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WASHINGTON NEW YORK

X *//WIDMEYER
V TC COMMUNICATIONS
1825 Connecticut Avenue, NW

Fifth Floor
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Fifth Floor

Washington, DC 2OOO9 New York, NY 10OO3

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F 202.667.0902 F 212.260.3402

WIDMEYER.COM

MEMORANDUM

TO: Al Felzenberg

FROM: Scott Widmeyer


Kevin Bonderud

DATE: December 16, 2003

RE: COMMUNICATIONS ASSISTANCE FOR THE 9/11 COMMISSION

We enjoyed meeting with you and your colleagues last week, and are looking forward to
working with you and the commission in the months ahead. We came away from the meeting
even more enthusiastic about working with you. At the same time, our discussion confirmed
how much work there is to be done, how important the communications aspects of the
commission's work are, and how large and broad the challenges ahead of us are.

This memo briefly outlines the four main areas we discussed in which we can focus our efforts
on your behalf. They include the three areas outlined by Phil - managing and assisting with the
media, working with the families, and the release and rollout of the report - as well as the critical
planning that must take place to make sure those three major tasks are executed effectively.
We have not reiterated every specific task here, but rather seek to clarify the broader areas of
work to be done.

Our hope is to discuss this memo soon so we can move forward as quickly as possible.

I. PLANNING
As we discussed, the first step is to develop a plan for the entire communications effort.
This will include determining how we intend to execute the other major task areas. But it
is primarily critical because it will also focus on:

• Developing overall messages to be used throughout.


• Identifying and determining tactics for potential constituencies - from the families,
others most affected by September 11, and government agencies and departments
to such groups as the aviation industry, the firefighters and law enforcement unions,
and the Arab-American community.
• Setting communications priorities.
• Analyzing past media coverage.
• Using that analysis to identify likely commentators.
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This planning should begin immediately. Again, the plan must contain mini-plans for
each potential stakeholder group.

II. MEDIA OUTREACH AND MANAGEMENT

This category of work - what Phil called the "help Al" tasks - would encompass all
aspects surrounding media relations leading up to the release of the report. It would
include:

• Ongoing monitoring and analysis of the media


• Assisting in drafting news releases, statements, op-eds, updates, backgrounders,
and other public materials.
• Providing support surrounding hearings and other events.
• Orchestrating media briefings.
• Assisting you with the ongoing liaison with the media, as well as responding to
inquiries.
• Ensuring that we stay on message and that the daily controversies or news items
don't overwhelm the big picture.

III. WORKING WITH THE FAMILIES

Clearly, the families of those who died on September 11 must be given special attention.
And this is an area in which you have, understandably, had trouble to date. Working
with Emily and Ellie, our work in this area would focus on three major areas:

• Expanding the number of families that are involved, ensure that they understand
what the commission is doing, and build more support within this group.
• Developing and implementing a proactive program for pushing information to them.
• Analyze past media coverage to identify articulate family members who deserve
additional, special attention and can play a more active role now and when the report
is released.

IV. REPORT RELEASE AND ROLLOUT


The first three tasks will set the stage for a successful release of the report. How well
the report is released and promoted will determine not only how the public and key
groups react to it, but how well history will understand and appreciate the commission's
work.

The release and rollout of the report includes two major sub-categories:
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The actual, day-of release and promotion of the report, including the pre-release
briefings.
A series of activities, such as speeches, interviews, and articles that will follow over
the final 60 days after the release.

Budget
As we discussed, the commission's communications challenges are enormous, and we must
meet those challenges in a very short timeframe. When we met last week, we recognized that
what needs to be done most likely exceeds the available resources for doing so. That means
we will need to make some choices during the planning stage, and we will continuously need to
work with you to set priorities and determine the best ways in which we can serve the
commission.

Let's discuss budget parameters and agree on how to proceed.

Again, we appreciate the opportunity to work on this extremely important and challenging
undertaking, and we look forward to beginning very soon.