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Beth Conroy Compendium - Rectal Discomfort - Traditional Chinese Medicine

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1/4/13 Beth Conroy Compendium - Rectal Discomfort - Traditional Chinese Medicine You are not a memberJoin now Dismiss guest | Join | Help | Sign In Beth Conroy Compendium Rectal Discomfort - Tr adition al Ch inese E E d d i i t t 0 0 0 0 1 1 Medicine Asymptomatic hemorrhoids are present in half of the population over fifty years old. It is not common between the ages of 25­50, with the exception of women after pregnancy. Symptomatic hemorrhoids result in bleeding, prolapse and sometimes pain, to various degrees. Other symptoms could be "fecal soilage", mucus production, itching and localized infection. Symptoms usually resolve themselves spontaneously within several days to several weeks but most patient develop recurrent episodes. Treatment will usually aim at relieving symptoms, while allowing spontaneous recovery. A more aggressive intervention, including surgery, is required in case of severe pain, severe bleeding (more a result of a fissure) or hemorrhoids that do not resolve. The hemorrhoidal veins provide a pathway of communication between the systemic venous system and the portal venous system. These veins, which due to their location go under tremendous pressures and strains, have a tendency to dilate and develop into a twisted and turned plexus. The anal cushions are a part of the normal anatomy of the anal canal. These cushions, containing the hemorrhoidal veins, the arterial plexuses, smooth muscles and connective tissue, permit the passage of variable sizes of stools, without disruption of the of the rectal mucosa. Hemorrhoidal disease is thought to be a result of the displacement of one or more of three vascular anal cushions, mainly: the right anterior cushion, the right posterior cushion and the left lateral portion of the anal canal. there are external and internal hemorrhoids: external hemorrhoids arise from the inferior hemorrhoidal plexus, exterior to the anal verge. They are covered by a layer of skin, which is very sensitive to pain. Thrombosis in this structure may cause a severe pain. Internal hemorrhoids have four categories: First degree­ a bulging into the lumen of the anal canal that causes bleeding Second degree­ a prolapse during defecation that reduces spontaneously Third degree­ a prolapse that requires manual reduction Fourth degree­ A prolapse so severe that it cannot be reduced SOURCES Barker, L.R, Burton, J.R and Zieve, P.D,; Principals of Ambulatory Medicine , fourth edition, pages: 1351­1352 Deadman, P and Al­Khafaji, M with Baker, K. (2007) A Manual of Acupuncture Flaws, B. and Sionneau, P. (2001) The Treatment of Modern Western Medical Diseases with Chinese Medicine, 2nd Edition O’Connor, J. and Bensky D. editors (1981) Acupuncture: A Comprehensive Text Image: http://www.hemroidharry.com/blog/71/hemorrhoids­home­treatment/ CLINICAL MANIFESTATION­ Patterns of Disharmony Actions Wiki Home Recent Changes Pages and Files Members Manage Wiki Search Wiki Navigation Home Protocols bconroytc.wikispaces.com/Rectal+Discomfort+-+Traditional+Chinese+Medicine 1/2 " id="pdf-obj-0-20" src="pdf-obj-0-20.jpg">
1/4/13 Beth Conroy Compendium - Rectal Discomfort - Traditional Chinese Medicine You are not a memberJoin now Dismiss guest | Join | Help | Sign In Beth Conroy Compendium Rectal Discomfort - Tr adition al Ch inese E E d d i i t t 0 0 0 0 1 1 Medicine Asymptomatic hemorrhoids are present in half of the population over fifty years old. It is not common between the ages of 25­50, with the exception of women after pregnancy. Symptomatic hemorrhoids result in bleeding, prolapse and sometimes pain, to various degrees. Other symptoms could be "fecal soilage", mucus production, itching and localized infection. Symptoms usually resolve themselves spontaneously within several days to several weeks but most patient develop recurrent episodes. Treatment will usually aim at relieving symptoms, while allowing spontaneous recovery. A more aggressive intervention, including surgery, is required in case of severe pain, severe bleeding (more a result of a fissure) or hemorrhoids that do not resolve. The hemorrhoidal veins provide a pathway of communication between the systemic venous system and the portal venous system. These veins, which due to their location go under tremendous pressures and strains, have a tendency to dilate and develop into a twisted and turned plexus. The anal cushions are a part of the normal anatomy of the anal canal. These cushions, containing the hemorrhoidal veins, the arterial plexuses, smooth muscles and connective tissue, permit the passage of variable sizes of stools, without disruption of the of the rectal mucosa. Hemorrhoidal disease is thought to be a result of the displacement of one or more of three vascular anal cushions, mainly: the right anterior cushion, the right posterior cushion and the left lateral portion of the anal canal. there are external and internal hemorrhoids: external hemorrhoids arise from the inferior hemorrhoidal plexus, exterior to the anal verge. They are covered by a layer of skin, which is very sensitive to pain. Thrombosis in this structure may cause a severe pain. Internal hemorrhoids have four categories: First degree­ a bulging into the lumen of the anal canal that causes bleeding Second degree­ a prolapse during defecation that reduces spontaneously Third degree­ a prolapse that requires manual reduction Fourth degree­ A prolapse so severe that it cannot be reduced SOURCES Barker, L.R, Burton, J.R and Zieve, P.D,; Principals of Ambulatory Medicine , fourth edition, pages: 1351­1352 Deadman, P and Al­Khafaji, M with Baker, K. (2007) A Manual of Acupuncture Flaws, B. and Sionneau, P. (2001) The Treatment of Modern Western Medical Diseases with Chinese Medicine, 2nd Edition O’Connor, J. and Bensky D. editors (1981) Acupuncture: A Comprehensive Text Image: http://www.hemroidharry.com/blog/71/hemorrhoids­home­treatment/ CLINICAL MANIFESTATION­ Patterns of Disharmony Actions Wiki Home Recent Changes Pages and Files Members Manage Wiki Search Wiki Navigation Home Protocols bconroytc.wikispaces.com/Rectal+Discomfort+-+Traditional+Chinese+Medicine 1/2 " id="pdf-obj-0-24" src="pdf-obj-0-24.jpg">
1/4/13 Beth Conroy Compendium - Rectal Discomfort - Traditional Chinese Medicine You are not a memberJoin now Dismiss guest | Join | Help | Sign In Beth Conroy Compendium Rectal Discomfort - Tr adition al Ch inese E E d d i i t t 0 0 0 0 1 1 Medicine Asymptomatic hemorrhoids are present in half of the population over fifty years old. It is not common between the ages of 25­50, with the exception of women after pregnancy. Symptomatic hemorrhoids result in bleeding, prolapse and sometimes pain, to various degrees. Other symptoms could be "fecal soilage", mucus production, itching and localized infection. Symptoms usually resolve themselves spontaneously within several days to several weeks but most patient develop recurrent episodes. Treatment will usually aim at relieving symptoms, while allowing spontaneous recovery. A more aggressive intervention, including surgery, is required in case of severe pain, severe bleeding (more a result of a fissure) or hemorrhoids that do not resolve. The hemorrhoidal veins provide a pathway of communication between the systemic venous system and the portal venous system. These veins, which due to their location go under tremendous pressures and strains, have a tendency to dilate and develop into a twisted and turned plexus. The anal cushions are a part of the normal anatomy of the anal canal. These cushions, containing the hemorrhoidal veins, the arterial plexuses, smooth muscles and connective tissue, permit the passage of variable sizes of stools, without disruption of the of the rectal mucosa. Hemorrhoidal disease is thought to be a result of the displacement of one or more of three vascular anal cushions, mainly: the right anterior cushion, the right posterior cushion and the left lateral portion of the anal canal. there are external and internal hemorrhoids: external hemorrhoids arise from the inferior hemorrhoidal plexus, exterior to the anal verge. They are covered by a layer of skin, which is very sensitive to pain. Thrombosis in this structure may cause a severe pain. Internal hemorrhoids have four categories: First degree­ a bulging into the lumen of the anal canal that causes bleeding Second degree­ a prolapse during defecation that reduces spontaneously Third degree­ a prolapse that requires manual reduction Fourth degree­ A prolapse so severe that it cannot be reduced SOURCES Barker, L.R, Burton, J.R and Zieve, P.D,; Principals of Ambulatory Medicine , fourth edition, pages: 1351­1352 Deadman, P and Al­Khafaji, M with Baker, K. (2007) A Manual of Acupuncture Flaws, B. and Sionneau, P. (2001) The Treatment of Modern Western Medical Diseases with Chinese Medicine, 2nd Edition O’Connor, J. and Bensky D. editors (1981) Acupuncture: A Comprehensive Text Image: http://www.hemroidharry.com/blog/71/hemorrhoids­home­treatment/ CLINICAL MANIFESTATION­ Patterns of Disharmony Actions Wiki Home Recent Changes Pages and Files Members Manage Wiki Search Wiki Navigation Home Protocols bconroytc.wikispaces.com/Rectal+Discomfort+-+Traditional+Chinese+Medicine 1/2 " id="pdf-obj-0-26" src="pdf-obj-0-26.jpg">

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1/4/13 Beth Conroy Compendium - Rectal Discomfort - Traditional Chinese Medicine You are not a memberJoin now Dismiss guest | Join | Help | Sign In Beth Conroy Compendium Rectal Discomfort - Tr adition al Ch inese E E d d i i t t 0 0 0 0 1 1 Medicine Asymptomatic hemorrhoids are present in half of the population over fifty years old. It is not common between the ages of 25­50, with the exception of women after pregnancy. Symptomatic hemorrhoids result in bleeding, prolapse and sometimes pain, to various degrees. Other symptoms could be "fecal soilage", mucus production, itching and localized infection. Symptoms usually resolve themselves spontaneously within several days to several weeks but most patient develop recurrent episodes. Treatment will usually aim at relieving symptoms, while allowing spontaneous recovery. A more aggressive intervention, including surgery, is required in case of severe pain, severe bleeding (more a result of a fissure) or hemorrhoids that do not resolve. The hemorrhoidal veins provide a pathway of communication between the systemic venous system and the portal venous system. These veins, which due to their location go under tremendous pressures and strains, have a tendency to dilate and develop into a twisted and turned plexus. The anal cushions are a part of the normal anatomy of the anal canal. These cushions, containing the hemorrhoidal veins, the arterial plexuses, smooth muscles and connective tissue, permit the passage of variable sizes of stools, without disruption of the of the rectal mucosa. Hemorrhoidal disease is thought to be a result of the displacement of one or more of three vascular anal cushions, mainly: the right anterior cushion, the right posterior cushion and the left lateral portion of the anal canal. there are external and internal hemorrhoids: external hemorrhoids arise from the inferior hemorrhoidal plexus, exterior to the anal verge. They are covered by a layer of skin, which is very sensitive to pain. Thrombosis in this structure may cause a severe pain. Internal hemorrhoids have four categories: First degree­ a bulging into the lumen of the anal canal that causes bleeding Second degree­ a prolapse during defecation that reduces spontaneously Third degree­ a prolapse that requires manual reduction Fourth degree­ A prolapse so severe that it cannot be reduced SOURCES Barker, L.R, Burton, J.R and Zieve, P.D,; Principals of Ambulatory Medicine , fourth edition, pages: 1351­1352 Deadman, P and Al­Khafaji, M with Baker, K. (2007) A Manual of Acupuncture Flaws, B. and Sionneau, P. (2001) The Treatment of Modern Western Medical Diseases with Chinese Medicine, 2nd Edition O’Connor, J. and Bensky D. editors (1981) Acupuncture: A Comprehensive Text Image: http://www.hemroidharry.com/blog/71/hemorrhoids­home­treatment/ CLINICAL MANIFESTATION­ Patterns of Disharmony Actions Wiki Home Recent Changes Pages and Files Members Manage Wiki Search Wiki Navigation Home Protocols bconroytc.wikispaces.com/Rectal+Discomfort+-+Traditional+Chinese+Medicine 1/2 " id="pdf-obj-0-57" src="pdf-obj-0-57.jpg">

Asymptomatic hemorrhoids are present in half of the population over fifty years old. It is not common between the ages of 25­50, with the exception of women after pregnancy. Symptomatic hemorrhoids result in bleeding, prolapse and sometimes pain, to various degrees. Other symptoms could be "fecal soilage", mucus production, itching and localized infection. Symptoms usually resolve themselves spontaneously within several days to several weeks but most patient develop recurrent episodes. Treatment will usually aim at relieving symptoms, while allowing spontaneous recovery. A more aggressive intervention, including surgery, is required in case of severe pain, severe bleeding (more a result of a fissure) or hemorrhoids that do not resolve. The hemorrhoidal veins provide a pathway of communication between the systemic venous system and the portal venous system. These veins, which due to their location go under tremendous pressures and strains, have a tendency to dilate and develop into a twisted and turned plexus. The anal cushions are a part of the normal anatomy of the anal canal. These cushions, containing the hemorrhoidal veins, the arterial plexuses, smooth muscles and connective tissue, permit the passage of variable sizes of stools, without disruption of the of the rectal mucosa. Hemorrhoidal disease is thought to be a result of the displacement of one or more of three vascular anal cushions, mainly: the right anterior cushion, the right posterior cushion and the left lateral portion of the anal canal. there are external and internal hemorrhoids:

external hemorrhoids arise from the inferior hemorrhoidal plexus, exterior to the anal verge. They are covered by a layer of skin, which is very sensitive to pain. Thrombosis in this structure may cause a severe pain. Internal hemorrhoids have four categories:

First degree­ a bulging into the lumen of the anal canal that causes bleeding Second degree­ a prolapse during defecation that reduces spontaneously Third degree­ a prolapse that requires manual reduction Fourth degree­ A prolapse so severe that it cannot be reduced

SOURCES Barker, L.R, Burton, J.R and Zieve, P.D,; Principals of Ambulatory Medicine, fourth edition, pages: 1351­1352

Deadman, P and Al­Khafaji, M with Baker, K. (2007) A Manual of Acupuncture Flaws, B. and Sionneau, P. (2001) The Treatment of Modern Western Medical Diseases with Chinese Medicine, 2nd Edition O’Connor, J. and Bensky D. editors (1981) Acupuncture: A Comprehensive Text Image: http://www.hemroidharry.com/blog/71/hemorrhoids­home­treatment/

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1/4/13

Beth Conroy Compendium - Rectal Discomfort - Traditional Chinese Medicine

Rectal Discomfort, Hemorrhoid Blood Stasis, Qi Stagnation. · May include: Heat, Dampness or Dryness, Liver Depression, Collapsed Spleen Qi

TREATMENT PRINCIPLES Move Blood and Qi, · Clear Heat, Resolve Damp or Dry, Soothe Liver Qi, Raise Spleen Qi

TREATMENT­ Points Primary treatment: Bl 57, Er Bai, GV1 to raise qi and circulate blood to the region Additional points may include:

· St44 to clear heat

· Sp9 to drain if damp · Sp6, Kd6 to moisten if dry · Lv3 to move Liver qi · Sp3 to tonify Spleen qi · TH6 to regulate the qi in the three heaters

PATIENT EDUCATION / RECOMMENDATIONS Patient is recommended to avoid extended sitting or standing. Kegels, or exercises that strengthen the pelvic floor are prescribed.

PROGNOSIS Treatment can be extremely effective.

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