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Chapter 29 Alternating-Current Circuits

Conceptual Problems
1 A coil in an ac generator rotates at 60 Hz. How much time elapses between successive peak emf values of the coil? Determine the Concept Successive peaks are one-half period apart. Hence the 1 1 1 = = 8.33 ms . elapsed time between the peaks is T = 2 2 f 2 60 s -1

2 If the rms voltage in an ac circuit is doubled, the peak voltage is (a) doubled, (b) halved, (c) increased by a factor of 2 , (d) not changed. Picture the Problem We can use the relationship between V and Vpeak to decide the effect of doubling the rms voltage on the peak voltage.

Express the initial rms voltage in terms of the peak voltage: Express the doubled rms voltage in terms of the new peak voltage V' peak : Divide the second of these equations by the first and simplify to obtain:

Vrms =

Vpeak 2
V' peak 2

2Vrms =

V' peak

V' peak 2Vrms = 2 2= Vpeak Vpeak Vrms


2

Solving for V' peak yields:

V' peak = 2Vpeak (a) is correct.

3 [SSM] If the frequency in the circuit shown in Figure 29-27 is doubled, the inductance of the inductor will (a) double, (b) not change, (c) halve, (d) quadruple. Determine the Concept The inductance of an inductor is determined by the details of its construction and is independent of the frequency of the circuit. The inductive reactance, on the other hand, is frequency dependent. (b) is correct. 4 If the frequency in the circuit shown in Figure 29-27 is doubled, the inductive reactance of the inductor will (a) double, (b) not change, (c) halve, (d) quadruple.

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2740 Chapter 29
Determine the Concept The inductive reactance of an inductor varies with the frequency according to X L = L. Hence, doubling will double XL. (a) is

correct.
5 If the frequency in the circuit in Figure 29-28 is doubled, the capacitive reactance of the circuit will (a) double, (b) not change, (c) halve, (d) quadruple. Determine the Concept The capacitive reactance of an capacitor varies with the frequency according to X C = 1 C . Hence, doubling will halve XC. (c) is

correct.
6 (a) In a circuit consisting solely of a ac generator and an ideal inductor, are there any time intervals when the inductor receives energy from the generator? If so, when? Explain your answer. (b) Are there any time intervals when the inductor supplies energy back to the generator? If so when? Explain your answer. Determine the Concept Yes to both questions. (a) While the magnitude of the current in the inductor is increasing, the inductor absorbs power from the generator. (b) When the magnitude of the current in the inductor decreases, the inductor supplies power to the generator. 7 [SSM] (a) In a circuit consisting of a generator and a capacitor, are there any time intervals when the capacitor receives energy from the generator? If so, when? Explain your answer. (b) Are there any time intervals when the capacitor supplies power to the generator? If so, when? Explain your answer. Determine the Concept Yes to both questions. (a) While the magnitude of the charge is accumulating on either plate of the capacitor, the capacitor absorbs power from the generator. (b) When the magnitude of the charge is on either plate of the capacitor is decreasing, it supplies power to the generator. 8 (a) Show that the SI unit of inductance multiplied by the SI unit of capacitance is equivalent to seconds squared. (b) Show that the SI unit of inductance divided by the SI unit of resistance is equivalent to seconds. Determine the Concept (a) Substitute the SI units of inductance and capacitance and simplify to obtain:

V s C s = C = s2 A V C s

Alternating-Current Circuits (b) Substitute the SI units of inductance divided by resistance and simplify to obtain:

2741

V s V s A = A = s V A

9 [SSM] Suppose you increase the rotation rate of the coil in the generator shown in the simple ac circuit in Figure 29-29. Then the rms current (a) increases, (b) does not change, (c) may increase or decrease depending on the magnitude of the original frequency, (d) may increase or decrease depending on the magnitude of the resistance, (e) decreases. Determine the Concept Because the rms current through the resistor is given by peak NBA , I rms is directly proportional to . (a) is correct. I rms = rms = = R 2 2 10 If the inductance value is tripled in a circuit consisting solely of a variable inductor and a variable capacitor, how would you have to change the capacitance so that the natural frequency of the circuit is unchanged? (a) triple the capacitance, (b) decrease the capacitance to one-third of its original value, (c) You should not change the capacitance.(d) You cannot determine how to change the capacitance from the data given. Determine the Concept The natural frequency of an LC circuit is given by f 0 = 1 2 LC .

Express the natural frequencies of the circuit before and after the inductance is tripled:
Divide the second of the these equations by the first and simplify to obtain:

f0 =

1 2 LC
1

and f 0' =

1 2 L'C'

f = 2 L'C' = 1 f0 2 LC
' 0

LC L'C'

Because the natural frequency is unchanged: When the inductance is tripled:

1=

LC LC L = 1 C' = C L'C' L'C' L'


L 1 C = C 3L 3

C' =

(b )

is correct.

11 [SSM] Consider a circuit consisting solely of an ideal inductor and an ideal capacitor. How does the maximum energy stored in the capacitor compare to the maximum value stored in the inductor? (a) They are the same and each equal to the total energy stored in the circuit. (b) They are the same and each

2742 Chapter 29 equal to half of the total energy stored in the circuit. (c) The maximum energy stored in the capacitor is larger than the maximum energy stored in the inductor. (d) The maximum energy stored in the inductor is larger than the maximum energy stored in the capacitor. (e) You cannot compare the maximum energies based on the data given because the ratio of the maximum energies depends on the actual capacitance and inductance values.
Determine the Concept The maximum energy stored in the electric field of the 1 Q2 and the maximum energy stored in the magnetic capacitor is given by U e = 2 C 1 field of the inductor is given by U m = LI 2 . Because energy is conserved in an 2 LC circuit and oscillates between the inductor and the capacitor, Ue = Um = Utotal. (a ) is correct. 12

True or false:

(a) A driven series RLC circuit that has a high Q factor has a narrow resonance curve. (b) A circuit consists solely of a resistor, an inductor and a capacitor, all connected in series. If the resistance of the resistor is doubled, the natural frequency of the circuit remains the same. (c) At resonance, the impedance of a driven series RLC combination equals the resistance R. (d) At resonance, the current in a driven series RLC circuit is in phase with the voltage applied to the combination. (a) True. The Q factor and the width of the resonance curve at half power are related according to Q = 0 ; i.e., they are inversely proportional to each other. (b) True. The natural frequency of the circuit depends only on the inductance L of the inductor and the capacitance C of the capacitor and is given by = 1 LC . (c) True. The impedance of an RLC circuit is given by Z = R 2 + ( X L X C ) . At
2

resonance XL = XC and so Z = R. (d) True. The phase angle is related to XL and XC according to X XC = tan 1 L . At resonance XL = XC and so = 0. R

Alternating-Current Circuits
13

2743

True or false (all questions related to a driven series RLC circuit):

(a) Near resonance, the power factor of a driven series RLC circuit is close to zero. (b) The power factor of a driven series RLC circuit does not depend on the value of the resistance. (c) The resonance frequency of a driven series RLC circuit does not depend on the value of the resistance. (d) At resonance, the peak current of a driven series RLC circuit does not depend on the capacitance or the inductance. (e) For frequencies below the resonant frequency, the capacitive reactance of a driven series RLC circuit is larger than the inductive reactance. (f) For frequencies below the resonant frequency of a driven series RLC circuit, the phase of the current leads (is ahead of) the phase of the applied voltage. (a) False. Near resonance, the power factor, given by cos = is close to 1. (b) False. The power factor is given by cos =
R R

(X L X C )

+R

( X L X C )2 + R 2

(c) True. The resonance frequency for a driven series RLC circuit depends only on L and C and is given by res = 1 LC (d) True. At resonance X L X C = 0 and so Z = R and the peak current is given by I peak = Vapp, peak R . (e) True. Because the capacitive reactance varies inversely with the driving frequency and the inductive reactance varies directly with the driving frequency, at frequencies well below the resonance frequency the capacitive reactance is larger than the inductive reactance. (f) True. For frequencies below the resonant frequency, the circuit is more capacitive than inductive and the phase constant is negative. This means that the current leads the applied voltage.
14 You may have noticed that sometimes two radio stations can be heard when your receiver is tuned to a specific frequency. This situation often occurs when you are driving and are between two cities. Explain how this situation can occur.

2744 Chapter 29
Determine the Concept Because the power curves received by your radio from two stations have width, you could have two frequencies overlapping as a result of receiving signals from both stations. 15

True or false (all questions related to a driven series RLC circuit):

(a) At frequencies much higher than or much lower than the resonant frequency of a driven series RLC circuit, the power factor is close to zero. (b) The larger the resonance width of a driven series RLC circuit is, the larger the Q factor for the circuit is. (c) The larger the resistance of a driven series RLC circuit is, the larger the resonance width for the circuit is. (a) True. Because the power factor is given by cos =

R
2

1 2 L +R C values of that are much higher or much lower than the resonant frequency, the term in parentheses becomes very large and cos approaches zero.
(b) False. When the resonance curve is reasonably narrow, the Q factor can be approximated by Q = 0 . Hence a large value for Q corresponds to a narrow resonance curve. (c) True. See Figure 29-21.
16 An ideal transformer has N1 turns on its primary and N2 turns on its secondary. The average power delivered to a load resistance R connected across the secondary is P2 when the primary rms voltage is V1. The rms current in the primary windings can then be expressed as (a) P2/V1, (b) (N1/N2)(P2/V1), (c) (N2/N1)(P2/V1), (d) (N2/N1)2(P2/V1). Picture the Problem Let the subscript 1 denote the primary and the subscript 2 the secondary. Assuming no loss of power in the transformer, we can equate the power in the primary circuit to the power in the secondary circuit and solve for the rms current in the primary windings.

, for

Assuming no loss of power in the transformer: Substitute for P1 and P2 to obtain:

P 1 = P 2
I1, rmsV1, rms = I 2, rmsV2, rms

Alternating-Current Circuits Solving for I1,rms and simplifying yields:

2745

I1, rms =

I 2, rmsV2, rms V1, rms

P2 V1, rms

(a )
17 [SSM]

is correct.

True or false:

(a) A transformer is used to change frequency. (b) A transformer is used to change voltage. (c) If a transformer steps up the current, it must step down the voltage. (d) A step-up transformer, steps down the current. (e) The standard household wall-outlet voltage in Europe is 220 V, about twice that used in the United States. If a European traveler wants her hair dryer to work properly in the United States, she should use a transformer that has more windings in its secondary coil than in its primary coil. (f) The standard household wall-outlet voltage in Europe is 220 V, about twice that used in the United States. If an American traveler wants his electric razor to work properly in Europe, he should use a transformer that steps up the current. (a) False. A transformer is a device used to raise or lower the voltage in a circuit. (b) True. A transformer is a device used to raise or lower the voltage in a circuit. (c) True. If energy is to be conserved, the product of the current and voltage must be constant. (d) True. Because the product of current and voltage in the primary and secondary circuits is the same, increasing the current in the secondary results in a lowering (or stepping down) of the voltage. (e) True. Because electrical energy is provided at a higher voltage in Europe, the visitor would want to step-up the voltage in order to make her hair dryer work properly. (f) True. Because electrical energy is provided at a higher voltage in Europe, the visitor would want to step-up the current (and decrease the voltage) in order to make his razor work properly.

Estimation and Approximation


18 The impedances of motors, transformers, and electromagnets include both resistance and inductive reactance. Suppose that phase of the current to a large industrial plant lags the phase of the applied voltage by 25 when the plant

2746 Chapter 29 is under full operation and using 2.3 MW of power. The power is supplied to the plant from a substation 4.5 km from the plant; the 60 Hz rms line voltage at the plant is 40 kV. The resistance of the transmission line from the substation to the plant is 5.2 . The cost per kilowatt-hour to the company that owns the plant is $0.14, and the plant pays only for the actual energy used. (a) Estimate the resistance and inductive reactance of the plants total load. (b) Estimate the rms current in the power lines and the rms voltage at the substation. (c) How much power is lost in transmission? (d) Suppose that the phase that the current lags the phase of the applied voltage is reduced to 18 by adding a bank of capacitors in series with the load. How much money would be saved by the electric utility during one month of operation, assuming the plant operates at full capacity for 16 h each day? (e) What must be the capacitance of this bank of capacitors to achieve this change in phase angle?
Picture the Problem We can find the resistance and inductive reactance of the plants total load from the impedance of the load and the phase constant. The current in the power lines can be found from the total impedance of the load the potential difference across it and the rms voltage at the substation by applying Kirchhoffs loop rule to the substation-transmission wires-load circuit. The power 2 Rtrans . We can find the cost lost in transmission can be found from Ptrans = I rms

savings by finding the difference in the power lost in transmission when the phase angle is reduced to 18. Finally, we can find the capacitance that is required to reduce the phase angle to 18 by first finding the capacitive reactance using the definition of tan and then applying the definition of capacitive reactance to find C.
Rtrans = 5.2

substation

f = 60 Hz

rms= 40 kV
= 25

(a) Relate the resistance and inductive reactance of the plants total load to Z and : Express Z in terms of the rms current I rms in the power lines and the rms

R = Z cos and X L = Z sin Z=

rms
I rms

voltage rms at the plant:

Alternating-Current Circuits Express the power delivered to the solve for I rms :

2747

plant in terms of rms, I rms , and and

Pav = rms I rms cos


and
I rms = Pav rms cos

(1)

Substitute to obtain:

Z=

2 rms cos

Pav

Substitute numerical values and evaluate Z: Substitute numerical values and evaluate R and XL:

2 ( 40 kV ) cos 25 Z= = 630

2.3 MW

R = (630 ) cos 25 = 571 = 0.57 k

and X L = (630 )sin 25 = 266

= 0.27 k
(b) Use equation (1) to find the current in the power lines:
I rms = 2.3 MW = 63.4 A (40 kV )cos 25

= 63 A

Apply Kirchhoffs loop rule to the circuit: Solve for sub: Substitute numerical values and evaluate sub:

sub I rms Rtrans I rms Z tot = 0

sub = I rms (Rtrans + Z tot )


sub = (63.4 A )(5.2 + 630 )
= 40.3 kV
2 Ptrans = I rms Rtrans = (63.4 A ) (5.2 ) 2

(c) The power lost in transmission is:

= 20.9 kW = 21kW

(d) Express the cost savings C in terms of the difference in energy consumption (P25 P18)t and the per-unit cost u of the energy:

C = (P25 P 18 )tu

2748 Chapter 29 Express the power lost in transmission when = 18: Find the current in the transmission lines when = 18: Evaluate P 18 :
2 P 18 = I18 Rtrans

I18 =

2.3 MW = 60.5 A (40 kV ) cos18


2

P18 = (60.5 A ) (5.2 ) = 19.0 kW

Substitute numerical values and evaluate C:


d $0.14 h C = (20.9 kW 19.0 kW )16 30 = $128 d month kW h

(e) The required capacitance is given by: Relate the new phase angle to the inductive reactance XL, the reactance due to the added capacitance XC, and the resistance of the load R: Substituting for XC yields:

C=

1 2fX C
XL XC X C = X L R tan R

tan =

C=

1 2f ( X L R tan )

Substitute numerical values and evaluate C:


C= 1 = 33 F 2 60 s (266 (571 ) tan 18)

-1

Alternating Current in Resistors, Inductors, and Capacitors


19 [SSM] A 100-W light bulb is screwed into a standard 120-V-rms socket. Find (a) the rms current, (b) the peak current, and (c) the peak power. Picture the Problem We can use Pav = rms I rms to find I rms , I peak = 2 I rms to find

I peak , and Ppeak = I peak peak to find Ppeak .

(a) Relate the average power delivered by the source to the rms voltage across the bulb and the rms current through it:

Pav = rms I rms I rms =

rms

Pav

Alternating-Current Circuits Substitute numerical values and evaluate I rms : (b) Express I peak in terms of I rms : Substitute for I rms and evaluate I peak :
I rms = 100 W = 0.8333 A = 0.833 A 120 V

2749

I peak = 2 I rms

I peak = 2 (0.8333 A ) = 1.1785 A


= 1.18 A

(c) Express the maximum power in terms of the maximum voltage and maximum current: Substitute numerical values and evaluate Ppeak :

Ppeak = I peak peak

Ppeak = (1.1785 A ) 2 (120 V ) = 200 W

20 A circuit breaker is rated for a current of 15 A rms at a voltage of 120 V rms. (a) What is the largest value of the peak current that the breaker can carry? (b) What is the maximum average power that can be supplied by this circuit? Picture the Problem We can I peak = 2 I rms to find the largest peak current the

breaker can carry and Pav = I rmsVrms to find the average power supplied by this circuit. (a) Express I peak in terms of I rms : (b) Relate the average power to the rms current and voltage:

I peak = 2 I rms = 2 (15 A ) = 21 A Pav = I rmsVrms = (15 A )(120 V ) = 1.8 kW

21 [SSM] What is the reactance of a 1.00-H inductor at (a) 60 Hz, (b) 600 Hz, and (c) 6.00 kHz? Picture the Problem We can use X L = L to find the reactance of the inductor at any frequency.

Express the inductive reactance as a function of f: (a) At f = 60 Hz:

X L = L = 2fL
X L = 2 60 s 1 (1.00 mH ) = 0.38

2750 Chapter 29 (b) At f = 600 Hz: (c) At f = 6.00 kHz:

X L = 2 (600 s 1 )(1.00 mH ) = 3.77 X L = 2 (6.00 kHz )(1.00 mH ) = 37.7

22 An inductor has a reactance of 100 at 80 Hz. (a) What is its inductance? (b) What is its reactance at 160 Hz? Picture the Problem We can use X L = L to find the inductance of the inductor at any frequency.

(a) Relate the reactance of the inductor to its inductance: Solve for and evaluate L:

X L = L = 2fL L =

XL 2f

L=

100 = 0.199 H = 0.20 H 2 80 s 1

(b) At 160 Hz:

X L = 2 (160 s 1 )(0.199 H ) = 0.20 k

23 At what frequency would the reactance of a 10-F capacitor equal the reactance of a 1.0-H inductor? Picture the Problem We can equate the reactances of the capacitor and the inductor and then solve for the frequency.

Express the reactance of the inductor: Express the reactance of the capacitor: Equate these reactances to obtain:

X L = L = 2fL
XC =

1 1 = C 2fC

2fL =

1 1 f = 2fC 2

1 LC

Substitute numerical values and evaluate f:

f =

1 2

1 = 1.6 kHz (10 F)(1.0 mH )

24 What is the reactance of a 1.00-nF capacitor at (a) 60.0 Hz, (b) 6.00 kHz, and (c) 6.00 MHz? Picture the Problem We can use X C = 1 C to find the reactance of the

capacitor at any frequency.

Alternating-Current Circuits

2751

Express the capacitive reactance as a function of f: (a) At f = 60.0 Hz:

XC = XC =

1 1 = C 2fC

2 60.0 s

1
1

)(1.00 nF) =

2.65 M

(b) At f = 6.00 kHz:

XC =

1 = 26.5 k 2 (6.00 kHz )(1.00 nF) 1 = 26.5 2 (6.00 MHz )(1.00 nF)

(c) At f = 6.00 MHz:

XC =

25 [SSM] A 20-Hz ac generator that produces a peak emf of 10 V is connected to a 20-F capacitor. Find (a) the peak current and (b) the rms current. Picture the Problem We can use Ipeak = peak/XC and XC = 1/C to express Ipeak as

a function of peak, f, and C. Once weve evaluate Ipeak, we can use Irms = Ipeak/ 2 to find I rms . Express I peak in terms of peak and XC:

I peak =

peak
XC

Express the capacitive reactance:

XC =

1 1 = C 2fC

Substitute for XC and simplify to obtain: (a) Substitute numerical values and evaluate I peak : (b) Express I rms in terms of I peak :

I peak = 2fC peak


I peak = 2 20 s 1 (20 F)(10 V ) = 25.1 mA = 25 mA
I peak 2 25.1 mA = 18 mA 2

I rms =

26 At what frequency is the reactance of a 10-F capacitor (a) 1.00 , (b) 100 , and (c) 10.0 m?

2752 Chapter 29
Picture the Problem We can use X C = 1 C = 1 2fC to relate the reactance of

the capacitor to the frequency. The reactance of the capacitor is given by: (a) Find f when XC = 1.00 :
XC =
f =

1 1 1 = f = C 2fC 2CX C

1 = 16 kHz 2 (10 F)(1.00 ) 1 = 0.16 kHz 2 (10 F)(100 ) 1 = 1.6 MHz

(b) Find f when XC = 100 :

f =

(c) Find f when XC = 10.0 m:

f =

2 (10 F)(10.0 m )

27 A circuit consists of two ideal ac generators and a 25- resistor, all connected in series. The potential difference across the terminals of one of the generators is given by V1 = (5.0 V) cos(t ), and the potential difference across the terminals of the other generator is given by V2 = (5.0 V) cos(t + ), where = /6. (a) Use Kirchhoffs loop rule and a trigonometric identity to find the peak current in the circuit. (b) Use a phasor diagram to find the peak current in the circuit. (c) Find the current in the resistor if = /4 and the amplitude of V2 is increased from 5.0 V to 7.0 V. Picture the Problem We can use the trigonometric identity cos + cos = 2 cos 1 + ) cos 1 2( 2 ( )

to find the sum of the phasors V1 and V2 and then use this sum to express I as a function of time. In (b) well use a phasor diagram to obtain the same result and in (c) well use the phasor diagram appropriate to the given voltages to express the current as a function of time. (a) Applying Kirchhoffs loop rule to the circuit yields: Solve for I to obtain:

V1 + V2 IR = 0
V1 + V2 R

I=

Alternating-Current Circuits
1 Use the trigonometric identity cos + cos = 2 cos 1 2 ( + ) cos 2 ( )

2753

to find V1 + V2:
1 V1 + V2 = (5.0 V )[cos(t ) + cos(t + )] = (5 V )[2 cos 1 2 (2t )cos 2 ( 2 )]

= (10 V )cos

cos t = (8.66 V )cos t

Substitute for V1 + V2 and R to obtain:

I=

(8.66 V ) cos t = (0.346 A ) cos t


25

= (0.35 A ) cos t where I peak = 0.35 A (b) Express the magnitude of the current in R: The phasor diagram for the voltages is shown to the right.
30 30
r V1

I =

r V
R
r V2
r V

r Use vector addition to find V :

r r V = 2 V1 cos 30 = 2(5.0 V ) cos 30


= 8.66 V

r Substitute for V and R to obtain:

= 0.346 A 25 and I = (0.35 A ) cos t where I peak = 0.35 A

I =

8.66 V

2754 Chapter 29 (c) The phasor diagram is shown to the right. Note that the phase angle r r between V1 and V2 is now 90.
r V2

90
o

r V

r V1

Use the Pythagorean theorem to r find V :

r r2 r 2 V = V1 + V2 =
= 8.60 V

(5.0 V )2 + (7.0 V )2

Express I as a function of t:

cos(t + ) R where = 45 (90 ) = 45

I=

r V

7 .0 V = tan 1 45 5.0 V = 9.462 = 0.165 rad

Substitute numerical values and evaluate I:

I= =

8.60 V cos(t + 0.165 rad ) 25

(0.34 A )cos(t + 0.17 rad )

Undriven Circuits Containing Capacitors, Resistors and Inductors


28 (a) Show that 1 LC has units of inverse seconds by substituting SI units for inductance and capacitance into the expression. (b) Show that 0L/R (the expression for the Q-factor) is dimensionless by substituting SI units for angular frequency, inductance, and resistance into the expression. Picture the Problem We can substitute the units of the various physical quantitities in 1 / LC and Q = 0 L R to establish their units.

Alternating-Current Circuits (a) Substitute the units for L and C in the expression 1 LC and simplify to obtain: (b) Substitute the units for 0, L, and R in the expression Q = 0 L R and simplify to obtain:
1 = HF 1 s ( s ) = 1 s
2

2755

= s 1

1 V s 1 V s s A = s A = 1 no units V V A A

29 [SSM] (a) What is the period of oscillation of an LC circuit consisting of an ideal 2.0-mH inductor and a 20-F capacitor? (b) A circuit that oscillates consists solely of an 80-F capacitor and a variable ideal inductor. What inductance is needed in order to tune this circuit to oscillate at 60 Hz? Picture the Problem We can use T = 2/ and = 1 f) to L and C.

LC to relate T (and hence

(a) Express the period of oscillation of the LC circuit: For an LC circuit:

T=

1 LC (1)

Substitute for to obtain: Substitute numerical values and evaluate T: (b) Solve equation (1) for L to obtain: Substitute numerical values and evaluate L:

T = 2 LC T = 2

(2.0 mH)(20 F) =

1.3 ms

L=

T2 1 = 2 2 2 4 C 4 f C

L=

4 2 60 s 1

) (80 F)
2

= 88 mH

An LC circuit has capacitance C0 and inductance L. A second LC 30 circuit has capacitance 1 2 C0 and inductance 2L, and a third LC circuit has capacitance 2C0 and inductance 1 2 L. (a) Show that each circuit oscillates with the same frequency. (b) In which circuit would the peak current be greatest if the peak voltage across the capacitor in each circuit was the same?

2756 Chapter 29
Picture the Problem We can use the expression f 0 = 1 2 LC for the resonance

frequency of an LC circuit to show that each circuit oscillates with the same frequency. In (b) we can use I peak = Q0 , where Q0 is the charge of the capacitor at time zero, and the definition of capacitance Q0 = CV to express Ipeak in terms of

, C and V.
Express the resonance frequency for an LC circuit: (a) Express the product of L and C0 for each circuit: f0 = 1 2 LC

Circuit 2: L2C2 = (2 L1 )( 1 2 C0 ) = L1C1 , and Circuit 3: L3C3 = ( 1 2 L1 )(2C0 ) = L1C1

Circuit 1: L1C1 = L1C0 ,

Because L1C1 = L2 C 2 = L3C3 , the resonance frequencies of the three circuits are the same. (b) Express I peak in terms of the charge stored in the capacitor: Express Q0 in terms of the capacitance of the capacitor and the potential difference across the capacitor: Substituting for Q0 yields: I peak = Q0

Q0 = CV

I peak = CV or, for and V constant, I peak C . Hence, the circuit with capacitance 2C0 has the greatest peak current.

31 A 5.0-F capacitor is charged to 30 V and is then connected across an ideal 10-mH inductor. (a) How much energy is stored in the system? (b) What is the frequency of oscillation of the circuit? (c) What is the peak current in the circuit?
2 Picture the Problem We can use U = 1 2 CV to find the energy stored in the

electric field of the capacitor, 0 = 2f 0 = 1

LC to find f0, and I peak = Q0 and

Q0 = CV to find I peak .

Alternating-Current Circuits

2757

(a) Express the energy stored in the system as a function of C and V: Substitute numerical values and evaluate U: (b) Express the resonance frequency of the circuit in terms of L and C: Substitute numerical values and evaluate f0:

2 U=1 2 CV

U=

1 2

(5.0 F)(30 V )2 =

2.3 mJ

0 = 2f 0 =

1 1 f0 = LC 2 LC

f0 =

(10 mH)(5.0 F)

= 712 Hz

= 0.71 kHz
(c) Express I peak in terms of the charge stored in the capacitor: Express Q0 in terms of the capacitance of the capacitor and the potential difference across the capacitor: Substituting for Q0 yields: Substitute numerical values and evaluate I peak : I peak = Q0

Q0 = CV

I peak = CV
I peak = 2 712 s 1 (5.0 F)(30 V )

= 0.67 A

32 A coil with internal resistance can be modeled as a resistor and an ideal inductor in series. Assume that the coil has an internal resistance of 1.00 and an inductance of 400 mH. A 2.00-F capacitor is charged to 24.0 V and is then connected across coil. (a) What is the initial voltage across the coil? (b) How much energy is dissipated in the circuit before the oscillations die out? (c) What is the frequency of oscillation the circuit? (Assume the internal resistance is sufficiently small that has no impact on the frequency of the circuit.) (d) What is the quality factor of the circuit?

2758 Chapter 29
Picture the Problem In Part (a) we can apply Kirchhoffs loop rule to find the initial voltage across the coil. (b) The total energy lost via joule heating is the total energy initially stored in the capacitor. (c) The natural frequency of the circuit is given by f 0 = 1 2 LC . In Part (d) we can use its definition to find the quality

factor of the circuit. (a) Application of Kirchhoffs loop rule leads us to conclude that the initial voltage across the coil is 24.0 V . (b) Because the ideal inductor can not dissipate energy as heat, all of the energy initially stored in the capacitor will be dissipated as joule heat in the resistor: (c) The natural frequency of the circuit is:

1 1 2 U = CV 2 = (2.00 F)(24.0 V ) 2 2 = 0.576 mJ

f0 =

1 2 LC

1 2 (400 mH )(2.00 F)

= 178 Hz
(d) The quality factor of the circuit is given by: Substituting for 0 and simplifying yields:
Q=

0 L
R

Q=

1 L LC = 1 L R R C

Substitute numerical values and evaluate Q:

Q=

1 400 mH = 447 1.00 2.00 F

33 [SSM] An inductor and a capacitor are connected, as shown in Figure 29-30. Initially, the switch is open, the left plate of the capacitor has charge Q0. The switch is then closed. (a) Plot both Q versus t and I versus t on the same graph, and explain how it can be seen from these two plots that the current leads the charge by 90. (b) The expressions for the charge and for the current are given by Equations 29-38 and 29-39, respectively. Use trigonometry and algebra to show that the current leads the charge by 90. Picture the Problem Let Q represent the instantaneous charge on the capacitor and apply Kirchhoffs loop rule to obtain the differential equation for the circuit. We can then solve this equation to obtain an expression for the charge on the capacitor as a function of time and, by differentiating this expression with respect

Alternating-Current Circuits

2759

to time, an expression for the current as a function of time. Well use a spreadsheet program to plot the graphs. Apply Kirchhoffs loop rule to a clockwise loop just after the switch is closed: Because I = dQ dt :
Q dI +L =0 C dt

d 2Q Q d 2Q 1 + Q=0 + = 0 or dt 2 LC dt 2 C

The solution to this equation is:

Q(t ) = Q0 cos(t )
where =
1 LC

Because Q(0) = Q0, = 0 and: The current in the circuit is the derivative of Q with respect to t:

Q(t ) = Q0 cos t
I= dQ d = [Q0 cos t ] = Q0 sin t dt dt

(a) A spreadsheet program was used to plot the following graph showing both the charge on the capacitor and the current in the circuit as functions of time. L, C, and Q0 were all arbitrarily set equal to one to obtain these graphs. Note that the current leads the charge by one-fourth of a cycle or 90.
1.2 Charge Current 0.6
0.6 1.2

Q (mC)

0.0

0.0

-0.6

-0.6

-1.2 0 2 4 6 8

-1.2

10

t (s)

(b) The equation for the current is: The sine and cosine functions are related through the identity:

I = Q0 sin t

I (mA)

(1)

sin = cos + 2

2760 Chapter 29 Use this identity to rewrite equation (1):

I = Q0 sin t = Q0 cos t + 2 Thus, the current leads the charge by 90.

Driven RL Circuits
34 A circuit consists of a resistor, an ideal 1.4-H inductor and an ideal 60-Hz generator, all connected in series. The rms voltage across the resistor is 30 V and the rms voltage across the inductor is 40 V. (a) What is the resistance of the resistor? (b) What is the peak emf of the generator? Picture the Problem We can express the ratio of VR to VL and solve this expression for the resistance R of the circuit. In (b) we can use the fact that, in an LR circuit, VL leads VR by 90 to find the ac input voltage.

(a) Express the potential differences across R and L in terms of the common current through these components: Divide the second of these equations by the first to obtain: Substitute numerical values and evaluate R: (b) Because VR leads VL by 90 in an LR circuit: Substitute numerical values and evaluate Vpeak :

VL = IX L = IL and VR = IR
VR VR IR R = = R = V L VL IL L L
30 V 1 R= 40 V 2 60 s (1.4 H ) = 0.40 k

Vpeak = 2Vrms = 2 VR2 + VL2

Vpeak = 2

(30 V )2 + (40 V )2 =

71 V

35 [SSM] A coil that has a resistance of 80.0 has an impedance of 200 when driven at a frequency of 1.00 kHz. What is the inductance of the coil? Picture the Problem We can solve the expression for the impedance in an LR circuit for the inductive reactance and then use the definition of XL to find L.

Alternating-Current Circuits

2761

Express the impedance of the coil in terms of its resistance and inductive reactance: Solve for XL to obtain: Express XL in terms of L: Equate these two expressions to obtain: Substitute numerical values and evaluate L:

2 Z = R2 + X L

X L = Z 2 R2

X L = 2fL
2fL = Z 2 R 2 L =

Z 2 R2 2f

L=

(200 )2 (80.0 )2 2 (1.00 kHz )

= 29.2 mH

36 A two conductor transmission line simultaneously carries a superposition of two voltage signals, so the potential difference between the two conductors is given by V = V1 + V2, where V1 = (10.0 V) cos(1t) and V2 = (10.0 V) cos(2t), where 1 = 100 rad/s and 2 = 10 000 rad/s. A 1.00 H inductor and a 1.00 k shunt resistor are inserted into the transmission line as shown in Figure 29-31. (Assume that the output is connected to a load that draws only an insignificant amount of current.) (a) What is the voltage (Vout) at the output of the transmission line? (b) What is the ratio of the low-frequency amplitude to the high-frequency amplitude at the output? Picture the Problem We can express the two output voltage signals as the product of the current from each source and R = 1.00 k. We can find the currents due to each source using the given voltage signals and the definition of the impedance for each of them.

(a) Express the voltage signals observed at the output side of the transmission line in terms of the potential difference across the resistor:

V1, out = I1 R and V2, out = I 2 R

2762 Chapter 29 Evaluate I1 and I2:


I1 = V1 = Z1

(10.0 V )cos100t = (9.95 mA )cos100t (1.00 k )2 + [(100 s -1 )(1.00 H )] 2

and

I2 =

V2 = Z2

(10.0 V )cos10 4 t = (0.995 mA )cos10 4 t 2 (1.00 k )2 + [(10 4 s 1 )(1.00 H )]


V1, out = (1.00 k )(9.95 mA ) cos100t

Substitute for I1 and I2 to obtain:

(9.95 V )cos100t

where 1 = 100 rad/s and 2 = 10 000 rad/s. and V2, out = (1.00 k )(0.995 mA ) cos10 4 t
=

(0.995 V )cos104 t
9.95 V = 10 : 1 0.995 V

(b) Express the ratio of V1,out to V2,out:

V1, out V2, out

37 A coil is connected to a 120-V rms, 60-Hz line. The average power supplied to the coil is 60 W, and the rms current is 1.5 A. Find (a) the power factor, (b) the resistance of the coil, and (c) the inductance of the coil. (d) Does the current lag or lead the voltage? Explain your answer. (e) Support your answer to Part (d) by determining the phase angle. Picture the Problem The average power supplied to coil is related to the power 2 R to find R. Because the factor by Pav = rms I rms cos . In (b) we can use Pav = I rms

inductance L is related to the resistance R and the phase angle according to X L = L = R tan , we can use this relationship to find the resistance of the coil. Finally, we can decide whether the current leads or lags the voltage by noting that the circuit is inductive. (a) Express the average power supplied to the coil in terms of the power factor of the circuit: Substitute numerical values and evaluate cos:

Pav = rms I rms cos cos =

Pav rms I rms

cos =

60 W = 0.333 = 0.33 (120 V )(1.5 A )

Alternating-Current Circuits (b) Express the power supplied by the source in terms of the resistance of the coil: Substitute numerical values and evaluate R: (c) Relate the inductive reactance to the resistance and phase angle: Solving for L yields:
2 Pav = I rms RR =

2763

Pav 2 I rms

R=

60 W = 26.7 = 27 (1.5 A )2

X L = L = R tan
R tan cos 1 (0.333) 2f

L=

R tan

Substitute numerical values and evaluate L: (d) Evaluate XL:

L=

(26.7 ) tan (70.5) =


2 60 s 1

0.20 H

X L = (26.7 ) tan(70.5) = 75.4

Because the circuit is inductive, the current lags the voltage. (e) From Part (a):
38

= cos 1 (0.333) = 71

ideal ac voltage source whose output is given by = (345 V) cos(150t), where t is in seconds. Determine (a) the peak current in the circuit, (b) the peak and rms voltages across the inductor, (c) the average power dissipation, and (d) the peak and average magnetic energy stored in the inductor.
Picture the Problem

A 36-mH inductor that has a resistance of 40 is connected to an

(a)

We

can

use

I peak = peak

R 2 + (L ) and
2

VL , peak = I peak X L = LI peak to find the peak current in the circuit and the peak
voltage across the inductor. (b) Once weve found VL, peak we can find VL , rms using
VL , rms = VL , peak
2 2 . (c) We can use Pav = 1 2 I rms R to find the average power
2 dissipation, and (d) U L , peak = 1 2 LI peak to find the peak and average magnetic energy

stored in the inductor. The average energy stored in the magnetic field of the inductor can be found using U L ,av = Pav dt .

2764 Chapter 29 (a) Apply Kirchhoffs loop rule to the circuit to obtain:

IZ = 0 I =
I=

R 2 + (L )
2

Substitute numerical values and evaluate I:

(345 V )cos(150t ) (40 )2 + [(150 s 1 )(36 mH )]2 = (7.94 A ) cos(150t )

and I peak = 7.9 A . (b) Because = (345 V) cos(150t) : Find VL ,rms from VL, peak :

V L , peak = 345 V
VL , rms = VL , peak 2 = 345 V = 244 V 2
2

(c) Relate the average power dissipation to Ipeak and R: Substitute numerical values and evaluate Pav : (d) The maximum energy stored in the magnetic field of the inductor is:

Pav = I

2 rms

I peak 1 2 R= 2 R = 2 I peak R
2

(7.94 A ) (40 ) = 1.3 kW Pav = 1 2


2 U L , peak = 1 2 LI peak = 1 2

(36 mH)(7.94 A )2

= 1.1 J
1 U (t )dt T 0
1 2 L[I (t )] 2
T

The definition of U L,av is:

U L ,av =
U (t ) =

U(t) is given by:

Substitute for U(t) to obtain:

U L ,av =

L 2T L 2T

[I (t )] dt
2 0

Evaluating the integral yields:

U L ,av =

1 2 1 2 I peak T = LI peak 4 2

Substitute numerical values and evaluate U L,av :

U L ,av =

1 (36 mH )(7.94 A )2 = 0.57 J 4

Alternating-Current Circuits
39 [SSM] A coil that has a resistance R and an inductance L has a power factor equal to 0.866 when driven at a frequency of 60 Hz. What is the coils power factor it is driven at 240 Hz?

2765

Picture the Problem We can use the definition of the power factor to find the relationship between XL and R when the coil is driven at a frequency of 60 Hz and then use the definition of XL to relate the inductive reactance at 240 Hz to the inductive reactance at 60 Hz. We can then use the definition of the power factor to determine its value at 240 Hz.

Using the definition of the power factor, relate R and XL: Square both sides of the equation to obtain:
2 (60 Hz) : Solve for X L

cos =

R = Z

R
2 R + XL 2

(1)

cos2 =

R2 2 R2 + X L

1 2 (60 Hz ) = R 2 1 XL 2 cos 1 2 1 2 (60 Hz ) = R 2 XL (0.866 ) 2 1 = 3R


2 ( f ) = 4f 2 L2 and X L2 ( f' ) = 4f' 2 L2 XL

Substitute for cos and simplify to obtain: Use the definition of XL to obtain: Dividing the second of these equations by the first and simplifying yields:

2 ( f' ) = 4f' 2 L2 = f' 2 XL 2 ( f ) 4f 2 L2 f 2 XL

or
f' 2 X ( f' ) = f XL(f )
2 L 2

Substitute numerical values to obtain:

240 s 1 2 ( ) X 240 Hz = X L (60 Hz ) 60 s 1 1 16 = 16 R 2 = R 2 3 3


2 L

2766 Chapter 29 Substitute in equation (1) to obtain:

(cos )240 Hz =

R R2 + 16 2 R 3

3 19

= 0.397
40

voltage source whose output is given by = peakcost as shown in Figure 29-32. Show that (a) the current in the resistor is given by IR = peak/R cos t, (b) the current in the inductor is given by IL = peak/XL cos(t 90), and (c) the current in the voltage source is given by I = IR + IL = Ipeak cos(t ), where

A resistor and an inductor are connected in parallel across an ideal ac

Ipeak = max/Z.

Picture the Problem Because the resistor and the inductor are connected in parallel, the voltage drops across them are equal. Also, the total current is the sum of the current through the resistor and the current through the inductor. Because these two currents are not in phase, well need to use phasors to calculate their sum. The amplitudes of the applied voltage and the currents are equal to the magnitude r r r r of the phasors. That is = peak , I = I peak , I R = I R , peak , and I L = I L , peak .

(a) The ac source applies a voltage given by = peak cos t . Thus, the voltage drop across both the load resistor and the inductor is: The current in the resistor is in phase with the applied voltage: Because I R , peak =

peak cos t = I R R

I R = I R , peak cos t

peak
R

IR =

peak
R

cos t

(b) The current in the inductor lags the applied voltage by 90: Because I L , peak =

I L = I L , peak cos(t 90)

peak
XL

IL =

peak
XL

cos(t 90)

(c) The net current I is the sum of the currents through the parallel branches:

I = IR + IL

Alternating-Current Circuits Draw the phasor diagram for the circuit. The projections of the phasors onto the horizontal axis are the instantaneous values. The current in the resistor is in phase with the applied voltage, and the current in the inductor lags the applied voltage by 90. The net current phasor is the sum of the r r r branch current phasors I = I L + I R .
r IR

2767

r
r I

90 t r IL

The peak current through the parallel combination is equal to peak Z , where Z is the impedance of the combination: From the phasor diagram we have:

I = I peak cos(t ) ,

where I peak =

peak
Z

2 2 2 I peak = IR , peak + I L , peak

2 1 1 peak = R2 + X 2 = Z2 L 1 1 1 where 2 = 2 + 2 Z R XL . 2 peak

peak peak = R + XL
2

Solving for Ipeak yields:

I peak =

peak
Z

2 where Z 2 = R 2 + X L

From the phasor diagram:

I = I peak cos(t where


I L , peak I R , peak

peak
=

tan =

peak
R

XL

R XL

of the ideal ac generator is given by = (100 V) cos(2ft). Find the rms currents in all three branches of the circuit if the driving frequency is (a) 500 Hz and (b) 2000 Hz. Find the fraction of the total average power supplied by the ac generator that is delivered to the load resistor if the frequency is (c) 500 Hz and (d) 2000 Hz.

41 [SSM] Figure 29-33 shows a load resistor that has a resistance of RL = 20.0 connected to a high-pass filter consisting of an inductor that has inductance L = 3.20-mH and a resistor that has resistance R = 4.00-. The output

2768 Chapter 29
Picture the Problem = V1 + V2 , where V1 is the voltage drop across R and V2 is r r r the voltage drop across the parallel combination of L and RL. = V1 + V 2 is the r r r relation for the phasors. For the parallel combination I = I RL + I L . Also, V1 is in

phase with I and V2 is in phase with I RL . First draw the phasor diagram for the currents in the parallel combination, then add the phasors for the voltages to the diagram. The phasor diagram for the currents in the circuit is:
r I RL
r I

r IL

Adding the voltage phasors to the diagram gives:


r I RL

r V2

r I

r V1

r IL

The maximum current in the inductor, I2, peak, is given by:

I 2, peak =

V2, peak Z2

(1) (2)

2 2 2 = RL + XL where Z 2

tan is given by:

tan = =

I L , peak I R , peak

V2, peak X L V2, peak RL

RL R R = L = L X L L 2fL

Solve for to obtain:

= tan 1

RL 2fL

(3)

Alternating-Current Circuits Apply the law of cosines to the triangle formed by the voltage phasors to obtain:
2 peak = V1,2peak + V22, peak + 2V1, peakV2, peak cos

2769

or
2 2 2 2 I peak Z 2 = I peak R 2 + I peak Z2 + 2 I peak RI peak Z 2 cos

Dividing out the current squared yields: Solving for Z yields: The maximum current I peak in the circuit is given by: Irms is related to I peak according to: (a) Substitute numerical values in equation (3) and evaluate :

2 Z 2 = R2 + Z2 + 2 RZ 2 cos

2 Z = R2 + Z2 + 2 RZ 2 cos

(4)

I peak =

peak
Z
1 I peak 2

(5)

I rms =

(6)

= tan 1

20.0 2 (500 Hz )(3.20 mH )

20.0 = tan 1 10.053 = 63.31

Solving equation (2) for Z2 yields:

Z2 =

1
2 R + XL 2 L

Substitute numerical values and evaluate Z2:

Z2 =

(20.0 )2 + (10.053 )2

= 8.982
Substitute numerical values and evaluate Z:

Z=

(4.00 )2 + (8.982 )2 + 2(4.00 )(8.982 )cos 63.31 = 11.36


I peak =
100 V = 8.806 A 11.36

Substitute numerical values in equation (5) and evaluate I peak :

2770 Chapter 29 Substitute for I peak in equation (6) and evaluate I rms : The maximum and rms values of V2 are given by:
I rms = 1 (8.806 A ) = 6.23 A 2

V2, peak = I peak Z 2

= (8.806 A )(8.982 ) = 79.095 V

and
V2,rms = 1 V2, peak 2 1 (79.095 V ) = 55.929 V = 2

The rms values of I RL ,rms and I L ,rms are:

I RL ,rms =

V2,rms RL

55.929 V = 2.80 A 20.0

and

I L ,rms =
(b) Proceed as in (a) with f = 2000 Hz to obtain:

V2,rms XL

55.929 V = 5.53 A 10.053

X L = 40.2 , = 26.4 , Z 2 = 17.9 ,


Z = 21.6 , I peak = 4.64 A , and

I rms = 3.28 A ,
V2,max = 83.0V , V2, rms = 58.7 V ,

I RL ,rms = 2.94 A , and I L,rms = 1.46 A


(c) The power delivered by the ac source equals the sum of the power dissipated in the two resistors. The fraction of the total power delivered by the source that is dissipated in load resistor is given by:
P I2 R = 1 + R = 1 + 2 rms I R ,rms RL PRL + PR L PRL

PRL

Substitute numerical values for f = 500 Hz to obtain:


PRL PRL + PR
f =500 Hz

(6.23 A )2 (4.00 ) = 1 + (2.80 A )2 (20.0 ) = 0.502 = 50.2%

Alternating-Current Circuits (d) Substitute numerical values for f = 2000 Hz to obtain:


PRL PRL + PR
f = 2000 Hz

2771

(3.28 A )2 (4.00 ) = 1 + (2.94 A )2 (20.0 ) = 0.800 = 80.0%

and an ideal battery whose emf 2 is 16 V are connected to a combination of two resistors and an inductor (Figure 29-34), where R1 = 10 , R2 = 8.0 , and L = 6.0 mH. Find the average power delivered to each resistor if (a) the driving frequency is 100 Hz, (b) the driving frequency is 200 Hz, and (c) the driving frequency is 800 Hz. dc component, L acts like a short circuit. Let 1, peak denote the peak value of the voltage supplied by the ac voltage source. We can use P = 22 R to find the power dissipated in the resistors by the current from the ideal battery. Well apply Kirchhoffs loop rule to the loop including L, R1, and R2 to derive an expression for the average power delivered to each resistor by the ac voltage source. (a) The total power delivered to R1 and R2 is: P1 = P1, dc + P1, ac and P2 = P2, dc + P2, ac (1) (2)
Picture the Problem We can treat the ac and dc components separately. For the

42

An ideal ac voltage source whose emf 1 is given by (20 V) cos(2ft)

The dc power delivered to the resistors whose resistances are R1 and R2 is: Express the average ac power delivered to R1: Apply Kirchhoffs loop rule to a clockwise loop that includes R1, L, and R2: Solving for I2 yields:

P1,dc =

22 and P
R1

2 ,dc

22
R2

P 1, ac =

12, rms 12, peak


R1 = 2 R1

R1 I1 Z 2 I 2 = 0

I2 =

R1 R I1 = 1 Z2 Z2

1, peak 1, peak
R1 = Z2

2772 Chapter 29 Express the average ac power delivered to R2:


P2, ac
1, peak R2 = = I Z R2 2 2 R = 1, peak2 2 2Z 2
2 1 2 2 2 , rms 1 2

Substituting in equations (1) and (2) yields:

P 1 =
and

22 + 12, peak
R1 2 R1

P2 =
Substitute numerical values and evaluate P1:

22 + 12, peak R2
R2
2 2Z 2

2 2 ( ( 16 V ) 20 V ) P1 = + = 10 2(10 )

46 W

Substitute numerical values and evaluate P2:


P2 =

(16 V )2
8 .0

(20 V )2 (8.0 ) 2 2 2 (8.0 ) + (2 { 100 s 1 }{6.0 mH})

]=

52 W

(b) Proceed as in (a) to evaluate P1 and P2 with f = 200 Hz:

P1 = 25.6 W + 20.0 W = 46 W P2 = 32.0 W + 13.2 W = 45 W P1 = 25.6 W + 20.0 W = 46 W P2 = 32.0 W + 1.64 W = 34 W

(c) Proceed as in (a) to evaluate P1 and P2 with f = 800 Hz:

An ac circuit contains a resistor and an ideal inductor connected in 43 series. The voltage rms drop across this series combination is 100-V and the rms voltage drop across the inductor alone is 80 V. What is the rms voltage drop across the resistor?
Picture the Problem We can use the phasor diagram for an RL circuit to find the voltage across the resistor.

Alternating-Current Circuits The phasor diagram for the voltages in the circuit is shown to the right:
r VL

2773

rms

r VR

Use the Pythagorean theorem to express VR: Substitute numerical values and evaluate VR:

VR =

2 rms VL2

VR =

(100 V ) 2 (80 V ) 2

= 60 V

Filters and Rectifiers


44 The circuit shown in Figure 29-35 is called an RC high-pass filter because it transmits input voltage signals that have high frequencies with greater amplitude than it transmits input voltage signals that have low frequencies. If the input voltage is given by Vin = Vin peak cos t, show that the output voltage is

Vout = VH cos(t ) where VH = Vin peak

1 + (RC ) . (Assume that the output is


2

connected to a load that draws only an insignificant amount of current.) Show that this result justifies calling this circuit a high-pass filter.
Picture the Problem The phasor diagram for the RC high-pass filter is r r shown to the right. Vapp and VR are the
r VR

phasors for Vin and Vout, respectively. Note that tan = X C R. That is r negative follows from the fact that Vapp r lags VR by . The projection of r Vapp onto the horizontal axis is r Vapp = Vin, and the projection of VR onto the horizontal axis is VR = Vout. Express Vapp :

t
t

r Vapp

r VC

Vapp = Vapp,peak cos t where Vapp,peak = Vpeak = I peak Z


2 and Z 2 = R 2 + X C

(1)

Because < 0:

t + = t

2774 Chapter 29 VR is given by: VR = VR , peak cos(t ) where VR , peak = VH = I peak R Solving equation (1) for Z and substituting for XC yields: Because Vout = VR :
1 Z = R + C
2 2

(2)

Vout = VR , peak cos(t ) Vin peak Z

= I in peak R cos(t ) = R cos(t )


R cos(t )

Using equation (2) to substitute for Z yields:

Vout =

Vin peak 1 R2 + C
Vin peak
1 + (RC )
2

Simplify further to obtain:

Vout =

cos(t )

or Vout = VH cos(t ) where VH = As : Vin peak 1 + (RC )


Vin peak
2

1 + (0 ) the result is consistent with the highpass name for this circuit.

VH

= Vin peak showing that

45 (a) Find an expression for the phase constant in Problem 44 in terms of , R and C. (b) What is the value of in the limit that 0? (c) What is the value of in the limit that ? (d) Explain your answers to Parts (b) and (c).

Alternating-Current Circuits
Picture the Problem The phasor diagram for the RC high-pass filter is r r shown below. Vapp and VR are the
r VR

2775

phasors for Vin and Vout, respectively. r The projection of Vapp onto the horizontal axis is Vapp = Vin, and the r projection of VR onto the horizontal axis is VR = Vout.

r Vapp

r VC

r r (a) Because Vapp lags VR by .

tan =

VC IX X = C = C VR IR R

Use the definition of XC to obtain:

1 1 tan = C = R RC

Solving for yields:

= tan 1 RC

(b) As 0: (c) As :

90 0

r r (d) For very low driving frequencies, X C >> R and so VC effectively lags Vin by r 90. For very high driving frequencies, X C << R and so VR is effectively in phase r with Vin .
46 Assume that in Problem 44, R = 20 k and C = 15 nF. (a) At what frequency is V H = 12 V in peak ? This particular frequency is known as the 3 dB

frequency, or f3dB for the circuit. (b) Using a spreadsheet program, make a graph of log10(VH) versus log10(f), where f is the frequency. Make sure that the scale extends from at least 10% of the 3-dB frequency to ten times the 3-dB frequency. (c) Make a graph of versus log10(f) for the same range of frequencies as in Part (b). What is the value of the phase constant when the frequency is equal to the 3-dB frequency?
Picture the Problem We can use the results obtained in Problems 44 and 45 to find f3 dB and to plot graphs of log(Vout) versus log(f) and versus log(f).

2776 Chapter 29 (a) Use the result of Problem 44 to express the ratio Vout/Vin peak:

Vin peak 1 + (RC ) Vout = Vin peak Vin peak 1 1 + (RC )


2

1 1 + (RC )
2

When Vout = Vin peak / 2 :

1 2
1 1 f 3 dB = RC 2RC

Square both sides of the equation and solve for RC to obtain: Substitute numerical values and evaluate f3 dB:
B

RC = 1 =

f 3 dB =

1 = 0.53 kHz 2 (20 k )(15 nF)


Vin peak 1 + (RC )
2

(b) From Problem 44 we have:

Vout =

In Problem 45 it was shown that:

= tan 1
Vout =

1 RC

Rewrite these expressions in terms of f3 dB to obtain:

Vin peak 1 1+ 2fRC


2

Vpeak f 3 dB 1+ f
2

and

= tan 1

f 1 = tan 1 3 dB 2fRC f

A spreadsheet program to generate the data for a graph of Vout versus f and versus f is shown below. The formulas used to calculate the quantities in the columns are as follows: Cell B1 B2 B3 B4 A8 Formula/Content 2.00E+03 1.50E08 1 531 53 Algebraic Form R C Vin peak f3 dB 0.1f3 dB

Alternating-Current Circuits C8 $B$3/SQRT(1+(1($B$4/A8))^2)

2777

Vin peak f 3 dB 1+ f log(Vout) f tan 1 3 dB f


2

D8 E8 F8 A 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 55 56 57 531 532 533 534 R= C= Vin peak= f3 dB=

LOG(C8) ATAN($B$4/A8) E8*180/PI() B 2.00E+04 1.50E08 1 531 log(f) 1.72 1.80 1.86 1.92 2.72 2.73 2.73 3.72 3.72 3.72 3.73 C ohms F V Hz D

in degrees
E F

f 53 63 73 83 523 533 543 5283 5293 5303 5313

Vout 0.099 0.118 0.136 0.155 0.702 0.709 0.715 0.995 0.995 0.995 0.995

log(Vout) 1.003 0.928 0.865 0.811 0.154 0.150 0.146 0.002 0.002 0.002 0.002

delta(rad) delta(deg) 1.471 84.3 1.453 83.2 1.434 82.2 1.416 81.1 0.793 0.783 0.774 0.100 0.100 0.100 0.100 45.4 44.9 44.3 5.7 5.7 5.7 5.7

The following graph of log(Vout) versus log(f) was plotted for Vin peak = 1 V.
0.0

-0.2

log(V out)

-0.4

-0.6

-0.8

-1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 4.0

log(f )

2778 Chapter 29 A graph of (in degrees) as a function of log(f) follows.


0 -10 -20 -30 delta (deg) -40 -50 -60 -70 -80 -90 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 4.0

log(f )

Referring to the spreadsheet program, we see that when f = f3 dB, 44.9. This result is in good agreement with its calculated value of 45.0.
[SSM] A slowly varying voltage signal V(t) is applied to the input of 47 the high-pass filter of Problem 44. Slowly varying means that during one time constant (equal to RC) there is no significant change in the voltage signal. Show that under these conditions the output voltage is proportional to the time derivative of V(t). This situation is known as a differentiation circuit. Picture the Problem We can use Kirchhoffs loop rule to obtain a differential equation relating the input, capacitor, and resistor voltages. Because the voltage drop across the resistor is small compared to the voltage drop across the capacitor, we can express the voltage drop across the capacitor in terms of the input voltage.

Apply Kirchhoffs loop rule to the input side of the filter to obtain: Substitute for V (t ) and I to obtain: Because Q = CVC:

V (t ) VC IR = 0 where VC is the potential difference across the capacitor.


Vin peak cos t Vc R dQ =0 dt

dQ d dV = [CVC ] = C C dt dt dt dVC =0 dt the differential equation describing the potential difference across the capacitor. Vpeak cos t VC RC

Substitute for dQ/dt to obtain:

Alternating-Current Circuits Because there is no significant change in the voltage signal during one time constant: Substituting for RC
dVC yields: dt

2779

dVC dV = 0 RC C = 0 dt dt
Vin peak cos t VC = 0 and VC = Vin peak cos t
V R = RC dVC d = RC Vin peak cos t dt dt

Consequently, the potential difference across the resistor is given by:

48 We can describe the output from the high-pass filter from Problem 44 using a decibel scale: = (20 dB) log10 (VH Vin peak ) , where is the output in

decibels. Show that for V H =


VH =
1 2

1 2

V in peak , = 3.0 dB. The frequency at which

V in peak is known as f3dB (the 3-dB frequency). Show that for f << f3dB, the

output drops by 6 dB if the frequency f is halved.


Picture the Problem We can use the expression for VH from Problem 44 and the definition of given in the problem to show that every time the frequency is halved, the output drops by 6 dB.

From Problem 44:

VH =

Vin peak 1 + (RC )


2

or VH 1 = 2 Vin peak 1 + (RC ) Express this ratio in terms of f and f3 dB and simplify to obtain:
VH = Vpeak
1 f 3 dB 1+ f
2

f
f2 + 1 f 32dB f 32dB

For f << f3dB:


B

VH Vpeak

f f2 1 f 32dB + f 32dB
VH V peak

f f 3 dB

From the definition of we have:

= 20 log10

2780 Chapter 29 Substitute for VH/Vpeak to obtain:

= 20 log10

f f 3 dB f f 3 dB
1 2

Doubling the frequency yields:

' = 20 log10
= '

The change in decibel level is:

1 f 2 f = 20 log10 f 20 log10 f 3 dB 3 dB = 20 log10 ( 1 2 ) 6 dB

49

Show that the average power dissipated in the resistor of the 2 V in peak high-pass filter of Problem 44 is given by Pave = . 2 2R 1 + ( RC )
[SSM]

Picture the Problem We can express the instantaneous power dissipated in the resistor and then use the fact that the average value of the square of the cosine function over one cycle is to establish the given result.

The instantaneous power P(t) dissipated in the resistor is: The output voltage Vout is: From Problem 44:

2 Vout P(t ) = R

Vout = VH cos(t )
VH = Vin peak 1 + (RC )
2

Substitute in the expression for P(t) to obtain:

2 VH P (t ) = cos 2 (t ) R 2 Vin peak = cos 2 (t ) 2 R 1 + (RC )

Because the average value of the square of the cosine function over one cycle is :

Pave =

2 R 1 + (RC )

2 Vin peak

Alternating-Current Circuits

2781

50 One application of the high-pass filter of Problem 44 is a noise filter for electronic circuits (a filter that blocks out low-frequency noise). Using a resistance value of 20 k, find a value for the capacitance for the high-pass filter that attenuates a 60-Hz input voltage signal by a factor of 10. That is, so 1 V in peak . V H = 10 Picture the Problem We can solve the expression for VH from Problem 44 for the required capacitance of the capacitor.

From Problem 44:

VH =

Vin peak 1 + (RC )


2

We require that:

VH Vin peak

1 1 + (RC )
2
2

1 10

or

1 + (RC )
Solving for C yields: C=

= 10

1 1 = 99R 2 99 Rf
1 = 13 nF 2 99 (20 k )(60 Hz )

Substitute numerical values and evaluate C:

C=

51 [SSM] The circuit shown in Figure 29-36 is an example of a lowpass filter. (Assume that the output is connected to a load that draws only an insignificant amount of current.) (a) If the input voltage is given by Vin = Vin peak cos t, show that the output voltage is Vout = VL cos(t ) where
V L = V in peak 1+ ( RC ) . (b) Discuss the trend of the output voltage in the
2

limiting cases 0 and .


Picture diagram r Vapp and the Problem In the phasor for the RC low-pass filter, r VC are the phasors for Vin and
r VR

Vout, respectively. The projection of r Vapp onto the horizontal axis is Vapp = r Vin, the projection of VC onto the horizontal axis is VC = Vout, r Vpeak = Vapp , and is the angle between r VC and the horizontal axis.

r Vapp

r VC

2782 Chapter 29 (a) Express Vapp : Vapp = Vin peak cos t where Vin peak = I peak Z
2 and Z 2 = R 2 + X C

(1)

Vout = VC is given by:

Vout = VC , peak cos = I peak X C cos

If we define as shown in the phasor diagram, then:

Vout = I peak X C cos(t ) = Vin peak Z


2

X C cos(t )
2

Solving equation (1) for Z and substituting for XC yields: Using equation (2) to substitute for Z and substituting for XC yields:

1 Z = R + C

(2)

Vout =

1 cos(t ) 2 C 1 R2 + C Vin peak


Vin peak 1 + (RC )
2

Simplify further to obtain:

Vout =

cos(t )

or Vout = VL cos(t ) where

VL =

Vin peak 1 + (RC )


2

(b) Note that, as 0, VL Vpeak . This makes sense physically in that, for low frequencies, XC is large and, therefore, a larger peak input voltage will appear across it than appears across it for high frequencies. Note further that, as , VL 0. This makes sense physically in that, for high frequencies, XC is small and, therefore, a smaller peak voltage will appear across it than appears across it for low frequencies.
Remarks: In Figures 29-19 and 29-20, is defined as the phase of the voltage drop across the combination relative to the voltage drop across the resistor.

Alternating-Current Circuits

2783

52 (a) Find an expression for the phase angle for the low-pass filter of Problem 51 in terms of , R and C. (b) Find the value of in the limit that 0 and in the limit that . Explain your answer. Picture the Problem The phasor diagram for the RC low-pass filter is r r shown to the right. Vapp and VC are the
r VR

phasors for Vin and Vout, respectively. r The projection of Vapp onto the horizontal axis is Vapp = Vin and the r projection of VC onto the horizontal r axis is VC = Vout . Vpeak = Vapp . (a) From the phasor diagram we have: Use the definition of XC to obtain:
t
r VC

r Vapp

tan =

I peak R VR R = = VC I peak X C X C R = RC 1 C

tan =

Solving for yields:

= tan 1 (RC )

(b) As 0, 0 . This behavior makes sense physically in that, at low frequencies, XC is very large compared to R and, as a consequence, VC is in phase with Vin . As , 90 . This behavior makes sense physically in that, at high frequencies, XC is very small compared to R and, as a consequence, VC is out of phase with Vin .
Remarks: See the spreadsheet solution in the following problem for additional evidence that our answer for Part (b) is correct. 53 Using a spreadsheet program, make a graph of VL versus input frequency f and a graph of phase angle versus input frequency for the low-pass filter of Problems 51 and 52. Use a resistance value of 10 k and a capacitance value of 5.0 nF.

2784 Chapter 29
Picture the Problem We can use the expressions for VL and derived in Problems 51 and 52 to plot the graphs of VL versus f and versus f for the lowpass filter of Problem 51. Well simplify the spreadsheet program by expressing both VL and as functions of f3 dB.

From Problems 51 and 52 we have:

VL =

Vin peak 1 + (RC )


2

and = tan 1 (RC ) Rewrite each of these expressions in terms of f to obtain:


VL = Vin peak 1 + (2fRC )
2

and = tan 1 (2fRC ) A spreadsheet program to generate the data for graphs of VL versus f and versus f for the low-pass filter is shown below. Note that Vin peak has been arbitrarily set equal to 1 V. The formulas used to calculate the quantities in the columns are as follows: Cell B1 B2 B3 B8 C8 D8 A Formula/Content 2.00E+03 5.00E09 1 $B$3/SQRT(1+((2*PI()*A8* 1000*$B$1*$B$2)^2)) ATAN(2*PI()*A8*1000*$B$1*$B$2) C8*180/PI() B C R= 1.00E+04 ohms C= 5.00E09 F Vin peak= 1 V f(kHz) 0 1 2 3 Algebraic Form R C Vin peak Vin peak
1 + (2fRC )
2

tan 1 (2fRC ) in degrees


D

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Vout 1.000 0.954 0.847 0.728

(rad)
0.000 0.304 0.561 0.756

(deg)
0.0 17.4 32.1 43.3

Alternating-Current Circuits 54 55 56 57 47 48 49 50 0.068 0.066 0.065 0.064 1.503 1.505 1.506 1.507 86.1 86.2 86.3 86.4

2785

A graph of VL as a function of f follows:


1.0

0.8

0.6 V L ( V) 0.4 0.2 0.0 0 10 20 f ( kHz) 30 40 50

A graph of as a function of f follows:


90

60 delta (deg) 30 0 0 10 20 f (kHz) 30 40 50

54 A rapidly varying voltage signal V(t) is applied to the input of the lowpass filter of Problem 51. Rapidly varying means that during one time constant (equal to RC) there are significant changes in the voltage signal. Show that under these conditions the output voltage is proportional to the integral of V(t) with respect to time. This situation is known as an integration circuit. Picture the Problem We can use Kirchhoffs loop rule to obtain a differential equation relating the input, capacitor, and resistor voltages. Well then assume a solution to this equation that is a linear combination of sine and cosine terms with coefficients that we can find by substitution in the differential equation. The solution to these simultaneous equations will yield the amplitude of the output voltage.

2786 Chapter 29 Apply Kirchhoffs loop rule to the input side of the filter to obtain:

V (t ) IR VC = 0 where VC is the potential difference across the capacitor.


Vin peak cos t R dQ VC = 0 dt

Substitute for V(t) and I to obtain: Because Q = CVC:

dQ d dV = [CVC ] = C C dt dt dt

Substitute for dQ/dt to obtain:

dVC VC = 0 dt the differential equation describing the potential difference across the capacitor. Vin peak cos t RC
VC = IX c = I C

VC is given by:

The fact that V(t) varies rapidly means that >> 1 and so:

VC 0 and
Vpeak cos t RC dVC =0 dt

Separating the variables in this differential equation and solving for VC yields:

VC =

1 Vpeak cos tdt RC

55 [SSM] The circuit shown in Figure 29-37 is a trap filter. (Assume that the output is connected to a load that draws only an insignificant amount of current.) (a) Show that the trap filter acts to reject signals in a band of frequencies centered at = 1/ LC . (b) How does the width of the frequency band rejected depend on the resistance R? Picture the Problem The phasor diagram for the trap filter is shown below. r r r Vapp and VL + VC are the phasors for Vin and Vout, respectively. The projection of r r r Vapp onto the horizontal axis is Vapp = Vin, and the projection of VL + VC onto the

horizontal axis is VL + VC = Vout. Requiring that the impedance of the trap be zero will yield the frequency at which the circuit rejects signals. Defining the bandwidth as = trap and requiring that Z trap = R will yield an expression for the bandwidth and reveal its dependence on R.

Alternating-Current Circuits
r Vapp
r VL

2787

r r VL + VC
r VR

t t
r VC

(a) Express Vapp :

Vapp = Vapp, peak cos t where Vapp, peak = Vpeak = I peak Z and Z 2 = R 2 + ( X L X C )
2

(1)

Vout is given by:

Vout = Vout, peak cos(t ) where Vout, peak = I peak Z trap and Z trap = X L X C

Solving equation (1) for Z yields: Because Vout = VL + VC :

Z = R2 + (X L X C )

(2)

Vout = Vout, peak cos(t ) Vpeak Z

= I peak Z trap cos(t ) = Z trap cos(t )


Z trap cos(t )

Using equation (2) to substitute for Z yields: Noting that Vout = 0 provided Z trap = 0, set Z trap = 0 to obtain: Substituting for XL and XC yields:

Vout =

Vpeak
2 R 2 + Z trap

Z trap = X L X C = 0

1 = 0 = C

1 LC
(3)

(b) Let the bandwidth be:

= trap

2788 Chapter 29 Let the frequency bandwidth be defined by the frequency at which Z trap = R . Then: Because trap = 1 : LC
1 2 = R LC 1 = RC C

trap

1 = RC

For trap:

2 2 trap trap RC trap


2 2 trap = ( trap )( + trap ) 2 2 trap 2 trap ( trap )

2 Solve for 2 trap :

Because trap, + trap 2 trap : Substitute in equation (3) to obtain:

= trap =

2 RCtrap

R 2L

56 A half-wave rectifier for transforming an ac voltage into a dc voltage is shown in Figure 29-38. The diode in the figure can be thought of as a one-way valve for current. It allows current to pass in the forward direction (the direction of the arrowhead) only when Vin is at a higher electric potential than Vout by 0.60 V (that is, whenever Vin Vout +0.60 V ). The resistance of the diode is effectively infinite when Vin Vout is less than +0.60 V. Plot two cycles of both input and output voltages as a function of time, on the same graph, assuming the input voltage is given by Vin = Vin peak cos t. Picture the Problem For voltages greater than 0.60 V, the output voltage will mirror the input voltage minus a 0.60 V drop. But when the voltage swings below 0.60 V, the output voltage will be 0. A spreadsheet program was used to plot the following graph. The angular frequency and the peak voltage were both arbitrarily set equal to one.

Alternating-Current Circuits
1.0
V_in V_out
1.0

2789

0.5

0.5

V in (V)

0.0

0.0

-0.5

-0.5

-1.0 0 2 4 6 8 10 12

-1.0

t (s)

57 The output of the rectifier of Problem 56, can be further filtered by putting its output through a low-pass filter as shown in Figure 29-39a. The resulting output is a dc voltage with a small ac component (ripple) shown in Figure 29-39b. If the input frequency is 60 Hz and the load resistance is 1.00 k, find the value for the capacitance so that the output voltage varies by less than 50 percent of the mean value over one cycle. Picture the Problem We can use the decay of the potential difference across the capacitor to relate the time constant for the RC circuit to the frequency of the input signal. Expanding the exponential factor in the expression for VC will allow us to find the approximate value for C that will limit the variation in the output voltage by less than 50 percent (or any other percentage).

The voltage across the capacitor is given by: Expand the exponential factor to obtain: For a decay of less than 50 percent:

VC = Vin e t RC
1 t RC

e t RC 1 1

1 2 t 0. 5 C t RC R

Because the voltage goes positive every cycle, t = 1/60 s and:

2 1 s = 33 F 1.00 k 60

Driven LC Circuits
58

= (100 V) cos (2ft). (a) For each branch, what is the peak current and what is the phase of the current relative to the phase of the generator voltage? (b) At the resonance frequency there is no current in the generator. What is the angular frequency at resonance? (c) At the resonance frequency, find the current in the inductor and what is the current in the capacitor. Express your results as

The generator voltage in Figure 29-40, is given by

Vout (V)

2790 Chapter 29 functions of time. (d) Draw a phasor diagram showing the phasors for the applied voltage, the generator current, the capacitor current, and the inductor current for the case where frequency is higher than the resonance frequency.
Picture the Problem We know that the current leads the voltage across and capacitor and lags the voltage across an inductor. We can use I L , peak = peak X L

and I C , peak = peak X C to find the amplitudes of these currents. The current in the

generator will vanish under resonance conditions, i.e., when I L = I C . To find the currents in the inductor and capacitor at resonance, we can use the common potential difference across them and their reactances together with our knowledge of the phase relationships mentioned above. (a) Express the amplitudes of the currents through the inductor and the capacitor:

I L , peak =
and
I C , peak =

peak peak
XL =
2fL

peak
XC

peak
1 2fC

= 2fC peak

Substitute numerical values to obtain:

I L , peak =
and

100 V 25.0 V/H = , lagging by 90 (4.00 H )2f 2f

I C , peak = (25.0 F)(100 V ) =

(2.50 mV F) 2f , leading by 90
I L = I C or

(b) Express the condition that I = 0:

1 C

= C

Solve for to obtain:

1 LC

Substitute numerical values and evaluate :

(4.00 H )(25.0 F)

= 100 rad/s

Alternating-Current Circuits (c) Express the current in the inductor at = 0: 25.0 V/H IL = 100 s 1 cos t 2 where = 100 rad/s. Express the current in the capacitor at = 0: =

2791

(250 mA)cos t
2

I C = (2.50 mV F) 100 s 1 cos t + 2

= (250 mA )cos t + 2 where = 100 rad/s.


(d) The phasor diagram for the case where the inductive reactance is larger than the capacitive reactance is shown to the right.
r IC
r I

r
max

r IL

59 A circuit consist of an ideal ac generator, a capacitor and an ideal inductor, all connected in series. The charge on the capacitor is given by Q = (15 C) cos(t + 4 ), where = 1250 rad/s. (a) Find the current in the circuit as a function of time. (b) Find the capacitance if the inductance is 28 mH. (c) Write expressions for the electrical energy Ue, the magnetic energy Um, and the total energy U as functions of time. Picture the Problem We can differentiate Q with respect to time to find I as a function of time. In (b) we can find C by using = 1 LC . The energy stored in
2 the magnetic field of the inductor is given by U m = 1 2 LI and the energy stored in

the electric field of the capacitor by U e =

1 2

Q2 . C

2792 Chapter 29 (a) Differentiate the charge with respect to time to obtain the current: I (t ) = dQ d = (15 C )cos t + = (15 C ) 1250 s 1 sin t + 4 4 dt dt

= (18.75 mA )sin t + = (19 mA )sin t + 4 4


where = 1250 rad/s (b) Relate C to L and :

1 LC
1

Solve for C to obtain:

C=

2L

Substitute numerical values and evaluate C:

C=

(1250 s ) (28 mH)


1 2

= 22.86 F

= 23 F
(c) Express and evaluate the magnetic energy U m (t ) :
2 U m (t ) = 1 2 LI = 1 2

2 (28 mH )(18.75 mA )2 sin 2 t + = (4.9 J )sin t +


4 4

where = 1250 rad/s Use U e = Q2 to find the electrical C energy stored in the capacitor as a function of time:
1 2

U e (t ) =

1 2

cos 2 t + 22.86 F 4

(15 F)2

= (4.92 J )cos 2 t + 4
where = 1250 rad/s =

(4.9 J )cos 2 t +
4

The total energy stored in the electric and magnetic fields is the sum of U m (t ) and U e (t ) :

U = (4.92 J )sin 2 t + + (4.92 J )cos 2 t + = 4.9 J 4 4 where = 1250 rad/s.

Alternating-Current Circuits

2793

60 One method for determining the compressibility of a dielectric material uses a driven LC circuit that has a parallel-plate capacitor. The dielectric is inserted between the plates and the change in resonance frequency is determined as the capacitor plates are subjected to a compressive stress. In one such arrangement, the resonance frequency is 120 MHz when a dielectric of thickness 0.100 cm and dielectric constant = 6.80 is placed between the plates. Under a compressive stress of 800 atm, the resonance frequency decreases to 116 MHz. Find the Youngs modulus of the dielectric material. (Assume that the dielectric constant does not change with pressure.) Picture the Problem We can use the definition of the capacitance of a dielectricfilled capacitor and the expression for the resonance frequency of an LC circuit to derive an expression for the fractional change in the thickness of the dielectric in terms of the resonance frequency and the frequency of the circuit when the dielectric is under compression. We can then use this expression for t/t to calculate the value of Youngs modulus for the dielectric material.

Use its definition to express Youngs modulus of the dielectric material: Letting t be the initial thickness of the dielectric, express the initial capacitance of the capacitor: Express the capacitance of the capacitor when it is under compression: Express the resonance frequency of the capacitor before the dielectric is compressed: When the dielectric is compressed:

Y=

stress P = strain t t

(1)

C0 =

0 A
t

Cc =

0 A
t t

0 =

1 = C0 L 1 = Cc L

1 0 AL t 1 0 AL t t

c =

Express the ratio of c to 0 and simplify to obtain:

c t t = = 1 0 t 0 AL
t t

0 AL

2794 Chapter 29 Expand the radical binomially to obtain:

c t = 1 0 t

12

t 2t

provided t << t. Solve for t/t: c t = 2 1 t 0


Y=
P c 2 1 0

Substitute in equation (1) to obtain:

Substitute numerical values and evaluate Y:

Y=

(800 atm )(101.325 kPa/atm )


116 MHz 2 1 120 MHz

= 1.22 109 N/m 2


61 Figure 29-41 shows an inductor in series with a parallel plate capacitor. The capacitor has a width w of 20 cm and a gap of 2.0 mm. A dielectric that has a dielectric constant of 4.8 can be slid in and out of the gap. The inductor has an inductance of 2.0 mH. When half the dielectric is between the capacitor w ), the resonant frequency of this combination is 90 MHz. plates (when x = 1 2 (a) What is the capacitance of the capacitor without the dielectric? (b) Find the resonance frequency as a function of x for 0 x w . Picture the Problem We can model this capacitor as the equivalent of two capacitors connected in parallel. Let C1 be the capacitance of the dielectric-filled capacitor and C2 be the capacitance of the air-filled capacitor. Well derive expressions for the capacitances of the parallel capacitors and add these expressions to obtain C(x). We can then use the given resonance frequency when x = w/2 and the given value for L to evaluate C0. In Part (b) we can use our result for C(x) and the relationship between f, L, and C(x) at resonance to express f(x).

(a) Express the equivalent capacitance of the two capacitors in parallel: Express A2 in terms of the total area of a capacitor plate A, w, and the distance x:

C (x ) = C1 + C2 =

0 A1 0 A2
d + d

(1)

A2 x x = A2 = A A w w

Alternating-Current Circuits Express A1 in terms of A and A2:


x A1 = A A2 = A1 w

2795

Substitute in equation (1) and simplify to obtain:

C (x ) =

x A x 1 + 0 d w d w A x x = 0 1 + d w w

0 A

1 = C0 1 x w 0 A where C0 = d Find C(w/2):


w 1 w C = C0 1 w 2 2 1 = C0 1 2 +1 = C0 2
f (x ) = 1 2 LC ( x )

Express the resonance frequency of the circuit in terms of L and C(x): Evaluate f(w/2):

(2)

w f = 2 =

1 2 LC0 1 2

+1
2

2 ( + 1)LC0

Solve for C0 to obtain:

C0 =

1 w 2 2 f 2 L( + 1) 2

Substitute numerical values and evaluate C0:


C0 = 1 = 5.4 fF 2 20 cm 2 2 (90 MHz ) (2.0 mH )(4.8 + 1) 2

2796 Chapter 29 (b) Substitute for C(x) in equation (2) to obtain:


f (x ) = 1 1 2 LC0 1 x w

Substitute numerical values and evaluate f(x):


f (x ) =

1 2

(2.0 mH )(4.8)(5.39 10

16

4.8 1 x F 1 4.8(0.20 m )

70 MHz

1 4.0 m 1 x

Driven RLC Circuits


62 A circuit consists of an ideal ac generator, a 20-F capacitor and an 80- resistor, all connected in series. The output of the generator has a peak emf of 20-V, and the armature of the generator rotates at 400 rad/s. Find (a) the power factor, (b) the rms current, and (c) the average power supplied by the generator. Picture the Problem The diagram shows the relationship between , XL, XC, and R. We can use this reference triangle to express the power factor for the given circuit. In (b) we can find the rms current from the rms potential difference and the impedance of the circuit. We can find the average power delivered by the source from the rms current and the resistance of the resistor.
2

Z=

XL +(

C X

)
X L XC

(a) The power factor is defined to be: With no inductance in the circuit:

cos =

R = Z

R R2 + (X L X C )
2

XL = 0 and
cos = R R +X
2 2 C

R R2 + 1 C2
2

Alternating-Current Circuits Substitute numerical values and evaluate cos:


cos = 80

2797

(80 )2 +

(400 s ) (20 F)
1 2

= 0.54

(b) Express the rms current in the circuit:

I rms = =

rms
Z

max
=

max
2 R2 +

2 2 R + XC
2

1 C2
2

Substitute numerical values and evaluate I rms :

I rms = 2

20 V

(80 )2 +

(400 s ) (20 F)
1 2

= 95.3 mA = 95 mA (c) The average power delivered by the generator is given by: Substitute numerical values and evaluate Pav :
2 Pav = I rms R

Pav = (95.3 mA) (80 ) = 0.73 W


2

2 63 [SSM] Show that the expression Pav = R rms Z 2 gives the correct result for a circuit containing only an ideal ac generator and (a) a resistor, (b) a 2 capacitor, and (c) an inductor. In the expression Pav = R rms Z 2 , Pav is the

average power supplied by the generator, rms is the root-mean-square of the emf of the generator, R is the resistance, C is the capacitance and L is the inductance. (In Part (a), C = L = 0, in Part (b), R = L = 0 and in Part (c), R = C = 0.
Picture the Problem The impedance of an ac circuit is given by

Z = R 2 + ( X L X C ) . We can evaluate the given expression for Pav first for


2

XL = XC = 0 and then for R = 0. (a) For X = 0, Z = R and:

Pav =

2 2 R rms R rms = = Z2 R2

2 rms

2798 Chapter 29 (b) and (c) If R = 0, then:


2 2 ( 0) rms R rms = = 0 Pav = Z2 ( X L X C )2

Remarks: Recall that there is no energy dissipation in an ideal inductor or capacitor. 64 A series RLC circuit that has an inductance of 10 mH, a capacitance of 2.0 F, and a resistance of 5.0 is driven by an ideal ac voltage source that has a peak emf of 100 V. Find (a) the resonant frequency and (b) the root-mean-square current at resonance. When the frequency is 8000 rad/s, find (c) the capacitive and inductive reactances, (d) the impedance, (e) the root-mean-square current, and (f) the phase angle.

the circuit, I rms = rms R to find the rms current at resonance, the definitions of XC

Picture the Problem We can use 0 = 1

LC to find the resonant frequency of

and XL to find these reactances at = 8000 rad/s, the definitions of Z and Irms to find the impedance and rms current at = 8000 rad/s, and the definition of the phase angle to find . (a) Express the resonant frequency 0 in terms of L and C: Substitute numerical values and evaluate 0:

0 =

1 LC

0 =

(10 mH)(2.0 F)

= 7.1 10 3 rad/s
(b) Relate the rms current at

resonance to rms and the impedance of the circuit at resonance: (c) Express and evaluate XC and XL at = 8000 rad/s:

I rms =

rms = max
R

2R

2 (5.0 )

100 V

= 14 A
XC = 1 1 = 1 C 8000 s (2.0 F)

= 62.50 = 63

and X L = L = 8000 s 1 (10 mH) = 80

Alternating-Current Circuits (d) Express the impedance in terms of the reactances, substitute the results from (c), and evaluate Z: Z = R 2 + (X L X C ) = = 18.2 = 18 (e) Relate the rms current at
2

2799

(5.0 )2 + (80 62.5 )2

= 8000 rad/s to rms and the

I rms =

rms = max
Z

2Z

2 (18.2 )

100 V

impedance of the circuit at this frequency: (f) is given by:

= 3.9 A
X L XC R 80 62.5 = 74 5.0

= tan 1

Substitute numerical values and evaluate :

= tan 1

65 [SSM] Find (a) the Q factor and (b) the resonance width (in hertz) for the circuit in Problem 64. (c) What is the power factor when = 8000 rad/s? Picture the Problem The Q factor of the circuit is given by Q = 0 L R , the

resonance width by f = f 0 Q = 0 2Q , and the power factor by cos = R Z . Because Z is frequency dependent, well need to find XC and XL at = 8000 rad/s in order to evaluate cos. Using their definitions, express the Q factor and the resonance width of the circuit:
Q=

0 L
R

(1)

and f =

f0 = 0 Q 2Q
1 LC

(2)

(a) Express the resonance frequency for the circuit: Substituting for 0 in equation (1) yields: Substitute numerical values and evaluate Q:

0 =

Q=

L LC R

1 L R C

Q=

1 10 mH = 14.1 = 14 5.0 2.0 F

2800 Chapter 29 (b) Substitute numerical values in equation (2) and evaluate f:
7.07 103 rad/s f = = 80 Hz 2 (14.1)

(c) The power factor of the circuit is given by:

cos =

R = Z

R R 2 + (X L X C )
2

=
2

R 1 R + L C
2

Substitute numerical values and evaluate cos:


cos = 5 .0 = 0.27

(5.0 )2

1 1 ( ) + 8000 s 10 mH 1 ( ) 8000 s 2 . 0 F

66 FM radio stations typically operate at frequencies separated by 0.20 MHz. Thus, when your radio is tuned to a station operating at a frequency of 100.1 MHz, the resonance width of the receiver circuit should be much smaller than 0.20 MHz, so that you do not receive a signal from stations operating at adjacent frequencies. Assume your receiving circuit has a resonance width of 0.050 MHz. When tuned in to this particular station, what is the Q factor of your circuit? Picture the Problem We can use its definition, Q = f 0 f to find the Q factor for

the circuit. The Q factor for the circuit is given by: Substitute numerical values and evaluate Q: Q= f0 f
100.1 MHz 2.0 103 0.050 MHz

Q=

67 A coil is connected to a 60-Hz ac generator with a peak emf equal to 100 V. At this frequency, the coil has an impedance of 10 and a reactance of 8.0 . (a) What is the peak current in the coil? (b) What is the phase angle between the current and the applied voltage? (c) A capacitor is put in series with the coil and the generator. What capacitance is required so that the current is in phase with the generator emf? (d) What is the peak voltage measured across this capacitor?

Alternating-Current Circuits

2801

Picture the Problem We can use I peak = peak Z to find the current in the coil and

the definition of the phase angle to evaluate . We can equate XL and XC to find the capacitance required so that the current and the voltage are in phase. Finally, we can find the voltage measured across the capacitor by using VC = IX C . (a) Express the current in the coil in terms of the potential difference across it and its impedance: Substitute numerical values and evaluate I peak : (b) The phase angle is given by: I peak =

peak
Z
100 V = 10 A 10 R 1 X = sin L Z Z

I peak =

= cos 1

Substitute numerical values and evaluate : (c) Express the condition on the reactances that must be satisfied if the current and voltage are to be in phase: Substitute numerical values and evaluate C:

= sin 1

8.0 = 53 10
1 1 1 C = = C X L 2fX L

X L = XC =

C=

2 60 s

1
1

)(8.0 ) = 332 F

= 0.33 mF

(d) Express the potential difference across the capacitor: Relate the peak current in the circuit to the impedance of the circuit when XL = XC: Substitute for I to obtain:

VC = I peak X C

I peak =

Vpeak R

VC =

Vpeak X C R

Vpeak 2fCR

Relate the impedance of the circuit to the resistance of the coil:

Z = R2 + X 2 R = Z 2 X 2

2802 Chapter 29

Substituting for R yields:

VC =

Vpeak 2fC Z 2 X 2

Substitute numerical values and evaluate VC: VC = 2 (60 s 1 )(332 F) (10 ) (8.0 )
2

100 V

= 0.13 kV

68 An ideal 0.25-H inductor and a capacitor are connected in series with an ideal 60-Hz generator. An digital voltmeter is used to measure the rms voltages across the inductor and capacitor independently. The voltmeter reading across the capacitor is 75 V and that across the inductor is 50 V. (a) Find the capacitance and the rms current in the circuit. (b) What is the rms voltage across the series combination of the capacitor and the inductor? Picture the Problem We can find C using VC = I rms X C and I rms from the potential difference across the inductor. In the absence of resistance in the circuit, the measured rms voltage across both the capacitor and inductor is V = VL VC .

(a) Relate the capacitance C to the potential difference across the capacitor: Use the potential difference across the inductor to express the rms current in the circuit: Substitute for I rms to obtain:

VC = I rms X C =

I rms I C = rms 2fC 2fVC

I rms =

VL V = L X L 2fL

C=

VL (2f )2 LVC

Substitute numerical values and evaluate C:

C=

[2 (60 s )] (0.25 H )(75 V )


1

50 V
2

= 19 F
(b) Express the measured rms voltage V across both the capacitor and the inductor when R = 0:
V = VL VC

Alternating-Current Circuits Substitute numerical values and V = 50 V 75 V = 25 V evaluate V: 69 [SSM] In the circuit shown in Figure 29-42 the ideal generator produces an rms voltage of 115 V when operated at 60 Hz. What is the rms voltage between points (a) A and B, (b) B and C, (c) C and D, (d) A and C, and (e) B and D?

2803

Picture the Problem We can find the rms current in the circuit and then use it to find the potential differences across each of the circuit elements. We can use phasor diagrams and our knowledge of the phase shifts between the voltages across the three circuit elements to find the voltage differences across their combinations.

(a) Express the potential difference between points A and B in terms of I rms and XL: Express I rms in terms of and Z:

VAB = I rms X L

(1)

I rms =

R2 + (X L X C )
2

Evaluate XL and XC to obtain:

X L = 2fL = 2 (60 s 1 )(137 mH) = 51.648


and
XC = 1 1 = 1 2fC 2 60 s (25 F) = 106.10

Substitute numerical values and evaluate I rms :

I rms =

115 V

(50 )2 + (51.648 106.10 )2

= 1.5556 A
Substitute numerical values in equation (1) and evaluate VAB: (b) Express the potential difference between points B and C in terms of I rms and R: V AB = (1.5556 A )(51.648 ) = 80.344 V = 80 V

VBC = I rms R = (1.5556 A )(50 ) = 77.780 V = 78 V

2804 Chapter 29 (c) Express the potential difference between points C and D in terms of I rms and XC: (d) The voltage across the inductor leads the voltage across the resistor as shown in the phasor diagram to the right:

VCD = I rms X C = (1.5556 A )(106.10 ) = 165.05 V = 0.17 kV


r V AB

r V AC

r V BC

Use the Pythagorean theorem to find VAC:

2 2 + VBC V AC = V AB

(80.0 V )2 + (77.780 V )2

= 111.58 V = 0.11 kV (e) The voltage across the capacitor lags the voltage across the resistor as shown in the phasor diagram to the right:
r VCD r V BC

r V BD

Use the Pythagorean theorem to find VBD:

2 2 VBD = VCD + V BC

(165.05 V )2 + (77.780 V )2

= 182.46 V = 0.18 kV
70 When an RLC series circuit is connected to a 120-V rms, 60-Hz line, the rms current in the circuit is 11 A and this current leads the line voltage by 45. (a) Find the average power supplied to the circuit. (b) What is the resistance in the circuit? (c) If the inductance in the circuit is 50 mH, find the capacitance in the circuit. (d) Without changing the inductance, by how much should you change the capacitance to make the power factor equal to 1? (e) Without changing the capacitance, by how much should you change the inductance to make the power factor equal to 1? Picture the Problem We can use Pav = rms I rms cos to find the power supplied
2 R to find the resistance. In Part (c) we can relate the to the circuit and Pav = I rms

capacitive reactance to the impedance, inductive reactance, and resistance of the circuit and solve for the capacitance C. We can use the condition on XL and XC at

Alternating-Current Circuits

2805

resonance to find the capacitance or inductance you would need to add to the circuit to make the power factor equal to 1.

(a) Express the power supplied to the circuit in terms of rms, I rms , and the power factor cos: Substitute numerical values and evaluate Pav : (b) Relate the power dissipated in the circuit to the resistance of the resistor: Substitute numerical values and evaluate R: (c) Express the capacitance of the capacitor in terms of its reactance: Relate the capacitive reactance to the impedance, inductive reactance, and resistance of the circuit: Express the impedance of the circuit in terms of the rms emf and the rms current I rms : Equating these two expressions yields: Solve for X L X C :

Pav = rms I rms cos

Pav = (120 V )(11A )cos 45 = 933 W = 0.93 kW


2 Pav = I rms R R=

Pav 2 I rms

R=

933 W = 7.71 = 7.7 (11A )2

C=

1 1 = X C 2fX C
2

(1)

Z 2 = R2 + (X L X C )

Z2 =

2
2 I rms

2
I
2 rms

= R 2 + (X L X C )

XL XC =

2
2 I rms

R2

Note that because I leads , the circuit is capacitive and XC > XL. Hence:

X L X C = ( X L X C )

and

2806 Chapter 29 XC = X L + = 2fL +

2
I
2 rms

R2 R2

2
I
2 rms

Substitute numerical values and evaluate XC:

X C = 2 (60 s 1 )(50 mH )
+

(120 V )2 (7.71 )2 (11 A )2


1
1

= 18.8 + 7.7 = 26.6

Substitute in equation (1) and evaluate C:

C=

2 (60 s

)(26.6 ) = 99.9 F

= 0.10 mF (d) Let Cpf = 1 represent the capacitance required to make cos = 1. The necessary change in capacitance is given by: Relate Cpf = 1 to XL:
XL = XC = 1 2fC pf = 1

C = C pf = 1 C = C pf = 1 99.9 F

Solving for Cpf = 1 yields:

C pf = 1 =

1 2fX L

Substitute for Cpf = 1 in the expression for C to obtain: Substitute numerical values and evaluate C:

C =

1 99.9 F 2fX L

C =

2 60 s

1
1

)(18.8 ) 99.9 F

= 41 F

(e) Let Lpf = 1 represent the inductance required to make cos = 1. The necessary change in inductance is given by:

L = Lpf = 1 L = Lpf = 1 50 mH

Alternating-Current Circuits Relate Lpf = 1 to XC: Solving for Lpf = 1 yields: X L = X C = 2fLpf = 1 Lpf = 1 = XC 2f

2807

Substitute for Lpf = 1 in the expression for L to obtain: Substitute numerical values and evaluate L:

L =

XC 50 mH 2f
26.6 50 mH = 20 mH 2 60 s 1

L =

71 Plot the circuit impedance versus the angular frequency for each of the following circuits. (a) A driven series LR circuit, (b) a driven series RC circuit, and (c) a driven series RLC circuit. Picture the Problem The impedance for the three circuits as functions of the angular frequency is shown in the three figures below. Also shown in each figure (dashed line) is the asymptotic approach for large angular frequencies.

(a)

(b)

(c)

72 In a driven series RLC circuit, the ideal generator has a peak emf equal to 200 V, the resistance is 60.0 and the capacitance is 8.00 F. The inductance can be varied from 8.00 mH to 40.0 mH by the insertion of an iron core in the solenoid. The angular frequency of the generator is 2500 rad/s. If the capacitor voltage is not to exceed 150 V, find (a) the peak current and (b) the range of inductances that is safe to use. Picture the Problem We can find the maximum current in the circuit from the maximum voltage across the capacitor and the reactance of the capacitor. To find the range of inductance that is safe to use we can express Z2 for the circuit in 2 2 terms of peak and I peak and solve the resulting quadratic equation for L.

(a) Express the peak current in terms of the maximum potential difference across the capacitor and its

I peak =

VC , peak XC

= CVC , peak

2808 Chapter 29 reactance: Substitute numerical values and evaluate I peak : (b) Relate the maximum current in the circuit to the emf of the source and the impedance of the circuit: Express Z2 in terms of R, XL, and XC: Substitute to obtain: I peak = (2500 rad/s )(8.00 F)(150 V ) = 3.00 A

I peak =

peak
Z

Z2 =

2 peak 2 I peak

Z 2 = R2 + (X L X C )
2 peak

I Evaluating XC yields:

2 peak

= R 2 + (X L X C )

XC =

1 1 = C (2500 rad/s )(8.00 F) = 50.0

Substitute numerical values to obtain:

(200 V )2 = (60.0 )2 + ((2500 rad/s)L 50.0 )2 (3.00 A )2


Solving for L yields:
L=
50.0 844 2 2500 s 1

Denoting the solutions as L+ and L, find the values for the inductance: The ranges for L are:

L+ = 31.6 mH and L = 8.38 mH

8.00 mH < L < 8.38 mH


and 31.6 mH < L < 40.0 mH

73 A certain electrical device draws an rms current of 10 A at an average power of 720 W when connected to a 120-V rms, 60-Hz power line. (a) What is the impedance of the device? (b) What series combination of resistance and reactance would have the same impedance as this device? (c) If the current leads the emf, is the reactance inductive or capacitive?

Alternating-Current Circuits

2809

Picture the Problem We can find the impedance of the circuit from the applied 2 R to find emf and the current drawn by the device. In Part (b) we can use Pav = I rms

R and the definition of the impedance of a series RLC circuit to find X = XL XC. (a) Express the impedance of the device in terms of the current it draws and the emf provided by the power line: Substitute numerical values and evaluate Z: (b) Use the relationship between the average power supplied to the device and the rms current it draws to express R: Substitute numerical values and evaluate R: The impedance of a series RLC circuit is given by:
Z=

rms
I rms

Z=

120 V = 12 10 A Pav 2 I rms

2 Pav = I rms RR =

R=

720 W = 7.20 = 7.2 (10 A )2


2

Z = R2 + (X L X C )

or 2 Z 2 = R2 + (X L X C )

Solving for X L X C yields: Substitute numerical values and evaluate X:

X = X L X C = Z 2 R2
X=

(12 )2 (7.20 )2

= 10

(c) If the current leads the emf, the reactance is capacitive. A method for measuring inductance is to connect the inductor in series 74 with a known capacitance, a known resistance, an ac ammeter, and a variablefrequency signal generator. The frequency of the signal generator is varied and the emf is kept constant until the current is maximum. (a) If the capacitance is 10 F, the peak emf is 10 V, the resistance is 100 , and the rms current in the circuit is maximum when the driving frequency is 5000 rad/s, what is the value of the inductance? (b) What is the maximum rms current?
Picture the Problem (a) We can use the fact that when the current is a maximum,

2810 Chapter 29 XL = XC, to find the inductance of the circuit. In Part (b), we can find Irms, max from

peak and the impedance of the circuit at resonance.


(a) Relate XL and XC at resonance:

X L = X C or 0 L =
1 02C

1 0C

Solve for L to obtain:

L=

Substitute numerical values and evaluate L: (b) Noting that, at resonance, X = 0, express Irms, max in terms of the applied emf and the impedance of the circuit at resonance:
75

L=

(5000 s ) (10 F)
1 2

= 4.0 mH

I rms, max = =

rms = max
Z 2 (100 ) 10 V

2Z = 71 mA

the current in the resistor is given by IR = (peak/R) cos t. (b) Show that the

generator (Figure 29-43) that has an emf given by = peak cos t. (a) Show that current in the capacitor branch is given by IC = (peak/XC) cos(t + 90). (c) Show that the total current is given by I = Ipeak cos(t + ), where tan = R/XC and

A resistor and a capacitor are connected in parallel across an ac

Ipeak = peak/Z.

Picture the Problem Because the resistor and the capacitor are connected in parallel, the voltage drops across them are equal. Also, the total current is the sum of the current through the resistor and the current through the capacitor. Because these two currents are not in phase, we use phasors to calculate their sum. The amplitudes of the applied voltage and the currents are equal to the magnitude of the r r r r phasors. That is = peak , I = I peak , I R = I R , peak , and I C = I C , peak .

(a) The ac source applies a voltage given by = peak cos t . Thus, the voltage drop across both the load resistor and the capacitor is: The current in the resistor is in phase with the applied voltage:

peak cos t = I R R

I R = I R , peak cos t

Alternating-Current Circuits Because I R , peak =

2811

peak
R

IR =

peak
R

cos t

(b) The current in the capacitor leads the applied voltage by 90: Because I C , peak =

I C = I C, peak cos(t + 90)

peak
XC

IC =

peak
XC

cos(t + 90)

(c) The net current I is the sum of the currents through the parallel branches: Draw the phasor diagram for the circuit. The projections of the phasors onto the horizontal axis are the instantaneous values. The current in the resistor is in phase with the applied voltage, and the current in the capacitor leads the applied voltage by 90. The net current phasor is the sum of the r r r branch current phasors I = I C + I R .

I = I R + IC
r I

r IC
r IR
t

r
max

The peak current through the parallel combination is equal to peak Z , where Z is the impedance of the combination: From the phasor diagram we have:

I = I peak cos(t ),

where I peak =

peak
Z

2 2 2 I peak = IR , peak + I C , peak

2 1 1 peak = R2 + X 2 = Z2 C 1 1 1 where 2 = 2 + 2 Z R XC 2 peak

peak peak = R + XC
2

Solving for Ipeak yields:

I peak =

peak
Z

2 where Z 2 = R 2 + X C

From the phasor diagram:

I = I peak cos(t + ) where

2812 Chapter 29

peak
IC R X = C = I R peak XC R 76 Figure 29-44 shows a plot of average power Pav versus generator frequency for a series RLC circuit driven by an ac generator. The average power Pav is given by Equation 29-56. The full width at half-maximum, , is the width of the resonance curve between the two points, where Pav is one-half its maximum value. Show that for a sharply peaked resonance, R/L and that Q 0/ in this case (Equation 29-58). Hint: The half-power points occur when the denominator of Equation 29-56 is equal to twice the value it has at resonance; 2 2 2 + 2 R 2 20 R . Let 1 and 2 be the solutions of this that is, when L2 2 0 tan =

equation. Then, show that = 2 1 R/L.


Picture the Problem We can use the condition determining the half-power points to obtain a quadratic equation that we can solve for the frequencies corresponding to the half-power points. Letting 1 be the half-power frequency that is less than 0 and 2 be the half-power frequency that is greater than 0 will lead us to the result that = 2 1 R/L. We can then use the definition of Q to complete the proof that Q 0 /.

Equation 29-56 is:

Pav =

2 L2 2 0

2 2 Vapp, rms R

+ 2R2

The half-power points occur when the denominator of Equation 29-56 is twice the value near resonance; that is, when:

2 2 2 L2 2 0 + 2 R 2 20 R

or 2 2 2 L2 [( 0 )( + 0 )] + 2 R 2 20 R

For a sharply peaked resonance, + 0 20 . Hence:

2 2 L2 [( 0 )(20 )] + 2 R 2 20 R 2

or 2 2 2 2 2 40 L ( 0 ) + 2 R 2 20 R
2 2 2 2 2 2 40 L (1 0 ) + 0 R 20 R 2

Let 1 be a solution to this equation. Noting that, for a sharply peaked resonance, 1 0 , it follows that:

or, simplifying, 2 (1 0 )2 R 2 4L

Alternating-Current Circuits Solving for 1 yields:


R 2L where weve used the minus sign because 1 < 0.

2813

1 0

2814 Chapter 29 Similarly for 2:

R 2L where weve used the plus sign because 2 > 0.

2 0 +

Evaluating = 2 1 yields:

0 +

R R R 0 = 2L 2L L

From the definition of Q:

R 0 = L Q
2

Substitute in the expression for to obtain:


77

0
Q

Show by direct substitution that L

(Equation 29-43b) is satisfied by Q = Q0e t

dQ 1 dQ + Q =0 2 +R dt dt C cos ' t , where = 2 L R ,

' = 1 (LC ) 1 2 , and Q0 is the charge on the capacitor at t = 0.


Picture the Problem Well differentiate Q = Q0e t cos ' t twice and substitute

this function and both its derivatives in the differential equation of the circuit. Rewriting the resulting equation in the form Acost + Bsint = 0 will reveal that B vanishes. Requiring that Acost = 0 hold for all values of t will lead to the result that ' = 1 (LC ) 1 2 .

Equation 29-43b is:

d 2Q dQ 1 +R + Q=0 2 dt C dt

Assume a solution of the form: Differentiate Q(t) twice to obtain:

Q = Q0 e t cos ' t

d t dQ = Q0 e cos ' t dt dt d d = Q0 e t cos ' t + cos ' t e t dt dt 1 = Q0e t ' sin ' t cos ' t

Alternating-Current Circuits and


d 2Q d 1 = Q0 e t ' sin ' t cos ' t 2 dt dt 1 2' sin 't = Q0e t 2 ' 2 cos 't +

2815

Substitute these derivatives in the differential equation and simplify to obtain: 1 2' 1 LQ0e t 2 ' 2 cos 't + sin 't + RQ0e t ' sin ' t cos ' t 1 + Q0e t cos ' t = 0 C Because Q0 and e t are never zero, divide them out of the equation and simplify to obtain:
2 L' R 1 1 L 2 ' 2 cos 't + sin 't ' R sin ' t cos ' t + cos ' t = 0 C

Rewriting this equation in the form Acost + Bsint = 0 yields:

1 R 1 2 (R' R' )sin 't + L 2 ' + cos 't = 0 C

or

1 1 R 2 L 2 ' + C cos 't = 0


If this equation is to hold for all values of t, its coefficient must vanish: Solving for yields:
1 1 R L 2 ' 2 + = 0 C

' =

1 1 LC 2L

the condition that must be satisfied if Q = Q0et cos 't is the solution to Equation 29-43b.
78 One method for measuring the magnetic susceptibility of a sample uses an LC circuit consisting of an air-core solenoid and a capacitor. The resonant frequency of the circuit without the sample is determined and then measured

2816 Chapter 29 again with the sample inserted in the solenoid. Suppose you have a solenoid that is 4.00 cm long, 3.00 mm in diameter, and has 400 turns of fine wire. You have a sample that is inserted in the solenoid and completely fills the air space. Neglect end effects. (a) Calculate the inductance of your empty solenoid. (b) What value for the capacitance of the capacitor should you choose that the resonance frequency of the circuit without a sample is exactly 6.0000 MHz? (c) When a sample is inserted in the solenoid, you determine that the resonance frequency drops to 5.9989 MHz. Use your data to determine the samples susceptibility.
Picture the Problem We can use L = 0 n 2 Al to determine the inductance of the

empty solenoid and the resonance condition to find the capacitance of the samplefree circuit when the resonance frequency of the circuit is 6.0000 MHz. By expressing L as a function of f0 and then evaluating df0/dL and approximating the derivative with f0/L , we can evaluate from its definition. (a) Express the inductance of an aircore solenoid: L = 0 n 2 Al

Substitute numerical values and evaluate L:


400 2 L = 4 10 N/A 4.00 cm 4 (3.00 cm ) (4.00 cm ) = 3.553 mH = 3.55 mH

(b) Express the condition for resonance in the LC circuit: Solving for C yields:

X L = X C 2f 0 L =
1 4 f 02 L
2

1 2f 0C

(1)

C=

Substitute numerical values and evaluate C:

C=

1 2 4 (6.0000 MHz ) (3.553 mH )


2

= 1.9803 10 13 F = 0.198 pF

(c) Express the samples susceptibility in terms of L and L: Solve equation (1) for f0:

L L

(2)

f0 =

1 2 LC

Alternating-Current Circuits Differentiate f0 with respect to L:


df 0 1 d 1 2 1 L = L3 2 = dL 2 C dL 4 C f 1 = = 0 2L 4L LC f L f 0 f = 0 or 0 = f0 2L L 2L

2817

Approximate df0/dL by f0/L:

Substitute in equation (2) to obtain:

= 2

f 0 f0

Substitute numerical values and evaluate :

= 2

5.9989 MHz 6.0000 MHz 6.0000 MHz 0

= 3.7 10 4

The Transformer
79 [SSM] A rms voltage of 24 V is required for a device whose impedance is 12 . (a) What should the turns ratio of a transformer be, so that the device can be operated from a 120-V line? (b) Suppose the transformer is accidentally connected in reverse with the secondary winding across the 120-V-rms line and the 12- load across the primary. How much rms current will then be in the primary winding? Picture the Problem Let the subscript 1 denote the primary and the subscript 2 the secondary. We can use V2 N1 = V1 N 2 and N1 I1 = N 2 I 2 to find the turns ratio and the primary current when the transformer connections are reversed.

(a) Relate the number of primary and secondary turns to the primary and secondary voltages: Solve for and evaluate the ratio N2/N1: (b) Relate the current in the primary to the current in the secondary and to the turns ratio:

V2, rms N1 = V1, rms N 2

(1)

1 N 2 V2, rms 24 V = = = 5 N1 V1, rms 120 V


I1, rms = N2 I 2, rms N1

2818 Chapter 29 Express the current in the primary winding in terms of the voltage across it and its impedance: Substitute for I2, rms to obtain:
I 2 , rms = V2 , rms Z2

I1, rms =

N 2 V2, rms N1 Z 2

Substitute numerical values and evaluate I1, rms:

5 120 V I1 = = 50 A 1 12

80 A transformer has 400 turns in the primary and 8 turns in the secondary. (a) Is this a step-up or a step-down transformer? (b) If the primary is connected to a 120 V rms voltage source, what is the open-circuit rms voltage across the secondary? (c) If the primary rms current is 0.100 A, what is the secondary rms current, assuming negligible magnetization current and no power loss? Picture the Problem Let the subscript 1 denote the primary and the subscript 2 the secondary. We can decide whether the transformer is a step-up or step-down transformer by examining the ratio of the number of turns in the secondary to the number of terms in the primary. We can relate the open-circuit rms voltage in the secondary to the primary rms voltage and the turns ratio.

(a) Because there are fewer turns in the secondary than in the primary it is a stepdown transformer. (b) Relate the open-circuit rms voltage V2, rms in the secondary to the rms voltage V1, rms in the primary: Substitute numerical values and evaluate V2, rms : (c) Because there are no power losses:
V2, rms = N2 V1, rms N1
8 (120 V ) = 2.40 V 400

V2, rms =

V1, rms I1, rms = V2, rms I 2, rms


and

I 2, rms =
Substitute numerical values and evaluate I2, rms:

V1, rms V2, rms

I1, rms

I 2, rms =

120 V (0.100 A ) = 5.00 A 2.40 V

Alternating-Current Circuits

2819

81 The primary of a step-down transformer has 250 turns and is connected to a 120-V rms line. The secondary is to supply 20 A rms at 9.0 V rms. Find (a) the rms current in the primary and (b) the number of turns in the secondary, assuming 100 percent efficiency. Picture the Problem Let the subscript 1 denote the primary and the subscript 2 the secondary. We can use I1, rmsV1, rms = I 2, rmsV2, rms to find the current in the primary

and V2, rms N1 = V1, rms N 2 to find the number of turns in the secondary. (a) Because we have 100 percent efficiency:

I1, rmsV1, rms = I 2, rmsV2, rms


and

I1, rms = I 2, rms


Substitute numerical values and evaluate I1, rms: (b) Relate the number of primary and secondary turns to the primary and secondary voltages: Substitute numerical values and evaluate N2/N1:

V2, rms V1, rms


9.0 V = 1.5 A 120 V

I1, rms = (20 A )

V2, rms N1 = V1, rms N 2 N 2 =

V2, rms V1, rms

N1

N2 =

9.0 V (250) 19 120 V

82 An audio oscillator (ac source) that has an internal resistance of 2000 and an open-circuit rms output voltage of 12.0 V is to be used to drive a loudspeaker coil that has a resistance of 8.00 . (a) What should be the ratio of primary to secondary turns of a transformer, so that maximum average power is transferred to the speaker? (b) Suppose a second identical speaker is connected in parallel with the first speaker. How much average power is then supplied to the two speakers combined? Picture the Problem Note: In a simple circuit maximum power transfer from source to load requires that the load resistance equals the internal resistance of the source. We can use Ohms law and the relationship between the primary and secondary currents and the primary and secondary voltages and the turns ratio of the transformer to derive an expression for the turns ratio as a function of the effective resistance of the circuit and the resistance of the speaker(s).

(a) Express the effective loudspeaker resistance at the primary of the transformer:

Reff =

V1, rms I1, rms

2820 Chapter 29 Relate V1, rms to V2, rms, N1, and N2:
V1, rms = V2, rms N1 N2 N2 N1

Express I1, rms in terms of I2, rms, N1, and N2: Substitute for V1, rms and I1, rms and simplify to obtain:

I1, rms = I 2, rms

V2, rms Reff = I 2, rms

N1 2 V2, rms N1 N2 = N N2 I 2, rms 2 N1


= Reff R2

Solve for N1/N2:

N1 = N2

I 2, rms Reff V2, rms

(1)

Evaluate N1/N2 for Reff = Rcoil:

N1 2000 = = 15.811 = 15.8 8.00 N2


Psp = I12, rms Reff

(b) Express the power delivered to the two speakers connected in parallel: Find the equivalent resistance Rsp of the two 8.00- speakers in parallel: Solve equation (1) for Reff to obtain:

(2)

1 1 1 Rsp = 4.00 = + Rsp 8.00 8.00 N1 = R2 N 2


2

Reff

Substitute numerical values and evaluate Reff : Find the current supplied by the source:

Reff = (4.00 )(15.811) = 1000


2

I1, rms =

12.0 V Vrms = Rtot 2000 + 1000

= 4.00 mA Substitute numerical values in equation (2) and evaluate the power delivered to the parallel speakers:

Psp = (4.00 mA ) (1000 ) = 16.0 mW


2

Alternating-Current Circuits

2821

General Problems
83 The distribution circuit of a residential power line is operated at 2000 V rms. This voltage must be reduced to 240 V rms for use within residences. If the secondary side of the transformer has 400 turns, how many turns are in the primary? Picture the Problem We can relate the input and output voltages to the number of turns in the primary and secondary using V2, rms N1 = V1, rms N 2 .

Relate the output voltages V2, rms to the input voltage V1, rms and the number of turns in the primary N1 and secondary N2: Substitute numerical values and evaluate N1:

V2, rms =

V N2 V1, rms N1 = N 2 1, rms V2, rms N1

2000 V 3 N1 = (400) 240 V = 3.33 10

84 A resistor that has a resistance R carries a current given by (5.0 A) sin 2ft + (7.0 A) sin 4ft, where f = 60 Hz. (a) What is the rms current in the resistor? (b) If R =12 , what is the average power delivered to the resistor? (c) What is the rms voltage across the resistor? Picture the Problem We can use its definition, I rms =

(I ) to relate the rms current to the current carried by the resistor and find (I ) by integrating I2.
2 av 2 av

(a) Express the rms current in terms of the I 2 av :

( )

I rms =

(I )
2

av

Evaluate I2:
I 2 = [(5.0 A ) sin 2ft + (7.0 A ) sin 4ft ]
2

= 25 A 2 sin 2 2ft + 70 A 2 sin 2ft sin 4ft + 49 A 2 sin 2 4ft

Find I 2

( )

av

by integrating I2 from t = 0 to t = T = 2/ and dividing by T:

(I )
2

av

{(25 A )sin
2 0

2ft + 70 A 2 sin 2ft sin 4ft

+ 49 A 2 sin 2 4ft dt

2822 Chapter 29 Use the trigonometric identity sin 2 x = 1 1 cos 2 x ) to simplify and 2( evaluate the 1st and 3rd integrals and recognize that the middle term is of the form sinxsin2x to obtain: Substitute for I 2

(I )
2

av

= 12.5 A 2 + 0 + 24.5 A 2 = 37.0 A 2

( )

av

and evaluate Irms:

I rms = 37.0 A 2 = 6.1 A


2 P = I rms R

(b) Relate the power dissipated in the resistor to its resistance and the rms current in it: Substitute numerical values and evaluate P: (c) Express the rms voltage across the resistor in terms of R and I rms : Substitute numerical values and evaluate Vrms :

P = (6.08 A ) (12 ) = 0.44 kW


2

Vrms = I rms R

Vrms = (6.08 A )(12 ) = 73 V

85 [SSM] Figure 29-45 shows the voltage versus time for a squarewave voltage source. If V0 = 12 V, (a) what is the rms voltage of this source? (b) If this alternating waveform is rectified by eliminating the negative voltages, so that only the positive voltages remain, what is the new rms voltage? Picture the Problem The average of any quantity over a time interval T is the integral of the quantity over the interval divided by T. We can use this definition to find both the average of the voltage squared, V 2 av and then use the definition

( )

of the rms voltage. (a) From the definition of Vrms we have: Noting that V02 = V02 , evaluate

Vrms =

(V )

2 0 av

Vrms = V02 = V0 = 12 V

Vrms :

Alternating-Current Circuits (b) Noting that the voltage during the second half of each cycle is now zero, express the voltage during the first half cycle of the time interval 1 2 T : Express the square of the voltage during this half cycle: Calculate V 2 by T: Substitute to obtain:
Vrms =
1 2

2823

V = V0

V 2 = V02

( )

av

by integrating V2
1 2

from t = 0 to t =

T and dividing

(V )
2

av

V2 = 0 T

1 T 2

dt =
0

V02 12 T 1 2 [t ] 0 = 2 V0 T

V02 =

V0 2

12 V 2

= 8.5 V

86 What are the average values and rms values of current for the two current waveforms shown in Figure 29-46? Picture the Problem The average of any quantity over a time interval T is the integral of the quantity over the interval divided by T. We can use this definition to find both the average current I av , and the average of the current squared,

(I )
2

av

From the definition of I av and

I rms we have:
Waveform (a) Express the current during the first half cycle of time interval T:

I av =

1 T

Idt and I rms =

(I )
2

av

4A t T where I is in A when t and T are in seconds. Ia =

Evaluate I av, a :

I av, a = =

1 T

4.0 A 4.0 A tdt = T (T )2 0 t = 2.0 A 2 0


2 T

tdt
0

4.0 A (T )2

2824 Chapter 29 Express the square of the current during this half cycle: Noting that the average value of the squared current is the same for each 2 time interval T, calculate I a by av
2 ( 4.0 A ) 2 I = t (T )2 2 T (I a2 )av = 1T (4.0 A2) t 2 dt 0 (T ) T 2 ( 4.0 A ) t 3 16 2 = = A 3 (T ) 3 0 3 2 a

( )

integrating I from t = 0 to t = T
2 a

and dividing by T: Substitute in the expression for I rms, a to obtain:


Waveform (b) Noting that the current during the second half of each cycle is zero, express the current during the first half cycle of the time interval 1 2 T :

I rms, a =

16 2 A = 2 .3 A 3

I b = 4.0 A

Evaluate I av, b :

I av, b

4.0 A 2 4.0 A 12 T dt = [t ] 0 = T 0 T = 2.0 A

Express the square of the current during this half cycle: Calculate I b2 by T:

I b2 = (4.0 A )

( )

av

by integrating I b2
1 2

from t = 0 to t =

T and dividing

(I )

2 b av

2 ( 4 .0 A ) =

1 2

dt
0
1 2

(4.0 A ) [t ] T 0
2

= 8 .0 A 2

Substitute in the expression for I rms, b to obtain:


87

I rms, b = 8.0 A 2 = 2.8 A

f = 180 Hz; 2 = 18 V, and R = 36 . Find the maximum, minimum, average, and rms values of the current in the resistor.
Picture the Problem We can apply Kirchhoffs loop rule to express the current in the circuit in terms of the emfs of the sources and the resistance of the resistor.

In the circuit shown in Figure 29-47, 1 = (20 V) cos 2ft, where

Alternating-Current Circuits

2825

We can then find Imax and I min by considering the conditions under which the time-dependent factor in I will be a maximum or a minimum. Finally, we can use

I rms =
value.

(I )
2

av

to derive an expression for Irms that we can use to determine its

Apply Kirchhoffs loop rule to obtain: Solving for I yields:

1, peak cos t + 2 IR = 0
I=

1, peak
R

cos t +

2
R

or I = A1 cos t + A2 where A1 = Substitute numerical values to obtain:

1, peak
R

and A2 =

2
R

20 V 18 V 1 I = 36 cos 2 180 s t + 36 = (0.556 A ) cos 1131s 1 t + 0.50 A

( ( (

))

The current is a maximum when cos 1131s 1 t = 1 . Hence :

I max = 0.50 A + 0.556 A = 1.06 A

Evaluate I min : Because the average value of cost = 0: The rms current is the square root of the average of the squared current:

I min = 0.50 A 0.556 A = 0.06 A I av = 0.50 A

I rms =

[I ]
2

av

(1)

[I ]
2

av

is given by:

Because cos 2

[cos t ]av = 0 :

[I ] = [( A cos t + A ) ] = [A cos t + 2 A A cos t + A ] = [A cos t ] + [2 A A cos t ] + [A ] = A [cos t ] + 2 A A [cos t ] + A [I ] = A + A t ] = and


2 2 av 1 2 av 2 1 2 1 2 2 2 av 2 1 2 av 1 2 av 2 1 2 av 1 2 av 2 2 av 1 2
2 av 1 2 2 1 2 2

2 2 av

2826 Chapter 29 Substituting in equation (1) yields: Substitute for A1 and A2 to obtain:

I rms =
I rms =

1 2
1 2

2 A12 + A2

1 2 + R R
2

Substitute numerical values and evaluate Irms:

I rms =

1 2

20 V 18 V + 36 36

= 0.64 A

88

Repeat Problem 87 if the resistor is replaced by a 2.0-F capacitor.

Picture the Problem We can apply Kirchhoffs loop rule to obtain an expression for charge on the capacitor as a function of time. Differentiating this expression with respect to time will give us the current in the circuit. We can then find Imax and Imin by considering the conditions under which the time-dependent factor in I

will be a maximum or a minimum. Finally, we can use I rms = expression for Irms that we can use to determine its value. Apply Kirchhoffs loop rule to obtain: Solving for q(t) yields:

(I )
2

av

to derive an

1 peak cos t + 2 q(t ) = 0


C

q(t ) = C (1 peak cos t + 2 ) = A1 cos t + A2 where A1 = C 1 peak and A2 = C 2

Differentiate this expression with respect to t to obtain the current as a function of time: Substituting numerical values yields:

I=

dq d = ( A1 cos t + A2 ) dt dt = A1 sin t

I = 2 (180 Hz )(2.0 F)sin (2 (180 Hz )t ) = ( 2.26 mA )sin 1131 s 1 t


The current is a minimum when sin 1131s 1 t = 1 . Hence:

I min = 2.3 mA

The current is a maximum when sin 1131s 1 t = 1 . Hence:

I max = 2.3 mA

Alternating-Current Circuits

2827

2828 Chapter 29 Because the dc source sees the capacitor as an open circuit and the average value of the sine function over a period is zero: The rms current is the square root of the average of the squared current:

I av = 0

I rms =

[I ]
2

av

(1)

[I ]
2

av

is given by:

Because cos 2

[cos t ]av = 0 :

[I ] = [( A cos t + A ) ] = [A cos t + 2 A A cos t + A ] = [A cos t ] + [2 A A cos t ] + [A ] = A [cos t ] + 2 A A [cos t ] + A [I ] = A + A t ] = and


2 2 av 1 2 av 2 1 2 1 2 2 2 av 2 1 2 av 1 2 av 2 1 2 av 1 2 av 2 2 av 1 2
2 av 1 2 2 1 2 2

2 2 av

Substituting in equation (1) yields: Substitute for A1 and A2 to obtain:

I rms =
I rms =
=C

1 2

2 A12 + A2

1 2

(C1 )2 + (C 2 )2
1 2

(1 )2 + ( 2 )2
1 2

Substitute numerical values and evaluate Irms:

I rms = (2.0 F)
= 46 A

(20 V )2 + (18 V )2

89 [SSM] A circuit consists of an ac generator, a capacitor and an ideal inductorall connected in series. The emf of the generator is given by peak cos t . (a) Show that the charge on the capacitor obeys the equation

d 2Q Q L 2 + = peak cos t . (b) Show by direct substitution that this equation is dt C


satisfied by Q = Qpeak cos t where Qpeak =
2 ) . (c) Show that the current L( 2 0 peak peak can be written as I = I peak cos(t ) , where I peak = and = 2 2 XL XC L 0

peak

= 90 for < 0 and = 90 for > 0, where 0 is the resonance frequency.

Alternating-Current Circuits

2829

Picture the Problem In Part (a) we can apply Kirchhoffs loop rule to obtain the 2nd order differential equation relating the charge on the capacitor to the time. In Part (b) well assume a solution of the form Q = Qpeak cos t , differentiate it twice,

and substitute for d2Q/dt2 and Q to show that the assumed solution satisfies the differential equation provided Qpeak =
2 ) L( 2 0

peak

. In Part (c) well use our

results from (a) and (b) to establish the result for Ipeak given in the problem statement. (a) Apply Kirchhoffs loop rule to obtain: Substitute for and rearrange the differential equation to obtain: Because I = dQ dt :

Q L dI
C L

dt

=0

dI Q + = max cos t dt C

d 2Q Q L 2 + = max cos t dt C
Q = Qpeak cos t
dQ = Qpeak sin t dt and d 2Q = 2 Qpeak cos t 2 dt

(b) Assume that the solution is: Differentiate the assumed solution twice to obtain:

d 2Q dQ and in the Substitute for dt 2 dt differential equation to obtain:


Factor cost from the left-hand side of the equation:

2 LQpeak cos t +

cos t C = peak cos t

Qpeak

Qpeak 2 cos t + LQ peak C = peak cos t


2 LQpeak +

If this equation is to hold for all values of t it must be true that:

Qpeak C

= peak

2830 Chapter 29 Solving for Qpeak yields:

Qpeak =

peak
2L + 1 C

Factor L from the denominator and substitute for 1/LC to obtain:

Qpeak =

peak
1 L 2 + LC
2 L 2 0

peak

(c) From (a) and (b) we have:

I= =

dQ = Qpeak sin t dt

peak 2 ) sin t = I peak sin t L ( 2 0

= I peak cos(t )

where

I peak =

peak
L
2 2 0

peak
L

peak
L
1 C

2 02

peak

XL XC

If > 0, XL > XC and the current lags the voltage by 90 ( = 90). If < 0, XL < XC and the current leads the voltage by 90( = 90).