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NAE Commissioning Guide

MS-NAE35xx-x, MS-NAE45xx-x, MS-NAE55xx-x, MS-NIE55xx-x, MS-NCE25xx-x, MS-NIE8500-x, NAE-8500-x Code No. LIT-1201519 Software Release 6.0 Issued January 30, 2013 Supersedes January 4, 2012
Refer to the QuickLIT website for the most up-to-date version of this document.

Document Introduction.............................................................................................................4 Related Documentation.............................................................................................................4 NAE Commissioning Overview................................................................................................5


Network Automation Engines (NAEs)...............................................................................................5 NAE35 Models......................................................................................................................................6 NAE45 Models......................................................................................................................................6 NAE55 Models......................................................................................................................................6 NIE55 Models........................................................................................................................................6 NCE25 Models......................................................................................................................................6 NxE85 Models.......................................................................................................................................7 MS/TP Communications Bus.............................................................................................................7 Metasys Network Sites.......................................................................................................................7 NAE Commissioning...........................................................................................................................8 NAE Configuration..............................................................................................................................9 Site Management Portal User Interface..........................................................................................11 Ready Access Portal UI....................................................................................................................12 Metasys System Help.......................................................................................................................12 Browser Recommendations for Downloading the Launcher.......................................................12 System Configuration Tool..............................................................................................................12 CCT.....................................................................................................................................................13 Archive Databases............................................................................................................................13 NAE Disk Image Updates and Archive Database Upgrades.........................................................14 Site Director.......................................................................................................................................14 NAE Computer Name........................................................................................................................14 NAE Object Name.............................................................................................................................15 Basic Access Operating Mode........................................................................................................15 Logon User Names and Passwords................................................................................................15 NAE Connectivity..............................................................................................................................16 Modems and Dial-Out Features.......................................................................................................16 Time Zone, Date, and Time Management........................................................................................18 Alarm and Events..............................................................................................................................18 Serial Printer DDA (Alarm Printer)...................................................................................................19 Recommended Serial Printer..............................................................................................................19 Serial Printer Installation Considerations............................................................................................21 E-mail Notification.............................................................................................................................22 Pager Notification.............................................................................................................................23 Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) Notification........................................................24 Initial Default NAE Configuration....................................................................................................24 System and User Preferences.........................................................................................................26 Reset Device Command...................................................................................................................26

Detailed Procedures................................................................................................................27
Using Launcher to Discover an NAE..............................................................................................27 Establishing a Direct Connection to an NAE.................................................................................30 Preparing an NAE for an Ethernet LAN That Supports DHCP and DNS......................................30
NAE Commissioning Guide 1

Preparing an NAE for an Ethernet LAN without DHCP and without DNS Support (NAE Uses APIPA)................................................................................................................................................33 Preparing an NAE for an Ethernet LAN without DHCP and without DNS Support (NAE Uses Static IP Address).............................................................................................................................34 Preparing an NAE for an Ethernet LAN That Supports DHCP but Not DNS................................35 Preparing an NAE for an Ethernet LAN That Supports DNS but Not DHCP................................36 Enabling the Serial Printer DDA......................................................................................................36 Preparing the NxE85 for Serial Printing..............................................................................................39 Creating Audit Entries for Discarded Events.................................................................................39 Accessing the Site Management Portal UI on an NAE..................................................................39 Establishing Basic NAE Parameters in the Focus Screen............................................................40 Establishing the NAE Network Parameters....................................................................................41 Establishing the NAE Direct-Connect and Modem Parameters...................................................42 Creating E-mail Alarm and Event Notifications and Destinations...............................................45 Creating Pager Alarm and Event Notifications and Destinations................................................48 Creating NAE SNMP Alarm Notifications and Destinations.........................................................52 Setting the Time, Date, Time Zone, and Time Synchronization....................................................55 Setting up the NAE Alarm Parameters............................................................................................55 Editing the Existing Alarm Parameters...............................................................................................55 Creating a New Alarm.........................................................................................................................57 Designating an NAE as the Site Director........................................................................................58 Changing the Site Director with the SCT............................................................................................60 Removing User Accounts from a Demoted Site Director.............................................................60 Moving the Security Database and Clearing It from the Demoted Site Director.................................60 Establishing a Dial-up Connection to an NAE...............................................................................60 Configuring an NAE to Dial Out to an ADS/ADX............................................................................60 Printing Information from the NAE Site Management Portal UI...................................................62 Replacing an NAE.............................................................................................................................63

Troubleshooting.......................................................................................................................63
Common NAE Problems..................................................................................................................63 Corrupted NAE Memory......................................................................................................................63 Logon Problems..................................................................................................................................64 Network Connection Related Problems..............................................................................................64 NAE Reset Related Problems.............................................................................................................64 Troubleshooting Guide........................................................................................................................64 NAE Diagnostic Tools.......................................................................................................................67 NAE Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Status Indicators.............................................................................68 NAE35/NAE45 LED Startup Sequence..............................................................................................70 NAE55/NIE55 LED Startup Sequence................................................................................................71 NCE25 LED Startup Sequence...........................................................................................................71 Diagnostic Tab.....................................................................................................................................71 Summary Tab......................................................................................................................................73 Troubleshooting Procedures...........................................................................................................74 Verifying Ethernet/IP Network Communications (Ping).......................................................................74 Pre-boot Execution Environment (PXE)..............................................................................................74 Determining the NAE IP Address and Device Name for a LAN Connection......................................75 Determining the NAE IP Address By Using the NCT..........................................................................75 Determining the NAE IP Address and Device Name through a Serial Port Monitor...........................75 Notes on Setting a Computer to Use APIPA...................................................................................76 For Versions of Windows OS That Do Not Support APIPA.................................................................77

Technical Specifications.........................................................................................................77
NAE Commissioning Guide 2

Appendix: Time Zone, Date, and Time Management............................................................80


Time Zone, Date, and Time Management Introduction..................................................................80 Overview of Time Synchronization.................................................................................................80 ADS/ADX Site Director with NAEs/NIEs.............................................................................................80 NIE and Child Devices........................................................................................................................81 Time Synchronization Methods.......................................................................................................81 Windows Time Synchronization..........................................................................................................81 Multicast Time Synchronization..........................................................................................................81 BACnet Time Synchronization............................................................................................................82 Example Network..............................................................................................................................82 Time Zone..........................................................................................................................................82 Site Time Server................................................................................................................................83 Time in Device Object and UI Status Bar........................................................................................83 Steps for Successful Time Management........................................................................................83 Verifying the Site Director Defined for an Engine/Server....................................................................84 Setting the Time Synchronization Method..........................................................................................84 NAE/NIE Is the Site Director...............................................................................................................85 ADS/ADX Is the Site Director..............................................................................................................87 Configuring Additional Multicast Time Synchronization Settings........................................................90

Appendix: Configuring and Maintaining Preferences..........................................................92


Configuring and Maintaining Preferences Introduction................................................................92 Preferences Concepts......................................................................................................................92 System and User Preferences............................................................................................................92 Managing Preferences........................................................................................................................94 Detailed Procedures.........................................................................................................................95 Configuring Preferences.....................................................................................................................95 Restoring Default System Preferences...............................................................................................95 Copying Preferences between Devices..............................................................................................95 Restoring Default User Preferences...................................................................................................95 Removing User Preference Files........................................................................................................95 Copying User Preferences to Another User........................................................................................96 Preserving Preferences in an Upgrade...............................................................................................96

NAE Commissioning Guide

Document Introduction
This document describes how to commission a Network Automation Engine (NAE), Network Integration Engine (NIE), or Network Control Engine (NCE) for network connectivity in several network scenarios; how to access the Metasys system Site Management Portal UI on an NAE; how to configure the basic NAE parameters for initial operation on the network; and how to troubleshoot an NAE. This document also describes how to configure the NAE Destination Delivery Agents (DDAs) for sending alarm and event messages via e-mail, pager, and Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP). This document does not describe how to mount, wire, or power on an NAE. Also, this document does not describe how to build or download an archive database for a Metasys system site or how to configure an NAE to monitor and control a Building Automation System (BAS). Note: In this document, NAE refers to all NAE35, NAE45, NAE45-Lite, NAE55, NIE55, NCE25, NxE85 models, unless noted otherwise. Refer to the NxE85 Commissioning Guide (LIT-12011044) for additional information specific to the NxE85 Series network engines. Refer to the NCE Technical Bulletin (LIT-12011267) for additional information specific to the NCE25 Series network control engines.

Related Documentation
Table 1: NAE Related Documentation For Information On See Document LIT or Part Number
Overview of the Metasys System Network Features Metasys System Extended Architecture LIT-1201527 Overview Technical Bulletin and Functions Definition of Terms, Concepts, and Acronyms Commonly Used to Describe Metasys System Metasys System Extended Architecture LIT-1201612 Glossary Technical Bulletin

General Network and Information Technology Network and IT Considerations for the LIT-1201578 Definitions and Concepts, and Creating a Printer IT Professional Technical Bulletin DDA for an NAE Daily Operation of the Metasys System Network, Metasys System Help Navigating the UI, and Monitoring and Controlling BAS Networks Installation Considerations and Guidelines, Mounting, Wiring, and Starting up an NAE35 or NAE45 Installation Considerations and Guidelines, Mounting, Wiring, and Starting up an NAE55 or NIE55 Installation Considerations and Guidelines, Mounting, Wiring, and Starting up an NCE25 Additional Guidelines for Commissioning and Configuring and NCE25 Network Engines LIT-1201793
1

NAE35/NAE45 Installation Instructions Part No. 24-10050-6

NAE55/NIE55 Installation Instructions Part No. 24-10051-43

NCE25 Installation Instructions NCE Technical Bulletin

Part No. 24-10143-63 LIT-12011267 LIT-12011044

Additional Guidelines for Commissioning NxE85 NxE85 Commissioning Guide Network Engines

Updating the NAE/NIE Disk Image to New Software NAE/NIE Update Tool Technical Bulletin LIT-12011524 Release Versions Installing the ADS-Lite Software ADS-Lite Installation and Upgrade 2 Instructions Wizard LIT-12011688 LIT-12011521 LIT-1201534

Installing the ADS, ADX, and System Configuration ADS, ADX, and SCT Installation and 2 Tool (SCT) Software Upgrade Instructions Wizard Creating, Editing, and Loading Archive Databases SCT Technical Bulletin with the SCT

Integrating N2 Devices into the Metasys System N2 Integration with the NAE Technical LIT-1201683 Network Bulletin

NAE Commissioning Guide

Table 1: NAE Related Documentation For Information On


How to Install the Controller Configuration Tool (CCT) Software Using the Controller Configuration Tool NAE/NCE BACnet Protocol Conformance

See Document
CCT Installation Instructions Controller Tool Help NAE/NCE Protocol Implementation Conformance Statement Technical Bulletin

LIT or Part Number


LIT-12011529 LIT-12011147 LIT-1201532
1

How to Set Up a Master-Slave/Token-Passing (MS/TP) Communications Bus Enabling NAEs to Communicate with MS/TP Controllers over Wireless Mesh Networks

MS/TP Communications Bus Technical LIT-12011034 Bulletin ZFR1800 Series Wireless Field Bus System Technical Bulletin LIT-12011295

Integrating LONWORKS Devices into the Metasys LONWORKS Network Integration with NAE LIT-1201668 and LCS Technical Bulletin System Network Migrating N1 Networks to the Metasys System Network Integrating BACnet MS/TP and BACnet IP Devices into the Metasys System Network N1 Migration with the NIE Technical Bulletin BACnet System Integration with NAE/NCE Technical Bulletin LIT-1201535 LIT-1201531 LIT-1201528

Security Issues, Including Adding Users and Roles Security Administrator System to the System and Configuring Standard and Basic Technical Bulletin Access Modes Installing the Launcher Application Launcher Installation Instructions

LIT-12011783 LIT-12011742

Using the Launcher, Accessing a Metasys System Launcher Help Network via Dial-up Connections Dialing into a Metasys System Network from a Computer

Metasys System Extended Architecture LIT-1201639 Direct Connection and Dial-Up Connection Application Note

1 This LIT number represents a printer friendly version of the help. 2 Use the wizard to generate instructions specific to your system.

NAE Commissioning Overview


Network Automation Engines (NAEs)
NAEs are web-enabled, Ethernet-based, supervisory controllers that connect BAS networks to IP networks and the web, and allow you to monitor and control BAS field devices from a computer using the Launcher application. Starting at Release 6.0, you use the Launcher application instead of a web browser to log on to the NAE. If the Launcher is not already installed on your machine, you are prompted to install it after you attempt to log on using the web browser. For the purpose of installing the Launcher, use Windows Internet Explorer Version 8.0 or 9.0. (Other web browsers may work, but are not tested or supported.) Refer to the Launcher Installation Instructions (LIT-12011783). The NAE Series of supervisory controllers is a scalable line of appliance computers with varying network, trunk, and field device capacities to meet the requirements of different applications. All NAEs provide scheduling, alarm and event management, trending, energy management, data exchange, dial-out capability, and password protection. NAEs are factory-loaded with a supported Microsoft Windows operating system and the current release of the Metasys system software.

NAE Commissioning Guide

NAE35 Models
The NAE35 models: integrate one RS485 field bus or one LONWORKS network trunk into a Metasys system network. The NAE351x models integrate one N2 Bus or one BACnet MS/TP trunk with up to 50 field controllers. The NAE352x-xxx models integrate a single LONWORKS trunk with up to 64 LONWORKS devices. monitor and control up to 50 BACnet IP devices over Ethernet at the supervisory level can serve as a Site Director supervising a maximum of two additional network engines, which can be NAE35 or NCE25 model engines only

Several NAE35 models provide the Basic Access operating mode as the primary UI. See Basic Access Operating Mode for more information.

NAE45 Models
The NAE45 models: integrate either one RS485 field bus or one LONWORKS network trunk into a Metasys system network. The NAE451x models integrate one N2 Bus or one BACnet MS/TP trunk with up to 100 field controllers. The NAE452x models integrate a single LONWORKS trunk with up to 127 LONWORKS devices.

Note: The NAE45-Lite supports the MS/TP bus and BACnet IP communication to third-party devices. The NAE45-Lite does not support the N2 Bus, N1 integration, VND integration, Xl5K integration, LONWORKS network, or wireless supervisor (N2). monitor and control up to 50 BACnet IP field devices over Ethernet at the supervisory level can serve as a Site Director supervising a maximum of two additional network engines, which can be NAE35, NAE45, or NCE25 model engines only

Note: The NAE45-Lite must have an ADS-Lite-A as its Site Director, or be stand-alone. The NAE45-Lite cannot be a Site Director to other engines.

NAE55 Models
The NAE55 models: integrate up to two RS485 field buses into a Metasys system. The NAE551x models integrate two N2 Buses, two BACnet MS/TP trunks, or one N2 Bus and one BACnet MS/TP trunk. Each bus or trunk may contain up to 100 field controllers. The NAE552x models can also integrate a LONWORKS network trunk with up to 255 LONWORKS devices. NAE55 models can also monitor and supervise a number of BACnet IP devices; the total number of BACnet IP devices depends on the number of objects each device supports. can serve as a Site Director supervising a maximum of four other network engines, which can be NAE35, NAE45, NCE25, NAE55 or NIE55 model engines

NIE55 Models
The NIE55 models: migrate N1 networks into a Metasys system network. NIEs do not integrate BACnet networks, N2 trunks, or LONWORKS networks can serve as a Site Director supervising a maximum of four other supervisory devices, which can be NAE35, NAE45, NCE25, NAE55, or NIE55 model engines

NCE25 Models
The NCE25 models: integrate either one RS485 field bus or one LONWORKS network trunk into a Metasys system network NCE256x-x models integrate one BACnet MS/TP trunk with up to 32 MS/TP controllers NCE251x-x models integrate one N2 Bus with up to 32 N2 controllers NCE252x-x models integrate a single LONWORKS trunk with up to 32 LONWORKS devices monitor and control up to 50 IP BACnet field devices over Ethernet at the supervisory level
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NAE Commissioning Guide

provide an integral MS/TP Field Equipment Controller with 33 Input/Output (I/O) points cannot serve as Site Director except in stand-alone applications

NxE85 Models
All NxE85 models ship as NIE85s. Use the ChangeModel utility in the NxE85 UI to change an NxE85 to an NAE85. The NAE85 models integrate large BACnet IP systems into a Metasys network. The NIE85 models migrate large N1 networks into a Metasys network. An NxE85 can serve as a Site Director supervising a maximum of four other supervisory devices, which can be NAE35, NAE45, NCE25, NAE55, NIE55, or NxE85 model engines. Refer to the NxE85 Commissioning Guide (LIT-12011044) for additional information specific to the NxE85 Series network engines.

MS/TP Communications Bus


The MS/TP bus is a local network that connects supervisory controllers and field controllers to point interfaces using BACnet MS/TP protocol. The MS/TP bus consists of two types of buses: the Field Controller (FC) Bus or the Sensor/Actuator (SA) Bus. Each bus has its own set of device addresses.

Metasys Network Sites


A small Metasys network site comprises a single NAE or multiple NAEs with one of the NAEs designated as the Site Director (Figure 1). See Site Director for additional information on Site Director hierarchy and the number of network engines a Site Director can supervise. Figure 1: Metasys Network with NAE55 as Site Director for Multiple NAEs

NAE Commissioning Guide

Larger Metasys network sites can comprise multiple NAEs and one or more Application and Data Servers (ADSs) or Extended Application and Data Servers (ADXs) with access to multiple remote sites. On any site with one or more ADSs/ADXs, an ADS/ADX is designated as the Site Director. Figure 2 shows an example of a simple Metasys network with multiple NAEs and an ADS as the Site Director. Figure 2: Metasys Network with ADS as Site Director for Multiple NAEs

NAE Commissioning
NAE commissioning includes preparing the NAE for connectivity, connecting to the NAE, adding the NAE to the profile list in Launcher, and accessing and logging on to the Site Management Portal UI. Each Metasys network installation, commissioning, and configuration scenario is unique. In some scenarios, the NAEs (on a Metasys network) may be commissioned and configured before they are installed and connected to the network; in other scenarios, the NAEs are mounted and wired to the network before they are commissioned and configured. Note: NAE installation includes locating, mounting, wiring, and powering on an NAE. See Related Documentation for references to NAE installation instructions for the various NAE models. The commissioning tasks, the task order, and the required attribute values (at commissioning) for an NAE are determined by the specific Metasys network installation, commissioning, and configuration scenario for the site. The NAE commissioning procedures presented in this document are the procedures required for most scenarios regardless of when commissioning occurs.

NAE Commissioning Guide

The first task in commissioning an NAE is to establish a connection with the NAE via the Launcher. If the Launcher is not already installed on your machine, you are prompted to install it after you attempt to log on using the web browser. Refer to the Launcher Installation Instructions (LIT-12011783). Note: The Launcher is a software application installed on each client computer that lets you access any Metasys server or supervisory engine on the building network, regardless of its software version. Its purpose is to remove the dependency on the public Java Runtime Environment (JRE) for the Site Management Portal user interface (UI) at Release 6.0 (or later) by placing a private edition of the JRE on the client computer. For details, refer to the Launcher Help (LIT-12011742). After a connection is established, you can then access the Site Management Portal on the NAE from the Launcher. See NAE Connectivity for six typical network connection scenarios. See Site Management Portal User Interface and Accessing the Site Management Portal UI on an NAE for more information on accessing and navigating the Site Management Portal UI. After you have accessed the Site Management Portal UI on an NAE, you can configure the NAE: object name and basic device parameters host name (Computer Name), domain name, and network parameter direct-connect and modem parameters time and date management parameters alarm and event parameters SNMP messages and the network management destination modem dial-out and dial-up parameters Site Director status

After commissioning an NAE, you must configure the NAE for the specified job site. Figure 3 is a flowchart that provides an overview of the sequence of steps needed to install, commission, and configure a new NAE.

NAE Configuration
NAE configuration is preparing an NAE in the Site Management Portal UI and the System Configuration Tool (SCT) to operate on a specific Metasys network site, and communicate with, monitor, and control specific BAS field devices on that site. Configuration also includes preparing the NAE to compile, generate, and communicate information about site status, alarms, events, and trends. You can typically accomplish NAE configuration by downloading a pre-built archive database (from the SCT) that contains the device objects, object references, attribute values, logic, graphics, user information, and other references and data required for the NAE to perform its specific tasks on the network. See Archive Databases. You can create and edit an archive database online in the Site Management Portal UI, but in almost all cases, you should create and edit the NAE archive database offline in the SCT. When you download the database, the values in the archive database overwrite the existing values on the commissioned NAE. Refer to the SCT Technical Bulletin (LIT-1201534) for information on creating and downloading archive databases. After you configure an NAE with an archive database containing user information, you can set up the e-mail, pager, and SNMP DDAs and create specific alarm and event notifications for delivery to specific e-mail, pager, network management destinations.

NAE Commissioning Guide

Figure 3: NAE Commissioning and Configuration Flowchart

NAE Commissioning Guide

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Site Management Portal User Interface


You can view and edit NAE parameters and the parameters for associated devices in the Site Management Portal UI installed on the NAE. Access the NAE Site Management Portal UI via the Launcher. See Accessing the Site Management Portal UI on an NAE. Figure 4 shows an example of the Site Management Portal UI. In the Display panel on the right side of the window is a series of tabbed screens. Table 2 provides a brief description of the information that you can view and edit in each tabbed screen. The navigation panel on the left displays the navigation tree for the BAS network integrations, field devices, field points, and their associated objects that the NAE is monitoring and supervising. Figure 4: NAE Focus Tab in Edit Mode - Advanced

When you view the online NAE Site Management Portal UI, the border around the panels is blue (Figure 4). When you view the offline SCT UI, the border is black (Figure 5). Table 2: Metasys Site Management Portal UI Tabbed Screens Screen Tab Purpose Designation Access Online/ Offline

Focus OR Configuration Provides description and name (label) of device object, the local time and Both date, the firmware version, message buffer and alarm, and audit repository sizes. The Focus tab also identifies the local Site Director and includes general site information about the ADS/ADX to which the NAE reports (if applicable). Communications Establish communication parameters, including Serial port and internal or external Universal Serial Bus (USB) modem configuration. Both

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Table 2: Metasys Site Management Portal UI Tabbed Screens Screen Tab Purpose Designation
Network Email Pager SNMP Establish Computer Name (host name) for network identity, Local Area Network (LAN), and ADS/ADX dial-up parameters (if applicable).

Access Online/ Offline


Both

Establish the NAE e-mail alarm-notifications features common to all e-mail Both messages and create unique e-mail message destinations. Establish the NAE pager alarm-notifications features common to all pager messages and create unique pager message destinations. Both

Establish the NAE Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) features Both common to all SNMP notifications and create unique SNMP message destinations. Provides the NAE alarm setup and destination information. See Alarm and Both Events for a description of the default NAE alarms. Provides network and field device status information and attribute values for Online supervisory and field devices on the NAE field trunks. Provides various status reports to aid in troubleshooting the NAE. Online

Alarm Summary Diagnostic

Menus, tab screens, attribute lists, values, and units of measure in the Site Management Portal UI are dynamic and change in the displayed screen according to the item you select from the navigation tree. Refer to the Object and Feature Tabs section in the Metasys system Help for descriptions of menu items.

Ready Access Portal UI


In addition to the Site Management Portal UI, an alternative, optional interface called the Ready Access Portal UI is also available. This software, which comes with the ADS/ADX software, is targeted to users who access only specific key functions of the Metasys system and perform typical tasks through a more intuitive navigation process. Available via a computer or handheld platform, the Ready Access Portal UI requires only a web browser. For more details, refer to the Ready Access Portal Software Catalog Page (LIT-1900538).

Metasys System Help


The Metasys system Help is the Users Guide for the Metasys system. The Help provides information on procedures such as downloading, global searching, commanding, and scheduling and also contains information on objects, the user interface, and wizards. The Contents, Index, and Search tabs in the left pane of the Help allow you to find information by browsing through defined sections, looking up key terms, or by performing a full-text search of the Help content. You can print the information appearing in the scrollable region in the right pane of the Help, but to print larger sections of the Help or the entire Help system, go to the PDF file of the Metasys system Help on the Johnson Controls QuickLIT literature website. The Metasys system Help menu also provides a link to the Help on QuickLIT. QuickLIT is available at the following website address: http://cgproducts.johnsoncontrols.com/default.aspx

Browser Recommendations for Downloading the Launcher


The Metasys system currently supports the Windows Internet Explorer web browser Versions 8.0 and 9.0 for the purpose of downloading the Launcher application. Other web browsers may work, but are not tested or supported. After you install the Launcher, you use the Launcher, not the web browser, to open the Site Management Portal UI.

System Configuration Tool


The SCT is an offline software tool used to create, edit, save, and restore the various archive and security databases that are used to configure Metasys system networks, ADSs/ADXs, NAEs, and supported field devices. The SCT UI opens in its own window and has a similar look and function to the online Site Management Portal UI (Figure 5). The SCT allows commissioning of N2 devices by allowing HVAC PRO software, GX-Tool software, and XTM Configurator software to access the devices on the N2 Bus of an NAE, and allows commissioning of FECs, VMA16s, Input/Output Modules (IOMs) by using the CCT software to access the devices on the field bus of an NAE.

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The SCT Manager is a software tool that allows you to use multiple versions of SCT on your computer. The SCT and SCT Manager are separate software installations included on the ADS/ADX installation disk. The SCT provides a Simulation feature that allows you to simulate an online supervisory device and test a databases control logic prior to downloading it to an NAE. Using the SCT, you can view and configure multiple sites in one archive. Figure 5: SCT UI Screen in Edit Mode

CCT
Use the CCT in conjunction with the Metasys system user interface to configure, simulate, and commission Field Equipment Controllers (FECs), IOMs, and VAV Modular Assembly (VMA) 16s, on an MS/TP bus. You must install CCT on the same computer as SCT software to use the Ethernet Passthru option in SCT.

Archive Databases
A Metasys archive database contains the configuration information for ADSs/ADXs, NAEs, BAS network integrations, field devices, and field points that make up a single site or multiple sites on a Metasys system network. Multiple archive databases, representing multiple sites, can reside on a single ADS/ADX running the SCT. The SCT navigation panel in Figure 5 provides graphical representation of some of the items that may be in a Metasys archive database. An NAE archive database, which resides in the NAE internal memory, contains only the specific configuration information that makes up the network integrations, field devices, and field points that the NAE is supervising. Each NAE retains only its own archive database. You can also save the NAE database in a Metasys archive database on an ADS/ADX or another computer using the SCT. A graphical representation of some of the items contained in an NAE archive database is shown in Figure 4 in the Site Management Portal UI navigation panel. You can upload an NAE archive database to the SCT where it can be saved to a hard disk or other long-term storage media. You can also edit an NAE archive database offline in the SCT and download the edited archive database to the NAE.

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NAE Disk Image Updates and Archive Database Upgrades


The NAE operating system, Metasys system software, NAE archive database, and recent NAE operation data reside on the NAE disk image. Use the NAE/NIE Update Tool to update the NAE disk image to the latest release version of the Metasys system software. Refer to the NAE/NIE Update Tool Technical Bulletin (LIT-12011524). When you update an NAE to a new version of the Metasys system software, you must also upgrade the NAE archive database to a new release database. For an overview of the upgrade process, refer to the ADS, ADX, and SCT Installation and Upgrade Instructions Wizard (LIT-12011521). Note: The NAE45-0, NAE55-0, and NIE55-0 engines with 256 MB flash memory are not supported at Release 4.1 or later. For upgrade options, contact the Johnson Controls Field Support Center.

Site Director
For each Metasys system network site, a single network engine or a Metasys server is designated as the Site Director. The Site Director UI provides a single point of access to the site and all of the web-enabled devices on the site; and supports functions such as user logon, user administration, user views, time synchronization, and data traffic management. On larger Metasys system networks with one or more ADSs/ADXs, an ADS/ADX is designated as the Site Director. On small network sites without an ADS/ADX, you must designate an NAE as the Site Director. All NAEs are shipped factory-designated as Site Directors. You must demote any NAE that is not the designated Site Director on a site. See Designating an NAE as the Site Director for more information. Note: You can establish or change the logon user name and password for the NAE only when the NAE is designated as a Site Director. Establish these values before demoting an NAE from Site Director. If an ADS/ADX is on a site, an NAE cannot be the Site Director. You must demote the NAE to be a child of an ADS/ADX. See Designating an NAE as the Site Director for more information. Note: The NAE45-Lite cannot be a Site Director to other engines. The NAE45-Lite can only be a child device of an ADS-Lite-A. You must demote the NAE to be a child of an ADS/ADX. See Designating an NAE as the Site Director for more information. If an NAE85 is the Site Director, it can supervise up to four additional engines on the site: NAE35s, NAE45s, NCE25s, NAE55s, NIE55s, or NxE85s. If an NAE55 is the Site Director, it can supervise up to four additional engines on the site: NAE35s, NAE45s, NCE25s, NAE55s, or NIE55s. If an NAE45 is the Site Director, it can supervise up to two additional engines on the site: NAE35s, NAE45s, or NCE25. If an NAE35 is the Site Director, it can supervise up to two additional NAE35s or NCE25s on the site. An NCE25 cannot be designated as the Site Director, except in stand-alone applications. Note: If you attempt to add an NAE to a site and the new NAE exceeds the supervisory device limit for the Site Director, the Site Director does not accept the additional device. The Site Director records an error message in the Site Director Audit Trail each time you attempt to add a new device that exceeds the device limit. If you attempt to add the same device more than once, each attempt fails but no error message is recorded after the first attempt.

NAE Computer Name


The NAE Computer Name is an editable Network Identification attribute on the NAE Network tab. Devices on the LAN and the Metasys system network use the NAE Computer Name to identify and communicate with the NAE across the network. Computer Name is synonymous with host name on a network.

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Each NAE ships with a unique initial Computer Name value NAExxxxxxxxxxxx, where xxxxxxxxxxxx is the Ethernet MAC address of the device without the hyphens. For example, if the NAEs MAC address is 00-80-66-05-0F-FC, the initial computer name is NAE008066050FFC. Changing the Computer Name value initiates a device reset on the NAE. The initial computer name is often useful during commissioning for locating and connecting to an NAE before it is configured with an archive database download from the SCT. In most cases, the archive database download from the SCT overwrites the initial Computer Name value and determines the NAE Computer Name on the Metasys site. Changing the NAE Computer Name breaks any existing references between the NAE object and other objects on the site and may break the existing network connection to other devices on the network. Important: Starting at Release 2.1.10, the NAE/NIE Update Tool placed restrictions on the Host Name (Computer Name) values you can use for NAE35, NAE45, and NCE25 models. Name values must start with a letter, end with either a letter or a number, and may contain dashes only in the interior of the name. The Host Name must contain a letter other than or in addition to the letter A and digits. For example, A522446 is not valid, but either A522446B or AB52446 are valid. B522446 or C522446 are valid Host Names. This restriction is caused by a known problem with Microsoft Windows CE. Failure to follow the Host Name restrictions results in the Computer Name value changing when an NAE35, NAE45, or NCE25 is updated. Refer to the NAE/NIE Update Tool Technical Bulletin (LIT-12011524) for more information on Host Name restrictions. Note: Before building the archive database in SCT, you should consult the network administrator or Information Technology department to determine if there is an existing protocol for host names (computer names) on the network.

NAE Object Name


The NAE Object Name is an editable attribute on the NAE Focus tab that the Metasys software uses to identify the NAE in the Site Management Portal UI and in the SCT. The Object Name is a label only and is not (necessarily) the same as the Computer Name. Changing the Object Name merely changes the name that you see in the navigation tree, alarm messages, trend reports, and other screens in the Site Management Portal UI and SCT that refer to the NAE. Changing the Object Name does not impact the object references or network communication with other devices on the site. You can change the Object Name at any time. We recommend an intuitive name that clearly identifies the NAE in the Site Management Portal UI and Metasys site.

Basic Access Operating Mode


Basic Access is a mode of operation allowing users with Basic Access user accounts access to a subset of the standard user interface capabilities based on their assigned permissions. Basic Access user accounts are created by Metasys system administrators using the Security Administrator system. Basic Access meets the user interface requirements for most building operators. Basic Access is provided on all of the Metasys system engines and servers but is the primary user interface in the NAE3514, NAE3515, NAE3524, and NAE3525 controllers. You cannot commission or configure an NAE35 in Basic Access mode. You must log on to the full Site Management Portal UI on the NAE35 to commission and configure the device. See Logon User Names and Passwords for information on logging on to NAE35 Basic Access.

Logon User Names and Passwords


All NAEs are shipped with the same initial logon user name. The initial logon user name is MetasysSysAgent, and it is not case sensitive. For the MetasysSysAgent default password, contact your local Johnson Controls representative. Use the initial user name and password to log on to any NAE the first time you commission the NAE. The Change Password screen then appears and prompts you to change the initial default password before continuing. You must change the MetasysSysAgent default password when you first log in to a new, factory-fresh NAE, or an NAE that was recently updated with the NAE/NIE Update Tool. Note: The NAE logon user name and password values can only be changed when an NAE is a Site Director. If you want to change the NAE logon user name or password, you must do so before demoting the NAE from Site Director status.
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The NAE35 models with Basic Access operation mode require an additional logon user name and password to enable and use the Basic Access mode. The initial logon user name is BasicSysAgent, and it is not case sensitive. You are prompted to create your own account password. For security reasons, we recommend that you change the logon user name before the NAE goes online in a Metasys network. Refer to the Security Administrator System Technical Bulletin (LIT-1201528) for details. Note: When you change (or add) an NAE logon user name or password, make sure to record the new user name and password values and store the new values in a safe location. You cannot access the NAE Site Management Portal UI without a valid user name and password.

NAE Connectivity
You can establish a connection between a computer and an NAE using one of the following procedures: Establishing a Direct Connection to an NAE Preparing an NAE for an Ethernet LAN That Supports DHCP and DNS Preparing an NAE for an Ethernet LAN without DHCP and without DNS Support (NAE Uses APIPA) Preparing an NAE for an Ethernet LAN without DHCP and without DNS Support (NAE Uses Static IP Address) Preparing an NAE for an Ethernet LAN That Supports DHCP but Not DNS Preparing an NAE for an Ethernet LAN That Supports DNS but Not DHCP

Modems and Dial-Out Features


You can set up an NAE with a modem to dial out to an ADS/ADX from a remote location or to be accessible from a computer remotely. Some NAE models include an optional, factory-installed, internal modem. You can also install a user-supplied external modem on the NAE. See Table 3 for a list of supported modem combinations for the NxE models. For example, an NAE55 with an internal modem can have an external USB modem, but not an external serial modem. Table 3: Supported Modem Combinations NxE Model Internal Modem Present? External USB Modem 1 Supported?
NAE55/NIE55 Yes No NAE35/NAE45/NCE25 Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes

External Serial Modem Supported?


No No No Yes - RS232C Port B Only
2

1 Only one external modem is supported per NAE: USB or Serial. 2 The RS232C A serial port does not support an external modem.

Note: The optional factory-installed, internal modem cannot be added to an NAE in the field. Each NAE is pre-loaded with the modem drivers for the following (optional and user-supplied) supported external Universal Serial Bus (USB) modems: Zoom Telephonics 2985-00-00L modem, V.90 external USB modem Multi-Tech Systems, MT5634ZBA - USB 56K, V.90 external USB modem U.S. Robotics USR5637 modem, 56K, external USB modem (requires 4.1.5 image or later

Note: The Multi-Tech Systems modem in Metasys system networks requires the 8.27L Version or higher of the Multi-Tech Systems modem firmware installed on the modem. Note: The Zoom and Multi-Tech Systems models specified here are discontinued and no longer available from Johnson Controls, but may be obtained from other vendors. By default, the NAE is not set up to accept incoming dial-up connections via a modem. To enable modem connections, access the NAE Site Management Portal UI, go to the Communication tab, and set the Allow Incoming Connections attribute value in the Internal Modem Config or External Modem Config sections to True.
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Modems used for Metasys system DDAs must be dedicated for the DDA. For example, a conflict exists if the Launcher application attempts to use the same modem that is configured for a Pager DDA. To help you understand supported uses of internal and external modems, see Table 4. For example, an internal modem can be shared for ADS/ADX dial-out (alarm, event, and audit forwarding) and incoming connection (Launcher) functions, whereas the external modem is dedicated to the paging function. If you use the same modem for the ADS/ADX dial-out and Launcher functions, you may need to increase the number of redial attempts and time between redial attempts for that modem. Table 4: Supported Modem Communication Uses Dial Out
Type of Modem Internal External

Dial In
Internal External

Paging
External Internal

With the presence of two modems, the NAE is capable of communicating over an incoming modem connection and an outgoing modem connection simultaneously. The supported modem configuration scenarios are summarized in Table 5. As an example, the NAEs internal modem can handle communications to an ADS/ADX and accept incoming connections, while its external modem can send out pages. An example of an unsupported combination is for the same modem (internal or external) to handle all three communication types: dial-out, dial-in, and paging. Table 6 lists the unsupported modem scenarios. Table 5: Supported Modem Configuration Scenarios for NAE Dial Out Dial In
Modem enabled Use internal modem Modem enabled Use external modem Modem enabled or disabled Use internal or external modem Modem disabled No modem in use Modem enabled Use internal modem Modem enabled Use external modem Modem enabled or disabled Use internal or external modem Modem disabled No modem in use

Paging
Modem enabled Use external modem Modem enabled Use internal modem Modem disabled No modem in use Modem enabled Use internal or external modem

Table 6: Unsupported Modem Configuration Scenarios for NAE Dial Out Dial In
Modem enabled Internal modem Modem enabled External modem Modem disabled No modem in use Modem disabled No modem in use Modem enabled Internal modem Modem enabled External modem Modem enabled Internal modem Modem enabled External modem Modem enabled Internal modem Modem enabled External modem Modem disabled No modem in use Modem disabled No modem in use

Paging
Modem enabled Internal modem Modem enabled External modem Modem enabled Internal modem Modem enabled External modem Modem enabled Internal modem Modem enabled External modem

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Time Zone, Date, and Time Management


The procedure you use to set the time zone, date, and time on an NAE depends on how the NAE fits into the Metasys site hierarchy. See Appendix: Time Zone, Date, and Time Management for information and detailed procedures for setting time zone, date, and time on an NAE and on a Metasys network.

Alarm and Events


Each NAE stores alarm and event messages generated by the NAE and the connected field trunk devices. You can configure an NAE to send alarm and event notifications via the NAE DDAs to e-mail destinations, paging devices, and SNMP devices. DDAs are agents that route and deliver alarm and event messages to destinations such as pagers, printers, e-mail addresses, and SNMP management systems. If the site has an ADS/ADX, each NAE can forward alarm and event information to the ADS/ADX for centralized notification and long-term storage. Important: If the site depends on alarm paging, printing, or e-mailing alarms, the Metasys system manages the NAE repositories according to the following criteria to avoid a loss of notification if the repository becomes full: Events forwarded to an ADS Event Repository are always removed before events that are not forwarded. The lowest priority event with the oldest time stamp and Acknowledge Required flag set to false is replaced first. If the event about to be created is of a higher priority than at least one event in the repository, the event with the oldest time stamp and the lowest priority is replaced. If all events are of the same priority, the event with the oldest time stamp is replaced. If the event about to be created is of a lower priority than all other events in the Event Repository, no event is replaced and the new event is discarded. A loss of alarm paging, printing, or e-mailing can result if the NAE is not commissioned with strict adherence to these criteria. To avoid managing events in this way, move ADS/ADX and the notification DDAs to the server. You can designate multiple alarm and event sources in an NAE and in the connected field devices, and then configure the conditions that trigger those alarms or events. You can also define multiple notification types and multiple notification destinations for each alarm or event. The NAE also has several pre-configured internal diagnostic features that are factory set to generate alarms. NAE device diagnostic features with factory-set default alarm values include: Central Processing Unit (CPU) usage flash usage memory usage battery condition CPU temperature (NAE55/NIE55 models only) board temperature

You can check the status of these diagnostic features on the Diagnostic tab. See Diagnostic Tab. Refer to the Introduction to Alarm and Event Management in the Metasys system Help for more information. Note: After an alarm is generated, anyone who acknowledges the alarm clears that alarm notification for all other users. If an ADS/ADX is the Site Director, you can set the ADS/ADX to deliver alarm and event notifications to a network printer.

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Serial Printer DDA (Alarm Printer)


Alarms from supervisory devices can be sent automatically to an alarm printer if one is configured and online. Alarms can be sent to an NAE55/NIE55 and NxE85. The Serial DDA must be enabled on the Site Director NAE/NIE that is connected to the serial printer and all NAEs/NIEs from which you want alarms printed. You can print alarms from all NAEs/NIEs using the serial printer connected to the Site Director Figure 6. You can also print alarms to a local printer connected to a single NAE/NIE. Important: Alarms are sent directly to the printer and are not queued or stored by the supervisory device. Alarms sent to an alarm printer that is offline, turned off, or out of paper are not printed and cannot be recovered. Figure 6 and Figure 7 show the possible printer connections to a Site Director NAE/NIE.

Recommended Serial Printer


Table 7 describes the recommended serial printer and accessories. Table 7: Recommended Serial Printer and Accessories Item Description
Serial Printer Serial Card Serial Printer Cable Epson FX890 9-pin, 680 cps printer Serial Card for Epson Dot Matrix printer Serial Null Modem Printer Cable

ITAS Number
C11C524001 C12C824431 F2J044-06

Table 8 shows the recommended settings for the serial card. Table 8: Serial Card Setup Switch Position
Switch 1 Setup SW1-1 SW1-2 SW1-3 SW1-4 SW1-5 SW1-6 Switch 2 Setup SW2-1 SW2-2 SW2-3 SW2-4 SW2-5 SW2-6 Switch 3 Setup SW3-1 SW3-2 SW3-3 SW3-4 SW3-5 SW3-6 SW3-7 SW3-8 Off Off Off Off Off Off Off Off Buffer size Buffer full recovery Buffer full recovery DTR + or DSR/DCD DTR flag set Self test enable Self test selection On On Off On Off Off 9600 Baud 9600 Baud Xon/Xoff Xon/Xoff RS232 RS232 On On Off Off On Off Enable Card 8-bit word parity - none parity - none 9600 Baud 9600 Baud

Description

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Table 8: Serial Card Setup Switch Position


Jumper Setup J1A J1B J2A J2B J3 J4 J5 J6 J7 J8 On Off On Off Off Off Factory set - Do not change. Factory set - Do not change. Factory set - Do not change. Off

Description

Figure 6 shows a Metasys system with the alarm printer connected to the Site Director NAE/NIE, and alarms for NAEs/NIEs (2 and 3) are routed to the Site Director NAE/NIE (1) for printing. All alarms from the NAEs/NIEs (1, 2, and 3) print on the serial printer. The serial printer DDA must be enabled on all NAEs/NIEs (1, 2, and 3). Figure 6: Metasys System with One Alarm Printer

Figure 7 shows a Metasys system with a local alarm printer (A) connected to an NAE/NIE (3) for printing. Only alarms from this NAE (3) print on this printer. The alarms from all NAEs/NIEs (1, 2, and 3) are routed to the Site Director NAE/NIE (1), and all alarms are printed to serial printer B. The serial printer DDA must be enabled on all NAEs (1, 2, and 3).

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Figure 7: Metasys System with Local Alarm Printer

Figure 8 shows a Metasys system with one local Alarm Printer. The alarms from only one NAE/NIE (3) print on a serial printer (A). Only that NAE/NIE (3) has the serial printer DDA enabled. The Site Director NAE/NIE (1) and NAE/NIE (2) do not have the serial printer DDA enabled. Figure 8: Metasys System with One Local Alarm Printer

Serial Printer Installation Considerations


Follow these guidelines when installing a serial printer: You cannot install the serial printer option on an ADS/ADX computer. You can install the serial printer option on an NIE that has an application that is already using the COM ports if the NIE is not designated as the Site Director. For example, you can install the serial printer option on an XL5000 NIE.
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You must connect the physical connection of the serial printer to COM Port B. You can install the serial printer option on an NIE85. The NIE85 uses COM1 for the physical connection of the serial printer. If your site contains multiple supervisory devices from which alarms are forwarded, you must connect the physical connection of the serial printer to COM Port B of the Site Director and perform the installation sequence on all supervisory devices from which alarms are forwarded. You must install the serial printer option when an NAE/NIE is reloaded or upgraded with the NAE/NIE Update Tool. You cannot filter alarms. All alarms forwarded from the device on which you install the serial printer DDA are printed. You cannot enable the Serial Printer DDA on an NAE35, NAE45, or NCE25. The NAE55/NIE55 battery must be in good condition prior to enabling the DDA (the procedure requires you to remove power from the engine). Before enabling the Serial Printer DDA, you must have a computer with the NxE Information and Configuration Tool (NCT) installed that has network access to each NAE/NIE on which the DDA is to be installed. If you have access to an NxE85 with a monitor and keyboard, you do not need to use NCT and may perform the procedures in this document directly on the NxE85 computer.

Important: Use care and follow instructions carefully when using NCT to access an engine or computer. Failure to follow the steps as written can render your engine or computer inoperable.

E-mail Notification
You can configure an NAE to generate alarm and event messages via e-mail to one or more e-mail destinations using the e-mail DDA. Configure custom e-mail messages, and specify e-mail message destinations in the Email tab of the Site Management Portal UI. Figure 9 provides an example of an e-mail message destination that is active Monday through Friday from 7:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M.

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Figure 9: Example of Defining an E-mail Notification

Pager Notification
You can configure an NAE to generate alarm and event messages using TAP to one or more pager destinations using the pager DDA. TAP is an American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) based protocol that allows the submission of a numeric or alphanumeric message. Configure custom pager messages and specify the pager message destinations in the Pager tab of the Site Management Portal UI. Figure 10 provides an example of how to define a set of pager destinations that can route a Fire alarm to the same pager over the weekend (4:00 P.M. Friday to 7:00 A.M. Monday). Note that this application requires the definition of three separate Pager destinations.

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Figure 10: Examples of Defining a Pager Notification

Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) Notification


SNMP is a protocol governing network management and the monitoring of network devices and their functions. It is not necessarily limited to Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) networks. SNMP monitoring is typically used for large BAS networks with many network devices. Alarm and event notifications are sent to and stored on an SNMP management computer that monitors all devices on the network. The NAE uses SNMP protocol to deliver network device status and conditions to a designated SNMP management computer. You must set up SNMP monitoring at the network level, and you must assign an SNMP management device on the network. (For details, see Creating NAE SNMP Alarm Notifications and Destinations.) If you are applying a Metasys system to an existing network, consult with the network administrator or IT department that administers the network to determine if SNMP monitoring is available on the network. Configure custom SNMP messages and specify the SNMP message destinations in the SNMP tab of the Site Management Portal UI. Perform this configuration to each NAE individually; SNMP configuration cannot be done on an ADS/ADX. Release 3.0 and later provides enhanced SNMP functionality on Metasys systems, including a Metasys system Management Information Base (MIB) file for configuring third-party SNMP translation applications to request, receive, and translate specified SNMP trap messages generated by the Metasys SNMP DDA.

Initial Default NAE Configuration


NAEs are shipped with standard initial values for many of the editable attribute values. Table 9 defines some important initial default configuration values for the NAE35, NAE45, and NCE25 models. Table 10 and Table 11 define some important initial default configuration values for the NAE55/NIE55 and NxE85 models.

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Table 9: NAE35, NAE45, and NCE25 Initial Configuration Values Attribute/Field Name NAE35, NAE45, and NCE25 Initial Value
Computer Name NAExxxxxxxxxxxx, where xxxxxxxxxxxx is the Ethernet Media Access Control (MAC) address of the device without the hyphens. For example, if the Ethernet MAC address is 00-80-66-05-0F-FC, the initial Computer Name is NAE008066050FFC. Enabled 115,200 baud, 8 bits, no parity, 1 stop bit (115200,8,n,1), Direct Connect IP over Point-to-Point (PTP). 115,200 baud, 8 bits, no parity, 1 stop bit (115200,8,n,1) A new NAE35/NAE45 is a Site Director by default. If an NAE is not going to be the Site Director, it must be demoted and the Computer Name or IP address of the designated Site Director must be entered here. MetasysSysAgent (not case sensitive) Contact your local Johnson Controls representative.
1

DHCP Client Serial Port RS232C A Serial Port RS232C B Site Director

Initial Site Management Portal UI Logon Username Initial Site Management Portal UI Logon Password

1 This information does not apply to the NAE45-Lite.

Table 10: NAE55/NIE55 Initial Configuration Values Attribute/Field Name NAE55/NIE55 Initial Value
Computer Name NAExxxxxxxxxxxx, where xxxxxxxxxxxx is the Ethernet Media Access Control (MAC) address of the device without the hyphens. For example, if the Ethernet MAC address is 00-80-66-05-0F-FC, the initial Computer Name is NAE008066050FFC. Enabled 115,200 baud, 8 bits, no parity, 1 stop bit (115200,8,n,1), Direct Connect IP over Point-to-Point (PTP). 9600 baud, 8 bits, no parity, 1 stop bit (9600,8,n,1) A new NAE55/NIE55 is a Site Director by default. If an NAE is not a Site Director, it must be demoted and the Computer Name or IP address of the designated Site Director is entered here. MetasysSysAgent (not case-sensitive) Contact your local Johnson Controls representative. MetasysSysAgent (not case-sensitive) Contact your local Johnson Controls representative.

DHCP Client Serial Port A Serial Port B Site Director

Initial Site Management Portal UI Logon Username Initial Site Management Portal UI Logon Password Initial Windows Logon ID
1

Initial Windows Password

1 The Windows operating system logon ID and password are used with dial-up and direct connections.

Table 11: NxE85 Initial Configuration Values Attribute/Field Name NxE85 Initial Value
Computer Name NAExxxxxxxxxxxx, where xxxxxxxxxxxx is the Ethernet Media Access Control (MAC) address of the enabled Ethernet card without the hyphens. For example, if the Ethernet MAC address is 00-1E-EC-6E-5D-32, the initial Computer Name is NAE001EEC6E5D32. Enabled

DHCP Client

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Table 11: NxE85 Initial Configuration Values Attribute/Field Name NxE85 Initial Value
Site Director A new NxE85 is shipped as a Site Director. If an NxE85 is not going to be the Site Director, you must demote it by entering the ComputerName or IP address of the designated Site Director in the SiteDirector attribute field on the Advanced Focus tab of the NxE85. MetasysSysAgent (not case-sensitive) Contact your local Johnson Controls representative. MetasysSysAgent (not case-sensitive) Contact your local Johnson Controls representative.

Initial Site Management Portal UI Logon Username Initial Site Management Portal UI Logon Password Initial Windows Logon ID
1

Initial Windows Password

1 The Windows OS has two administrator level user accounts. For security reasons, we strongly recommend changing the Windows OS logon password for both accounts at commissioning. You can disable the administrator account, but do not disable the MetasysSysAgent account.

System and User Preferences


The Metasys system provides customized preferences for the Site Management Portal UI. The preferences allow you to configure how the UI behaves, including the sounds and colors, the startup view, and the ability to add links to external applications that can be accessed from within the UI of the NAE device. See Appendix: Configuring and Maintaining Preferences for information and detailed procedures on how to customize system and user preferences.

Reset Device Command


The NAE Reset Device command in the Site Management Portal UI initiates an orderly reset that saves recent changes to the NAE archive database and restarts the NAE operating system. When the NAE requires a reset, Reset Needed appears in the title bar of the object in the Display panel. A reset is required for new settings to take effect after making changes to the following attributes: APDU Retries APDU Segment Time-out APDU Time-out BACnet IP Port Computer Name Contact Person Domain Name External Modem Config Internal Modem Config Max APDU Length Network Address Port Number Read Community SNMP DDA SNMP Management Device Serial Port 1 Cable Config Time Sync Period (NAE55/NIE55 models only) Write Community XMS Dial-up Config (NAE55/NIE55 models only)

Note: Changing the NAE Computer Name value forces a device reset.
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Important: Do not push the RE-BOOT SYSTEM switch on the NAE to initiate a device reset. Pushing the RE-BOOT SYSTEM switch initiates a CPU reset and restart of the NAE, which causes all unsaved data to be lost, including recent attribute value changes.

Detailed Procedures
You need the following items to perform the detailed procedures and commission an NAE: an NAE with Release 6.0 software a laptop or desktop computer with Internet Explorer Web browser Version 8.0 or 9.0 for the purpose of downloading the Launcher application Note: In some scenarios, the computer must be a DHCP client or must be configured to use a static IP address appropriate for the LAN. the NAE Ethernet MAC address

You may also need: a null modem Serial cable an Ethernet crossover cable a new, unique IP address for the NAE on the Metasys network a copy of the NAE archive database that configures the NAE for your specific site (The NAE archive database can be created and stored offline in the SCT.) Release 6.0 SCT loaded on a computer

Using Launcher to Discover an NAE


Starting at Release 6.0, you use the Launcher application instead of a web browser to discover an NAE. If the Launcher application is already installed on your computer, skip to Step 5. If the Launcher application is not installed, follow these steps: 1. 2. Start the Internet Explorer web browser. Enter this URL in the Internet Explorer address field: http://NAE-computer-name/metasys. See the NAE Computer Name section. The Windows Launcher Download screen appears (Figure 11). Figure 11: Windows Launcher Download

3. 4. 5.

Click Download. A user message displays asking you to run or save the file. Click Run. Follow the instructions on the screen to install the Launcher. Refer to the Launcher Installation Instructions (LIT-12011783) if needed. When the Launcher is installed on your computer, proceed to Step 5. Start the Launcher application. The Launcher screens appears (Figure 12).

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Figure 12: Launcher Screen

6.

Click Add. The Add New window appears (Figure 13). Figure 13: Add New Device

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7.

Enter the IP address of the NAE, and then click Discover. The Launcher searches for the device on the building network. When the device is found, the Add New window refreshes to indicate the found device (Figure 14). Figure 14: Found Device

8.

You may enter a descriptive name for the NAE in the SMP field or keep the default IP address. Click Save. The NAE is added to the profile list on the SMP tab of the Launcher. Note: Descriptive names make it easier to find NAEs in the profile list. Select the NAE from the SMP profile list and click Launch. If the device you are adding has not yet been downloaded and installed on your computer, a Downloading screen appears, followed by an Installing screen (Figure 15). The screens clear when the download and installation steps are complete. Figure 15: Downloading and Installing Metasys Version

9.

The Metasys system logon screen appears. 10. Enter the initial Username and Password values for the NAE and click Login. See Logon User Names and Passwords. 11. If necessary, set the time, time zone, and date. See Appendix: Time Zone, Date, and Time Management.

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Establishing a Direct Connection to an NAE


This scenario is typical for a single NAE that is not attached to a LAN and can be used to set up an NAE before it is installed and connected to a site network. The following procedure can also be used when an Ethernet crossover cable is not available. Your computer must be set up for dial-up access as described in Metasys System Extended Architecture Direct Connection and Dial-Up Connection Application Note (LIT-1201639). 1. Connect the computer Communication (COM) port to the NAE Serial Port A using a null modem cable. 2. Establish the connection to the NAE by double-clicking the icon for Direct Connect that was created when the computer was set up for dial-up access. If you are using Windows XP Professional OS, the Direct Connect icon is located on the Network Connections screen (Start > Settings > Network Connections). If you are using Windows 7 OS or Windows Server 2008 OS, the Direct Connect selection is located under the Network and Sharing Center (select Control Panel > Network and Internet > Network and Sharing Center > Connect to a Network). The direct-connect setup is complete. You can access the Metasys system logon screen using the Launcher. See Accessing the Site Management Portal UI on an NAE for information on accessing the NAE UI.

Preparing an NAE for an Ethernet LAN That Supports DHCP and DNS
The following scenario is typical when installing an NAE on an existing building LAN. Your computer must be connected to the LAN. The computer must be a Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) client or configured to use a static IP address appropriate for the LAN. Note: We recommend that DHCP be configured to assign the same IP address to an NAE when the IP address lease expires and after the NAE device resets. When a different IP address is issued to an NAE, address binding to the NAE from other devices breaks. 1. Your LAN Administrator must update the DNS server and the DHCP server with the NAE Ethernet MAC address and the NAE host name. 2. Connect the NAE to the LAN with an Ethernet patch cable. 3. Connect 24 VAC supply power to the NAE. Then wait for the NAE to complete the startup and initialization sequence. Note: Startup and initialization is complete when the NAE green RUN LED is steady on and the PEER COM is either off or flickering to show activity. The startup and initialization sequence may take up to 10 minutes to complete. If the DHCP server is not online when the NAE is powered on (or if the NAE Ethernet cable is disconnected and reconnected with no DHCP server online), the NAE assumes a unique IP address between 169.254.0.1 and 169.254.255.254 and a subnet mask of 255.255.0.0. This is a feature of Automatic Private Internet Protocol Addressing (APIPA) that applies when DHCP is enabled in the NAE (factory default). 4. Go to Using Launcher to Discover an NAE, follow all instructions, then return to the next step in this section. 5. After you have completed the steps in Using Launcher to Discover an NAE, including the step for logging on to the NAE, select the NAE device object in the Navigation panel, and drag it to the Display panel of the Site Management Portal UI. The Focus tab for the selected NAE appears in the Display panel (Figure 16).

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Figure 16: NAE Focus Tab - Basic

6. Go to the Network tab and check the Computer Name and Domain Name values. Change these values to the assigned values for your network site (Figure 17).

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Figure 17: NAE Network Tab - Edit Mode

Important: Starting at Release 2.1.10, the NAE/NIE Update Tool places restrictions on the Host Name (Computer Name) values you can use for NAE35, NAE45, or NCE25 models. Name values must start with a letter, end with either a letter or a number, and may contain dashes only in the interior of the name. Failure to follow the name restrictions results in the Computer Name values changing when an NAE35, NAE45, or NCE25 is updated. Refer to the NAE/NIE Update Tool Technical Bulletin (LIT-12011524) for more information on Host Name restrictions. Note: Changing the Computer Name value forces a device reset on the NAE. (See NAE Computer Name and Reset Device Command.) 7. Go to the Focus tab and check the NAE Object Name value (Figure 18). Change the Object Name value to the descriptive label used to identify the NAE in the Site Management Portal UI and SCT.

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Figure 18: NAE Focus Tab - Advanced Edit Mode

Depending on the DNS server configuration, the NAE should be reachable from the subnet on which the NAE resides or from other subnets.

Preparing an NAE for an Ethernet LAN without DHCP and without DNS Support (NAE Uses APIPA)
This scenario is typical when installing an NAE on a stand-alone LAN designated as a building control network only. Perform these steps from a computer attached to the LAN. The NAE uses APIPA to automatically assign an IP address. For this procedure, do not attach an Ethernet crossover cable directly to the NAE. In this scenario, a direct connection to the NAE may affect the assignment of an IP address. 1. Attach the NAE to the LAN using an Ethernet patch cable. 2. Connect supply power to the NAE and wait for the NAE to complete initialization. Note: Startup and initialization is complete when the NAE green RUN LED is steady on and the PEER COM is either off or flickering to show activity. The startup and initialization sequence may take up to 10 minutes to complete.

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3. Verify that the computer is configured to use APIPA or a static IP address and subnet mask compatible with APIPA. If necessary, change the computers IP address and subnet mask to be compatible with APIPA. 4. Go to Using Launcher to Discover an NAE, follow all instructions, then return to the next step in this section. 5. After you have completed the steps in Using Launcher to Discover an NAE, including the step for logging on to the NAE, demote the NAE from Site Director if the NAE is not going to be the Site Director. See Designating an NAE as the Site Director. 6. (This step is optional.) Select the Network tab of the NAE device object. Change the Computer Name value from the factory default, if desired (Figure 17). See NAE Computer Name and Reset Device Command. Initial setup is complete. You can now log on to the NAE by entering computer-name in Launcher, where computer-name is the initial computer name of the NAE or the computer name you assigned in Step 6.

Preparing an NAE for an Ethernet LAN without DHCP and without DNS Support (NAE Uses Static IP Address)
This scenario is typical when installing the NAE on a stand-alone LAN dedicated to building control only. Using this scenario when using APIPA is not appropriate. The steps can be performed from a computer attached to the LAN or a computer connected directly to the NAE with an Ethernet crossover cable. If attached to the LAN, the computer must be connected to the same subnet as the NAE. To connect to the NAE with this procedure, you may need to know the IP address of the NAE. See Determining the NAE IP Address and Device Name for a LAN Connection. 1. Check the LAN IP address and subnet mask of the computer. If needed, change the IP address and subnet mask of the computer so that the computer and NAE are on the same subnet. The IP address assigned to the computer must be unique for the subnet. 2. Connect supply power to the NAE and wait for the NAE to complete startup and initialization. Startup and initialization is complete when the NAE green RUN LED is steady on and the PEER COM is either off or flickering to show activity. The startup and initialization sequence may take up to 10 minutes to complete. 3. Go to Using Launcher to Discover an NAE, follow all instructions, then return to the next step in this section. 4. After you have completed the steps in Using Launcher to Discover an NAE, including the step for logging on to the NAE, demote the NAE from Site Director if the NAE is not going to be the Site Director. See Designating an NAE as the Site Director. 5. Select the NAE device object from the Navigation panel of the Site Management Portal UI and drag it to the Display panel. The NAE device object UI opens in the Display panel. 6. Select the Network tab of the NAE device object and click Edit (Figure 19). 7. Change the Computer Name value, if desired. Change DHCP Enabled attribute value to False. This disables DHCP and APIPA. Change the IP address and subnet mask. The network administrator typically assigns static IP addresses. Record the assigned IP address for the NAE for future reference. The NAE automatically logs off and resets when you save the Computer Name change.

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Figure 19: Network Tab - Edit Mode

8. Wait for the NAE to complete the startup and initialization sequence. Note: Startup and initialization is complete when the NAE green RUN LED is steady on and the PEER COM is either off or flickering to show activity. The startup and initialization sequence may take up to 10 minutes to complete. Initial setup is complete. Note: If you connected your computer directly to the NAE with an Ethernet crossover cable, disconnect the crossover cable and connect the NAE to the LAN with an Ethernet patch cable. You can log on to the NAE by entering its IP address in Launcher on any subnet of the LAN.

Preparing an NAE for an Ethernet LAN That Supports DHCP but Not DNS
This scenario is common to many building LANs. The NAE should only use DHCP without DNS if you have configured DHCP to always assign the same IP address after device resets and lease renewals. If this is not the case, use static IP addresses as described in Preparing an NAE for an Ethernet LAN without DHCP and without DNS Support (NAE Uses Static IP Address). 1. Attach the NAE to the LAN using an Ethernet patch cable. 2. Connect supply power to the NAE and wait for the NAE to complete initialization. Startup and initialization is complete when the NAE green RUN LED is steady on and the PEER COM is either off or flickering to show activity. The startup and initialization sequence may take up to 10 minutes to complete.
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3. Go to Using Launcher to Discover an NAE, follow all instructions, then return to the next step in this section. 4. After you have completed the steps in Using Launcher to Discover an NAE, including the step for logging on to the NAE, update the NAE computer name value on the Network tab. After the computer name is updated, the Site Management Portal UI automatically logs off, and the NAE automatically resets. Wait for the NAE to complete the startup and initialization sequence. (Startup and initialization is complete when the NAE green RUN LED is steady on. This sequence may take up to 10 minutes. See Pre-boot Execution Environment (PXE) for more information.)

Preparing an NAE for an Ethernet LAN That Supports DNS but Not DHCP
This scenario is not typical of todays networks. The steps are identical to the steps in the Preparing an NAE for an Ethernet LAN without DHCP and without DNS Support (NAE Uses APIPA) and Preparing an NAE for an Ethernet LAN without DHCP and without DNS Support (NAE Uses Static IP Address). Using the NAE Ethernet MAC address (from the NAE label), the network administrator can update the DNS server and the assigned computer name. If this is done, you can enter dns-name in Launcher on any computer on the LAN.

Enabling the Serial Printer DDA


Important: Follow instructions carefully when using Remote Desktop with the NxE Information and Configuration Tool (NCT) to access an engine or computer. Failure to follow the steps as written can render your engine or computer inoperable. 1. 2. 3. 4. To prevent data loss, issue an Archive command to the device from the Site Management Portal UI. If you are enabling the DDA on an NxE85, complete the steps in Preparing the NxE85 for Serial Printing. Access the NAE remotely using the NCT. Click Remote Desktop in the NCT. If a Remote Desktop identity message appears, click Yes. The tool logs in to the NAE, and the Remote Desktop screen with the Command Prompt appears (Figure 20). Note: If the Command prompt does not appear, press Ctrl+Alt+End to open the Windows Security screen. Click Task Manager. The Windows Task Manager appears. Click the Applications tab, then New Task. The Create New Task window appears. In the Open field, type CMD and press Enter. When the Command prompt opens, close the Task Manager.

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Figure 20: Command Prompt

5. 6.

At the command prompt, type net pause miiidm to pause the Device Manager. At the command prompt, type notepad and press Enter. Microsoft Notepad opens in a new window (Figure 21).

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Figure 21: Notepad in Remote Desktop

7. 8. 9. 10. 11.

In Notepad, on the File menu, select Open. From the Files of Type drop-down menu, select All Files. Browse to JCI_NAE (C:)\Inetpub\wwwroot\MetasysIII\WS and select Web.config. Click Open. The Web.config file opens in Notepad. In the <EventRouter> section, locate the serial printer DDA line:

12. Delete <!-- at the beginning and--> at the end of the serial printer DDA line (see circled text):

13. On the Notepad File menu, click Save. Note: If the file is not saved with the original name, including the .txt extension, the DDA is not enabled. 14. If you are enabling printing on an NAE55/NIE55: a. At the command prompt enter, shutdown -r -t 0, or remove power from the NAE55/NIE55. b. When the NAE55/NIE55 LEDs are off, reapply power to the NAE55/NIE55. 15. If you are enabling serial printing on an NxE85, restart the computer.
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The Serial Printer DDA installation is now complete. The Remote Desktop connection closes and the NAE/NIE restarts.

Preparing the NxE85 for Serial Printing


1. Disable COM port B in the Windows Device Manager. 2. Configure COM Port A for 9600-8-N-1-N. 3. Connect the serial printer to COM port A. Note: The printer has only one physical port. 4. Install the Epson FX-880 printer driver. Note: The FX-890 printer driver is not available. 5. Return to Enabling the Serial Printer DDA. If you have access to an NxE85 with a monitor and keyboard, start with Step 7; otherwise, start with Step 3.

Creating Audit Entries for Discarded Events


By default, discarded events that originate at the NAE are not recorded. You can change this behavior so that an audit entry is recorded and shown in the Audit Viewer each time an event is discarded. 1. Access the NAE remotely using the NCT. 2. For an NxE55 or NxE85, click Remote Desktop in the NCT, then start Notepad from the Command Prompt. For an NAE35/45 or NCE25, click Start FTP in the NCT. 3. Open the following file for editing: NxE55 or NxE85: C:\Inetpub\wwwroot\MetasysIII\WS\web.config NAE35/45 or NCE25: ftp://<IP address>/Storage/Metasys/wwwroot/metasysIII/WS/Web.ce.config 4. Find the line for WriteAuditAckDiscard: <add key="EventRepository.WriteAuditAckDiscard" value="false"/> 5. 6. 7. 8. Change the value from false to true. Save the file. Terminate your remote connection to the NAE. Exit the NCT.

Accessing the Site Management Portal UI on an NAE


After an NAE is set up for connectivity, the Site Management Portal UI can be accessed via the Launcher. See the Site Management Portal User Interface section of this document and the Metasys system Help for additional information about navigating the Site Management Portal UI. You need to know the IP address (or Computer Name) for the NAE you wish to access. If you do not know the IP address for the NAE, see Determining the NAE IP Address and Device Name for a LAN Connection and Determining the NAE IP Address and Device Name through a Serial Port Monitor. If the NAE has been added to a buildings DNS server, you can access it by its Computer Name value. To access the Site Management Portal UI on an NAE via the Launcher: 1. Start the Launcher application. 2. Select the IP address of the NAE on the SMP tab of the Launcher, and click Launch. The Metasys system logon screen appears. 3. In the Metasys system logon screen, type the NAE Username and Password, and then click Login or press Enter. 4. To view an NAE, select the NAE object from the Navigation panel and drag it to the Display panel. The NAE object opens with the Focus tab active (Figure 22).

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Establishing Basic NAE Parameters in the Focus Screen


1. In the Site Management Portal UI, display the NAE device object and click the Focus tab. 2. Click Edit (Figure 22). Edit the NAE Object Name and Description values as required. Figure 22: NAE Focus Tab (Basic)

3. Click Save. 4. Select the Advanced option and click Edit (Figure 23).

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Figure 23: NAE Focus Tab - Advanced Edit Mode

5. Edit the advanced attribute values as needed. (Refer to the NAE Device Object Help and Audit Trails Help in the Metasys system Help for guidance.) If the NAE is on a site with an ADS/ADX, enter the ADS/ADXs IP address in Local Site Director field in the Site section of this screen so the NAE can find the ADS/ADX.

Establishing the NAE Network Parameters


The NAE Computer Name and Domain Name on the Network tab identify the NAE on the network so it can be found by other computers. In many commissioning scenarios, you can use the initial Computer Name value to commission the NAE. See NAE Computer Name for more information. In most site configuration scenarios, you configure many of the Metasys network values in the NAE UI by downloading a pre-built archive database from the SCT to the commissioned NAE. The download from SCT overwrites the initial Computer Name value with the new value for the Metasys network. Note: If you are building the NAE database online, you must establish the production network NAE Computer Name value before establishing references to objects on the NAE. After creating object references, changing the Computer Name value breaks all object references to local objects on the site.

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Important: Starting at Release 2.1.10, the NAE/NIE Update Tool places restrictions on the Host Name (Computer Name) values you can use for NAE35, NAE45, or NCE25 models. Name values must start with a letter, end with either a letter or a number, and may contain dashes only in the interior of the name. Failure to follow the name restrictions results in the Computer Name values changing when an NAE35, NAE45, or NCE25 is updated. Refer to the NAE/NIE Update Tool Technical Bulletin (LIT-12011524) for more information on Host Name restrictions. To set up the NAE network identification, LAN configuration, and the dial-up attributes: 1. In the Site Management Portal UI, display the NAE device object, click the Network tab, and then click Edit (Figure 24). Figure 24: NAE Network Tab - Edit Mode

2. In the Network Identification section, type the Computer Name value. 3. Fill in the Network Identification and LAN attribute values as needed and click Save. Note: If you are setting up an NAE to dial out to an ADS/ADX, see Configuring an NAE to Dial Out to an ADS/ADX.

Establishing the NAE Direct-Connect and Modem Parameters


On the NAE Communications tab, you can set the NAE to communicate via a direct connection to Serial Port A (NAE55/NIE55 models), an optional internal modem, or a user-supplied external modem (Figure 25).

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Note: On NAE35/NAE45 models, Serial Port A is labeled RS232C A. Use Serial Port A for direct connections. Set up Serial Port A in the Serial Port Cable Config section of the Communications tab. Configure an optional internal modem on the NAE for dial-up connection in the Internal Modem Config section of the Communications tab. Note: You can order specified NAE models with the optional internal modem. An internal modem cannot be added to an NAE in the field. Configure a user-supplied external modem on a USB port in the External Modem Config section of the Communications tab. See Modems and Dial-Out Features for the external modems and drivers supported on Metasys system networks. Note: To enable modem connections, set the value for the Allow Incoming Connections attribute (in the Internal Modem Config or External Modem Config sections) on the Communications tab to True. NCE25/NAE55/NIE55 serial ports do not support external serial modems. Use only external USB modems with the NCE25/NAE55/NIE55 models. Each NAE supports the concurrent use of one internal modem and one external modem. For example, you can configure the internal modem for dial-out communication and configure the external modem for dial-up communication (or vice versa). But you should not configure the internal modem and the external modem for the same purpose; for example, both modems should not be configured for paging use. To configure the NAE Serial Port A, an internal modem, or an external modem: 1. In the Site Management Portal UI, display the NAE device object, click the Communications tab, and then click Edit (Figure 25).

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Figure 25: NAE Communications Configuration Tab - Edit Mode

2. To establish a serial port connection to the RS232C A Serial port on NAE35/NAE45 models or Serial Port A on NAE55/NIE55 models, edit the attribute values in the Serial Port Cable Config section (Figure 25). Note: Direct connections cannot be made to Serial Port B on NAE55/NIE55 models or to the RS232C B Serial port on NAE35/NAE45 models. To establish an internal modem connection, edit the attribute values in the Internal Modem Config section (Figure 25). Note: You can connect a user-supplied, external serial modem (such as Zoom models 2949 or 3049) to the RS232C B Serial port only on NAE35/NAE45 models that do not have an internal modem. To establish a connection to the external serial modem, you must edit the Internal Modem Config section on the Communications tab. To establish an external modem connection via a USB port, edit the attribute values in the External Modem Config section (Figure 25). (See the Modems and Dial-Out Features section in this document for more information on external modems.) Note: On NAE55 and NIE55 models, the Enabled attribute value is False (in the External Modem Config section) and an external modem cannot be configured in the NAE UI until the external modem is connected to the NAE and the Communication tab is refreshed in the UI. The refresh may take up to 30 seconds, after which the Enabled attribute value is True and the external modem can be configured in the UI.
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3. Click Save.

Creating E-mail Alarm and Event Notifications and Destinations


An NAE can be set up to generate custom alarm and event e-mail messages and send the messages to one or more specified e-mail destinations. Note: In most scenarios, we recommend that you set up the Email DDA and configure the e-mail notifications and the notification-destinations after the NAE is configured with an archive database that includes the user database. To create e-mail messages and specify e-mail destinations for the messages: 1. 2. In the Site Management Portal UI, display the NAE device object, click the Email tab, and then click Edit. (See the top half of the Display panel in Figure 26.) Enter the Shared Configuration values according to Table 12. These fields establish values for attributes that are common to all e-mail alarm notifications generated from this NAE. Refer to Alarm and Event Management in the Metasys system Help for additional information on setting the attribute values for alarm and event notifications. Scroll down to the Destinations section of the Email tab. Click New. The Email Destinations Configuration edit section appears (Figure 26). Figure 26: The NAE Email Configuration - Edit Mode

3. 4.

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5.

Enter the Destination values according to Table 12. (Refer to the Alarm and Events Management section in the Metasys system Help for additional information on setting the attribute values for alarm and event notifications.) Table 12: Shared Attributes for All E-mail Destinations Attribute Description (Value Requirement/Range)
SMTP Server Host SMTP Port Authentication Type Specifies the Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP) server name that handles outgoing e-mail. (Required Value)

Initial Value
Fully qualified host name

Specifies the TCP port that the server uses to deliver e-mail message. 25 (Required Value/1 to 25) Specifies the Authentication Type the NAE uses to log on to the outgoing None e-mail server. Select SMTP, Post Office Protocol (POP) before SMTP, or None. Specifies the user name the NAE uses to log on to the SMTP server that handles outgoing e-mail messages. (Required only if SMTP is selected for Authentication Type.)

SMTP User Name

SMTP Password

Specifies the password the NAE uses to log on to the SMTP server that handles outgoing e-mail messages. (Required only if SMTP is selected for Authentication Type.) Specifies the POP server name for incoming e-mail messages. (Required only if the e-mail server requires POP before SMTP, before it accepts e-mail messages from client. If this field is left blank, POP before SMTP is disabled.) Specifies the POP user name. (Required only if POP Authentication is Maximum 20 required and there is a value specified for POP server host.) characters Specifies the POP Password. (Required only if POP Authentication is Maximum 20 required and there is a value specified for POP server host.) characters Specifies a valid e-mail address that is recognized and exists on the SMTP Server. (Required Value) E-mail address

POP Server Hostname

POP User name POP Password From Email Address Email Diagnostics

Displays diagnostic information regarding the communication between the Email DDA (SMTP Client) and the SMTP Server. This attribute displays both successful and unsuccessful e-mail message deliveries.

Table 13: Attributes for Specific E-mail Destinations and Notifications Attribute Description (Value Requirement/Range)
Label Email Address Priority Subject Retries Enabled Specifies a name for the e-mail destination (for example, John Doe).

Initial Value

Specifies the destination e-mail addresses (for example, john.doe@jci.com). (Required Value) Specifies the e-mail message priority (High, low, or normal). Normal

Contains the body text of the e-mail message. (Maximum of 256 characters.) Specifies the number of attempts at sending the e-mail message. (010 Retries) Enables or disables E-mail Destination. (True, False) 3 True

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Table 13: Attributes for Specific E-mail Destinations and Notifications Attribute Description (Value Requirement/Range)
Filters Format Enables you to specify the rules that filter alarm and event notifications. Each filter has an Item, Operator, and Value. Enables some predefined format characteristics of the notifications that are sent to a destination. Predefined format characteristics include: Notification Priority Notification Message (content) Value Site Name Item Description Item Fully Qualified Reference Item Category Acknowledge Required

Initial Value

Previous Status (Enable a format by selecting the check box next to the format.)

6.

Click New to the right of Destination Email Addresses. The Email Import dialog box appears. Import user names and the associated e-mail addresses from the list of user names for the site. (Refer to the Metasys system Help for more information.) Figure 27: Import Email Addresses Dialog Box

7.

To filter the e-mail messages that are sent to a destination, click New next to the Filters section of the Email Destination Configuration tab. The Add Filter dialog box appears (Figure 28).
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Figure 28: Add Filter Dialog Box

8.

Select the Item, Operator, and Value (from the drop-down lists) for the condition that you want to trigger the e-mail notification. (Refer to Event Message Routing, Filtering, and Destinations in the Metasys system Help for additional information on adding filters.) 9. Click OK. 10. Enable the Format characteristics for e-mail notifications sent to the specified destinations by selecting the check boxes next to the Format characteristic. 11. Add additional e-mail destinations with filters and formats as required. 12. Click Save.

Creating Pager Alarm and Event Notifications and Destinations


You can set up an NAE to generate custom alarm and event pager messages and send the messages to one or more specified pager destinations. Note: In most scenarios, we recommend that you set up the Pager DDA and configure the pager notifications and destinations after an NAE is configured with an archive database that includes the user database. 1. 2. In the Site Management Portal UI, display the NAE device object and click the Pager tab. Click Edit. The Shared Configuration section of Pager Edit tab appears. (See the top half of the Display panel in Figure 29.)

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Figure 29: NAE Pager Configuration Edit Mode

3.

Enter the Shared Configuration values using Table 14 and Table 15 as references. (These fields establish values for attributes that are common to all pager alarm notifications generated from this NAE. Refer to Alarm and Event Management in the Metasys system Help for additional information on setting the attribute values for alarm and event notifications.) Table 14: Shared Attributes for All Pager Destinations Attribute Description (Value Requirement/Range)
Connect Using Access Number Redial Attempts Time Between Redial Attempts Idle Time Before Hanging Up Redial If Line Is Dropped Password Specifies the connection type: Internal Modem, External Modem. Specifies the service or modem phone number that the NAE uses to access phone service. (This is not a pager destination phone number.) Specifies the number of attempts the NAE makes to connect with the destination pager before stopping. Specifies the time-delay interval between subsequent attempts to connect with a destination pager. Specifies the amount of idle time allowed on the connection before disconnecting. Specifies whether to redial if connection with destination pager is broken. Specifies a 6-digit alphanumeric code used as a password. This attribute appears when you select External Modem. Enter a password only if required by the pager company. An empty/blank password is the default value. Displays the diagnostic information regarding communication between the Pager DDA, modem, and customer's paging Service. It displays both successful and unsuccessful attempts to send a page.

Pager Diagnostics

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Table 15: Attributes for Specific Pager Destinations and Notifications Attribute Description (Value Requirement/Range)
Label Pager Phone Number Max Characters Retries Enabled Filters Format Specifies a functional name for the destination pager (for example, John Doe). (Maximum 20 characters) Specifies the complete telephone number of the destination pager. (Maximum 20 characters) Specifies the maximum number of characters allowed (by the service provider) in the text string that is sent to the pager. (This field cannot have a value of zero.) Specifies the number of redial attempts that can be made. Enables or disables the Pager Destination. Enables you to specify the rules that filter alarm and event notifications. Each filter has an Item, Operator, and Value. Enables some predefined format characteristics of the notifications that are sent to a destination. Predefined format characteristics include: Notification Priority Notification Message (content) Value Site Name Item Description Item Fully Qualified Reference Item Category Acknowledge Required

Previous Status (Enable a format by selecting the check box next to the format.)

4.

In the Destination section (Figure 29), click New. The Destinations Configuration edit fields appear (Figure 30).

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Figure 30: NAE Pager Destination Tab - Edit Mode

5.

Note: The Max Characters field defines the length of the text string that is sent to the pager. This field cannot have a value of zero (Figure 30). Enter the appropriate values for the specified pager message destination. Note: These fields establish values for attributes that are specific to the pager destination and message for specified alarm notifications generated from this NAE. Refer to Alarm and Event Management in the Metasys system Help for additional information on setting the attribute values for alarm and event notifications. To filter the conditions that trigger a pager notification, click New next to the filters section of the Pager Destination Configuration tab (Figure 30). The Add Filter dialog box appears (Figure 31). Figure 31: Add Filter Dialog Box

6.

7.

Select the item, operator, and value of the condition that you want to trigger a pager notification. (Refer to Event Message Routing, Filtering, and Destinations in the Metasys System Help for additional information on adding filters.)
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8. 9.

Add additional pager destinations and filters as desired. Click OK.

10. Click Save (Figure 30).

Creating NAE SNMP Alarm Notifications and Destinations


You can set up an NAE to generate and deliver alarm and event messages on a network using SNMP network monitoring. You can typically use SNMP monitoring for large BAS networks with many network devices. Alarm notifications are sent to and stored on an SNMP management computer that monitors all devices on the network. You must set up SNMP monitoring at the network level and an SNMP management device must be assigned on the network. If you are applying a Metasys system to any existing network, consult with the network administrator or IT department that administers the LAN to determine if SNMP monitoring is available on the network. Note: In most scenarios, we recommend that you set up the SNMP DDA and configure the SNMP notifications and the notification destinations after an NAE is configured with an archive database that includes the user database. 1. In the Site Management Portal UI, display the NAE device object and click the SNMP tab. 2. Click Edit. The SNMP Configuration Edit screen appears (Figure 32). Figure 32: NAE SNMP Configuration Tab - Edit Mode

3. In the Shared Configuration section, set SNMP Enabled value to True if your network application uses SNMP monitoring. 4. Type the IP address or host name values of the SNMP Management device (computer). 5. In the Read Only Community and Read/Write Community fields, enter the community string used by the Enterprise/Network Management Systems (E/NMS) to retrieve data from objects maintained by managed devices (Table 16).

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Table 16: Share Attributes for SNMP Destination Attribute Description (Value Requirement/Range)
SNMP Enabled SNMP Trap Version SNMP Management Device Enables or disables SNMP DDA on the NAE. (True, False)

Initial Value
False

Specifies the version of SNMP used on the network on which the NAE SNMP Version 1 resides. (Not required if SNMP Enabled is set to False) Specifies the IP address or host name of the SNMP Management device on the network on which the NAE resides. (Not required if SNMP Enabled is set to False)

SNMP Request Port Contact Person Public Community Name

Specifies the port on the SNMP server where SNMP notifications are 161 sent. (Not required if SNMP Enabled is set to False) Specifies the contact person for the SNMP notifications. (Not required if SNMP Enabled is set to False) Specifies the community name used by the NMS to modify data in objects maintained by managed devices. (Not required if SNMP Enabled is set to False) public

SNMP Trap Message Format Specifies the format used to generate SNMP notifications. Change to String Based MIB Based when SNMP management application uses the Metasys MIB file to translate SNMP notifications. (Not required if SNMP Enabled is set to False)

6. Click New in the Destinations section. The Destination Configuration edit screen appears (Figure 33).

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Figure 33: SNMP Destination Configuration Tab - Edit Mode

7. Enter the Destination information for the SNMP trap (Table 17). Table 17: Attributes for Specific SNMP Notifications Attribute Description (Value Requirement/Range)
Label Trap Community Name IP Address

Initial Value

Specifies a functional name for the destination SNMP server. (Maximum Destination # 20 characters) Specifies the SNMP Community Name used by the Network Management Public System (NMS) group to listen to the traps. (Maximum 20 characters) Specifies the IP Address of the NMS system that receives the trap messages. 0.0.0.0

Destination Port Number Specifies the target port on the SNMP server that listens for trap messages. 162 (Typically Port Number 162)

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Table 17: Attributes for Specific SNMP Notifications Attribute Description (Value Requirement/Range)
Enabled Filters Format Enables or disables the SNMP destination. Enables you to specify the rules that filter alarm and event notifications. Each filter has an item, operator, and value.

Initial Value
True

Allows you to enable some predefined format characteristics of the notifications that are sent to a destination. Predefined format characteristics include: Notification Priority Notification Message (content) Value Site Name Item Description Item Fully Qualified Reference Item Category Acknowledge Required

Previous Status (Enable a format by selecting the check box next to the format.)

8. Click Save when finished.

Setting the Time, Date, Time Zone, and Time Synchronization


How you set the time zone, date, and time on an NAE depends on how the NAE fits into the Metasys site hierarchy. See Appendix: Time Zone, Date, and Time Management for information and detailed procedures on setting time zone, date, and time on an NAE and on a Metasys network.

Setting up the NAE Alarm Parameters


NAEs ship from the factory with several pre-configured default diagnostic alarms that monitor the NAE hardware. You can edit these default alarm settings or create new alarms for the NAE hardware. You can also create new alarms and edit existing alarms for supported field devices on the NAE field trunks.

Editing the Existing Alarm Parameters


1. In the Site Management Portal UI, select and drag the desired NAE object or field device object from the Navigation panel and drop it in the Display panel. The NAE or field device Focus screen opens. 2. Click the Alarm tab. The Alarm Configuration screen opens (Figure 34).

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Figure 34: NAE Alarm Configuration Tab

3. Select items in the Select Item(s) list to edit existing alarms. (To create new alarms, see Creating a New Alarm.) 4. Click Edit. The NAE Alarm edit screen appears (Figure 35).

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Figure 35: NAE Alarms Tab Edit Mode

5. Edit the desired Attributes for the NAE or field device, and click Save to save the edited alarm settings.

Creating a New Alarm


You can create new alarms for the NAE or any of the supported field devices on the field trunks attached to the NAE. 1. Select and drag the desired NAE or field device object from the Navigation panel into the Display panel. The NAE or field device object Focus screen opens. 2. Select the Alarm tab and the devices Alarm screen opens. Click New and the Insert Alarm Wizard opens (Figure 36).

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Figure 36: Insert Alarm Wizard

3. Select the device Attribute for which you want to create an alarm. 4. Follow the Wizard instructions and create or edit the values for the Attribute for which you want to create an alarm. 5. Click Save when you have finished creating the desired alarm parameters for the device Attribute.

Designating an NAE as the Site Director


All NAEs ship from the factory with a Site object and therefore are Site Directors by default. To designate the Site Director on a new site, you must demote all the NAEs on the site that are not designated as the Site Director. You must reset an NAE when it is demoted. In many Metasys network site commissioning and configuration scenarios, the Site Director status of the NAEs on the site is built into the archive database for the site. The status of these devices is established on the NAEs when the archive database is downloaded from the SCT to the site devices. The SCT database download overwrites the existing values in the NAEs. Note: If an ADS/ADX is on a site, an NAE cannot be the Site Director. If an NAE55 is the Site Director, it can supervise up to four additional supervisory devices on the site (NAE35s, NAE45s, NCE25, or NAE55s only). If an NAE45 is the Site Director, it can supervise up to two additional supervisory devices on the site (NAE35s, NAE45s, or NCE25s only). If an NAE35 is the Site Director, it can supervise up to two additional NAE35s or NCE25s on the site. NCE25s cannot supervise other network engines and should only be designated as the Site Director in stand-alone applications. Designating an NAE as Site Director is typically done offline in the SCT but can be done online in the NAE UI. The procedure in this section describes how to designate an NAE as the Site Director online in the NAE UI. To do so with the SCT, go to the Changing the Site Director with the SCT section. Note: If you do the site promotion/demotion online, you may lose any navigation trees built for the site. If User Views (navigation trees) have already been built, upload them to the SCT, establish the Site Director, and then download the navigation trees back to the source devices. The Site Director and NAE Computer Name values in the NAE UI must match the values in the SCT archive database. To designate an NAE as a Site Director:
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1. Select on the Navigation panel the NAE that you wish to demote from Site Director. 2. Drag the NAE into the Display panel to open the Focus tab. 3. Select the Advanced option. 4. Click Edit. The NAE Focus edit screen appears (Figure 37). 5. Scroll down to the Site attributes and select the Local Site Director field. Figure 37: Designating the Site Director

6. Type the host name or IP address of the NAE or ADS/ADX that you want to designate as the local Site Director. 7. Click Save. A confirmation message box appears (Figure 38). Figure 38: Confirmation for Demoting Site Director

8. If you wish to proceed, click OK to this confirmation message; otherwise, click Cancel. If you click OK, the NAE logs you off and resets. Note: To see the Site Director changes just made, wait several minutes for the NAE to reset, then log on again. The navigation tree shows the NAE is no longer the Site Director.
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Changing the Site Director with the SCT


Note: If you have already changed the Site Director and downloaded the site, go to Moving the Security Database and Clearing It from the Demoted Site Director. 1. Start the SCT, open the archive database for the site, and choose the new Site Director in the Site object. 2. Download the database so that every device recognizes the new Site Director.

Removing User Accounts from a Demoted Site Director


If you demote a supervisory controller or ADS/ADX from a Site Director to a child device on the site, all user accounts that you added to the device while it was a Site Director remain in the security database. If you determine that user accounts on the demoted site should be removed after the demotion has occurred, use the SCT to perform the following steps to prepare a clean security database with all user-defined accounts deleted. You can then download this clean database to the demoted device.

Moving the Security Database and Clearing It from the Demoted Site Director
1. Create a backup of the Security database of the demoted device, but only if you are using the same set of users on the new or existing Site Director. 2. Create a backup of the Security database from one of the devices (NAE/NIE/ADS/ADX) on the site that has never been a Site Director and has never had a Site Directors Security database restored to it (in other words, has a clean Security database with only the default user accounts). 3. Restore the clean copy of the Security database that you created in Step 2 to the device that was demoted from the Site Director. 4. If you are using the Security database of the demoted device on the new Site Director, restore the Security database that you backed up in Step 1 to the new or existing Site Director. 5. Create a backup of the Security database from the device that was demoted and restored with a clean database in Step 3. This step ensures that the device Security database in the SCT matches the clean Security you restored to the device in Step 3.

Establishing a Dial-up Connection to an NAE


A dial-up connection configuration is typical for a single NAE at a remote location that does not have an Ethernet connection to a LAN. The NAE you are dialing out to and the NAE modem must be configured properly for dial-up connections. See the Modems and Dial-Out Features section for additional information on setting up an NAE and modem for dial-up. Note: Do not use a dial-up connection for the initial setup of an NAE. Use a direct connection or stable network connection to commission a new NAE. The initial default baud rate for dial-up connections is 115,200 baud. You can use the Launcher application for dial-up connections. Launcher removes the dependency on the public Java Runtime Engine (JRE) for the Site Management Portal (SMP) user interface at Release 6.0 (or later) by placing a private edition of the JRE on the client computer. Refer to the Launcher Installation Instructions (LIT-12011783) and the Launcher Help (LIT-12011742) for information on installing and using the Launcher tool. To connect to an NAE through a dial-up connection: 1. Start the computer and initiate a dial-up connection to the NAE. 2. Open the Launcher application. 3. Select the NAE from the SMP profile list of the Launcher, and click Launch.

Configuring an NAE to Dial Out to an ADS/ADX


An NAE can be configured to dial out through a modem to an ADS/ADX (on a different site) to deliver trend data, alarms, and other information to the ADS/ADX for storage and analysis.

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You can use a direct connection from a computer to an NAE to configure the NAE and modem for dial-out. You can also connect the computer to the NAE with an Ethernet crossover cable to configure the NAE and modem. Note: The dial-out capability is intended for small networks with a single NAE or only a few NAEs. Each NAE requires its own modem and phone line connection to dial out to an ADS/ADX. NAEs without a modem cannot dial out to an ADS/ADX through the Site Directors modem. 1. 2. In the Site Management Portal UI, display the NAE device object. On the View menu, click Selected Item; the NAE Focus window appears in the Display panel. Select the Advanced option and then click Edit. The NAE Focus edit screen appears. Scroll down to the Site attributes. Figure 39: Configuring NAE to Dial Out to an ADS/ADX - Focus Tab

3. 4.

5. 6. 7.

Make sure that the ADS/ADX Connection Type value is Dial (Figure 39). Verify that the ADS/ADX Repository attribute is the first IP address in the range specified when configuring the ADS/ADX to accept incoming connections. (Refer to the Configuring an ADS/ADX to Accept Dial-Up Connections section of the ADS/ADX Commissioning Guide [LIT-1201645] for more information.) Edit the other ADS/ADX attributes as needed. Click Save. Select the Network tab and click Edit. The Network edit screen appears. Scroll down to the ADS/ADX Dial-up section (Figure 40).

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Figure 40: Configuring ADS/ADX Dial-up on the NAE - Network Tab

8. 9.

In the Connect Using drop-down box, select Internal modem or External modem. Type in the Access Number value, which is the complete telephone number of the ADS/ADX or the Internet Service Provider (ISP) to which the NAE is dialing. 10. Verify that the ADS/ADX Dial-up ISP Username and ISP Password values match either the account (user name and password) selected for incoming messages to the ADS/ADX or the user name and password assigned by the ISP. Note: The user name and password values need not match the Metasys system account values because these values are used for establishing dial-up connections only. 11. Click Save.

Printing Information from the NAE Site Management Portal UI


The NAE allows printing of the information displayed in the panels of the Site Management Portal UI. The information must be selected before it can be printed. 1. Select an NAE object in the Navigation panel and drag it to the Display panel of the Site Management Portal UI. The Focus tab for the selected NAE appears in the Display panel. Note: You can preview the print output by selecting Print Preview. 2. Select the Item > Print menu option. 3. Select from the available printers and click OK.

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Replacing an NAE
To replace an NAE on a network site, update the site registration to ensure that devices on the site communicate with the new (replacement) NAE; otherwise, devices may attempt to communicate with the NAE that was removed from the site. If you do not remove an NAE from a site correctly, the Site Director may attempt to send messages to the old NAE, creating unnecessary network traffic. If the NAEs trend data is stored in an ADS repository, forward the data prior to beginning the upgrade following these steps for each engine: 1. Select a supervisory engine in the Navigation tree. 2. Select Action > Commands. A list of available commands appears. 3. Select Archive, then click Send. The archived trend data is sent to the ADS/ADX. To replace an NAE: 1. Using the SCT, upload the current copy of the NAE database, so that it can be downloaded to the new NAE later. 2. Disconnect the old NAE from the network. 3. Once the old NAE device is offline, go to the Site Director UI and select the old NAE in the All Items navigation tree. 4. Right-click the NAE and select Remove from Site from the pop-up menu. This removes the old NAE from the site registration table. 5. Connect the new NAE to the network, and power on the new NAE. Download the old NAE archive database to the new NAE. The new NAE is operational on the network. Note: When the new NAE comes online, it registers itself with the Site Director.

Troubleshooting
This section describes some of the most common problems encountered when setting up and operating NAEs. Use the general solution guidelines and procedure references in this section to avoid or resolve these problems. Table 18 provides a list of common NAE problems and their solutions. This section is not a troubleshooting guide for Metasys system networks, customer LANs, BAS networks, or the field devices connected to the NAE. Troubleshooting field devices is covered in the field device documentation. Refer to the appropriate field device documentation for additional information. Note: To effectively troubleshoot an NAE, it may be necessary to isolate the NAE from the Ethernet network and the associated field trunks and field devices, and then direct connect to the NAE with a computer to browse the Site Management Portal UI.

Common NAE Problems


See the following sections and Table 18 when you encounter a problem with an NAE.

Corrupted NAE Memory


Corruption of nonvolatile NAE flash memory may render an NAE inoperable. Corrupted flash memory may occur for a variety of reasons and is one of the most common NAE problems encountered when commissioning, configuring, updating, and operating the NAE. A typical recovery procedure from corrupted NAE flash memory includes reloading the NAE disk image and downloading the NAE archive database with a compatible version of the SCT. Refer to the NAE/NIE Update Tool Technical Bulletin (LIT-12011524 ) for information on installing the NAE disk image. Refer to the SCT Technical Bulletin (LIT-1201534) for information on upgrading NAE archive databases.

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NAE Disk Image Update and Archive Download Related Problems One of the most common causes of corrupted NAE flash memory is interrupting an NAE disk image update or archive download that is in progress. To avoid memory corruption and data loss, follow the procedure for disk image updates and archive downloads carefully, and allow the NAE to complete the update and download without interruption. Another common cause of update and upgrade related problems is version incompatibility of the SCT software, NAE software, and the NAE archive databases. When you update the NAE disk image, you must update the NAE archive database to match the new software version. The SCT application used to configure a Metasys network or NAE must also be the same software version as the NAE software. Refer to the NAE/NIE Update Tool Technical Bulletin (LIT-12011524) and see the Related Documentation section of this document for additional information on disk image updates and archive upgrades and downloads. Data Protection Battery Related Problems Improper shipping, handling, installing, charging, or disconnecting of the NAE data protection battery may also result in flash memory corruption and data loss. To avoid problems related to the data protection battery, refer to the Setup and Adjustment sections in the NAE35/NAE45 Installation Instructions (Part No. 24-10050-6), the NCE25 Installation Instructions (Part No. 24-10143-63), and the NAE55/NIE55 Installation Instructions (Part No. 24-10051-43) for proper procedures for connecting, charging, and disconnecting the data protection battery before connecting supply power to the NAE.

Logon Problems
Logon problems may occur when the user name or password are incorrectly entered at logon. If the default user name and password fail, these initial values may have been changed by an administrator-level user. You need the designated user name and password to log on to an NAE.

Network Connection Related Problems


Many network connection/communication problems result from incorrect device names, IP addresses, and other attribute value errors entered into the Site Management Portal UI or incorrect values entered into the UI of the associated network devices. If the NAE attribute values do not match the respective values entered in the devices connected to the NAE, the NAE and associated devices may not establish network connections or communications. Check for proper device names, IP addresses, gateway, subnet masks, ports, baud rates, and other network parameters in the Site Management Portal UI. Also check the appropriate servers, other computers, and field devices connected to the NAE, and ensure that the attribute values are correct for each computer or device. See Determining the NAE IP Address and Device Name for a LAN Connection, Determining the NAE IP Address and Device Name through a Serial Port Monitor, and Verifying Ethernet/IP Network Communications (Ping).

NAE Reset Related Problems


Certain setting changes, initiated in the Site Management Portal UI, do not take effect until the NAE is reset. Reset the NAE whenever prompted to, and allow the NAE to complete the reset sequence. See Reset Device Command.

Troubleshooting Guide
Table 18 provides information for troubleshooting an NAE.

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Table 18: Troubleshooting the NAE Problem

Solution

NAE does not operate when powered on Corrupted flash memory or data loss are the most common causes of this problem. (and POWER LED is on). To resolve this problem: 1. Ensure that the data protection battery is connected and charged. (Refer to Installation Instructions for more information on handling, installing, and charging the data protection battery.) 2. Ensure that the database does not exceed the NAE flash memory capacity. 3. Reload the disk image and download the archive database to the NAE while the NAE is disconnected from the network. NAE does not operate after updating the Corrupted flash memory or data loss are the most common causes of this problem. disk image, downloading an archive To resolve this problem: database, or installing a patch. 1. Ensure that database does not exceed the NAE flash memory capacity. 2. Reload the disk image and download the archive database to the NAE while the NAE is disconnected from the network. NAE does not communicate with any other Check to make sure that 24 VAC power is connected correctly and that the 24 device. VAC and POWER LEDs are on. Check to make sure that communication terminal blocks and other communication connectors are firmly in place. Check that the wiring is the correct size (18 AWG minimum for power, 18 AWG for N2 Bus, 26 AWG for Ethernet communication). Check that you have set the correct baud rate on each connected device. Check the integrity of the wires and cables. Check that N2 End-of-Line (EOL) switches are correct. Refer to the Setting Terminations section of the N2 Communications Bus Technical Bulletin (LIT-636018) for details on N2 EOL terminations. No N2 Communication Check that the N2 wires are connected properly and are not loose in the termination block. Check that the N2 LEDs indicate communication. Check that the N2 EOL switches are correctly set. Refer to the Setting Terminations section of the N2 Communications Bus Technical Bulletin (LIT-636018) for details on N2 terminations. Check the entire N2 Bus. Refer to the N2 Communications Bus Technical Bulletin (LIT-636018). No LONWORKS Communication Check that the LONWORKS network wires are connected properly and are not loose in the termination block. Connect the Metasys system Connectivity to LONWORKS network Tool, the COM.PRO Tool, or a third-party LONWORKS network configuration tool to the LONWORKS network. Verify that it is possible to communicate with the devices on the network including the NAE. If communication is good, verify that the NAE database has been generated correctly and that the LONWORKS enabled device data corresponds to the devices installed. If the NAE does not respond, verify that the NAE has been correctly installed in the LONWORKS network database and that the network configuration image has been sent to the NAE. If the NAE cannot be installed, replace the NAE. Refer to the LONWORKS Network Integration with NAE and LCS Technical Bulletin (LIT-1201668) for NAE database generation information. Check the entire LONWORKS network. Refer to the LONMARK Guidelines - Physical Layer for details (http://www.lonmark.org).

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Table 18: Troubleshooting the NAE Problem


No Ethernet Communication

Solution
Verify that you are using a patch cable for a hub or switch and a crossover cable for a single computer connection. Check the port and cable integrity. Make sure either the 10/Link, 100/Link, or 100/1000 Link LED is green or yellow (indicating an established Ethernet connection [1000 Mbps Ethernet connection is yellow]). Check that the hub or switch into which the LAN connector is plugged works and is connected correctly.

No Modem Communication

Check the port connector and cable for integrity and make sure you have the right driver installed and configured if you are using an external modem. Three modem drivers are pre-installed on the NAE: U.S. Robotics USR5637 modem, 56K, external USB modem (requires 4.1.5 image or later) Zoom Telephonics 2985 modem driver Multi-Tech Systems MT5634ZBA-USB modem driver

Refer to the N1 Migration with the NIE Technical Bulletin (LIT-1201535). USR 5637 modem connects, but garbled To correct this issue, manually set the serial port settings. Check with your paging characters appear and eventually service provider to verify the correct number of bits and parity. In this example, communication drops. the Nortel service uses 7 data bits and even parity. To enter the serial port settings: 1. From the NAE Communications tab, click Edit. 2. In the External Modem Config section, set the Extra Initialization Commands to S13=7S19=2, where S13 = the number of data bits (S13=7)S19 = the required parity: 0=no parity, 1=odd parity, 2=even parity (S19=2) 3. Reset the NAE. NAE does not dial in or dial out. Check that you have the right modem configuration string and dialing parameters. Refer to the N1 Migration with the NIE Technical Bulletin (LIT-1201535), or the Metasys System Extended Architecture Direct Connection and Dial-Up Connection Application Note (LIT-1201639). Check that the modem is set to the correct baud rate. Refer to the N1 Migration with the NIE Technical Bulletin (LIT-1201535). Check that the phone line is plugged into the modem port and is active. To check the phone line, disconnect the NAE modem and use an analog phone to check that the line is active. Check that the modem is set up properly for the application in use. For example, a pager DDA must use a dedicated modem and the Allow Incoming Connections attribute for this modem must be set to False. Additionally, the MRA feature and ADS/ADX audit forwarding should not be configured to use the same modem as the pager. For more details, see Modems and Dial-Out Features. NAE loses data. Check to make sure the battery is installed and that the BATT FAULT LED is not lit. Replace, if necessary, with appropriate replacement battery. Do not unnecessarily press the system RE-BOOT switch. NAE runs slowly. The amount of data you are trying to process is too much for the NAE to handle. A value of 50% or less for the CPU Usage attribute of the NAE is considered OK, although other performance indicators should also be assessed. Refer to the NAE Object and the Diagnostics topics in the Metasys system Help system for more information. Reduce the size of the database.

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Table 18: Troubleshooting the NAE Problem


NAE is generating high CPU alarms.

Solution
Programming objects (LCT, Signal Select, Global Data) referencing analog objects with small COV values (0.5%) are the most common cause. To determine the source of the high CPU usage, follow these steps: 1. Add a Trend extension to the Last Idle Sample of the NAE. This attribute is the inverted instantaneous CPU Usage. For example, if this number is low (5%), then the CPU usage is high (95%). The CPU usage is an average over 15-30 minute period. 2. Locate programming objects (Control System objects [LCT] or Signal Select) that reference objects with small COV Increments and disable them one at a time. Monitor the Last Idle Sample value after disabling the object. Within 30 seconds, the Last Idle Sample should significantly increase if that object was a contributing factor to the high CPU usage. 3. When the problem object is determined, then either manually or with Mass Edit Live, update the COV increment to a larger value before re-enabling the programming object.

All communication is disrupted.

Check for possible external interference. To reduce Radio Frequency (RF) interference, do not use cell phones or handheld transceivers within 3 meters (10 feet) of the NAE. Check that the power transformer secondary is not shared with another load.

NAE overheats.

When the internal temperature reaches the high limit, the NAE issues an alarm and lights the GENL FAULT LED, allowing you a chance to intervene before heat-related damage results. Check that the unit has been installed according to the installation instructions and that the mounting orientation is correct. Make sure cables are not blocking the ventilation of the unit. Clean out the dust in the unit with canned air (pressurized air used to clean computers and other sensitive devices).

Internal modem no longer functions. Unit has been damaged or all external causes of failure have been checked.

Use the USB port and connect an external modem or replace unit. (See the modem literature for more information on using external modems with the NAE.) Replace the NAE.

NAE Diagnostic Tools


The NAE hardware and UI provide tools for diagnosing and troubleshooting hardware and software problems with the NAE. The primary NAE diagnostic tools include: the NAE Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Status Indicators the Diagnostic Tab the Summary Tab a serial point monitor (See Determining the NAE IP Address and Device Name through a Serial Port Monitor.)

Other tools are also available, such as the SNMP Trap Browser and the (ping) command for determining the NAE IP address and ability to communicate on the TCP/IP network. See Determining the NAE IP Address and Device Name for a LAN Connection and Troubleshooting Procedures for information on using the Trap Browser and the ping command.

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NAE Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Status Indicators


Figure 41, Figure 42, and Figure 43 show the location and designation of the NAE35, NAE45, NAE55, and NIE55 LEDs that indicate the status of the engines. Some models do not have all the LEDs shown in these figures. Table 19 describes their Normal Status and Function. See Figure 44 and refer to the NCE25 Installation Instructions (Part No. 24-10143-63) for information on the NCE25 LED status indicators. Figure 41: NAE35/NAE45 LED Status Indicators

Figure 42: NAE55 LED Status Indicators

Figure 43: NIE55 LED Status Indicators

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Figure 44: NCE25 LED Status Indicators

Table 19: NAE LED Status Indicators LED Label NAE Series Normal (Color) Status
POWER (Green) ETHERNET (Green) NAE35/45 NAE55 NIE55 NCE25 NAE35/45 NAE55 NIE55 NCE25 On Steady Flicker

Descriptions/Other Conditions
On Steady = Unit is getting power from either the battery or 24 VAC power. Also see the 24 VAC LED. Off Steady = Unit is shut down. Flicker = Data is transferring on the Ethernet connection. Ethernet traffic is general traffic (may not be for the NAE). Off Steady = No Ethernet traffic, probably indicates a dead Ethernet network or bad Ethernet connection.

10/LINK (Green) 100/LINK (Green) 100/1000 Link (Green/Yellow)

NAE35/45 NAE55 NIE55 NCE25 NAE35/45 NCE25 NAE55 NIE55

On Steady On Steady On Steady

On Steady = Ethernet connection is established at 10 Mb/s. On Steady = Ethernet connection is established at 100 Mb/s On Steady (Green) = Ethernet connection is established at 100 Mb/s. On Steady (Yellow) = Ethernet connection is established at 1,000 Mb/s

FCA (Green)

NAE55

Flicker

On Steady = Controllers are defined to FC A (Trunk 1) in the NAE55, but none are communicating. (NAE55 transmitting only) Flicker = Normal communications; FCA port is transmitting and receiving data. Flickers are generally in sync with data transmission but should not be used to indicate specific transmission times. Off Steady = No controllers are defined to FC A (FC Bus 1 or N2 Trunk 1) in the NAE55.

FCB (Green)

NAE55

Flicker

On Steady = Controllers are defined to FCB (Trunk 2) in the NAE55, but none are communicating. (NAE55 transmitting only) Flicker = Normal communications; FC B port is transmitting and receiving data. Flickers are generally in sync with data transmission but should not be used to indicate specific transmission times. Off Steady = No controllers are defined to F B (FC Bus 2 or N2 Trunk 2) in the NAE55.

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Table 19: NAE LED Status Indicators LED Label NAE Series Normal (Color) Status
FC BUS or LON
1

Descriptions/Other Conditions
Flicker = N2 controllers are defined to FC BUS in the NAE35/45, but none are communicating. (NAE35/45 transmitting only) Fast Flicker (may appear Steady on) = Normal communications; FC BUS port is transmitting and receiving data. Flickers are generally in sync with data transmission but do not indicate specific transmission times. Off Steady = No field controllers are defined to FC BUS in the NAE35/45.

NAE35/45 NCE25

SA BUS (Green)

NCE25

Blinking

Blinking - 5 Hz = Data Transmission (normal communication) Off Steady = No Data Transmission On Steady = Communication lost, waiting to join communication ring Flicker = Data traffic between NAE devices. For an NAE that is not a Site Director, this LED indicates regular heartbeat communications with the Site Director. For a Site Director NAE, flashes are more frequent and indicate heartbeat communications from all other NAE devices on the site. For a single NAE on a network without an ADS/ADX, there is no flicker. On Steady = NAE software is running. On 1 second, Off 1 second = NAE software is in startup mode. On 0.5 seconds, Off 0.5 seconds = NAE software is shutting down. Off Steady = Operating system is shutting down or software is not running.

PEER COMM (Green)

NAE35/45 NAE55 NIE55 NCE25

Varies (see next column)

RUN (Green)

NAE35/45 NAE55 NIE55 NCE25

On Steady

24 VAC (Green)

NAE55 NIE55

On Steady

On Steady = 24 VAC power present Off Steady = Loss of 24 VAC power. In the Off Steady condition, the NAE may be running on battery power. Also see the POWER LED.

MODEM RX

NAE35/45 NCE25 NAE35/45 NCE25

Flicker Flicker Off Steady

Flicker indicates modem is connected and receiving data. Flicker indicates modem is connected and transmitting data. On Steady = Battery fault. Replace the battery. Battery not connected or cannot be charged. The BATT FAULT LED may remain On for up to 24 hours after initially powering on the NAE55. If the BATT FAULT LED remains on longer than 48 hours after initially powering on the NAE55, check the battery connection or replace the battery. On Steady = General Fault. Fault conditions are user configured in software. Pre-configured fault conditions include excessive CPU use, flash or memory use, excessive CPU or Printed Wire Board (PWB) temperature, or battery fault. In normal operation, the GENL FAULT LED stays on steady for the first half of the startup sequence. Note: On NAE35/45 and NCE25 models the GENL FAULT LED label designation is FAULT.

MODEM TX1

BATT FAULT (Red) NAE35/45 NAE55 NIE55 NCE25

GENL FAULTorFAULT (Red)

NAE35/45 NAE55 NIE55 NCE25

Off Steady

1 LED labeled FC BUS on models that support MS/TP Bus or N2 Bus and labeled LON on models that support LONWORKS network. 2 Modem LEDs are only on NCE25 models with internal modems.

NAE35/NAE45 LED Startup Sequence


During startup, the NAE35/NAE45 automatically initiates an LED test to verify the operational status of the LEDs. Immediately after connecting supply power, the following LED lighting sequence occurs:
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1. The POWER, FAULT, RUN, and PEER COM LEDs turn on, indicating that the Operating System (OS) is starting up. (After 2 seconds, the LEDs may change states depending on site-specific network activity.) 2. The PEER COM and FAULT LEDs shut off. The RUN LED flashes to indicate that the NAE35/NAE45 software is loading. 3. The LEDs display the operational status of the NAE35/NAE45. When the RUN LED goes on steady, startup is complete and the NAE35/NAE45 is operational. The total time to start up the NAE35/NAE45 depends on the size of the database and may take several minutes.

NAE55/NIE55 LED Startup Sequence


During startup, the NAE55/NIE55 automatically initiates an LED test to verify the operational status of the LEDs. Immediately after connecting supply power, the following LED lighting sequence occurs: 1. The POWER, PEER COM, RUN, and GENL FAULT LEDs turn on, indicating that the OS is starting up. For the NAE55, the N2A and N2B LEDs also turn on. 2. The FCA, FCB, PEER COM, and GENL FAULT LEDs shut off. The RUN LED flashes to indicate that the NAE55/NIE55 software is loading. 3. The LEDs display the operational status of the NAE55/NIE55. When the RUN LED goes on steady, the application is running and the NAE55/NIE55 is ready. The total time to start up the NAE55/NIE55 depends on the size of the database and may take up to 15 minutes. Note: The NIE55 does not have FCA and FCB LEDs.

NCE25 LED Startup Sequence


During startup, the NCE25 automatically initiates an LED test to verify the operational status of the LEDs. Immediately after connecting supply power, the following LED lighting sequence occurs: 1. The POWER, BATT FAULT, 10 LINK, FAULT, RUN, and PEER COM LEDs turn on, indicating that the OS is starting up. (After 2 seconds, the LEDs may change states depending on site-specific network activity.) 2. The BATT FAULT, PEER COM, and FAULT LEDs shut off. The RUN LED flashes to indicate that the NCE software is loading. 3. The LEDs display the operational status of the NCE. When the RUN LED goes on steady, startup is complete and the NCE is operational. The total time to start up the NCE25 depends on the size of the database and can take several minutes.

Diagnostic Tab
The Diagnostic tab displays NAE hardware status information that may aid troubleshooting. With the NAE object selected, click the Diagnostic tab to view current information about the NAE hardware status (Figure 45).

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Figure 45: NAE Diagnostic Tab

You can also select, drag, and drop Network Protocol objects into the Display panel and click the Diagnostic tab to view information for the selected Network protocol (Figure 46).

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Figure 46: BACnet Protocol Diagnostic Tab

Summary Tab
The Summary tab (Figure 47) in the Site Management Portal UI provides a quick view of the status of the objects and items currently in your site. Select, drag, and drop an object from the Navigation panel in the Display panel, and click the Summary tab. When you first click the Summary tab, the NAE requests the status of the items in the Display panel (Figure 47). This request may take a few minutes. For additional information and explanations of the attributes found in the Summary and Diagnostic tabs, refer to the Object Help in the Metasys system Help.

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Figure 47: NAE Summary Tab

Troubleshooting Procedures
Verifying Ethernet/IP Network Communications (Ping)
You can use the ping command to verify that computers on the Ethernet/IP network can communicate with other computers on the network. To use the ping command, you must have a computer configured to use the TCP/IP protocol and at least one other computer connected to the network. To verify the computers can communicate on the network using the ping command: 1. Go to Start > Run. 2. Type cmd, then click OK to display the Command prompt. 3. Type the ping command. Use the format ping xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx, where xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx is the IP address or domain name of the computer you want to ping. (For example: ping 198.81.196.2, www.jci.com, or NAE008066050FFC.) 4. Press Enter. If you get a reply, the computers are communicating on the network. If you do not get a reply, try pinging your own computer address. If you can ping your own address but not any other addresses, the problem is with the network. Check the Link light on the network card. If you cannot get a reply from your own address, the problem is probably with the network card in your computer or with the TCP/IP properties. Check the network card in your computer, and verify the TCP/IP properties.

Pre-boot Execution Environment (PXE)


The NAE implements a PXE client. If your network uses a PXE server, exclude the NAE MAC address from the PXE server. If you do not exclude the NAE MAC address, the NAE may not start properly. Note: Consult with the system administrator or IT department to determine if the network has a PXE server.

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Determining the NAE IP Address and Device Name for a LAN Connection
The IP Address determined by this procedure is the IP Address used on a LAN connection, not serial or dial connections.

Determining the NAE IP Address By Using the NCT


You can use the Network Engine (NxE) Information and Configuration Tool (NCT) to discover the NAE. To determine the IP address of an NxE by using the NCT to discover the device, start the NCT, click Discover, and look for the NxE in the Discovered Devices list. For more information, refer to the NxE Information and Configuration Tool Technical Bulletin (LIT-1201990). Note: The NxEs must be connected to the same subnet as the NCT computer for the NCT to detect them. NCE25, NAE35, and NAE45 engines must be at Release 3.0 or later to respond to the NCT discovery request. NxE55 engines must be at Release 4.1.11 or later to respond to the NCT discovery request.

Determining the NAE IP Address and Device Name through a Serial Port Monitor
When an NAE35, NAE45, NAE55, NIE55, or NCE25 is powered on, it sends a text string to its serial port that contains helpful information, such as its current IP address and device name. For the NAE35 or NAE45, this data stream is sent to the RS232C A Serial Port. For the NAE55 or NIE55, this data stream is sent to Serial Port B; for the NCE25, the data is sent to the RS232C port. Table 20 and Table 21 provide examples of the data that is sent. Table 20: Example NAE35, NAE45, and NCE25 Startup Data Stream Device Information Example Output
Host Name DHCP Enabled IP Address Subnet Mask Default Gateway DHCP Server MAC Address Neuron ID Model Number RAM Memory NAND Memory OS Type COM1 Internal Modem USB Modem Battery Status NAE-1 Yes 159.222.8.206 255.255.252.0 159.222.8.2 159.222.8.9 00-80-66-05-0F-FC 00-00-00-00-00-00 MS-NAE4511-1 108 Mb 101 Mb Windows CE 115200, 8, 1 115200, 8, 1 115200, 8, 1 Good

Table 21: Example NAE55/NIE55 Startup Data Stream Device Information Example Output
Host Name DHCP Enabled IP Address Subnet Mask Default Gateway DHCP Server MAC Address NAE-1 Yes 159.222.8.206 255.255.252.0 159.222.8.2 159.222.8.9 00-80-66-05-0F-FC

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Table 21: Example NAE55/NIE55 Startup Data Stream Device Information Example Output
Neuron ID Model Name 00-06-10-25-03-00 MS-NAE5501

Note: The IP address and device name are internal to the NAE and change if the NAE is attached to a network using DHCP, unless the DHCP server is configured to assign a static IP address. Also, if an NAE is connected to a network and has an IP address and is then disconnected from the network, a VT100 terminal emulator sees zeros as the IP address until the NAE is restarted. To determine the NAE IP address and device name through a serial port monitor, a VT100 terminal emulator program must be installed on the computer connecting to the device. Windows XP includes the terminal emulator program HyperTerminal, but Windows 7 does not include one. Check with your local IT department (or technical support team) for a recommended VT100 terminal emulator program to use with Windows 7. To determine the NAE IP address and device name through a serial port monitor on a computer running Windows XP: 1. Connect a VT100 terminal or a computer with a VT100 terminal emulator to the RS232C A serial port on an NAE35/NAE45, the RS232C serial port on an NCE25, or the serial port B on an NAE55/NIE55 using a null modem cable. 2. Enter the values in Table 22 to configure the VT100 terminal emulator. Note: The values for the RS232C A serial port on an NAE35/NAE45, the RS232C serial port on an NCE25, or serial port B on an NAE55/NIE55 cannot be changed using the Site Management Portal UI. Table 22: VT100 Terminal Emulator Settings Setting Values for NAE35, NAE45, or NCE25
Data Bits Parity Stop Bits Baud Rate Flow Control 8 No 1 115200 None

Values for NAE55/NIE55


8 No 1 9600 baud Hardware flow control

3. 4. 5. 6.

Note: If using a VT100 terminal emulator, set the emulation setting to VT100. Disconnect power to the NAE and wait until it completes its shutdown sequence. Connect the NAE to the LAN if using DHCP so the DHCP server can assign the IP address. Reconnect power to the NAE. A few minutes after the NAE powers up, its IP address is sent to the serial port. Note the IP address and device name listed in the resulting text file on your VT100 emulator.

Notes on Setting a Computer to Use APIPA


If you are configuring an NAE for use on an Ethernet LAN without DHCP or DNS support, you need to change the computers IP address and subnet mask to be compatible with Automatic Private Internet Protocol Addressing (APIPA). If you are not familiar with these settings, see the Windows operating systems Help or talk to the customers Network Administrator. If you are familiar with these procedures, the following notes describe how to set your computer to use APIPA (in Microsoft Windows XP operating systems) or how to set your IP address to be compatible with APIPA for other Windows operating systems. The easiest method to change the computers IP address and subnet mask to be compatible with APIPA is to enable APIPA on the computer (if supported). The Windows XP operating system supports APIPA. To enable APIPA on a computer with a Windows XP OS: 1. View the local area connection properties of the active network connection as follows: a. Go to Start > Settings > Network Connections.
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b. Right-click the icon for the active network connection and select Properties. The Local Area Connection Properties screen appears. 2. Select the Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) item and click Properties. 3. Under the General tab, select Obtain an IP Address Automatically. 4. Under the Alternate Configuration tab, select Automatic Private IP address.

For Versions of Windows OS That Do Not Support APIPA


1. View the local area connection properties of the active network connection as follows: a. Go to Start > Settings > Network Connections. b. Right-click the icon for the active network connection and select Properties. The Local Area Connection Properties screen appears. 2. Select the Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) item and click Properties. 3. Select the Use the following IP Address option. 4. Enter a static IP address between 169.254.0.1 and 169.254.255.254 and a subnet mask of 255.255.0.0. 5. Verify the chosen static IP address is not in use by pinging the proposed IP address. If you receive no reply, the IP address is not in use.

Technical Specifications
Table 23: NAE35, NAE45, NAE45-Lite Models
Power Requirement Power Consumption Ambient Operating Conditions Dedicated nominal 24 VAC, Class 2 power supply (North America), Safety Extra-Low Voltage (SELV) power supply (Europe), at 50/60 Hz (20 VAC minimum to 30 VAC maximum) 25 VA maximum 0 to 50C (32 to 122F); 10 to 90% RH, 30C (86F) maximum dew point

Ambient Storage Conditions -40 to 70C (-40 to 158F); 5 to 95% RH, 30C (86F) maximum dew point Data Protection Battery Processor Memory Supports data protection on power failure. Rechargeable NiMH battery: 3.6 VDC 500 mAh, with a typical life of 5 to 7 years at 21C (70F); Product Code Number: MS-BAT1020-0 192 MHz Renesas SH4 7760 RISC processor 128 MB Flash nonvolatile memory for operating system, configuration data, and operations data storage and backup 128 MB Synchronous Dynamic Random Access Memory (DRAM) for operations data dynamic memory Operating System Microsoft Windows CE embedded

Network and Serial Interfaces One Ethernet port; 10/100 Mbps; 8-pin RJ-45 connector One optically isolated RS-485 port; 9600, 19.2k, 38.4k, or 76.8k baud (depending on protocol); with a pluggable and keyed 4-position terminal block (FC Bus available on NAE351x-1 and NAE451x-1 models only) One LONWORKS port; FTT10 78 Kbps; pluggable, keyed 3-position terminal block (LONWORKS port available on NAE352x-x and NAE452x models only) One RS-232-C serial port with standard 9-pin sub-D connector that supports standard baud rates There is a second serial port on models without an internal modem that supports an optional, user-supplied external modem. One USB serial port with standard USB connector that supports an optional, user-supplied external modem Option: One telephone port for internal modem; up to 56 Kbps; 6-pin modular connector (NAE models with an optional internal modem have one RS-232-C serial port only.)

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Table 23: NAE35, NAE45, NAE45-Lite Models


Housing Plastic housing material: ABS + polycarbonate Protection: IP20 (IEC60529) Mounting On flat surface with screws on three mounting clips or a single 35 mm DIN rail

Dimensions (Height x Width 131 x 270 x 62 mm (5.2 x 10.6 x 2.5 in.) x Depth) Minimum space for mounting NAE35 and NAE45: 210 x 350 x 110 mm (8.3 x 13.8 x 4.3 in.) Shipping Weight Compliance 1.2 kg (2.7 lb) United States UL Listed, File E107041, CCN PAZX, UL 916, Energy Management Equipment; FCC Compliant to CFR47, Part 15, Subpart B, Class AUL Listed, File S4977, UUKL 864 - 9th Edition, Smoke Control Equipment (MS-NAE35x0-2U and MS-NAE45x0-2U models only) Canada UL Listed, File E107041, CCN PAZX7, CAN/CSA C22.2 No. 205, Signal Equipment Industry Canada Compliant, ICES-003 Europe CE Mark - Johnson Controls, Inc., declares that this product is in compliance with the essential requirements and other relevant provisions of the EMC Directive 2004/108/EC. Australia and New Zealand C-Tick Mark, Australia/NZ Emissions Compliant BACnet International BACnet Testing Laboratories (BTL) 135-2004 Listed BACnet Building Controller (B-BC)

Table 24: NAE55xx-2 and NIE55xx-2


Power Requirement Power Consumption Dedicated nominal 24 VAC, Class 2 power supply (North America), Safety Extra-Low Voltage (SELV) power supply (Europe), at 50/60 Hz (20 VAC minimum to 30 VAC maximum) 50 VA maximum

Ambient Operating Conditions 0 to 50C (32 to 122F); 10 to 90% RH, 30C (86F) maximum dew point Ambient Storage Conditions Data Protection Battery Clock Battery Processor Memory -40 to 70C (-40 to 158F); 5 to 95% RH, 30C (86F) maximum dew point Supports data protection on power failure. Rechargeable gel cell battery: 12 V, 1.2 Ah, with a typical life of 3 to 5 years at 21C (70F); Product Code Number: MS-BAT1010-0 Maintains real-time clock through a power failure. Onboard cell; typical life 10 years at 21C (70F) 1.6 GHz Intel Atom processor for MS-NAE55xx-2 models 4 GB Flash nonvolatile memory for operating system, configuration data, and operations data storage and backup for MS-NAE55xx-2 models. 1 GB Synchronous Dynamic Random Access Memory (DRAM) for operations data dynamic memory for all models Operating System Microsoft Windows Embedded Standard (WES) 2009

Network and Serial Interfaces One Ethernet port; 10/100/1,000 Mbps; 8-pin RJ-45 connector Two optically isolated RS-485 ports; 9600, 19.2k, 38.4k, or 76.8k baud; pluggable and keyed 4 position terminal blocks (RS-485 ports available on NAE55 models only) Two RS-232-C serial ports, with standard 9-pin sub-D connectors, that support all standard baud rates Two USB serial ports; standard USB connectors support an optional, user-supplied external modem Options: One telephone port for internal modem; up to 56 kbps; 6-pin modular connector One LONWORKS port; FT3120 78 kbps; pluggable, keyed 3-position terminal block (LONWORKS port available on NAE552x-x models only) Housing Plastic housing with internal metal shield Plastic material: ABS + polycarbonate UL94-5VB Protection: IP20 (IEC 60529) NAE Commissioning Guide 78

Table 24: NAE55xx-2 and NIE55xx-2


Mounting On flat surface with screws on four mounting feet or on dual 35 mm DIN rail Dimensions (Height x Width x 226 x 332 x 96.5 mm (8.9 x 13.1 x 3.8 in.) including mounting feet Depth) Minimum space for mounting: 303 x 408 x 148 mm (12.0 x 16.1 x 5.8 in.) Shipping Weight Compliance 2.9 kg (6.4 lb) United States: UL Listed, File E107041, CCN PAZX, UL 916, Energy Management Equipment, FCC Compliant to CFR47, Part 15, Subpart B, Class A Canada: UL Listed, File E107041, CCN PAZX7, CAN/CSA C22.2 No. 205, Signal Equipment, Industry Canada Compliant, ICES-003 Europe: CE Mark - Johnson Controls, Inc., declares that this product is in compliance with the essential requirements and other relevant provisions of the EMC Directive 2004/108/EC. Australia and New Zealand: C-Tick Mark, Australia/NZ Emissions Compliant BACnet International: BACnet Testing Laboratories (BTL) 135-2004 Listed BACnet Building Controller (B-BC) The performance specifications are nominal and conform to acceptable industry standard. For application at conditions beyond these specifications, consult the local Johnson Controls office. Johnson Controls, Inc. shall not be liable for damages resulting from misapplication or misuse of its products.

Table 25: NxE85 Model


Computer Type Power Requirement Power Supply Ambient Operating Conditions Ambient Storage Conditions Data Protection Dell PowerEdge R410 or latest equivalent 120240 VAC 50/60 Hz 480 W 10 to 35C (50 to 95F); 20 to 80% RH (noncondensing twmax = 29C) -40 to 65C (-40 to 149F); 5 to 95% RH (noncondensing twmax = 38C) Recommended Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS): American Power Conversion (APC) Smart-UPS SC 450VA, 280 W, 120 VAC input/output, NEMA 5-15R output connections, OEM Part No. SC450RM1U Intel Xeon E5506, 2+ GHz, 4 MB Cache2 or comparable (subject to availability) 2 GB or more, 1066 MHz or higher, 2 x 1 GB, single ranked UDIMMs for 1 processor 2 total (providing ample storage space, size subject to availability) 7.2K RPM Serial Advanced Technology Attachment (SATA), 8.9 cm (3.5 in.) cabled 3 Gbps, RAID 1 configuration with add-in SAS6/iR (SATA/SAS Controller) or higher Internal Optical Drive Operating System Antivirus Software Network and Serial Interfaces DVD ROM, SATA Windows Server 2008 R2 OS (64-bit) Symantec Endpoint Protection, Small Business Edition (latest version) 2 RJ45 1 Gbps Ethernet Ports, Port 2 is disabled. 2 video ports (1 front, 1 back) 1 9-pin Serial port 4 USB ports (2 front, 2 back) Dimensions (Height x Width x Depth) Mounting Shipping Weight Compliance 4.3 x 43.4 x 62.7 cm (1.7 x 17.1 x 24.7 in.) Mount in an EIA-310D compatible server cabinet 15.9 kg (35 lb) Europe: CE Mark (Record Holder: http://www.dell.com/regulatory_compliance)

Processor Memory Hard Disk

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Appendix: Time Zone, Date, and Time Management


Time Zone, Date, and Time Management Introduction
The time zone, date, and time used by all devices connected to a Metasys site are synchronized automatically, preventing errors from manual time entry and clocks that become inaccurate over time. Network-wide time management ensures that scheduling, trending, audit trailing, data collecting, time-stamping of alarms, and other functions that require accurate time management use the same time zone, date, and time consistently for all system operations. Time synchronization occurs on the Metasys network when an engine or server sends an IAmLive message to the Site Director. If the IAmLive message fails, the engine or server sends another message to retrieve the time from the Site Director. When the time is synchronized between the devices, a second IAmLive message is successful. For network-wide time synchronization, the NAE/NIE/ADS/ADX designated as Site Director is the device time server because it provides the time zone, date, and time for all other engines/servers on the site. All other devices are considered time clients because they receive the time zone, date, and time from the Site Director. To set the date and time in the Site Director (and therefore the entire site), you can set the time manually or select a time server for the Site Director. The time server for the Site Director is referred to as the site time server and should be a reliable source not on the Metasys network. Regardless of how you set the date and time, you must set the time zone in the Site Director. Important: Edit the Device Time Servers attribute or Time Sync Period attribute in the Site object only. Note: To ensure that the correct time appears on the Site Management Portal UI accessed from a client computer, apply the most recent Daylight Saving Time (DST) patch for the operating system on all clients that access the Site Director. The DST patch is available from Microsoft Corporation.

Overview of Time Synchronization


This section contains a summary of how time synchronizes on a site with various system components. Table 26 summarizes the time sources for various system items. All time is Universal Time Coordinated (UTC) and all system devices handle DST. Table 26: Time Sources Item
NAE/NIE Trend Data NAE/NIE Events NAE/NIE Commands Annotations Event Acknowledgements

Time Source
NAE/NIE NAE/NIE NAE/NIE ADS/ADX ADS/ADX

ADS/ADX Site Director with NAEs/NIEs


On a site with an ADS/ADX Site Director and NAEs/NIEs, the following time synchronization steps occur: 1. ADS/ADX Site Director comes online. 2. NAEs/NIEs come online and check in with the Site Director. 3. Every 15 seconds, the NAEs/NIEs check for ADS/ADX online/offline conditions. If the ADS/ADX is offline, the NAEs/NIEs send an IAmLive message to the ADS/ADX every 20 seconds. 4. When the ADS/ADX receives the IAmLive message, it attempts to validate the security credentials of the NAEs/NIEs. If the time in the NAEs/NIEs is different than the time in the ADS/ADX by 5 or more minutes, the engine security credentials are invalidated. 5. When the NAE receives back an invalidated credential, the NAEs/NIEs request the current time from the ADS/ADX and update the engine time to match.

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Note: Time between an ADS/ADX and NAEs/NIEs synchronizes only if the time differs between the ADS/ADX and NAEs/NIEs by 5 or more minutes. In the worst case scenario, one NAE could be 4 minutes and 59 seconds ahead of the ADS/ADX, and another NAE could be 4 minutes and 59 seconds behind the ADS/ADX. 6. After time is synchronized and the ADS/ADX is online, the NAEs/NIEs send IAmLive messages to the ADS/ADX every 5 minutes (instead of every 20 seconds).

NIE and Child Devices


Important: We recommend that time be synchronized carefully between the NIE and the N1 network, preferably using a common external time server. All N1 network data collected by the NIE is time stamped at the NIE (no N1 network time stamps persist in the data collected by the NIE). While the NIE can push time to the NCM, the preferred method of synchronization for the NIE and N1 network is to have both synchronize with an external time server. On a site with an NIE and child devices (NCMs, for example), the following time synchronization steps occur: 1. The NIE comes online and is mapped to NCMs. 2. When the time changes in the NIE (as a result of synchronization with an ADS/ADX, for example), the NIE pushes the time change down to the NCM. This time push requires that the Synchronize Time attribute of the NIE N1 Integration object is enabled.

Time Synchronization Methods


Three methods for network time synchronization are available in the Metasys system, including Microsoft Windows Simple Network Time Protocol (SNTP) time synchronization, Multicast, and BACnet time synchronization. You can use the Microsoft Windows and Multicast methods when an SNTP master time server is available. If the Site Director has no access to SNTP time servers, you can use the BACnet synchronization method. To enable a time synchronization method, modify the Time Sync Method attribute for the Site. See the Steps for Successful Time Management and Setting the Time Synchronization Method sections.

Windows Time Synchronization


The Windows time synchronization is Microsoft Corporations implementation of the standard Windows SNTP w32time. This method is also referred to as unicast synchronization. With this form of time synchronization, all routers can route User Datagram Protocol (UDP) traffic. Windows time synchronization may have a larger time interval in which devices are out of sync with the SNTP master time server due to skewing and convergence. If you use Windows time synchronization, you must define a device time server in the Site Director using the Device Time Servers attribute. Note: If you implement an intentional time change for your site, in less than 5 minutes, all other devices on the site update with the new time with Windows time synchronization.

Multicast Time Synchronization


The Multicast time synchronization is the Johnson Controls implementation of SNTP w32time with Multicast capabilities and RFC-2030 compliance. This method delivers the same features as the Windows method, but also provides Multicast functionality. The Multicast method provides improved Metasys time synchronization between the Site Director and supervisory devices. A time domain server provides the master time to the Site Director, and the Site Director in turn multicasts the time to all supervisory devices on the Metasys network. When a supervisory device first signs up with the Site Director, it polls the Site Director for the current time and matches its time with the Site Director time. By default, every 5 minutes the Site Director broadcasts the current time to all supervisory devices. If a particular device time differs 1.5 seconds or more from the Site Director time, the device adjusts its time to match. Additionally, if the Site Director time changes by more than 1 to 1.5 seconds, it sends out a Multicast time message to all devices within 2 seconds of the change.

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This form of time synchronization requires that all routers on the site support Multicast routing (Internet Group Multicast Protocol [IGMP]) because the Multicast time message crosses routers. The Johnson Controls SNTP time synchronization reduces the time interval in which devices are out of sync with the SNTP master time server. Note: All devices synchronized with Multicast time synchronization must be at Release 3.1 or later. For example, if you have an ADS at Release 3.1 and NAEs at Release 2.2, you cannot sync these devices using Multicast time synchronization. Note: If you implement an intentional time change for your site, within a few seconds, all other devices on the site update with the new time with Multicast time synchronization.

BACnet Time Synchronization


BACnet time synchronization uses BACnet protocol to synchronize with BACnet devices such as the NAE. Use this method when the Site Director has access to a BACnet time server. This method is not available on the ADS/ADX.

Example Network
Step 1 shows an example system with a common time zone, date, and time management setup. This example is representative of the Multicast and Windows time synchronization methods. The Site Director (in this case, an ADS) is configured to receive the date and time from an intranet time server. The date and time originates at an Internet time server (such as the Naval atomic clock). Using Simple Network Time Protocol (SNTP), the intranet time server requests the time from the Internet time server. The Site Director requests the time from the intranet time server. Then, using the Metasys system automatic time synchronization, and the manually configured time zone, the Site Director automatically provides the time zone, date, and time to the other engines/server on the Metasys network. Figure 48: Time Management Sample System

Time Zone
The time zone of the Site Director defaults to (GMT-06:00) Central Time (US & Canada). If your site is not in the Central time zone, set the time zone for your location. When you set the time zone in the Site Director, it propagates the current time to all the engines/servers on the site. You must set the time zone in the Site Director even if you select a site time server. In addition, set the time zone in all ADS/ADX devices, even though none of them are the Site Director. When a non-Site Director NAE is downloaded in a different time zone than Central Standard Time (CST), the NAE might revert to CST. This problem indicates that domain name resolution is not working properly. Consequently, the NAE cannot reach the ADX Site Director after download. You can solve this problem in one of two ways: Add the ADX name and IP address to the NAE host file. The NAE communicates to the Site Director as long as both have the same date based on their time zones. Communication fails if the two machines are set to different time zones such that one has passed into the next day but the other has not. An example of this would be if the
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Site Director is set to Japan Standard Time and the device is set to CST, and the time in Osaka has passed midnight while the device is just after 10 A.M. the previous day. Set the NAE to the Site Director time zone and write the NAE Local Site Director attribute to the ADX IP address; then, upload the NAE. After that step, each download of the device is given the Site Director IP address and correct time zone.

Site Time Server


As an alternative to setting date and time manually for a device, you can select a site time server. A site time server sets the date and time in the Site Director. If you have a split ADX, select the same site time server for both the web/application server computer and the database server computer. Site time servers can be on your intranet, such as a Domain Controller/Server; or on the Internet, such as the U.S. Naval Observatory Master Clock. For a list of Navy master clocks, go to http://tycho.usno.navy.mil/. See the Selecting a Site Time Server for the Site Director NAE/NIE or Selecting a Site Time Server for the Site Director ADS/ADX (Windows Method Only) sections.

Time in Device Object and UI Status Bar


The time zone, date, and time in the Status Bar of the UI and the time zone, date, and time in the device object of the device to which you are browsing are the same time; however, there may sometimes seem to be a discrepancy or delay between the two. In the Site Director, the time zone, date, and time in the device object of the device are set by you or by the designated site time server. In a non-Site Director NAE, the time zone, date, and time in the device object come from the Site Director. In a non-Site Director ADS/ADX, the time zone in the device object comes from your manual setting, but the date and time come from the Site Director. The Device object then passes the time zone, date, and time along to the Status Bar for display. If the device is busy, it may take a few minutes for the time zone, date, and time to update correctly in the Status Bar.

Steps for Successful Time Management


For successful time management, do the following: 1. Verify that each non-supervisory engine/server on the Metasys network has the correct Site Director defined. See the Verifying the Site Director Defined for an Engine/Server section. 2. Set the time synchronization method for the site. See the Setting the Time Synchronization Method section. 3. Set the time zone and then set the date and time or select a site time server for the site. See the NAE/NIE Is the Site Director or ADS/ADX Is the Site Director section. If you have an NAE/NIE as the Site Director, the time zone, date, and time are set in the UI of the Site Director NAE/NIE. See the NAE/NIE Is the Site Director section. If you have non-Site Director ADSs/ADXs on the site, you must set the time zone for these servers. If you have an ADS/ADX as the Site Director, the time zone, date, and time are set in the Windows OS of the computer where the ADS/ADX resides. See the ADS/ADX Is the Site Director section. If you have non-Site Director ADS/ADX devices on the site, you must set the time zone for these servers. 4. For Multicast time synchronization only, configure the SNTP Multicast attributes for the site. See the Configuring Additional Multicast Time Synchronization Settings section. 5. If a P2000 Security Management System (SMS) is integrated to the ADS/ADX server, both the P2000 and ADS/ADX servers should reference the same network time server. If the two systems use different time servers, the P2000 and ADS/ADX servers are not clock synchronized, which results in intermittent or no communications between the two systems.

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Verifying the Site Director Defined for an Engine/Server


For time synchronization to work properly, all engines/servers on a site must have the correct name for the Site Director in the Local Site Director attribute. If an engine/server has the wrong device defined as Site Director, time synchronization may not work properly on your Metasys site. 1. Log on to engine/server. 2. Drag and drop the engine/server object to the Display frame. 3. Select Advanced. 4. Scroll to the Site section and verify the Local Site Director attribute contains the correct device (Figure 49). In this example, the Site Director is an NAE (NAE-THREE). Note: The Local Site Director may be entered as an IP address or host name. If entered as a host name, the name is case sensitive (for example, NAE-THREE is not the same as nae-three). Figure 49: Site Director Field

Note: If the Site Director field contains the wrong device or is empty, click Edit. Edit the Site Director entry and click Save. 5. Go to Setting the Time Synchronization Method.

Setting the Time Synchronization Method


See the Time Synchronization Methods section for descriptions of the methods. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Log on to Site Director engine/server. Drag and drop the Site object to the Display frame. Click Edit. Select Advanced. In the Time section, in the Time Sync Method drop-down box, select the desired time synchronization method (Windows or Multicast). Figure 50: Time Sync Method Field

6. If you select Windows time, enter a device time server in the Device Time Servers attribute. A device time server is required for Windows time synchronization. 7. Click Save.

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Important: When the Time Sync Method is set to Multicast and the ADS/ADX computer is synchronized with a time source other than itself, the Site Time Server must be an SNTP Time Server to allow the ADS/ADX to perform time synchronization. Time synchronization occurs when a change is detected in the ADS/ADX computer local clock, or at the Site configured Time Sync Period. Enabling Multicast time synchronization terminates the Windows win32time service, but changing the Time Sync Method back to Windows does not re-enable the service. If you change the Time Sync Method back to Windows, you must manually start the win32time service, or restart the Site Director. 8. Go to NAE/NIE Is the Site Director or ADS/ADX Is the Site Director.

NAE/NIE Is the Site Director


If an NAE/NIE is the Site Director, you must set the time zone first, then either set the date and time or select a time server for the Site Director NAE/NIE. Note: See the Verifying the Site Director Defined for an Engine/Server and Setting the Time Synchronization Method sections before following the steps in this section. Setting the Time Zone in the Site Director NAE/NIE 1. Log on to the Site Director NAE/NIE. 2. Drag and drop the Site object to the Display frame. 3. Click Edit. 4. In the Time section, in the Time Zone drop-down box, select the correct time zone for the device (Figure 51). Figure 51: Time Zone in the Site Object

5. Click Save. If you are also manually setting the date and time in the Site Director NAE/NIE, go to the Setting the Date and Time in the Site Director NAE/NIE section. If you are selecting a time server for the Site Director NAE/NIE, go to the Selecting a Site Time Server for the Site Director NAE/NIE section. Setting the Date and Time in the Site Director NAE/NIE Before manually setting the date and time in the Site Director NAE/NIE, follow the steps in the Setting the Time Zone in the Site Director NAE/NIE section. 1. In the navigation tree, right-click the Site object and select Commands. The Commands dialog box appears. 2. Click Set Time and enter a value in the text box (Figure 52).

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Figure 52: Time in a Site Director NAE/NIE

3. Click Send. Note: If you have a site time server selected, do not attempt to set the time manually. If you have one or more site time servers defined, sending this command generates an error. 4. In the navigation tree, right-click the Site object and select Commands. The Commands dialog box appears. 5. Click Set Date and select a date from the calendar (Figure 53). Figure 53: Date in a Site Director NAE/NIE

6. Click Send. Note: If you have one or more site time servers defined, sending this command produces an error. If you have a site time server defined, do not attempt to set the time manually. The Site Director time zone, date, and time are now set and propagate to all other engines on the site.

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Selecting a Site Time Server for the Site Director NAE/NIE Before selecting a site time server for the Site Director NAE/NIE, follow the steps in the Setting the Time Zone in the Site Director NAE/NIE section. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Reset the NAE/NIE for the time zone change to take effect. Log on to the NAE/NIE. Drag and drop the Site object to the Display frame. Click Edit. In the Time section, in the Site Time Servers field, click the browse button. Note: The Device Time Servers field should be blank unless you are using Windows time synchronization. Do not change the value for the Time Sync Period attribute. Figure 54: Site Time Servers in the Site Object

6. 7.

In the screen that appears, click Add (Figure 54). Enter the IP address of the SNTP server from which the Site Director receives its time (Figure 55). Note: Specify a host name only if a DNS server is available to the Site Director. Note: If you add more than one address, the Site Director NAE55/NIE55 tries to contact the first address. If that fails, the NAE55/NIE55 contacts the second one, and so on. The NAE35/NAE45 engines use only the first address in the list. Figure 55: Add Site Time Server

8. 9.

Click OK. Click Save. The Site Director now requests the date and time from the selected time server and propagates it to all other engines on the site.

10. Go to Configuring Additional Multicast Time Synchronization Settings if needed.

ADS/ADX Is the Site Director


Set the time zone first, then either set the date and time or select a time server for the Site Director ADS/ADX. Note: See the Verifying the Site Director Defined for an Engine/Server and Setting the Time Synchronization Method sections before following the steps in this section. Note: If you select a site time server for your Site Director ADS/ADX, and you also set the time manually in the ADS/ADX, the manual time is overridden at the end of the time specified in the Time Sync Period attribute (default is 1 hour).
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Setting the Time Zone in the Site Director ADS/ADX 1. In the lower right corner of the ADS/ADX computer screen, double-click the time. If you are using Windows 7 OS, Windows Server 2008 R2 OS, or Windows Server 2008 OS, single-click the time. The Date and Time Properties box appears (Figure 56). The appearance of this screen varies depending on the OS. Figure 56: Time and Date on a Site Director ADS/ADX - Windows XP Professional OS

2. If you have Windows XP Professional OS, click the Time Zone tab (Figure 57). If you have Windows 7 OS, Windows Server 2008 R2 OS, or Windows Server 2008 OS, select the Change date and time settings option and click Change time zone. Figure 57: Time Zone on a Site Director ADS/ADX

3. Select a time zone from the drop-down list box. 4. Select Automatically adjust clock for daylight saving changes, if present. 5. If you have non-Site Director ADS/ADX devices on your site, set the time zone in those servers following the instructions in this section. If you are also manually setting the date and time in the Site Director ADS/ADX, go to the Setting the Date and Time in the Site Director ADS/ADX section.

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If you are selecting a time server for the Site Director ADS/ADX, click OK and go to the Selecting a Site Time Server for the Site Director ADS/ADX (Windows Method Only) or Selecting a Site Time Server for the Site Director ADS/ADX (Multicast Method Only) section. Setting the Date and Time in the Site Director ADS/ADX Before manually setting the date and time in the Site Director ADS/ADX, follow the steps in the Setting the Time Zone in the Site Director ADS/ADX section. 1. In the Date and Time Properties box, click the Date & Time tab. If you have Windows 7 OS, Windows Server 2008 R2 OS, or Windows Server 2008 OS, click the time in the lower right corner of the screen. Select the Change date and time settings option and click Change date and time. 2. Set the time and date. 3. Click OK. The Site Director time zone, date, and time are now set and propagate to all other engines/servers on the site. Selecting a Site Time Server for the Site Director ADS/ADX (Windows Method Only) If you set up a site time server for your Site Director, you can set the date and time manually in the ADS/ADX, but the manual settings are overridden at the end of the Time Sync Period. Before selecting a site time server for the Site Director ADS/ADX, follow the steps in the Setting the Time Zone in the Site Director ADS/ADX section. 1. On the Windows Start menu of the ADS/ADX computer, select Run. The Run dialog box appears (Figure 58). If you have Windows 7 OS, click the Start icon and select All Programs > Accessories > Run. Figure 58: Run Dialog Box

2. Type Net time /setsntp:"10.10.16.1 10.10.16.2 ...", where 10.10.16.1 and 10.10.16.2 are example IP addresses of time servers. Note: The IT department should provide the address of a suitable time server. Be sure that the quotation marks are included (especially when listing multiple time servers). 3. Click OK. The Site Director now requests the date and time from the selected time server and propagates it to all other engines/servers on the site. Selecting a Site Time Server for the Site Director ADS/ADX (Multicast Method Only) Before selecting a site time server for the Site Director ADS/ADX, follow the steps in the Setting the Time Zone in the Site Director ADS/ADX section. 1. 2. 3. 4. Log on to ADS/ADX. Drag and drop the Site object to the Display frame. Click Edit. In the Time section, in the Site Time Servers field, click the browse button. Note: Leave the Device Time Servers field blank. Do not change the value for the Time Sync Period attribute.

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Figure 59: Site Time Servers in the Site Object

5. In the screen that appears, click Add (Figure 59). 6. Enter the IP address of the SNTP server from which the Site Director receives its time (Figure 60). Note: Specify a host name only if a DNS server is available to the Site Director. Leave the Device Time Servers field blank. For Multicast time synchronization, if you add more than one address, the Site Director ADS/ADX tries to contact only the first address. 7. Click OK. Figure 60: Add Site Time Server

8. Click Save. The Site Director now requests the date and time from the selected time server and propagates it to all other engines/servers on the site. 9. Go to Configuring Additional Multicast Time Synchronization Settings.

Configuring Additional Multicast Time Synchronization Settings


In addition to selecting the Multicast time synchronization method (Setting the Time Synchronization Method), you must define other Multicast attributes. To configure additional Multicast time synchronization settings: 1. 2. 3. 4. Log on to Site Director engine/server. Drag and drop the Site object to the Display frame. Click Edit. Select Advanced.

5. In the Time section, modify the attributes listed in Table 27 (Figure 61).

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Figure 61: Multicast Time Synchronization Fields

Table 27: Multicast Time Synchronization Fields Attribute Description


Multicast Group Address Specifies the IP address used to multicast the SNTP message. This address identifies the group of devices to receive the SNTP message. The RFC-2030 defined standard address is 224.0.1.1. The address is configurable to allow site specific use. Specifies the UDP port on which Multicast time synchronization polls and listens for messages. The RFC-2030 defined standard port is 123.The UDP port defined here must match the Time Servers UDP port for successful polling to occur. Specifies the Time-to-Live (TTL) for a Multicast message. The value indicates the number of router hops (number of routers to pass through) allowed before the message is not sent. Routers must be configured to pass Multicast messages to allow the time sync message to pass. Note: A default value of 1 typically stops the Multicast message from leaving the IP subnet of the Site Director. Most routers decrease the existing TTL upon arrival of a packet, and drop the packet instead of rerouting it when the TTL reaches 0.

Multicast UDP Port

Multicast TTL

Multicast Heartbeat Interval Specifies the number of minutes between forcing a Multicast time synchronization message from the Site Director to participating devices.

6. Click Save.

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Appendix: Configuring and Maintaining Preferences


Configuring and Maintaining Preferences Introduction
The Metasys system provides customized preferences for the UI. The preferences allow authorized users to configure how the UI behaves, including the sounds and colors, the startup view, and the ability to add links to external applications that can be accessed from within the UI of the ADS/ADX/SCT/NAE device. Important: Preferences do not persist after an upgrade unless you take manual steps to save the settings before you begin a system upgrade. See Preserving Preferences in an Upgrade. Some steps in the following sections involve certain file operations, such as copying files and navigating to specific folders. The tool used for these operations is either Windows Explorer (ADS, ADX, SCT, NAE55, NIE55, NxE85) or Internet Explorer Web browser (NAE35, NAE45, or NCE25). For an NAE55/NIE55, log on to the device remotely using the NxE Information and Configuration Tool (NCT), then use the Remote Desktop function in the NCT. Type explorer at the command prompt. For an NAE35/NAE45/NCE25, use the Start FTP function in the NCT. Access the NAE contents with Internet Explorer and type ftp://<NAE IP Address> in the Address line. For information on the NCT, refer to the NxE Information and Configuration Tool Technical Bulletin (LIT-1201990).

Preferences Concepts
System and User Preferences
Preferences are divided into two categories: System Preferences and User Preferences. System Preferences System preferences apply to all users who log on to the site or device. System preferences affect the performance and operation of the system. Only the MetasysSysAgent user and the BasicSysAgent user have authorization to configure system preferences. An audible alarm notification change is an example of a system preference. The SCT supports a subset of system preferences. If the SCT is installed on an ADS/ADX, the preferences are shared by the UI and the SCT. Before you make system preference changes, the preferences are read from the DefaultSystemPreferences.xml file. Once you make system preference changes, a new file called SystemPreferences.xml is created (Figure 62). Both of these files are located in the directory on the Metasys system device as indicated in Table 28. Table 28: Location of Preferences Files Metasys System File Location Device
ADS/ADX C:\Documents and Settings\All Users\Application Data\Johnson Controls\MetasysIII\Preferences C:\ProgramData\Johnson Controls\MetasysIII\Preferences NAE55/NIE55 NAE85/NIE85 NAE35/NAE45/NCE25
2 1

C:\Documents and Settings\All Users\Application Data\Johnson Controls\MetasysIII\Preferences C:\ProgramData\Johnson Controls\MetasysIII\Preferences \Storage\Metasys\Preferences

1 This location applies if you have Windows XP Professional OS. 2 This location applies if you have Windows 7 OS, Windows Server 2008 R2 OS, or Windows Server 2008 OS.

The procedure to synchronize system preferences within a site or to reuse the system preferences on another site is a manual copy and paste process. Use the process to copy system preferences to other devices on the site or to other sites. See Copying Preferences between Devices.

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Figure 62: System Preference Files

As highlighted in Figure 62: DefaultSystemPreferences.xml: This is the default system preferences file. It is installed as part of the standard installation for all Metasys system devices. SystemPreferences.xml: This file stores the configured system preferences. If you have not yet configured system preferences, this file does not appear in the directory.

User Preferences User preferences apply to a specific Metasys system user. User preferences define how the information is displayed in the UI and do not affect the operation of the system. The colors and marker styles of a trend display are examples of user preferences. Each user is authorized to view and edit their own user preferences. The system automatically assigns a numbered user preference file name for each user called UserPreferences-userID.xml, where userID is the identification number of the user. Using an identification number, rather than using the actual user name, serves two purposes. First, it avoids any conflicts that might arise if the user name contains special characters. Second, it allows the user to be renamed without breaking the connection to the user preferences file. To view user identification numbers, open the Security Administrator screen and select User Preference File Names under the View menu (this option is available only to the MetasysSysAgent user). The user preference file names appear in the Roles and Users pane (Figure 63) and correspond to files on the Metasys device in the directory as indicated in Table 28. As shown by two callouts in Figure 63: 1: User preference file name as seen in the Security Administration in the UI. 2: User preference file as seen when accessing an NAE using Remote Desktop in the NCT.

The procedure to synchronize user preferences within a site or to reuse the user preferences on another site is a manual copy and paste process. Use the manual process to copy user preferences to other devices on the site or to other sites. See Copying Preferences between Devices.

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Figure 63: User Preference File

Managing Preferences
Preferences are not archived on the SCT and they are not part of the upload/download process. Additionally, Preferences are not saved during a security backup when you upgrade. Preferences must be managed manually. For information on managing preferences for each preference type, see the following sections: System Preferences User Preferences

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Detailed Procedures
Configuring Preferences
Note: To configure the preferences of a specific user, you must log on as that user or as a user with Administrator rights. 1. On the Tools menu of the UI, click Configure Preferences. The Metasys Preferences dialog box appears. 2. Set the preferences according to the Preferences section of the Metasys system Help. If you specified Level 1-4 Sound Files on the Alarm Settings tab, place the alarm sound files into the audio folder on the Metasys system device. The audio folder is located in the following directory: For ADS/ADX/NAE55/NIE55/NAE85/NIE85: C:\Inetpub\wwwroot\MetasysIII\UI\audio For NAE35/NAE45/NCE25: \Storage\Metasys\wwwroot\metasysIII\UI\audio Note: If a sound file is missing from the folder, the Metasys system uses the default system beep for that alarm priority.

Restoring Default System Preferences


1. Access the Metasys system device on which you want to restore the default system preferences. (For example, if this is an NAE55, use the Remote Desktop option available in the NCT. 2. Navigate to the Preferences directory for the device as shown in Table 28. 3. Delete the SystemPreferences.xml file.

Copying Preferences between Devices


1. Access the source Metasys system device; that is, the one that contains the preferences you want to copy. (For example, if this is an NAE55, use the Remote Desktop option available in the NCT. The local hard drive of your computer is automatically mapped to the NAE through the remote desktop function.) 2. Navigate to the Preferences directory for the device as shown in Table 28. 3. Copy SystemPreferences.xml (system preference) or UserPreferences-userID.xml (user preference), where userID is the identification number that appears in the Security Administration tool. 4. Paste the file onto the desktop of your computer. 5. If you are accessing the Metasys system device remotely, log off. 6. Access the destination Metasys system device (where you want to copy the preferences) with the MetasysSysAgent user and navigate to the Preferences directory for the device as shown in Table 28. 7. Paste the SystemPreferences.xml file or UserPreferences-userID.xml file that you copied to your computer desktop with Step 4.

Restoring Default User Preferences


1. Log on to the Metasys UI as the MetasysSysAgent user. 2. On the Tools menu of the UI, select Administrator. The Security Administration tool appears. 3. On the View menu, select User Preference File Names. The user preference file names appear in the Roles and Users pane of the Security Administration tool. 4. Record the file name of the user whose preferences you want to restore. Note: If the user has been removed from the system, there is no record of the user preference file name in the Security Administration tool. In this case, remove user preference files from the Metasys device that do not have a corresponding user preference file name in the Security Administration tool. 5. Close the Security Administration tool and continue with Removing User Preference Files.

Removing User Preference Files


1. Access the Metasys device from which you want to remove the user preference files and navigate to the Preferences directory for the device as shown in Table 28.
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2. Delete files named UserPreferences-userID.xml, where userID is the identification number that appears in the Security Administration tool. Note: Do not delete DefaultUserPreferences.xml.

Copying User Preferences to Another User


1. Log on to the Metasys UI as the MetasysSysAgent user. 2. On the Tools menu of the UI, select Administrator. The Security Administration tool appears. 3. On the View menu, select User Preference File Names. The user preference file names appear in the Roles and Users pane of the Security Administration tool. 4. Record the file name of the user whose preferences you want to copy (Source User) and the file name of the user whom you want to share those preferences (Destination User). 5. Close the Security Administration tool. 6. Access the Metasys device and navigate to the Preferences directory for the device as shown in Table 28. 7. Delete the preference file (if it exists) of the Destination User that you recorded in Step 4. 8. Copy and paste the user preference file of the Source User you recorded in Step 4. If using Windows Explorer, the file appears in the folder with Copy of appended to the front of the file name. 9. Rename the copied file to the original name of the Destination User preference file name.

Preserving Preferences in an Upgrade


Preferences do not persist after an upgrade unless you take manual steps to save the settings before you begin a system upgrade. 1. Before you begin the upgrade process, access the source Metasys system device that contains the preferences you want to copy. (For example, if this is an NAE55, use the Remote Desktop option available with NCT. The local hard drive of your computer is automatically mapped to the NAE through remote desktop.) 2. Navigate to the Preferences directory for the device as shown in Table 28. 3. Copy SystemPreferences.xml (system preference) or UserPreferences-userID.xml (user preference), where userID is the identification number for each specific user with customized preferences. If you are saving preferences for multiple users, be sure to copy all files. 4. Paste these files in a safe location on your computer or network drive, or store them on other media. 5. Upgrade your system according to the ADS, ADX, and SCT Installation and Upgrade Instructions Wizard (LIT-12011521) and other appropriate documentation. 6. Copy the files from the safe location in Step 4 back to the directory in Step 1.

Building Efficiency 507 E. Michigan Street, Milwaukee, WI 53202 Metasys and Johnson Controls are registered trademarks of Johnson Controls, Inc. All other marks herein are the marks of their respective owners. 2013 Johnson Controls, Inc. Published in U.S.A. NAE Commissioning Guide www.johnsoncontrols.com 96