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Exploring the Feasibility of Developing Online and/or Hybrid Delivery Formats of Selected Lab-Based Science Courses for Adult

Learners

By

Tun K. Nyein, Ph.D.

May 31, 2011

CONTENT TITLE
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

PAGE
3

1. STATE OF THE ART

2. BEST PRACTICES FOR ONLINE SCIENCE COURSES 2.1. Delivery Formats 2.2. Lectures and Lab Videos 2.3. Laboratory Components 2.4. Lab Kits 2.5. Simulations and Virtual Science Labs

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3. ASSESSMENT OF TECHNOLOGY AND SOFTWARE NEEDS 3.1. Technology available at MU 3.2. Other available technology resources

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4. SAMPLES AND RECOMMENDATIONS 4.1. Sample syllabi 4.2. Recommendations

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APPENDICES Appendix 1: BIO 103 Syllabus Appendix 2: BIO 104 Syllabus Appendix 3: BIO 211 Syllabus Appendix 4: BIO 212 Syllabus Appendix 5: BIO 227 Syllabus Appendix 6: PHY 117 Syllabus Appendix 7: PHY 118 Syllabus Appendix 8: CHM 104 Syllabus Appendix 9: CHM 105 Syllabus
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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Introduction As students continue to increasingly choose online classes as part of their quest to earn a degree, universities and colleges developed and began offering the core courses required for graduation via online delivery. Since science lab courses are part of the core requirements for graduation, it is imperative that lab-based science courses are offered as online or hybrid courses to make it possible for non-traditional students to meet the lab science core requirement. This is the same challenge that the adult and continuing education enterprise at Misericordia University faces since all its science courses are provided in semester based format. While several courses have been adapted to nontraditional format, no science courses have been offered in off-campus learning environments either as online courses or in classroom-based or blended/hybrid (7.5 weeks) Expressway format. The courses selected for this feasibility report are: 1. BIO 103-104 (General Biology I & II) 2. BIO 211-212 (A&P I & II) 3. BIO 227 (Bacteriology) 4. PHY 117-118 (Physics Intro I & II) 5. CHM 104 (General Chemistry I) 6. CHM 105 (Intro to Organic).

Barriers As with other universities and colleges who are striving to incorporate laboratory experiments and hands-on activities into science courses in online and other nontraditional formats, Misericordia University has to contend with a number of barriers. Combined with the lack of start-up interest in exploring what is being done by others in this arena, current full-time science faculty hold the notion that it is not possible or it will not be effective since there is lack of familiarity with recognizable and acceptable lab components for lab-based science courses. On the other hand, like many colleges and universities, Misericordia faces the challenges of budgetary constraints, emerging -3-

technology offering new tools, meeting high standards and adult students with diverse needs who could definitely benefit from innovative use of these new methodologies. In this very competitive arena of adult education, Misericordia University has to surmount these barriers and develop strategies for offering online and off-campus programs that embed a winning combination of high-quality, low-cost, relevance, and flexibility if it aspires to be a winner.

The Report This report examines the feasibility of offering Misericordia Universitys lab-based science courses in an online or blended environment. In writing this report, the author engaged in an extensive review of current articles, online learning web-sites, discussion board, trade organization web-sites, conference papers and educational consortia such as Open Course Ware, New Media Consortium, Merlot Organization and Academic Commons that are that are leading initiatives currently affecting the practices of teaching, learning, and creative inquiry. In exploring the feasibility of offering MUs labbased science courses in an online or blended environment, this report addresses the following areas:

1. State of the Art A survey of literature and course websites reveal that universities, colleges, and institutions in Canada, the U.S., Europe, Asia and Australia are actively engaged in delivery of science courses both on and off campus with online labs. The final report will describe in detail, how college lab courses similar to MUs designated science courses are being delivered online and how the requisite components such as lab experiences are integrated into the courses. In terms of feasibility, the state of the art is at a level where beyond college level labbased science courses, leading medical and nursing schools in the US and world wide have come together to form International Virtual Medical School (IVIMEDS) and the International Virtual Nursing School. These schools are developing and sharing resources to deliver lab courses such as the Virtual Anatomy Lab.

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With the Blackboard LMS in place at MU, the two remaining questions with regard to transforming lab courses into virtual environment, two main questions remain: how would the instructors present lecture material and how would the instructors deliver the laboratory activities? Lecture materials are commonly provided text on the Blackboard course site or as streamed video lectures. Additionally, students can receive CDs containing the video lectures and other course material such as software and videos for specific laboratory exercises.

A variety of methods can be employed to provide laboratory experiences to online students. The methods included Lab Kits, Virtual Simulation Labs and Textbook website or CDs providing the software for students to execute at home or a combination of all the strategies. Although more research on effectiveness and learning outcomes of these innovative methodologies is forthcoming extant research findings support the use of virtual laboratories, and virtual laboratory simulations for providing engaged, active learning experiences in physics and biological science education. 2. Best Practices for Online Science Courses 2.1. Delivery formats range from full semester online and hybrid to varying degrees of compressed schedule. Most commonly, courses are offered as 16 weeks fully online, 16 weeks hybrid and as 7-8 weeks hybrid courses with lectures online and labs and exams on campus or at test proctoring sites convenient to students. Sample syllabi of courses comparable to the nine designated courses are examined.

2.2. Lectures and Lab Videos. While many universities employ lecture capture equipment to produce home grown lecture and lab instruction videos, a wealth of high quality video lectures and course material from major research universities and member schools of various consortia are available for free. The report examines a number of those resources .

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2.3. Laboratory Components. Depending on faculty preference, labs for all the designated courses can be integrated as traditional on-campus lab exercises, online exercises or as separate lab kits that student will buy as course requirement. 2.4. Lab Kits. Commonly in an online lab science course, commercially prepared lab kits are utilized for the lab component of the course. LabPaqs are commonly used lab kits and are available for biology (biology I&II, API&II, bacteriology), chemistry (introductory chem., biochemistry) and physics courses. LabPaqs can provide hands-on laboratory experiences in the biological and physical sciences. These LabPaqs contain comprehensive hands-on laboratory experiments that are academically aligned and mirror those performed on campuses around the world. LabPaqs allow instructors to teach sciences completely online, on campus, or in some combination that customizes the laboratory experience for the benefit of their students and their institutions. Products comparable to LabPaq kits are also available from eScience Kits.

2.5. Simulations and Virtual Science Labs. A virtual lab is one that does not physically exist as such but made by software to appear to do so where as simulate is to imitate or reproduce the appearance, character, or conditions of. A simulation uses algorithms (including equations) to create apparent but unreal objects, data, and/or phenomena. These fail to duplicate the real-world aspect of the complexity and ambiguity of empirical work. Not all simulations use computers. For example, a popular simulation used in many classrooms employs colored beads in hands-on mode. Students physically contact the beads and manipulate them. They stand in for DNA, which the students do not touch. This activity is not a hands-on experiment; it is a hands-on simulation. Scientists do use simulations but as a means to test models or to suggest direction to their research. They do not take and analyze simulation data as though it were real. Pilots and surgeons use simulations in training, which has a very different purpose from scientific investigations. Simulations play an important role in the science classroom by

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allowing visualization of difficult concepts and exploration of scientific models, including their limitations. A virtual experiment uses data mediated by a computer. These data may originate from simulations or from the material world. Currently, there is a growing number of virtual science labs on the internet established by research universities such as MIT, private philanthropic institutions such as Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), textbook publishers and trade organizations. Virtual labs are available for chemistry, biology, anatomy and physiology, and physics.

3. Assessment of Technology and Software Needs In this report, the software and technology necessary for delivery of online and hybrid lab-based science courses and estimated costs are assessed. 3.1 Technology available at MU. At Misericordia University, the Blackboard LMS is already in place, so is Wimba and the VBrick lecturing capturing system. 3.2. Other available technology resources. The report will discuss additional technology resources that are available for free and could be used by MU. It will also assess the option of partnering with commercial course developers such as 2Tor, Embanet and LearningHouse.

4. Samples and Recommendations 4.1. Sample syllabi of courses comparable to the nine designated courses are examined and adapted sample syllabi for MU courses are provided. 4.2. Recommendations. Feasible options for meeting technology and training and support needs are identified. Pertinent information with regard to feasibility is included.

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1. STATE OF THE ART

Does the state of the art exist to support delivery of lab science courses? The answer is a resounding yes. It is to be noted that the state of the art has moved beyond delivery of online undergraduate lab science courses to the delivery of higher level professional degrees in engineering and medicine. Though still in relative infancy, online education has reached the level of development at which terminal and professional degrees can be delivered wholly or in part electronically. It is to be noted that international research universities are now in the midst of pioneering a virtual medical university.

In their article on the International Virtual School of Medicine (see box 1 below on IVIMEDS partner schools), Drs. Frank Sullivan and Ronald Harden of the University of Dundee, UK wrote: The future of medical education, facilitated by the new learning technologies and pedagogies, lies in a move from such international interconnected approaches, which emphasize the mobility of students, teachers, and curriculum across the boundaries of two countries, to a transnational approach. Harvard Medical School also offers continuing medical education online. Aside from health-related programs, requisite lab sciences courses are delivered online and in hybrid formats as part of online undergraduate and graduate programs ranging from University of Floridas Doctor of Pharmacy to Master of in Science in Engineering offered by the University of Toledo.

Courses delivered entirely or in part (hybrid) online have obvious advantages with respect to student access and potential cost savings. Thus, over the last several years, the development and delivery of online and hybrid courses have seen a tremendous growth. Interestingly, there is a discernable asymmetry in the number of universities and colleges offering lab science courses vis--vis the technology that already exists to support online laboratory science courses. Besides technology and know-how, there are considerable challenges that stand in the way to offering online laboratory science courses such as faculty resistance, inadequate infrastructure and budgetary restraints. Yet these challenges must be met if undergraduate degree programs for online learners are to be successful since the core -8-

requirements of undergraduate degrees at most universities stipulates completion of at least one laboratory science course, and for all health related majors, at least one semester of laboratory-based general chemistry.

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2. BEST PRACTICES FOR ONLINE SCIENCE COURSES

Review of the best practices literature reveals an implicit assumption that best practices for the large research university are the same as the best practices for a small liberal arts college which in turn are the same as the best practices for a community college. The Sloan Consortium (Sloan-C) recognizes that different size schools have historically implemented online education at different times. In its annual report on online learning, schools are differentiated based on total school enrollment: schools with (1) under 1500 students, (2) 1500 to 2999 students, (3) 3000 to 7499 students, (4) 7500 to 14999 students, and (5) 15000+ students (Allen & Seaman, 2008). Yet, in its sixth annual report on the state of online education, Sloan-C perpetuates the implicit assumption of best practices homogeneity across schools irrespective of size without testing its validity.

2.1. Delivery Formats


Presently, MU is offering these courses in 16 weeks (3 hours a week) face-to-face format or 5 weeks Summer Semester formats. An environmental scan on the internet reveals that online and hybrid courses are offered as full semester online or hybrid and accelerated 8 weeks online or hybrid. However, for hybrid courses, core elements such as lecture, lab component and examinations are packaged in different permutations. Although lectures are almost invariably delivered online, exams and lab activities are stipulated to take place either online or onsite. A number of universities allow students to take off-site albeit proctored exams. Biology I & II 1. Online 16 weeks course with both lecture and lab online. Biology 1. (Harford Community College, MD) Biology I & 2 (Clinton Community College/SUNY) 2. Online 8 weeks course with both lab and lecture components delivered online. Biology I(Columbia Community College MO)

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3. Hybrid 16 weeks course with on campus exams. Biology I and II (Antelope Valley Online, Palmdale CA)) Both lectures online but labs are on campus. Students will meet face-to-face on campus to take the exams. There is going to be (5) scheduled meetings oncampus. The class meets a total of 5 times. The first meeting is a mandatory orientation to the course and the 4 additional meetings including 3 midterms and 1 final.

Biology 211 & 212 1. 16 weeks online lecture and lab API Brevard Community College AP1 AP II Northland CC, MN AP2 API Northland CC, MN AP1 2. 8 weeks online APII Henry Ford CC API University of Texas at Arlington Biology 227 (Microbiology) 1. 16 weeks online Baltimore County CC Muskegon CC Colorado Community College Ocean City College 2. 8 weeks online Kalamazoo Valley Community College Tammy Port

Physics I and II 1. 8 weeks online Physics I University syllabus Physics I Columbia I Physics II Lawrence Tech Univ. MI 2. 16 weeks online Physics II Connecticut State Univ Physics I&II Thomas Edison College

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Chemistry 1. 8 weeks online CHEMII Northern Virginia Community College 2. 16 weeks online San Diego Mesa College University of New England 3.10 weeks online Oregon State University 4. 2 weeks online Oregon State University CHEM I all 3

Organic Chemistry 1. 6 weeks hybrid Oregon State University

2. 16 weeks online University of New England Park College Illinois

2.2. Lectures and Lab Videos


With the Blackboard LMS in place at MU, the two remaining questions with regard to transforming lab courses into virtual environment, two main questions remain: a) how would the instructors present lecture material and b) how would the instructors deliver the laboratory activities? Lecture materials are commonly provided text on the Blackboard course site or as streamed video lectures. Additionally, students can receive CDs containing the video lectures and other course material such as software and videos for specific laboratory exercises. While instructors can develop their own lecture notes and post it on the course website, many textbooks provide a lecture web site with virtual class room - 12 -

Lectures can also be delivered by video-streaming and a world-wide movement of sharing academic resources has burgeoned, giving rise to valuable initiatives such as the open courseware consortium. There is a wealth of invaluable resources available at these open access sites and one is struck by the number of sites and availability of high quality instructional materials shared by hundreds of internationally renowned universities.

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Open Courseware Consortium

There exists now a plethora of valuable resources for video lectures and video labs such as the Free Video Lectures site. Similar to the OCC website, FVL provides searchable course materials with audio video lectures from many colleges and universities. Many universities now share their course materials with other schools and in turn incorporate materials from other schools into their courses as evidence by a list of shared courses for Spring/Winter list of courses shared.

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The list of Anatomy and Physiology courses on FVL site:

API Course Lectures from Hillsborough Community College

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Funded by Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Khan Academy reflects a revolutionary concept of providing a free world class education for anyone anywhere. It provides videos that address concepts in approximately 10 minutes utilizing only audio, diagrams and drawings.

Introduction to Evolution and Natural Selection

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You tube education is a sub-site called YouTube EDU, aggregating thousands of free lectures from over a hundred universities across the country, including MIT, Yale, Harvard, Stanford, and many more.

Organic Chemistry Naming Example

Bio-alive is a life science online video sharing community, and the premier destination to watch and share biology and life science related videos worldwide through the web. Its mission is to promote scientific literacy and web based education by providing an online community for video sharing in all biology and life science related fields. At this site, videos in the fields of biology, medicine and life science including but not limited to laboratory methods, techniques, experimental or operation procedures, lab actions,

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animations, lectures, seminars, meetings, as well as teaching and learning slideshow are freely available.

Lecture Video Search Engine For instructors who are not averse to using shared resources, a search engine dedicated to locating video lectures on desired topics is now available at http://talkminer.com/. This is especially useful for finding lectures on topics that are not commonly available. A manual search for such a topic browsing through different sites would take an inordinate amount of time. The screen capture below shows the result of a search for lipid and lipid metabolism. Obviously despite the growth in open access websites for video lectures, there appears to be a dearth of available shared video lectures on lipid metabolism.

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Many universities have established their own video streaming sites such as the Media Vision site of California State University at Pomona.

2.3. Laboratory Components


Engaging in laboratory experimentation and following the scientific method is universally recognized as the best way to learn science. Regardless of how when or where a science course is taught experimentation that follows the scientific method must be a part of the experience. In exploring the options for providing this experience to online students, it is found that commercially assembled lab kits, kitchen science labs, remote labs and computer simulations are the common approaches to meeting the lab experience need.

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2.4. Lab Kits

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Benefits

Schools using Biology, Chemistry, and Physics LabPaqs:

Universities Black Hills State East Carolina Oklahoma State Texas Tech Florida Colorado Toledo Cleveland State Mississippi State Penn State Erie Thompson Rivers Mass (Lowell) Oregon Colorado State Northern State (SD) Penn State Arizona Minnesota (Duluth) Sioux Falls Drexel Ohio State Rutgers Colorado; Northern South Dakota

Western New Mexico DePaul

Colleges Adams State New Jersey Rhodes State Bacone Hartwick Bermuda Mesa State Colby Mt. Ida;

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A Sample of Lab Science Course Using Lab Kits

1. Anatomy and Physiology http://www.uta.edu/ra/real/syllabi/12862_4019__2457_syllabus.pdf 2. Microbiology 3. Chemistry 4. Human Biology


http://tinyurl.com/3uhrt84 http://tinyurl.com/3uureht http://tinyurl.com/3mst6cz

How a chemistry lab kit is used

2.5. Simulations and Virtual Science Labs


The reason that laboratory sections are needed in science courses is because the best way to learn science is to do science. The activities include making observations, proposing hypotheses, designing experiments, gathering data, performing data analyses, synthesizing the results into a coherent report and these are the activities that allow our students to realize that science is a means of discovery, not a body of facts. Steeped in - 22 -

their traditional pedagogy, professors are wont to look askance at virtual labs. Yet even in a real lab, instructors are limited in the types of lab-based activities they can design because some experiments may be too costly, some dangerous, or time-consuming to include in a typical biology or chemistry course. A careful study of online lab usage reveals that many professors across disciplines are turning to well-designed interactive simulations lab online as a viable alternative on campus web labs.

A prime example is a virtual microscopy lab at Florida State University. Students can experience manipulation and use of a virtual electron microscope that award-winning electron microscopist Dr. Dennis Kunkle developed a series of interactive Java tutorials that explore various aspects of virtual Scanning Electron Microscopy (vSEM). Students can use the tutorial to discover how specimens appear when magnified in the virtual SEM. Similarly, a biology student can not only study mitosis from an animation but the java applet allows him/her to move through different phases of mitosis by manipulating the applet.

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How Virtual Labs Are Used In Online Courses Biology I & II A Virtual Lab Provided by McGraw Hill Text Book

Anatomy and Physiology I & II

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Microbiology

College Physics Lab Course (Click on each lab activity) College Physics Lab Course Example II

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Chemistry using Commercial Lab

Open Learning Initiative: resource for course materials Thanks to a growing open access movement, many resource centers such as OpenCourseWare and Freevideo Lectures, HHMI and Merlot have emerged to assist course instructors in developing their online courses. One great place to go to is the OpenLearningInitiative (http://oli.web.cmu.edu/openlearning/forinstructors) website at the Carnegie Mellon University. The Open Learning Initiative offers instructors a variety - 26 -

of resources designed to support teaching practice. To get an idea of how online science courses are developed and taught online, one could select a discipline from a list on OLI site. Step 1. Access OLI

Step 2. Pick a course, then join class for free or peek in

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Step 3. Study the content

Step 4. Check out the simulations and lab exercises.

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Howard Hughes Medical Institute HHMI is a nonprofit medical research organization that ranks as one of the nations largest philanthropies. The Institute spent $776 million for research and distributed $1.6 million in grant support for science education in fiscal year 2010. Through its grants to individuals and institutions, HHMI supports scientists and educators who seek to transform the way science is taught in schools, colleges and universities across the nation. HHMI grantees have created a wealth of resources that you can adapt to your own needs or use as inspiration for your own teaching. The Cool Science web page at HHMI is a database that contains a wide range of resourcesfrom lesson plans and detailed curricula to tutorials, animations and laboratory exercisesfor educators at all levels.

Other Resources Online Labs serve as a comprehensive, encyclopedic reference about online labs in a variety of subjects, particularly virtual laboratory simulations for science education. We categorize useful listings for online lab simulations, virtual science experiments and free educational software. It offers current resources in Chemistry, Physics and Biology to help learners identify free and commercial virtual science labs. It also offers online educational resources and information about simulations and free software in Anatomy, Geology, Astronomy, Design and Math. Virtual Labs from McGraw Hill Virtual Class Room from McGraw Hill Virtual Labs from Pearson Education - 29 -

These virtual labs are created in partnership with Bringham Young University and are commercially products (demo)

Testing Lab Practical Skills Testing lab skills vary from institution to institution and the following are the different options: Option 1. For hybrid courses, exams and lab activities are conducted on-campus. Option 2. Lectures and Lab both delivered online but exams are taken on campus as in the case of Texas Tech. Option 3. Lectures and Lab and exams are taken online as in Oregon State U. Option 4. All web courses require proctored exams and the process is well described at the UMUC Testing and Exams Service.

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3. ASSESSMENT OF TECHNOLOGY AND SOFTWARE NEEDS


In this report, the software and technology necessary for delivery of online and hybrid lab-based science courses and estimated costs are assessed. At Misericordia University, the Blackboard Learning Management System (LMS) is already in place and so is the VBrick lecturing capturing system. The report will also assess the option of partnering with commercial course developers such as 2Tor, Embanet and LearningHouse.

The technology infra structure at Misericordia University, though not cutting edge, is adequate to commence offering of lab-based sciences online. Misericordia University already possesses essential means to pilot lab-based science courses online/hybrid that will enable adult students to satisfy general education core requirements.

3.1. Technology available at MU


Blackboard Learning Management System The blackboard LMS is an adequate platform for standardized online course delivery. In the above report, many online courses given as examples are delivered via individual websites with no standardized format or branding. Blackboard at MU eliminates that problem. Lecture videos and accompanying lecture texts and notes can be linked to the course website. Furthermore, it enables the university to implement controlled access.

Wimba Video-conferencing/collaborating software integrated into Blackboard is also a valuable tool for synchronous class discussion but beyond that the sessions can be recorded and archived. This capability can be leveraged to develop video lectures for individual faculty. In particular, Wimba can be used for presentations of course materials and for diagrams with the instructors lecture voiced over the slides. A good model is the lectures videostreamed and vodcasted by the University Of South Carolina School Of Medicine whereby the instructor is not seen but the lectures are voiced over slides. Wimba can also

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be used for delivering Lab Instructions in conjunction with virtual lab exercises or use of Lab Kits.

VBrick Ideally, a university should have a dedicated site for delivery of not only video-streamed lectures for public relations and general communication purposes. With VBrick deployed in the College of Health Sciences, the University already commands the basic means to record, store and stream video lectures.

3.2. Other available technology resources


Delivery on Youtube Education Channel. Leading research universities streaming video lectures is now a widely prevalent educational practice and a typical webcast site such as Berkeleys is impressive and costly. Interestingly, despite having their dedicated campus webcast sites, they are developing free access channels on facilities such as YouTube education channels. Currently, MU already has established a YouTube channel and which could be used effectively as additional venue for delivery of online video lectures as is being done by many universities and colleges. The downside of this resource is that MUs lectures will be open to the general public.

Screen casting With vBrick lecture capturing system already deployed by the College of Health Sciences, MU has the means to develop video lectures. However, even motivated faculty will have to dedicate time to be at the facility to record a lecture and more often than not, such a scheduled event in and of itself can pose as a barrier. This barrier may be overcome by a less technology intensive effort such as screen casting. A screen cast is a digital movie in which the setting is partly or wholly a computer screen, and in which audio narration describes the on-screen action. In short it is a technology that enables instructors to capture events on their own computer screen replete with audio narration. - 32 -

The needed software such as Camtasia that will video capture, edit and compress the recorded files is already available at CETL. Khan Academy utilizes similar technology to create to create highly effective educational videos which have become the hallmark of successful quality online instruction. To learn more about Salman Khan and the Khan Academy, please see his recent interview with Charlie Rose. Conceivably, a more accessible and widespread use of this technology among faculty may possibly be effected by acquiring professional use license of an online site such as the Screen-cast-omatic. To conclude, a close assessment of technology and software at Misericordia University reveals that though scattered, available technology assets can be garnered to support delivery of lab-based science courses.

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4. SAMPLES AND RECOMMENDATIONS

4.1. Sample Syllabi


Sample syllabi from other universities Sample syllabi of online/hybrid courses from colleges and universities comparable to MUs nine designated courses are provided in this report. In collecting the samples, it became evident that universities and colleges that are serious players in the online education enterprise do not make available to the public full versions of their online science syllabi. It is almost a standard practice for these universities to make course syllabi with course outline and timeline available only to enrolled students. In the main, the samples provided in this report contain course description with information pertaining to how a course will be delivered, the length of the course, how lab sessions will be conducted-online or on campus and other housekeeping information.

Adapted online/hybrid syllabi Based upon the syllabi of the nine designated courses provided by Misericordia University, adapted sample syllabi are developed and presented as Appendices 1 to 9. It is to be noted that course syllabi provided by MU are disparate in their format, and vary in their content with regard to standard elements. Where course objectives or outlines or schedules are missing, suggested versions are included in the adapted syllabi. All the adapted versions are based upon an (8) week accelerated online/hybrid delivery format. Each adapted syllabus contains: a course outline/schedule, sample video lectures from Open Access Institutions, reading assignments from the websites of prescribed texts, sample online lab exercises where possible, and sources of publicly available video lectures online and open and commercial sources of online lab and tutorial activities. The lab activities as mentioned earlier in this report can be delivered via online virtual labs. These labs are available either as open access virtual labs or commercially available sites often packaged with textbooks. Where possible, a free online textbook under

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academic or creative commons license is included. For most of the designated courses, commercially prepared Lab Kits are available and thus pictorial examples of the kits and experiments that come with each kit and web-source are also provided. It is up to the instructors to determine how and when exams and quizzes are to be conducted. Topic appropriate online lab activities are included in some courses but for courses that this author is less familiar with, lab exercises are described and sources are hyperlinked but selection of appropriate lab activities remains firmly within in the ambit of instructors. In the original syllabi provided by MU, certain course policies such as requiring regular class attendance are incongruent with online courses and duly redacted from the versions adapted for online delivery. PDE Compliance. Based on the syllabi of traditional science courses, the adapted syllabi contain elements to demonstrate how lab-based sciences can be taught online. Theses sample adapted syllabi may not be compliant with PDE guidelines. Thus in actual development and delivery online of these courses, it will be incumbent upon instructors to assemble their course elements in such a way as to comply with the PDE guideline. It is imperative that this particular exercise be an integral part of faculty training and course development process. The PDE Guideline and Template can be obtained from the Center for Adult and Continuing education.

4.2. Recommendations
Delivery format In a survey of online/hybrid science courses with lab component, 8 weeks accelerated courses or 16 weeks full semester are almost the standard with a few varying from 2 weeks to 10 weeks timelines. In light of MUs Expressway Program, an 8 weeks accelerated course closely approximates the 7 1/2 weeks course that students are currently accustomed. Thus it is recommended that the lab-based science courses be structured as 8 weeks accelerated courses.

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Online or hybrid The decision to offer a lab-based science course either fully online or as a hybrid course is largely contingent on the opinion and expertise of the content owners. Thus the determination to offer a course as hybrid should be made by the respective academic departments and faculty members. However, the decision should be made in full cognizance of the possibility that hybridization reduces the flexibility of the option often critical to nontraditional students and thus mitigating its reach to the target audience.

Lectures While a medley of technology-mediated and impressive options exists for delivering online lectures, a number of issues are inherent in each option. Remarkably, with the burgeoning movement of open access to education, many high quality courses and with video lectures, virtual labs and other courseware are made available for free by leading universities. Yet, for a variety of reasons, instructors may remain inclined to use their own customized, home grown lectures and course materials. Migrating from a traditional classroom to an online environment, developing lectures and course material entail substantial amount of time, effort and resources. Thus for the initial launch of the online courses, and in the ensuing near term, commercially available course materials such as lectures, online assignment websites and even open coursewares should be looked at as interim options where possible.

Lab Components Many open access virtual labs have been described and hotlinks provided in this report. But from operational standpoint, these free virtual labs with a few exceptions are individual projects with unreliable sustainability. In light of this unreliability, it is recommended that the science courses anchor their lab components on commercially available Lab Kits or fee-based virtual labs. Since Lab Kits can be used at home, the need for on-campus lab sessions will be eliminated and flexibility enhanced by making a fully online delivery of the course amenable. While an additional cost of $200 to $300 for the Lab Kits might make the course less attractive to students, operationally, the use of Lab Kits is the recommended option. - 36 -

Faculty Training Science faculty who will be delivering web-based lab science courses will need two categories of training. The first category of skills needed is online teaching skills. It is true that high quality video lectures readily available through open access can be integrated into an online course augmented with lab kits and lab manuals. But in the course of their online teaching, instructors will develop desire and need to create their own course materials such as tutorials that are interactive and engaging. To that end science faculty need instruction in web-authoring, scanning, digital photography sound over and screencasting. MU has in place a full-time instructional designer and instructional technologist in the persons of Rich Hancuff and Alex Sergay respectively. They can provide the skills training based on a well structured training protocols. It is recommended that the faculty training team comprised of Rich and Alex plan and develop training protocols in two categories of skills, namely online course development and online teaching.

Software Both IT and CETL can make available to faculty, software such as Dreamweaver for web-authoring and Camtasia for screencasting and sound over. However, Dreamweaver is a sophisticated software with a high learning curve. A simpler version for beginners is SoftChalk which is widely used by faculty who lack time to learn new complicated web authoring software. For sound over, Jing is available online for free with an annual subscription rate of $14.50 for the use of a professional version.

Revenue Sharing Partnerships As a comprehensive teaching university, faculty at MU carry heavy teaching loads and it is particularly so for the Biology professors. Thus while requisite infrastructure including hardware and software needs are adequate to support development of online lab science courses, it is likely that faculty may not have the time needed to train, learn and then develop quality online lab courses. If such a situation prevails, then the recommended option is to partner with course/program development companies which operate on a - 37 -

revenue sharing basis. Among the leading names in this arena are 2Tor, Embanet and LearningHouse. For smaller universities with limited resources, this option offers comprehensive solutions to online education program/course development and obviates the need to make substantial upfront investment.

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APPENDICES

APPENDIX 1

Biology 103: General Biology I Online


Location: Online
Room: 113 Science Building Instructor: Office: Phone: 674-XXXX Email: xxxx@misericordia.edu Office Hours: By appointment Adapted from syllabus provided by MU by Tun K. Nyein, Ph.D. (Note: The adapter has inserted a suggested COURSE SCHEDULE in line with an 8 week course. The instructors will select Lab activities from the options suggested. The instructors will also determine how and when the exams, lab tests and quizzes will be given. )

Text: Essential Biology, 3rd Edition, by N. Campbell, J. Reece & E. Simon


Pearson Education/Benjamin Cummings, Inc., San Francisco, CA. 2004

Video Lectures : 1. University of California, Berkeley, General Biology I 43 lectures


2. Khan Academy (They are used under open license from Creative Commons.)

Lab Kit: (Note to instructors. There are virtual micro labs but if you prefer students to
have the touch and feel of experiments this is the option. The BK-1 comes with 28 experiments. The cost is $199 per student. Experiments include :
01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 The Scientific Method The Macrobiome The Microbiome Macromolecules of Life Cell Membrane Transport Photosynthesis & Respiration DNA & Protein Synthesis Extraction of DNA Plant Genetics Phenotype and Genotype 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Primate Characteristics Classification of Species Microbes Everywhere Conditions to Grow Molds Fungi and Seeds Plant Structures Plant Reproduction Homeostasis Comparing Arthropods Functions of Bones

21 22 23 24 25 26

Human Behavior Muscle Fatigue Chemoreceptors Respiration Spread of Contagion Mitosis

Note: The textbook provides its own (Campbell) - 39 -

OnlineLabs: 1. Biology Labs (from OKCCC) 2. Biology Lab (from Northwest Arkansas CC) 3. Online Lab (Provided by Publisher of Campbell)

Course Objectives:
1. To develop an understanding of fundamental biological principles. 2. To develop an understanding of scientific method. 3. To develop and interest in an appreciation of the nature and diversity of living organisms. 4. To develop a responsible attitude towards all living things and towards questions of the environment. 5. To develop the ability to make responsible and informed decisions regarding questions involving biological and environmental issues.

Course Policy:
To view a demonstration course for details about taking an on-line course, please go to the following address: http://www.misericordia.edu/xxx/xxx Student Conduct The instructor reserves the right to manage a positive learning environment and thus will not tolerate inappropriate conduct in the course. All MU students, whether enrolled in a face-to-face or on-line course, are responsible for behaving in a manner consistent with Misericordia Universitys Code of Student Conduct and Ethics Code for Computer Users

Course Schedule
BIO 103 Schedule BIO 103 Schedule

Week

Topic

Lectures& Reading Assignments


Chapter 1: What is Life? Lecture 1

Lab Activities

I. CELLS

Lab Options Instructor will select appropriate activities from the following:

Reading Assignment from Text Select assigned chapter

Complete Lab Experiement 1 Scientific Method

- 40 -

Complete Lab Experiment 2. Organic Molecule QUIZ Ch. (1 and 2)

2. Essential Chemistry for Biology

Chapter 2: Cells and the Chemistry of Life Lecture 2 Lecture 3

Reading Assignment from Text Select assigned chapter

3. The Molecules of Life

Chapter 3. The Molecules of Life Lecture 4 Lecture 5

Ch. 3 Take Activities Quiz from text site for assigned chapter

Reading Assignment from Text Select assigned chapter

Complete Lab 3: Cells & Membrane Take Activities Quiz from text site for assigned chapter Complete Lab Experiment 4:
Cells

4. A Tour of the Cell

Chapter 4: Cell Structure Lecture 6 Lecture 7

- 41 -

Reading Assignment from Text Select assigned chapter

Respiration

EXAM I

3 5. The Working Cell

Chapter 5. The Cell At Work

Lecture 8 Lecture 9

Reading Assignment from Text Select assigned chapter

Take Activities Quiz from text site for assigned chapter The Cell At Work Review Animation Video cell transport Khan Academy Complete Lab Experiment 5: Diffusion & Osmosis Announce term paper topic on forum for approval Complete Test #1 (Ch 1-4) Ch. 6 Read assigned chapter Take Activities Quiz from text site for assigned chapter Review the Video Lecture Cell Respiration Review Animation Video How Cells take in and Use Energy Khan Academy Complete Lab Experiments Respiration Paper Topic Due. Quizz Take Activities Quiz from text site for assigned chapter

4 6. Cellular Respiration: Obtaining Energy from Food

Chapter 6: Cellular Respiration Lecture 10

Lecture 11
Reading Assignment from Text Select assigned chapter

5 7. Photosynthesis:

Chapter 7: Photosynthesis - 42 -

Using Light to Make Food

Lecture 12 Lecture 13

Complete Lab Experiments Photosynthesis Respiration Paper Topic Due. Qizz EXAM II (Ch 5-7)

Reading Assignment from Text Select assigned chapter

Chapter 8 The Cell Cycle 8. Cellular Reproduction: Cells from Cells Lecture 14 Lecture 15

Take Activities Quiz from text site for assigned chapter


Reading Assignment from Text Select assigned chapter

Review Meiosis video Review Mitosis animation Complete Lab Experiments 8 Cell Cycle Rough Draft of Term Paper

9. Patterns of Inheritance Genetics

Chapter 9: Patterns of Inheritance

Take Activities Quiz from text site for assigned chapter

Lecture 16 Lecture 17

Complete Lab Experiments 9 Genetics

Reading Assignment from Text Select assigned chapter

10. Molecular Biology

Readings: Chapter 10: Molecular - 43 -

Take Activities Quiz

Biology

from text site for assigned chapter

Lecture 18 Lecture 19

Complete Lab Experiment 10 DNA

Reading Assignment from Text Select assigned chapter

Term Paper Due EXAM III (Ch 810)


Complete Course Evaluation

Grading:
Exams (THREE I-hour exams) 300 pts Research Paper 50 pts Laboratory 120 pts Quizzes 75 pts --------------------------------------------------------------TOTAL 545 pts Exams will consist of multiple-choice questions; fill in the blank and short answer essays. You will be responsible for all the material covered in lecture and the assigned readings in the text. Quizzes will be based on the material covered in the previous lectures. The Research paper must be at least 3 but no more then 5 pages in length (this does not include a title page or reference list), Times New Roman 12 pt. font, and double spaced with I inch margins. You may select any topic within the area of DNA Technology, or Biotechnology (see Chapter 12 in your textbook for ideas). You must cite all your sources throughout the text; plagiarism will not be tolerated! Citations can be done in either APA or MLA style. At least one of your references must be a scientific article.

Grading System: A 93+ C+ 77-79


A- 90-92 C 73-76 B+ 86-89 C- 70-72 B 83-85 D 60-69 B- 80-82 F <60

- 44 -

RULES FOR SUCCESS: a. Dont miss lecture or lab. Even though this is an On-Line class you need to set aside dedicated time every week to read your text, cover the lecture PowerPoint or lecture videos, animations, slides, and do the assigned and recommended activities. Do not procrastinate! There is simply too much material covered too rapidly to catch up if you get behind. TAKE NOTES on what you read in your text and off the lecture slides, dont just read them. Students who actively take notes and do the activities generally learn the material better than those who dont. You may want to use the Note Taking Pages available for each chapter. b. Be consistent. Determine when you can regularly attend class on-line. You need to make an agreement with yourself at the outset of the course and stick to it as to when youll study General Biology. Students who vary their study time generally do not do as well as those who set aside the same time every week for study. c. Keep up by studying regularly. You will not succeed in this course if you wait until the week before an exam to study. You must drill on the material as it is presented. d. Manage your time well. Schedule study time every day. In all college/university classes you should expect to study a minimum of 2-3 hours OUTSIDE OF CLASS TIME for each credit hour of class. General Biology is a four (4) hour course so you should expect to spend at least 8 12 hours a week studying for this course. This is not like any other on-line class you may have taken. I will give you a time limit in which to cover the assigned material. You may not work ahead nor will I allow make-up or late work. e. Study the right stuff. The purpose of a lecture is to direct your attention to what you need to know. The notes clearly state what you are expected to learn. I do not cover every topic in the text and you are responsible for those topics I do cover in class. You will also be responsible for any outside reading (usually in your textbook) that I assign you. Recopying your notes and making flash cards are two essential techniques. Students find that copying off the "Note Taking Pages" before starting the PowerPoint lectures is helpful. f. Practice! Practice! Practice! After learning your notes, put yourself in a test situation by answering each chapters checkpoint and review questions, and then the activities. g. If youre having difficulty, get help early. The sooner you seek help, the more options I have to help you improve your learning. Ask me questions in the Discussion Board under Student Questions. h. Improve your test-taking skills. Well cover this in more detail before the first exam. - 45 -

i. DO the Written Assignments, Homework Assignments, Worksheets, Group Discussion, and Group Discussion Quizzes! The written assignments, homework, worksheets, and group discussions are designed to assist you in learning the course material. Grades are based on the assumption you are completing the Written Assignments, Homework, Worksheets, and Group Discussion Quizzes. Failure to do all the Written Assignments, Homework, and Worksheets, and Group Discussion Quizzes may negatively affect your grade as they are worth about (xx%) of your lecture grade.

- 46 -

APPENDIX 2

Biology 104: General Biology II Online


Adapted from syllabus provided by MU by Tun K. Nyein, Ph.D. ( Note: The adapter has inserted a suggested a COURSE SCHEDULE in line with an 8 week course. The instructors will select Lab activities from the options suggested. The instructors will also determine how and when the exams, lab tests and quizzes will be given. ) Location: Online Instructor: Cell Phone: (570 xxx-xxxx E-mail: instructor@misericordia.edu Office Hours: By appointment only TEXT: Essential Biology, 4th Edition, by N. Campbell, J. Reece, E. Simon & J. Dickey. Benjamin Cummings, Inc., San Francisco, CA. 2010. _______________________________________________________________________ Course Objectives: 1. To develop an understanding of fundamental biological principles. 2. To develop an understanding of the scientific method. 3. To develop an interest in and appreciation of the nature and diversity of living organisms. 4. To develop a responsible attitude towards all living things and towards questions of the environment. 5. To develop the ability to make responsible and informed decisions regarding questions involving biological and environmental issues.

Course Objectives Related to the Core Curriculum:


1. Use quantitative data and pictorial representation of that data to present arguments and information. 2. Use data in the construct ion of an argument. 3. Apply the scientific process to test hypotheses, propositions and solutions. 4. Make use of major scientific and mathematical theories, concepts and principles. 5. Demonstrate knowledge of the basic content, organization, concepts and paradigms of biological/physical science.

Course Policies: Academic Integrity: Any form of cheating, plagiarism or dishonesty will result in a
grade of zero (0) for the work involved (i.e. exam, lab report ... ). Repeated infractions of academic integrity could lead to dismissal from the course. Refer to the current catalog for

- 47 -

Misericordia University's Academic Integrity Policy.

Grading: Exams/Project (3 @ 15% each) Laboratory Reflection Papers (5 @ 5% each)

45% 30% 25% 100%

Grading System: A 93+ C+ 77-79 A- 90-92 C 73-76 B+ 86-89 C- 70-72 B 83-85 D 60-69 B- 80-82 F <60 You are expected to complete all the assigned readings, video lectures and online lab exercises. This will allow you to better follow and understand the material. Exams will consist of multiple-choice and open-ended questions. You will be responsible for all the material covered in lecture videos, assigned readings in the text and supplemental information given by the instructor. Reflection papers will be completed monthly for a total of five (5). Each paper will be a reflection of a news article or a response to a question in class or in blackboard. The papers are expected to have the following format: 1. Typed in Times New Roman 12 pt. font. 2. Have a length of 1-2 double spaced pages. 3. Have the C~lUrse number, date and student's name in the upper left hand comer. Papers will be e-mailed to instructor or uploaded to Blackboard prior to class.

COURSE OUTLINE

Week

Readings and Exercises


Chapter 13: Evolution

Online Activities
Ch. I Read assigned chapter Take Activities Quiz from text site for assigned chapter Review the Video Lectures Theory of Evolution: selection inheritance and history microevolution macroevolution Genetic Drift Darwins Legacy

- 48 -

Complete Lab Experiment I: Pattern of Development

Chapter 14.

Ch. 14 Read assigned chapter Take Activities Quiz from text site for assigned chapter Review the Video Lecture Why so many species Species and Speciation Complete Lab Experiment 2 Speciation QIZZ Ch. (13 and 14)

Chapter 15. Evolution of Microorganisms

Ch. 15 Read assigned chapter Take Activities Quiz from text site for assigned chapter Review the Video Lecture Microbial Evolution Pt.1,2,3,4 Complete Lab 3: Viruses and simple organisms Cells & Membrane Announce term paper topic on forum for approval Complete Test #1 (Ch 13-14)

- 49 -

Chapter 16: Plants and Fungi

Ch. 16 Read assigned chapter Take Activities Quiz from text site for assigned chapter Review the Video Lecture Plant and fungi diversity Importance of Fungi Complete Lab Experiment 4: Plant growth and reproduction EXAM I

Chapter 17: Animals

Ch. 17 Read assigned chapter Take Activities Quiz from text site for assigned chapter Review the Video Lecture Human Evolution Review Video Phylogenetics Complete Lab Experiment 5: Animal Diversity Announce term paper topic on forum for approval

Chapter 18:

Ch. 18 Read assigned chapter Take Activities Quiz from text site for assigned chapter Review the Video Lecture Ecology of Individuals and Species Review Video Lecture Population Growth Complete Lab Experiments 6: Ecology and Behavior

- 50 -

Paper Topic Due. Quizz Ch. 19 Read assigned chapter Take Activities Quiz from text site for assigned chapter Review the Video Lecture Community Ecology 1 Community Ecology 2 Complete Lab Experiments7: Global Environment Paper Topic Due. Qizz

Chapter 19: Ecology of Communities and Ecosystems

Chapter 20: Human Impact

EXAM II (Ch 15-17) Ch. 20 Read assigned chapter Take Activities Quiz from text site for assigned chapter Review the Video Lecture Ecology and the Environment Review Video Lecture Human Impact and Environment Economic Impact of Population Growth Review text Complete Lab Experiments 8: Pollutants

Term Paper Due EXAM III (Ch18 -20)


Complete Course Evaluation

RULES FOR SUCCESS: a. Dont miss lecture or lab. Even though this is an On-Line class you need to set aside dedicated time every week to read your text, cover the lecture PowerPoint or lecture - 51 -

videos, animations, slides, and do the assigned and recommended activities. Do not procrastinate! There is simply too much material covered too rapidly to catch up if you get behind. TAKE NOTES on what you read in your text and off the lecture slides, dont just read them. Students who actively take notes and do the activities generally learn the material better than those who dont. You may want to use the Note Taking Pages available for each chapter.

b. Be consistent. Determine when you can regularly attend class on-line. You need to make an agreement with yourself at the outset of the course and stick to it as to when youll study General Biology. Students who vary their study time generally do not do as well as those who set aside the same time every week for study. c. Keep up by studying regularly. You will not succeed in this course if you wait until the week before an exam to study. You must drill on the material as it is presented. d. Manage your time well. Schedule study time every day. In all college/university classes you should expect to study a minimum of 2-3 hours OUTSIDE OF CLASS TIME for each credit hour of class. General Biology is a four (4) hour course so you should expect to spend at least 8 12 hours a week studying for this course. This is not like any other on-line class you may have taken. I will give you a time limit in which to cover the assigned material. You may not work ahead nor will I allow make-up or late work. e. Study the right stuff. The purpose of a lecture is to direct your attention to what you need to know. The notes clearly state what you are expected to learn. I do not cover every topic in the text and you are responsible for those topics I do cover in class. You will also be responsible for any outside reading (usually in your textbook) that I assign you. Recopying your notes and making flash cards are two essential techniques. Students find that copying off the "Note Taking Pages" before starting the PowerPoint lectures is helpful. f. Practice! Practice! Practice! After learning your notes, put yourself in a test situation by answering each chapters checkpoint and review questions, and then the activities. g. If youre having difficulty, get help early. The sooner you seek help, the more options I have to help you improve your learning. Ask me questions in the Discussion Board under Student Questions. h. Improve your test-taking skills. Well cover this in more detail before the first exam. - 52 -

i. DO the Written Assignments, Homework Assignments, Worksheets, Group Discussion, and Group Discussion Quizzes! The written assignments, homework, worksheets, and group discussions are designed to assist you in learning the course material. Grades are based on the assumption you are completing the Written Assignments, Homework, Worksheets, and Group Discussion Quizzes. Failure to do all the Written Assignments, Homework, and Worksheets, and Group Discussion Quizzes may negatively affect your grade as they are worth about (xx%)of your lecture grade. -

- 53 -

APPENDIX 3

Biology 211: Anatomy and Physiology I (Online 8 week course adapted to MU Fall 2009 syllabus)
Adapted from syllabus provided by MU by Tun K. Nyein, Ph.D. ( Note: The adapter has inserted a suggested a COURSE SCHEDULE in line with an 8 week course. The instructors will select Lab activities from the options suggested. The instructors will also determine how and when the exams, lab tests and quizzes will be given. )

Location: Online
(Sunday 8:00 am-12:30pm, 1:00pm-4:30pm) ( Instructor: Mary James) Email: mjames@misericordia.edu

TEXT: Human Anatomy and Physiology, 8th edition, Elaine Marieb


Human Anatomy and Physiology Manual, 8th edition, Elaine Marieb

Video Lectures : 1. Hillsboro Community College, Anatomy & PhysiologyI 23 lectures


(They are used under open license from Creative Commons.)

Lab Kit: (Note to instructors. There are virtual micro labs but if you prefer students to
have the touch and feel of experiments this is the option. The AP-1 CAT comes with 12 experiments. The cost is $365 per student. Experiments include: 01 Using the Microscope 02 Histology 03 Classification of Body Membranes 04 Overview of the Skeletal System 05 The Axial and Appendicular Skeleton 06 Joints and Body Movements 07 Organization of Muscle Tissue 08 Gross Anatomy of the Muscular System 09 Muscle Physiology 10 Organization of Nervous Tissue 11 Gross Anatomy of the Central Nervous System 12 Reflex and Sensory Physiology . Note: This version of Bio 211 does not have Course Description, Objectives or Learning Outcomes. Following are suggested Description and Learning Objectives.

- 54 -

Content: this course, the first of a two course sequence, introduces the student to the
structure and function of the human body, to include cells, tissues, skin, bones, muscles, and nervous systems. Wherever applicable, anatomical relationships are correlated to health and disease.

Course Objectives: At the end of the course the student will be able to:
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. recognize anatomical and physiological terminology; apply the concept of homeostasis to human physiological activity; classify the organic and inorganic chemicals as they relate to the human body; describe cell structure and cellular activity; discuss anatomical and physiological features of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems (including special senses); 6. evaluate select pathological conditions as they relate to normal functioning of the above-named systems.

Grading:
Students will be graded out of a total of 950 points which are distributed as follows: Test 1 - 200 points Test 2 - 200 points Test 3 - 150 points Lab Test 1 -150 points Lab Test 2 - 150 points Quizzes(2) - 50 points Assignments(2) - 50 points There is no extra credit. Grades will be assigned as follows: 855-950 A 807-854 B+ 760-806 B 712-759 C+ 665-711 C 570-664 D <570 F All Grades will be posted in the Grade Book in Blackboard for this class STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY You are expected to complete all the assigned readings, video lectures and online lab exercises. This will allow you to better follow and understand the material. Exams will consist of multiple-choice and open-ended questions. You will be responsible for all the material covered in lecture videos, assigned readings in the text and supplemental information given by the instructor. TEST FORMAT: Tests will consist of M.C., T or F, diagrams, completions, short answers or essays. Material will come from video lecture, lecture notes, text material cited/assigned in class and handouts. - 55 -

WITHDRAWAL POLlCY - There will be no withdrawals after the official withdrawal date. COURSE SCHEDULE AND OUTLINE Lab Activities Week Topic Chapter Lectures (50min.)Lectures from 1 Basic Chapter 1. An Hiilsboro CC. Lab Options Chemistry/ Overview of Lecture 1 (Intro, Instructor will Biochemistry Anatomy and Homeostatis,Tissues) select Anatomical Physiology, 2 appropriate Terms Chapter 2. Lecture 2. (Cells) activities from Homeostasis Chemistry Comes the following: Cell Structure Alive PowerPoint (chapter Chapter 3. Cells: 1) 1. Lab Paq. AP-1 CAT comes with The Living Units 12 experiments. PowerPoint (chapter 2) PowerPoint (chapter 3) Group discussion on Wimba

Virtual Labs: 1. Virtual Web Anatomy 2. Virtual Cat Dissection (from Penn State) 3. Virtual Histology Lab (Univ.of Oklahoma

1.Review Anatomic Terms Chapter 2 (hand out) Lab. assign.


1.Homeostasis 2.Microscop e 3. Review and selftest Biochemistry

Tissues, Chapter 4. Tissue: Lecture 3 (Tissues) Integumentary The Living Fabric system Chapter 5. The Lecture 4 Integumentary (Integument) System Lecture 5 (Bone t/s)

1.General Histology, Skin (handout lab manual)

2.Quizz 1-25 pts.is due. PowerPoint (chapter 3. Biochemistry

- 56 -

4) PowerPoint (chapter 6) Group Discussion on Wimba (1 hour)

Lab

Reproduction, Chapter 28/29 Nervous Tissue, Chapter 11

Lecture (Female Reproductive System) Lecture (Male reproductive System)

1. Lecture Test I covers


Chemistry/ Biochemistry,Cells, Anatomical Terms & Homeostasis. 2. Cat Dissection, Models (lab Tissues, Integument, manual pages 800804; handout)

Lecture (Nervous Tissue)

PowerPoint (chapter 3. Review Histology 28,) PowerPoint (chapter 29) PowerPoint (chapter 11) Group Discussion on Wimba (1 hour)

4 Spinal Cord Chapter 12 Brain/PNS Chapter 13 Lecture (Brain) Lecture (Brain 2) PowerPoint (chapter 12) PowerPoint (chapter 13) Group Discussion on Wimba (1 hour)
1. Review Nervous Tissue

2. Lab Test I
covers Microscope, Histology & Reproductive Models 3.Assignment on Nervous Tissue 4. Dissect Brain (lab manual handed out - due (date) pages 214-

- 57 -

218; handout) Study Models

Special Senses, Chapter 15 Autonomic Nervous System, Chapter 14

Lecture (ANS) Lecture (Sensory Pathways) Lecture (The Eye) Lecture (Vision: Challenges & Prospects) Animation (The Ear) Lecture PowerPoint (chapter 14) PowerPoint (chapter 15) Group Discussion on Wimba (1 hour)

1. Quiz 2 - Brain
In Class

2. Sensory Labs I & II Assignment 2 is due (handout; parts of lab book extracted from exercises 23-26)

Skeletal System, Chapter 6, Articulations, Chapter 8

Lecture (Axial Skeletal Sys.) Lecture (Bones)

1.Lecture Test II - covers Reproduction, Nervous Tissue, Brain, Spinal cord, PNS & ANS 2. Skeletal System

PowerPoint (chapter Lab.( (handout, lab manual pages 906))


131)

PowerPoint (chapter 8) Group Discussion on Wimba (1 hour) Continue Lecture (Joints) skeletal lab as

Lecture Test 111covers Special - 58 -

Senses, Skeletal System & Articulations 8 Lab Test II (Practical) (bones, joints, eye & ear anatomy)

above Group Discussion on Wimba (1 hour)

Lecture 9 muscle) RULES FOR SUCCESS: a. Dont miss lecture or lab. Even though this is an On-Line class you need to set aside dedicated time every week to read your text, cover the lecture PowerPoint or lecture videos, animations, slides, and do the assigned and recommended activities. Do not procrastinate! There is simply too much material covered too rapidly to catch up if you get behind. TAKE NOTES on what you read in your text and off the lecture slides, dont just read them. Students who actively take notes and do the activities generally learn the material better than those who dont. You may want to use the Note Taking Pages available for each chapter.

b. Be consistent. Determine when you can regularly attend class on-line. You need to make an agreement with yourself at the outset of the course and stick to it as to when youll study General Biology. Students who vary their study time generally do not do as well as those who set aside the same time every week for study. c. Keep up by studying regularly. You will not succeed in this course if you wait until the week before an exam to study. You must drill on the material as it is presented. d. Manage your time well. Schedule study time every day. In all college/university classes you should expect to study a minimum of 2-3 hours OUTSIDE OF CLASS TIME for each credit hour of class. General Biology is a four (4) hour course so you should expect to spend at least 8 12 hours a week studying for this course. This is not like any other on-line class you may have taken. I will give you a time limit in which to cover the assigned material. You may not work ahead nor will I allow make-up or late work. e. Study the right stuff. The purpose of a lecture is to direct your attention to what you need to know. The notes clearly state what you are expected to learn. I do not cover every topic in the text and you are responsible for those topics I do cover in class. You will also be responsible for any outside reading (usually in - 59 -

your textbook) that I assign you. Recopying your notes and making flash cards are two essential techniques. Students find that copying off the "Note Taking Pages" before starting the PowerPoint lectures is helpful. f. Practice! Practice! Practice! After learning your notes, put yourself in a test situation by answering each chapters checkpoint and review questions, and then the activities. g. If youre having difficulty, get help early. The sooner you seek help, the more options I have to help you improve your learning. Ask me questions in the Discussion Board under Student Questions. h. Improve your test-taking skills. Well cover this in more detail before the first exam. i. DO the Written Assignments, Homework Assignments, Worksheets, Group Discussion, and Group Discussion Quizzes! The written assignments, homework, worksheets, and group discussions are designed to assist you in learning the course material. Grades are based on the assumption you are completing the Written Assignments, Homework, Worksheets, and Group Discussion Quizzes. Failure to do all the Written Assignments, Homework, and Worksheets, and Group Discussion Quizzes may negatively affect your grade as they are worth about (xx%)of your lecture grade. -

- 60 -

APPENDIX 4

Biology 212: Anatomy and Physiology II (Online 8 week course adapted to MU Fall 2009 syllabus)
Adapted from syllabus provided by MU by Tun K. Nyein, Ph.D. ( Note: The adapter has inserted a suggested a COURSE SCHEDULE in line with an 8 week course. The instructors will select Lab activities from the options suggested. The instructors will also determine how and when the exams, lab tests and quizzes will be given. )

Location: Online

Video Lectures : 1. University of California, Berkeley, General Biology I 43 lectures


2. Khan Academy (They are used under open license from Creative Commons.)

Lab Kit: (Note to instructors. There are virtual micro labs but if you prefer students to
have the touch and feel of experiments this is the option. The AP-2 CAT comes with 12 experiments. The cost is $374 per student. Experiments include: 01 The Endocrine System 02 Cardiovascular System: Blood 03 Cardiovascular System: The Heart 04 Cardiovascular System: Blood Vessels 05 Cardiovascular Physiology 06 The Lymphatic System 07 Anatomy of the Respiratory System 08 Respiratory Physiology 09 The Digestive System 10 Anatomy of the Urinary System 11 Urinalysis 12 The Reproductive System

Virtual Labs: 1. Virtual Web Anatomy


2. Virtual Cat Dissection (from Penn State) 3. Virtual Histology Lab (Univ.of Oklahoma)

- 61 -

Video Lectures : 1. Hillsboro Community College, Anatomy & PhysiologyI 23 lectures


(They are used under open license from Creative Commons.)

2. The LabPaq can be augmented with virtual exercises from virtual labs such as Web Lab. However, I have provided options for online lab activities such as cat dissection.

Grading:
Students will be graded out of a total of 1000 points which are distributed as follows: Test 1 - 200 points Test 2 - 200 points Test 3 - 200 points Lab Test 1 -150 points Lab Test 2-150 points Quizzes - 4@25 pts each total 100 pts There is no extra credit. Grades will be assigned as follows: 930-1000 A 900-929 A870-899 B+ 830-869 B 800-829 B770-799 C+ 700-769 C - 62 -

600-699 D <600 F

All Grades will be posted in the Grade Book in Blackboard for this class
on an individual basis. TEST FORMAT: Tests will consist of M.C., T or F, diagrams, completions, short answers or essays. Material will come from lecture notes, text material cited/assigned in class and handouts. WITHDRAWAL POLICY - There will be no withdrawals after the official withdrawal date.

COURSE SCHEDULE & OUTLINE BIO 212 SCHEDULE

Wee Topic & k Chapter


1 Chapter 9 Physiology of Skeletal Muscle Fibers, 284

Lectures
(50min.)Lectures from Hiilsboro CC.

Lab Activities
Lab Options Instructor will select appropriate activities from the following:
1. Lab Paq. AP-2 CAT comes with 12 experiments. . 2. Virtual Labs: 1. Virtual Web Anatomy 2. Virtual Cat Dissection (from Penn State) 3. Virtual Histology Lab (Univ.of Oklahoma

Lecture 1 (Anatomy of Muscle) Lecture 2. (Myosin Actin) Lecture 3 (Role of Endoplasmic Reticulum in the Muscle Cell) Lecture 4 (Muscular System) PowerPoint (chapter 9) Group discussion on Wimba

1. Cat Muscle Dissection

2.Respiration Chapter 22. The Respiratory System, 804 3. Digestion Chapter 23. The

Lecture 1(Respiratoty System 1)


1. Continue Cat Muscle Dissection

Lecture 2(Repiratory System 2) Lecture 1 (Digestive System 1)

2. Human Muscle 3. Muscle Physiology

- 63 -

Digestive System, 851

Lecture 2 (Digestive System 2) 4.Quizz 1-25 pts. Lecture 3 (Digestive System 3+Begin Urinary System) PowerPoint (chapter 22) PowerPoint (chapter 23) Group Discussion on Wimba (1 hour) 1. Lecture Test I covers Muscle Physiology & Respiratory System.. 2. Finish Dissection Lecture 2 (Blood Vascular System 1) 3. Review Lecture 3 (Blood Vascular System 2) 4. Blood Labs Lecture 1(Blood 1)

4.Heart Chapter 18. The Cardiovascular System: The Heart, 661 5. Blood Vessels Chapter 19. The Cardiovascular System: Blood Vessels, 694

Lecture 1 (Circulatory System and the Heart)

PowerPoint (chapter 18) PowerPoint (chapter 9) Group Discussion on Wimba (1 hour)

4 The Blood Chapter 17. Bloo d, 634 Lecture 2 (Blood 2) Lecture 3 ( Blood 3) PowerPoint (chapter 17) Group Discussion on Wimba (1 hour) 3. Physiology Lab 4. Quiz 2-25 pts. 1. Lab Test I covers Cat muscles, human muscle, Origin/Insertions & actions (150) 2. Heart Structure

Blood - 64 -

Lecture (Lymphatic system) Lymphatic Chapter 20. The Lymphatic System and Lymphoid Organs and Tissues, 752

1. Quiz 3 2. Cat Dissection (Internal organs and blood vessels)

PowerPoint (chapter 20) PowerPoint (chapter 15) Group Discussion on Wimba (1 hour)

Chapter 21. The Immune System: Innate and Adaptive Body Defenses, 766

1.Lecture Test 2- covers

Lecture 1(Immune System)

Digestive System, the Heart ,Blood Vessels, Blood & Lymphatic System.

Lecture 2 (Cell Communication and Immunology) Lecture 3 (Cell Communication and immunology) PowerPoint (chapter 21)) Group Discussion on Wimba (1 hour)

Finish Cat Dissection

Chapter 25. The Urinary System, 960 Urinary System

Lecture 1 (Urinary System) Lecture 2 (Urinary System) Lecture 3 (Excretory and Urinary System) Lab Test II covers Cat Internal organs/Blood vessels, human blood vessels, Heart & Respiratory Models. (150 pts.)

Overview of Metabolic Reactions, 918 Metabolism

Group Discussion on Wimba (1 hour) Lecture 1(Metabolism I) Lecture 2 (Metabolism II) Lecture 3(Metabolism III) Lecture 4 (BioenergeticsI) Lecture 5 (Bioenergetics II) - 65 1. Lecture Test 3 covers the Immune System, Urinary System , Metabolism .

RULES FOR SUCCESS: a. Dont miss lecture or lab. Even though this is an On-Line class you need to set aside dedicated time every week to read your text, cover the lecture PowerPoint or lecture videos, animations, slides, and do the assigned and recommended activities. Do not procrastinate! There is simply too much material covered too rapidly to catch up if you get behind. TAKE NOTES on what you read in your text and off the lecture slides, dont just read them. Students who actively take notes and do the activities generally learn the material better than those who dont. You may want to use the Note Taking Pages available for each chapter. b. Be consistent. Determine when you can regularly attend class on-line. You need to make an agreement with yourself at the outset of the course and stick to it as to when youll study General Biology. Students who vary their study time generally do not do as well as those who set aside the same time every week for study. c. Keep up by studying regularly. You will not succeed in this course if you wait until the week before an exam to study. You must drill on the material as it is presented. d. Manage your time well. Schedule study time every day. In all college/university classes you should expect to study a minimum of 2-3 hours OUTSIDE OF CLASS TIME for each credit hour of class. General Biology is a four (4) hour course so you should expect to spend at least 8 12 hours a week studying for this course. This is not like any other on-line class you may have taken. I will give you a time limit in which to cover the assigned material. You may not work ahead nor will I allow make-up or late work. e. Study the right stuff. The purpose of a lecture is to direct your attention to what you need to know. The notes clearly state what you are expected to learn. I do not cover every topic in the text and you are responsible for those topics I do cover in class. You will also be responsible for any outside reading (usually in your textbook) that I assign you. Recopying your notes and making flash cards are two essential techniques. Students find that copying off the "Note Taking Pages" before starting the PowerPoint lectures is helpful. f. Practice! Practice! Practice! After learning your notes, put yourself in a test situation by answering each chapters checkpoint and review questions, and then the activities. g. If youre having difficulty, get help early. The sooner you seek help, the more options I have to help you improve your learning. Ask me questions in the Discussion Board under Student Questions. - 66 -

h. Improve your test-taking skills. Well cover this in more detail before the first exam. i. DO the Written Assignments, Homework Assignments, Worksheets, Group Discussion, and Group Discussion Quizzes! The written assignments, homework, worksheets, and group discussions are designed to assist you in learning the course material. Grades are based on the assumption you are completing the Written Assignments, Homework, Worksheets, and Group Discussion Quizzes. Failure to do all the Written Assignments, Homework, and Worksheets, and Group Discussion Quizzes may negatively affect your grade as they are worth about (xx%)of your lecture grade. -

- 67 -

APPENDIX 5

BIOLOGY 227: BACTERIOLOGY (Online)


Adapted by Tun K. Nyein, Ph.D. Location: Online

Instructor: XXXXXXXX Rm. XXX Science Building 674-XXXX xxxxx@misericordia.edu


Course Description General morphology and physiology of bacteria yeasts, molds and viruses. Study of infection and immunity. Special studies of foods, water and sewage with reference to health and sanitation. Prerequisites: None (4 credits)

Video Lectures : Microbiology and Immunology On-line from the Department of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology at the University of South Carolina School of Medicine Text: Todar's Online Textbook of Bacteriology (TOC) This is a free online textbook but students can donate for continuing development costs. As an electronic text, new material is constantly being added, and current material is constantly being revised and updated. This is an inherent advantage of the web-based text over the tree-burner. Lab Kit. (Note to instructors. There are virtual micro labs but if you prefer students to have the touch and feel of experiments this is the option. The MicroBiology Kit MBK comes with 13 experiments. The cost is $299 per student without microscope which is available for additional $121. ) * Experiments that come with MBK:
o. Experiment Name 01 Observing Bacteria and Blood 02 Bacterial Morphology 03 Aseptic Technique & Culturing Microbes 04 Isolation of Individual Colonies 05 Differential Staining 06 Methyl Red Voges-Proskauer Test 07 Motility Testing 08 Carbohydrate Fermentation Testing 09 Osmosis 10 Antibiotic Sensitivity

11 Fomite Transmission 12 Microbes in the Environment 13 Fungi

- 68 -

Virtual Labs: There are numerous virtual microbiology labs which are shared by many schools. Here are some good ones: 1. SPO Virtual Microbiology Lab 2. VML for identification of unknown bacteria 3. VML (Bacteria culture ) .

Major Course Objectives:


Upon completion of Bacteriology students should: be capable of naming the structural components of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells be capable of describing the functions of the structural components of the bacterial cell be able to explain the process of bacterial sporulation be capable of describing the mechanism of the bacterial flagellum and bacterial chemotaxis be able to name the major macromolecules of the bacterial cell and describe key features of the structure of DNA, RNA and protein be able to explain the major processes of bacterial DNA synthesis, RNA synthesis, and protein synthesis be able to describe the structure of a T even bacteriophage. be able to describe the major steps of a bacteriophage infection cycle be able to demonstrate an understanding of the HIV structure and infection cycle of HIV. be able to explain the general structure and mechanisms of the bacterial operon structure and function be able to describe the use of bacteria in biotechnology and cloning be able to describe the diversity of microbes and the diverse environments in which they thrive. be able to demonstrate a proficiency in bright field microscopy. be capable of explaining the bacterial growth and the control of bacterial growth with physical, chemical, and mechanical methods. be able to demonstrate a proficiency in aseptic technique. be capable of basic staining methods. be able to grow bacteria in pure cultures and describe colony morphologies. be able to describe the pathogenesis process be able to demonstrate an understanding of the mechanisms of virulence factors. be able to demonstrate an understanding of basic methods and terminology of medical microbiology. be able to demonstrate an understanding of the mechanisms of antibiotic drug action and mechanisms of resistance be able to describe common infectious diseases and pathogens

- 69 -

(Note: The syllabus provided by MU does not have a Course Schedule and List of Lab Activities.)

Suggested Course Outline and Lab Activities


Bio 227 Schedule Week Chapter 1 1 2 3 2 6 7 8 3
7. Microbial Genetics 8. Recombinant DNA Technology (go to bacteriology Exchange of Genetic Information 1,2,3,) 6. Growth 4. Microscopy, Staining & Classification 5. Microbial Metabolism

Chapter Topic

Bio 227 Schedule Lab Activities (Lab Paq)+ Virtual 1. microscopy


2. Preparation of Specimens Ectoparasites, Helminths, Unbiquity of Bacteria fungi 3. Pure CultureTechniques 4. Simple Staining 5. Transfer of Bacteria 6. Gram Stain, 7. Colony 8. Morphology

Lectures (From Text) 1. Introduction: Brief History 2. Chemistry of Microbiology 3. Cell Structure and Function Videos On Bacteriology 4. Introduction: The World within us:Microbes (Stanford Lecture)

9. Counting Bacteria

4
9. Controlling Microbial Growth 10. Antimicrobial Drugs

10. Antimicrobial Chemicals

5
11. Prokaryotes 12. Eukaryotes

11. Spore Stain, Acidfast Stain 12. Environmental Conditions & Growth 13. Motility tests, Capsule Stain

6
13. Viruses, Viroids and Prions (Go to virology:lecture 10/13/09) 14. Infectious Diseases & Epidemiology

14. Effects of Temperature, Surgical


Hand scrub. 15. Kirby-Bauer Sensitivity 16 UNKNOWN BACTERIUM ASSIGNED 17. Oxygen Requirements 18 Biochemical Tests 19. Bacteriophages 21. Staph & Strep ID: 20. Serological Testing DEMO

15.Innate (Nonspecific) Defenses 16. Adaptive Immunity

8
18. Immunization & Immune

- 70 -

Testing Immune Disorders 26.Bioterrorism

GRADING: The instructor will determine how this course will be graded RULES FOR SUCCESS: a. Dont miss lecture or lab. Even though this is an On-Line class you need to set aside dedicated time every week to read your text, cover the lecture PowerPoint or lecture videos, animations, slides, and do the assigned and recommended activities. Do not procrastinate! There is simply too much material covered too rapidly to catch up if you get behind. TAKE NOTES on what you read in your text and off the lecture slides, dont just read them. Students who actively take notes and do the activities generally learn the material better than those who dont. You may want to use the Note Taking Pages available for each chapter.

b. Be consistent. Determine when you can regularly attend class on-line. You need to make an agreement with yourself at the outset of the course and stick to it as to when youll study General Biology. Students who vary their study time generally do not do as well as those who set aside the same time every week for study. c. Keep up by studying regularly. You will not succeed in this course if you wait until the week before an exam to study. You must drill on the material as it is presented. d. Manage your time well. Schedule study time every day. In all college/university classes you should expect to study a minimum of 2-3 hours OUTSIDE OF CLASS TIME for each credit hour of class. Bacteriology is a (4) credit hour course so you should expect to spend at least 8 12 hours a week studying for this course. This is not like any other on-line class you may have taken. I will give you a time limit in which to cover the assigned material. You may not work ahead nor will I allow make-up or late work. e. Study the right stuff. The purpose of a lecture is to direct your attention to what you need to know. The notes clearly state what you are expected to learn. I do not cover every topic in the text and you are responsible for those topics I do cover in class. You will also be responsible for any outside reading (usually in your textbook) that I assign you. Recopying your notes and making flash cards - 71 -

are two essential techniques. Students find that copying off the "Note Taking Pages" before starting the PowerPoint lectures is helpful. f. Practice! Practice! Practice! After learning your notes, put yourself in a test situation by answering each chapters checkpoint and review questions, and then the activities. g. If youre having difficulty, get help early. The sooner you seek help, the more options I have to help you improve your learning. Ask me questions in the Discussion Board under Student Questions. h. Improve your test-taking skills. Well cover this in more detail before the first exam. i. DO the Written Assignments, Homework Assignments, Worksheets, Group Discussion, and Group Discussion Quizzes! The written assignments, homework, worksheets, and group discussions are designed to assist you in learning the course material. Grades are based on the assumption you are completing the Written Assignments, Homework, Worksheets, and Group Discussion Quizzes. Failure to do all the Written Assignments, Homework, and Worksheets, and Group Discussion Quizzes may negatively affect your grade as they are worth about (xx%)of your lecture grade. -

- 72 -

APPENDIX 6

PHYSICS 117: Physics Introduction I (Online)


Adapted from syllabus provided by MU by Tun K. Nyein, Ph.D. ( Note: The adapter has inserted a suggested COURSE SCHEDULE in line with an 8 week course. The instructors will select Lab activities from the options suggested. The instructors will also determine how and when the exams, lab tests and quizzes will be given. ) LOCATION: Online

Instructor: XXXXXXXX Rm. XXX Science Building 674-XXXX xxxxx@misericordia.edu


Text: Physics, James Walker, Prentice Hall, 4th Ed., 2009
Mastering Physics : Mastering Physics is the technologically advanced, educationally effective and widely used physics homework system. Comes with textbook.

Video Lectures :
from 1. University of Missouri at Kansas Physics 210 General Physics I 26 lectures (They are used under open license from Creative Commons.)

Lab Kit:
(Note to instructors. There are virtual micro labs but if you prefer students to have the touch and feel of experiments this is the option. The PK105 comes with 13 experiments. The cost is $181 per student. Experiments include : 01 Measurement
02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 Data Collection Friction Simple Machine - Lever Pendulum and the Calculation of g Hooke's Law Specific Heat Capacity of Metals Static Electricity or Electrostatics Reflection and Refraction

Virtual Labs: 1. Lawrence Tech Lab


2. Online ChemLab (commercial)(Assessment of this lab by Oregon State University)

- 73 -

Course Description: This course provides an overview of physic topics in areas of


mechanics and heat for non-science majors at an introductory level, emphasizing conceptual development and qualitative and quantitative (using algebra and trigonometry) applications of these concepts to real world physical examples.

Prerequisites: None (4 credits)


COURSE OBJECTIVES: The student should be able to: -Demonstrate an understanding of the basic concepts and principles of mechanics, matter and heat -Apply these concepts and principles of mechanics, matter and heat to solve physical problems -Conduct a laboratory experiment to understand or discover basic concepts and principles of mechanics, matter and heat CORE CURRICULUM GOALS: This course helps fulfill the following core curriculum goals: -Use modern technology effectively to support learning -Use evidence in the construction and evaluation of arguments -Use mathematics and statistics as a means of Communicating ideas and relationships -Apply the scientific process to test hypotheses, propositions, and solutions -Make use of major scientific and mathematical theories, concepts, and principles -Demonstrate familiarity with notable achievements in science, philosophy, religion, music, art, and literature -Demonstrate knowledge of the basic content and concepts of natural science and social and behavioral science EDUCATIONAL GOALS : This course helps fulfill the following educational goals: -Think independently and creatively, analyze information critically, and solve problems -Understand and appreciate the arts, humanities, science and technology
COURSE OUTLINE & SCHEDULE

PHY 117 Schedule Week Chapter 1 1&2

Chapter Topic

PHY 117 Schedule Lab Activities


Lab Options Instructor will select appropriate

Units & Problem Solving Mechanics

- 74 -

SI Basic Units Conversions Problem Solving

activities from the following:

Lecture 1 I. Mechanics

(Lab Paq)PK105
No. Experiment Name 01 Measurement 02 Data Collection 03 Friction 04 Simple Machine - Lever 05 Pendulum and the Calculation of g 06 Hooke's Law 07 Specific Heat Capacity of Metals 08 Static Electricity or Electrostatics 09 Reflection and Refraction

Motion
Vectors, Displacement, Speed, Velocity Acceleration Gravitational Accel.

Lecture 2 Lecture 3 Lecture 4

Reading Assignment from Text Select assigned chapter

Virtual Labs 1. Lawrence Tech Lab

-------------------------------------------

2 Motion
Vectors, Displacement, Speed, Velocity Acceleration Gravitational Accel.

Lecture 5 Lecture 6

Reading Assignment from Text Select assigned chapter

Forces
Newton's First Law Newton's Second Law Newton's Third Law Examples of Forces Vector components Vector Addition 2-Dimensional Motion 2-Dimensional Forces Spring Force Centripetal Force Force Examples Lecture 7

Lecture 8 Lecture 9

- 75 -

Lecture 10 Reading Assignment from Text Select assigned chapter

Lecture 11 7.Work & Energy


Work Kinetic Energy Power Energy Potential Energy Conservation of Energy Lecture 12 Lecture 13

Reading Assignment from Text Select assigned chapter

Static Equilibrium
Torques Balanced Torques Simple Machines Center of Mass Examples of Equilibrium Lecture 14 Lecture 15

Reading Assignment from Text Select assigned chapter

Simple Machines Center of Mass Examples of Equilibrium Lecture 16 Lecture 17

Momentum
Linear Momentum Lecture 18

Reading Assignment from Text Select assigned chapter

Heat Specific Heat Capacity Transfer of Heat Change of state Thermal Expansion

- 76 -

Lecture 19 Lecture 20 Lecture 21 Reading Assignment from Text Select assigned chapter

Fluids Density, Pressure Buoyancy Fluid Flow


Lecture 22 Lecture 23

Reading Assignment from Text Select assigned chapter

EVALUATION:

REQUIREMENTS/EVALUATION OF OBJECTIVES: The final grade will be based upon a weighted average of: 60% Tests 3 one-hour tests - These tests may have questions which require cumulative knowledge, some of which could be on previous tests. Tests can cover any material in lecture, labs, textbook assignments, quizzes, and homework. 25% Lab Work. Lab work is due per instructor. 5% Quizzes and Questions There will be unannounced quizzes in class. Questions or ranking tasks may also be given in class to be turned in next class. No late credit will be given for these questions. The three lowest grades will be dropped. 5% Homework Homework will usually be due on Wednesdays. A portion of the assigned problems will be graded. Late homework will receive a 25% penalty for each class late. At the end of the semester, if your test average is higher than your homework average, your test average will be used for this portion of your grade (Homework can only help you). 5% Outside Lectures & Service Learning. You will receive more information about this in class.

- 77 -

COURSE POLICIES: You are responsible for all information presented in each class. Discussion and ideasharing on homework assignments is also encouraged, although you should always try the problems before you work with others. You are responsible for being aware of the Academic Integrity Policy in the Catalog and the Student Handbook. Any violations of the policy will result in a grade of F for the assignment or test for all involved persons.

RULES FOR SUCCESS: a. Dont miss lecture or lab. Even though this is an On-Line class you need to set aside dedicated time every week to read your text, cover the lecture PowerPoint or lecture videos, animations, slides, and do the assigned and recommended activities. Do not procrastinate! There is simply too much material covered too rapidly to catch up if you get behind. TAKE NOTES on what you read in your text and off the lecture slides, dont just read them. Students who actively take notes and do the activities generally learn the material better than those who dont. You may want to use the Note Taking Pages available for each chapter. b. Be consistent. Determine when you can regularly attend class on-line. You need to make an agreement with yourself at the outset of the course and stick to it as to when youll study General Biology. Students who vary their stud y time generally do not do as well as those who set aside the same time every week for study. c. Keep up by studying regularly. You will not succeed in this course if you wait until the week before an exam to study. You must drill on the material as it is presented. d. Manage your time well. Schedule study time every day. In all college/university classes you should expect to study a minimum of 2-3 hours OUTSIDE OF CLASS TIME for each credit hour of class. Bacteriology is a (4) credit hour course so you should expect to spend at least 8 12 hours a week studying for this course. This is not like any other on-line class you may have taken. I will give you a time limit in which to cover the assigned material. You may not work ahead nor will I allow make-up or late work. e. Study the right stuff. The purpose of a lecture is to direct your attention to what you need to know. The notes clearly state what you are expected to learn. I do not cover - 78 -

every topic in the text and you are responsible for those topics I do cover in class. You will also be responsible for any outside reading (usually in your textbook) that I assign you. Recopying your notes and making flash cards are two essential techniques. Students find that copying off the "Note Taking Pages" before starting the PowerPoint lectures is helpful. f. Practice! Practice! Practice! After learning your notes, put yourself in a test situation by answering each chapters checkpoint and review questions, and then the activities. g. If youre having difficulty, get help early. The sooner you seek help, the more options I have to help you improve your learning. Ask me questions in the Discussion Board under Student Questions. h. Improve your test-taking skills. Well cover this in more detail before the first exam. i. DO the Written Assignments, Homework Assignments, Worksheets, Group Discussion, and Group Discussion Quizzes! -

- 79 -

APPENDIX 7

PHYSICS 118: Physics Introduction II(Online)


Adapted from syllabus provided by MU by Tun K. Nyein, Ph.D. ( Note: The adapter has inserted a suggested a COURSE SCHEDULE in line with an 8 week course. The instructors will select Lab activities from the options suggested. The instructors will also determine how and when the exams, lab tests and quizzes will be given. ) LOCATION: Online

Instructor: XXXXXXXX Rm. XXX Science Building 674-XXXX xxxxx@misericordia.edu


Text: Physics, James Walker, Prentice Hall, 4th Ed., 2009
Mastering Physics : Mastering Physics is the technologically advanced, educationally effective and widely used physics homework system. Comes with textbook.

Video Lectures :
1. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Electricity & Magnetism 36 lectures Course Home 2. University of California, Berkeley Physics for Future Presidents 27 lectures Course Website (They are used under open license from Creative Commons and MIT OCW) 3. Yale University Open Yale Courses, Physics 201 Fundamentals of Physics 25 lectures 4. Khan Academy

Lab Kit:
(Note to instructors. There are virtual micro labs but if you prefer students to have the touch and feel of experiments this is the option. The PK105 comes with 13 experiments. The cost is $181 per student. Experiments include:
01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 Measurement Data Collection Friction Simple Machine - Lever Pendulum and the Calculation of g Hooke's Law Specific Heat Capacity of Metals Static Electricity or Electrostatics Reflection and Refraction

- 80 -

Virtual Labs: 1. Lawrence Tech Lab


2. McGraw Hill ElectroMagnetism Virtual Lab 3. Virtual Physics Lab (Central Connecticut State University) 4. Y Science (Commercial)

Course Description: This course provides an overview of physics topics in areas of


electricity, magnetism, waves, sound, light, and modern physics for non-science majors at an introductory level, emphasizing conceptual development and qualitative and quantitative (using algebra and trigonometry) applications of these concepts to real world physical examples.

Prerequisites: None (4 credits)


COURSE OBJECTIVES The student should be able to: -Demonstrate an understanding of the basic concepts and principles of mechanics, matter and heat -Apply these concepts and principles of mechanics, matter and heat to solve physical problems -Conduct a laboratory experiment to understand or discover basic concepts and principles of mechanics, matter and heat CORE CURRICULUM GOALS This course helps fulfill the following core curriculum goals: -Use modern technology effectively to support learning -Use evidence in the construction and evaluation of arguments -Use mathematics and statistics as a means of communicating ideas and relationships -Apply the scientific process to test hypotheses, propositions, and solutions -Make use of major scientific and mathematical theories, concepts, and principles -Demonstrate familiarity with notable achievements in science, philosophy, religion, music, art, and literature -Demonstrate knowledge of the basic content and concepts of natural science and social and behavioral science

- 81 -

EDUCATIONAL GOALS This course helps fulfill the following educational goals: -Think independently and creatively, analyze information critically, and solve problems -Understand and appreciate the arts, humanities, science and technology
COURSE OUTLINE & SCHEDULE

PHY 118 Schedule Week Chapter 1 1&2

Chapter Topic

PHY 118 Schedule Lab Activities


Lab Options Instructor will select appropriate activities from the following: (Lab Paq)PK105 No. Experiment Name 01 Measurement 02 Data Collection 03 Friction 04 Simple Machine - Lever 05 Pendulum and the Calculation of g 06 Hooke's Law 07 Specific Heat Capacity of Metals 08 Static Electricity or Electrostatics 09 Reflection and Refraction Virtual Labs 1. Lawrence Tech Lab 2. McGraw Hill ElectroMagnetism Virtual Lab 3. Virtual Physics Lab (Central Connecticut State University) 4. Y Science (Commercial

Electricity & Magnetism 1. Electricity 2. Electrical Charge Lecture 1 Lecture 2 Lecture 3 Lecture 4 Reading Assignment from Text Select assigned chapter

Charging by Induction 3.Electric Force 4. Electric Field Lecture 5 Lecture 6 Lecture 7 Reading Assignment from Text Select assigned chapter

5. Voltage, Electric

- 82 -

Lecture Lecture Lecture

Reading Assignment from Text Select assigned chapter

6. Electric Currents Lecture Lecture Lecture Reading Assignment from Text Select assigned chapter

7. Potential 8. Ohm's Law, Resistance Lecture Lecture Lecture Reading Assignment from Text Select assigned chapter

Electrical Energy&Power 9. Electric Circuits 10. Electrical Safety Lecture Lecture Lecture Reading Assignment from Text Select assigned chapter

11. Capacitance 12. Capacitor Circuits Lecture Lecture Lecture Reading Assignment from Text Select assigned chapter

Electromagnetism 13, Magnetic Field 14 Magnetic Force Lecture

- 83 -

Lecture Lecture
Reading Assignment from Text Select assigned chapter

EVALUATION: REQUIREMENTS/EVALUATION OF OBJECTIVES: The final grade will be based upon a weighted average of: 60% Tests 3 one-hour tests - These tests may have questions which require cumulative knowledge, some of which could be on previous tests. Tests can cover any material in lecture, labs, textbook assignments, quizzes, and homework. 25% Lab Work. Lab work is due per instructor. 5% Quizzes and Questions There will be unannounced quizzes in class. Questions or ranking tasks may also be given in class to be turned in next class. No late credit will be given for t these questions. The three lowest grades will be dropped. 5% Homework Homework will usually be due on Wednesdays. A portion of the assigned problems will be graded. Late homework will receive a 25% penalty for each class late. At the end of the semester, if your test average is higher than your homework average, your test average will be used for this portion of your grade (Homework can only help you) . 5% Outside Lectures & Service Learning. You will receive more information about this in class. COURSE POLICIES: You are responsible for all information presented in each class. Discussion and idea-sharing on homework assignments is also encouraged, although you should always try the problems before you work with others. You are responsible for being aware of the Academic Integrity Policy in the Catalog and the Student Handbook. Any violations of the policy will result in a grade of F for the assignment or test for all involved persons.

- 84 -

RULES FOR SUCCESS: a. Dont miss lecture or lab. Even though this is an On-Line class you need to set aside dedicated time every week to read your text, cover the lecture PowerPoint or lecture videos, animations, slides, and do the assigned and recommended activities. Do not procrastinate! There is simply too much material covered too rapidly to catch up if you get behind. TAKE NOTES on what you read in your text and off the lecture slides, dont just read them. Students who actively take notes and do the activities generally learn the material better than those who dont. You may want to use the Note Taking Pages available for each chapter. b. Be consistent. Determine when you can regularly attend class on-line. You need to make an agreement with yourself at the outset of the course and stick to it as to when youll study General Biology. Students who vary their study time generally do not do as well as those who set aside the same time every week for study. c. Keep up by studying regularly. You will not succeed in this course if you wait until the week before an exam to study. You must drill on the material as it is presented. d. Manage your time well. Schedule study time every day. In all college/university classes you should expect to study a minimum of 2-3 hours OUTSIDE OF CLASS TIME for each credit hour of class. Bacteriology is a (4) credit hour course so you should expect to spend at least 8 12 hours a week studying for this course. This is not like any other on-line class you may have taken. I will give you a time limit in which to cover the assigned material. You may not work ahead nor will I allow make-up or late work. e. Study the right stuff. The purpose of a lecture is to direct your attention to what you need to know. The notes clearly state what you are expected to learn. I do not cover every topic in the text and you are responsible for those topics I do cover in class. You will also be responsible for any outside reading (usually in your textbook) that I assign you. Recopying your notes and making flash cards are two essential techniques. Students find that copying off the "Note Taking Pages" before starting the PowerPoint lectures is helpful. f. Practice! Practice! Practice! After learning your notes, put yourself in a test situation by answering each chapters checkpoint and review questions, and then the activities. g. If youre having difficulty, get help early. The sooner you seek help, the more options I have to help you improve your learning. Ask me questions in the Discussion Board under Student Questions.

- 85 -

h. Improve your test-taking skills. Well cover this in more detail before the first exam. i. DO the Written Assignments, Homework Assignments, Worksheets, Group Discussion, and Group Discussion Quizzes! -

- 86 -

Appendix 8

CHEMISTRY IO4 General Chemistry (Online)


Syllabus provided by MU and adapted by Tun K. Nyein, Ph.D. (Note: The syllabus provided by MU does not include course schedule or activities for Lab. The adapter has suggested a COURSE SCHEDULE in line with an 8 week course. The instructors will select Lab activities from the options suggested. The instructors will also determine how and when the exams, lab tests and quizzes will be given. ) LOCATION: Online

Instructor: XXXXXXXX Rm. XXX Science Building 674-XXXX xxxxx@misericordia.edu


Text: Fundamentals of General. organic. and Biological Chemistry. 5th Ed. McMurry,
Castellion, and Ballantine; Prentice Hall.

Video Lectures : Video lectures are from 1. Khan Academy with 101 lectures.
2. The Principles of Chemical Science MIT OpenCourseWare With (36)lectures. (They are used under open license from Creative Commons.)

Lab Kit:
(Note to instructors. There are virtual micro labs but if you prefer students to have the touch and feel of experiments this is the option. The CK-105 comes with 13 experiments. The cost is $181 per student. Experiments included :
01 Properties of Gases 02 Liquids and Solids 03 Ionic Reactions 04 Colligative Properties & Osmotic Pressure 05 Reaction Order and Rate Laws 06 Le Chatelier's Principle 07 Titration of Acetic Acid in Vinegar 08 Chromatography of Food Dyes 09* Organic Structures, Shapes, and Isomerism 10* Organic Structures, Shapes, and Isomerism Part 2: Alkenes & Cis-Trans Geometric Isomerism

- 87 -

Virtual Labs: 1. Virtual General Chemistry Lab (Univ.of Colorado)


2. Online ChemLab (commercial)(Assessment of this lab by Oregon State University)

Course Description: The course will study the first eleven chapters of the text book,
which will introduce the student to the basic principles of chemistry, including physical and chemical properties, atomic theory, chemical bonding, types of chemical reactions, and nuclear chemistry. It will also explore the behavior of solids, liquids, and gasses, including mass relationships, chemical equilibria, reaction rates, gas laws, acid-base relationships, and solubility. Thus, the student will acquire a significant knowledge of the principles of inorganic chemistry that will provide the foundation for future study of Introductory Organic and Biochemistry in CHM 105. In CHM 105, the principles derived from CHM 104 are applied to the study of the chemistry of living systems.

PREREQUISITES: None (4 credits)


COURSE OBJECTIVES: At the completion of the course, the student should have acquired a level of understanding of inorganic chemistry commensurate with being able to demonstrate a significant knowledge of the principles of inorganic chemistry, as evidenced by their being able to recognize, comprehend, and interpret the chemistry of the major elements and of inorganic molecules. During the course, the student will be taught how to synthesize their knowledge, so that they can demonstrate an ability to: 1) integrate specific facts with general principles; 2) properly define and analyze what questions are being asked, and 3) successfully solve given problems through critical thinking. In conjunction with the Science Core curriculum goals, the criteria the professor will use to evaluate the student's critical thinking skills will include a judgment of the student's ability to: I) demonstrate a reasonable knowledge of the basic content, organization, concepts, and paradigms of biological/physical science; 2) use mathematics and statistics as a means of analyzing and communicating ideas and relationships; 3) apply the Scientific Method to test hypotheses, propositions, and solutions; 4) make use of major mathematical and scientific theories, concepts, and principles driven by critical thinking and then display the data and use trends, in order to test hypotheses and illustrate basic chemical concepts. COURSE OBJECTIVES: The objectives 'of this course are in concert with those of the Science Core Curriculum. The student will acquire a significant knowledge of the principles of Organic and Biological Chemistry by being able to recognize, comprehend, and interpret the chemistry of the major organic functional groups, as well as the structure of biomolecules in relation to their function in the body. During the course, the student will be taught how to synthesize knowledge, so that they can demonstrate the ability to: 1) integrate specific facts with general principles; 2) properly define and analyze what questions are being asked, and 3) successfully solve given problems through critical thinking. - 88 -

EVALUATION: The grading format will be as follows:


4, hour exams @ 15% Comprehensive final exam Laboratory 60% total 20% 20%

HOMEWORK: Homework assignments are an essential component of the learning


process, because they provide an opportunity for you to solidify your understanding of the subject material and to practice problem-solving, analysis and critical thinking. Although they will not be graded per se, they will be examined by your professor, and they must be handed in on time, in order for your overall grade not to be affected adversely. After you hand in each of your completed homework assignments, your professor will provide you with a set of complete solutions to the problems. It is your responsibility to make a copy of the homework you hand in, so that you can evaluate your ability to understand the subject matter and apply it, in order to solve problems. You are encouraged to seek help from your professor regarding any of these problems which you do not understand or on any other related subject matter.

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: Any form of academic dishonesty (as outlined in the


Student Handbook) will result in a grade of F for the whole course.

CHEM 104 Schedule Week Chapter Chapter Topic 1 1&2


Lectures

CHEM 104 Schedule Lab Activities (Lab Paq)+ Virtual


Instructor will select appropriate activities from the following: . Lab Paq ChemKit 105 comes with 10 experiments: 01 Properties of Gases 02 Liquids and Solids 03 Ionic Reactions 04 Colligative Properties & Osmotic Pressure 05 Reaction Order and Rate Laws 06 Le Chatelier's Principle 07 Titration of Acetic Acid in Vinegar 08 Chromatography of Food Dyes 09* Organic Structures, Shapes, and Isomerism 10* Organic Structures, Shapes, and Isomerism Part 2: Alkenes & Cis-Trans Geometric Isomerism

1. 2. 3.

(list of lectures in MIT course (list of lectures at Khan list of lectures from GenChemConcepts

Chapter 1 Matter and Life Lecture 1.) Lecture 2 (list of lectures at Khan) Chapter 2 Measurements in Chemistry Lecture 1 Lecture 2

Readings from Text (Select and the assigned chapter ) Chapter 1 & Chapter 2

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2
Chapter 3 Atoms and the Periodic Table Lecture Lecture 1 Lecture 2 Lecture 3

Virtual General Chemistry Labs

1. Virtual General Chemistry Lab (Univ.of Colorado)


2. Online

Chapter 4 Ionic Compounds Lecture 1 Lecture 2

ChemLab (Assessment of this lab by Oregon State University)

Readings from Text (Select and the assigned chapter ) Chapter 3 & Chapter 4

Chapter 5 Molecular Compounds Lecture 1 Lecture 2 Chapter 6 Chemical Reactions: Classification and Mass Relationships Lecture 1 Lecture 2 Readings from Text (Select and the assigned chapter ) Chapter 5 & Chapter 6

Chapter 7 Chemical Reactions: Energy, Rates and Equilibrium Lecture 1 Lecture 2 Readings from Text (Select the assigned chapter ) Chapter 7

Chapter 8 Gases, Liquids and Solids

Lecture 1 Lecture 2 Lecture 3


Readings from Text (Select the assigned chapter ) Chapter 7

Chapter 9 Solutions

Lecture 1 Lecture 2 Lecture 3


Readings from Text (Select the assigned

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chapter ) Chapter 7

Chapter 10 Acids and Bases

Lecture 1 Lecture 2 Lecture 3


Readings from Text (Select the assigned chapter ) Chapter 10

Chapter 11 Nuclear Chemistry Lecture 1 Lecture 2 Lecture 3 Readings from Text (Select the assigned chapter ) Chapter 11

HOMEWORK PROBLEMS (Do all parts of each problem unless otherwise


indicated) Chapter 1 Matter and Life 19,25,27,29,35,37,47,54,59

Chapter 2

Measurements in Chemistry 53,57,59,63,65,69,71,73,77,81,91

Chapter 3

Atoms and the Periodic Table 31,33,39,41,45,47,51,61,69,73,75,83,101,109

Chapter 4

Ionic Compounds 40, 51a, 55, 61, 63, 69, 71, 77,1)8, 95

Chapter 5

Molecular Compounds 31,37,41,45,51,55,59,67,69,73,83,91 Chemical Reactions: Classification and Mass Relationships 41a, C, e, g, 43,47, 51b, 55, 57a, 61, 67, 75, 77a, 81a, b, C Chemical Reactions: Energy, Rates and Equilibrium - 91 -

Chapter 6

Chapter 7

31a-d, 33, 41, 45, 51, 55, 57, 61, 63a, b, c1,c2 79, 83 Chapter 8 Gases, Liquids and Solids 39,43,49, 57,69,77, 85,94a Solutions 51,55,59, 63a, 67, 69, 83

Chapter 9

Chapter 10

Acids and Bases 65,67,75

Chapter 11

Nuclear Chemistry 45, 47, 49, 55

RULES FOR SUCCESS: a. Dont miss lecture or lab. Even though this is an On-Line class you need to set aside dedicated time every week to read your text, cover the lecture PowerPoint or lecture videos, animations, slides, and do the assigned and recommended activities. Do not procrastinate! There is simply too much material covered too rapidly to catch up if you get behind. TAKE NOTES on what you read in your text and off the lecture slides, dont just read them. Students who actively take notes and do the activities generally learn the material better than those who dont. You may want to use the Note Taking Pages available for each chapter. b. Be consistent. Determine when you can regularly attend class on-line. You need to make an agreement with yourself at the outset of the course and stick to it as to when youll study General Biology. Students who vary their study time generally do not do as well as those who set aside the same time every week for study. c. Keep up by studying regularly. You will not succeed in this course if you wait until the week before an exam to study. You must drill on the material as it is presented. d. Manage your time well. Schedule study time every day. In all college/university classes you should expect to study a minimum of 2-3 hours OUTSIDE OF CLASS TIME for each credit hour of class. Bacteriology is a (4) credit hour course so you should expect to spend at least 8 12 hours a week studying for this course. This is not like any other - 92 -

on-line class you may have taken. I will give you a time limit in which to cover the assigned material. You may not work ahead nor will I allow make-up or late work. e. Study the right stuff. The purpose of a lecture is to direct your attention to what you need to know. The notes clearly state what you are expected to learn. I do not cover every topic in the text and you are responsible for those topics I do cover in class. You will also be responsible for any outside reading (usually in your textbook) that I assign you. Recopying your notes and making flash cards are two essential techniques. Students find that copying off the "Note Taking Pages" before starting the PowerPoint lectures is helpful. f. Practice! Practice! Practice! After learning your notes, put yourself in a test situation by answering each chapters checkpoint and review questions, and then the activities. g. If youre having difficulty, get help early. The sooner you seek help, the more options I have to help you improve your learning. Ask me questions in the Discussion Board under Student Questions. h. Improve your test-taking skills. Well cover this in more detail before the first exam. i. DO the Written Assignments, Homework Assignments, Worksheets, Group Discussion, and Group Discussion Quizzes! -

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APPENDIX 9

CHEMISTRY IO5 Introduction to Organic Chemistry & Biochemistry (Online)


Adapted from syllabus provided by MU by Tun K. Nyein, Ph.D. (Note: The syllabus provided by MU does not include course schedule or activities for Lab. The adapter has suggested a COURSE SCHEDULE. ) LOCATION: Online

Instructor: XXXXXXXX Rm. XXX Science Building 674-XXXX xxxxx@misericordia.edu


Course Description: This course is a survey of the carbon compounds and functional
groups, with an emphasis on their nomenclature and the environmental and biological significance of these organic molecules. An introduction to the structure and biological function of lipids, carbohydrates, and proteins (including enzymes) is included. This four credit course includes two hours of laboratory per week.

Prerequisites: None (4 credits) Video Lectures :


Video lectures are from 1. Khan Academy with 59 lectures. 2. University of California Irvine with 29 lectures. (They are used through open license from Creative Commons.)

Text: Fundamentals of General. organic. and Biological Chemistry. 5th Ed. McMurry,
Castellion, and Ballantine; Prentice Hall.

Lab Kit. (Note to instructors. There are virtual micro labs but if you prefer students to
have the touch and feel of experiments this is the option. The CK-102 comes with 13 experiments. The cost is $299 per student. Experiments included : 01 02 03 04 05 06 Laboratory Techniques & Measurements Melting Points Caloric Content of Food Hydrolysis of Acetylsalicylic Acid: Sympathetic Ink* Chromatography of Food Dyes Enzymes and Temperature - 94 -

07 Stereochemistry I 08 Stereochemistry II 09 Introduction to Spectroscopy Virtual Labs: 1.Online Web Lab OWL Organic Chemistry 2. Virtual Organic Chemistry Lab from University of Oxford 3. The Organic Laboratory from Univ. of Akron 4. The Virtual ChemLab (commercial) . COURSE OBJECTIVES: The objectives 'of this course are in concert with those of the Science Core Curriculum. The student will acquire a significant knowledge of the principles of Organic and Biological Chemistry by being able to recognize, comprehend, and interpret the chemistry of the major organic functional groups, as well as the structure of biomolecules in relation to their function in the body. During the course, the student will be taught how to synthesize knowledge, so that they can demonstrate the ability to: 1) integrate specific facts with general principles; 2) properly define and analyze what questions are being asked, and 3) successfully solve given problems through critical thinking.

EVALUATION: The grading format will be as follows:


4, hour exams @ 15% Comprehensive final exam Laboratory 60% total 20% 20%

HOMEWORK: Homework assignments are an essential component of the learning


process, because they provide an opportunity for you to solidify your understanding of the subject material and to practice problem-solving, analysis and critical thinking. Although they will not be graded per se, they will be examined by your professor, and they must be handed in on time, in order for your overall grade not to be affected adversely. After you hand in each of your completed homework assignments, your professor will provide you with a set of complete solutions to the problems. It is your responsibility to make a copy of the homework you hand in, so that you can evaluate your ability to understand the subject matter and apply it, in order to solve problems. You are encouraged to seek help from your professor regarding any of these problems which you do not understand or on any other related subject matter. SUBJECTS TO BE COVERED Introduction to Organic Chemistry: Alkanes Alkenes, Alkynes, Aromatic compounds Compounds with oxygen, sulfur or halogen Amines - 95 -

Aldehydes and ketones Carboxylic acids and their derivatives Amino acids and proteins Enzymes and vitamins Generation of biochemical energy Carbohydrates and carbohydrate metabolism Lipids and lipid metabolism

HOMEWORK PROBLEMS
(Do all parts of each problem unless otherwise indicated)

Chapter 12 Introduction to Organic Chemistry 24,26,30,32,38,40,42,44,50,52,54,58,68,70 Chapter 13 Alkanes, Alkynes, Aromatic Compounds 34, 36, 38a. c, e, g, 40, 42, 48, 50, 54, 56, 58, 60, 66, 68, 78, 80 b and c, 86, 90 Chapter 14 Compounds with oxygen, sulfur or halogen 36, 38, 40, 42, 44a, b, c, 46, 50, 56, 62, 66, 70 Cahpter 15 Amines 28, 30, 32, 40, 42, 54, 58, 64 Chapter 16 Aldehydes and ketones 24, 28, 34, 36, 38, 54, 60, 62, 64 b and c, 66 Chapter 17 Carboxylic acids and their derivatives 34 a and b, 38, 40, 42, 44, 46, 52a, 54, 60, 62, 64, 70, 76, 82, 86 Chaper 18 Amino acids and proteins 34, 36, 46, 52, 56, 60, 66, 82, 98 Chapter 19 Enzymes and vitamins 30, 32, 34, 56

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Suggested Course Outline and Schedule


Bio 227 Schedule Week Chapter 1 12 13 Chapter Topic Bio 227 Schedule Lab Activities (Lab Paq)+ Virtual
Instructor will select appropriate activities from the following:

( The instructor will determine the schedule for Exams and Lab Tests) Lectures 1. The Nature of Organic Molecules 1.a. Lecture 2. Alkanes Alkenes, Alkynes, 3. Aromatic compounds

1. Lab Paq ChemKit 102 comes with 10 experiments:


01 Laboratory Techniques & Measurements 02 Melting Points 03 Caloric Content of Food 04 Hydrolysis of Acetylsalicylic Acid: Sympathetic Ink* 05 Chromatography of Food Dyes 06 Enzymes and Temperature 07 Stereochemistry I 08 Stereochemistry II 09 Introduction to Spectroscopy

Note: There are two sources of video


lecture courses on Intro. To Organic Chemistry for the instructor to select:

1. Khan Academy with 59 lectures. 2. University of California, Irvine with 29 lectures. Pl Reading: Chapter 13 2 14 3. Compounds with oxygen, sulfur or halogen

2.Online Web Lab OWL


Organic Chemistry

3. Virtual Labs
Virtual Organic Chemistry Lab from University of Oxford The Organic Laboratory from Univ. of Akron The Virtual ChemLab (commercial)

15 16

4. Amines 5. Aldehydes and ketones

17 18

6. Carboxylic acids and their derivatives 7. Amino acids and proteins 8. Enzymes and vitamins 9. Generation of biochemical energy

5 6

19 20

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7 8

21

10.. Carbohydrates and carbohydrate metabolism 11. Lipids and lipid metabolism

24

RULES FOR SUCCESS: a. Dont miss lecture or lab. Even though this is an On-Line class you need to set aside dedicated time every week to read your text, cover the lecture PowerPoint or lecture videos, animations, slides, and do the assigned and recommended activities. Do not procrastinate! There is simply too much material covered too rapidly to catch up if you get behind. TAKE NOTES on what you read in your text and off the lecture slides, dont just read them. Students who actively take notes and do the activities generally learn the material better than those who dont. You may want to use the Note Taking Pages available for each chapter. b. Be consistent. Determine when you can regularly attend class on-line. You need to make an agreement with yourself at the outset of the course and stick to it as to when youll study General Biology. Students who vary their study time generally do not do as well as those who set aside the same time every week for study. c. Keep up by studying regularly. You will not succeed in this course if you wait until the week before an exam to study. You must drill on the material as it is presented. d. Manage your time well. Schedule study time every day. In all college/university classes you should expect to study a minimum of 2-3 hours OUTSIDE OF CLASS TIME for each credit hour of class. Bacteriology is a (4) credit hour course so you should expect to spend at least 8 12 hours a week studying for this course. This is not like any other on-line class you may have taken. I will give you a time limit in which to cover the assigned material. You may not work ahead nor will I allow make-up or late work. e. Study the right stuff. The purpose of a lecture is to direct your attention to what you need to know. The notes clearly state what you are expected to learn. I do not cover every topic in the text and you are responsible for those topics I do cover in class. You will also be responsible for any outside reading (usually in - 98 -

your textbook) that I assign you. Recopying your notes and making flash cards are two essential techniques. Students find that copying off the "Note Taking Pages" before starting the PowerPoint lectures is helpful. f. Practice! Practice! Practice! After learning your notes, put yourself in a test situation by answering each chapters checkpoint and review questions, and then the activities. g. If youre having difficulty, get help early. The sooner you seek help, the more options I have to help you improve your learning. Ask me questions in the Discussion Board under Student Questions. h. Improve your test-taking skills. Well cover this in more detail before the first exam. i. DO the Written Assignments, Homework Assignments, Worksheets, Group Discussion, and Group Discussion Quizzes! The written assignments, homework, worksheets, and group discussions are designed to assist you in learning the course material. Grades are based on the assumption you are completing the Written Assignments, Homework, Worksheets, and Group Discussion Quizzes. Failure to do all the Written Assignments, Homework, and Worksheets, and Group Discussion Quizzes may negatively affect your grade as they are worth about (xx%)of your lecture grade.

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