''

fever

called livinir is over at last."

Clairvoyance necessarily subtilizes and refines the mind, body, tastes, passions, and tendencies of every one who possesses
Fifth.

and practises
Virtue
is

it.
; ;

Death is but by clairvoyance the bars of Death are beaten down, and it opens the gates of Glory, to show all doubting souls the light and life beyond. And why die
not a myth
till

work is done ? Is yours ? If not, this divine thing will enable you to more effectually accomplish it. Possession ordercth use. True clairvoyants do not count themone's
selves as altogether of this world, for they are in connection with, and do the work below of the ethereal peoples of the starry skies.

By means of

this royal road, the true seer or seeress is enabled to


scrolls of

read the varied

human

life

frequently to explain the


;

real significance of
for those

dreams and visions

who

arc sick or ailing

examine and prescribe in body, soul, mind, heart, affeo-

ixTEniOR v^sIoy
as

'^

neaimg oociies, cnaractcr, min^s, ever}' sou'of '-lit* -11 tr tr fear* a^'^ ''^ ^^ ^^^^ vision, not merely the secrets of Hv rc!
F

a
crood fruif-^^

p:-ociitly,

but
it is
i

them ad wisaom
also reachin<y

the sublime fact that organizatioa of ic:oion ^rapre per^^ TvLlJi of course begi's c''^;inty to the tinic",

,1.1
J.

on,
-i

love to all

maiikind

honce

'-'>
t

o fore-

^1

c^
^

fral or

are

111.,,^

must incvitaM}' come to p--9, eitucr iu the genand life iriivi'luars experience. There an of pl-ne *J and three choic ^ before every intelligent hutwo ro^ ilrvoyancc alone is competent to decide which 1
that
' (

'

Is

Axf thi's
I

magnificent science and power can enable us

Lw

r
r

*'^^

i-

haliuin.

t
ai,

iMI uud di
''
*

a Roscicrucian, I kn^tu that men .wainly through f.Mciiu^^ of Will. Clairvov"

As

*'

pt

how
..^i-'j

to strengthen

it.

The AVill
If
it

is

one
to

of*'

pilm'*

hiini.'iu
"*

^-

"'1

^^;

I triumph"^ that r^^^rk all the ng'^^. the

and

it

alone has ena])lod

Man

sleep,

orl
If
iuil
it

Iv,

P^'mI, or l^Miargic,
'

man
no

atn^Mnts to a mere cipher.


o^:3tacle

W
K'

and normal, there

is

can successfully
healed by
its

iLci

sway.

We know

that the

sick are
its

sL.
self

-gih

that

homes are made happy by

c:mc; to
her

r:aliz:.
t!,,;t

man through its hopes, in many directions, through


Will, and whoso hath
!

power i that love itdivine agency; that woman enn


its resistless force;
it

r,rD is

fulLot au'^ finest, most

re-

semblelh hini
7

S'

7^/

u-nihin o'Hi l,i,ifj ]^-n;ri;iy Qj- t^i^iQji

and of
Es-

T^
..'.'.

If

also, th'^-'"

who

love or would, love

may

find.

lo

this

Uuc of that large class who seek the

occult,

and

8tiMi-;ly <i-^iic to

world,
?"' 'm
ftnl

r^ h the cryptic light beneath the floors of the I mean the sons and daughters of Sorrow, An;

the Light

the loving, uulovcd ones of

the earth

'
n-'.v

lonely pilgrims over desert


^

sands;

the heart-reft mariners

liliug

and surging over the stormy waters of the bitter sea

of Circumstance,

for these are the

God-sent, and they travel

eur

the roughest
is

ppti's.

To

all

such,

Will, and

especially
all

C'"irvoyance,

a boon, a true friend, saying, "

Come
any

unto me,

ye that arc weary and heavy-laden, and I will point the road to
''

" cliiiivoy-^nce I mean not automacy In


man
or

shajje.

^^

hat a

woman

eats, drinks, is clothed with, inhales, or

INTERIOR YISIOX.
is

25
entire being,
[

surrounded by, has a direct

effect

upon the

W
>u, .v
\

sLall be partaken of or avoided, in order to purify the

create the best possible personal conditions?

What
can
at

che-^^'^t

cvi
I

answer that question?

Who among

them

all

tell

the

i>i\

1.^

magnetic, electric, or dynamic state of a

man
seer
in

ment of his life? Not one. But the clear more! What shall be taken or avoided
sions? the entire nature?
persistence?
principle?

^^-^n

any given modo all that and


s*"^'^"^''^-"!!

onler to

the will? the love nature? the fl<tgging ap|>oti^'^ '^nd


coui..-;\:?

iim*m->i j,,^^.

fortitude? fui*'^?

Mental lucidity alone can reply.

Nothing
toll,

is

m^^^

certain than that in certain thin^3


failure has b^-^n the result.

vouhavc undertaken, disastrous

And why?
o'^*",

You cannot
^r

but lu-

cidity will enable

you

to

Qnd

and rond

you

m'^^^^r or mistliat .,0


a'^

tress of the situation.

There

.4.0

three TuiNu^only
reaching
all

strive
1

for in this life, as times go,

and these are Love,


fail in

]NL)ney,

Po-

sition

(Power), but we often

or cither, only

because we are ignorant of the true road to them, as determined

by our respective organizations.


all

What

but seership can remedy

this?
:

Again

It

may happen

with the best of us that we have forfeited

love or lost

it.

That we are stranded midwaj" on the rocko of dis-

trust, jealousy, incompatibility.

Does passion lie smouldering? Do you love, and find that love unreturned? Are you forced to "eat your own heart," and languish all your days and nights in hopelc:: ^loora, as I have in years gone by? Have meddlers destroyed your pft"^, broken up the dearest and tenderest ties, wrecked you on the hard rock's of life's roughest paths, deserted you, and left you all alone in the Have you been wrecked on life's journey, a'-^d terrible trial hour? seek dry and solid footing? Do you seek communion with the dead, and to know the higher magic of Power? Here is Rhodes,
and here leap
!

Hope

Persistence

Is

it

worth while to know


of your under-

what your
cdi*^d? to

faults of character are,

and how the defect may be remfail in

know

the reasons

why you

many

takings? and what will lead you on to success? If man or woman hath lost hope, and love and passion are smouldering wrecks, is it

worth while to know how they

may be

resurro^^

from

t'

ir

pre-

mature graves?
to accomplish.

All this true clairvoyance will instruct you how

26

INTERIOR VISION
Sad. sad
imiles.

oonless

The

silvery coasts of fairy isles.

But sadder they, whose


Kiss empty
air,

longing lips

and never touch

The dear warm mouth of those they love, Waiting, wasting, suffering much.
amber, sweet as musk,

" But,

clear as

Is life to those

whose loves unite!

Thoy bask

in Allah's smiles

by day,

And

nestle in his heart

by night."

true soul. every singeth Clairvoyance thus Fatima; sang Thus then there and would everybody, be fewer by cultivated be should

marriage mistakes.

No
And

curtain hides from view the spheres elysian,

Save these poor shells of half-transparent dust;


all that blinds

the spiritual vision


lust.

Is pride,

and hate, and

Clairvoyance points the road that


valuable,
it

should be healthy.

But to be Sydney Smith said a good thing


all

should travel.

when he remarked
resist it steadily, for the Never give way to melancholy I once gave a lady two-and-twenty receipts habit will encroach.
'*
;

against melancholy.
all

One was a

bright

fire
;

another to remember

the pleasant things said to

and of her

another to keep a box

of sugar-plums on the chimney-piece, and a kettle simmering on


the hob.

" Xcver teach false moralit3\


girls

How

exquisitel}^ absurd to
!

tell

that beauty

is

of no value

dress of no use

Beauty

is

of

value; her whole prosperity

and happiness

in life

may
if

often defive
is

pend on a new gown or a becoming bonnet; and


grains of

she has

common

sense she will find this out.

The great

thing

to teach hor their just value,


ter

and that there must be something

bet-

under a bonnet than a pretty face for real happiness.

But
an
1

never sacrifice truth.


'*I

am convinced

that digestion is the great secret of life

INTERIOr. VISION.

27

that character, talents, virtues, and qualities are powerfully affect-

ed by beef, mutton, pie-crust, and rich soups.


thought that I could feed or starve
vices,

I have
virtues

often

men

into

many

and

them more powerfully with the instruments of cookery than Tiraotheus could do formerly with his lyre.'* The principle applies to clairvoyance (lucidity). Be so healthSelf-mesmerization is a very safe and sure road ily, or not at all. As a matter of course, every tyro and exif it is a slow process.
and
affect

perimentalist will not

make a grand
;

success, because in too great

a hurry

nor

is it

to be expected

neither will every one skate

or sing well wdio tries, until

a fair

amount of

practice shall

enable them to do so

that practice necessarily involving

many
ii

failures before tlie final triumph.

Mesmerism,

self or foreign, has


is

been

in use as

an educator for hundreds of long ages, as

proved

by the sculptures and tablets of Ancient Egypt, Syria, Nineveh, and Babylon, fashioned by civilized man over forty thousand years ago, if there be any truth in the archseological conclusions of Botta, Marictte, Champollion, Lepsius, Rawlings, Leonard Horner, and Baron Bunsen and in those ancient days, magnetism and chdrvoyance, judging from art relics yet remaining, were, as now, used Then probabl}^, as now, a large class of learned men practically. affirmed diseases mainly to spring from bad states of the blood and
;

organs, totally ignoring w^hat clairvoyance then, as now, asserted,


that they were (and are) frequently the result of deeply hidden
causes,
albeit

there

is

some doubt whether they even distantly


fact, that

glimpsed the recently discovered

every disorder bears

its

own

signature or

means of
;

cure, as plainly as its direct

symptoms
i\

themselves are apparent


fully baflOled

that

many

diseases that have success-

medical science are due to magnetic disturbances in

many

instances,

fairly eluding detection until forced to yield


;

the secret to clairvoyance

that

still

other,

and many, diseases can

only be accounted for on the doctrine of spores,

already herein
own
time, prob-

explained; nor, furthermore, were the '^learned" ones of that


day, any more than their brethren or class in our
ably aware, that at least three-fifths of
all

the evil in the world

social, mental, national, religious, physical,

agony, and premature death


fevers, colds,

and moral, sickness, sprung and spring from troubles,


love departments of our comi

and

acidities in the

mon human

nature, as clairvoj^ance universally demonstrates be-

93

IXTERIOR VISION.
all cavil, as it also,

yond

and

it

alone, can indicate the universal

remedy.
3Iost people are sick because there's trouble in the love nature

and that trouble demoralizes the


ily

man

or

woman, destroys

the fam-

compact, and, disorganizing the foundations of society, eno-enders multitudinous hells on earth, and makes crime abound like
locusts in

a plague

Ko power
causes at
the remedy.

on earth but true clairvoyance, can either detect the work productive of this domestic inharmony, or suijo-est
is

'

But what
self-effort

true clairvoyance?

I reply,

it

is

the ability, by

or otherwise, to drop beneath the floors of the outer world, and come up, as it were, upon the other side. often see

We

what we take to be sparks or flashes of light before us in the night but they are not really what they seem, but are instanta;

neous penetrations of the veil that, pall-like, hangs between this outer world of Dark and Cold, and the inner realm of Lio-ht and
Fire, in the

midst of which

it

is

embosomed,
is

or, as it w^ere, en-

shrouded

and true clairvoyance


It is

the lengthened uplifting of that

not the insane raving of obsession, possession, of a puling sickly somnambule It is not a lure, to win a man or woman from correct practices, or their ideas and standard of
pall.
!

heavy

Virtue,

not a trap to bait one's senses nor the mere ability to make a sort of twilight introspection of your own or some one else's corpus; nor a thing calculated to undermine the religious principles of any human being, nor to sap one's moral nature in any way, or to exhaust the strength. But It is a rich and very valuable power, whose growth depends upon the due observance of the normal laws which underlie it.
;

the Latin
;

word

for strength

it is

The

price of

power

is

obedience to law.

If

we would

be strong, clear;

seemg, powerful, the rules thereof must be observed and the adept and acolyte alike be ever conscious that no earthly fame gained,
or place reached, or wealth accumulated, will, or probably can, avail them or any human being, when, passed over the river of death, we take our places in the ranks of the vast armies of the dead, as they file by the Hails of Destiny, past the gates of God. What, then, is clairvoyance? I reply : It is the light which the seer reaches sometimes

through years of agony


;

oceans, as

by wading through

it

were, of tears and blood

it is

an interior unfoldment

IXTEEIOR YISIOX.
ot native powers, culminating in

on

somnambulic vision through the mesmeric processes, and the comprehension and application of the principles that underlie and overflow human nature and the
physical universe, together with a knowledge of the principia of the vast spirit-sea whereon the worlds of space are cushioned. Thus true clairvoyance generally is knowledge resulting from expert

ment,
It

bom

may

of agony, and purified by the baptism of fire. require a special examination in certain cases
is

to deter-

mine whether the person


or psychoraeter,

best fitted, naturally, for a sympathist, tn'-j such in any one of a thou^-md phases,

or for
to

decree
is

To go

blindly

but to waste your time and effort to no purpose whatever. If your natural bent, organization, and genius best fit you for one particular thing, it were folly to attempt to force yourself into another path.

work

Never begin a course of experiments unless you intend to carry them on to certain success. To begin a course of magnetic experiments, and become tired in a fortnight because you do not succeed, is absurd. Mesmeric circles are, all things considered, probably the quickest

way

to reach practical results in a short time.

In the attempt to reach clairvoyance, most people are altogether in too grc"t a hurry to reach grand results, and in that haste neglect the very means required, permitting the mind to wander all over creation, from the consideration of a miserable

love affair of

to an exploration of the mysteries enshrouding the great nebulae of Orion or Centauri. that won't do. If

no account whatever,

Now

one w\ants to be able to peruse the life-scroll of others, tlie first thing learned must be the steady fixing of mind and purpose, aim and intent upon a single point, wholly void of other thought
or
object.
third,

The second requirement


ivill

is.

Think

the thing closely

and

the correct solution of the problem in hand, and then the probabilities are a hundred to ten that the vision thereof, or the phantokama of it, will pass before you like a vivid dream or it will flash across your mind with
;

steadily, firmly,

to

know

resistless conviction of truth.

Mechanical or magnetic means may be used to facilitate results, but never by the opiates or narcotics. Lured by what Cahagnct wrote about the use of narcotic agents, and strengthened inthe hope by what Theophile Gautier, Bayard Taylor, Fitz Hugh

INTERIOR VISION.
regarding the wrote use travellers, of Other Tarioiis and T two make to experiments led was I 1855, year the P earlV in Nothing on ea.-th eould d^oing so for me forgive but'mayGod do for so, to I others know no suffer to or them, repeat to me induce result can evil, therefrom. unmitigated of much but crood, nossible advise purely magnetstrongly I lucidity, gain atte'Jnpting to

mow

manipulator, judicious or by a of hands the at either means ical worn bandage over magnetic the A herein. 'indicated means the back or front head, the in or either plates polar
head, with the

In

[ndnce Uie

the currents, equalize and to worn be may temple, either covering plate is made magnetic, splendid most A slumber.

the above to purposes, adapted peculiarly only not Boston, in here especially persons, females, sick all to value lut also of infinite impotentia, nervous . . any form of under laboring and men fact that notorious infantithe seeing help can eyes with

No

one

||

cide

is

becoming quite

too common,

nor, if he has a heart as

it

only does the Not evil so. is it that regretting should be, avoid extent greater among far a to but females, unmarried exist among
" married," the
this

as that term

is

generally understood.

Why

is

so?

The
It is

last

sad fact, I mean.

The answer

is all

too easily

reached.

because so

many married women

live,

not in the an-

opposite thereof. unmitigated an in but wedlock, of heaven ticipated fond cares, sweet, in the delight husbands, their love Women who

and deep,

full

joys of maternity

and happy wives never stain


at

their souls with

murder, for such

it is,

any stage of actual pregcalled into play to explain


final

nancy, no matter what sophistry


the thing away.

may be
is

Such casuistry

of no avail at the bar of

judgment, where

God

himself

is

on one side the bar

in the shape

of a quickened conscience, and a murdered


other.

No

matter

how

successful the

human being on the mother may be in the whirl


evil

of

life

and society, in drowning out the remembrance of the

deed, there will, as surely as


(

God

lives,

come a time when before


a long epoch after she

her weeping eyes will

flit

the

phantom shape of her dead baby,

and that vision will cling to her for


shall

many

have crossed the boundaries of time, and entered the wide

domain of eternity.
final stop ?

How

shall this dreadful thing

be put to a

I reply, not

by preaching and denouncing, nor by


it.

holding up the horror to public view, for that will never stop

Just nt this point

Love comes

in

and says

All

these murders

INTEEIOU VISION.
are done because
I,

31

Love, do not reign in the household, but Lust.


Four-fifths of the children,

has taken

my

place.

dead and livings

by thoughtless '' making family quarrel, way of just after a by generally fathers, Husbands are, if anything,, up*' and cooling down the tempest. more to blame for such a state of things, than are the wives,
are begotten of sick mothers, in a storm of lust,

for a loved
If

woman a man loves

never

"kills /

a woman, and that

woman

purposely destroys

the babe of her body, even at


tion to maturity, the curse of

any

stage of its career,

from incep-

God and

his blight is sure to fall

on

her and destroy the love between them.

He may

even encourage

her to the act, but

still

the natural curse impends, and in

way it will surely fall, for God always punishes murder. woman, remember this Let no father of an unwedded woman's babe, be ashamed of hia own flesh and blood, but do his best to render it and its mother s life happy and contented, for, in the drama of agee^ i^ maybe that, And let in other worlds, that child may link him to the Gods
!

seme Tempted

husbands learn that a child


genuine real estate, and
organized, which
its
it

is

the richest property on earth,

all

the

more valuable when

properly-

can never be unless genuine love presided at


let all

incarnation.

And

true

men and women

join,

every*

where, in one grand


lish

effort,

here and now, to very speedily estabcant,,

a refuge for poor women, wherein they shall, free of

creed or sect, color or nationality, be provided for in the season


1

of

trial,

unquestioned, and being thus removed from the awful


foeticide,

temptation of
for,

bring forth their children healthily

to,

and

and then, when recovered, provide, if need be, for the youngling, and repeating the sweet words of the dear Jesus, say, " Let them who are without '' Sister, neither do I condemn sin cast at thee the first stone.''

God, and

this great

MAN-wanting world

go thy way and sin no more Is such an ambition a worthy one? power to do this thing is near at hand.
thee,
!

*^

I think so.

The
!

da}^ of

nursling of long, bitter,

The pleasant hope is the and weary years. And lo when all
fairl}^,

seemed darkest, the golden sun shone out bright and


albeit I, like all frail creatures of

and

God's

infinite love

and merc}^,

have erred, yet never once from the heart, ever from the head,
angular head,

which the world

will

one day forget, but, I hope

INTERIOR VISION
32
soul the not
stood.
ueuLi... .., ^--

made
for,

It will

so, be always not

ronnd, and round goes Still the world men their courses run;

And

ppermostj

And

ever

is

justice done.

And

after all,

few

if

any of us
;

all that's

justice stern needed

want or ask for pity. Justice is and when that is truly accorded,

there will

be found

full

I, for for. looked been Slaters the of except earth, God's on people all lenity towards

only devils have where angel an many abounding have and this, believe one,

THE Innocents.
task

o
poet

may

benefit

all.

To

God gave us hands,


The

one

left,
;

one right;

first to help ourselves

the other

To

stretch abroad in kindly might,

And
Then

keep along a suffering brother.

if

you

see a sister fall,

And bow her head


Assist at once ;

before the weather,


thrall,

remove the

And

suffer, or

grow strong

" together'

may

too, them have lake walk way, your in get if they straight on, and don't mind them

my

advice

for I

sap-heads
man
or

mainly.

Go

round them, regardless of their spite. no enemies is seldom good for anything,

A is made of that kind of


woman who
They

has

in hand a has one every that worked easily is so which material she what speaks A sterling character is one who thinks and it.
or he thinks
;

such are sure to have enemies.


air.

are as neces-

They keep people alive and remark, to used brated character, who was surrounded by enemies, themof out '' go They are sparks which, if you do not blow, will motto. " Duke's" iron selves." "Live down prejudice," was the
sary as fresh
active.

cele-

Let this be your feeling while endeavoring to live


of those

down

the scandal

who

are bitter against

you

if

you

you dispute, stop to

INTERIOR VISION.
do but as they
desire,

and open the ivaj for more abuse. be a reaction if vou Derform
flock
error.

Let

and acknowledge their


tenor of your

Keep

right

on

tb'*

rough or even

own

waj-.

be
to the future?

why hurry

to the old haunts,

when you

o^e the

whole world hastening the other way?


dence, a
ity,
little forb^^'^/'-^^ce

little

generous pru-

of one another, and some grains of char-

might win

all to join
;

and unite into one general and brother) v


lition

search after truth

could we but fore


liKcit'-s into

of

crowding free consciences and Christian

canons and

precepts of men, I doubt not, if some great and worthy stranger

were to come among us, wise to discern the mould and temi)cr of a people, and how to govern it, observing the high hopes and aims,

and reasons, in pursuance of truth and freedom, but that he would cry out as Pyrrhus did, adnyring the Roman docilitj' and coura^':), * If such were my Epirots, I would not despair the greatest design that could be
attempted to make a church or a kingdom happy."
faith in the great spirit of

the diligent alacrity of our extended thoughts

Have you
discern

our might}^ people?

Can you

the instinct of its immortal longing?


tide of its irresistible
'^

Do you

hope to stem the

Ivance, any
flight

from the sky and stop their

more than to take the swallows toward summer? Is it possible


anything but men's

you can believe that tradition

will serve for

couch drnms, or that the shadows of antiquity will stnnd for the substance of Now? The President, Congress, and Supreme

Court of to-day are not, do not mean, the same powers of


years ago.
their effect

fifty

We

call

our Constitution the same

but laws vary in

with the tendencies of their administrators, as comof the obsolete;

pletely

as if they were repealed, or altered in their subs^'^nce.

Public opinion consigns some to the cobwebs


altered views change their very interpretation.

Are you alone


stirring with the

insensible to the change?

If not, be

up and

times,

in
life,

all

affairs,

of church,

State,

politics,

labor, love,

marriage, and the family^ for

we

live in stirring times,

when every

one of us must prove ourselves either pieces or pawns in the chess

game of

and to avoid being checked must play well

In these days of turmoil, climatic changes, political change, and

'

'

34

rN'TERIOR YISION.

revelation, true rampant quackery and and imposture revelation, villany side and by side, people may honesty science, blooming and its world fortunes but to do the of despair and falter so
;

his providence, doubt and for God, he has safely i3 therefore and let us truly trust him far, so through us brought to to distrust
the end.

not only read, but study KP^^, the glorious meaning of the following sublime jewel from the pen of one of Islam's poets for once armed with its philosophy you
;

Reader, whoever you

may be, I beg you to

will be

impregnable to

all

assaults,

and stand firm amidst the

wild-

est tempest

* Allah! Allah!
Till

'

cried the sick

with prayer his

man^ racked with pain the long night through, heart grew tender, till his lips like honey grew.
said,
'

But at morning came the tempter;


See
if

Call louder, child of Pain,


again,'

Allah ever hears, or answers,

"Here am I"

Like a stab the cruel cavil through his brain and pulses went;

To

his heart an icy coldness, to his brain

a darkness sent.
child,

Then before him stands Elias:


Dost repent thy former fervor
*

says,
?

*My

why

thus dismayed?
?

Is thy soul of prayer afraid

Ah!' he
I

cried,

'

IVe

called so often; never heard the ^'Here

am I;

**

And

thought God will not pity; will not turn on


'

me

his eye.'

Then the grave Elias answered,


Speak
to him, the sorely

God

said,

**

Rise, Elias, go

tempted;

lift

hira

from his gulf of woe.

Tell him that his very longing is itself

an answering cryj
is

That

his prayer,

" CoME, GRACIOUS Allah! "


is

my
*

answer "

Hers am
'

"

Every inmost aspiration

God's angel undefiled;


'

And in every

'

my

Father!

slumbers deep a

Here,

my

child!

Women,

a last

word

to you.

Perhaps you have a lover or

husband, and, that being the case, I say,


If you prize him, let

him know
it,

it;

If you love him, show

show iu

The cure
will enable

for all

wroug and

evil is to

be found in Clairvoyance, which

to avoid certain risks, at certain times; ena])le man to uuderstaud himself, his wife, and his neighbor; and thus will secrship

woman

banish crime, and bring peace on earth and good-will among men. So may it be. Let us now turn to another branch of the great subject of
seersbip.

INTERIOR VISION.

35

PART SECOND.
THEORT AND PRACTICE THE MAGNETIC MIRROR.
INTRODUCTORY.

My reasons for
dinary treatise,
literary

a very channels, a subject


among

writing, compiling, and editing the following extraordifficult task,

because wholly out of the ordinary almost wholly unknown to the great ma-

jority of readers,

and a labor that necessitated very extensive reading and

research of and

''Many a quaint and ourioos volame of forgotten lore"

were threefold: First, to relieve myself of the pressure of correspondence on the subject of the treatise, and occult matters generally, by recording the principal points upon which inquiries are made of me, from the fact that I am generally supposed to be thoroughly versed in many of those subtle sciences which for ages have constituted the special studies of the fraternities Pythagorean and Rosicrucian, to which I have, for many years, had the honor and privilege to belong. The second motive was that of obliging one who, in the dark hour of sickness, proved to me a friend indeed; and, thirdly, because the time had come wherein to at least partially ventilate a much misunderstood and tabooed subject, especially as the opportunity was afforded me just then to avail myself of very rare and unusual facilities for obtaining information on the subjects treated of, from one of the first masters of occult science now on the globe in flesh and blood and bone I allude to the famous Armenian Philosopher, Cuilna Vilmara, then on a brief visit to the shores of Republican and matter-of-fact America. Aside from these motives is another: Within these past few years there has grown up a very widespread discontent regarding theories, theorists, and the real causes underlying and subtending the strange and varied

Psychical

Phenomena of the

age.

Especially

is this

true with reference

to the but little understood, yet in reality vast, science of magnetics, one branch of which the following pages are devoted to. The want was felt

handbook. That want is here supplied. Amidst the heavy pressure on my time, health, and vital power, but little opportunity has been hitherto afforded the writer hereof, to give the
for a

g
subject the attention
it

INTERIOR VISION.
so richly deserves.

The task of bringing

its scat-

herein performed perhaps; imperfectly yet been has together tered ends mystery purposely of garb thrown the of it stripped have I fearlessly charlatans, and the rank impostors who pseudo-mystics, around it by on disgrace a matter and whereof odium bring and hands, abound on all
ignorant. wholly are they

science, however and a fact some a unquestionably is Mirror-seeing sneers of others the who despite are and see, to efforts their may fail in the of principia whatever of that nothing know conceit, own wise in their not who have the and kind condemn, or and deride glibly so they

which

quality of brains or mental qualified than they are.


is

power possessed by those who are


;

better

clairvoyance phase of it is the and mode another but Mirror-seeing different processes, and road, but dififereut a by reached power, self-same
can

strongly advise here all And I fail. wholly and totally others sons, while to refrain from the expense and trouble of mirror-experimentation, who

mesmeric character. But magnetic or interior an of tendencies have no possessing these, it is highly probable that satisfactory results will follow
a proper
trial.

In the " Master Passion," I promised to


to the
ink.

so-called Davenport Brothers I once wrote a book for them from so-called facts and data which

make a statement in reference mediums. They are not worth the

they furnished me, and which I believed were true


lieved

as

I certainly be-

them to be genuine media. I am now satisfied that the data furin nished were wholly untrue, and the alleged facts entirely imaginary, a word, I believe that the D. B.'s are dead beats in other words, that they are skilful jugglers, without the slightest real spiritual power about any

of their performances, save


that for

be "ardent spirits." I am free to confess years the brothers deceived me. I acknowledge the fact. " Why
it

did you not apply certain occult


vestigation? "
ually

power you are

said to possess, to the in-

Never thought of it for a long time; but eventbecame convinced it had been better to have done so years ago.
I reply:
late than never.

But better

P. 6. B>

The famous Dr. Dee, of London, and thousands of others, since and before him too, used a plate of polished cannel coal (which identical plate I have myself seen in the British Museum), and other instrumentalities also, as a means whereby to scan and cognize mysteries otherwise wholly
sturdy matter-of-fact people in these material days, wherein a great deal of pseudo-miracleisra is current, along with a very
that is real and genuine, are apt to ridicule and laugh at the idea that a mere physical agent can enable one to penetrate the floors of the
little

unreachable.

Some

ESTERIOK VISION.
ak
crysa or mirror, black-white concave, oval, an that notion the scout Such iustruiueusuch really arc hand, virgin's tal, or even a splotch of ink in a

and yet I ^now that such testify can who country this in thousands are regard that in claimed others and what Dee
talities;
is,

incontrovertibli/, the Tact;

and there to the startling truth of

What

upon the mirror^s face serene Your lot ia life bo written ? What, if its pearly sphoro Disclose to mortal view the far aud dark unseen 7
if

I,

Thia seemoth strange, yet doth to me appear. far events can often clear preview,
glass

Foresee what future days shall bring to p

There
Peace, war, health, sickness, death and life Of loss and gain; of famine and of store;
;

Deceits of hu^baadd, wives; of travels on the shore;

Of storms at

sea; the rise


state;

and

fall

of stocks;

and great commercial shocks; air; the in fortune good speculations; busiaess Of Of when to stop, or go; 'gainst danger to prepare;

The market's

Of turns of fortune; changes

in the state;

The

fall of favorites;

projects of the great.

The mystical hath been


on earth.
In
its

a more familiar face than that of frienus solemn school of dim and solitary discipline, learned I
to

me

the languages of other peopled worlds.

Unquestionably immortality is a truth, sublime as Creation, more solid than the granite hills; and it has been demonstrated in a thousand ways, physically, by viewless spiritual beings. There have been true mediums; there may be still; but it is equally certain that scores of heartless trick-

whose business it is to counterfeit these testimonies from the dead. These wretched people thrive, for they are sustained by an unthinking class of believers in spiritualism, who care all for phenomena, I call them horse-radish spiritualists; and their nothing for principia.
sters abound,

name

is

Legion.

Just so in other departments of occult science. False media and pre*' horse-radish spiritualists," abound call and what clairvoyants, I tended

on

unreasoning fanatics, else a cla^s of most wretched people who, for the sake of a little pecuniary gain, will not, do not, hesitate in the grossest possible manner to counterfeit true and real, and by their trickery bring odium on true spiritualism and genuine scerall

hands,

downright,

ehip.

In these days a real

medium

or clairvoyant

is

the

marked excepiioa

INTERIOR VISION.
33
mirror seeing, and the) crystal with Kmnd rule Just so * The thing land. itself the is in one true single every to fllse iTen nevertheless, like gcuulno yet globe, the on now civilization n than anv turn Indeed, whichever counterfeited. being
is it is

ned umship. wav vou win, a

constantly

prevails in the housediscontent deep-seated great and Rosicrucians, albeit their among so not is It faith. spiritual the hold of -hnt strong. fanatical not be; can strong as strong as is spirits belief in accept, for they as spiritualism, I modern of tired
getting are people The crudities. and jargon its discard but facts, real

Interested parties

The reason is themselves. Hhow will they but blotches, its hide try to little religion; too much hea^l, too and theorizing much too there's that of mine friend that to a a wrote Carlyle heart. of sparseness -reat and a '* liturgy of Dead Sea the was spiritualism modern of certain given form " Much of it is but out of what is good and true in it will, I hope, apes coming. time good the in hope and heart things of
;

do

its

spring glorious

Madame
main, one

Count Gerfamous St. the of account gives an George Sand lived this ever that magic-mirrorists remarkable of the most

lived for he had that claimed was it whom of and side the hills of India, revolutions surging the and of time, tear and wear centuries, despite the
of decaying empires
'

What makes

this

Count de

St.

Germain an interesting and remarkable


opinion
is

personage, to say the least, in

my

the

number of new and

ingen-

hisobscurer the points of doubtful the unravels he which by ious claims and history, epoch of or subject any about him Question of States. tory probable of infinity invent an unfold or him hear to surprised will be you

and interesting things, which throw a new light on what has been doubtMere erudition does not suffice to explain history. ful and mysterious. This man must have a mighty mind and great knowlege of humanity.
. .
.

It is with great difficulty that

derful things.

...
.
.

He

is

he can be made to talk of the wonaware that he is treated as a charlatan and

dreamer, and this seems to trouble


plain his supernatural

him much.
.

He

refuses to ex-

power.

He

has
:

filled

strange tales."

Frederick the

" It Of Count Cagliostro e> Great ordered him to quit Berliu, that he

Europe with countless is well known, when


left
it,

ia his car-

same time through each of the gates; at least twenty thousand people will swear to that. The guards at every gate saw the same hat, wig, carriage and horses, and you cannot convince them that on that day there were not at least six Cagliostros in the field.'' That same Cai^liostro fashioned and owned a magic mirror, now in Florence, Italy, in which whosoever he permittee! to gaze, could, and did, see any three things or persons they desired to, no matter whether living or dead And thousands as sacredly believe this as they do that two and two make four. Nor is this belief
riage, in propria

persona^ at twelve exactly, passing at the

any part or parcel of spiritism, so-called; nor superstition; but

it is

per-

INTERIOR VISION.

39

clairvoynature, magnetic of a being thing wlioTe the fectly scientific, will be exactly, as formulated easily and conditions, unusual under ance

done before

I finish this

monograph.

I quote
his philosophical

Frederick, the Great,

was thus forced to resume

serenity without assistance. ghosts for '' hour the and Cagliostro, talking of are we Since said, He
is it hard how show will which one you will tell come, I and stories has perthe from it have for I is true; story My sorcerers. in faith to have son to whom it happened last year." " asked La Mettrie. terrible? story the *'Is
*' *'

Perhaps," said Frederick.

Then I will shut the door; for I cannot listen with a door gaping." La Mettrie shut the door, and the king spoke as follows '* Cagliostro, as you know, had the trick of showing people pictures,
or rather magic mirrors, on which he caused the absent to appear.

He

pretended to be able to reveal the most secret occupations of their lives in this manner. Jealous women went to consult him about the infidelities great deal a learned have husbands and lovers some and husbands, of their mysteries of betrayed has mirror magic The capers. ladies' their about
iniquity.
ofi'ered

Be that as it may, the opera-singers all met one night and perform would providedhe music, admirable and supper good him a
feats.

some of his
hell, as

consented, and appointed a day to meet Torporino, Conciolini, the Signora Astrua, and Porporina, and show them heaven or

He

they pleased.

" The Barberiui family were also there. Giovonna Barberini asked to see the late Doge of Venice, and as Cagliostro gets up ghosts in very good style, she was very much frightened, and rushed completely overpowered from the cabinet in which Cagliostro had placed her, tete-a-tete with the
doge.

La Porporina, with

the calm expression which, as you know,

is

so

peculiar to her, told Cagliostro she

would have

faith in his science, if

he

would show her the person of whom she then thought, but whom it was not necessary for her to name, for if he was a sorcerer, he must be able to read her soul as he would read a book. '' What you ask Is not a trifle.' said our count; yet I think I can satisfy you, provided that you swear, by all that is holy and terrible, not to speak to the person I shall evoke, to make no motion nor gesture, to utter
' '

no sound, while the apparition stands before you.' *' Porporina promised to do so, and went boldly Into the dark closet. is the woman one of young this that gentlemen, tell you, not need **I most intellectual and correct persons to be met with. She is well educated, thinks well about all matters, and I have reason to know no narrow or restricted idea makes any impression upon her, " She remained in the ghost-room long enough to make her companions very uneasy. All was silent as possible, and finally she came out very

"

,^

INTERIOR VISION.

Slie immediately said to eyes. her from streaming tears nolo and Avith is a deceiving one: he sorcerer, a be Casliostro 'If her companions, no say wonld more. She Conyou.' shows he that nothing Have faith iu concerts, of my of one this at after, days few a me told however, riolini question to Porporina myself promised I entertainment. wonde'rful had much difficulty I Souci. iu Sans at sang first time she

about
.

spectres'so like

me told she thus but it, of speak her making of power producing strange the doubt, a beyond . has, Ca-liostro minds calmest to the bo for impossible is it truth that
:

it

the

and incomplete, I would is however, knowledge, His them. by unmoved for he Police, of would Minister your him make to sire, you, advise not show him to me the asked I when Thus, strange mistakes.
perpetrate

absent person I wished

to see, I

thought of

my music-master,
in the

Porpora,

who

is

now

at Vienna.

Instead of him, I

saw

magic-room a very

year.' current the during dear friend I lost " Pcstel" said D'Argens, " that is more wonderful even than the apparition of a living person."

" Wait a moment, gentlemen. Cagliostro had no doubt but what he had it had disappeared, when and, person, living of a phantom shown was the the first In satisfactory. was seen had she what if asked Porporina explain? Will you it. understand to wish 'I she, said place, monsieur,'
'

well, and is friend your that assured Be power. my That surpasses have you 'Alas! sir, replied, signora the this To usefully employed.' think, not I did person of whom a me showed you wrong much done me " ago.' months six eyes his and who is, you say, now living. I closed "All this is very fine," said La Mettrie; "but does not explain how your majesty's Porporina saw the dead alive. If she is gifted with as much
'
;

firmness and reason as your majesty says, the fact goes to disprove your

majesty's argument.

The

sorcerer,

it is

a dead rather than a living that he controls both life


I

your majesty, which,

if it

In that respect, he is greater than does not displease your majesty, has killed many

man. It, and death.

was mistaken, in producing however, makes it the more certain


true,

men, but never resuscitated a single one." " Then we are to believe in the devil," said the king, laughing at the
to

Q
. . .

Your Porporiua is either foolish or credulous, and saw her dead man, or she was philosophical, and saw nothing. She
conclude.

"To

was

frightened, however."

'*Not so; she was distressed," said the king, ** as all naturally would be, at the sight or portrait which would exactly recall a person loved, but know we shall see no more. But if I must tell you all, I will say, that she

subsequently was afraid, and that her moral


in

to

was not so sound a state as it was previously. Thenceforth she has been liable a dark melancholy, which is always the proof of weakness or disorder

power

after this test

INTERIOR VISION.
Of onr faculties.
denies
it."

41

Her miud was

touclied, I

am

confident, tlxougli she

power the under not if influence, the under And I confess I am person the me show to promised having ofCa-liostro. Imagine, that after eyes, my in read to pretended he whom of name the thought, I of whom whom living, as person a me showed he Besides, another. me showed he resushe error, double this Notwithstanding dead. be to know not he did and painful a me to be ever will that husband I had lost, and
"
citated the

inexpressible enigma."

details. the up filled fancy and phantom, " He showed you some I interested, respect no in was fancy " I can assure you that my I for Porpora, Maestro of representation some mirror a in pected to see had absence, his deploring while and supper, at him of often had spoken his make To words. my to Cagliostro paid no little attention

^^

^eeu that

task

more

easy, I chose in

my mind

of subject the as Porpora, of face the

considered yet as having not certainly, him expected I and apparition, the life in my moment only the perhaps at Pinally, serious. as the test

me asked Cagliostro appeared. he Count, the of think not did which I eyes my have to consent would I if closet, magic the into went when I of man was a he As hand. his to on holding him, follow and banda-ed, would he that condition it a made not hesitate; but
good reputation,
not leave
I did

without hand, my go let to not and moment, a me leave request not to promised I feel.' may you emotion what or happen, may what re-ard to swear solemnly me made He suffice. not did affirmative simple him but a silent and mute remain but exclamation, nor gesture no make that'l would havand glove, his on put then He experiment. the of whole dmin- the over my fell which velvet, black of hood a with head my in- covered to able being my without minutes five about walk me made shoulders, he of aware being from me kept hood The shut. or opened door hear any had I whether know not could I therefore atmosphere, the in change any turns, frequent such make me made he for not, or room the out of gone with and paused; he last At direction. the of appreciation no had that I it. of aware even not was that I lightly so hood, the removed one hand might that I me informed he free, more My respiration having become that I darkness intense such in however, look around. I found myself, which star, aluminous saw I time, short a After nothing. ascertain could first, it seemed At me. before brilliant became soon and trembled, at first was It me. near very appeared brightest, its at when but, ; remote most and intense, more and more became produced, I think, of a light which the star, approach me made Cagliostro which was behind a transparency. wall that of side other the On wall. the in pierced orifice an which was regularly lights with filled and decorated, magnificently chamber, I saw a of a air every had ornaments, and character its in room, This arranged. t(j however, time, not had I "dedicated to magical operations.

me

for

an instant.

place

INTERIOR VISION
4J

flppD meditation,

Sd

As one was no seen hitherto had I which in by a costume wUh purp faced e, satin, wh.te of cloak or robe a was it to remark, which I observed a on gems, hieroglyphic with breast the fastened over of various ribbons rich many and death's-head, a cross, rose a trian^^le, a .. ... ... After one Porpora. or not ^ was it that was see could I 1 tba A I's k I began to fancy a statue which personage, mysterious ....a^esrtMs" .vvu miu two distinctly, not Albert Count of face the saw I and hands, slowlv moved its death, but of shadows the with gaze, covered
as
it

cumu

^^^

^ fa

t as I

had

last

met my

animated amid

its pallor,

and

full

of soul in

its

serenity

such, in fine, as I

I was confldeuce. and calm of seasons beautiful most its in it had seen crushing movement involuntary au by and cry, a uttering of point on the of Caghospressure violent A me. from separated him

the crystal

which not know I with me impressed and oath, my of me reminded hand tro's the room of extremity the at opened door a then Just terror. vague what as was, he dressed persons, unknown many in which I saw Albert; and gestures, strange made having After sword. a bearing each him, joined very in to him, a spoke they pantomine, a as if they had been playing towards went and arose He comprehend. not solemn tone, words I could unintelligible were which and strange, equally them, and replied in words tongue. mother as ray well as nearly German know me, though now I
to

This dialogue was so had apparition, the of miracle the scene, of the
like that

which we hear

in

dreams, and the strangeness

much

of this character,

however, Cagliostro, not. or dreamed whether I that I really doubted so perAlbert of voice the recognized I and motionless, forced me to be comlast, At I saw. what reality of the doubt not fectly that I could speak and oath my forget to about was scene, I the by away pletely carried
to him,

hood again was placed over ray head and all became nor I you neither Cagliostro, said least noise,' the make 'If you dark will see the light again.' I had strength enough to follow him, and walk Finally, when he for a long time amid the zigzags of an unknown space. took away the hood again, I found myself in his laboratory, Avhich w\as dimly lighted as it had been at the commencement of this adventure. Cagliostro was very pale, and still trembled, for, as I walked with him, I became aware of a convulsive agitation of his arm, and that he hurried me along as if lie was under the influence of great terror. The first thing he said was to reproach me bitterly about my want of loyalty, and the terrible dangers to which I had exposed him by wishing to violate my promises. *I should have remembered,' said he, that women are not bound by their word of honor, and that one should forbear to accede to their rash and

when

the

'

vain curiosity.'

His tone was very angry. " Hitherto I had participated in the terror of my guide. I had been so amazed at Albert's being alive, that I had not inquired if this was possl-

INTEEIOR VISION.

43

preand dear this me of bereft had death that forgotten I had even ble. all this that me to recalled magician the of emotion cious friend. The reason, howMy spectre. only a seen had that I and strange, was very reproaches of the bitterness the and impossible, was what ever, repudiated from weakme protected which ill-humor, kind of a caused of Casliostro
llOSS.

You

feign to have faith in your

own

falsehood,* said I, with

with all that is sport you Yes; cruel. is very game your vivacity; most holy, even with death itself/ but in a angrily, said he, power,' without and faith, without '''Soul * You do, and yet vulgar as the death, believe in manner. most imposing " dies; Nothing die. not do said: We who one master great you had a forget to and seem falsehood, me of accuse You dies J' nothing there is imyour in death the name of is here untrue which is thing only that the my thoughts, overturned all reply strange this that confess I mouth.' pious and for a moment overcame the resistance of my troubled mind. How came this man to be aware of my relations with Albert, and even the secrets of his doctrine? Did he believe as Albert did, or did he make use
ah,

of this as a means to acquire an ascendency over me? " I was confused and alarmed. Soon, however, I said that this gross

manner of interpreting Albert's

faith could not

be mine, and that God, not

the impostor Cagliostro, can invoke death, or recall life. Finally, convinced that I was the dupe of an inexplicable illusion, the explanation of

which, however, I might some day find, I arose, praising coldly the savoirfaire of the sorcerer, and asked him for an explanation of the whimsical conversation his phantoms had together. In relation to that he replied, that it was impossible to satisfy me, and that I sihould be satisfied with
seeing the person calm, and carefully occupied. 'You will ask me in I am ignorant vain,' added he, what are his thoughts and actions in life.

even of his name. When you desired and asked to see it, there was formed between you two a mysterious communication, which my power was capable of making able to bring you together. All science goes no
farther.'

"* Your
*"

science,* said I,

*does not reach that far even; I thought of


I

Porpora, and you did not present him to me.'

Of that

know

nothing,' said he, in atone serious and terrible.

do

not wish to know.

I have seen nothing, either in your mind, or in the

magic mirror.
maintain
all

My mind would

not support such a spectacle, and

must

power. The laws of science are infallible, and consequently, though not aware of it yourself, you must have thought of some one else than Porpora, since you did not see the
senses to exercise
latter.'"
**

my

my

Such

is

the talk of
'^

madmen

of that kind," said the princess, shrugging

her shoulders. of a

Each one has his peculiar mode; though all, by means captious reasoning, which may be called the method of madness, so

44

INTERIOR VISION.

they are that never cut others, short, of ideas the disturbing contrive, by themselves." disturbed or *^and I was no longer Consuelo; said raine,** disturbed certainly
*'IIe

true or false, Albert, made of apparition me The them. able to analyze forever, and I shed tears. him lost had I that aware more distinctly

" Consuelo,' said the magician in a solemn tone, and offering me his hitherto unknown name, to all, was real ray that imagine may hand (you it), *you have great errors speak him heard I when surprise, an additional nothing to regain your neglect peace of will you trust I and repair, to vain to hide my in tears sought from I reply. to power not had I mind/
'

my

companions,

who waited

impatiently for

me

in the next room.

was

as I was alone, after having soon and as withdraw, to yet impatient more the night in reflections and passed comgrief, I my to course free given a mentaries on the scenes of this fatal evening. The more I sought to un-

became lost in a labyrinth of uncertainty; and I implicit than an worse obedience to often were ideas my that own must the oracles of magic would have been. Worn resolved to suspend my judgment until there should be light. Since then,
derstand
it,

the

more

however,

have been impressionable, subject to the vapors, sick at heart,

and deeply sad."


. .

**

You

are about to tell

me

that he died during the conclusion of

you that ho is not dead, that no one, that nothing, dies, and that we may still have communion with those the vulgar call dead, if we know their language and the secret of
the marriage ceremony.

I will, however, tell

their lives.'*
.

pliijhed,

While waiting for the miracles which are about to be accomGod, who apparently mingles in nothing, who is eternal silence,
*^

creates

among

us beings of a nature superior to our

own, both

for

good

powers. The latter are to test the just, the former to ensure their triumph. The contest between the great powers has already begun. The king of evil, the father of ignorance and crime, defends himself in vain. The archangels have bent the bow of
evil

and

angels

and demons

hidden

and their arrows have Satan roars and struggles, but soon will venom, and, instead of the impure blood of pardon circulate through his veins. This is
tion of
evil
all

science and of truth,

pierced the corslet of Satan.

abandon falsehood,

lose his

reptiles, will feel the

dew of

the clear and certain explana-

that
in

is

contend

incomprehensible and terrible in the world. Good and higher regions which are unattainable to men. Victory

aud defeat soar above us, without its being possible for us to fix them. Yes I say it is clear that men are ignorant of what occurs . . on earth. They see impiety arm itself against fate, and vice versa. They
. ;

suffer oppression, misery,

and

all

the scourges of discord, without their

prayers being heard, without the intervention of the miracles of any religion.

^ They

They now understand nothing; they complain, they know not why.
walk blindfolded on the brink of a precipice.

To

this the Invisibles

IXTERIOR YISIOX.
Impel them, though none
the

45
God
or of evil, as at
to

know

if their

mission be of

many. a being divine and powerful as Christ. I tell you all prodigies arc of God, for Satan can achieve none without permission being granted him, and that among those called invisi'bles, some act by direct light from the Iloly Spirit, while to others the light comes through a cloud, and they do good, fatally thinking that they do evil." "A few rare persons have the power of commanding their ideas in a state of contemplative idleness, which is granted less frequently to the happy in this world than to those who earn their living by toil, persecution, and danger. All must recognize this mystery as providential, without which the serenity of many unfortunate creatures would appear impossible to those who have not known misfortune." *' She then went to a rich . . toilette a table of white marble sustaining a mirror, in a golden frame, of excellent taste. Her attention was attracted by an inscription on the upper ornament of the mirror. It was ^1/ your soul be as pure as yon crystal, you will see yonrsdfin it always young and beautiful. But if vice has icithered your heart, be fearful of reading in me the stern reflection of moral deformity.**'

commencement of Christianity, Simon, the magician, sccmecl

...

If the thought of evil be in your heart, you are unworthy of con* templatingthe divine spectacle of nature; if your heart be the home of virtue^
.
. .

^'

look up andllcss God, xcho opens to you the door of a terrestrial paradise.** The loftiest spiritualism the world ever saw that of ancient Jewry

rewgnized the truth of such mirrors, for they the *'Urim and Thummiu "-polished breast-plates were used for purposes of a celestial divination, and are still so used to-day. Even many of the modern spiritualists recognize the same truths, for their papers frequently contain articles on crystal-seeing, and the magical uses of various jewels and precious stones; while one of their noblest ** Psalms of life" contains this
beautiful verse

**

But most the watching angels guide the thought^ If in the mortars heart be wrong or error. Soon by the pure and viewless influence taught, He sees bis wrong as in a Magic Mirror I

He

sees the

end where leads the tortuous path,

Its darkness

and

its

dangers; and, awaking,

He finds within his soul a holier faith, And turns, with willing heart, his sin forsaking."

The

chief Rosicrucian of

all

England
roll in."

says, in his recent

work on "
is

Fire,

When
shoics o/the

magical world

Again world
.

<The gauge

according
intelli-

to the

amount of absorption out of

this

flights which the


.

gence takes into the worlds not about us.

We

INTErJOR VISION46
in the focus of hl3

the

perfect ^^S^^'^^^^^;

sense of glasses
float over,

BiU

^^^ ,^,,, janclscapes. ^^3,


.

and new sight,

^ new adjustments of

new soul-sight the preternatural centria^^^^^^^^ undulate t,e sa^^^ ^^ ^^^ ^^^^ ^^^^^ can . . . s.ows. Cas.s pos^.'^^e. thing .3 ,,,y ,,, it kno^^led^e ^.^^ .^^^^ .^^ ^^ clsm or occult ^^ ^^^^^ upo strokes heavy by as working, ^^^^ T,.,.nrtni firP glow, by forj^od^out l^S^^' exalting an with this, And mortal forge. men's to visible grow to "even voiid, anotner 'aZhe t of out wealth real, less the None n^^^ination. Di^^^m^^^^^^ he and ecstasy, is This eyes. be, as the should we Else wo the in it of nothing see because we ,^^^ that j, light, God's ^^ of world magical this in is It Bible says, IxOQS. . . ^^^^ exterior ^^^ t^^^^^ and possible, t^f /^^, sainthood becomes the into ^^,,^,^^ n.n.,V,allv. magically, drawn, and worked nature God-like the obey nature Trodden

and ^1;-"=^'

^TnTJ

which is or, to, penetrated ^o'lds are ^^^^ ^^^ ^iniversal flat of

o^J^llll

We

_:

circle of its

power
It is

of the spirit.

magnetism. all-compelling by the unliywhich in life, magic a God-instinctive, is who magician, first The
subject or ,agic,

* ":;! ZAn.n.^SS :^r So:.*" a^.'


of Chlctais

Cardanus, aud Sculiger and


sight.

.s

placed

*"=

^'^

'
'

"'"^'^

t.mes later In K^^-'^'^'O^.f magic) (or inward ,c,c,ed ;' ^ hav.^reco-ds We^ Paracelsus.^ mirror-seer, ad magnetist groat ^ ad the art, the of masters grand of over three thousand these where of rifle-shot within land. our in right all liviug -"'>- us, before is nrirror the of plane The ^es aro Panned." stauy fj^^' the up roads its aud ages, the down lead lanes its but inches; or a,>d above within, below, Yastness the is field Its mnnite. he steeps this off next ' life ail contains elsewhere that but and elsewhere, around

J^'

factness. immortal an is life by^a full constantly^ kept rock, of basin natural ^In ancient times a

...

running stream, was


ing

magical its for haunt favorite a


iflection

effects.

The double

gloomy and pools Kocky melancholy. with tinctured contemplation deeply the in Craic-pol-nain the witness magic: of stories lakes figure in all Wiclvlow, of County the in Glen Devil's the Laynchork; of woods Highland the and Italy; of witch-mountains tlie Blokula; Ireland; the Swedish glens the in resorts, Babiagora, between Hungary and Poland. Similar
salt-springs. by mentions, Tacitus as of Germany, were marked, watergloomy the ' It was, really, only another form of divination by Mr. when ago, years pool, that attracted so much public attention, a few practised as success Lane, in his work on Modern Egypt, testified to its the witness to resolved
in

down

into clear water, the

mind

to and self-retirement, is disposed to

Egypt and Hindostan.

That gentleman, having

performance of this species of Psycho-vision, the magician

commenced

INTERIOR VISION.

4T

on spirits, fanaiViar his to invocation, of forms writing by operations his it, Nvas then in charcoal live some with chafing-dish, six slips of paper; a age of the reached yet not had who summoned procured, and a boy th& in see could that persons the were puberty. Mr. Lane inquired who puberty, at a arrived not boy were a they that told magic mirror, and was

woman. pregnant a and slave, female virgin, a black Lane Mr. the boy, and sorcerer the between To prevent any collusion When met. he boy first the take to sent his servant the into paper, of strips the of one and sorcerer threw some incense, drew and a hand, right boy's the of hold chafing-dish. He then took the of centre the in palm; the on marks, mystical some with square", steadily look to boy the desired and mirror, square he formed the magic he that declared boy the mirror, this In it, without raising liis head.
into
pitcharmy an flags, with men seven sweeping, saw, successively, a man Sultan. the on attending state of officers ing its tents, and the various adnow sorcerer The himself. Lane ^' The rest must be told by Mr. persou any see to boy the wished if I dressed himself to me, and asked me had boy the whom of Nelson; Lord named I dead. or absent was who pronounced he that difficulty much with evidently never heard, for it was tho to say to boy the desired magician the name after several trials. The Nelson. Lord bring thee to desires " and My master salutes thee, Sultan, then boy The speedily." him see may I that eves, my before him Bring and gone has messenger "A added: immediately almost and "so, said suit of dark-blue) rather, (or, black a in dressed man a back brought for a paused then He arm." left his European clothes; the man has lost
'

or two, and, looking more hia to placed it is but arm, left his lost not has he "No; said, mirror it had than striking more description his breast." This correction made sleeveempty his had generally been without it, since Lord Nelson had he that arm right the was it But attached to the breast of his coat,

moment

intently and

more

closely into the

lost.

mirror, the in appeared, objects asked the magician whether the appear right the makes which glass in a if as or eyes, the before actually rcnThis mirror. common a in as appeared they that answered He left. was I puzzled, completely Though dered the boy's description faultless. what of short fell they for performances, with his

as if

somewhat disappointed

he had accomplished, in many presEnglishman an occasions, these of one On countrymen. friends and him satisfy would nothing that said and performance, the ridiculed ent whom of father; own his of appearance the of description correct but a accordboy, The knowledge. any he was sure no one of the company had in man, a described to, alluded ingly, having called by name for the person and spectacles; wearing head his on placed hand his with a Frank dress, were he if as liim, behind raised other the and ground on the foot one with
;

instances, in pvesence of certain of

my

stepping

down from

a seat.

The description was

exactly true in every re-

.Q

Ds'TERIOR VISION
i

-. ..... posiuou peculiar the m)ect: stiff knee, caused by a a by leg, or foot the of that and ^ant headache, Shakespeare occasion, was deanother On hunting. Wl Torn a horse in and person dress to as and both exactness minute most the with scribed magician same has the excited which in cases other several add mi'^ht I of my Englishmen acquaintseveral of minds sober the in astonishment compared with be that may account whose Lane, Mr. far, So ance.'

ux tu.

........

..,

..^.-^-

XenbyMr.Kinglake.theauthorof'Eothen.'

medium than with the it; without better see could boy the writer, the to water. This of vessel fact in a images reflected see also could he thoii-h the to eye of reflected the are images such that prove to admitted be may thus enchanted, becomes brain the How brain. own mind and
seer from his

"It may be worth

of case recent a in that, adding,

hydromancy known

Certainly it is no question. another is vision, for disposed eye the or is transferred inquirer, the of mind the in image, that the recollected

proof

When we look contrary. the to shown be can to the seer, as proofs magical a with web, almost, over, woven seems closely Into' it, Nature rife." are . . . marvellous the of forms and dealing with nothing, know we which of ' things, Are there intelligent of solids which play perfect a mechanism, wondrous the world? Is .all a the only are people scientific the laws proceeds unerringly, and of whose of progress the Is miracles? as things such interpreters? Are there no never departed the do world, the of things never changed ? And, once out
-.return?
all the Are foreseen? be ever future the "Is all chance? Cannot the of forgery the inventions? strange matters told us mere fables or

imaginative mind, or the self-belief of the deluded?

How world? the pervaded always has "Whence came that fear which history, Cannot believed? been have spirits times, comes it that, in all spiritual of phantom this conjure cannot science, cannot common sense
fear, until it

really resolve into the real

Cannot the apparition be


until this be done, if

laid?

Cannot we

eject this terror of invisible thinJcing things


?

spectators of us
it

out of the world

Nothing
is

is

really

done

can

ever be done.
thing
is

Man
it.

other this until world, his absolutely not fairly in

out of

'It cannot be done.


truth of things.

And why?

Because

this fear lies buried in the

of believing it. the mistrust This dread of the supernatural is the clog upon his boldness which which spoils his plans which interferes with his prosperity brings a cloud over the sunshine of his certainties. Man, then, is afilictcd with this fearful mistrust, that, after all, perhaps, his life may be the

Man's interest lies quite the other

way

dream,' and that


'

knew) is the go? Are there well-known faces about


Are there
silent feet

unknown future (which is filled waking.' Where have our friends gone?
us,

with those
w^e see

whom
shall

he

Where

we

though

them not?

amidst our loud feet?

And

is it

possible to corae

mXERIOR
suddenly upon
these ay, and

VISION.

49

to hear?

Miracle, or flash, in the (con.

body." and spirit . . of waves trarily-struck) supposed the under fears their hide they But " Men secretly tremble. Separately bold. are they company In jest. defiance and in the boastful
they
reflect, in their

own

secret minds, that, after

all,

these things

their of surmises confirmatory such and true. True from such the from or experiences, unaccountable personal some perhaps, from, only But believe. to disposed are they whom assurance of some friend supposed are supernatural; the reject times believe. Modern
;

may be own true

disposed to to have

no superstition.

Superstition ?

When

this

modern time
;

is full

of

superstition! " But, unfortunately,

man

has restless curiosity

upon. depend finally can he which he solicits that fantasso evasive is so things supernatural could. But the evidence of scienordinary the hold by will he that unreliable, ticso, in one word, known. partially only that is says, he All mystery, tific explanations.

he loves real truth He would believe if he

the declares, man understood, is thing When that which constitutes a now before nature Unknown nature. mystery ceases. He only finds

known nature. "The faculty

exhighest that mean we wonder by of wonder or up, set to which upon world, this haustive knowledge of the things of
is a gift;

of ladder the By another. with converse of machinery the construct, to In sense. general the platform, top the the several senses, we climb to this And stretched. not is intelligence most men's minds this bridge of grasp to gems precious like rejected knowledge of the supernatural is an and cowardice, compliant A hands. which there are, literally, no to ought really, who, writers pervaded ashamed, merely half-belief have . . denied." they while believed who have known better " We feel a sensation of surprise and shame, that some writers who, out that saw weakness, of its out not and minds, of the secret strength of their eye, the meets than superstition called more in that which is

there

is

it seriously, with deal to afraid were and should, because they hesitated is Superstition ridicule. with it treat condescend to disparage and to Scott Walter ennobling. is a sense of the supernatural

degrading;

fail to be a benot could he mind his of althoughlrrom the constitution into, toned and for, apologized and liever-has surmised and supposed, we wondershis all resolved has commonplace and explained, until he that seen be never it Will into nothing. say, stripped all his truths

may

Scott's Walter plausible? only that is, even truth Invisible. the of sense deep really mind was not profound enough for a wise true the have, could nature We greatly doubt whether he had, or by an as but world this holds which man's sense of the Great Unseen that marthe with deal designedly not indeed, he did
;

our truth may be

island in

Whether, with up all trim and superstitions, vellous, and chip and pare, amidst his the of favor his in balance a the instincts of a romancist, and the eye to
it.

'

50
/>rl4v

rrrERiOR nsio:?.

b
o-

#,:^

w
in

n.
1 -

A^ a
ad

cl**^'--

*'^uof

It.

waiiicU
h'-a tift*

II

ho
of r.,u
up**"
f.

tl
,# ,1

,Mv

J
j^ T^

a:'
I

aii

thb.
'

W^t

his
*
*

.k in
to pi

trmC
^

haUeviDST,

^
te
Wa:)
^ j^

'

he u and e^cn nr,:en*tilT laughli^


,all

\V^.>
-. .
1

i^t

M
^
e.

tlm^ H^fhre
t

.f^oMe to Mrter.

This, If

rerj ihinf he dUin^ juooa. If I


th**
i

?f#*

it

ii

ho have trci*:3 of the marvelloD^ ha\.


It
151

*ttt
I

io

tb*'

a toar^'u to
t

""'^r.
it;

AH

tMn
W
I

wo
a
I

luc*

a the

^^ at love of

aiL
1

a of
"
,

4^A4wito
,

too
.iljn; t"^ great a

I ^
(

./ h roi
t
(

tlnsf

of the nnivo

pi,
f
V

f*

r*Vnr> !n
fO

^
'

*r

f'

'11:.*^.,

In Ihe fa'^*^nr>tnT'^

.- -

uiLt.t.sourformof
^ -

ih<

kril

''^

a.-*

it

l^

',*-v.^

o^^ ^'ro.a.

w^

'1^

.Mj fr%r

>.<.

world.
tl
I

n;i
'

and ezr
99
\
4

perna
re!**"g

aware

of
III
I I

4 ^

material which they hav

at
t

comf T>lt

II

inii'U:^ Y,'vh the -t:


c

.:nse of the N*
nt

al"^^*^t

>\ icli

op'^

thonijh lonu'in:r
'\ti o'ltj

'

>

t*"!!

vl

J to

pan'

3rt of

.Lame

ot TT
?*Wle
*
-,

at th^'r fm^
^^ in

A .id

half-way in every bcu


tl.^re Is
ly

^ ill
I

ii

1.

Them
,f
1

a;:
1

fc^v

fauuues
Is

nay,

an

^
t

^.,^^,
fl

r-'-"-'hj uncx; 'iilnablc luliis

li

if.

Thr
if

<^^pern :",ral tale alw*^ j


r?!
1

nn

. Jio iu

evc.y

br-

"Nowr,
I

^/ K^ fK

.
tf

but
ir

th*\f

iff?
iMi
1
I i

the '^npernaturar should not be Aiierc are plonfy of subj^o^q at wl/ich tbey mnr play,
.^,

I>y

w/
I

Knl

ai

f*.y
i

:*

their ordinary
^

life

so serioi^ ov*\
be
the
to

K
f>

of the
K^.,
1^

*5nnei

'-'e

believed, and its instan

^, caudid

A.ussM iiu'
of
t

t:.,j believe.

T>^" exp'

men ind honpot men,


''ons

mnko

which are frequently

offered

.,.,'s
V.
.-.

pi-w.i..,2r a-s
A

supernatural, arc greatly

ra-natural
*
ri

matters t^-'""-lves.

more difficult They are often

to cr^-Mt
inflnltcly

f^f^U
*

f^Tn1>

p-i,^

n..v,>T^,p.K,^^

Of r\r The nnc. oifortable fact is ^o^ n<? of. The snbj--* '- dismake way for the next soliciting object. The wonder is giv^n
^

^nghly :sarain.J, thc^ will continually fall to p' -^s pomo no.ro.inf"ble thin-s, in fact, nobodv credits the

And
.^

that

is

the whole process.

This

is

a very easy,

factory
pUnnrv^o
TT-'^

r?;-.v^i
\\ ^

We

^Ve are
,.

iry of the

'^^r nntnr-'
..

janron donbMoo, natural ;);i


h-

ihc hLstory of all unknown things has

jmpnn have
u

b.

ii

degra-iH,

ims similar, that at the out-

' '

INTERIOR VISION.
set,

51

There is nothing newer, other than that they have been suddenly and widely noticed, in these psychologico-magnetic displays this supposed spiritual this counter-working and false working of the betrayal universal transitive evolvement these aberrations of polarity. We have an abidiu'>dislike to, and we cordially dissent from, all this epileptic wandering"

they have iuvariably been invested with the attributes of the magical. We must carefully guard ourselves from credulity. Such things as these presumed Spiritual Disclosures have been known in all ages.

blameworthy nay, audacious reaching out at forbidden things. The pampered human mind can run into any extreme. We, on the contrary, are friends to the soiidest and plainest
all

this convulsive, incoherent,

common
"

sense.

apprehend that the explanation of the great majority of the spiritual manifestations as they are called may be, that the forceful magnetism with which the world is charged is (in states of excitement) impelled through the medium probably the stronger through the reflective

We

undulates again outwards, as we see the rings, or rather the single ring, upon a sheet of water circumvolve from about a stone suddenly dropped in. The exterior, magnetic, unconscious
it

vacuity; and that

may become intelligent, from which motived circles obeying laws of which we know nothing, or from which Invisible walls, come sounds vibrates motion. It may be at the intersection of these out-of-sense
'

'

rin^s

'

from the multitude of minds, must be innumerable, though they are altogether unsuspected) at which are struck all that strange attraction and repulsion which we call sympathy and antipathy, and in which are mind-commerce, and all the puzzling 2]7ienomena of the so-called spiritual shows. Thus the mind answers to itself. And instead of spirit
circles (which,
'

having much to do with it, it is mainly the invisible microscopical,' unnecessary work to the world of man's own other nature; real spirit being in the majority of cases still as far off as ever, and outside and transcended
'
'

'

of

all

of

it

All the grave gossip

and delusion, therefore, of religious com-

munication and of impartraents (truly pieced out, in his wild imagination, by the consultant's own convulsive ingenuity) of disembodied individualities, must fall to the ground. The phenomena are indisputable. What they are, the scientiflc world has yet to learn. We seem to fall, in
these things, into a wide field of vital magnetism. contagion." . . .

And

also into mind-

" To reduce the question into the narrowest limits do spirits exist? Is there anything apart from the solid, the tangible, the senses of man, the bulk of nature? Can intelligences exist without a body? Is the world of soul within the world of fiesh, or is the world of flesh within the world of spirit? Wiiich is the real thing, the material or the immaterial? All
the speculation

all

the purposes of

life

may be
Is
all,

confined within these


it is

circumscribed l-omuls.

Either this world

or
is

almost, nothing.

For

if

the senses arc all of the

man;

if

Nature

just the

mere

solids

52

INTERIOR VISION

circumstances is fortuitous; if of course the if us; to which she presents is believable nothing and if world therefore ; the in alone really, we are,

possible

but what

is

demonstrable;

if

human reason

is everytliing,

why, then, guide; only the if all that and guide true the sense common close we the sooner the account true, really with be us the world tells this case away w^ith it! In better! the phantom-world this outside

and

And away with we realize to ourselves


all

the spiritual tales

which are told us

The quicker that

the fact that all of the supernatural

though,

more the conformable untrue, it will be the of possibly, are We children ourselves. of otherwise. exercising comfortable the to fairy tales? with Why bri] ourselves frighten we should Why We must, surely, be as this damp of the phantasmagoric view of life? in distressing ourselves the rude and ignorant as the very unlettered
amusing
is all

concerning this supposed outside w^atch of which fabulists have found it Surely, in this nineteenth century, when exploratheir interest to tell us.
tion has sifted the world,

the watchwork of

it;

and science has exposed, however admirable, all when superstitions have been, even from their last

and when teaching has almost we are comsettled things, we can dismiss pelled to use the significant word, almost our belief in this old world-mistaken idea of the reappearance of the dead; of anything which has ceased out of the world. We can get rid of the fear of the preternaturah In one word, supernaturalism is untrue, because nature is true. And because it has nothing of the supernatural iu it. All the groping in the world cannot discover a thing that is not
lurking-places, expelled,

there."
*'

...
own domain, which
is

Science-men are kings in their

the world of

But they are very untrustworthy guides out of it. They can domesticate us very satisfactorily in this world, and can, piece by piece, put the machinery of it into our hand. But they can never give us aiiother. Nor will their glance ever arrest one invisible visitant from out another world; nor will their sight ever penetrate, for a moment, past that shadowy curtain which is yet, perhaps, penetrable whicJi divides the Seen from the Unseen. Let us give Science due honor; but let us
sense.

not render up to
present."
.

it
.

our hopes of the future, as equally as

all

of us of the

" True magic lies iu the

most secret and inmost powers of the mind.


were, barred within us.
All spiritual

Our

spiritual nature is still, as it

Avonders, in the end,


''In

become but wonders of our own minds.


the key to unlock the future science of magic, to
in cultivated fields

magnetism

lies

fertilize

the growing

germs

of knowledge, and reveal

the wonders of the creative mind.

and disbelicved-iu wisdom (out of this world, and its opposite). Reason is a great, public, relied-on mistake (in this world, and the same with it, in its, by man, accepted operations). The one treads down, and destroys the world. The other springs
*'

Magic

is

a great, secret, sudden,

INTERIOR VISION.
with
isince
it,

53

and makes
is

it.

Therefore
it,

man makes

himself in

one the worldlily true and believed, and grows, into his being, in it. And
is
lie,
.

therefore
since

the other, in the world-judgment, false and a


.

and a juggle,
.

man is contradicted in it. So says Paracelsus." "The crystal seers and mirror viewers use their talent

in telling love-

sick girls their fortunes, and,"

tenscore
brains,

What
uses.

of it?

God gave

all

men

more such things are said. but some pat them to swindling

Are brains, per se, bad things to possess? Barbers use leav^es of literature to wipe their razors on; yet essays nor the art of printing had that end in view. Trunks are lined with sheets of the Bible, but the " But all people can't successfatten souls upon. piinted to w^ere books A fully use these crystals and mirrors?" No one knows till they try. gentleman of Cambridge left me ten minutes ago, who had stopped a
little

time, while floating

down

the river of

life,

at Spiritualists' Island,

but grew

tired of the fruit,

religious,

reputed to grow there; just as I did, more thousands do and will; and he owned a very valuable trinue glass. builder of that seer than splendid more possesses a America if doubt I

and so on, and thousands more have, and still


social, philosophic,

glass enBecause the Why? systems! philosophical and houses brick perverse bondage of a the burst to fulness, magnetic its by him, abled That senses. the beneath that flow streams the reach and brainism,
is all.

Horace H. Day, the famous financier and true philanhad morning That I Boston. St., Pleasant in house my to thropist, came worlds inner the of doors the and sake, pleasure's for mirror-gazing, been in that him, and told foresaw, distinctly I and had not yet wholly closed; the Result, crash. monetary feel a would country September the sudto some " and thousands, '* ruin to carrying mouth, gold panic of that markets the forecasts who man one know I slaughter. den death by selfappears whicn sheaf the as grain,and in deals he trinue by means of another is wants All he market. the will inevitably in the glass rises or falls, so bamagneto-commercial his follow to man sensible capital to buy, or a
In April, 1869,

t
iH

rometer.
tell

He

will soon have both.


all

know

woman who

never

fails to

'

correctly

that others want to know.

odors, ethers,

deprecate this sort of thing; it a divine instrumentality; for, but purposes, psycho-visional and second to none other for iutromissioual fumes, Drugs, are. others all which objection, is liable to not one single nervous the disturb them, of each and all, mesmerism,
system, injure the brain, and their effects
are
all

But I iretting rich. She borders close upon a mere prostitution of properly used, this agency is not only

lit

unhealthy and abII

normal

but the mirror

is

free

from

all that,

and the things, persons,

plain clear, a.s tactual, almost events, and symbols seen, are actual, eflTects of tlie the resembling plauo-diorama, and distinct as any other wide is seer the for induced; is camera obscura, aud no abnormal state inits all in sense, every of possession iu intelligent, broadly awake,
14

54

IXTEFJOK VISION.

there is no strain whattime same the at while watchfulness; and te-rity " mesmeric lucidity, In nerves. the of tension no brain; the upon ever reproduced be they or can again never away; rapidly pass

are also

any picture of locality, place, face, given any mirror, the in but, recalledremain fixed, stato made be will, the of effort 'TvmboL^in! can, by an which, an besides intielect; shall seer the as long as solid, and J.ary, t; them than use can successfully can persons of Ditely greater percentage agencies. There above-specified the of combined all or any by effect.;, be there are only but two modes; mesmeric and diverse drugs,

the viMons

many

are which but of crystalline, the existence, in ^...Lo of magic mirrors besides being exsample; is a coal polished the which ]^^^\e use, and of peculiar shade and of a coal only that seeing obtain, i ulingly diflJicult to useless unless utterly of is then even and purpose; the answer
g. Jin will

to correctly sufficient be flaw, or solidity difference, a size, without crack, depends upon thing the whole the for polished; and gruiiu'd, shaped,
its surface, the magnetic upon retain and power all cases the surface in magnetic which on eyes; the fluid thrown from substance of the or surface the in or upou nut -ir, and '^n ap'^' thlii'^s and in front above of mostly but case; the apparently is as itself, mirror

of the mirror to attract,

cn^c, in that which, mirror, the through st.r sees the indeed, it. Sometimes, out-looker, that the spirit of the uses to and ends same the precisely serves

theeye-pio^^'^and object-glas^.o do to the external senses of the telescopist and microseopical investigator. In mesmeric vision there is a necessary
aTul unget-rid-of-able rapport

and magnetic sympathy between the opera-

tor and the subject,

which latter is, therefore, quite as likely to give forth the pictures, images, memories, and fancies of the former, as he or she is '* But spiritworld. outside from the and actual truth of to reveal the
ual or spirits'

thorr''-re,

magnetisms are not so likely to intrude fantasies; and, what a medmm sees must be true and real." To which I reply,

the objections against the spirir"\l, or the


it is

human magnctiism are spirits, so-called, even when


is,

tenfold stronger against


it

not, over once in at least


for spiritual trance
effect

and true, which two hundred times; for beyond all cavil,
is real

what pi^^s

in the vast majority of cases, either sim-

ulated, delusive, the

of mental habit, the effect of the physico-

mental influence of the parties present, or the result of a diseased condition of the nerves and brain. But suppose, for argument's sake, a real Mnd bona fide case of spiritual magnetism. How is the medium or bystander to

know whether

the thing seen is a real photograph of the un-

...u by mortals, or a transcript from the playful fancy of a disembodied wag or experimenter? The medium cannot tell, because the very term and service both indicate a person played upon, an instrument actual in

un u
made

hands

a machine

worked by unknown
at the will
literally

forces,

a mere automaton,
There
is

to

move, do, act and say,

of a power of which neither

they or the bystanders

know

anything whatsoever!
is

no

standard of comparison.

The medium

nobody

in the matter, while

INTERIOR VISION.
the iiivlsible,
!

55

and necessarily totally unknown, operator, is all in all The difference, therefore, between positive seership and mediumship in any form is the difference of a whole species; or that between hearing a description of Paris, and seeing Paris one's self; that is to say, it is the difference between act and experience, and the merest hearsay. These opinions are based upon over twenty years' experience and observation of both classes of phenomena. Tlie second class or order of mirrors (the first embracing all the
coals, light-colored metallic mirrors,

and

crystals,

none of which are of

much worth,
tury,

compared with the perfected instrument of the last cenand the present) are those made upon strictly scieutiflc principles
as

as to form, in the first place.

After innumerable experiments,

it

was

found that upon removing the skull, and slicing the brain of dead beings horizontally, just above the ear, that all heads of all the
races

human human
outside

were sIva^cA precisely alike, and that all differences of external contour depended upon the volume of matter on the periphery or
surface of the brain,
brain, at that

was found, also, that the foundation-point, was of the same general form or shape
It

the
it

cortical matter.

as the

earth on which

we

dwell

that

is

to say,

an oblate spheroid,

that such section of a figure, oblately spheroidal, was also the very best possible form of a magic mirror.

whence, by experiment,

was deduced

from the centre of the fore-brain, thus completing a magnetic circuit, and rendering the portion of brain in the line of contact exceedingly active, by reason of Its mcreased magnetic play and motion of the brain-particles there situate.^ So much for the shape. But experiment also demonstrated that something else was wanted beside the peculiar outline; for if the fluid impinged upon a perfectly plane surface, it would bound back, and the result of Its action would be merely the magnetization of the
of the fluid would penetrate the surfice and e io.t in space. Then a long series of experiments were inst;turd by durereut master-chemists, of different scientific lodges, in various pans of the world, to find a substance which would prevent the e' ap Of te refined .7,-this extremely subtle, magnetic fluid,-as the sides of
;

Such a figure having two mathematically true and absolutely certain /oci,* so that a stream of magnetism being thrown upon one focus slid alonthe surface and returned to the centre of the other focus,

fore-brain

organs

beside which,

much

in the

of the V very

?' first

proposed n Slating material, even if such should be discovered; which for a Ion" ' period of time seemed problematical.
If the

'''^"' ''^""^''' "^^^' ^^^^"^ indispensable. importance before the application of the

point

'^

convex form was used, the fluid -even supposing the retentive r.aw.s applied would roll off, like a soap'bubbi: from a ^^ ^^ ''^ ^"^^-^^^^^ ^^^^ ^^ -asnetic' ura d o, off at the ends and o7:t"thr:; "^rsides, and hang in a mass Lcncaih

the

56

INTERIOR VISION.

months were now spent And in do. never would wbid^^ourse mirror, adopted for was the concave glass last a at untU rearch, that particular it on the edge of a pecuto close placed was gold itself; a thin film of frame, made in concavo-convex coucompound coustructed 1 lUi y rare tluids, ethers, of motion the governing laws known forraity with the
i

and

<T

eous boJies.
to find an insulating substance,
affinity

The next step was

magnetic and chemical and e^-^^ric tive

and one having electo and with the finest

experience. human to It hud and science to known magnetism of form and hold insulate would electricity what that demonstrated ly been alit higher forms in its and element modes same that to sieve open an but W..O And so experiments else. were something to had be must recourse Lviice, metals, Lithium, allialiue the Sodium, with combined, and separate made, but Ammonium, without comsubstance, hypothetical the 'ium, and Pot., Magnesium, plete success. Then came the metals of the alkaline earths, Calcium, Barium, and Strontium, but without avail. Then experiments Didymium, Cerium, Lanthanum, were made with the proper earths, Zircunimn, Xorium, Erbium, Beryllium, Thorium, Yttrium, Terbium, and Aluminum; but still the proper thing was not found. Attention and trial was next turned to the oxidable metals proper, whose oxides form powerful bases, and these are Copper, Uranium, Lead, Cobalt, Zinc, Cadmium, Nickel, Bismuth, Iron, Chromium, and Manganese; but you might as well try to hold sunlight in a basket, as to confine magnetism within walls made of any, or any combinations of these metals. Therefore the next series of tests embraced the oxidable metals proper, whose oxides form weak bases, or acids, namely, Arsenic, Tin, Vandium, Osmium, Niobium, Antimony, Titanium, Molybdenum, Tetherium, Tantalum, and Tungs-

ten:

a nearer

approach, but

still

not the thing required, albeit

time, a deal of

money, and more patience,

much had been expended. Then

came the noble metals, whose oxides are reducible by heat, namely, Khudium, PiUtheuium, Silver, Platinum, Iridium, Mercury, Palladium, and Gold. Of course the isomorphous groups of substances, embracing
Seleuium, Chlorine, Cyanogen, Phosphorus, Fluorine, Iodine and Bromine, were also called into play, and a few of them, as some of the
Sulphur,

but not wholly, applicable to the purpose sought to be attained, not even by the aid of others of the non-metallic
*,

on

were found

partially,

eleui* nts, viz.,

albeit

It

Oxygen, Nitrogen, Carbon, Boron, Hydrogen, and Silicon, found that fusible combinations of fifteen of these score or

two of substances, associated with Phthalic acid and Paranapthalene, constituted just the thing required,

and r^ ^ric
far*^

namely, a compound with strong elective characteristics, presenting a perfectly even, white-black surtive in

and
is

Sei

the highest possible degree.

Of course
is

this sub-

stance

very

difl3cult to

make, and well

it

is

that such

the case, else

the land

would be flooded with counterfeit or very imperfectly constructed

mirr

As

it is, it is

impossible to

make them properly

in this country,

INTERIOR VISION.
and only one

57
is

man

ever imports tliem, and that

man

Cuilna Vilmaray

from whose very upon a monograph exhaustive this mand, meaning of a the catch correctly to easy not
lips I

am now

reporting, in as plain English as I can


difficult

comit is

subject

for
is

man whose speech

part

Armenian, and Arabic, and yet by dint lialf-a-dozen and linguists, two information, chemical patience, great of had of all he marrow pith and the getting in succeeded have lexicons, I translathe French reading case when the was agreed himself to say, as of this view^s herewith give the that I understood be will it Hence, tion. great master of the subject, as well as, and interspersed with, my ow^u and
English, French, German,
Italian,

others' beliefs

and knowledges of the matters under consideration.

The man whose experiences are wholly confined to things of the practical every-day life, is a mere shell, floating on the sea, totally ignorant of the amazing wealths lying scattered beneath the surftice, and piled up in mountains on the ocean floors; for there's more real worlds wuder this outside life of ours, than human brain can number. Dream-life, so wonderful, vivid, oftentimes strangely prophetic, is but one of these; and there is a real state even behind that life of Dreams; and we reach its mystic borders by the mesmeric roads, while we gaze into its very depths by the mysterious lens I am here writing about. There is no accident, no chance, only such seem to be to our outer senses but when the veil;

hangs over the inner senses is removed, we at once glance down the mystic lanes, and are in the street of chances; hence the future as the present and the past is a fact, and all their events are now I Wherefore
pall that

it is

not

difficult to foretell

what

shall be, if

we

but get beneath the veil

aud glance along the floors of the world.

God's numbers never change.

scannable by whoever has the sciences! They are perpetual Fixedness, Sir David Brewster, albeit he attempts to pervert the account to other ends, says that, *'It can scarcely be doubted that a concave mirror was the principal instrument by which the heathen gods (disembodied heroes) were made to appear in the ancient temples. Esculapius often . exhibited himself to his worshippers of Tarsus; and the temple of Euguinum, in Sicily, was celebrated as the place where the goddesses (disem.

bodied heroines) exhibited themselves to mortals." lamblichus informs us that the ancient magicians caused the gods to appear among the vapors

and the conjurer, Maximus, terrified his audience by making the statue of Hecate laugh. Damascius, quoted, in a bad cause by Salverte, says, In a manifestation (the cause of which, that is, a magic mirror, ought not to be revealed), there appeared on . .
fire;
.

disengaged from

mass of light which at first seemed to be very remote; it transformed itself, in coming nearer, into a face evideiithj divine and supernatural, of a severe aspect, but mixed with gentleness, and extremely beautiful.

the wall of the temple a

According to the institutions of a mysterious religion the Alexandrians honored it as Osiris and Adonis.

58
Basil, of

DsTEPJOR VISIOX
Macedonia, inconsolable at the loss of his son,

The Emperor hi^i miracles, who exhibited for celebrated Santabaron, went to Theodore dressed, magniflcenily and son, mounted beloved his of irr-^je the to him toward his father, threw himrushed youth The char'^er. -Tb nnon apon aerial image was no trick, for This I disappeared ^nd 4AA gelfin^
^
L

even now
pr'-lu^.J

o^'^'^^ ^*inuot
in,

do anything of the sort; but

it

unquestionably was
in this case,

or by, and through, a magic mirror.


in his life of

The plea

of imi

ure, is absurd.
Uc):'^''-',

Mr.

that famous artist's

what

is

more to

tlie

account of adventure with spectres raised by magical means, and, purpose, neither Roscoe, Brewster, or Smith, pretend

Benvenuto

Cellini, gives a thrilling

figments of mere fancy. were spectres, On the the they, that claim to contrary, all three admit the thing was real! True, they attempt to stave
off the

supernatural conclusion; but do

it

very lamely indeed, for

it is

pre-

tended by them that the magic lantern, playing upon volumes of smoke, accounts for the whole terrific affair, totally forgetful of the fact that
Cellini's

experience tooli place in the middle of the sixteenth century,

whereas Kircher did not invent that instrument till a hundred years later I The paragraph in italics on page 154, of Smith's edition of ** Brewster's Such hard-headed JIagie," is too puerile and contemptible to merit notice. people would fain make us believe that all ghostly appearances are phas-

mas
thiy

even

that of Jesus after his death;

and that

all that's

knowable

know; wheu, aside from the multitudinous impostures, there are


real spiritual visitations

enough
mental

worlds upon.

and visions to base the hopes of a million In no case, whether the objects viewed are physical or
is it

as in dreams, etc.,

the eye

which

sees, but the faculty of cou-

sciousness icithin the eye, brain, soul, of the observer; and as man is a spiritual beiug, it follows that he has a series of inner senses underlying

and subtending his external ones, and which series of internal senses are adapted to his natural-born spiritual nature; and all that he requires is a
bridge to help him span the thick matter and reach the spiritual ether. This the mirror enables many, though not ally to do. The condition of death is mental activity and physical quiescence. If

had without the quiescence of death, our greatest aim a new avenue or means of knowing: is attained. This is all the mesmerist and the mirrorist claim to achieve; and both have proved and made good that claim in numberless instances. The spiritual, therefore the substantial reality of all being, is above and beyond the other senses, and it is only either by his rising to it, through
the floors of the outer world beneath which he sinks, or him, that he can cognize the actualities of
either case, if his motive be good, he ascends his ac- junt must be rendered for his
act.

the activity can be

by

its

descent to
In

that superior world.

toward God.

If evil, then

When

a man, his organs of perception, his intelligent principle,


its

is

sus-

pended from

matter-bounded exercise; he can enter the domain of the

INTERIOE

YISION.^^^^^^H

59

the forglimpses of catch inuer senses; the gates, of the through real, time, but born of not yet events the cognize therefore and world, ward thereand, Necessity; body of the on of God begotten already are w^hich In the and being. experience, show, outside actual of fail cannot fore, the lets in soul, and of his windows the open throws he interior state deprecate seers can but true all hence spaces; of the glory and sunshine rare to imtherefore very and true, Clairvoyance of prostitution the such like and fortnne-telling, mere mirrors to the of that or uses; moral are, and can have been, things these unquestionably although for, ends;

means, their efficiency by and success marvellous and rare with be done, cart, or, butcher's a draw race-horse to first-class causing a like yet it is advice, caution and Hence the land. the plough to attire rich donning field, another world, another to gate is the mirror the simply because

World

99

writings whose man England, a of Rosicrucians master the of one Says " rank him high among the true genii of the world of letters, " Fire on man monograph, a who this quoted in largely have whom I from one and

aflfection every and of esteem the in place lofty occupies a deservedly true brother of the Arch Fraternity of Rosicrucians, in his last great work concerning the "Curious Things of the Outside World": "The

Phantasmagoria of real things are revealed to us only when w^e escape the outer world." In other words, when we elude by mental swiftness these cast-iron, outward-seeming senses of ours; and when we take a God-bath in the rivers that flow by our souls. There is a light of slumbrous beauty beneath this world-light of ours, and the spaces are thronged with aerial intelligences, unseen by material man. They, to him, wait in

and ''our'' effulgent light, because it illumines the waste of what to him is mystery. That realm is no shadowcountry, no phantom-land. It is a country without sound and noise; yet the fulness of melody echoes through its gorgeous halls, and the wingless cherubim are there in effulgent majesty, to guard its mystic splendarkness, but his darkness
is

theirs

dors; heuce, none but true, brave, feeling souls can loholly
It is a regal

cntci^

therein.

Gautama Buddha, domain where our under life is topmost. seer of all seers of the olden time, and equalled only now, if ever, tried, and in that land he has to stupid man, these sublime mysteries to reveal
;

waited six thousand years for the advent of understanders, just as that other king, the lonely Man of Nazareth and Bethlehem, waited nineteen

hundred years to find a score of Christians!


It is

Are they found?


Thus,

only in deep absorption that the soul can outwit the body.
is

tempted to waste his manhood in the lap of lust, his senses ever urge him to the deed, albeit he knows it is pollution and death which invite him to the horrid banquet, death-charged and dreadful! But the very instant he sets his soul to gaze upon the temptress, he sees her hollow heart, and realizes the danger to his soul and body; and

when a man

the sight and the

knowledge

frees him, that

moment, from

his thrall; his

rQ

rSTERIOR ^^SIOX
tempe-uous
nnns

his chaunels; proper its to back recedes cools; b^ilin- blood


-
."
:

,.

and
case

man: which
of want...
,

is

r-Tthe

when

lust

extinguishes

its fires in tlio

-iou.

Lo, here, what a truth

[.

[Note -For "The Master


!

see thought, this of amplification an


or.

"Love and

its

Hidden Mystery."

.'After Death; or,

their antecedent, And Raised." Curtain The Pa.,:on; Story."] " Rosicrucian's The Also Man." Disembodied

not iit cither possible, end is only landscape the telesc-'^e the in As in the exact focus, but glasses, unadjusted the amoii- the mi.lakcs of lu -Id that (rvosicrucians) we so even caught, where the sigiit-point is cross-point whore that at visible possible are beings only
sui-cniatural
;

In short, intersect. man dilatation magic the and the ang Mc contraction magico-magnetic focus at the at only it is telescope, V"''-4 him..lf as the spi"d be into. are to xcorlds i,^ essential the and ^^.j^;!^, world gpifit man can no enter tcrong, avarice, hatred, lust, of Under the dominion supernatural and Divine reward! own its is virtue either! Therefore
truth. absolute to road only the lllmnination that is, vision of philosophy The riatonlc
is

It

is

the view of objects

which assume form; not according to arunites This light mind. the of state the to according bi'-i'ry laws, but or iraagsensuous into a drawn thus and is eye, the in V ".h exterior light it reposes in separated, is light outward the when but, iiuitive activity;
really existing in interior light,

repose interior state of this in then, its own light so same the is It occur. visions correct and inspired tliat all ivJly light the -^ It is experiences. modern and books ancient in of -poben Oil' revealed to Piraander, Zoroaster, and the sages of the East. It is Boehserene atmosphere.
It is,

men's Divine Vision or Contemplation;


tlic

Molinos' Spiritual

Guide, and
It is

inner

life

of

all

true

men few,
all

and women many.

the

FouxDATiox-FiRR upou which

things whatever are buildcd;

am-

bushed everywhere; bursting out when least expected; slumbering for a-c-, v' ^ suddenly illuminating an inebriate's brain, so that he shall see the moral snakes and larva) of his perversion assume physical proportion and magnUnde to fright him back to temperance, virtue, and his
for:5akeQ

Godl No amount of merely

intellectual quickness, sharpness, or solidity will

av.iil

the searcher for the unseen!

A meek

spirit, attention,

persever-

ance, faith open only the doors

which lead to the vastitudes.

The world

v..

live in is full

nr^ic of spiritual singers.


here write concerning the

of the pattering of ghostly feet, and the I may not It is not difflcult to hear them.

methods of invocation, because fools will laugli, and the fraternity of the mystical, everywhere, would grieve thereat; and yet it is certain that perfumes, odors, and vapors of magnetic character have, in ages past,

and may again and in ages yet to be,

provvd immense aids to the true seer.

There are hundreds who visited the

INTERIOR VISION.
in

Gl

greatly at marvelled who St., Boston, Boylston "Rosicrucian Rooms" splendid the over clouds pass no seeing and ticks, hporin^^no raps or scattered and incense were perfumes unti' used, and owned rairror^'there

patterings rained upon the silver triof thousands burned, scores, floated over the seen by and of presence in glory-clouds, pc^V and

whereupon,

fidelitv;

mirror. peerless the of face black-'-"^i coldest the ihout of escape only the is supernatural the of The belief another term for magbut is where every magic word the and

mysteries from all its removes once at understood, netic, which, being beautiful realms of the into so-called, Arts," Black *' the of the region
ethereal science.
\-

hunwhatever; and any sort mirror of in a see can person Not every procure a genuine inunable to are them in see caii who those dreds of beautiful substitute, and cheap very a recommend such I To strument. easily made, mirror, mould Lorraine Clatide concaved a of form in the it hard, and and bake Dry, convex. slightly square, foot a clay of a lump press Then pasteboard on possible. as perfectly as surface its smooth

ltl>

smooth and even. Now make another exactly to match it, fine plate-glass. Bake till sheet of a place two these Between concave. Between these alike. two, two Make shape. required the to conforms it cemented one-fourth inch apart, pour black ink till full seal the apersubstitute for good a magvery have a you and purpose, that for left ture netic mirror. Else take a glass saucer filled half full of black ink, and you successfully worked in Egypt. so Lane saw as mirror a good have as will purpose good to served a often the has water pure of glass crystal A same end; and, in fact, there are numberless forms of substitutes for the
it till all is
;

Ml

genuine mirror, some of which are very good, but of course not equal to even an ordinary trinue glass. The rules and laws governing these substitutes are precisely the
*'It will

same as those of genuine

glasses.

never do to urge that these things lie beyond us. A fruitful source of the spiritual lowness of the modern time is the resolute averting of the face from deep thoughts, which, of course, give trouble. That
all

the lifting of the mind, that all the sublimest speculation, that all the

occupancy of the thoughts by these intensely noble and refining investigations; that all these high ideas, and great ideas, about God's providence, and his purposes in the world, end, when pushed to answer, just where they
opened, and in no wise attaining to definite result this is, of course, as true as that men cannot help their speculations and their wonder. But we unconsciously pass higher, and become something better, in such thoughts. We teach ourselves to place the world

1^

began

that

is,

where they

first

at a distance.

We grow spiritualized
it

and the very amount of our pleasures


time
is

multiplies,
is

because

purifies.

The

fault of the

haste

a wilful disregard of the higher truths

is

conceit

is

back again amidst the business of the world ment of incapacity to cope with the contemplation of man's possible

a protesting speed to be a cowardly acknowledg-

g2

INTERIOR VISION.

reliance upon, and of putting-forward hypocritical a hic^bcr destiny in the Providence superintending beneficent a of, acknowledsment questioned for is so everything unenthusiastic, so is time The abstract it is the voice that commonplace, to down toned so is all Us utilities and hearing we obtain a To arouse. can that and alarm only

of exclamaUon

must

call aloud.

"We
ourselves in

We
much. too dreams mechanic our

making very are We us. of out heart the living are We wUh sv-tems. is becoming as Formalism nature. of intensities grand the of clockwork the of translation the is living of method our and us, to a .econd nature cases fine very our Even pence. and pounds into charities life-Ionvastly too growing it-are figure curiously too perhaps, so, we may" Why not for us. wrought elaborately too and wonderful, too vastly fine and not bulk of outside painted mere of and material, rou-her be of varnish of and wood of components solid coarse, the -of sentiment flesh of a. of and blood, vermilion exquisite instead of making up of such something be There us of ? examples female marble-lil^e whiteness in the casting laboriously so are we when Why, you! look colors, in superb make all we should Hades, golden devil's the for ingots into as ourselves well might as we Surely improvement ? moral about fuss hypocritical this unand mean as wood, hard dead, into -turn
' '

become stumps -blocks

human our all and when idols, Lapland as aiulsome 1 out of demonstrated and argued convincingly most being are sympathies,
all our foolish pity,

too not me think oh, strangled are aff-ections very the when and us compliant too perhaps, but, contented, direct and plain-spoken, my dear, their bring sure to only are which those like irregular children; reader to a not belong they since town, no of Children discredit. into parents claim cannot they since love, town, where money abounds! Owning no affinity with the love of bank-notes the of burnishing the in cup the "We have forgotten the inside of
;

the in triumph Our life. our we all exterior. in perfection our of vaunting our common conveniences of life spite of cannot we But anchor. an forge go not great lengths. We can them
live half

Nor after

do

three or two in calico of cook a dinner. We can spin thousands of yards that indiflferently, so curve revolutions of a wheel. But we, personally, yet And gold. our with groan we can scarcely make a bow. The banks

we have not

the knowledge profitably

Plutusuniversal this In to expend a single dollar. our soul's advantage our while gold, into growing conversion, our heads so to speak are

towards mean here we which by

us! of inside paper-bag hearts are fast becoming but as the merest blown nature; of all this Is right? ' Is this Dutchlike life of toys and trifles

and

all

of us?

forests eternal the oh, and, Oh, this wilderness of flowers,

far microcosm inexpressible Let the mind, for a moment, glance at that the of sight of out from the vulgar disturbances of the pavements, and

DsTERlOR ^^SIOX.
glare of the
c'^^j

63

wbicU are the thin, spiry stalt^ iu \\L. -e invisibly tv^asury What neglected a blood. bright-green the up arse > c iii.^ \^ ilV""^ the s..kiug! for undreamed-of riches lie which in ours, of world i- tliw an^'^^s? Tvho stand inviting to the desireless all them "'^'>n W countthose Oh, might enter! we which upon Paradise a o.atinels upon stretching b-anties nature! Oh of sumless forever and diversities, le'''^
in

Blue ..^ the very ultimate floor of diviuity ye ^ u,st fields all e\cu all-exultant, of an intensity the through as worlds, with throbbing ible wonders, t!"t thousand ^ all ye I Oh, life God-declarant molenthj invisibly all this most through magic, fruitful the of as ficatter spells, the larger mind or of man's of whether universe, this universe; populous
above us
all
!

or meanness, evil, whether know, that ye Pronounce, macroc m! profane should a bud aught of whether purpose false to wrcstiug Vought to who himself mau Is not immense? so grandeur th-^tre of desirous b^^m so would he but as it of ion r""-^: as the the arch-glory,
r^

1i

of making him^^lf the blot upon


"'ibliraity?

this excellence, the lie to all this over-

powering banks, myriad of this in bankrupt the understand), which he may best supInexhaustible their draw might virtue and can thought whence

Is he not, himself

(to n_.k to

him the language

plies?

"

Were

gold-ribs the very

out of their

framework of the world, and were they tora mighty sockets; were even the Genius of its Riches shown^

because detestably, this of so heart very at the throned central, and bartas the pos sight (or the would globe worshipped glory, material its for so the spirit of the Were chance? immortal thine against s<->ion) match

splenblasting all his in revelation, single in a exposed, world material thou miserably merchandising heart thou seller of thy dors, would seat amidst the star-girt saints thou wretched contemner of the chanc offered th^", for thy salvation, by thy God! would all this compensate

one moment, from thee, of the face of the rulers of Confess, thou mad and besotted man! thine immortnl destinies? avouch, thou less defiant than hypocritical rebel to God's heavenly care of would thy very hngest heap of dross match in value with the thee tiniest flower, into whose thirsty cup the heaven-missioned spirit poured
for the averting, for
!

his eternal

Christening to immortality out " Boastest thou of thy world, and of thy dignity in thy science of it ? Art what is art to the reticulation of a fungus ? What is it to what is thy labor, the flne-spun tracery of the meanest moss? Labor

dew?
I

that thou shouldst pride thyself

upon it when the whole frame of stars be nightly moved ? Pride why, what a shallow thing is this pride, when to the lily of the field even Solomon, in all his glory, has been declared not when, thy rings and spots equal What than all, the snake hath more splendid? What be thy braveries, and all
!

thine ingenious

less than thee the adornment, when the summer insect 'painted child ofdirt surpasseth thee at them? What be thy money,
'

"

INTERIOR VISION
64

-as. .ha ,,,, with


,

..r

iiailS'tnyB goia come never to shall thee, as g which enioymeut ^nj * y clay that for ^^^ Hoarder ^^^.^^^ ^^^^^ metal precious of house? fences tenfold ^^^^ all thy al hou^e y earthly last thy ^^^^^ ^^^^^^^ in ^^^^ thee,

reliest thou o^surance ^^^ ^,y ^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^^

upon

it, it

may not
,^^

spot for

,,eless,

,n thy

.-ea

^-^ZlZVotJa U thy . h
'

so very thy thou forfeitest

.uowest, thou aught for and, chattels,' ,^^. ^^,,^^ ^^^^.^^^ ^^ ^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^

^.^

misspent

life

--. ''""/

C'rarSne^Iway f fr
B

tMne
It

heritage, and hast

T.:lT,L"::SL. good a boast uva.u = est esL


..

r.r AJaTow
of

thatas which to be

hath been thy great-

busmess-thou

ut.

m
.

renaenug up

thy-

self,
lifp

P-f"
to

thee

than a act virtuous single a better theu, sake, interest's own I'nne in poor the of prayer the thee, for Better, victories! at on of money reit whole a than widow, the of and fatherless the of the blessings n of conr whole a and menials, bowing of avenue an plate, of oad "ip nDi come must thee, with reckoning, the Remember that flatterers! lands thy of ' conveyances very the Perhaps time. in cumber yourself last, at found, be will there which in box, that in oiiay not be contained

fdeud,

will tell lawyer any as deeds good by Jble ^^j' & purcud^auic '"::7 falone come be * n i the law. miscalculated hast consultest him -thou
,
i

obligations.

that oe tuac If the real law be

i-i

if

thou

"

but too much room

for the possessor himself!

as to sagacious thou - Art thou wise even in this world's sense ? Art atworld the all When creditor'? and debtor of meanings the relative worlds inner concerning written have I which things these tcsteth that
'

persethen, thou, shalt true, are thereto, admission of methods and the flee which things false fine of phantoms of chase a in so hopeless

vere

good, iroigined an for strain from thee ? Shalt thou, with this knowledge, these all with thou, Shalt melteth? hand, own thine in even which, of sleep the sleep results which experience avoucheth as imminent, still acquiesce and hands, fools? Still, with no alarm, fold the accustomed

thy waste thou Shalt because we see all the world doing so likewise? for which, things, precious hours in the pursuit of those anticipated fine If thee? to daggers all thy knowledge to the contrary, are to prove as
selfishof pits or missing ihee, perhaps to prove nets to the feet to trip up, thou whom to ness, or of mistake, into which they shall fall, to those farther no have canst leavest thine accumulation That for which thou fanthou that Those use, keep it as tenaciously as thou mightest want
! !

riches. thy heiriug in may but inherit direct ruin That which might have been as a gold mosaic pavement for thee to walk
ciest best beloved,

over in thy lifetime, may, in the sinking under thee in thy final disappearance out of this slippery world, convert as into a devil-trap to thy children!

"Love not money, then, other than wisely;' and not 'too well-' Grow back into the simplicity of thy childhood. Time hastens from thee.
*

'

INTERIOR VISION.

65

Hve. to proposest thou which century half that not hast really, Thou hyget but vanity, thy in not Prate life. new a in leading e o r;t L child very a thyself confess And man foolish thou f to thv knees, better to ' mind thy Recall wisdom. true the in nr! than a child imitatest thou much too far by which in traffic, w^^hed 1^ tan U^i'nr flowers like which, affections holy the of much Make muc^orm. not wouldst ox, an like thou, (if thee of mind the in heaven hath planted children. thy of and feet) brutish thy with out daily tr 'ad them so own Thine thee. contradicteth children little Innocent Each of thine Tlvink policy false thy exposeth completely most the youth is that which Thy life. present thy in life the poorest portion of
1

that thou hast but

bank-notes, of and bonds of thy and profit, of margin widest hour the -in weight dead of tons as but -ay, clogs but alike shall prove that time that in or thee, before up start shall affliction when unexpected ay, wealth are Chains world. this of out summons real thou hast thy unconsciousone's in wound selfhell-forged, but

very mound

chains of heaviest link;

angels the hour last the in escape, its for which, -of acquisition ness of orphan the of blessings The soull struggling the free to perhaps, have, rescued now the but of trodden, downof the lately and of the widow thou shalt clay, thy of out triumph in be the wings upon which,

shall
of the

thine to and penetrate, shall heart thy Then to mount to the face of God doors the within thee welcoming assurance, ears shall reach, that blessed these meanest of the ' Even to it didst thou as eternal places
! :

thine earthly brethren, hast thou

done

it

unto

me

"The
world

man's transitory miserable, mere, this of out heaven, of roads this world of disputes and difficulties, of the struggle, and of the

eagerness, to live, but of the compelled

and confused haste when death

arrests
of things

this place

of weariness and discomfort, of in the real reasons very frequently, the high-placed low, and of the lowly-placed

ways, leading beyond those clouds of heaven towards which thou gazest, thou longing man have not those solid barriers of division, between body and spirit, which thou, sometimes, art taught to believe!
high
I

the

Look out into the universe important as thou thinkest thine own globe -and imagine what innumerable mansions' thy Father's house' hath! By how many ways may the hope (which may be all of thee) travel into the celestial spaces! By how many natural and ethereal wickets the blessed may, according to their natures, enter! Are not the stars as
*

'

bright doors, opening into the glory?

*"God called up from dreams a man into the vestibule of heaven, saying, " Come thou hither, and see the glory of my house." And to the servants that stood around his throne he said, " Take him and undress
him from his robes of flesh; cleanse his vision, and put a
his nostrils;

new breath

into

arm him with sail-broad wings for flight. Only touch not with any change his human heart the heart that weeps and trembles." It was done and, with a mighty angel for his guide, the man stood
'
*

lyXERlOB VISION.
CG
terraces of heaven, ^vitbout the from and voyage; infinite -f.rhls rea . endless into space. away Somewheeled , tliey tu 11 t nnce once at well, fare r, ..,^,W1 U . ^ ^ through fled they Zaarruhs of angel-wing of thr^oleronflight Vk es ^'^h jl the divided worlds that of life; death, of t.'a^h wildernesses "^ quickening, under were that profrontiers, : over th..v%wcpt Then, from a realized. distance yet not life Mon/tow.:ds a time, through for a si a dawned, light heaven, in only "c'ouated they by to unutterable swept light the pace J/^.m. unutterable .m.!bv upou was planets them of rushing in the moment a
'

j-

'

T:Z
'

^'''''

'o tiie li-ht

In

right the To hand and revealed. to not were but uvi'li.^ht that revealed, self-repetitions and by that by constellations, Tft'tou-ered mi-hty mysterious by that combU counter-positions, by that afar, from '"^ver8 whose archways architraves, whose gates, r^-., built up triumphal spans, that by seemed altitudes, -at rose -rested, upright horizontal,

,eut the blazing

them. around was suns of

Then came

eternities of

uhc^My from gates. Within the were memory beyond archways, the were nnmber to the eternities descended that above, eternities g' "^aled the
stripped of gravman the to above, was below Above was below, belo insurmountable, height height in up swallowed was Depth b-ly. itaan'^ thus they as rode Suddenly unfathomable. depth in up rwullowed wu, abysmal worlc^^, over tilted they thus as suddenly infinite, to infinite from more billowy worlds mysterious, more systems arose -that
a
'rs

infinitude,

"VVithout

that

mighty cry

depths other and heights, other


hand.
'
'

were dawning, were nearing, were at


1

overladen His wept. and shuddered, stopped, Then the man sighed, farther no go will Angel, I *' said, he heart uttered itself in tears; and glory the is Insufferable infinity. this For the spirit of man aches under from rest find may I that grave, the of God's house. Let me lie down in And none." is there see, I For end, persecut'-^ns of the Infinite!
the

chant: choral one issued around from all the listening stars that shone that none is there End " Even so it is it is. Angel, thou knowest that
!

desolemnly angel the none?" is there ever yet we heard answered, " voice no " But you ? kills that And is this the sorrow Biar'kd. glorious his up threw angel Then the that he might answer himself.

"End of."

han^^ to the heaven of heavens, saying, "


Tcrse of

End

is

there none to the unl-

God ?

Lo, also, there is

no beginning !"'...
*

" If the bond of the whole visible world be the universal magnetism the be Magnetism then the immortal, uuparticled Spirit, of which this
8ha.1ow,

may be

that ineffable potentiality in

which

be, alone, possible.

In this manner shall Sainthood

shall religion real the time. all of true be

lu this

'

manner

this In possible. new world of the old world,' shall miracle be ont of thfi f;imi1i'ir sTinll rnmn t.hp wonrlerful. In this angcliC

medium

Ueaven be And alone be." " In my book I have sought to cast loose the chains which men think
shall
1

INTEEIOR TIBIOS.
.
,

"'

'""Z

::J-TofT.cconni
n

"

out Spirit Iguoring ours. of world soulless solid, . f thi, dense subuot will it because Eejectiug miracle, course, of Is, which but world; the produces which

mlcWuery

l-::oTes whouy

over mastership "t to eTplL the the separates that irthe frontier

itself.

Which machiuery great, outside, uuUnowu


ns dlspo.
abdicated

::rrh"n;rp:t;^:lre "Tltir
as pedestal, sessod
throne.
it Is

to superstition

upon Supernatural the to replace

rts

"rnd
c

if,

when 1 Pml "" triumphant so then was he which of Kedecmer, the of "on eli he n! tl; cernms himself "'^^ he, which (in .-every
taeax AsriPPa a ctamP'on.

of eloquence mighty the to time, a long so after listening, for conproof on proof and Inference on inference heaping
j^i,

!CV:ul
,

;,,

Iw

fu;:

r Vf,l

exclamation not we may l' Christian a be to Persuadest Thou lost shall probability of light such reader, reflecting to the the that see 'almost shall too, he, that as r^ ments, our' hours, familiar own his In even him_ about posslMe may be

,,d

^,^^ ^^^^,,,^,,^^

day?" present and ,,. nn.linthisourmodern ,, ,. f hnnse to proposed author the hand, reader's the in now :! work n h the establish to power, his of best the to First: objects. certain these the prove to Next, denies. science This supernatural. the of roib my to Lastly, rejects. faith This supernatural. the of existence nt p ; believe we that thinJcing the in not possible, only Tow that all relic^ion is .anMnd Eor believing. in the actually but per : ; ^an^^^ rather, or, matters, divine in belief of subject the be dividedsections great three into worldthis of out anything The crediting of d wou who those into secondly, nothing; believe I'rst into those who In believe. they that thinJc who those into lastly, believe if thev could; imis things impossible believe to as included are class, large" last tl orders. various the all of 'good' and ;onscientious posslwe-all the their and power their of best the to ; according believe People can only conI as which, in miracle of conviction the of common sense stops short tend, real religion can alone lie." i , .t, ;/i said, has author the what of - It will only be thoughts which arise out things other lie there that see will lie musing. that will set the reader in indeed, nature this of work in a which to beyond, farther reference illuminaclear as accept, will who Those improper. would be any work by who, those are world, this of delusions the tion out of the fogs and readers, Ordinary recognize. to fitted are knowledge, intelligence and by author the mind, of vivacity natural the and curiosity of whom, out of most as pages same the accept will many, have feels assured he will profoundest the stimulate will which in things certain matter, amusing are there reading, in For, gift. higher the have who thoughts in those

...

Lv

...

two views.

9>

iNTEElOR VISION
C8
the of guardians the societies ^^^ the in whom, 'ofwliora, of knowUdge,

moi e

recondite and secret pliilosophical

gi^.ter
^ill

^'J^^^'^^^^^g^ eveu^^^^ even number number, ^^^^ _^ ^^


.g^

there are a abroad and at home ^^^^ the uninitiated might suppose, it

^^^^ ^^

^^.^

^^^^ rthnn-h (though


,

f.vr^ every

of entertainment in it) is i find will reader in any mind, which, might disclosures ^^ ^u^^^^^ tne by there approach, ^^ ^ ^
be

be Qffl^'^"'^J^

abundance presumed

extraordinary the philosoof purpose and m ^^^'^'^''fJ^lV/^eamns = real the u Respecting of which this book coutheRosicrucnns-some^len^d^^^P^^^^^^ p,y of ^orks- indeed they are, do also as tains, profoundest the general is -there an R^gieruci were a mighty sect they that is them of supposed is Ubat A rnor'n': involved insomuch were practiceindeed,
Ifhose '
a^^^^^^^^^^

"torr'"'' the Bjstcr,

the arausemcut, but problem, the only ^^, not times. O. the pr,e,p.emo^e... or ::r::r;:/irthrr::a.ce, therefore, be 5mmust, unknown the all of that one true very a usually those turn of who the served has Cabalists I 'the story of these of their history, it use made have writers modern If impress. so""irt'to of the Rosiname The romance. into materials
'"^ ^

scarcely was them compvehenrfon of

possible.

Aud

this

the up weave 'been to charlatans with might of word a been crucians has

they have been the

n^us ?ernity-

with all charm potent a objects and designs its stunulatmg of power a it, through possessed, they that iLe who thought introbeen have Cross Rosy the of Society the of curiosity. Members ex aeus the as flitted mysteriously have novels in duced as heroes, of knowledge of want From imagination. the of tales ^lachiua, through been have They everything. supposed been have they what they were, exas and magicians, as down set at-feared-laughed wondered at dreamFanaticism, men. lot of the children of

in fiction. dealers the with of exciting,

The

character of the mystic

-have been

empted from the

common

all self-delusion accusation, of form milder the in in-, imposture, and, they which in forms From the curious
;

this has

been assumed of them.

they which fables singular ; because of the knowledge their iave.st chose to have they hidden, be should secrets their which in medium the elected as they But men. scarcely as race another of quite as upon been looked have been much mistaken. of terras -the thinkers original all to arrival of late "Justice is so fallin long so are sense), and of astonishment (not in the good

prejudice,

iug off from profound searchers

that, even

now, the Rosicrucians

'"

other words, the Paracelaiaus, or Magnetlsts


arch-chemists to

whose deep thoughts and juggles the (not science is indebted for most of its truths. As astrology of and being, of method the seeking exploration, the true stars, but of the the was as astrology the glittering habitants of space)
workin
of
;

the as ignored are totally modern labors unrelaxing

N
^.

INTERIOR VISIOX

G9

the Ro>icrucians) popular the that unrncs-and n1v one of itcir Eosicrucianism side, applied its In philosophy. present all of ^rouuclvvork Herthe as Cut vaUutble. so and flimiliar, so is which i the very science popular their Lave course, of they, religion, great a metic Beliefs are '- "There them. to mythology is a there consequence, in adaptation; and. be may it which through faith, every to machinery a be n u^t alvva -s machinery childish the accepting ia is people of mistake the known And rehgthe for religion a of mythology colored fitly) (but coarsely and the the of doctrine supposed Kosicriicians' the Hence it. of all iou itself and its kosylpliids, or sylphs its elements various T the of children invisible salamauand salamanders its kelpies, kelps, or gnomes, krolls, bolds catalogue necessary but picturesque the all hence ondines its and driues might vulgar the that system it a constitute to belief, of items of paraded intellibrighter that surprising is It sense. with reconcilable as accept concealments. and coverings only as this .rences have not perceived all certain display to possible not is it that once, at seen, be to ou-ht It there perhaps For religion. every of priests chief the are Mystics r. tliinssfor all was knowledge that than supposition uevTr was a worse-founded who Men grow. never individuals of classes people. The minds of some children much as are possibilities mental their of last the at arrived have (which knowledge their for unfit as are and intelligences, higher the to chilthe as dUhelieved), be sure to being of merit however, great the has, of, admits capacity their than things higher of dren, knowledge to whom, disclosed been yet, has, as that All talk. nursery falsify in
' ;

we

conceal and

eomprehensiou the to only fitted fable is Rosicrucians of the beliefs of the As faith. of a necessary first the as mytlios of those who demanded a introdisciple the is so mind, the in kindled is more and more of the light fit, so becomes himself, As he, truth. greater duced into the greater and it is because (and, sense mystic the And in him. are things fitted to move and facts settled their leave men when mystic, the only true sense), process, inverse an only, by they unbelievable, as assumed towards things

and stories children's their leave and facts real the as it were, approach as impossible nay, transcendental and fantastical, Mystical, fables.

seem in the modern ultra-pracare science contemporaneous of the truths that forgotten is it tical days, Out of natural philosophy, all based on the dreams of the old thinkers.
the studies and objects of the riosicrucians
the occult brethren

sought the spirits of natural philosophy.


unlike ordinary
life

And

to this

inner heaven

so

througli

purifications,

through

humbling and prayers, through penances to break the terms of body with the world, through fumigations and incensing to raise up another world about them, and to place themselves en rapport with the inhabitants of it, through the suspension of the senses and thereby to the op( niug of other senses to the shutting-out of one state, in order to the
invocations, through

'

passing into anotlier state; to

all tiiis
'

the Rosicrucians souglit to reach.


that

"

By

the rhilosopher's

btoue

we acknowledge

wc mean

the magic

INTERIOR ^^SIOX
70
crystal, in which impossible-seeming spirit-seelug translucent or '"'"'^^' dissolvent, a tninsuniversal or menstruum The disclostd. re '"".'=', general regeneration, of power magical a or ^Uoe eh.. "i^Tjent the with the deal to materials capacity of sen widest '""Tin their them; of every evolved pha^o of are things contrary llltnre until quite these pliilosophors. of ' assumed That >^'eu has

e-a

Ki

vn

rl-e

lights begin grand to shine, m . the nature, material ou -^de of our accomplishments were their suspected vulgar the by But t' -T argument. treasure-house in \Yhich lie the very the of rr keys 'Jen forbidden t the , i knowledge immortal the to gales the unl-king nsof what is by advaucod see, will in this volumes thoe up ^ who take t; or iucouclusive Hmdes crude no with deal they that coDHudlng c'-iptci-, people. Nor that they are theorizing imaginative, of merely "enthusiastic, to sought be diverted work, from unconscientious the in Ku l.e defrauded simply seduced in nor the pluusiattractions, flimsy in the
'

, !

judgment traitors tribe; book-making bilitiosonhe


.""jlid
-.

compelled or lured

to the

k'/ers! of ommouu.alth g^' Ilargrave Jennings, (by Things F. R. Curious < of volume sr-ond i^iie herein), made in which been will be have extracts copious which V Uoxxi
r%

'

'

speculation, points, as its keyinteresting and original very found some though surprising well-supported asserfollowing the to were, as it Du.j, of India Buddhists Upper (of whom the race, extraordinary 'That t->n:
I

Melchizedek, Canaanite, rhoenician the miih, S.^.^Jienge, Carnac, etc., can be


anr - nt

Mythologies of the

was a priest), v:Uo built the Pyrashown to have founded all the World, which, however varied and corrupted

were originally One, and that One founded on principles sublime, beautiful, and true!* " And at this stage of ray book, I may, with propriety, cease addressing
in recent times,
in the

formal and distant third person, and, in

a*=^ure the

kind reader

(who has

my individual capacity, accompanied me thus far, and so long)

that the

work,

in

volumes upon which he has been occupied have been the full one manner and another, of two years, I first formed the notion
It

of such a book as this at no less distant a date than nine years; namely,
in 1S51.

umes.
I

was in October, isr>8, that I first commenced upon these volExcept a certain interval from December, 1859, until the succeed-

when I Avas otherwise occupied, the task has held me, uninterruptedly, down to the present. Twenty years of metaphysics are exhibited in the conclusions of this book. They have, thus, the guarantee of delay and of thought. Much thinking produces good acting." ''Distributed as over the wide and heaving sea of history, most numerous fragments, evidently of a mighty wreck most wonderful the ship, and of materials and of design portentous and superhuman have floated as to the thinker's feet. Chips as of strange and puzzling woods pieces
ing March,
.
. .

that, dissevered,
ters,

bore no meaninu diverse matcontradictory objects only, through keenness, with suspected rdation a beam, portions

INTERIOR VISION.

71

of rope, the angle of the prow, items that, by loug guessing, could aloue be discovered to have once constituted a fabric; these have been, as it

were, gathered up, and built, into a whole Argo, humbly, iu my book. And I have sought to reconstruct a majestic ship, and have traced a celes-

and the sublimest story, which we have heired, unknowingly, through Whether I have succeeded in demonstrating the philosophical the ages. possibility of the Supernatural, I am not to be the judge." . . . There are seven distinct magnetic laws, which, when obeyed and enforced, cannot possibly fail of producing given effects or results and the first of these, and without which but little can be done, either with refertial
;

ence to one's self or another,


AIM,

is

PERSISTE^XE of pukpose to a given end

AND PURPOSE, My owu carccr is a proof-case in point. Many years ago I made the discovery, elsewhere announced, that most of human ills,
domestic, mental, and moral, were the result of infractions, by excess, entire continence, or inversion, therefore perversion^ of the sexual
social,

passion and instinct


the

common

to the

human

race.

But there was no known

cure for those evils, and I

was therefore compelled to search for one la regions of the unknown. With certain speculative and transmitted

data to start from, I began, and for longyears continued, the investigation of the matter, with a persistence, patient research, and strength of will that

sbruuk at no obstacle, admitted no possibility of defeat or failure. The result of that persistence is before the world, which this day acknowledges that I have perfected a series of nervo-vital remedials, better than have yet been prockiced on the globe, to relieve the nervous troubles of mankind, no matter whether they resulted from excess or inversion of the sex-

mankind, or from prodigal waste of life from over-study, sedentary, in-door life, or excessive mental, moral, or nervous toil. The second law is thatof Attention condensed, steady, concentrated attention to, and upon, the person, object, principle, purpose or thing
instinct of

intended or attempted to be achieved. The exercise of this increase the general mental strength, rapidly.

power

will

The

third law

is.

Calmness, quietude

Nothing can be gained by

ebulli-

excitement, especially in matters pertaining to seership, by, any moans whatever, because it destroys the direction and volume of the

tion, hurry,

magnetic currents, and scatters to the winds what ought to be a steady, waving flow of power.

The fourth magnetic law

is

that of

Wirx; not persistence

iu,

or

of, it;

but will itticlf the /iJ-shall-be-as-I-want-it-power of the soul. It is the central pivot about which all the others rotate, and receive their impul-

toward the ends aimed at. The fifth law is that of Intensity, which needs no explanation. The sixth law is that of Polakity, the most important one of all, because without it not much can be done; with it, there is no human being but can be reached and influenced, to a degree perfectly astonishing, as I have demonstrated in a hundred cases, one of which shall serve as a lesson
sion

r,.2

INTERIOR VlStON.

that I sometimes give lessons of a lieard having instance, Mrs. A., for story, that her husband's old the with me to comes psychical 'character, elsewhere, ac:? attracted she is wretched is he that cool, love has grown by back magnetic, or any other him draw to wants and consequence,
in

equally sure,

innocent and certain means.


all

magnetic mirror,

the better

If she already possesses a.good if not, I tell her to borrow one from a
;

begin by inquiring it the use and frie d, hair, approximative and eyes of weight, color and complexion, height, determine his to This, temperament, husband. her with of age buHd, and blonde and a is her she husband Suppose a bruown. her to reference temperaments, and such reZa^iue proper ought to be a the are These nette. I conclude that the fault is disagreeing, twain they and union, happy
as hereinafter directed
I

and

She is, very liliely, too cold, exacting, imperious, disoand I tell her uon-caressive; to correct these him; of heedless bli-no''. faults ia herself to begin with, for such a man with such a temperament will full restive, and of angles; yet, armed with passionate, impulsive, quick, be love, the blonde wife can not only subdue him, but win him from any
mainly her own.

vioman under the sun. How? Blondes are electric, brunettes magnetic, and very susceptible to influences steadily brought to bear upon them. His weakest point, and therefore greatest want, is caressive love. Let the blonde wife play thai card, and her game is won and that's what
brunetie
;

meant by Polarity. Let her sit before the mirroi% bring up his image before her therein, and when it is steadily fixed before the soul's eye, let
is

her bring

all

the other six laws to bear

upon

it

him crowning

all,

as she

looks upon
all

him with
6o;f/i

true, pure, wifely desire; the

seventh law, which

understand.
parties are blondes.
It is

But suppose

evident thai caressive love

won't do there, because both are of the same electric temperament, and the straying husband, nine chances in ten, has become fascinated with some

woman, whose warm, magnetic nature is altogether fascinating, and chains him with bands of triple steel. Well, in that case, the wife must attack him through the door of his higher nature, and prove to him by her steady, unchanging treatment of him, that soul is superior to body, mind to mere beauty, solicitude and
interest in his affairs of

dark-eyed, dark-haired, olive-hued, passional

more worth than whole oceans of mere


is

passioual-

ism.

His brain and sense, then,

the point d'appui in that case

is

the

Reverse the sexes and circumstances, if you choose to do so, yet the law is still the same. But there is another principle here, that is of equal importance, in all cases where a love-sunderiug is the result of a third party's intrusion, influence,

polar point.

and power.

Repulsion

is

precisely as powerful as Attraction, and

we

will

suppose that the fault

lies

neither in the wife nor husband, but in a


is

female rival of the former,

who
point

of course

just as susceptible to magnetic

influences, hatred, dislike, etc., as trate this very important


:

any other human being.

Well, to

illus-

Once

in Cairo,

Egypt,

conversed with

INTERIOR VISIOX.

73

whether a coinmon one or a diamond, she invokes the Simulacrum, or magnetic imao'e oftlie woman who has stolen her husband's affections. "But suppose

an educated Arab on tliis very topic, and learned that it was a common custom for au injnred wife to bring before her the image of the recreant husband frequently using, for \^xut of by force of will a better, either a glass of water, or such a magic mirror as is described in Lane's "Modern Egyptians," and in Mrs. Poole's "English Woman in Egypt;" but as there are plenty of Wulees, Kutbs,' and dervishes all over Egypt, it is quite an easy matter for such to gain an hour's use of a genuine glass or jewel. In this mirror, no matter

That makes not the slightest differeuce; all she has to do is to will the woman, and no earthly power can prevent her image, wraith, picture, or spiritual form and face from appearWhen she does so " Bach on ihy head, all the misery thou hast ing. heaped upon mine 1 Back to thy heart the pangs thou hast made me endure I In the name of love, whom thou hast disgraced; in the name of
is ?
:

she don't

know who

the

woman

"

(husband or lover) bears thee, into its opposite dislike and hatred; and in Allah's name I change thy mutual passion into foul disgust and horror. In the name of God so may " it be I Now your practical people will probably laugh at such a method, such means, and yet in so doing they laugh at God, at human love, breaking hearts, and the irresistible magnetic laws of the entire universe of the great Supreme, and I had rather face the '* devil " than the solemn prayer
is

omnipotent, I turn the love

my

Him who

he had any; but it is certain that such a message, from such a woman, under such circumstances, and in such a cause, would find me and fang my soul with horror wherever I might hide; because woman's love is the strongest
if

of an injured

woman;

for I migJii escape his clutches

the purest, strongest, and most just and all the good powers of the universe are in sympathy therewith. Nor do I believe it possible for a failure to occur, provided the woman be in dead earnest, and follows up her blow day by day, till her (magnetic) vic;

force on earth

her cause

is

tory

is

achieved.
i

But injured wives are not the only oues iu Syria, Egypt, Turkey, aud Arabia, who have recourse to magnetic means in love aflliirs; for widows resort to the identical methods, save only a change of formulas:
"Gracious Allah, thou hast declared
fore grant that I
it is

not good to be alone; whereThis, supposing


has, then she

she has

may (herein) behold one no special man for a husband


;

suited to me."
in view-

If she

upon him. I have heard of manysuccesses I have known of no failures nor do I see any reason wliy the white women of Western Europe and North America should not be quite as powerful and successful in these matters as their Arabian and Egypto-Syriac sisters, or the quadroons of the South, who notoriously practise the same things to the same ends. If one of these women has no special man in view whom she desires to have for a husband, then she continues
;

brings up his image, and directs her force

^.

INTERIOR VISION.

phantasmal faces psyclio-visual flit across of series a until the experiments When one glass. appears magnetical toward the of face dark the stran-e, can yearn, soul and she woman's feels a only toas yearns, soul whom her siiuulacruin there, the hrmly, steadholds she feel, can aloue ward it as love

explained, heretofore and law forthwith the play active into ilv brin'^s living the be original may he of that whoever, wherever, irapre--es irresistible. The next forceful, thing is magnetism a by picture,

phantom

and this i^s done by the same together; two the bring to find the man; to localities, revealed places, often names. has lucidity the for means; for above; generally the womau the like case a there is however, Seldom, then her object and is to inspire wants, she man the of alreadv knows affair. easy very is a afterw^ard meeting and the
him,

Of

course this wiiole thing

is

ple, entirely

magnetic from first from those differing in practice methods by reached is and Western, of if we except a few of the Wangenerally Americans and Europeans by Octoroons. Southern and Zingaras, dering world magnetic through the of the profundities the into gazing lu agency of a mirror, it sometimes happens that very strange things are

nothing but clairvoyance, pure and simto last, only that it is Oriental, instead

from mirror-seers to me most unequivocally demonstrate. Occasionally au eye, emblematic of the very loftiest seership and celestial guidance, is beheld, and blessed indeed are they to whom it appears. Kecently a correspondent in Ohio wrote me that he had beheld such a mysterious eye, and forthwith I wrote him for particuseen; as d

hundred

letters

|
'

lars,

book was nearly all set up in type. The subjoined reply came to hand, which I deem of so great importance to those who Says the a>pire to seer^hip, that I have caused it to be printed herein.
after
this

writer;

^T

OiiiO, Juu. 9th, 18G9


it

*'Now

for the particulars of that eye,

or whatever

was.

For some

time past I have beeu wearing a bandage (not the improved magnetic

arrangement, but the

first

crude substitute therefor)

this

bandage was

heavy paper over my eyes and forehead at night, and tried to see through them, according to the directions laid down in your book, 'Dealings with the Dead,' and your first monograph on clairvoyance. I began this practice immediately after purof linen, with half-a-dozen thicknesses of

chasing a magnetic or magic mirror (a second-grade trinue). As I sit at the present time, I soon see a pale golden light, seemingly misty, frequently cut with flashes of electric or magnetic light. In this soft, pale,

golden light, there appears a spot of deep-yellow gold moving about, sometimes in a circle. After watching it for some time, it resolves itself
into

something like an eye, with a dark, deep-blue pupil; then into a rin or of gold around the eye-centre; then into a lighter ring of blue, resemI first

bling au eye.
the

saw

this object
I

mirror.

The

first

object

two or three weeks after I bought saw at all was in the evening when sit-

"

IXTERIOR TISIOX.
ting back

-r

toward the bright lamp-light. I had sat about twenty ml ,t", impatient and discouraged at seeing nothing but a black mirror who suddenly the appearance described above showed i^^^elf near the left" hand lower corner of the disk, slowly passing upward two-thirds the" way toward the right-hand upper corner, when it suddonlv disappear This has been n-peated several times, with variations. Its'sizc w is ihVt of a silver dime. I thought it was a usual thing, hence
1

'

teution to

it;

am

paid but

little at-

certainly not a seer, but thought I

was

t'

because I could not g.-t a wished to. I can get answers euough, but not always the future may reveal something more satisfactory.
I

way.

was not

-Jin^ that urn,


'l

satisfied,

likenc. i uiien
reliable, '

thon-h **

'Yours,

etc.,

cases wherein that identical spot of golden light has resolved itself into an ethereal lane through which raagniflcent supernal realities have been seen; and other cases wherein ftill faces have grown out from it, and the perfect forms and features of the den^l

Now I know

been

fully be-

held and recognized.


the

More than

that: I have

known

same time, in broad daylight, see the same living picture, embodying the most splendid and arabesque scenery; and I am satisfied that whoever can see even a single cloud pass across

three persons, at things, a magniOc'nt

the

mirror's face can, if they but pursue the matter, very soon develop their latent powers of clairvoyance or seership. But not all can do so, for I have known persons to try for quite a length of time without succ-ding,

born with them; persons who will probably never become clairvoyant while in the body. At this point I will state, that in any case of difficulty in developing the psycho-vision, tlie wearing of the magnetic bandage on the head at night, and the ma uetic plate on the body by day, will go far toward removing the disturbance and obstructions, besides exerting a positive curative effect, if the
difficulty

owing to some organic

party be at

all ailing.

Again, while reading the printer's proofs of this work, another letter, from a lady in Oswego, N. Y., reaches mc, pertinent to the matter of the volume. I quote " Oh, let me tell you that ray dear father has gone home since I left Bos-

was far, far away from him. I was looking in my mirror, not even knowing he was ill. I saw my father's face, his beautiful face; aud it seemed as white as snow, and his reverend hair as White as Lis face. . . . Since that he has come to me just as I used to see him long, long years agone, in the spleoclid prime of perfect manI

ton.

...

... ...

hood.

And he conveyed
'

to

me

these blessed words,

.ify c/ii7J,

/ am

not dead /

Is

Reader, such a proof of immortality can be had by no other means, and worth all the medium talk, and oblique, indirect, and far-fetched com-

niuuications in the world, ten thousand times over.

INTEEIOR VISION
76
Another

"^S^'Me

I write.

The Cambridge gentleman,

alhided to

to related just has since, while a

me

the following strange experience with

my attention mirror, was my in arlooking while ago ^'"TXrt'lme a vast resembling and distant object an of appearance rested by the it changed into outlines, craggy its upon gazed T while Even mountain top toward the of the glass, moving cloud, enormous an of semblance the from evanishing sight. And gradually and parts, two into itself ciividlnto pass in began panoramic objects indistinct, but curious, of train now a glass. Suddenly marvellous the the of field sublime the across order things flashed across and it light, auroral with mirror "be came radiant destitute of verdure; rugutterly regions, Barren with electric speed. passed, -immediately precipices fearful chasms, aed mountains, awful systems, galaxies, suns, stars, planets, of sweep followed by a majestic sailed away, and They majesty. unutterable in awful splendor and the confines, by as hard standing alone, and seemed to leave me solitary clime unearthly an in stranger a eternity an awful, vast
it

were, of

existence -the in specli merest -the space an infinitesimal mote in the. vast, comprehend to power without nearest approach to Nothing, me. around and above, beneath, before, boundless, limitless vault calling point of the on was I scene, the of sublimity the awful

Amazed

at

ray when obtained, have should undoubtedly for an explanation, which I matter-ofcast-iron, those of one of solitude was broken by the entrance the annoyance great my to and dollar; the fact men, whose only idea is

that for s6ance the and Eternal, the mirror ceased to reflect the image of

time was ended."


the of mediumism so-called The superiority of Psycho-vision to the argument. further need to apparent too is day, for all purposes whatever, the demonstrating of end grand manifestations subserve the
Spiritual

otherpower, revelative as a but, sublime fact of post-mortem existence,

unquestionmediuraship quality of the and wise is of but very little ably injurious, because it is impossible to know whether the possessing know," " " and " see but I good is invisible is good or evil. A Hearsay was conveyed, be to intended is a great deal better. The thought here use
; ;

very elegantly and forcibly expressed by


the bravery to openly
spiritualism, in defence of a truer

Dr. Uriah Clark, a

man who had

modern of pretence and imposture the denounce

and higher kind, direct from God.

modern spiritual iusigniflcance before the magnificent phenomena of Nature and the Revelations of God in human history. Yon brave o'erhanging firmament,' their pushing fretted with golden fire yon cloud-capped mountains white cones into the heavens yon glorious landscapes sweeping into the distant horizon the murmur of myriads of sentient existences swarming
'
;

" The trifling tricks passing for

phenomena

pale into

'

and earth around the eternal roar of old ocean, and the seolian melody of the morning and the evening breeze; the songs of woodlands,
the air
;

II

INTERIOR VISION.
flcd

77

mechanism of our being; thesenninds within us, anon making us feel like heroes, martyrs, gods facing fire, flood aud fiercest baule; these hearts of our ours pulsating with hopes bounded only by eternity' all these are revelations of Almighty God, and prophets of the soul's
derful

the whistling of hurricanes; the waves aud tides sweeping around our globe ; the world, wheeling through empires of endless space, the occult forces flashing in lightnings, and rolling iu thunders vibrating the universe; the unseen currents coursing through every fibre of the won-

unending destiny."

>

grander one, I never yet heard fall from human Yet this is called defection, and treason against the truth. It lips. may be so, but if it is, then set me down as loving all such defection, and glorying in just such treason. If there were more of it, this were
a
great deal better world.
.

finer peroration, or a

Enforced celibacy, continued singleness, is, in the vast majoilty of cases, an unmitigated curse, beside being an outrageous swindle on God, and fraud upon Nature; alike to be dreaded and shunned by all men, and especially by all women, who were never created or intended to
**
J

i9i

Waste

their sweetness on the desert air,"

by any manner of means, for which reason I fully justify any and every woman in getting a husband by any art or means within her power, magic, magnetic, sympathetic, or, if she can do it, by the magnetic lovecharms, amulets, or the mysterious magnetic powders, not of the modern tricksters, but of *'La Petite Albert," which, however, the wise ones may laugh and sneer at, have, for one hundred and tlfty years demonstrated their astonishing magnetic power in affectional directions. On my table lies a copy of that work, in old French, printed at Lyons in 1758,

of strange secrets on the points here mooted; and which book it would take a large sum to buy from me. I fully agree with that author, that any man or woman is fully justified in resorting to any crimeless
full

order to retain or regain the love of wife, husband, or friend; hence my advice in this book, but more especially that contained in my \vorks on ''Love and its Hidden History," ''The Master Tassion," or my work **Eulis" and *'Love: Woman: Marriage," all of which are essential to a complete and perfect mastery of the subjects involved '' especially should "Eulis" and Casca Llanna" be read, and^ their magnificent lessons be thoroughly and perfectly learned, for on them depends the weal or woe of every human life.
in
It
is

means

disheartening, not
in

to

say disgusting,

to read

the nauseous

advertisements
chalk.

papers of conscienceless wretches, who have *'love powders" for sale, which have no more virtue than a piece of
the

based upon a truth as eternal as the universe, which truth is, that peculiar substances can be charged with the efflux or aura of the human being (witness the science of homoeyet the idea involved
is

And

INTERIOR TISTOX.

and the etc., houses, startling Hicts haunted about thv to say nothing thus chargeable are few, rare, substances The XniVitual mediaraship). two persons of takes opposite (it and exist, do such yet nnd cJstlyspeciflc raagnetism the with of filled a perbe only not can to do it) they aud lust hadean passion, of ju.^t as aur!l the with filled be can but son spells; magnetic or they can be incontestible their effect udoos the'v spiritually with impressed a mission be and love, divinest with
char-ed
to any soul

with whose body they


the of fact this denies

shall

come

in contact.

It matters not

magnetic universe; Iknoxo it, for I have tome who recreant lord; I have seen a her feet her to bring wife _en a deserted another member whom of the same wife, his of love the re-win iruut actor seen a betrayed and almost have I and him, from stole troupe
opera

betrayed, and then first left her who him of career the arrest ruined girl hypocritical w^orld. infernally To save an of cold cheerless *the out in well it is as to inform charlatans, them by victimized being pt-ople from
the with power by one charged person be anything can case no in that things is worse than thrown away. such for sent money hence, alone; must ichom be the party v:ho deone gender, of opposite of T-'-o persons, of infiltrating, the process in conjoin by must on^, third a ^.l.cslo affect
will,

by hope, by the breath and finger-tips, the neutral substances with

power and magnetic quality designed; nor can it be done iu any other way whatever, because there can he no magnetic evolution uulrss the magnetic law of minus and plus, positive and negative^ magnetic and
the specific
electric, be

observed.

But what are the materials that can be charged with a specific human The negroes of Africa and our own land know raairnetisra? I reply,
of and

use hundreds, herbs and

roots mainly; but science, in the hands


into
tlie

of the late Baron

Van Riechenbach, whose researches

mysteries

of light, heat, odics, chemism, and


has thrown a flood of light

magnetics cannot

on the subject, so that now substauces are the best; and fine steel-filings, iron by hydrogen, sugar of milk, chloride of gold and lactucarlum, well manipulated together in r roper quantities aud exact proportions, by two persons, in a glass mortar, can be charged so powerfully as to exert a specific infiuencc upon
I

be overvalued, we know what

even a

dumb

animal,

much

less a

human

being.

Perhaps

it

is

well that

such a preparation

very costly, requiring much time, trouble, aud expense, else wrong uses might be made thereof. And, besides that, it is
is

must be furnished from the person of the individual who proposes to be benefited by its use; and without this the thing is useless, because the specific magnetism will escape. It is to be sewed in the garment, or worn by the party to be
effected; not

absolutely essential that certain ingredients

swallowed, or taken inwardly.


be, to the
I

Albeit there arc substan-

ces that

may

same end.
to

do not propose to name the someit

thmgelse, unless

know

whom

is

imparted.

To

rakes, seducers,

INTERIOR VISION.

79

wives, unloved yes-, and also to victims heavt-sick, to 1 no ind libertines, others if I know it. none to But gender. of the other " America in and maids" Christian old Europe, of millions are There in all Turkish Europe, India, China, found be can many as If but I doubt the as exist within Islands of Seas, the the and Syria, Vrabia Jaoan, the white woman, everyBecause Why? ..-^alone I -England i^uj,..."v^ l^evv of New limits Ol ^of love! the wonderful mo as foundation-laws the of where, is ignorant the the master-passion of underlying forces (magnetic) ures of magic altogether thing, too general is a man, as white the human soul; while impressed the imor by struck properly not ; is matter surface in the principles which subof the nor children, of importance mense value and They are too generation. normal and proper their of laws the tend perishable amother and political, dollars, and dimes in absorbed much woman is love for their eclat; and power place, bitions; too fond of physical organon based superficial, intermittent, tempestuous, sensual, it soul and give to elan moral or mental a either ization mainly, without evils, so which correct to badly wear but easily win They substance. my of edition after edition publish and write, I why is possible, far as The " Story," " Eosicrucian's The History," its Hidden
;

works "Love and

Ravalette'. " Death," "After Raised," Curtain The or, ; Passion Master' if the y^ich, of all or any, subject, general the upon and others bearing Marof surface the smooth will observed, well be convey lessons they

magbrain or cerebral require specially who those of "ror^'he benefit furnish au to here artisan an with arrangements made have uetization, I el-ti.Positive and specific a exert to calculated rnvnt on admirably the on right and eyes, the above directly brain, the on power ma<^netic that doubt slightest the not be can There head. ftonUl reXn of the and indicated, direction the in useful extremely will prove
hese p

:::

TL

res

elect^nc

curative power

as well, in

^^:^^^^^^X:i:Z

especially these abdomen, or limbs; and not nerves; .,,dered disordered in originate as such especially forms of disease, in existence other any by surpassed, if equalled, ^^^ ^^^^^ to ^^ beg I \'' work, this of Before closing necessity ^^^,, ^ ^^f of development l-^^^^^J'/^l^^^ fj^^y departure attain to a positive the during quietude perfect nervous P^-^^^^^'^^^^.rsexual- every mental physical, to therefrom, every excess, bars '^^^iJefi^cXXv.

^f

abnormalness, of whatever
its

attainment. Everything ^J^^'^y^^^ th upon treads mark, beyond the ^^^^ Persistence Force. central the Love Power. primal is the

-^-';-j"frodrtionbt may be ^

whoever goes
Will
is

^f

the Road,

INNEK VISION
sense, who realouter underlying things the in faith T^o^P la hare as SUCH reality of all things the ^ that TO mysteries, ^^^ ^^ ^' and strong that patient the only Ue which veil, thick , ''ir^^'^^^ u hicKieu provided themhave who lies deeply especially ^^^^^ ^^ pene or soul can raise ^^^^^ ^.^^ ^^^^ ^^^ p^^^^^^ instrumentallast the selves during in the deeper importance their ^;^^^,trated only, is ties; and to thos^JJ such this to and ^^^ philosophy;
^ ,

researches of

ma

netic

bookandthesubjo^^e^^^^^^^^
copies exact rules are

^^^ presented. And these use in by those all -of English into ^^^,^^.^ ^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^ ^^^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^
^^^^.^

print of out long since


I.

TO have

.ucces,.

Bat unto the

P^";;;;;;- , soalcometU
t^^'";
.^

ever tte real IlgM of the


i its fulness only

,,jh

,H,e

!S-'-/,fX"se "and cai.

Remember what

the Grand

.-The says: seer, true a therefore, and, I'srare. ge .; ;;te;';l ' .nfln, e, the for forth reaches adept, the acolyte, the ;; mctn, c glory; of gates the unlock that keys the are Goodness, whieh mora sooal, phys.cal, healeth the mental,

rJand

and rrhe ghty his m and goodness his of means by humankind, Za domest c ills of still fewer and possessed, naturally are age an in few but e Th t or the of chddren the only For patiknce. and will of want for tain tZ a of treasure-house the to admitted are adoption, ."pyre,; by nature or and medical true the .^ have ua.= only, ou.j, ucu, Such, real. overllowins .JL.^.L. ^A ajid overflowmg
ees, hears, knows,

the undeilymg.

of breath diviner the supernal inspiration, and inhale stron

God

Whoso

revel and domain, strange and wide her enter the doors of mystery, souls." uaaci owuio. bu baser denied to knowledge Know leage .ueuieu a hatn too, it, unfathomable; not is fortuitous De Novalis says: "The
fortuitous, the for ssnse right hath a that she or He own. regularity of its and know to naturally hath already the signet and seal of a royal power, of ken the beyond far 'very very, lies that much but mystery, use, not all thereto grown not mortals who are not thus endowed by nature, or have ^ , j;i determine Ar.4-,^^.mxina fvlll/ll that ^ yx^^^^-.^^icnunj unu persous and cnoice. choice. oucn by Dy experience ana

...

persistence, will, courage, which to others less gifted, or with less with one For PATIENCE, and quietude, must forever remain unknown. obedience and these qualities necessarily commands both information of agencies and from the viewless intelligences and subordinate powers
the universe.

her riddles

Such can seek destiny for others, in her own future, the book, open by her own laws; and read, as in an
soul, body, to that pertaineth

halls; solve

the things that shall befall an Inquirer in all


health, affections,
;

the soul's
beius, and

upward and forward and possessions and, still casting of up keen glance, can discern the final result and summing
all

to revealed by means of the phasoul and phantorama, as

INNER VISION.

81
r

mirror, th v^:.^c the Symph, the of surface the on vision the Searcher's Trinue." La of disk -eerless . .^ the neuter; small, or mule, the grades: three of are'glasses TT There ^phic toy phil a more fine; but small, first is The male. fpniale and the symK-.s flame, and clouds for good foci, is two Has use; thTn of practical not foci two the and thin, very is filament magnetic the but Ind shadows . broV. and warped easily quite are they true mathematically !lwavs of gypsies vagrant fortune-telling, by used mainly are and little, but coTt better and higher a procure to able not are who and class, lowest the
; ;

is. in described, just sort imperfect the to size in ''ThVmia^r next arc foci Us because female, or well-sexed, called parlance,

mirrorists'

rcMuarkamost sensitiveness and great, power its superb, polish its rrue to superior much not really existence in mirrors There are magic cover, tMt one the instance, For sums. fabulous at valued last, these one possesses Turkey, Aziz, of Abdul for watch, Sultan's the of back he out; concaved diamond single a of consists it AnvP beautv seein- that DhnV Maha-rajah , late The ^400.000. over something is enormous an other the diamond, Immense an one : three essed sIVh Vos world, the In known emerald largest the of composed f^v and the hird those between value in difference pecuniary enormous the e despi and vet

:dUra^

to L-; rtota'rtC : e.ea.up i.a,e, o. ordinary -^-^^'^f^l^r; all for But, dead. or living absent
ou'

.Jny a..ct Cstant Pe--; ;; -"^^


i^

^
t.^j

r:ia,.,.a. U .^s y
^

bly, and, in

my

Judgment,

Is

altogether

^f^^';^,^^^^^^^^^^ Trimus, ^^ Charles to globe, belonging the than \!,^;,,3.,.e more P are J^^^^" ^bey refused, and offered which e3..000 was ^^^^ they and impoited and made are more of them

for

f^

male-glass;

generally in use tliroas..ou.

u= Western ,,

" " Reform a ago, long Not thereafter, month mirrors and yet, within a
;

fcuh ^.^ ^^ Oecwrea paper publi.hei

Id

mn

the precisely of to prove the reality

P^Wf-^y;;; bo For e Uu g.

^, prt. P^^^^

ciples, rationale,

photography,
me^fd'^d

doctor lawyers, was backed up by wealthy of style the.r from judging whom, most of ="' poor, are friends my and greenbacks than brains. I
,

"Sr

'^f^^f^J'^^^Z^ ,^,ause comJn. h'^soirolC, ptnUar ^^^.^/if f-'j-^'^f onS--.;^;1 thus <i It tac-se thing, rrlonhe'same
jud e, a

methods and

results, arc

^^^^^^
.^

.j-^a to

INNER TI>IOX.
which, papers, of pr^^rieto^ the l,ny np
there hence and world; the In
after
is

yon see, makes all the 3! a marked contrast in rc-.d

to

all,

preci^^'j rigi'^ because exactly on the

same grouud.

Spiri^-i

and ever was and will be, true; and cry-^j gcership, and mirror visions, and such photography, are one and the &., n* thi"", opera* d by the same laws and principles, and underlaid a.*a m:* tendf^i by precl.^ely the same wonderful esoteric chemistry; and the ouiv difference, if any, lies in the fact that but few persons can ^.t snii; .^j
and
el^'^tric

photo^jraphy

l3,

P^^f/^n.r.)phs, \\*hile

a great

nescent, pi^^ires, by

!i

means

satisfactory, but evaof a differently sensitized plate, a fact I L^e

many can obtain very

demonstrated hundreds of times, as thousands of others have whom I n^'^^r saw, h'^^rd, or knew. The male mirror Is superior to either of the others. Its foci are ^ /^.?., rrpn,'^^ - The basin is over 9^''*^n inrhpshjjire in ^^e clear ^

Immense. Thoy are better adapted to prof^^'^^^f use than priv^^e experiment, because they are cnpible of, and frequently do, cxIuiMt three separate and dNtinct vivoraraas, at one and the same I have often wished I could make t;ms to flQ mrtny distinct on-lookers.
of cour::
ItB Jteld Is

impossible, as three continents furnish the And even the frames and glasses must bo matcri..' ^ composing them. Inipor*'"! from beyond tlie ?eas; as must also the strangely sensitive
thc^e mirrors;
is

but f^nt

material wherewith the sympathetic rings are filled;


rii

concerning which
s^'-ange darkqu'^^-

"'^

^heir brightening,
evil

when

the future

is

well,

and their

ening,

when

impends, or friends
in

fall off,

and lovers betray, the

roons of Louisiana, as well as the


tluilling tnlf^^.

women

of Syria, could

tell strar^-^ly

consequence of the importance attached to these rings and mirrors, counterfeits of them have been, in times past, put forward, albeit the parties who obtained them were themselves to blame, seeing that but one person Vilmara ever imported either to this

And

T'-tiintry.

mirror or ring must be allowed to be handled much, if at all, by other than the owner thereof; because such handlins: mixes the mr\:xIII.

No

and d< "'roys their sensitiveness. Others may. look into them, holding hv the box in which the frame is kept, but never touching either
n'^*'-^nis

ftanie or glass.

IV.

When

the glass surf^ice

\.;th fine soap-<^nds,


little fluoric

becomes soiled or dusty, it may be cl'^-^ned rinsed well, washed with alcohol, or rubbed with a
;

and then polished with soft velvet or chamois leather. V. A mirror must not be neglected but should frequently be magnetized oy p.3es with the right hand, five minutes at a time. This Is calculated to keep it alive, and give it strength and power. VI. Passes with the left hand add to its magnetic sensitivens, VII. Tiie longer time, and frequency of its use, the better it becomes.
acid,

VIII.

The somnifying or magnetizing power of the glass

is

obtained

INNER VISION.
to a f^^eater

S3
its

degree than

is

possible by band-mesmerism, by looking at


It will

magnetize many who defy mesmerism. back mirror's must always the be toward the light; used, When IX. its visional fatal to power. That is never. face its but the glass, held or phxced, must be oblique; that is to of position The X.
quietude. perfect in centre

When
nobody at all. touched by be then must but pended; focus or position of the proper glass is when no the of proof The XII. in reflected it. Change its inclination, or is whatever thing or Ima^e
clear^ plain, whitish-black, deep-watery volume is a move That surtill the magnetism has time to collect. be not will which seen mirror; and in and upon it all things of the plane magnetic the face is

the head,

till

seeable in

a trinue are beheld. appear They to be on or in the clouds. mirare seen thing first The XIIImagnetic upper surface of the field on the but so, not are reality ror but in of there from the eyes the onlooker. collects plane magnetic That it.

above

brownbrunette, dark-eyed, temperament, magnetic Persons of a it quicker, hut no move effertv^'*^ charge hair, dark with and skinned, v:ho are blondette blonde or temperament, opposite the of than those

if

electric in

temperament. XIV. The male is not so

easily

developed into seership as the female

they are so. when correct and powerful exceedingly sex; but become widows. are them to next best; sec Virgins pucilage, her girl in the and puberty, before boy XV. In all cases the unmixed, pure, is magnetism Their seers. sharpest make the quickest and occult. and magnetic things in all power means unsexed; and purity good. affirmative; favorable; are clouds XVI. White bad. inauspicious reverse exact the XVII. Black clouds are
: ;

excellent. are joy, coming presage XVIII. Violet, green, blue, sickness trouble, danger, mean yellow, XIX. Red, crimson, orange,
surindicate and grief, slander, "beware," deceptions, losses, betrayal, prises of a disagreeable character.

_.
fix

may be,-no matter

and will, it by Hold image. the To afi-ect a distant person, invoke she or he whoever and person; the upon steadily purpose and mind the find will soul of telegraph where they are, -the
But, observe this

them, somewhere within the spaces.


surer than, if the seer's

law: Nothing

is

purpose be

evil, it

will react upon


all

him or herse

wjth terrible

efi^ect,

sooner or later; wherefore

are strictly cautioned to


, intelinnumera^^le

he and do good, only; for

:
I

with thronged are spaces XXI. Remember the aerial former the Force; have latter The reverse. ligences, celestial and the In correspond. must heart the ones, good the possess Power. To reach and feelings; prayerful with invoked many ways will they respond, when hosts countless are there and bad, the they will protect and shield from

r.1

^^^^^^^^^

INNER VISION.

of the confines two great worlds, Matter and serried the on bad of the Spirit: myriads of grades of them, whereof the i>zZz/25r, phenomenal spiritThese dreamed. malign forces are many and even has yet never ualist or reach successfully assault the soul that never can they but terrible; relies on God in perfect faith, and which invokes the Good, the Beautiful,

and the True.

XXII. The face of the mirror should never be exposed to the chemical and actinic influence of direct sunlight, because it ruins the magnetic susceptibility, just as it does the sensitized plate of the photographer; and no mirror once spoiled can be made good as before, without sending it to Europe to be re-made entirely. Moonlight, on the contrary, benefits them. The back must not be tampered with, or removed, for any light striking it will at once completely ruin all its magnetic properties; hence So also are extremes of heat and cold injurious to its careful sealing. them, because either will destroy the parabolic-ovoid shape of the glass, which done, it is thenceforth useless, for it will no longer retain its hold the sensitive sheet upon upon the magnetic effluvium from the eyes, which its clouds and other marvels are mirrored; but it will roll off" like water from hot iron, and, in the words of Vilmara, " be good never no more XXIII. Whatever appears upon the left hand of the mirror-looker, as he

'*

gazes into

it,

is real;

that

is

to say,

is

a picture of an actual thing.


right hand, as he looks into
it, is

XXIV. Whatever appears upon the


symbolical.

XXV. Ascending clouds or indistinct shadows are affirmative replies questions that may be asked, if silently, it makes no difi'erence.
XXVI. Descending clouds are the negations to all such questions. XXVII. Clouds or shadows movin^r & toward the seer's ri2:ht hand
signals from spiritual beings, indicative of their presence

to

are

and

interest.
it

XXVIII. When they move toward the left hand of the seer, " Done for this time," the stance is ended for the present.

means,

That Magic is an actual thing no sane man, especially if well read and travelled, can well deny, for there is too much corroborative testimony from among the Hindoos, Indians, Arabs, Negroes, Tartars, Chinese, and other races, to successfully do so. Americans till of late years hare
wholly neglected the veiled studies;

but from their immense amount of

energy, brain and nervous power, they will yet excel all other people on the globe, in that, as in other specialties. So sure am I of this, that I venture to assert that aside from the savages of our cities, eight-tenths of the

average Americans are competent in six weeks, to the development of what in another age than this, would be regarded as miraculous phenomena, either of the physical type of mediumism, or of the clairvoyant order, through circles, magnetism, or seeing by the mirror.

NEAV VvTORKS!
BY
DR. EANDOLPH.

the:

ixe:t^ mcola^i

THE LAWS AND PRINCIPLES OF

and Mediumism. Clairvoyance Magnetism,


Mediumship ever published. on monograph important The most

HOW

TO OBTAIll

THE PHENOMENA

IN

ALL

THEffi PHASES.

Identification of the dead. Conditions Magic. White SriV"OP-SJ>S>. Media. Brunette A and Blonde Clairvoyance, and pssential Mediumship Psyclnc Yu-tang. The Circles. importance. inestimahle discovery of

Force Double Circle. Peonle and Spirits, of INIaxerializatiox sitters. the PirAes and arrangement of Essentials Spirit-room. The hand. Phantom yo%;ri-L it about ! The Mcrgcment of Identities ATRILISM xo PhtSi^Ma^^^^^^^^ xvlule occupychooses it what does and drinks eats, talks, walks, one A dead consciousness^ and

A Eternity Gulf of the Spanning Medial-Aura. form a To Insulation. alone. when Phenomena
!
!

Spirit.

octnc

w,

quiescent is soul latter's the while 5,- another's body,

S^S^Lz^Z/
Judge

lost

Juror, Minister, Spiritualist,

Thysicia^ - a problem of enormous importance to every bemg. Tlie

and

husband wife, every human

-Si^T^o!^^;"Sl"^^'^
Magnetic Spells.

th.r

h..

Part

Spiritualism. of Utilisra The III.

''

Voodoo-ism" Black Magic.

TRUE! STRANGE! THIIILLING!

MYSTERY THE
BEING A JUST

SOLVED:
t>

SECRET MEDIUM'S THE DISCOVERED


HUMAN THE OF MYSTERY
POWEU
ALSO

DWELL

WOMAN COMING THE


E C K Y O I D E N PKICE IT. FOU GROUNDS 60
Sp..dean,.

iM
mi

AND THE

LAW!

^^^^^

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&r

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,,

Dr.

Randolph's
series

Masterpiece.
I

Containing a splendid

of most Magnificent Discoveries concerning

SEX,

WOMEN AND

WILL.

LOVE; OF HISTORY THE


Its

Moods, Modes, and Laws, Eationale; Eules, Chemistry, Magic, Wondrous

BEING THE

AND SEX. SOUL OF EEYELATION THIED


ALSO,

"

WHY IS MAN IMMORTAL


Darwin Problem

"
Theory.

The Solution of the


|^=" Post
free.

an

entirely

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Price $2.50.

"EULIS OF READERS THE TO


''THE Vv^OMAN'S BOOK/'
The

<J

TITTT

TCI

5J
J

Etc.

appreciation and extraordinary favor with which the above three works have been received, induce me to express my thanks and gratitude to that large-hearted Public who have sustained me, and aided in giving my Thought to the World. I have portions of Editions of some of my writings

which will NEVER BK REPRINTED, viz., *'LOVE AT LAST," Published at $1; ^'THE GOLDEN SECliET," at$l; My ^'CURIOUS LIFE," at 75 cts. and '' THE ANSAIRETIC MYSTERY," written for $10 and^5. The three first contain much of rare and vital interest; the "LIFE" being a *' THE GOLDP^N graphic account of my rather singular History and Career. SECRET*' should be read by every per'=^on, because its medical advice, and the extraordinarily valuable Life-tables tor determining how long, in years, months, weeks and days, any person, at any point, from babyhood to senility, has a fair chance of yet living; while "LOVE AT LAST'* gives rules and laws concerning the Divine Passion, of incalculable worth to every one. Now for $-\ I will send to every purchaser of EULIS and THE WOMAN'S BOOK any two of the three works named above, so long as any remain, and will GIVE the " ANSAIRETIC MYSTERY," gratis When the books arc all gone, then I will send for $2, Poole's celebrated Portrait of myself fit for framing lar^e, fine, and the best ever taken I will send the Picture and GIVE the Mystery and a copy of cither of the above, or the New MOLA the wliole postpaid for $2, of course to Eulis Patrons only, as the Portrait* we COSTLY, and otherwise could not be afforded.
;
^

p. B.

PvANDOLPH, M.

D.,

LOYE!
ITS HIDDEJSr HISTORY!
!

THE BOOK OF THE CENTURY MOST REMAEKABLE BOOK ON HUMAN LOVE


Ever Issued from the American Press.

Two

Vols, in One.
Ci

A BOOK FOR
/

WOMEN,
SINGLE, UNLOVED, HEART-REFT PINING ONES;
ESPECIALLY FOR

WORLD,
DIRECT, EXPLICIT,

AND VALUABLE COUNSEL


I

CONCEBNIWa THE

GREAT CHEMICO-MAGNETIC LAWS OF LOVE

THE MASTER PASSION; OR, THE CURTAIN RAISED.


WOMAN, LOVE, AND MARRIAGE; FEMALE BEAUTY, AND POWER; TIIEIR ATTAINMENT, CULTURE, AND RETENTION.
Terrible power of a Warron Chase on 'Tree Love" Origin of Uterine Diseases Woman's hatu Love vs. PassionThe stormy life The love-cure The lovo-curse A hint for Motbcrs-in-law Onco-in-awhilish love Strange power of woman's lovo wives unloved husbands Truo marriage for Lint love A of Tho tides lovo Gusty How to regain a lost ailcction The law of fixedness in lov matters The magnetio attack When woman's love has most conquering power A secret revealed An extraordinary thing concerning parcntugo ! Relative lovo powerof brunettes and blondes Men dtui'fc know bow to make love The Aow/ Man's periodicity of love WoCypnThe Dwiu's Singular dead The difference are we after Sex and passion

||

ft

LOVE

J9

AND THE ^MASTER PASSION."

Diotima, Domenichino, Milton, Alecto, Salmasius, Bacon, Cote, Shakespeare, Montaigne, Moliere, La Fontaino, Rousseau, Beaumarchais, AVhitlocko, Savillo, John Wesley, Dryden, Steele, Coleridge, Sterne, Churchill, Byron, Shellej', Bulwer and his wife, Fuseli, Hobbes, Locke, Bentham, Spinosa, Kant, Gibbon, Barrow, Chillingworth, Hammond, Poo, and other genii Why unhappy benedicts aro celibates Caiiyle and his wife How tho Scotch giant lives at homo Tho underlying law of human genius A hint to mothers Freeman B. Grand master of tho Ptosicrucians Reference to seership, and the seven magnetio laws of lovo, whereby tho unloved gain it, and lost loves are firmly rcbuildcd A strange and mighty power How to retain a husband s lovoOId-maidhood and how to avoid it The how [Tho work called " Seership," contamingtho Oriental Woman's Art of Love, and direct statement and application of the seven magnetio laws of love, was put to press after tho above volumes were written. Its price IS three dollars, and can be had only direct from this office.] Uf tho large double volume, octavo work on Lovo and tho Master Passion, the universal

of Gautier Dickens' trouble with his wife Why wives generally ruin their talented husbands A hint women A very curious paper on incest Proving a man^s nearer ofJdn him than father vr mother Byron's alleged incest Singular cause of wedded misery and disconterit Its certain euro The cure the deadly personal sin Why wives hato their husbands General Grant Wilson on marriairca among men of genius A splendid paper, by a splendid man Socrates, Xantippe, Aspasia,
to

she did years, and how it ninety Strange at young secret of life^ D^VEnclos, Ninon Curious method of Madame Tallien prolonging! \ilmd.xd^ and his mysterious cordial whole art Tho of adornment beauty and youth Skin, hair, eyes, her preserving for is worth the price of ten such books to alone section This Protozone teeth every female in the land, be she old or young; for it contains the whole secret of magnetio Turkish Harems The magnetio plate for nervous ladies female beauty How they How to make and uso them Ead effects of two Toilet articles beautify themselves Rather curious in one bed Fun as a doctor Difference between tho sexes The.Roman ~~ daughter- Touching story A latter-day sermon The social evil- 'Extraordinary means '* loose women " to preserve their of grades higher beauty, and restore the by to resorted it when lost Protoplasm, and how to increase it Huxley's theory Scandal Running Freeman B. Dowd, Luke Eurko, Charles Swinburne upstairs, and tho heart-disease Divorce, is it a real remedy for Boyd of Minneapolis on true marriage Peerless trio Beechcr on *^ The secret sins of The Woman's Grand Secret unhappy marriage? Portrait of tho Girl of the Period, and the The chemieal origin of ''sin" youth" A startling scientific fact concerning human Marriage in 1970 girl of tho future Tests of tho love nature by the color "What becomes cf harlots after death? blood A certain cure for dyspepsia, page 100, second Very singular, and true of the eyes Whom not to marry A philosophic caution to those who love The essence of part What the Kosicruiians are The rights of a lover and husband marriage is consent are tho same A lover's and brother's not so The true rule of divorce Legislators Heart, not mind, carries sex along with it take notes of this Marriage not dependent on a ceremony A fashionable woman's prayer Prayer of the Girl of tho Period Why some people marry A Hottentot's picture of heaven To puysicians especially An entirely new theory of nervous diseases, and methods of cure Prompt, certain and complete Trouble in tho lovo nature tho cause of untold sickness Means of cure The uso and abuse of amatory passion Change of nervous centres Frin-htful consequences thereof Dircovery of tho philosopher's stone! Magnetio exhaustion and the remedy Voodoo John, of New Orleans, who completely subjugated woman Magnetio fascination Vampires Lifo leeches Consumers of souls A thrilling warning The wholo terrible mystery of Voodooism revealed Tho cause and cure ol all evil Want of true lovo Tho death of lovo and its lifo Valuable hints to medical men^ A new theory of cure and a faultless ono The celebrated " Le^-Love " Secret

Beauty and Art early The chemistry of love and marry and well Love prayer Aspasia, Diana do love-power Poictiersand increase the bath to How boauty and the elixir of Kosierucian, the Lombardy, ^What was ~ of Peter beauty
ill's

cl

life

it

brother

to be

to

is his

o?ily

for

Dowd

wtn^^^ hauative.

^f

'^' ^^

^^^^^ *^^^ ^^

^^^ language

is

so full, plain, clear, explicit, and ox-

P. B.

RANDOLPH.

THE ROSICRUCIAN LIBRARY.


By
p. B.

RANDOLPH.

Ll

I.

PRE-ADAMITE MAN.
existence of the

Seventh

edition.

Human Race upon

Demonstrating the
lu

this earth 100,000 years ago.


.

$2.00.

"A
Truth!

remarkable book."

"We
built

the Fort of

iK

35 Extra valuable volume." " Great gi'asp of thought Adam was ;zo/ the first man, nor anything like it
!

Shows

that

men

P.
. . .

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centuiy

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men

f!

mil

II

AFTER DEATH;
No
among
worl-

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DISEMBODIED MAN.
$2.25.

Sixth

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enlarged edition; with notice of the author.

t
\

\\

om
tions,

concerning our state and doings

after death, that heretofore


*

)S,

would have been

for

grapple with them.


2,

For

marry, beget our kind,


^

after

death ?

These and many other most asto


remarkable

interesting subjeds are thoroughly treated in this very

volume/'
I

11

List of Worls.
"

No

other living

man

could have penned such a

work

as this.

The

after sex death concerning chapter, immortal tenth

books." ordinary worth a hundred

ni.
and Laws The MOLA! THE NEW
Principles of
]VIag-

Mediumism. and Clairvoyance, NETisM, important monograph most on the Meunquestionably is This
try
t3

How

to obtain the

Phenomena

in all its Phases.

Conglomerate
Phases of

^editimship.

New

and Startling Dodrine of Mixed Identities.


Explicit forms for
all

hand-book of White Magic.

Cabalistic^ Incantatory^

and Thaumatiirgic Science a?td Practice

SYNOPSLS.
White Magic an adual
ditions essential to their
fa6l.

Identification of the dead.

Con-

reappearance.

Essentials of

Mediumship

and Clairvoyance.

Blonde and Brunette Media.


inestimable importance.

Curious reasons,
Circles.

A vast discovery of
The Yu-YANG.
Gulf of Eternity
alone.
!

Conglomerate

Psychic Force.
EIe6lric People.

Medial Aura.

Spanning the
Double
t

To

get the

Phenomena when

Odyllic Insulation.

To form
about!

a splendid Circle.

C'jcles

and new arrangement of the

sitters.

Spirits,

and how to bring

it

Materialization of The Phantom hand of Toledo.


Mergement of
and does what
it

The Spirit-room.
tations
!

Machinery essential to Physical ManifesIdea

An Astounding

ATRILISM

Identities

A
and

dead one walks,

talks, eats, drinks,

chooses while occupying another's body, while the latter' s soul is


quiescent^

consciousness

and

identity ivJwlly lost I

most

im
^^'^^^^ Juror, Minister,

husband, wife, in short, to every human


evolved

being.

It

is

the most astounding thought yet


heretofore wholly unaccountable.
to

as

it

accounts for
I

much

Part
their

II.

How

Mesmerize.

Clairvoyance.

Psychometry
Seership
Breatli

differences.

The Eastern Mystery

of obtaining
ink.

The Mystical Mirror


J

In a

drop of

common

The

li

List of Works.
power
Magic.

Ill

An Arab

Secret.

Magnetic Spells.

" Voodo-ism " Black


l

Price, postpaid, 50- cents per copy.

TV.

REVELATION OF SEX LOVE, WOMAN, SECOND THE MARRIAGE. THE WOMAN'S BOOK. For those who
;

HAVE Hearts.

Price, $2.50.

Postage

free.

SYNOPSIS.
Chapter
I.

n
a mighty Lesson.

Wealth

The

\\

two Sphinxes:

Woman
Some

True and False Love,


very peculiar ideas about women.

their lines of difference.

male and why.


Passion-love.

Test of a genuine Love.

11

Noyes
affinitists

some
them.

and bad ones,

some

of

w
I!

"Women
'

suffer less
?

and are more cruel


Signs of a

in love matters than

men.
one.

Is

it

true

If so,

why ?

false love

and a true

Chap.

II.

The
She
;2C7;er.^

one great human want


have love or die

is

love.

Wl

Hap.

Wl
than men.
but
tnzcsf
!

W
Physical aspedls

Men
grand
too,
:lerful

women

Why? Magnet
lover,

of Love.

Its celestial chemistry,

every woman^ and

and husband,

be neg
one.

One

of Love's

Hidden Myst

Conditions

of Love.

Why

Divorce Sharpers.

"Passional
1

Desert. the on Miser Attraaion," The Seducer her with happy be never can Wife Why a Seduced

Wonderful

The

Amatory
Chap.
III.

Love
be

curious.

Why
!'

No
and
a terrible fa6l.

be led astray.

Why

he does love her.


fallacy exploded.

A
;

A
!

hi

Marks

Mysteries of Mystery

How

wives' are slain


I

how husbands make


words old of leadings

hem

false

Sedudioi:
of Anti

rrua

rtiiiptiis

by condolence

New

List of Worhs,
Marriagelsts.

Whoever cannot
or pay.

weep

is

Lost!
to

ne^er

satisfy

The death-blow

^ " Free

Love."

The

Home argumcn
From
about

A A

Parent to Child. Fatlierhood. of Mystery Strange Parentage.

O c^om-ong Theories oi Soul-ori,2:in.

Secret and

Adultery. of cause Mysterious returned of Necessity CiiAP. IV.

Love.

Who

wins a

bod}r

loses

who wins
The

soul wins all

a strange, but might}^ rule of

Love'l

Vermicular Philosophers.

Why

Free Lovers always

Commandments. Passional 12th and nth The come to grief! of " short it." and Moments long The dangers of Eating-houses -/ of^^o wnnr^prful. and mvstic beauty in all women. The
!

mystery

of

Vampirism, a

terrible

revelation!
its
;

Picture

of a

love-laden

woman.

True Womanhood, and


cannot
call

counterfeit.
kill
it

A true
quickly.

woman's Love.

Men

out love

but can

Why? The

three things essential to call out

worn

human soul. The Chap. V. The Solar Law of lonely and heart-reft the Love in of sunbursts " Something." The Bridal Hour, Better The Love. A Vampire.

strange,

weird Power of the


!

and the
feit

fearful

''-

afterwards

.''

An

unsuspected^ terrible counterIlerodlas, his

of Love.

Legend of the Wandering Jew, and

mate.

" Circles," " Sorosis," and the Circcan

Sisterhood.

Pro-

tedion from

Vampire Life
A6lual

leeches.

How

these are created by

Parents not loving each other.


fallen

Singular

fa(5t

and a Plea
also.

for the

woman.

Vampirism, a case described.

SpiderTlie triple

women.
crazy

Kidney troubles indicate Love troubles

form of Love,
1

a new revelation.
1

The kind

of

Love

that sets us

Love tides

Proof of Love-adaptedness.

Love and

Friendship,

the

difference.

Eternal Affinityism disse6led.

A
fluid

grand Love-Truth.

Chap. VI.

New
Why

definitions

of

Marriage,

Love
fall.

/Ether

Origin of Vampire Life,


life.

how
A

they destroy plant

and animal

loving wives and husbands

A
full

Test.

Genius, Love,

and Passion go together.

Why?

The

Geniusof
re-

producing Law.

The Law of

Social Joy.

chapter

1-

List of Works,
wrecked
Vivat

Love's VII. Chap.


grand
Passion!

Chemistry,

very

curious, but very true.

nature. double Love's


the

Magnetic, Eledric, and Nervous bases of

Law

of Tidal Love.

The Poison
!

flow.

of true Fevers Affedion and Im Chills Passion. Attraction of male and female existence. between Difference TALizATiON.

What Strange. Words Lovers. and


a

woman
is
!

H
Power.
Brain versus Heart
versus Heart
1

VIII

Goodness alone
strength, not

Knowledge is Love. of Phases Grooves, ^Moods,

power

Head

Women.

How

Love

requires but one

Spain, of Isabella Mystery. Hatred. deadly to change to second resulted War Franco-Prussian the How lover. her Marfori, and PhotoMagic woman's a about fad Singular loving. their from trial. Man" on of Monkey-origin " the of Darwin power. graphic

His acquittal.

A Hint to Parents.
Why women
wrecked.
are
ill,

Chap

but should not be.

Con-

feaionery and Love.

Drugged Candy.

An

unsuspefted rock on
is

which lovers are

Mental Sex, not physical,

what men

as dress, woman's About love most. make. men most which about women

Love

creators.

mistake
for

Another word
Caution to

the
die

W^
early
!

^Extremes

Shakerism Freeism.
Hereditary Bias.

Why women

complain, and why wives


all.

X.- Divorce: more kissed are boy-babies Why Dress. New a Old Friend in Wl girl infants.
Chap.
year.

The

Love-cure.

An
than

Camp-meeting and

Ball-room tJaii-room

Loves. i^uvc^.

Another ^.^, ^. Mystery .

T>..i A.^ o.o T r..r...tarveA.

the Affedion-Congrcss, The

Con

Arrival. the and Passengers, the Train, the duaor,

splendid

Married
Chap Love without exists Jealousy To a husband! To a Lover! How trutn. rare of Gems Jealousy. without exist may Love l^oetiWhy Souls. of Beginning recover when Lovc-exhaustcd. of
I

A New

Discovery in

great a and Love,

cide,

at

any stage,

is

'u.orse

Murder adult than

Freczmg

List of
VI
Aft^dion.

1^'orks

Story Sad The

Heart fa o^^

What

man

said about

it.

^^^^^^,

Its Refutation.

Rome

for plea Poefs Persian

Cxsars. the before

Cn;.p.XII.-"TheageofJ3rass.^

Why

Mutilates cannot Love

Manhood.

"The

Origin of

Why
^^'"

"

^^-"^^^'':^/;;'''

"
^

Why

CAXNOT CA^NOl xJT^ss" "Mistress


T ife

"Mistress." a resped can Man wlTno concerning Something BK HAPPV!

Ir JA 1 Wedded

of. thought r^ry seldom

L^J^' ^^_;;^

Mil. Chap.
Partners .eleaing
pa^iharities.
:

p.^^^ ^f ^
the

Man

Miss." Kept versus Wife


^^^

baa

^^^ ^^^^

Pre-nuptial
^^^^^ ^

^^

^^^^^

M.^^^^^^^^^^

and tame A--^-ness,

wild,

A
a

better

metho

of

d. o^c

^P^

curious notion.

Whyure

^^^^^^

^^ ^^^^^ S^^^^,,,,,,

____,_._,,

f a Rival.

Can

'^''r^'

A YTV CAP. XI^Vone-sided ty


Husbands

came what and Wit, of Worth Penny's


( ?)

of

it?

Marriage. Single-sided Love, and

What

a Sensible
,

Woman

said

W;i::."n

Bew.e Wi.s Menu

^- 1 1

L.
Its

//.W,

Denial,-its f.s.

The Great

f'f^f ^-sU n D-a.


t

answer!

B;autifui a.e are All A.

Homage. No
phar's Wife.

one can

No Him Make Her Love and Home Demand Women so^ek.^! All Po' Why? Woman. Loving Seduce a

H
What Sappho
said
;

Why

a Coar

one. Fine a than better Temptation can Resist

Old Ma.ds

Old

Poem her Love on

Chap.

XV
Ascent, Descent
;

Mr
a Great

land and Miss Green.

New
Human,
Str

Husbands.

How

the Coarse

Weaker
who
are not.
^

Who

are Stridly

and

Anatomy
versus
Settle-downity
1 1

Honeymoonness
Force,

Definitions:
-

^ Friendship
.

and

^^'^'-J Unless T^nccJnn.

Hz'sf

of Works.

\'\\

great, or even good. h^ How canU to Recoiistrua you love you in ancient Pompeii. other, the and Love Wife. Stormy Love Antagon its uses. XVI. Chap.

It

M
!

etnier. freinier. of Adam,


Folly.

Who

Falls by

Closets, People's in Skeletons

Love by Love must Rise and our own. Copy-ists. Hero.


1

Worship

its
t

Why
>J

Anatomization

Piaure

H
Nature

Man
I

St,

O'Rafferty Paddy and Peter Fisk, Jr. James Company.


^^^

What

befell

an

Affinityist in S

His Love-power and Career.

Hiu

II

Success

What

the

The Grand Secret of his wonderful Feronee Lady said about Fisk, Vanderbilt,
read them.

Butler and

Forney

Chap.
Powerful.

XVIL Woman
Wom
The Grand Magnetic Law.
flip

The
oS
\

H
The Rule
Flow a
false step photo-

"Rule

and law of

ght. Risfht.

graphs itself

and

the

Party

xn

her eye

an

Egyptian Secret!

The of Love

distrusts of Love-life,
!

and

their causes.

Descensive and Ascen

law Curse."

Admiral Verhuel

The deeper meanings " The mother-inThe Napol

Louisiana Belle and

Worlds

distin6l.

what Fact
I'

befell

her!

The Male and Female


Chemical Love.
Se-

Woman
Med
con-

"Who's been here


cret of absolute

since

love-power.

Chap. XVIIL
!

Love-theory Consuelo Sands' Madame George cubinic Sham True Excesses. Periodic Personal Earthquakes and
rejected.
1

and Debauchees Fa6l Singular Love renders us malaria-proof prefer beasts and insets Why them attack that Parasites the
! !

human prey

to

all

discovery! vast and Strange A other how and animalcule Another


&

War
recipe

in

Europe
v^hat

Hov^r to
it

Home happy! a new

Want, and
living.

1
I

W
and
last

A
How

make docs! The The ist, 2d,

grand duty of every husband

Chap

properly unless times meat hurts our souls at


List of
IJ^orls.

VIII

s!iii:Mitcrccl

which

It

scltlom Is!!

fa(5l

for Legislation

How

T'orl. our injmrs Ethereal a<51ion of magnetically cook wicked a 'Myi^l'^iyix-vcnhd. Love ITowSlo\cn Bx/ranri///iarf An Love.

lincss kills

aflcaion

The Sum..^.
IJad

rrol'I-m.

Tiic Xcvv Depart-

ure.
fret

Al'out Relationship, very curious!


the worst liushaiuls
;

1"(ULh!

men, the worst wives.

Good women The general


J

mlxed-upness.
CiiAP.

JJoy and Girl h^^c.

Souk ihiui;

for

c>eryhody.

XX.

The
and

Girl anil Dridc of the i'criod.

What's up?

Why
male

Honeymoons

turn Miter so quickly!


OJilif.

Curious causes of FeFrlendslilp.

Whims

Scarcity of real

The

Love Key.

The Seven
letter.

Love Passion beyond the


Eli's

The Kini,' 1\. -nn. Amative grave!! Woman's Grand Tov.^r. Ben
Drvils.
love.
-'
1 [

Marrowy

Chap.

XXL Dead-level
Angularities.
relative

Ti!""'

and
for

sp.^ts.
'

IIiit.

'^andic

Rules, which husbands nc^lcct


.celibates.

'ing

Married

More about L^^^.


;

T'LONDES and Bru\\'ivcb

nettes

their

love-power and v-hie


mucJi to those
rcslbt
cotut^.

very

curious analysis

"JL'orth

ncJ ! I

L'

k Eves,
than

and the "De'il."


Brunettes.
In

Blondes
fall /O

out^^rd pressure

better

Brunettes

Whv,
in their

both cases.
they
all

Singular!

Astounding the ^r\- conceniing Brunettes


veins?

Have
its

Black man's blood

The

qu^^tion and
Brunettei

answer!

Blondes love more than one


Fire-Pach.d

at one time.
I

one only,

their
!

SouM
!-vc.

heir

n'.w.o love and


Blonde-love

revenge powei
its

BrunetUs
I
isac

Its intensitv.

superior delicacy.

Bru

5'CT;j^-Subduing;

vampiral.

Blonde love, Soul-S'lduin-! Brunettes never Blondes arc, and a startllnix f -1 Their relative im!

munity from ^.^Ied dis^.^cs!

widow's and widower's chances


t

of marriage better than those of slr-le

-I

O:rious rc-.cns.
."

Cotton- Aids.
pires.

How
women

to

win

a true

imul

C.

Male Vam-

Little

have adv'.Ligrc

Dead-Loves.

How?

Loaier Gospel.
the \vh.s of

Why? Rcconstniaion of Xcw E.igbnd Love ComI

parative deaths of
children live longest

light

and Whv

and daik men.

^^'llOse

\ Prod

CiiAr.

XXII. Hov

A
!

List of IVorks,
Husbands.

IX

Meddling "Friends." Dangers of unrequited and Love! The Awakening. Never Make your loves Public Watchand what Mr ing a wife

and his trowsers

while watching
"Lost
1

his wife

The place

of sighs
fallacy

a touching story of

Souls."

The "All-Right"

exploded.

The

Social Evil!

proud

and his readers will XXIII. Pre-nuptial

Author
Deceptions sure
be found out!
Dissedion
f

to

Complaining Marriages.
of an Atheistic Libertine.

Necessity of loving some one.

Temptation.

The Upper Faith. The Dog Nature. The True Bill. Bad Marriage-horrors The I^Iagic
!

Power of dress.
Poem.
view.

Wife-negle6ling husbands.

Woman's
offers,

love

Evidences of high civilization from a savage's point of

A rebuke to the
Wedded
Rights of

19th Century.

Ignorant

and

fool

acceptances.

Licenses

Impure
How the
man.

brides,

Discovered.
Author

Man
!

Women New, and very good


little.

great are fooled by the


offish at times.

How the best women


No
No man can endure
male one!
!

must a6l queer and


full

" Hard Case."


ciates.

Atheist a

negleft.

Hopes fixed on inappreA powerful /ewa/e advantage!

powerful

Stingy husbands!
!

How

husbands can

rewin the wife's love

A splendid resort

to fight."

for out went " what animlles the story and sermon concerning about fad Singular it. of The fight, and what came

jealousy.

''Only once\
trust a

that won't count

much!"

Won't

it?

Bri-ands history.

Can a lover

woman who
foes.

deceives her husband?

Social

their

own worst
!

Why ? A

bit of the author's life

What
soul

Human
" She was
all

Responsibility.

Vastness
!

the

human

the world to

Me

"

A
!

Heart
Sen-

Poem.
the cost
for

No

sitlveness

Love. real evoke can libertine Points seven The its advantages.
to

Modern Love

this alone is

worth
do.
;

of the book

every woman.

Something

for wives

husbands.

"When

Offices of

wom
The real

her soul's at work!" system. Telegraphic The human


Counterfeit kisses.

The

distributive
Its

wonders.
portunity

Sexburg and Scoundrelton.


kissI

"Op

Its meaning.

GractI When

X
friendships fail!

List of Works,
"Bitter Beer!"
I

" Like a gentle summer rain


truly

Home! Sweet Home! twam " A Poem

Ita

Vive L' Amour

Finis.

Y.

LOVE: ITS SEX. HIDOF REVELATION THE FIRST ONE. A Book IN for VOLS. TWO DEN HISTORY.

Loving The and the Husbands. Wives, Woman, Man, Power. and Their Beauty Female Unloved. Also Retention. and Culture, Attainment,
" Hearts?
Hearts?

Who
Price, $2.50.

speaks of breaking Hearts?"

Post

free.

Of

tliis

large the from reprinted volume,


;

tells Edition" "Seventh for need be said and work, preceding the entirely from

oaavo its own

edition, nothing
story.
It differs

covers totally different

grounds.

CONTENTS.
Chapter
certain
I.

What

is

Love?

Reply All
Passion
is

of us born with a
is

amount of Love
True Love and

in us.

not love, but love

Passion!

"Free Love" Infernalisms.


its

Life and

Love a desperate

game.
girls
fl

counterfeits.

Prudery.

Why

young

wedded disagree a the infamous Abortionists and unsuspe6led curious cause tribe Love's Hidden Mysteries. The TEN great Rules and Laws
"Fall."

Magnetic Love.

Why

the

thereof!

She stoops
Vampires

to

conquer I

Dress

Silence as Powers of
Test of True
is

Love.

life-teachers.

Soul-devourers.

Love.

Jealousy.
so.
II.

Suspicion.

When woman
fault

divine,

and how

to

make her
Chap.

The
Why

wife's great

and oversight.

Adultery.

The

kiss.

woman's

idea of Love.

Dofrg-Ish husbands.

Blind

Tom
bear

and the Monkey boy.

Love an Element.
!

Why

she " can't

him!"

he " hates her "

Divorce.

"Spirit-medium"

frauds.

" Love powders."

" Dragon's blood."

The Heart

Song.

List of Works.

XI

I
I

Barn-yard Love Philosophers. " I've fallen again " Passion in Men and Women. Song of the Forsaken. Laughinjr wScandal
!

Sunshine.

Sugar-life.
III.
;

Chap.

Perverted Magnetisms.
Love dependent on

Magnetic Poisons.

Uter-

ine diseases

undreamed-of causes of such.

Complaints of women.

Vulgar natures.

vidluals

and drink.

The

Song of Wedded Misery. Vicarious Love Wretchedness. Real What it is, and is not! MeddHng People. Love-song Marriage

of the Soul

Chap. IV.
creator

Power
life.

of words

startling truth.
!

Air;
!

the

supreme joy of
I

Curious, but true

Oxygen a
!

Love

The two

Babies.

A sad, sad story.


AfTedion
! ;

Nellie and the flick;

ering- candle.

Consumption.

Love
!

the difference be-

tween.

Love and provender


is

The

secret sin

The Proper Study


White
races.

of Mankind

Woman

V
ferences

Dif-

between the Sexes.

"Blue

Pill

for

Breaking Hearts."

other and attentions Forced all. Love at no Love Unwelcome Modern Why? ones. light than healthier people Dark Poisc^ns. woman. of a wonders The } Why Roses. of Bed marriage not a woman. of Helplessness Divorce. False Nuts for married people.
s

MarAdual Why.? best. women Men of lofty soul love simple by child a bears who woman Why a riage means reciprocateness. Transfusion. one. light bear a a dark man can never thereafter Mingling. Magnetism. it. resist to and how Temptation

Chap. VI. How


Secrets.

to

win a husband's
but

love.

The Three
revelation.
to

Oriental

Love

An

excellent,

strange,

Magnetic
cure
it!

Will and Love Power.

Love Starvation and how


husbands

The Seven Rules


Grundy.
side.

for

good
Sally.

ones

to

tlie

wise.

Mrs.
other
it

Free will.

John and
tale.

"Animality."
Social Evil.

The

Tides ofPassIon and Love.

The

"

When

is

dark

"-a

mournful

Incompatibility.

Why
he

relations

hate

each other.

Physical basis of

human
to

love.

Seven Laws of Love.


loves

Vampires." The author's " woman. When the Sultan goes


ous.

experience.

Why
!

pretty
I

Ispahan "

Funny, but danger-

XII

List of iror^s.

Chap. VII.

Woman

is

Love Incarnate, only men don't


Hearts for sale!

rr-llze it

Dimic^ versus Divinity. Art. an Love, her Power.


Lo\.-.
re.

Woman

fails to

The Magic Ring


Lola Montez.

very strange.
Once
to

know The
in

Mother-in-law the

trouble tliey make.

whilish love of husbands.


j

The Christ-imaged

child.

Wonderful law.
wild husbands.

Love-storms, gales, tempests.

How

su'iue

Woman's

second attack wins, and why.

Chap. VIII.
I

Love

not to be forced on either side.

What Leon
it

Cozlan said
vioic?iccl

about women,

'infernal fol-dc-rolisms," "Legal"

How
The

Love-matches are

broken

ofT.

The Lesson
Beauty;
its

teaches.

French " Girl's" curious Prayer.

laws.

means of incK and arts the on Chapter An Invaluable Insa-'ty. Dr. of Cazenavc. French the from tran^:..Ud in'' Female Beauty
;

teeth, hair, eyes, skin, the beautifying for Special instru(5lions


I
LA.P

in

Adornment of \v omen.

Good-IIumor.

Home.

The

true

life.

Heart ver-

sus Brain.

was
i

saved.

The Woman condemned to be strangled, and how she The three Lessons. A latter-day Sermon Text:

travel." to road hard a is "Jordan

Magdalen.

Scandal and Gossip.


thrilling

The Castaways. Singular. What Echo said. The Baby


Fighter.

World.
splendid

Sermon by a reformed Prize

Poem

Swinburn.
HoneyMarriage
in 1790.

CiTAP. X. "Eternal Affinityism," and Chnroh-ortion.

moons
of

versus sour Syrup.

One happy man;

the curious reason why.


its

" Doctors."
all

Science

a wonderful
!

case

mighty Power.

Cyprians not

bad or

lost.

Why? Mono-

gamy and Amative Stimulants.


Propagation of Heroes

The

fmest race upon the Planet.

how

it is

Charader
cure in a

Gray, Clue,
Women.

The Eye as an Hazel, Black eyes. The L o


accomplished
Gossiping.
Matter.

new
in

phase.

Matrimonial career.

Healthy

Love.
I
'

Sex

Nature
classes of

Music
"Lip-

Sexive.

Three

Whom

not to

Wed.
Fretting.

Chap. XI.
Salve."
*

Ivlarried Celibates.

Friendliness.
1

Boston.

Philosophy Soul-Marriage

Fashionable
Hottentofi

Lady's Prayer.

Prayer of the Girl of the Period.

List of JVorls,

yn|

and Female Subju^ .ion by Bknl. VouJoo John, ITcaxen. How Wives arc Ladies. P^l.anwi Bre^^cl^.s Arte.
I

Ci'VP-

^i^'

T^^^

Fountain of Lo>e.

How
*

to

rcniuvt'*
ci"

exhaubuon.

What

to ct to

gain Love-Power.
'^.

Power

^g
\\
)
'

Woman.
S
out.
ally

Her

child.

Ex^^

Promi^jv^v..**

Lov^

A
Ankles.

Genius

-^nd

Wedlock.

Why

th(

Talen.*

c-,

^
^juUr
'

Wretched
in

in tL^ Marriag:; State.

Sir^-'-ir iaAs

and

Fuults
Incest.

Women.

Bitter Lxpcrio"ce.

A
J

^'-ju'

I\

Non-recipro^.*iiu.i

and
'

its

uibc

and
'

cure.
.

OuIJUr'xi

Po^iples Causes
cure.

Cure.

rault-u.id:..s.

i*^ue

Power, or Geniua.
hoo:.
a'

The
cure.

contains spo

articles

con.

.ning

why
i

natc their hua'

u. '^.

Sin<;ular cauaea of

wedded

miscr>-,

hint to mothers.

Hint

to

unloved wl.v

Gia^
lif"
i>e 1
1
!

When woman
mn
-r.ctic

has most c..aquering power.

The atormy
are
i_
1

attack.

Sex and paaaion


avoid
it

after

we

r^\

01

hood, and

how

to

VI.

THE OF MYSTERIES THE wonderful A Edition. New SEiiu.iiir.


for

MAGNi^fl^

UNIVLH^
.^

stiics of di

^^
.:

sclf-dcvclopment in all

branches of 0-r%.,

mcc.

inc,.

of agency astonishing the use tliem.

^LVG1C MIRRORS;

and haw to

CONTENTS. Part
lucidity.

L
al

Somnambuhstic
ri-ht.

Genuine

clair>o>

ui'^hn.:*-

Two
fail to

sources of

ligtit,

astral and mgnetic.

Why
\

merists

produce

subjects." their clair^-oyance in


ite

.-^.r.
:.pec.fic
^

in agents as water, magnets and tradors


rules.

produftaon
false

CI./..oy.nce

is

not spiritualism.

The

.nd

e true.

Psvchometry and

clairvoyanc:. not are intuition


!

Mc
are

J-ic c...
""
^

Clair^'oyance of i:..Js Eig^^t


trance.

Mesmeric c^^a ;7^

The

difTerence.
seer.

power. lung of EO-ea

Eff^'H of

passion on
Oriental,

the

Dangers

to

women who

method.. American European, and

The

...r

j^j^

List oj Works,

How
stool.

common a by mesmerize
!Tnct

looking-gla.s.

The

insulated

gnet.

The
Black

Chemlsm.

Why

''Spirits" are

away ,a,u .. tnk'nubj^as Very charms, projects spells, ("Hoodoo") Voudoo Ma-ic. dangers ternble tire and sham, The Powders." Strange! "Love
of the" real

from magnetizers.

Curious.

How

fabricated. are they


in

Astounding disclosures

Voudooism concerning
conches,
the

Tennessee.
test,
T,fflo/i ffled

Proofs.

The
tl>e

cock, the
ellea, the
.Mrs. A..

the herbs, the triangle,

the spell,
l->l:irk
.

-.

1-,'j'

mno-ic.
r
.1

wonderful

result.

Chief. Voudoo the the Doaor, and them. reach to bow and Clairvoyance, The dec^recs of

Explanation of the mystery.

power^ve, and money.

Self-mesmerism.

The Mesmerism in

road to
ancient

years of thousands Babylon and Nineveh, Ec^ypt Syria, Chaldea, Bunsen, Horner, Rawllngs, Botta, Lepsius, of Testimony airo. Ad Phantorama. The Mariette. and

diampollion,
Seersh

PART

II.

and Mirror The Magnetic The Count


St.

its Uses.
it.

Dr. Dee and

his

magic mirror.
o

Strange things seen in

Not

spiritual juggle.

Sand.

glass. Spirit-Seeing or Magic Mirror Rosicrucian), (the purposes. Ilargrave Jennings

same the for used Jewels

C
Ca &

illumination.

andlils

Magic

IvIIrror.

Count Crystal-seeing Frederick the Great

Ame
Gold panic of September. more
effeAive than

Apr
Its literal fulfilment.

Business

men

use

mirrors to forestall the markets.

Their singular magic.

Better and

animal

magnetism.

Why.

Extraordmary

pidure. a as steady psycho-vision method of holding a

Two

kinds
**

of mirrors.

Cr}
it.

masfic mirror are

m0J^

not on or in, but above

Dangers of " Spirit control."


mirrors.
Failures.

Fads.
Success.

Theory.
i

Construdors of magic

Chemistry of mirrors.

of Street the and The Life of Dream,


a6lually

Ch
there can be no future to

Omniscience.

The

future

embosomed

List of Works,

x\

tM

who
the womb
all

'M

of coming time.
the right sense.

It

can be done,
Sir

is

done, and will be by


Salverte, lambli-

who have

David Brewster,

Damascius. and chus,

A magic mirror seance extraordinary.


is

The

Emperor

Basil's son

brought to his father

in a

magic glass bj
ge adven-

Santa Baren.

Mr. Roscoe

death really What Bellini. is. A new theory \ Benvenuto of ture Absorption. real things. of Its use and phantasmagoria The Theory of of vision. spiritual theory sight. Platonic meaning. Statement of the seven ma and Magic wife rewins her straying blonde The Love. of laws mao-netic blonde from rival. rival a brunette from a husband brunette polar law of love. antagonal The love. Caressive Polarites.

Backtlirown

love.

singular

principle.

Egyptians.

Magic
H

maiden How a testimony. Lane's Mr. and mirrors. Mrs. Pool power magnetic Awful wrong-doer. a rival a discovers a lover finds widow Oriental " prayer." magnetic injured woman's

of an

a husband

having seen him

never

having seen him.

"The
I

Master Passion."
rors.

How
De

Master

"After death." Grand The magnetically. them to clean and charge magic " Japanese Trinius " Novalis. The celebrated

Rules and laws of magic mir-

Cal. Francisco, San of rystal globe is the It dollars. two at TI.P nnVe of this work has been fixed le English language,
incontestably excels either

the
tr

German, Arabic, Sy
t

Hindostanee, or the Chaldaic

most and fullest the p probably,

me
extraordinary charader
is,

A
\

indeed, rare.

be

from

my

office.

VII.
The

RETIC MYSTERY

ANSAIExtraordinanquite the of part, W.IOI.E, instead of a ConcernRevelation Rosicrucian fourth -the


can thousands Sex, and, as
testify

nlan

the .ost
;

ng

,h!t

earth on anywhere appeared yet ever has

there wh.le and

XVI
not a

List of Worhs,
word
in suggestion or line or
it,

or in the third Revelation,

yet they blush, angel go to an make could that that favors anything agitator, on hearing celebrated a Said subjed. the very foot of the

What
w^hole.
as
it is

" Five dollars

hard work

to write

it

out."

" Five dollars

Why,

it is

worth

thrill brains, or a of of ounc^ an with earth on one $500 to any !" up the Orienlooked T Weh, them in left Man or Womanhood mighty things if the anu me, of had be can and copies
tal

MSS.,

lands praftical coid, these in of dreamed things not even therein sublim then the sum, tlie times ten worth are not found to be must wait another century
tive souls.

)rders hereafter reach


,

$5

at

one time, a

fine like-

by Poole, of Nashville, Tenn., will be sent as a Ansairetic Mystery will be given gratis^ and
whatever, but only

when requested

in letter of

remittance with return stamps.

Address

this

Publishing House, Toledo, Ohio P. B.

THE CURIOUS LIFE OF


with

RANDOLPH

" The Man

Two

Souls!"

Oath!

Their Initiation!

A Revelation of the Rosicrucian Secrets! The Strange Theories Very. His Birth,
Power
I

Blood, Education, Adventures, Secret of his

His Glory

anu Their Shame


Part
I.

The Scandal and

Sensat'on

The Bright Side. What the People say. Part II. The Ordeal. The Accusation. His Experience. Behind the Bars. He loses all he has made in a Life-time Part III. The Charge and Trial! The Witnesses. Curious
I

Testimony.
den's, the

Speeches of the Attorney against Randolph, and Sel-

Free-Love Champion.

Caution

to

Masons, Odd-FelRandolph's De-

lows, and other Secret Societies.


fence,

(See Part 3.)

and Address
I

to the Jury.

He makes
for

a Clean Expose of the

Whole Thing
strongest

These three masterly

efforts are

undoubtedly the

and ablest ever delivered


!

and against Free Love.


!

The Verdia

Startling Disclosures

''

The Mysteries and Miser-

"

List of Worls.
Talk about Novels and Romances tume nothings beside this man's life and career.
ies

XVII
!

of Love."

Why
It

reads like a
all

romance.
females.

The

strange oaths of the Rosicrucians rec^ardincr ^s^'^^^^O

Love

Extraordinary comparison between Agapism and FreeThe Rosecross initiation, the officiating girls and what

they do.

"Dodor"

BAY
!

and

his

"BUG"

theory!

"When

the

Band Begins to Play " What was said concerning Randolph's Book about Love and Women, Affedion, the Sexes, Attradions,
Vampirisms,
Infatuations,

Friendship,. Passion,

Beauty,

Heart,

Affeaion
False Marriagfe. to

One
the
the

of the

first

writers in the country,


it

when asked

his opinion of

MSS. from which

was printed exclaimed: "All I can say to Price only 50 cents and people of America is Buy the Book
I I

that will tell the

whole strange

story

EAVALETTE. OF STOBT THE WONDERFUL Two voU.


i,
"

Thb

Sxokt. Eos,cbuc..-s
,^^,^

Fourth
"

edition.

on^

$2.00.

Post ree.

Vnr TTAtF

'Wb admibe the Genius who


ROM..CE,
.KX> THE MOST EXIK THIS COnNTBT."

vre ever read; books wonderful oi one "1" PP-' 12mo,396 a This 13 who reader any interest J"^ English vigorous plain in written Bui than incidents ^f^^^J^;^/;^\X o^^^^^ marvel the ^r love German has a the of writings the the i imo throws wer's "Strange Story; is never end, to be^ning Irom^^^^ story the of thread the yet ^^, ^^^^^^,^ and mystics; the ran^^^^^^^^ beyond ^tjetched broken or ^^^ ^ reader^aiongw the carry will ^ ^^ .^^ premises, and he 1^^, reasonings and literature of the present

TBAOBDi>AK ^kTo^'dI

RoS^^^^ A wCk^ ^n^sf "" THBILLXKO WOKK EVEB PUBLXSHEB

-.

fm^

cal mys^t ^^^'..fyof^the '^^^^'^Vf " Campbell Duncan ^diy^^^re'^n^miubre^'uk^f


ing.

is

more

fascinat.

Boston
Now

Traveller.

Ready.

WorkI Thrilling and Extraordinart


SOUL!

SotJL

lo^/"^^ "s it ^^^^5 whence it is; what Soul; Human The ^^^^f. DEATH, AFTEB GOES IT WHITHEB DEATH; THBOUGH PASSAGE nonv ITS OF.^ SoUL-WOBLD THE IN MaBKIAGE LIVES IT WHAT'lipOEsTHOW
! I

questions, profound and important location, with scores of equally volume. original entirely and answered in this most extraordinary anyor country this printed ever books wonderful most the of one Tliis is vigorous most the of one be to known well is author The where else. he of especially delineators, grapluc most and writers, thinkers, sterling hue, life ^^ literary of stage the on now psychological, and weird, occult, the deepsouls the of forth picturer a being, of halls inner the of dcscriber a as equaiiea ever any, if few, but and surpassed, ever has writer no mysteries, est reveladedared its all with " Spiritualism," author. gifted wonderfully this can that anything produced tions from tne so-called departed, has not yet a what know to want who hegin to be ccmparcd with thi. book. People

DEAD abe we wjs Ar, aetek apteb ^^^j co^Tva thp.rr! SPRING thebe! IN wET ^O^D HEAT, PEEL SOUL A DoES SPACE? OCCUPT Do sou's J.uIdiots? of Children? Dead of becomes What A STORM? and nature Their Hell IIeaven BiBTHS? ruEMATUBB natS? are all
Eating, drinking, sleeping,
I
!

>OUL

in, comes and out goes FEELS, MOVES, LOOKS, is looked at; how to, goes it where it; how it sleeps; how the body dies; how the soul escapes etc., world, other the in 1 what it does; how it loves, marries; offspring tne to dead the by made should not fail to read this book. A revelation on chapters The dyin^, by means of a process, most fearful and strange. Transmi" and " Pre-existence The and "The winged Globe," The Flight," book. the of price the worth itself in each are Souls," gration of Postage free. Frice, &:^.UU. ^^^tt
it

Address

K. C.

RANDOLPH,

Toledo, Ohio

SYNOPSIS.
will

her keeps She grave. the beyond land the of mysteries the reveal flpath and who, man, a of experiences the relates work the of part second The nromise phej mterestmg An body. his of disenthralled completely was forT time, where! and live, people dead How body. one in souls Two nomen^ Inthoughts! one^ dead a thinks person living a How ThTBlending! The h! ear on lived never who characteristics, human with beino-s, ered dlsco^ lady dead the What soul. disembodied of a prophecy mysterious regarding thmg curious A death. to^sound, soul, and spirit, after veil. mystic a behind from phantoms J^ f * or,^ :iarl-nos^ She discerns two past all from_ existent Souls ^^I'uv ntSt'betwlen the three worids ! they feel Do garments. in clothed ''The^^u^^^^ ?re-eS^enc; experience lady dead The " discoveries. grand ? Three years j'^c of ui bTwei^ht wtioiit !r.e ,, ^ J +^v^i^n^io Qlfnrnnt vP! '' I T must miist wait till room a within se unive a discoverygra^d Another tlrCse'dfcayl" in rivers and vaUeys, lakes, -hills, discovery important An Vastitudef The between Difference intellect. than nobler Something life. Death, ^.e soul ung Some joys. sense strange Her soul-world. the ^Ht-laaTa^^^^ "her organs; lady's dead The die. to expect who all w^Drth knowL- by falls She haggard." and pale are cheeks her wrinkled, hand are b ue and sou^-woi^ he to spirit-i^nd the passage Her f-n. s'tate. a :Sula" i^tf ui now images, ot law The miracle. ; a realm new a in Rinds herself of. made dothmg Vs .ou dl-mbodled a material What l:^e ir^ead."' iicv ^^.^r^-^^a wiia laay aeaa ;' Where the whV hpnsts are are, beasts Why pre-existence. Its soul. human the of cerning the origin immortal. time, same the and are not, at tttt^av -Rorm I i Humak J^bm o^ci^i'ie^^JHE it before Soul The Story of a ire. ol Lath The journey. its upon out started Whpre it originated how it

Slf

SCard

^r

tog

worth studymg.

Why

spiritual

meammB
rit.

are

Something that is always ''" can woman a How ^''f*"J^t;Li,,inr. thomihts are made. and destiny. Organization "," ue "^'^" " lover tne whether "^ truly or not, ';V be-are mediums ^,e How sensitives. to Valuable -especially conThe ^J^^J^^^^^^j;^^^/^^^^^ space of regions mid the of people set by their and ums Med -X.l/Sead the with compacts making sequences of cold ^^^^^^ and W^^^^ f^^;,,/ji^^^^^ ^h^ niediums
serpents, toads, asps, Ethereal friends. val^^ Comparative breath.^_ same
in the

sp nor matter, mind, neither

onc^y and unhappy^ Tto mater^^l wne

^.^^

the dead. the answer.

pax.. .. same le t ol 7"^-^- ."^^ elevate the children Why c aeaa lovin the How ution. so its mystery and ^^^ sister. i its loses hell Hojv iceberg the and Man j^^^^ loved Uving. route *<>. thornless go. of they whither inside ^^,^^7^7 is What na ^jf vv jf sad it what voice the ; and picture The on the corner.

,,r..hy?

every tree and ^^^^^^^^ Soul-wodd the to archway Soul'the ing Jsoul. The ana flowers f^irds graves, palaces, ^.^^^^^3 Cottages, heaven. ^^^ am^ eternal about discourses She ^^^^^ ^ ^^^^ world; musical trees. here Marriage the and doctrine. that spheres, the ^^^ft^Ihe of u* ^ mating r mttuua tne lover: lover and ^lA^A v.;^ TTor r^wn lovG
flower.
5

How

en wl ook people deformed

^ , ^^ -^

^^^^^V^Xin

tided

affair.

Her own

love

threshold of the a crosses She ^,,..1, -hpr Tipinff. J3 .1, beautifuJ .trange thrills that ^^P^ ^eates a world. Curious new one, of universe. a and view, third g^Hime ^^^^''^^^^^^^ ^ a explanation ts and ^^ ^^^^^.^^ universe, with mystery, a law; ares dec She attributes. His .^^^^^^ ^^^.^^^ ^.^^ ^^ and ^^^^^ Deity, is atter au ^ems ^^.^ starry .^^^.^^ countless ^^ ^^^^^^^ all its ^f upon floats lake, locomoSpiritual eggshell on a fabric. the ^^^//^^^^'^d Mahomet; how eea of Spirit." ^^^^^^''^^^L ^Socl^^^^ tives, and and where the ladies ]^<>;-''Syj:iX\J^;^^^^^^ ^"" blessea ^ is Islamite ^^ curious a earth; each on uses Ogx its and ^e^;,^"^ true and curious very ; come from ^^ ^^ ^^rth may really amongst Up " revelation. Soul-world. the in ^^orces divo^^^ ^^tt^'^^^^i^^ mgular S a r v vice and there woman ^^^^ ^^^^ ^^ be a ^^^^^^ ^o doHar^s a ^^ .^^ ^^^^t^^. penny's worth of wit ^^^^ ^^ ^^^ wnat tell ^f.^^her ^^ miswhich any woman can themselves gn^ ^^^,.^^1 h^^^^^^^^^^ no IS there foncy .^^^ How those who ^^^3^ feit. ^^^.^^^ ^^ ^^^ hotter something taken; Horrors. of Gulf the into ^[g^^^^^g^e gazes J^^^ Gehenna, and l^e^^;^^^\^^\f/T^J;ninffire, and hundreds of souls therein. of Lak^s snakes. of The crowri Do souls gamblers.

'Ste^ ^^^^
i

bn,^^^^^^
into

Are answer. The Deity ? ^^^'TprnZ or ar^theyT;ily aL parents are whose of only one The r^^^^^ of both monsters, Malformed response. The immortlu^ luimu they human are ui^y numan, may woman A answer. The ^mmnrtnl? they are human; are whose parents ^^^ ^^ 1^^^^ (.uiiuitiuiio xn*^ nowr soul, a without ixc^'^r 1 hnman hodv ^ immortal ? abortions Are t germ What becomes of a wasted soul ^^rfn^w reply. The when? teU to we are r!l" iT*u When which ? How

M-'^V^mSr

c.i?..Tw "Some." Answer:


Why

Sometimes

The soulsalso? two there are o^t;;^^^^^^^ born children Are Explanation. Yes. child? a bear virgin Can a answer Extraordinary answer The soul-worlds? the in cohabit !^dTthe sexes of hierarchy The intercourse. spiritual of results the concernhig ;^a?ement and nank their and beings, disembodied of orders ascending the ; ie skies the what tells and bounded, be to space declares lady dead The names. hours Two man. of faculty omniscient The final destiny.
Nebuli
is

SHboTS roSs
Man's

in the Soul-world.

Climbing up the sky.

Pakt Second.
tram. the from time a for disenthralled soul a of experience thrilling The the that but doubt of a shadow not *-.w the -c*xi be p^w can There jLAi^A^ - - bodv. body. uuuy. Pis lilt; the of t)i mels mtilS ^ conbook this of conclusion the comprising one hundred and twenty pages habits, riature, looks, its soul the of tains more information on the subject characterisand destiny, origin, location, moods, powers, phases, capacities, other any or this of press the from tics tlian any work ever before issued dream The return. of methods and country. State of the dead their powers

state, spiritual state,

and "Hashish"

when dying. The human soul.

disenthrallment.

compared. How a person feels The exact seat of the Invisible men.
state

The Winged

Globe.

Pre-existence of the

difference between spirit, soul, and matter. Tha size. Its soul. human veritable actual, Description of an itft color. language. silent The student. lone The described. thinking process of goes, eoul tht Where Egyptian. dead The man meets, and is instructed by a dreaming. when and sound both asleep, person is and what it does when a no have day one will soul The resting. way of curious Souls get tired ; their

The

Human Soul. How a man's spirit look**,

males between Difference body at all will be bodiless. in a caught get souls the two ascends and men, females and women. He fire, rain, wind, by affected they Are wet? spirits get Do hunder-storm.
;

The " Under God."


;

them; siround play lightnings fierce The -Ived. tK>n^ niiction qne , . f ThP ^he L?yptian The reply.^ cold, water? The spirit? a blowawny hurricane a Can rcpubThe air. the in the horror ^ ^ ^^^ f starry The epeaks to singular.. very thoughts various of "^^^4^tTs souls. ho winch question, lie of tremendous a puts Egyptian .|Jl.;;i"J'''%i,e Uiei^gyi Its letters. and Deity. j^ of alphabet, Personality j^^^.j^^g. hear. He " made are worlds these what of and woddsT wu creating crTaUn still , He IS extraordinary tlungs it spoke. magnificent a speaker a wondrous the sees He Uen. wr '^^^^^^^jVas f^^^^^^' a^^ sentence glorious to deep grief on her acnc ii ^ wonaers woroan, and masterly analysis of tho Tho definition. count. J "I'^r/"' splendid hehum^^^^ nn/nf he^avcnand^^^^^^^^^^^^ constituents of "All thing, to'nonenity he fears soul . ^^"-y;^^ therefore, how, ffp-d air; -^ ^ than li"htcr verv of ,i,,^er than scries it^lf? TLcr"^^^^ is which "^^^^^1^=^^^ ;'':" '^. through descend " answered. are car U soul the ^^J' ^^ of physique water? jg'' in freciuent questions .oaked be flame a i^f'^Vau o^ ,",,df mjicK.^ body^^is .;-;;'"^''.""f spmtual j^ ^.^^^, What a human ^^^^ ^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^_ thousand three cnhl a through pacs soul A o.^^^^^^^^ piuiosopuc the ,^ for Bomething fire-proot nature. witlK>u^bein,a^^^^^^^ zero ^^^^^.^.^^ ^^ ^ dcgr-s below uiu Abcanc^o e and Meshach, process Shadrach, ^, bod^^^^^^^^ the mto Monad. How the f^^V^^cts real ghosts 'ghosts described^ S^e, <^^ spiritual body of a plant

^\

T'^K^^

^^

Why

graveyard

and Dronms man. and acorn, oak, the "3'ertion ^f ^^^ sleep. we or flower, ^.l^^^^^^^y^''^'^^ when does it what and goes, 'soul sou^^g^^^ the Where Visions. dr-'^-nin-. souls eat and drink? Do tler^^^^^^^^ they have If do,, dreani, The slumber; ^ diocnthraUtd ^^^ The . answer. other; ^'^; The the to st-^^e ^^e ^f
^-

^J^^^^'^^^^^^^^^^

^'^^

the awakening. and the number

^as^^^^^^^^^ takes H^.^^S Jt of these stacs.

^'j^^^ad no beeinning.

.^ ^,^ ^^,^,^_ The soul's form.

time. .an,e .he at piaces

"Tub^r I'Ss: ^l"ln Kemorsc. The choking-

^^l^^i'Ji'^Zkl^^- and
Ol'lnion^

'itLr,.
Tuought.

i.rstatcmont. MuMer. Conscience.

Part

III-

Necessity of Antagonism. Pray"' ?,t I'^^^". than gi..aer Soul The the new. Life of form to er a ^^^S^^'^ii^tter Ma moods. Soul unknown and Cr-d. Final results ^^

The Baptism of I^re

'^Sneers/'

J^^

still

Rosicrucians. the of Chief of the

Address

K.

RANDOLni,
Toledo, Ohio.

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