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Piping Design

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Piping Design

Preface Using This Guide What's New? Getting Started Entering the Workbench Set Correct Working Units and Grid Changing the Current Axis Creating a Run Placing a Part on a Run Updating Documents Saving Documents User Tasks Managing Piping Lines Creating a Line ID Renaming a Line ID Select/Filter Line IDs Deleting a Line ID Importing Line IDs Modify the Properties of a Line ID Querying a Line ID or its Members Transfer Members of a Line ID Merging Line IDs Routing Runs Routing a Run Routing with Defined Nodes Routing from the End of a Routable Branching a Run Routing a Run at a Slope Auto-route Between Equipment Route a Run Within a Pathway Routing from an Item Reservation Display Information About Routables Checking Turn Radius Errors Modifying Runs Using the Definition Dialog Box Changing a Section Changing the Angle of a Segment Moving Nodes Align Adjacent Segments

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Make Segment Parallel to Reference Plane Make Segment Parallel to Compass Base Plane Make Segment Parallel to Z Axis Fit Segment for Parts Assembly Position Segment Relative to a Plane Create an Offset Connection Between Segments Create a Closed Loop Run Open a Closed Run Adjust Extremities of a Run Transfer Run to Another Document Connecting Elements Connecting Parts Disconnecting Parts Connections Between Work Packages Managing Publications Manipulating Objects Search for Objects in a Document Aligning Elements Distributing Elements Rotate Resource Using the Definition Dialog Box Snap Resources Together Quick Snap Resources Snap and Rotate a Resource Using Offset Planes and Advanced Offset Planes Generating Detail Information Disable/Enable Manipulation Handles Using Quick Translate to Move Objects Activating the Product or Parent Transfer Elements to New Document Query/modify properties of an object Edit or Display Properties of an Object Changing the Display Order of Properties Filter Shown Properties of an Object Renaming Objects Changing the Size or Spec of a Part Assigning Values to Parts Placing & Modifying a Piping Part Placing Parts Rotate a Piping Part Flipping a Part Inserting a Part Move/Rotate In-Line Parts Placing Transitional Objects On a Run Detecting Clash in Parts Placement Switching Graphic Representations Placing a Part in a Sub-document Query or Convert Auto Parts Flow Direction Display Flow Direction Change Flow Direction

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Managing Spools Creating a Spool Display and Edit Properties of a Spool Select/Query a Spool or its Members Transfer a Spool Add/Remove Members in a Spool Rename a Spool Delete a Spool Analyzing Networks Analyze Network for Connections Viewing Related Objects Routing Tasks Aligning a Run to an Existing Surface Routing in 3D with the Compass Routing at an Offset of a Routable Edgeline: Routing Parallel to a Run Route a Run along a Spline Fix broken routables Building Piping Parts Create a Part with Specified Type Define Graphic Representations for a Part Define Properties for a Part Change the Parameters of a Part Defining the Part Type Building a New Unique Reference Generating Resolved Parts from Parametric Parts Requirements for Building Parts Using ENOVIA Creating a Product Importing a Product Using Work Packages Saving a Work Package Organizing Work Packages Creating and Modifying Connectors Create Connectors Associate Attributes to a Connector Use the Compass to Manipulate Connectors Modifying or Deleting Connectors Creating Duplicate Connectors Using the Plane Manipulator Hide/Show Connectors Transferring a Document to Another Site Migrating V4 Models to V5 Creating a Directory Structure Exporting the V4 Project Registration Model Exporting the V5 Feature Dictionary Comparing the XML Output Importing the XML Output Exporting V4 Standards Data Exporting V4 Catalog Parts

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Exporting V4 Piping Lines Creating/Modifying Setup Data Migrating the V4 Model Exporting Parts from a V4 Model Importing Parts from Other Software Creating an Isometric Drawing Setup Requirements Creating an Isometric Drawing from a 3-D Document Generating a PCF File Using Mapping Tables Drawing Production Drawing Production Settings Generating a Drawing Defining 2D Endstyle Symbols Schematic Driven Design Placing Parts Using a Schematic Creating a Run Using a Schematic Analyzing Schematic Driven Design Penetration Management Usage Querying for Penetrations Create a Cutout Sketch Adding an Object to a Penetration Hole Placement Placing a Hole on a Part Modifying a Hole Querying Hole Properties Working with Bendables Extract Bending Data from Bendable Pipes and Tubes Design Checks for Bendable Pipes and Tubes Computed Attributes Piping Customizing Customizing Settings ISOGen Setup (3-D) Setting Up the Application Project Resource Management Using the PRM Command Understanding Project Resource Management Checking a PRM File for Errors Organizing Resources in PRM File List of PRM Resources and Flags Feature Dictionary: Creating Classes and Attributes Mapping the Functional Physical Classes Defining User Names for Classes & Attributes Comparing Feature Dictionaries Opening a Document Without CATfct File Cache Mode Working in Cache Mode Penetration Management

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Penetration Management Setup Creating Reports Defining the Report Format Generating a Report Generating a Report from a Macro Creating a Toolbar Shortcut for a Macro Generate a Bolt Report Catalogs Creating a Catalog Creating Sub-Catalogs Modifying a Catalog Creating a Specifications Catalog Line ID Catalogs Displaying Line ID Properties in Catalog Modifying/Updating a Lines Catalog Standards and Design Rules Rules Overview Modifying Design Rules Creating and Modifying Standards Adding an Attribute to a Standard Modifying the Object Naming Rules Add Computed Attribute to Object Name Adding an Attribute to General Design Rules Adding a New Part Size Resource Map Using Knowledgeware Checks Using Knowledgeware Packages Importing Checks from Knowledgeware (3D) Opening a Sample Document Checking a Document for Design Errors Defining Options Finding Sample Data on Various Platforms Specifications Tree Working with ENOVIA Setup for Enovia Using Catalogs Resources That Must be Placed in ENOVIA Workbench Description Design Create Toolbar Fabricate Toolbar Build Create Toolbar Piping Line Management Toolbar Design Modify Toolbar General Environment Toolbar General Design Toolbar Rename Toolbar Glossary Index

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Preface
The Piping Design product provides customers with a complete set of tools to create, modify, analyze and manage physical designs of piping systems using industry standard conventions, terminology, and practices. The tools are focused on creating an intelligent piping layout that captures the design intent. Intelligent piping design allows users to create and validate their designs more productively and, in addition, reuse the captured intelligence for downstream design processes. The product supports the definition of piping configurations. This involves general layout tools for intelligent placement of parts, and automatic placement of components such as bends, elbows, tees, and reducers. A full set of routing and parts placement methods allows users to choose the one that is right for a given situation. Specification driven design is available to ensure compliance with the project standard. Function driven design is used to ensure that the design intent is available for any modification scenario. In addition, full capabilities are provided to quickly query design information, and generate appropriate report information. These design tools are provided via a highly intuitive and productive interface that allows the user to create, modify, and manage designs quickly. The product includes comprehensive and flexible setup functions that will provide a rapid way to define project standards and catalogs that get the users into production quickly. This product comes with a starter piping parts catalog based on the American National Standard Institute (ANSI). Together with other products, the Piping Design product gives users the power to manage their piping systems from initial design to ship or plant operations, in a completely flexible way.

Using This Guide

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Using This Guide


This book describes how to use the Piping Design product. Before you read it, you should be familiar with basic Version 5 concepts such as document windows, standard tool bars, and view tool bars. To get the most out of this guide, you should start with the tutorial in the Getting Started section. The remaining sections of the book describe in detail the procedures for using all of the features of the Piping Design product. The procedures are divided into user tasks and customization sections.

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What's New?
New Functionality
You can transfer elements in a document to a new document or work package. The import node points command allows you to predefine the node points of a run in a document and route using that document. A list of Knowledgeware computed attributes and methods, and their descriptions, is included. A query function allows you to display all auto parts in your document. You can also convert auto parts into "non auto parts".

Enhanced Functionality
Several changes have been made in schematic driven routing. These include the need to associate runs, and explanations of the Create the Run and User Defined Path functions. For generating a report, style sheets have been provided to allow you to control the looks of the generated report. Modifying or deleting connectors on the instance of a part is no longer allowed. You can only perform these tasks on a reference or unique part. There has been a modification in the interface for the task associating attributes to connectors, allowing you to see which discipline a connector is associated with. The Resize/Respec command has been modified, with several new features added, to provide more flexibility. You can use the Display Alternate Path button in the Routing a Run function to see possible routing paths between objects. The Create the Run button provides additional flexibility.

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Getting Started
The following short tutorial provides an introduction to the Piping Design product, It is intended to give you a feel for the product's capabilities in a few step-by-step scenarios, which are listed below. Entering the Workbench Set Correct Working Units and Grid Changing the Current Axis Creating a Run Placing a Part on a Run Updating Documents Saving Documents

These tasks can be completed in about 15 minutes. Certain functions will not work without setting up directory paths and options. The system administrator should refer to the tasks under Understanding Project Resource Management as well as platform dependent sample data in Finding sample data on various platforms. The task Setting Up the Application (in the Customizing section) describes the various steps you have to take, and the order in which you have to do them, to set up Piping Design.

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Entering the Workbench


This task shows you how to enter the Piping Design workbench. 1. On the menu bar click Start, select Equipment & Systems and then Piping Design. 2. The Piping Design workbench displays.

Before using many tasks you will need to set your options correctly. Refer to the Customizing section.

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Set Working Units and Grid


This task describes how to set your working units and grid. 1. 2. Select Tools - Options and expand the General node. Select Parameters and Measure then click the Units tab. Under Magnitudes, select Length and click the drop down arrow to set the unit of measure you will be using; Foot, Meter, etc.

3.

Now, scroll down the list in Magnitudes and select Area. Select the unit of measure you will be using for area. Note: This is normally consistent with the Length standard.

4. 5.

To set the Grid Step, under Options, select Equipment & Systems and click on the General tab. The Enter a value for the Grid Step field; for example, 1 ft. grid step is the increment used for snapping (to grid). Imagine a grid placed over your workspace, consisting of squares. The value you enter in this field becomes the distance between the lines of each square. If you enter 1 ft then when routing the run will extend by 1 ft at a time. Runs begin, end and turn at grid intersections (there are ways of overriding this). Similarly, when placing parts in free space (as opposed to on a run), they will place at grid intersections.

The grid step setting will display in the General Environment toolbar at the bottom of the 3-D viewer. You can change it in the toolbar during your session but the new value will only apply to your current session. If you close the application and reopen it, the toolbar will again display the value in the General tab page. These will be your default settings and will remain in effect until you change them. 6. Click the OK button to complete the customization of the working units.

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Changing the Current Axis


This task shows you how to change the current axis. When you activate an object, the current axis is reset to the axis of that object. Changing the current axis changes the reference point by which elements are routed and placed.

. 1. Click the Change Current Axis icon 2. Select the object you want to use as a reference. The axis for the selected object is displayed. You can also change the current axis and place the compass on the object. The compass allows you to manipulate that object. To do this click the Change Current Axis and Snap Compass button and select the object. The axis and compass are both placed.

3.

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Creating a Run
This task describes how to create a run. When you create a run you "reserve" space in your work area so that you can later lay pipes, ducts, etc., and place parts. In the example below you will create a run in "free space". In actual practice you will create runs in a much more controlled environment - the deck of a ship, or floor of a house, for instance. In the example below it does not matter where you begin or end a run - but when you are working on a project you will have to start and end at specific places, and your run will have to be a certain size and shape. For more information on runs and routing see Routing a Run. You will learn more about line IDs later, but you should know that a run is associated with a line ID. A line ID is an organizational element that identifies the type and nominal size of the run (e.g., piping, 6 in.) but may also include attributes such as pipe specification, design and operating temperature and pressure, insulation thickness, etc. These properties of the line ID ensure that the parts you place meet the requirements of the line ID and the intended design. Thus, when you make a run it is part of a line ID. The line ID of your run is displayed on the upper toolbar on the left hand side.

To learn more, including how to select a line ID, see Managing Piping Lines. . 1. Click the Route a Run button . The Run dialog box opens.

Note: If the Design Rule: Multiple Rule Found dialog box opens, this means there is more than one type of run to choose from. For example, there could be multiple choices for Turn Radius, Diameter Factor or Number of Miter Cuts. For this scenario the choice is unimportant because you are learning the fundamentals of creating a basic run. Select from the table and click OK. 2. In the Run dialog box select either Point-To-Point 3. . In Click the Section button. The Section dialog box opens showing the available section types Piping Design the section choices are No Section or Round Section. Leave this set to Round Section. Check to make sure the display setting is set to Solid . Click OK in the Section dialog box. or Orthogonal for the routing Mode.

This returns you to the Run dialog box. Section dimensions, Turn radius and Minimum length fields display the default values of the line ID being used. For more information on the settings and options used in the Run and Section dialog boxes see Routing a Run.

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4. To begin your run, click at any point, move the pointer in any direction, and click again. This is the first segment of the run. Now move the pointer to the next position and click. Create a simple run with three segments as show below.

5. Double click to complete routing. The run displays as a solid.

6. You have created a run with three segments. You are now ready to place pipes and other parts in it.

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Placing a Part on a Run


This task shows you how to place a part - in this example a gate valve - on a run. The part placement procedure described below is a simplified version of the process. There is much more to placing parts. This process is described more fully in Placing Parts.

1. 2. 3.

With the run displayed, click the Place Piping Part button . The Place Piping Part dialog box displays (shown in Step 4). Click at the location where you want to place the part - you must do this before displaying the Class Browser, which is the next step. Click the Class Browser button (next to the Function Type field) to display the Class Browser. Double click on Piping Part Function to expand the list and click the + sign at Valve Function to expand the list of valve types.

4.

Select Control Valve Function. The function will display in the Place Piping Part dialog box.

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5.

In the Place Piping Part dialog box, click on the down arrow in the Part Type field to display a list of control valves and select the gate valve.

When there is only one part type it will be preselected. If the Part Type field is grayed out, click again on the location where you want to place the part. 6. If there is more than one part number for the Part Type you selected the Part Selection box will display. For this scenario, select from the list of 2 inch gate valves.

7.

The valve is placed.

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Updating Documents
This task contains information on updating documents. The connections in your design will not update automatically after you make certain changes to it, such as moving parts, runs or lofts. This behavior is by design, to enhance performance. In order to update your design document click the Force Update button .

You can also update a part - see Placing Parts.

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Saving Documents
This task contains recommendations on saving your documents. Ways in which documents are saved are explained in the Infrastructure User's Guide - Creating, Opening and Saving Documents. You must read that documentation because the various methods are not explained here. This task simply suggests the methodology you should follow in specific circumstances. 1. If you are saving a document to a local machine or network drive it is recommended that you use the "Save Management" command initially. The Propagate Directory command (which is in the Save Management dialog box) should not be used routinely. It is meant to be used in specific circumstances, such as when you want to place all the contents of a document in one directory before sending it to another location. If you are saving a document to another site or network you should use the "Send To" command. In this case, you should be careful about the links for documents such as resolved parts folder or line ID. These links could change to reflect the local network drive to which the documents have been sent. You should make sure they point to the original location - using the Reset button in the Save Management dialog box is one way of doing this. You should check the active document before you execute the Save command . The root product must be the active document if you want to save everything under it.

2.

3.

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User Tasks
The tasks for creating documents using the Piping Design product are explained here. Managing Piping Lines Routing Runs Modifying Runs Connecting Elements Manipulating Objects Query/modify properties of an object Placing & Modifying a Piping Part Flow Direction Managing Spools Analyzing Networks Routing Tasks Building Piping Parts Using ENOVIA Creating and Modifying Connectors Transferring a Document to Another Site Migrating V4 Models to V5 Creating an Isometric Drawing Drawing Production Schematic Driven Design Penetration Management Usage Hole Placement Working with Bendables Computed Attributes

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Managing Piping Lines


The following section explains ways of managing piping lines. Also see the Customizing section for information about Line ID catalogs. Creating a Line ID Renaming a Line ID Select/Filter Line IDs Deleting a Line ID Importing Line IDs Modify the Properties of a Line ID Querying a Line ID or its Members Transfer Members of a Line ID Merging Line IDs

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Creating a Line ID
This task describes how to create a line ID. You need to create a line ID before you can begin routing and placing components and equipment. A line ID is a mechanism for identifying and organizing piping segments and the components and equipment you place in them. When you create a line ID you also assign characteristics; material, size, pressure attributes, heat tolerance and so on. The line ID displays in the specifications tree as an organizational element. The routes you create and the components you place under it, will appear in the specifications tree and will also display as a 3D image. The Line ID will appear in the specifications tree with the name you assigned it. Each run segment you route will show as ArrRunX, X being a unique number assigned in sequence. Components and equipment will show as YYYFunction.X, YYY being a component name and X being a unique number, i.e. PumpFunction.1. To store line IDs that you create, the default directory as defined in the Project Management resources must be set for read/write file permission. Contact your system administrator to add line IDs or directories for line lists. Also see the Customizing section for information about Line ID catalogs. 1. Click the Create Line ID button . The Create Line ID dialog box displays.

Enter the name for your new piping line in the Line ID field or you can accept the default name by clicking Set to default. 3. The Line ID Filename field is only available if you have set an option. Click Tools - Options, select Equipment and Systems and the Design Criteria field, and check the option User Defined Filename. To explain what this is, every time you create a line ID, this application creates a system file for it. Normally this file is named in such a way that users cannot recognize it. If you want to give this file your own name then enter it in this field. 4. Click the Properties button to open the Properties dialogue box. Click the Piping tab and assign properties to the Line ID you are creating. You may enter all known characteristics for the new piping segment but at a minimum you must assign values for Nominal size and Pipe specification properties. 5. Click Apply - you can create more line IDs if you want to. Click OK to end.

2.

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Renaming a Line ID
This task shows you how to rename a Line ID. 1. Click the Rename Line ID button line IDs. . The Rename Line ID dialog box opens showing the list of

2. 3.

If you want to search for other line IDs, scroll through the list or enter a keyword in the Filter String field. Select the line ID you want to rename. The Rename dialog box displays.

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4.

5.

The box will display a name in the Default ID field. This name is based on preferences set by your system administrator. To use this name click the Set to default button. To use a different name enter it in the ID field. Click OK. Click OK again in the Rename Line ID box. The line ID will be renamed.

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Select/Filter Line IDs


This task shows you how to select a line ID or its members, and to filter for line IDs. Piping lines are used in the illustration below - the process is the same for other types of line. You can edit the properties of line IDs or their members after selecting them. You must make some setup changes if you want to see all properties of a line. See Displaying Line ID Properties in a Catalog to learn how to do it. 1. Click the Select/Query Line ID button . The Select/Query Line ID dialog box displays.

2. Use the Sort and Filter options if you need to. Under Filter, select the Local option if you only want to filter line IDs in the document. Select All if you want to filter all line IDs available to you. Use of the Filter Attributes button is explained below. 3. If you are selecting members then select Line ID Members under Selection Type. If you want to select a line ID then select Line ID.

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4. Click to select a line ID in the Line ID list or click on one of the members. Either the line ID or the members will be selected, depending on the selection you made in Step 2.

5. Click the Filter Attributes button is you want to filter for line IDs. The Line Attribute Filter dialog box displays.

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6.

Click the drop down arrow in the Attributes field to select a property. Name is selected in the image above. Click the drop down arrow in the Operators field to select an operator. Most are obvious, such as == (equal to) or > (greater than). the operator *= means you are using a wild card. If you select this operator and enter U8 in the Values field then the function will filter for all lines beginning with U8. Select or enter a value in the Values field. This is the value that the function will filter for. Click Add when you have defined your query to add it to the Composed Query window. The And/Or buttons let you further refine your search. You can click the And button to add another query to your search. Clicking the Eraser button removes a query from the Composed Query window. The Filter String field allows you to enter a line ID name - you can use wild cards.

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Deleting a Line ID
This task shows you how to delete a Line ID. 1. Click the Delete Line ID button IDs contained in your document. . The Delete Line ID dialog box displays showing all the line

2. 3.

Select the line ID that you want to delete. (When you select a line ID all members that belong to it are highlighted.) If the line ID you selected has any members a message will display alerting you that all members belonging to that line ID will be deleted.

4.

Click OK. The line ID and all its members will be deleted.

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Only line IDs contained in your document will be deleted. The same line ID used in other documents will not be deleted unless you open those documents and follow the steps given above.

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Importing Line IDs

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This task shows how to import and/or update Piping Line IDs. The Import Line ID feature offers the user the utility of importing line IDs from existing databases in other CAD software products. The Update feature allows you to update the properties of existing line IDs with properties contained in an XML import file. Installation of the Document Type Definition (DTD) and knowledge of XML are prerequisite to using this feature. The file format for the Line ID XML Import File resides in the DTD. The location of the DTD and sample XML file is platform dependent. In Windows the path for the DTD is ...\intel_a\startup\EquipmentAndSystems\Piping\SampleData\PlantShipLineIDImport.dtd. For the XML file, the path is ...\intel_a\startup\EquipmentAndSystems\Piping\SampleData\PipingLineIDImportsample.xml. The paths for the other platforms are identical with the exception of the platform identifier. Shown below are the platforms with their respective identifiers.
q

Windows: ...\win_a\ AIX: .../aix_a/ HPUX: .../hpux_a/ IRIX: .../irix_a/ SOLARIS: .../solaris_a/

In all cases, copy the PlantShipLineIDImport.dtd and the PipingLineIDImportsample.xml file to a local directory with 'write access'. In the following scenario both the sample XML file and the DTD have been copied to a user Temp directory. A portion of the sample XML file is shown below:

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Be alert to any line IDs you have created as well as the line IDs you will be importing. The properties of existing line IDs will be updated (replaced) with properties of line IDs of the same name upon import. The path for your line IDs is preset under Project Resource Management.

1. 2.

Click the Import Line ID button . The Line ID Import/Update dialog box opens. Click to open the file. This will cause the subroutine to run which will generate the line IDs from the XML file. Note that under Files of type, only XML files may be displayed and opened.

3.

When the routine is complete, the Results Summary will display.

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Click View output file to view the Line ID Import/Update Report for the sample case below.

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5. You can verify that the new line IDs have been imported by clicking the Select/Query Line ID button dialog box opens showing the updated and imported line IDs. . The Select/Query Line ID

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Modifying the Properties of a Line ID


This task shows you how to modify the properties of a line ID. 1. With your document open, click the Select/Query Line ID button . The Selecting Line IDs dialog box displays, showing all the line IDs contained in your document.

2. 3. 4. 5.

Select the line ID whose properties you want to modify. Under Selection Type select Line ID. Click the Properties button. The Properties dialog box will display. Click on the Piping tab. Enter your changes for the attributes and click OK.

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Querying a Line ID or its Members


This task shows you how to query a Line ID. When you query a line ID you are asking which members belong to it. When you query a member you are asking which line ID it belongs to. 1.

Click the Select/Query Line ID button

. The Select/Query Line ID dialog box appears.

2.

3.

Use the Sort and Filter options if you need to. Under Filter, select the Local option if you only want to filter line IDs in the document. Select All if you want to filter all line IDs available to you. The Filter String field allows you to enter a line ID name - you can use wild cards. Clicking the Filter Attributes button brings up the Line Attribute Filter dialog box. See Select/Filter Line IDs to learn more about filtering. To perform a query on a line ID click on the line ID in the Filtered Line ID List. The members of that line ID will be highlighted in the document. To query a member click on it in the document. All members that belong to the same line ID will be highlighted and the line ID will be highlighted in the dialog box.

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Transfer Members of a Line ID


This task shows how to transfer members of one line ID to another line ID. 1. With your document open, click the Transfer Line ID button . The Transfer Members of Line IDs dialog box opens. Click on the Local in the Scope field to see all the line IDs contained in your document. If you click on All, you will see all the line IDs available.

2. 3. 4. 5.

Select the line ID that you want to transfer a member to. (When you select a line ID, all members that belong to it are highlighted.) Click on the member that you want to transfer. It will be transferred to the line ID you had selected. You can also use a feature called multi-select to transfer several members at a time. To do this: Select the members you want to transfer by clicking and dragging. They will change color once selected. Click on the Transfer Line ID button . The Transfer Members of Line IDs dialog box opens.

6.

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7.

Select the line ID to which you want to transfer the members. You will be alerted that you are about to transfer the members.

8. Click OK. The members will be transferred. The line ID and member must be compatible for the transfer to take place.

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Merging Line IDs


This task shows you how to merge the members of one line ID into another line ID 1. With your document open, click the Merge Line ID button showing all the line IDs contained in your document. . The Merge Line IDs dialog box displays

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2.

Select the line ID you want to merge. All members that belong to that line ID will be selected. The lower field will display the line IDs to which it can be merged.

Select the line ID into which you want to merge and click OK. All members of the first line ID will merge into the line ID you selected, and the first line ID will be deleted. You cannot merge incompatible line IDs. Also, members of a line ID that is merged into another will assume the properties of the line ID into which it is merged. 3.

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Routing Runs
Routing runs, including routing runs in special circumstances, are explained here. Routing a Run Routing with Defined Nodes Routing from the End of a Routable Branching a Run Routing a Run at a Slope Auto-route Between Equipment Route a Run Within a Pathway Routing from an Item Reservation Display Information About Routables Checking Turn Radius Errors

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Routing a Run
This task shows you how to create a run. You can begin routing a run from: q Space.
q

An object, such as a tube. The end of a run or middle of a run. A point. Connectors. Item reservation face.

Design rules affect the way runs are routed. For instance, the turn radius of a run of a given nominal size is determined by the design rules. A sample set of design rules is included with this application, but most users (administrators, not individual users) will add to or modify them. Some ways in which rules affect run creation are explained below. See Rules Overview to find out which rules affected run creation. Also see Customizing - Standards and Design Rules - Modifying Design Rules for more information.

1. Click the Route a Run button The Run dialog box is displayed. .

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2.

If the Schematic Driven option is set then the Schematic Browser will also display. This option is controlled from the Design Criteria tab - click Tools - Options, select Equipment & Systems, and select the Design Criteria tab. A Multiple Rule dialog box may also display. This is explained below and in the Design Rules section. Define the routing mode for the run:

Point-to-point: routing will be directly between two points indicated by clicking.

Orthogonal: routing between two points will proceed first in the X direction, then in the Y direction.

Slope routing: see Slope Routing.

Directional routing: see Routing with a Compass.

Edgeline: see Edgeline Routing.

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Branch at Center: see Branching a Run. In addition, if you place the compass on an object the Use Compass Origin button will display. If you click the button and start to route the route will start from the compass origin. If you are in the middle of routing, the compass origin will serve as a routing point. Click one of the Select Mode buttons - the default is No Filter. The Select Mode buttons allow you to define where you can start routing from.

No Filter: No filters are applied and you can route from any routable object or in space.

In Space: Routing will be in space. This is useful when you have a large object in the background, such as a ship structure, and you want to be able to route in space.

Only Part Connectors: Select this to be able to route from part or equipment connectors only.

Import Node Points: This allows you to route using predefined node points. See Routing with Defined Nodes for more information. Section dimensions, Turn radius and Minimum length fields display the values given to the Line ID being used. Click the Section icon. The Display buttons allow you to select a display mode of Line/Curve or Solid. Click the Display Centerline button to show the centerline of the run. This will appear as a dashed yellow line. In addition a blue line will appear to display the Set Point setting. This feature works in both the Line/Curve and Solid display modes.

When defining Section parameters the section Types that are available depend on which workbench you are in. For example, Piping Design, Tubing Design and Conduit Design use only the round section while Systems Routing (shown below) offers all section types.

3.

Define the Section parameters:

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a. Select the Section Type button. The Section dialog box is displayed.

b. Define the section type and corresponding parameters for each of them:

No Section

Rectangular. Enter or select the:


q

Set Point Envelope Height Envelope Width Display

Circular. Enter or select the:


q

Set Point Envelope Diameter

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Display

Flat Oval: Enter or select the:


q

Set Point Envelope Height Envelope Width Display

Radius Corner: Enter or select the:


q

Set Point Envelope Height Envelope Width Radius Corner Display

Double Ridge: Enter or select the:


q

Set Point Envelope Height Envelope Width Display

The Envelope field refers to the total work area needed. The section diameter is obtained from the line ID and equals the size of the pipe or tube you will place in the run. The envelope diameter includes additional space need for pipe insulation, etc. In the case of a round section the value is obtained from the Outside Diameter column of the XXXDimension design table.

c. Select OK on the Section dialog box.

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Instead of entering the type of run, the set point and the height, width or diameter in the Section dialog box, you can select an existing run in your document. Once selected, the Section dialog box will display the values for that run. To select, click on the Run button and then click on the run whose values you want as the default. Make sure the entire run is selected - not just a segment or a node. It will be easier to select the run in the specifications tree.

4.

if you want to use the intelligent design capabilities Click the Press to use rule button incorporated in the application. When you do this the turn radius and minimum length are governed by the nominal size you select - you will not be able to enter a different value. The nominal size is displayed in the menu bar, along with the Line ID to which the run will belong and the Specification. The turn radius and minimum length for that nominal size are in turn governed by the rules tables. If there is more than one attribute, such as turn radius, associated with that nominal size then you will be prompted to select one and the Multiple Rule dialog box will display. In the example below you can select from four possible options to define the bend radius of a run. You will still be able to override the bend definition on a specific node of a run. If the nominal size you select does not exist in the turn rule table then an elbow will be placed at the turns.

NominalSize: This is the nominal size you selected in the menubar. BendRadius: Also known as turn radius. This is the turn radius of the run and the different values displayed are taken from the Turn Rules design table. If the value is 0 then the application will calculate it as explained below.

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DiameterFactor: The diameter factor is a value used to calculate the turn radius of the run if no value for the Bend Radius attribute for a given nominal size is entered in the Turn Rules design table. The diameter factor multiplied by the Bend Diameter provides the turn radius of the run. (The Bend Diameter value is obtained from the Tube Dimension design table.) It is this calculated figure that will show in the Run dialog box. The application first determines if there is a value for a given nominal size in the Bend Radius column of the Turn Rules design table. If there is a value it will use that value. If there is no value then it will calculate it as explained above. NumberofMiterCuts: If the value is other than 0 then your elbows will be mitered. The number of miters will equal the value shown in the column plus 1. See Modifying Design Rules and Creating a Line ID for more information.

5.

If you decide not to use the rules then enter values for the minimum length and turn radius.

If you enter a minimum length or turn radius you will not be able to route correctly unless these values are satisfied. For instance, if you enter a minimum length of 10 feet, you will not be able to complete a segment that is 5 feet. In the illustration below, the green line shows the minimum segment length that will be created, even if you try to make a shorter segment, because the minimum length you entered is longer than the segment you are now trying to create. Similarly, if you enter a value for the turn radius, your run will automatically be adjusted to satisfy the defined turn radius.

6.

Click in the drawing to define the routing points. If you want the application to show you possible paths between two objects, then select your beginning and end points and click the Display Alternate Path button possible paths: . The first click displays a field showing the number of . Subsequent clicks show the actual paths.

7 Once you have a route you want to accept, click OK or the Create the Run button and the run will be created. If you click the button you can select another run. If you click OK you will exit the command. Click Cancel to abort your routing. You can also double-click on the last point to stop routing. In this case you will not be able to alternative paths.

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8. Click on the Close Loop symbol that shows at the beginning of the run if you want to create a closed loop run. In a closed loop run the ends of the run are joined. 9. When starting a run from a part, a run that is a continuation of an existing run, or if branching from an existing run use the following buttons as needed:

from.

Get Line ID from Selection: gets the line ID from the run or part you are routing

Get Line Size/Spec from Selection: gets the size and spec from the run or part you are routing from.

10. The Change to Schematic Mode button lets you toggle between schematic and nonschematic mode. You will exit the command when you click this button and need to click the Route Run command again.

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Routing with Defined Nodes


This task shows you how to route a run with predefined node points. You can create a run by predefining the node points. This means you do not need to route the run by clicking the mouse pointer in the 3D window, as explained below. See Routing a Run for basic information.

1.

Create a text file, using a text editor like Wordpad, with column headings as shown below, and define the node sequence, X/Y/Z coordinates and bend radius of the node points. A sample file is provided with this application to help you define the text file. The file name is RunInputNodeData.txt and the location is: ...intel_a\startup\EquipmentandSystems\MultiDiscipline\SampleData. The file is reproduced below to show you the column headings and layout. (It has been opened in Excel to make it easier to distinguish columns.

You can see that there are two sets of node numbers, ranging from 1 to 4. Whenever the application reads the node number 1 it will start a new run. So, based on the file above, two runs will be created.

2.

Open the Run dialog box and click the Import Node Points button . The File Selection dialog box displays. Navigate to the location of your file and select it. The runs will be created.

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Routing from the End of a Routable


This task explains how to route from the end of a routable. If you route an element with the same type and parameter values as the "source" element (i.e., the element from which the routable is routed), you can specify whether the new element is a continuation of the source element or a separate element. If you want to use the "Continue" option, be sure that the parent for the source element is active before you begin.

1. Select the Route a Run button The Routing dialog box is displayed. .

2. Define the routing parameters. See Routing a Run for instructions.

3. Move the pointer to the end from which you want to route. When a green arrow appears, click and begin to route. Double click to end routing.

4. Once you begin routing the following buttons are added to the Routing dialog box:

Continue Routing: If you select this the run you create will be part of the run from which you are routing.

Create New Route: If you select this the run you create will be a new run.

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5. When starting a run that is a continuation of an existing run, a branch from an existing run, or routing from an object or equipment (nozzle) use either or both of the following buttons as applicable:

Get Size/Spec from Selection: If you select this button the run you create will be a new run but will assume the size and specification attributes of the run or object you are routing from.

Get Line ID from Selection: If you select this button the run you create will assume the same line ID as the run or object from which you are routing. If you de-select it, the new run will belong to the line ID displayed in the menu bar.

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Branching a Run
This task explains how to branch a run from any of these elements: q Another run
q

Boundary Contour Pathway

If the "source" element (i.e., the element from which the run branches) is moved or resized, the run is adjusted accordingly. 1. With your document open, select the Route a Run button. The Routing dialog box is displayed. Define the parameters for the run. See Routing a Run for instructions. Select the element from which you want to route the run and begin routing.

2.

3. 4.

If you want to branch from the center of the segment, click the Branch at Center button in the Run dialog box. The branch will begin from the center of the segment, irrespective of the point in the segment that you route from. If you want to create a run that "branches" from the end of a run, see Routing from the End of a Routable.

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Routing a Run at a Slope


This task shows you how to route a run at a slope. 1. At the point in your run at which you want to slope it click the Slope button box. Enter the degrees of slope you want. in the Run dialog

2.

3. 4. Click the Section button and enter data about the type and size of run. Continue creating your run. Click once to define the ending point of a segment. Click twice to end the run.

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Auto-route Between Equipment


This task shows you how to auto-route a run between two pieces of equipment or two connectors. 1. 2. 3. 4. Make the appropriate element (area, system or line) active by double-clicking in the specifications tree. Place the two pieces of equipment you want to connect on your area. Click on the Route a Run button and enter parameters in the dialog box that displays. Move the cursor to the first equipment - an arrow displays at the connector point. If the equipment has more than one connector point the arrow will display at different points as you move your cursor.

5. 6. 7.

Click to select the starting point of the run. Move the cursor to the second equipment, where the arrow will also display, and click to select the ending point of the run. The run is created over the shortest possible path. Press the shift key to see other possible routes for the run between the two objects.

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This task shows you how to route a run within a pathway.

1. 2. 3.

With your pathway model open, click the Route Thru a Pathway button

. The Run dialog box opens.

Click the Section button to open the Section dialog box. Select the type of run, the set point and other options. Click on the pathway in which you want to route your run. This displays set points on the pathway. Select a position for the run by clicking on one of the points. For example, if you select Top Center the run will align to the top center of the pathway. You can click Apply in the Run dialog box to see how the run looks and to try different positions. Click OK when you are finished.

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Routing from an Item Reservation


This task shows you how to route from an item reservation. Click the Route a Run button. 1. 2. Click on the face of the item reservation from which you want to route. 3. Begin routing.

The point on the item reservation face from which the run will start depends on the set point of the run. In the illustration above the set point is set at Center Center. If the set point was set at Bottom Center the run would have started at the bottom center edge of the item reservation. To change the set point, button in the Run dialog box and select the Set Point from the drop click on the Section Type down list in the Section dialog box that displays.

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Display Information About Routables


This task shows you how to display information about routables. This feature works only when you are performing an action with a routable, such as placing a part, branching a run or creating an offset route. To display more detailed information see Generating Detail Information. Go to Tools - Options, select Equipment & Systems and select the Display tab. Click to activate 1. 2. Analysis Mode. Place the pointer over the run. If a segment is highlighted you will see the length displayed. If a node is highlighted, the angle between two adjacent segments, the coordinates of the node, and the bend radius (if there is one) will be displayed. Click the button again if you do not want to see the information.

3.

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Checking Turn Radius Errors


This task shows you how to check your document for turn errors. This command determines if any of the turns have values that are in violation of the parameters as defined in the Turn Design Rule. See also Using the Definition Dialog Box. 1. With your document open click the Validate Run Turns button . The Validate Run Turns dialog box displays.

If a run is already selected it will display in the window. 2.Select one of the options: q Current selection lets you select runs in your document.
q

All runs under the active parent in the specifications tree. All runs created under a particular Line.

3.After you make your selection, the runs will display in the window in the Turn Rule Used column with their status indicated by a YES or NO - NO means one or more turns in that run does not conform to the turn rules.

If you click the Select All NO button then all runs that are in violation of the turn rules will be selected.

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4.Select the run you want to validate in the dialog box window - the run will highlight in the viewer. Click the Run Details button to see information about the run in the Run Details dialog box.

If you want to reset some of the turns in a run then select them in the Run Details dialog box and click the Reset Run . The turn radius for the selected turns will be reset according to the design rules. If the line has more Turns button than one turn radius or diameter factor then the Multiple Rule Found dialog box will display. Select one of the values - it will apply to the selected turns. 5.If you want to reset all the turns in a run then select the run in the Validate Run Turns dialog box and click the Reset Run Turns button. (If the line has more than one turn radius or diameter factor then the Multiple Rule Found dialog box will display. Select one of the values.) All turns in the run will be reset according to the design rule.

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Modifying Runs
Runs can be modified in the following ways. Using the Definition Dialog Box Changing a Section Changing the Angle of a Segment Moving Nodes Align Adjacent Segments Make Segment Parallel to Reference Plane Make Segment Parallel to Compass Base Plane Make Segment Parallel to Z Axis Fit Segment for Parts Assembly Position Segment Relative to a Plane Create an Offset Connection Between Segments Create a Closed Loop Run Open a Closed Run Adjust Extremities of a Run Transfer Run to Another Document

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Using the Definition Dialog Box


This task gives you an overview of the definition dialog box. You can make modifications to a routable using the functions contained in this box. Specific task-oriented modifications are explained elsewhere in this section. You should be familiar with the concepts explained in Routing a Run to be able to take full advantage of these functions. Note that some applications, like Systems Routing, do not utilize design rules and the norule conditions apply to them. 1. Right click on a routable and, in the drop down menus that display, select the routable (in this case Run-0049 object) and then Definition.

2. This brings up the Definition dialog box.

3. The Name field allows you to change the routable's instance name. 4. The Section button lets you change section parameters, as explained in Routing a Run. 5. Click one of the Turn Type buttons if you want to change the turn type. q No Turn: The turn radius for all turns is changed to 0. The Turn Radius field is not displayed.
q

Uniform Turn: All turns in the run have the same turn radius. Mixed Turn: Turns in the run can have different turn radius.

6. The Press to Use Rule button indicates if you are using the design rules. In the image above it is on, which is why the Turn Radius and Minimum Length fields are grayed out. You can click the button to go to a no-rule state, in which case the Turn Radius and Minimum Length fields will no longer be grayed out. See Routing a Run for more information.

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7. The Display Error Report button is green when there is no error in the run. It turns red when you insert a value or make some other change to cause an error. Click the button to display a report. This error function checks to make sure that the turn radius and minimum length conform to the design rule. 8. The Turn Radius field displays the turn radius. To change it you need to display the Node Definition dialog box (see Moving Nodes) and enter a value. If you introduce an invalid turn radius, by entering a value in the Node Definition dialog box, then the Display Error Report button will turn red. (You can also introduce a turn radius error by shortening the length of one or both segments.) A red arc will also display on your run. The ends of the arc are the minimum point to which each segment should be routed for a valid turn. In the example below, the segment is not long enough to support the turn radius value entered by the user.

9. The Node Edit Table button displays a table containing node values - see Moving Nodes. 10. The Minimum Length field displays the minimum length of each segment. You cannot change the value in this field if you are using design rules. 11. The Total Length field displays the total length of the run. You cannot change the value in this field.

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Changing a Section
This task explains how to change parameters that control how the section of an element is displayed. 1. Place your cursor over the element and click the right mouse button. 2.

From the pull-down menu, select the element or object you want to modify and select Definition. The Run Definition dialog box is displayed.

3. Click the Section button to set the desired section shape to No section, Rectangle, Round, Flat Oval, Radius Corner or Double Ridge.

When defining the Section parameters the section Types that are available depend on which workbench you are in. For example, Piping Design, Tubing Design and Conduit Design use only the round section while Systems Routing offers all section types. 4.

If you select Rectangular Section, you can define or change these parameters: q Set Point
q

Height Width Display

If you select Round Section, you can define or change these parameters:
q

Set Point Diameter Display

If you select Flat Oval Section, you can define or change these parameters:
q

Set Point Height Width Display

If you select Radius Corner Section, you can define or change these parameters:
q

Set Point Height Width

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Display Radius Corner

If you select Double Ridge Section, you can define or change these parameters:
q

Set Point Height Width Display

5. Click OK on the Section dialog box and OK on the Definition box to complete the change..

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Changing the Angle of a Segment


This task shows you how to change the angle of a pathway, boundary, or run segment. 1. Place your cursor over the element and click the right mouse button. 2. From the pull-down menu, select the element, or object, you want to modify and select Definition. The Run Definition dialog box is displayed. 3. Place the cursor over the support line for that element and click the right mouse button. 4. Select Definition from the pop-menu. The Segment Definition dialog box is displayed. 5. Specify a new value for the Turn Angle. A line is displayed in the drawing to show the new position for the segment. 6. Select OK on the Segment Definition dialog box. 7. Select OK on the Run Definition dialog box to complete the change. 8. To align a section's normal with the compass Z axis: q Bring up the Definition box for the section.
q

Place the compass on a 3-D element and adjust the Z axis to the angle you want. Right click on the segment. A pop-up menu will show. Click on Rotate section to compass Z direction. The normal of the section will rotate to align with the Z axis, as shown in the image below.

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Moving or Deleting a Node


This task shows you how to move the nodes on a path reservation, boundary, or run. In the example below a node will be moved in a pipe run. 1. 2. Place your mouse pointer over the element and click the right mouse button. From the menu that displays, select the element you want to modify, in this case pipe run.1 object, and select the Definition option. This will bring up the Definition dialog box. Symbols are displayed on the pipe run to show the location of nodes: asterisks represent non-connected nodes, and Os (circles) represent connected nodes.

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3.

To move a node by entering coordinates, do one of the following: q Right-click the node symbol and select Definition from the pop-up menu. The Node Definition dialog box displays.

Key in new values for X, Y, or Z. Click OK in the Node Definition dialog box.

4.

OR Bring up the (run) Definition dialog box and click the Node Edit Table button to display the Node Edit Table and make changes to values in the table. To move the node using the cursor, place the cursor over the node symbol and drag it to a new location. See below.

A line is displayed to show the new location for the segment.

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5.

Click OK in the Definition dialog box to complete the change.

A node will move parallel to the compass base plane, which is normally XY. To move a node vertical to the base, change the compass base to the XZ plane. 6. To move a node parallel to the compass Z axis. q Bring up the Definition box for the routable.
q

Place the compass on a 3-D object where it can be manipulated. Change the Z axis to the desired direction. Click on the square around the node and move it with the mouse button depressed. It will only move parallel to the compass Z axis. If you click on the node itself you will be able to move it in any direction.

7.

To move a node of a routable to the origin of the compass. This allows you to move the compass to a specific point on a routable or resource, and then move the node to it. To do this: q Bring up the Definition box for the routable which has the node you want to move.
q

Move the compass to the point where you want the node to move. Bring up the Definition box for the node that will be moved.

Click the Compass Origin button in the image.

. The node will move to the compass base, as shown

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8.

To delete a node right-click on the node and select Delete Node from the pop-up menu that displays.

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Align Adjacent Segments


This task shows you how to align adjacent segments which have become out of alignment. Segments can get out of alignment when a node is moved in a non-planar manner. In the illustration below the joints marked in red have been moved out of alignment.

1. 2. 3.

Bring up the Definition dialog box for the run. Right click on the segment half closest to the misaligned joint. If more than one joint is misaligned click on a segment half closest to one of the end joints. A drop down menu will appear. Click on Align adjacent segments in the drop down menu. All segments will align beginning at the joint closest to the segment handle you selected. Segments will align in one direction only. If there are other misaligned segments in the run then you may have to repeat the operation.

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Make Segment Parallel to Reference Plane


This task shows you how to make a segment of a run parallel to a reference plane. You can place the Offset Plane on a surface to make it the reference plane, and then make a segment of a run parallel to the reference plane. In the illustration below, a reference plane will be placed on a face of the item reservation, and a segment made parallel to it.

1. Click on the Offset Plane button and then on the face where you want to place it. A square

shows on the face. 2. Bring up the Definition dialog box for the run. 3. Bring up the Definition dialog box again, this time for the segment half you are interested in. See note below. Each segment is divided into two halves, which become visible when you bring up the Definition dialog box for the run. It is important to select the segment half correctly because the segment will pivot at the node closest to the segment half you select.

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4. Click on the Reference Plane button in the Segment Definition dialog box. The segment will pivot - at the node closest to the segment half you selected - to become parallel with the reference plane.

In the illustration above, the portion in red was the segment half selected. If the half to the left of it had been selected then the segment would have pivoted at the node to the left of it, as shown below.

5.

Click OK and then OK again in the Definition dialog box.

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Make Segment Parallel to Compass Base Plane


This task shows you how to make a segment of a run parallel to the compass base plane. Also see Make segment parallel to reference plane. 1. Drag the compass and place it on the surface to which you want to align the segment.

2. 3.

Bring up the Definition dialog box for the run. Bring up the Definition dialog box again, this time for the segment half you are interested in. See note below. Each segment is divided into two halves, which become visible when you bring up the Definition dialog box for the run. It is important to select the correct half, because the segment will pivot at the node closest to the segment half you select. 4. Click on the Compass Base Plane button. The segment will pivot - at the node closest to the segment half you selected - to become parallel with the reference plane.

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In the illustration above, the portion in red was the segment half selected. If the half to the left of it had been selected then the segment would have pivoted at the node to the left of it, as shown below.

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Make Segment Parallel to Z Axis


This task shows you how to make a segment of a run parallel to the compass Z axis. See also Make Segment Parallel to Reference Plane. 1. Drag the compass and place it with the Z axis pointing in the direction with which you want to make the segment parallel. 2. Bring up the Definition dialog box for the run. 3. Bring up the Definition dialog box again, this time for the segment half you are interested in. See note below. Each segment is divided into two halves, which become visible when you bring up the Definition dialog box for the run. It is important to select the correct half, because the segment will pivot at the node closest to the segment half you select. 4. Click on the Compass Z Direction button. The segment will pivot - at the node closest to the segment half you selected - to become parallel with the Z axis of the compass. NOTE: Place the compass carefully because segments also have a directional relationship to the compass. The node that pivots will parallel the base of the compass. The node at the other end will parallel the Z vector.

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Fit Segment for Parts Assembly


This task shows you how to adjust a segment for parts assembly purposes. It can be used to move one part next to another, or to place two bends next to each other to create a U. In this example the segment half to the right will be shortened so that the elbow is placed against the tee. 1. Bring up the Definition dialog box for the routable.

2.

Right-click on the segment half that you want to shorten. A drop down menu will display.

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3.

Click Adjust to fit. The elbow will move flush against the tee.

The same command can be used to create a U. If you have a segment with bends at the two ends and you use the command described above, the segment will shorten so that the two bends are adjacent. It will not work if there are no bends.

If you have two connected parts, like a valve and a flange, and you want to move both after they have been placed, select both first. Then, when you move any one part both will move together.

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Position a Segment Relative to Plane or Another Segment


This task shows you how to position a routable segment so that it is a defined distance away from a reference plane or from another segment. This function can be used to make a segment clear an existing structure or in situations where it is necessary to position a segment a specified distance from another object or segment. See also Edgeline Routing. 1. In the example below, the routable is colliding with the beam. The task is to move the segment up so that it passes just over the beam.

2. Place the offset plane on top of the beam and bring up the Definition dialog box for the routable. Right-click on the segment you want to move. A drop down menu will display. Select Offset segment.

3.

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4.

Select Offset segment. The Offset segment dialog box will appear.

5.

Select Make segment parallel to reference plane and then select one of the buttons, Outside edge to reference plane or Center line to reference plane. See Step 9 to offset to another segment.

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6.

Enter a distance in the Offset field. If you enter 0 the routable will be placed on top of the beam if you have selected Outside edge to reference plane. If you select Center line to reference plane then entering 0 in the Offset field will place the center line of the routable on top of the beam. Click the Offset to far side or Offset to near side button. These buttons will place the routable on either side of the reference plane. Click Preview if you want to preview, then click OK and then OK again in the Definition dialog box. The run segment will be placed on top of the beam.

7.

8.

9.

To position a segment a certain distance from another segment, select the Offset to another segment option and click the segment to which you want to offset. Click one of the three buttons: Outside edge to outside edge, Center line to center line or Center line to outside edge.

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Creating an Offset Connection Between Segments


This task shows you how to create an offset connection between two segments. Creating this connection makes a master-slave relationship between the two and maintains a fixed distance between them. If you create the connection only between two segments, the two will maintain the offset if you move one. But other segments of the slave routable may change in length to allow the offset to be maintained between the two segments that have a connection. If you do not want this to happen you can create a connection between the other segments too. 1. Click the Create an offset segment connection button . The Run dialog box displays.

2. Select the segment you want to be the slave. The first segment you select becomes the slave, while the second becomes the master. 3. Select the second segment. The compass displays and you can see a connector line between the two.

4. Enter the offset distance and select your offset between options in the Run box. You can choose to have the offset connection between the:
q

Outside edge to outside edge Centerline to centerline Outside edge to centerline

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5. To create a connection between other segments of the same two routables select other segments in the same sequence given above. 6. Click OK. The connections will be created. 7. To modify the connection, select the slave run, click the Create offset segment connection button , select the slave segment and enter your changes. 8. To delete offset connections select the slave routable, right click, then click on the line corresponding to the routable and click Delete offset connections. All connections between the two routables will be deleted.

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Create a Closed Loop Run


This task shows you how to modify an existing run in order to create a closed loop run. In a closed loop run the ends of the run are joined. There are two ways of turning an existing run into a closed loop run. Both are explained below. 1. Click on the Route a Run 2. Click the Continue Routing button in the Run dialog box. 3. Click on the other end of the run when finished. The ends of the run will join . 4. In the second method, right-click on the run and, in the drop down box that appears, click on the line that describes the run, in this case Run.1 Object. 5. Another drop down menu will display. Click on Close Route. button and continue routing from the end of the run.

6. The two ends of the run will join. An open end run and closed loop run are shown below.

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Open a Closed Run


This task shows you how to open a closed run. You can only open a closed run at a node. 1. Bring up the Definition dialog box for the run. 2. Click the right mouse button on the node where you want the run to be opened. This will display a drop down box.

3. Click on Open. The run will open at the node.

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Adjust the Extremity of a Run


This task shows you how to move or adjust the extremity of a run. You can use two methods to move the extremities of a run. One utilizes the Definition dialog box. The other uses the Adjust Run Extremity command. Both are described here. 1. To adjust using the Definition dialog box, right click on the segment whose extremity you want to adjust. From the menu, select the object, in this case 'Run2.1 object' and then select Definition. The run will be highlighted as shown below and the Definition dialog box will open.

2. Click and drag the connector symbol at the end of the section to reposition it. The image below shows the repositioned extremity. Notice that the Total length in the Definition dialog box has changed to reflect the adjusted length.

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3. Click Apply and OK. The run will now extend to the selected position.

4. The other method uses the Adjust Run Extremity command. With your document open, click the Adjust Run Extremity button . The Adjust Run Extremity dialog box displays.

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5. Select the run extremity you want to adjust. The run is highlighted and the Adjust Options become available.

6. Click the down arrow in the Adjust Options field and select one of the options. You can: q Move to connector: Move the extremity to a connector.
q

Move to point: Move it to a point on a part or equipment. You see the points as you move your pointer over the part. Move to x ,y, z coordinate: Move to a specific coordinate. Enter the coordinates in the fields that display. Move to run and keep alignment: Move to another run - the extremity is moved to that plane, not connected. Move to part and keep alignment: Move to a part - the extremity is moved to that plane, not connected.

7. Click OK to end.

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Transfer Run to Another Document


This task shows you how to transfer a run to another document. You can use this function to transfer a run to documents or work packages that are under the same Product. See also Transfer Elements to New Document. This command will only work if you do not have any parts placed on the run. 1. The image below shows a run in the document "Product4.1". You want to move it to the document Product3.1.

2. Click the Transfer Run button . The Transfer Run dialog displays and you are prompted to select the run you want to transfer. 3. Select the run, at which time the Apply and OK buttons in the Transfer Run dialog box become available.

4. Click on the down arrow in the File name field to see documents that are directly under the top level product. Select the document you want to transfer the run to in this list or in the specifications tree. NOTE: If you have a third level document you will need to select it in the specifications tree.

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5. Click Apply or OK. The run is transferred to the document you selected.

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Connecting Elements
This task explains how to connect and disconnect elements. Connecting Parts Disconnecting Parts Connections Between Work Packages Managing Publications

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Connecting Parts
This task shows you how to connect two or more parts or runs. You can use this function to connect parts or runs. Select the part that you want to connect. Press the Ctrl key while selecting the other parts. Click the Connect 1. Parts button .

2. The parts will be highlighted and the Action dialog box will open. Click OK to connect the parts. The parts will be connected.

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3. To verify that the the parts are connected, use the Analyze Networks function. Select the Path tab. Select the extremities of the range of parts you connected. The From Object and To Object fields will display the parts selected and the Current Path field will show 1, indicating that the three items are connected. 4. You can also connect by clicking the Connect button and selecting the connectors on two parts. In this case the first part you select becomes slave to the second part.

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Disconnecting Parts
This task shows you how to disconnect two parts or runs. In the specifications tree, select the part that you want to disconnect. Press the Ctrl key while selecting the other parts. 1. Click the Disconnect Parts button .

2. The parts will be highlighted and the Action dialog box will open. Click OK to disconnect the parts. The parts are disconnected.

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3. To verify that the parts are disconnected, use the Analyze Network function. Select the extremities of the range of parts you connected. The From Object and To Object fields will display the parts selected. The Current Path will show 0, and there will be no objects in the path; indicating that the three items are disconnected.

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Connections Between Work Packages


This task explains the ways you can establish connections between work packages. You should also refer to the following tasks for more information: Using Work Packages, Understanding Project Resource Management, and Managing Publications. The system manages connections between elements within your design. As you place parts or route elements within your design, the system automatically creates connections between them. When these elements are in different work packages then the system also needs a way of identifying the work package containing the linked element. When connections are being established between elements in different work packages, the system may use one of two link mechanisms, based on the environment and user options set in the Project Resource Management file. The two mechanisms used for cross work package connections are:
q

Publication based connections Document based connections

Publication based linking enables effective configuration management, revision management and concurrent engineering support. Publication based connections are established through a publication and can easily be replaced by new configurations or revisions of a work package. The connection is resolved dynamically as work packages are loaded into a session. Document based connections use a more direct linking mechanism. This allows the linked document to be identified more easily, but it does not easily support relinking to a new configuration or revision. In publication based linking, connection information is added to both work packages, establishing a one way or two way link. A two way link is established when the system has Write access to both work packages. If it has Write access to one of the work packages it will establish a one way connection from the work package to which it has access. Users can convert a one way link to a two way link if they have Write access to the necessary work package, using the Cross Document Connections command. It is recommended that a two way connection be established to ensure complete network connectivity for downstream processes such as From-To analysis. In the case of document based connections, the connection is stored in the parent document of the two work packages. In this case, a two way connection is always established.

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Managing Publications
This task explains ways you can manage publications. You should also refer to the following tasks for more information: Using Work Packages and Connections Between Work Packages. Publications are used to identify work packages that have linked elements, for instance, when a vessel is in one work package and the pipe routed from it in another. In such cases publications are automatically created and used to track connected elements. Using the Manage Logical Publications command, and an associated command, Cross Document Connections, you can manage the publications. Both are explained below. Select the work package for which you want to manage publications and click Tools - Manage Logical 1. Publications in the menubar. The Manage Logical Publications dialog box displays, with all publications in the document listed. The box shows the publication name, the element to which it is associated, the associated connector and whether it is linked or unlinked.

2.

You can perform the following functions (you must have Write access to the work package): q Rename: To rename, double click on a publication and enter the new name.
q

Reset: Click the Reset button to reset to the original publication name. Delete: Select a publication and click the Delete button.

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3.

To use the cross document connections command, select a work package and click Analyze - Cross Document Connections in the menubar. The Cross Document Connections dialog box displays, showing the publications in the document.

4.

The buttons become available when you select a publication. In the image above, the symbol in the Link Type column shows the publication has a two way connection. You can perform the following functions (some functions require Write access to both work packages): q Remove Link: This will remove a connection one way and the following symbol will display.

Add Link: When you have a one way connection, click this button to make it a two way connection. Disconnect: Click this button to remove the connection. Use the Reframe, Select All or Clear Selection buttons as needed.

You can also use the Connect Parts and Disconnect Parts commands to add or remove connections.

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Manipulating Objects
This section explains some ways in which objects and resources are manipulated. Search for Objects in a Document Aligning Elements Distributing Elements Rotate Resource Using the Definition Dialog Box Snap Resources Together Quick Snap Resources Snap and Rotate a Resource Using Offset Planes and Advanced Offset Planes Generating Detail Information Disable/Enable Manipulation Handles Using Quick Translate to Move Objects Activating the Product or Parent Transfer Elements to New Document

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Search for Objects in a Document


You can search for objects in a diagram by using the Edit - Search command. This will display the Search dialog box.

Under Workbench select your workbench. Under Type select the type of object you are searching for. Detailed instructions on using the Search function can be found in the Infrastructure User Guide under Basic Tasks Selecting Objects.

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Aligning Elements
This task shows you how to align elements in your layout. You can align the center or the sides of an element to a user defined reference plane that you define. You can also rotate an element to align it with a reference plane. 1. 2. Select the element(s) that you want to align. Select the icon for the type of alignment you want to perform:

Align Sides: aligns the sides of two or more elements

Align Center: aligns along the centerlines of two or more elements

Rotate to Align: rotates elements on the axis to align them

Align Planes: aligns selected planes

Distribute: See Distributing elements 3. Define the plane to use as a reference for the alignment. If you have an offset plane already defined it will be used as the reference plane. If you do not already have the offset plane defined do the following: a. Place your cursor over a geometric element that defines the plane (e.g., a construction plane, boundary, area contour, item reservation). As you move the cursor, a small white rectangle is displayed to show the selectable planes, as shown below. A line normal to the rectangle shows the direction in which the alignment will be performed.

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If you do not see the white rectangle, zoom out from the drawing. The white rectangle cannot be displayed if the element under your cursor is displayed too small. b. Click to select the plane. The selected elements are aligned along the plane.

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Using the Align Planes command allows you to select any plane on an item reservation or part. After you select the first plane to which to align to, you can only select a plane that is parallel to it. For instance, if you select the the top of an item reservation you need to select the top or bottom of the second item reservation - you cannot select the sides. Click any button in one of the tool bars to exit the alignment command. If you want to continue with the alignment command using the same reference plane then select another element in the model. 4.

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Distributing Elements
This task shows you how to distribute elements within parameters that you define. 1. Select the elements you want to move. 2. Click the Distribute button . 3. Define a reference plane for the distribution by doing the following: a. Place your cursor over a geometric element that defines the plane (e.g., a construction plane, boundary, area contour, item reservation). As you move the cursor, a small white rectangle is displayed to show the selectable planes, as shown below. A line perpendicular to the rectangle shows the direction in which the distribution will be performed.

If you do not see the white rectangle, zoom out from the drawing. The white rectangle cannot be displayed if the element under your cursor is displayed too small.

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b. Click to select the plane.

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The selected elements are distributed along a line perpendicular to the plane, as shown below.

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Rotate Resource Using the Definition Dialog Box


This task shows you how to rotate a catalog resource by entering into the definition dialog box the number of degrees that you want it to rotate on its vertical axis.. 1. 2. Click on the resource. Click Edit-Definition in the menu bar. This displays the Product Definition dialog box. (You can also press Cntrl-Enter to display the box.)

3. 4.

Enter the degrees in the Rotation field. Click Apply and the resource will rotate on its vertical axis.

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Snap Resources Together


This task shows you how to snap two resources together. Resources can be joined at existing connectors, you can create new connectors to join them, or you can snap them together without using connectors. All procedures are described below, beginning with the procedure for snapping resources in which you create connectors.

1. 2.

To snap resources together by creating new connectors, click the Snap button

Click one of the resources you want to snap together. The resource changes color and the Define Reference Plane (From) dialog box displays.

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By default the Define Plane button is selected, allowing you to select a plane for the connector you will create. See Creating Connectors for information about using the Define Plane functions. The two resources will have a Master-Slave relationship to each other - but only if you choose to add a constraint (see below). If you add a constraint the first object you select becomes the slave, and the second object becomes the master. Also note that the first resource you select will move to snap - the second resource you select remains stationary. 3. Select the second resource. The Define Reference Plane (To) box will display - make your selections as explained above. You can also select an existing connector. Click OK when done. The two resources will snap together and the Constraint Options dialog box will display. 4. You can clear the Align, Face and Orientation check boxes and click OK if you want the two resources to remain snapped together without any new connectors being created. To add one or more constraints - which will also result in creating connectors - follow the steps given below. Make your selections in the Snap Options box.

5.

Align: You can increase distance between the two resources, but if you change the alignment the

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slave will snap back to the original alignment. In the image below the distance is increased but the alignment remains the same.

Face: The two resources will maintain the face if you move one of them. In the image below the two maintain the same face, though the alignment has changed.

Orientation: The two connectors will maintain the same orientation if you move them, i.e. the red arrows visible in the connectors will align. It is therefore important to make sure that the red arrows in the connectors are pointed correctly and oriented correctly with reference to the part. The red arrow is usually set to the "Up" position of the resource, which means that on both resources they should point in the Up direction. If the red arrow points "down" in one resource and "up" in the other, then the resources will snap together incorrectly. You can toggle the position of the red arrow by clicking on the green arrow that is parallel to the plane. Fix in space: If you select this option the position of the master resource is fixed - if it is moved it will snap back to its original position. Attach: Checking this option allows you to attach the two objects. Place manipulator at snapped location: Check this if you want to rotate the snapped object after placing it. The manipulator is placed on the object if you check this. You can then click on the bottom curve of the manipulator (see image below) and rotate the object. It will rotate in increments, based on the value entered in the Snap Angle field. In the image above it is 45 degrees.

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To remove a constraint select it in the specifications tree and delete it. To remove the 'Fix in space' option right click on the Fix line in the specifications tree, click Properties, go to the Constraints tab, and uncheck the Fix in space box. 6. Click OK when done. 7. To snap resources together using preexisting connectors: a. Click the Snap button. b. Move the pointer over the first resource - the connectors will display. Select the connector. c. Move the pointer over the second resource - the connectors will display. Select the connector and the two resources will snap together. d. The Snap Options box will display. Make your selections and click OK.

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Quick Snap Resources


This task shows you how to Quick Snap two resources together. The Quick Snap procedure allows you to snap two resources together using one of three selection methods. You can select the snapping point on one of the resources using one of these methods. On the other resource the snapping point will either be its origin, or at a connector, as described in Step 2. The three selection methods are: q Center of three points (on a circle): the snapping will be the center of three points indicated by you.
q

Center of polygon: the snapping point will be the center of any surface indicated by you. Surface: the snapping point is at any point indicated by you.

The three methods are described below.

To snap resources together using the center of three points on a circle method, click the Snap Three Points button 1. 2. .

Click the resource that you want to move. Note: q If you click the resource at a connector it will snap to the other resource at that connector. You can create a connector if you want to.
q

If you click the resource at a point other than a connector it will join to the other resource at its origin. If the resource was preselected when you clicked the snap command you will not be able to select a connector.

These points apply to all three methods of Quick Snap. In the image below the user wants the paint gun to snap to the robot arm. After he clicks the paint gun the compass displays at the origin of the paint gun to show that the part will snap at that location. You can choose not to display the compass at the snap location by unchecking the option Place compass at snapping point in the Snap Options dialog box. The box displays when you click on any of the Quick Snap buttons. Placing the compass at the snapping location allows you to rotate the resource after it has snapped.

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3.

Define the point on the robot where you want the paint gun to snap, in this case the end of the robot arm, by clicking on three points. You can only select your defining points on the edges of a circle. Only points on the ends of edges are selectable. Note: If you click the three points clockwise the paint gun will attach "inward" as shown in the image below:

If you click counter clockwise then the paint gun will attach "outward", which is the correct position in this example.

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4. To Quick Snap using the center of polygon method, click the Snap Center of Polygon and perform the action detailed in Step 2. 5. button

Select the snapping point on the second resource by clicking on a surface. The resource will be placed in the center of the polygon.

6. To Quick Snap using the surface method, click the Snap Surface detailed in Step 2. 7. button and perform the action

Select the snapping point on the second resource by clicking on any surface. The resource will be placed at the point you click.

If you double click a command you will be in repeat mode. This allows you to snap a resource to a different location, using a different selection method if you want.

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Snap and Rotate a Resource


This task shows you how to rotate a resource after snapping it to another resource.

1. With both resources on the screen, click on the Snap appear.

button and then on a resource. The orientation symbol will

2. Click on the second resource. A white square will appear. Move the pointer over the resource and click when the white square is at the location where you want to snap the two resources. The orientation symbol will appear at the location and the Define Reference Plane dialog box will display.

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3.

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Click on the Define plane using compass button snap the two resources.

. The compass will be placed at the location where you want to

4. Click OK on the Define Reference Plane box. The two resources will snap together.

5. Click on the Select button to exit the Snap command. Click on the resource you want to rotate, then grab one of the handles on the compass with your pointer and move it. Different handles will move/rotate the resource in different directions.

You can also double click on the compass to bring up the Compass Manipulation dialog box and enter the required figure in the Angle field. Click on the + or - sign next to the Z axis to rotate it.

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Using Offset Planes and Advanced Offset Planes


This task shows you how to define a plane to use as a temporary reference for positioning other elements. The second part of the document explains the use of an advanced offset plane, which allows you to define origin, orientation and other parameters. 1. Select the Offset Plane icon . 2. Define the reference plane by doing the following: a. Place your cursor over a geometric element that defines the plane (e.g., a construction plane, boundary, area contour, item reservation). As you move the cursor, a small white rectangle is displayed to show the selectable planes, as shown below.

If you do not see the white rectangle, zoom out from the drawing. The white rectangle cannot be displayed if the element under your cursor is displayed too small. b. Click to select the plane. The white rectangle changes to a blue rectangle, and remains displayed on the reference element, as shown below.

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The reference plane can now be used as a reference to position other elements. 3. Use the advanced offset plane feature to set your plane reference, origin and orientation settings as follows: a. Click the Advanced Offset Plane button. The Define Plane dialog box will display.

b. The Define Plane button is selected by default. However, you can select any button in the Define Plane box. Click when you have found a location. The plane manipulator displays.

Click on the buttons in the Define Plane dialog box to make your selections. See Creating Connectors on using the buttons. c. Click OK when done. The reference plane will be created.

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Generating Detail Information


This task shows you how to display detailed information about objects as you move the pointer over them. The Analyze Item command displays information about an object when the pointer passes over it. This information can include line IDs, nominal size of runs and parts, XYZ coordinates of connectors, etc. The type of information shown will depend on the object and the product you are using. See also Display Information About Routables. From Release 13 the angle of routables from the x,y,z axis will also display, as in the image below.

1. With your document open, click the Analyze Item button . 2. Move the pointer in the document highlighting various objects. Attributes and their values are displayed, depending on the type of object highlighted. In the illustration below the pointer is on a tubing tee.

3. When you click again the feature will be disabled.

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Disabling/Enabling Manipulation Handles


This task shows you how to disable or enable manipulator handles using the Toggle Manipulator Handle Mode command. The default is for the manipulation handles to be enabled. If you are working on a large document, however, displaying the handles on each part can take up time. If you do not need the handles then you can use this feature to disable the display. It is a toggle button, so clicking it again will enable the handles. This feature can be used with parts placed in-line or in free space. To disable display of the manipulation 'handles' click the Toggle Manipulation Handle Mode button 1. . To enable them again click the button once more. The handles look like a green box on parts placed in free space. On parts placed in line they look like the image below.

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Using Quick Translate to Move Objects


This task shows you how to use the Quick Translate command to move elements. This function allows the user to transfer an element relative to a location on another element by any of the following alignment methods:
q

Point-to-Point Point-to-Line Point-to-Plane Plane-to-Plane Plane-to-Point Line-to-Point

An object or element moved using this command does not rotate.

This function works with parts placed in a run only before the pipes, tubes have been placed. The placing of such objects prevents the part, e.g., a valve, from moving.

1. With your document open, click the Quick Translate button . The Translate dialog box opens. Depending upon which From element you select the available To elements will either be greyed out or become active.

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2.

Select the type of transfer, Point-to-Point, Point-to-Plane, etc. Using the Point-to-Point method as an example, select a point on the From element, a valve, in your document and select a point on the To element, the nozzle on the sea pump.

3.

The transfer occurs when you click on the To element. Click the Update button, if necessary. The valve has moved to align with the nozzle.

4.

The function works similarly with the other From/To selection methods and may be applied as the design dictates.

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Activating the Product/Product Parent


This task shows you how to activate the product or product's parent. This command can be useful when you have numerous objects and/or documents displayed in the specifications tree. It helps you activate an object, or locate the parent to which an object belongs. 1. Click the button Activate Product's Parent . The Activate Product dialog box displays.

2.

If you want to activate an object then click on the object, in the specifications tree or viewer. If you want to activate the object's parent, then click the checkbox Activate Product's Parent and select the object. The parent will be selected and highlighted in the specifications tree.

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Transfer Elements to New Document


This task shows you how to transfer elements to a new document. You can use this function to transfer elements to documents or work packages that are under the same Product. See also Transfer Run to Another Document. This function removes selected elements from a document and moves them to a new document. You cannot move them to an existing document. 1. . The Transfer Elements With your document open, click the Transfer Elements button dialog box displays. In the image below it displays equipment that has been selected.

2. You can select elements to transfer in various ways: q Click the element you want to transfer. Click the Select Elements in Range Networks dialog box that displays. Click the Select Spools button and make your selection in the Analyze

button and make your selection in the Selection List.

Click the Select Line IDs

button and make your selection in the Selection List.

3. If you do not want to transfer some elements in the Selection List, select the element(s) and click Remove. Remove All removes all elements.

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4. Make your selections. Spools and Lines will display the existing name in the File Name field. You can edit this name, or add a Prefix or Suffix (or both) to distinguish it from the original name. Elements do not display any name - you need to enter a name. In this example it is TestTransfer. The image below shows the entries in the specifications tree, with the Equipments node expanded, before the transfer.

5. The vessel has been selected for transfer (the associated nozzle will automatically be selected). Click Apply or OK. Apply allows you to transfer more elements. OK exits you from the command. The image below shows the transferred equipment.

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Query or Modify the Properties of an Object


This section explains ways of querying and modifying the properties of objects. Edit or Display Properties of an Object Changing the Display Order of Properties Filter Shown Properties of an Object Renaming Objects Changing the Size or Spec of a Part Assigning Values to Parts

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Edit or Display Properties of an Object


This task shows you how to edit or display the properties of an object. 1. 2. Select the component. Click Edit - Properties or, as an alternative, right-click and select Properties. The Properties dialog box appears with the properties displayed under various tabs. Some of these properties are computed and cannot be modified. To see which properties are computed click the Filter button.

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If the object cannot have derived values, the Derived checkboxes will not display. If a Derived checkbox is selected, it means the value is derived. If it is not checked the values are not derived. A value is considered to be derived when it is obtained from another object. For instance, a piping route may derive the values of some properties from the line of which it is a member. The Properties dialog box displays several tabs: q The Graphic tab allows you to change the looks.
q

The Object tab displays information about the object such as ID, Function Class, Parent Group or Group Members, depending on the object being queried. Under the Product tab you can make changes to the basic Product in the specifications tree, such as renaming. You can include additional descriptive and historical data. One or more application tab - such as Piping or Equipment - lists various properties. They will display depending on the class of object whose properties you are editing. Click the More button if one of these tabs does not display, or if you want to see other tabs. More than one tab may display for some objects, such as Piping and Equipment, if the object has properties in more than one domain. The filter button lets you use the filter function. See Filter the Properties of an Object.

See Infrastructure documentation (Basic Tasks - Manipulating Objects - Displaying and Editing Graphic Properties) and Product Structure documentation (User's Tasks - Modifying Component Properties) for more information. 3. Enter values in the fields as desired and click OK. The properties will be edited. 4. You can override derived values by modifying the values as outlined in Step 3. The Derived checkbox will become unchecked. You can also override derived values by unchecking the Derived checkbox. To revert to derived values check the Derived checkbox. 5. Click OK to end. Some objects have discrete values - which means you may only select certain values. In that case you will be able to display a drop-down box and select one of the values in it.

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Changing the Display Order of Properties


This task shows how you can change the order in which properties are displayed. This task shows how you can change the display order in the Properties dialog box. You can also use this function to select the properties that you want displayed in the dialog box. This change applies to the class or subclass. NOTE: When you use the Filtering function the changes apply to all classes in the application. Changing the display order applies only to the class or subclass you choose, as explained below. You must use internal names for this function. To find out the internal names of classes or properties, open the Feature Dictionary Editor, go to the relevant CATfct file and generate a report. Internal names for properties are listed in the column "Attribute Key". Internal names for classes are shown against the entry "Object Key". The process of generating a report is explained in the Feature Dictionary section of this documentation. 1. Create a text file using a text editor such as Wordpad, and give the file the same name (use the internal name) as the class whose display you want to change. For example, if the class is 'compressor function' then name the file CompressorFunction.txt. There should only be one file for each class. 2. Enter the properties in this file, in the order you want to see them displayed in the Properties dialog box. Any property that you do not enter will not display. For a globe valve for instance, you may only want to see the following. Other properties will not display. NominalSize EndStyle Rating MaterialCode You can choose to display computed properties also by adding them to this list. However, for computed properties to display they must also be entered in the computed attributes text file (XXXComputedAttributes.txt), where XXX is the domain name. For example: HangerComputedAttributes.txt, PipingComputedAttributes.txt, etc. The computed attributes text files are located under the directory ...intel_a\startup\\EquipmentAnd Systems\\MultiDiscipline\SampleData. These files must also be referenced in the PRM file. For more information on Computed attributes see Computed Attributes and Methods; for more information on the PRM file, see Project Resource Management.

3.

Save the file in a directory of your choice. Modify the project resource management file to reflect the directory in which the file is located. To do this, change the entry for the resource "Attribute Display List". See PRM documentation for more information. The display order will apply to subclasses also, unless a subclass has its own display order text file.

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Filter the Shown Properties of an Object


This task shows how you can filter the properties of an object. Filtering the properties means you can choose to display or hide any of the properties shown in the Properties dialog box. You can only filter properties for objects that are unique to the Design application you have open. Note that any changes you make will apply to all objects that have this property. To make changes for a class or subclass only see Changing the Display Order of Properties. The following scenario features Hanger Design, but the process applies to all applications, including Diagrams. 1. Click the Filter button on the Properties dialog box (Edit or display properties of an object). The Attribute Filter box displays.

2.

An X in the column Show means the attribute is displayed in the Properties dialog box. An X in the column Computed means the attribute is computed. If you check the checkbox Show Only Attributes with Value, then only attributes that have a value will display in the Properties dialog box. Click on each property to toggle between Display and Hide. An X next to a property means it is displayed. The settings will be retained when you open the Properties dialog box again.

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Renaming Objects
This task shows you how to rename objects. 1. . The Rename dialog box displays. In the view below you can With your document open, select the object and click the Rename button see that the ID field is displaying the name assigned by the application; in this case, P-004, indicating that this is the fourth instance of a pipe being placed in this document.

2. If you wish to rename the object (or instance) enter the new name in the ID field. To revert to the Default ID click on the Set to default button.

3. If you want to rename additional objects click Apply and continue renaming. 4. Click OK when finished. The objects will be renamed.

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Using this command to rename a object does not rename all instances of that object. If you have placed an object more than once in a document and want to rename all of them, you will have to rename each one, individually.

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Changing the Size or Specification of a Part


This task shows you how to resize a part, or group of parts, or change the specification.

1.

. The Resize/Respec window opens. (The With your document open click the Resize/Respec Part button Reset/Resize/Respec buttons become available after you make a selection.)

2. To change the size or specification of parts in a network, click the Select elements in range button. The Analyze Networks dialog box displays. Click the Path tab and set the From Object and To Object.

When Current Path and Number of objects in current path accurately reflect the range you want to select, click Close. The Resize/Respec dialog box opens. Click Resize to open the Resize Parts dialog box, explained in the next step. 3.

Nominal Size: This field displays the size of parts in your selection. If there is more than one size in your selection then more than one size displays, as in the image above. If one part has more than one size (a reducer) and you have checked the option List Multiple Sized Parts in the Resize/Respec dialog box, then the display will be as shown below, to allow for more flexibility in selection.

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The asterisks after the value will be replaced by a value once you make your selection in the To field. For a rectangular object you will get height and width fields. See HVAC Design documentation. You can highlight your selection change, or reframe it, using the buttons. If the Resize Run and Validate Turns (checks for turn radius errors) options are grayed out, it is because these operations are not relevant - there is no run selected. Move your pointer over a part to see values for various properties. Make your changes and click OK, to open the Define Part Options dialog box. 4. The Define Part Options dialog box allows you to select a part when you have more than one selectable part.

The first line shows an error - you will not be able to resize the nozzle. The asterisk in the first column means you have more than one selectable option for this part. The Options field appears when you select a part. Click on the down arrow to display your options, shown above.

Make your selection and click OK. The selected parts will be resized. 5. To change the specification, click the Respec button after making your selection (Step 2). The Respec Parts dialog box opens, allowing you to change/add the specification. The From and To fields display after you select a specification. In HVAC Design the column headings are different. See HVAC Design documentation.

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6. , and select To change the size or spec of all members of a line ID in the active document click the Select Line button the Line ID in the Selection List that displays. Click OK and the Resize/Respec dialog box will open. Make changes as necessary. 7. ; select the spool in the To change the size or specification of members of a Spool, click the Select Spool button Selection List that displays, and click OK. With the Resize/Respec dialog box open, proceed as above, making the desired changes. 8. To change the size or spec of a single part select it in the document or from the specification tree and click the Resize/Respec button. The Resize/Respec dialog box will open. Select the Resize or Respec button and make your changes.

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Assigning Values to Parts


This task shows you how values are assigned to parts that you have placed. Placed parts get their values from various sources, a list of which is provided below. This task explains the rules that govern how these values are assigned to parts. Users may need to know this information so that they can assign attributes in such a way that the parts they place obtain the correct values. In most cases this follows a standard pattern, but some users may need to change the way in which values are assigned in order to meet special needs. Only values are derived, not the attributes. An attribute must be defined on both the part and the 'parent' object or a value cannot be assigned. Values can be assigned to a placed part from the following seven sources:
q

From the part itself. A run. A connector. Based on a specifications catalog. A line. From a 2-D function (in the case of schematic driven design only). Defined by the user. If a value has been assigned to an attribute during part build time, then that value will be used when the part is placed. Examples of attributes whose values are defined in the part are: material category, material code, part numbers. If a part is placed on a run: A bendable part will pick up the bend radius and the nominal size values from the run. Other parts will pick up the nominal size value only. If you select a connector before placing a part then the values will be derived from the connector. The image below shows a connector with attributes and values displayed.

1. 2.

3.

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If the valve shown above had already been placed on a run, and you selected the run before placing a new part, then that new part would have derived values from the run. In the HVAC Design application, if you select a connector to place a new part, then the values will actually be assigned to the new part. In other applications you will be provided with a part that matches the nominal size and other attribute values. Some of the attributes typically defined on a connector are those displayed above: wall thickness, rating, end style and nominal size. If you are selecting parts from a specifications catalog: If the part being placed does not have an attribute value defined, then the value will be obtained from the specification. If the value is defined in both the specification and on the part then the value on the part will remain unchanged. When you are placing a part as part of a line: If the part does not have an attribute value defined, then the value will be obtained from the line. If the value is defined on both the line and the part then the value on the part will remain unchanged. Attributes that are typically defined on the line are: insulation specification, insulation thickness, temperature and pressure. In schematic driven design: If the value is not defined on the physical part then it will be obtained from the function. If the value is defined on the the function and the physical part then the value on the physical part will remain unchanged. User defined: During part build time some attributes can be defined as override parameters, which means the user defines the value. For such attributes, users will be prompted to define values at parts placement time. The application attempts to determine values in the order given above - if the part itself does not have a value it will examine the line, then the run and so on.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

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Placing & Modifying a Piping Part


Ways of modifying a piping part are discussed in this section. Placing Parts Rotate a Piping Part Flipping a Part Inserting a Part Move/Rotate In-Line Parts Placing Transitional Objects On a Run Detecting Clash in Parts Placement Switching Graphic Representations Placing a Part in a Sub-document Query or Convert Auto Parts

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Placing Parts
This task shows you how to place a part on a run. This function allows you to filter (or search) a catalog for parts that meet the criteria that you specify. You are presented with a list of parts that meet these criteria so that you can select the part that you want to place. The same procedure is used for placing parts at a location other than a run. Also, while piping parts are used in this example, the procedure is the same for other types of parts. See also Detecting Clash in Parts Placement and Placing Parts Using a Schematic. Note that this application incorporates intelligent design functions. This means that the application ensures your design meets a selection of criteria. These criteria are established by Design Rules. For instance, the design rules will match the threaded end of a pipe to the threaded end of a part. (You can override the rules if necessary.) There are certain general design rules that apply to all parts you place. Other rules apply to parts you place from a specifications catalog or a standard. Theoretically you can create a new standard and not incorporate any design rules. However, your parts will not place correctly if you do so. A set of sample design rules is included with this application. But most users (administrators, not individual users) will create or add to these. See Rules Overview to find out which rules affect parts placement. The standard and specifications catalog that you use for parts placement is defined in the setup data. See Understanding Project Resource Management. 1. With the run displayed, click on the Place Piping Part button . The Place Piping Part dialog box displays. (In the image below the user has already made some selections.)

The first row of buttons provides you with placement options. This can aid you in selecting a placement location in a busy document. Move the cursor over the button to see its name.
q

Select or Indicate: This is the default selection and allows you to select or indicate a placement location. Select Run Only: You can only select a run. Select Connector Only: Allows you to select a part connector only. First select a part - all connectors display - then select the connector.

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Indicate On Local XY Plane: You can select a location that is on the XY plane of the local axis of the document. Indicate on Compass Plane: You can select a location that is on the compass plane. If the compass is inactive then the local plane will be used. Select Surface: Select a surface and then select a location. Use Compass Z for Placement Up Orientation: The part will align itself with the compass Z direction, and not the default 'up' direction of the part. In the image below the valve on the left shows the default up direction, the valve on the right aligns to the compass Z direction.

2. Select a location for the part - you have to do this before you can display the Class Browser. See below if you want to multi-place parts. You may want to place the same part in more than one location - for instance you have a run with several bends and you want to place an elbow at each bend. You can multi-place parts in one of two ways. Before you select a location (Step 3) click the Multi-Place Parts button. Or do a Shift-Click when you select the location. Now when you select a part it will be placed at all compatible locations. This works with elbows and pipes. The multi-place function applies to one run. If your run is broken, and you use the multi-place function, it will apply to a single run. If the Break Run at every placed part option is checked then the multi-place function may not work. To check or uncheck the option go to Tools - Options - Equipment and Systems and select/unselect the Design Criteria tab. 3. If the Clear Filter button is enabled it means that values from a previous part placement exist in the Filter Definition dialog box. (See Step 5.) Click the button if you want to clear these values. 4. If you want to change the values of one or more properties of the part you want to filter for, then click the Filter Definition button to display the Filter Definition dialog box. Select the property whose value you want to change and then select the new value from the drop down box in the Value field. (The Value field will display after you select a property.) This new value will appear in the Override value column. The values in the Override value column will be used when searching for parts in the catalog.

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The Override button brings up the Manage Override Parameters dialog box, allowing you to change attribute values. The Flip Part button allows you to flip parts that can be flipped, such as a reducer. The Move/Rotate button displays the Move/Rotate dialog box, allowing you to manipulate the part. The Pipe Selection and Pipe Segment Shortcut buttons are shortcuts that let you select part type. Click the Spec Driven button if you want part placement to be specifications driven. The Change to Schematic Mode button lets you toggle between schematic and non-schematic mode. You will exit the command when you click this button and need to click the Place Part command again.

5. Click the Class Browser button to display the Class Browser. Double click on Piping Part Function to expand the list.

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6. Select a function and click OK. The function will display in the Place Piping Part dialog box. 7. In the Place Piping Part dialog box, click on the down arrow in the Part Type field to display a list of part types (if there is more than one) and select the part type you want. If there is only one part type it will be preselected. If the Part Type field is grayed out then click again on the location where you want to place the part. 8. The Part Selection box will display after you select a part type - if there is more than one selection. It will not display if there is only one selection available to you.

If the part you want to place can be created as a light object, you will be able to differentiate between heavy and light sample parts. Heavy parts are identified by the letters HV in the part name. Light parts do not have any designation.

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9. Select the part you want to place and click where you want to place it. The part will be placed. In the image below it is a straight pipe. If there is only one selection available to you then click after Step 6.

To ensure correct placement of pipes in a run you should first place all the in-line components and then place the pipes. You can choose to display or hide a "preview" of the part you are placing. To do this click on Tools Options and select Equipment & Systems and the General tab. Check or uncheck the box Display image while placing catalog object in 3D viewer to obtain the effect you want. By default, when you click (in free space) to place a part the center of that part will be placed at that location. The center is determined by the application by drawing a box around the part and selecting the center of the base of the box. You can also choose to place the origin of the part at the point where you click. To do this click on Tools - Options and select Equipment & Systems and the General tab. Check the box Place at component's origin when placing in free space.

After you move or modify a run or part, click the Update Part button and select a part to update that part, or select the run to update the run. You only need to do this if the application does not update the object.

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Rotate a Piping Part


This task shows you how to rotate a piping part. A piping part can only be rotated if it is in free space - connected components cannot be rotated. 1. With your component displayed, click and drag the compass and place it on the part you want to rotate.

2. Move the pointer to the highlight the compass for the desired direction of rotation.

3. At this point there are two methods of rotating the part. If you know the exact amount of rotation required, double click on the highlighted arc (visible in Step 2). The Compass Manipulation dialog box opens. Enter the exact amount of rotation in the desired axis; in this case the Y axis. Click Apply new position and then Close.

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The alternate method is to grab the compass and rotate the part to the desired degree of rotation.

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Flipping a Part
This task shows you how to flip a piping part. "Flipping" here means connecting the part by using a different connector than the one currently used. 1. Click on the Flip Part Position button and then click on the part you want to flip. You can repeat this step to keep trying out all the connectors on the part. In the image below, the tee has three connectors. This step has been used twice to try out all the connectors.

Some parts cannot be flipped. In such cases you will get an error message.

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Inserting a Part
This task shows you how to insert a part. This procedure is used for inserting a part, such as a tee, at a location on a pipe, for instance. This effectively splits the pipe into two parts. 1.

. The Place Piping Part dialog box With the run displayed, click the Place Piping Part button displays. Click the Class Browser button and navigate to the type of part you want to place. See Placing a Part on a Run.

2.

Select the part you want to place and click where you want to place it. The part will be placed. In the image below a tee has been inserted in a straight pipe.

3.

To learn about adjusting the location of the part once it is placed, see Move/Rotate In-Line Parts.

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Move/Rotate In-Line Parts


This task shows you how to move or rotate an inline part. This function gives the user the ability to move an in-line object that has been placed. Piping parts are used here for illustration purposes - the procedure is the same for other types of parts. Open a product having the conditions described above, or (with Autoparts disabled) create a simple run, place a valve and a pipe. 1. To move or rotate a part click the Move/Rotate Part on the Run button . The Move/Rotate , or

dialog box appears. Two buttons in the Move/Rotate dialog box allow you to move (offset) rotate physical parts.

2. To move the part, click the Move Physical Part button .

Select the part; it will highlight orange. An offset plane will appear on one end of the inline pipe.

The Offset Value field will open permitting you to enter the desired offset value (where the offset plane appears). . The offset is measured from the end of the inline bendable

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The Toggle offset plane button opposite the Offset value field allows you to toggle the offset plane to either end of the segment so that you can make measured movements of the part in either direction. If you already know the amount of offset required, enter it in the Offset value field and click OK. The part will be moved. If no other move operations are to be performed, click OK in the Move/Rotate dialog box. 3. Click the Rotate Physical Parts button .

Select the part you want to rotate; it will highlight orange.

The Angle Value field will open permitting you to enter a value for the degree of rotation. This can be either a positive or a negative value. Enter the desired degree of rotation, e.g., 90 deg, and click OK. The part will be rotated.

If no other rotate operations are to be performed, click OK in the Move/Rotate dialog box. You can rotate an inline part using the compass or set the angle of rotation by aligning it with a line or point on another object.

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4. To rotate an inline part using the compass, click the Rotate Physical Parts button part you want to rotate, e.g., the valve; it will highlight orange. . Select the

Place the compass on the valve as shown and drag the compass. The valve will rotate and the Angle Value field will continually update the angle of rotation as you move the compass.

5. To rotate an inline part by aligning it with a line or point on another object, we must create the other object. Open the Plant Layout workbench by going to Start - AEC Plant - Plant Layout. Create an item reservation next to the objects created in the previous steps.

. Select the part you want to rotate, e.g., the Now, click the Rotate Physical Parts button valve; it will highlight orange. Place the compass on the valve as shown and drag the compass. The valve will rotate to align with the location of the compass on the item reservation. Click OK to close the Move/Rotate dialog box.

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Repeat the command and select the valve so that it is highlighted and select a line on the item reservation. The valve will rotate to align with the selection. Similarly, select a point (green dot) to align with.

If no other rotate operations are to be performed, click OK in the Move/Rotate dialog box.

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Placing Transitional Objects on a Run


This task discusses "transitional" objects placed on a run. For purposes of discussion, transitional objects are defined by any one of three criteria: Objects that transition a change in size (e.g., 2in to 1in reducer) q
q

Objects that transition a change in shape (e.g., round duct to rectangular) Objects that transition a change in alignment (e.g., twisted section)

Transitional part types are reducers, transitions, and twisting parts. When placed on a run, these transitional objects split the run. In the following scenario we will use the Piping Design application to illustrate this function. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Create a simple run and click the Place Part button . The Place Part dialog box opens.

opposite the Function type field. The Class Select the run, then click the Browser button Browser opens. Expand Piping Part Function and select Reducer Function. Under Part Type, select Eccentric Reducer. In the Part Selection dialog box, select a Part Number that is appropriate for the size of the run. For example, if you created a 2 in. run, select REDECC-WM-BW-2in-1in.

6.

Place the part and notice that now there are two runs of different sizes. In the specifications tree, note that in addition to the Reducer Function and Reducer, there is also a second Run.

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Detecting Clash in Parts Placement


This task shows how you can detect clashes between parts when you are moving parts in a document. This function only works when you are placing/moving parts in free space. It will not work if the parts have been placed on a run, for instance. Three modes are available: Clash Detection Off; Clash Detection On, and Clash Detection Stop. 1. To turn clash detection off click the Clash Detection (off) button . This is the default mode.

2. To turn clash detection on click the Clash Detection (On) button . When you move a part in such a way that it interferes with another part, a red outline will display, as in the images below. (If your part displays red highlights and you want to change the color you can do so by clicking ToolsOptions-Display and selecting another color.)

3. . When this mode is on To change to the stop mode click the Clash Detection (Stop) button you will not be able to move a part to a position in which it interferes with another part. In the first image below the pump has been stopped because it interferes with the heat exchanger. However, when the user moves his pointer to the other side, and there is enough room for the pump, the pump will appear on the other side of the exchanger.

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Manage Graphic Representations


This task shows you how to manage graphic representations for a part. See also Define Graphic Representations in the section Building Parts. You use this function to change the graphic representation that is active, or displayed, in your document. 1. With your document displayed click the Manage Graphic Representations button. The Representations dialog box displays.

The window displays all graphic representation categories in the document, even if the part type is from a different application, e.g. if you open the document in a piping application, you will also see categories for tubing parts and equipment.

2.

Select one of the Range options. q Single object: You can select a single part or run. Runs can be displayed as single or double.
q

Selection: Select the parts in your document first, by clicking on them, and then click the Manage Graphic Representations button. You can now change the category of all the parts you selected. All: You can change the category of all parts in your document. All runs: You can change the category of all runs in your document.

The options under the Mode section allow you to replace or add a representation. Except for runs and light objects, other objects can have more than one representation active at the same time. If you check Add and continue to Step 3, the representation will be added to the visible representation (for example, single and double will display at the same time). If you check Replace, the visible representation will be replaced by the representation you select.

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3.

Change the graphic representation that is active by selecting a different category in the window. Based on what you selected under Range, one object, more than one selected objects or all objects in your document will change to the newly selected category. The images below show a valve as double, and envelope.

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Placing a Part in a Sub-document


This task shows you how to place a part under the active parent, such as in a sub-document. When you place a part on a routable, it will place in the same document to which the routable belongs. This command can be used to place a part in a document that is different from the one to which a routable belongs. This will only work for documents that are sub-documents of the one to which the routable belongs. You cannot use it to place a part in a document that is at a higher level. The sub-document in which you want to place the part should be the active document - activate it by double clicking or any other means. 1. With the routable on which you want to place the part displayed, click the button Place New Part Under Active Parent . The part will place on the routable and will show in the specifications under the document you selected. In the image below, the run is in the document Product2, but the valve placed on it is in the sub-document Product3.

2.

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Query or Convert Auto Parts


This task shows you how to query a document to find out how many auto parts it contains. You can also convert auto parts into 'non-auto' parts. Auto parts are so called because they are placed automatically when you place certain other parts. When you delete the part with which they are associated, the auto parts are also deleted. In addition, auto parts cannot be modified. However, you can use this function to convert them to 'non-auto' parts, in which case their behavior will be like that of normal parts. 1. With your document open, click the Query Auto Parts button box displays. . The Query Auto Parts dialog

2.

If you check the option Highlight current elements then the auto parts that display in the dialog box window will be highlighted in the 3D viewer.

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3.

Choose one of the Selection Options. q Single part: Select a part and this option. All auto parts associated to the part will display in the dialog box window.
q

Single Run: Select a run and this option. All auto parts in the run will display in the dialog box window. Selection: First make your selection in the document, then click the Query Auto Parts button to open this dialog box, and select this option. Line ID: Select a line ID and this option. All auto parts in the line ID will display in the dialog box window. Active Parent: Select the active parent of the part/parts and this option.

Once you make your selection the auto parts will display in the window.

4.

To convert auto parts, click the Convert button. The action will apply to all auto parts displayed in the Query Auto Parts dialog box. A second dialog box will ask you to confirm the action. Click OK to convert the parts.

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Flow Direction
This section discusses management of flow direction. Display Flow Direction Change Flow Direction

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Displaying Flow Direction

This task shows you how to display the flow direction. 1. With your document displayed click the Flow Direction button . The Manage Flows box displays.

2. Click one of the buttons in the Manage Flows box to select your range: you can select elements, you can select a spool if one is defined or you can select the line ID. 3. Click the Select Elements button . The Analyze Networks dialog box displays. Click the first and last objects in the range whose flow you want displayed. Make sure you click the part, and not just the run. The objects you clicked will display in the Analyze Networks box in the From Object and To Object fields. 4. Close the Analyze Networks box. The flow direction will display. (The Flow Options box will also display - you use it to change flow direction as explained in Changing the Flow Direction.)

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To display the flow direction of a spool click the Select Spool button listed.

. The Selection List box will display with all the spools

6 Select a spool and click OK. The flow direction will display on the spool you selected. 7 To see the flow direction of all members of a line ID click the Select Line ID button . The Selection List box will display with line IDs displayed. Select the line ID and click OK. The flow direction will display on all members of the line ID.

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Changing the Flow Direction


This task shows you how to change the flow direction. 1. With the flow direction displayed, as explained in Displaying Flow Direction, select the Single Element option in the Flow Options box.

2. Click on one of the flow direction arrows so that it points in the direction you want. In the image below the flow direction of the last arrow has changed.

3. Click the option All connected elements to one direction in the Flow Options box and then click the flow direction arrow again. All parts connected to it (in the range that you selected) will change flow direction to the same direction as the selected arrow.

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The flow direction will not change in a tee, or beyond a tee, even though it is connected and within your selected range. If the flow capability was defined when a part was built then you will not be able to change its flow direction using this command.

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Managing Spools
The following section explains ways of managing spools in a piping line. Creating a Spool Display and Edit Properties of a Spool Select/Query a Spool or its Members Transfer a Spool Add/Remove Members in a Spool Rename a Spool Delete a Spool

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Creating a Spool
This task shows you how to create a spool. A spool is a grouping of objects much like an assembly is a group of components or parts. All objects in a spool must be contiguous and connected to each other. 1. In the following scenario a series of runs have been connected. Click on the Create Spool button . The Create Spool dialog box will appear.

2.

Click on the New button. A dialog box will appear prompting you to define the range (from-to) for the spool you want to create.

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To create a spool in a new document check the option Create Spool in a New Document and enter a file name in the window that displays. 3. Click the Define elements in range button . The Analyze Networks dialog box will open.

4.

Click on the Path tab and select the From and To objects of the spool you want to create. The image below shows the selected spool.

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5.

The spool is highlighted in the 3D viewer as are its members in the specification tree. The Analyze Networks dialog box displays the From object and To object as well as the Number of objects in the current path.

6. 7.

Click the Close button on the Analyze Networks dialog box. The New dialog box opens again allowing you to name the spool you just created. You may accept

the default name or assign a name of your choosing. Click on the Use ID Schema button to activate the Name field and enter the name for the spool. Click on the Use ID Schema button if you want to revert to the name assigned by the application. When finished, click OK. The spool is created. 8. You can click the Show all spools feature in the New dialog box shown in Step 2. All spools in your document will be highlighted. Click again on the Create Spool button to see the list of spools you have created.

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Display or Edit Properties of a Spool


This task shows how to display and edit properties of a spool. 1. With the Create Spool dialog box displayed, click the Properties button. The Properties dialog box displays.

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The Properties dialog box will display tabs, most of which are used in all products. The Graphic tab allows you to change the appearance of the object. Under the Product tab you can include additional descriptive and historical data and make changes, such as renaming, to the basic Product in the specifications tree. See Infrastructure documentation ( Basic Tasks - Manipulating Objects - Displaying and Editing Graphic Properties) and Product Structure documentation (User's Tasks - Modifying Component Properties) for more information. 2. Click the More button to reveal the Object tab and all other available tabs. In the image above the Object tab displays the members of the spool under Group Members. 3. Click on the Product tab to display properties and enter the values and information in the fields provided. 4. Click Apply or OK. The properties will be edited. Some objects have discrete values - which means you may only select certain values. In that case you will be able to display a drop-down box and select one of the values in it.

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Select/Query a Spool or its Members


This task shows you how to select or query a spool and its members. When you select a spool, it will be highlighted in your product. In addition, by selecting the spool you are also querying it for its members which are highlighted in the specifications tree. 1.

With your product open, click on the Create Spool button . The Create Spools dialog box appears and displays the list of spools for the current product. Click on a spool among the list to reveal its location and to identify its members. You can also click on a part in the specifications tree to determine which spool it belongs to.

2. Use the Sort and Filter options if needed. 3. When you are finished, click Close.

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Transfer a Spool
This task shows you how to transfer a spool to another document. In the specifications tree, make active the document to which you want to transfer the spool, and 1. click the Create Spool button . The Create Spools dialog box appears and displays the list of spools for the current product. Select the spool you want to transfer and then click the Transfer button. The Transfer dialog box displays.

2.

3. 4.

Check one of the options - the first option will result in a new document being created under the active document, while the second option transfers the spool to the document you activated earlier. Click OK. The spool is transferred.

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Add/Remove Members in a Spool


This task shows you how to modify a spool 1. With your document open select the spool you want to modify and click the Modify button.

2. The Modify dialog box displays. You can redefine, extend the range to add additional members, or remove members from the spool.

When modifying a spool, your options are limited to extending its range to include additional members or removing members. Remember that members may only be removed from the ends of a spool. The 'Remove members' feature will only let you remove members from the end of the spool.

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3. Click to activate the Show all spools option. This will highlight all spools in the your product.

4. To remove a member activate the Remove members option. Click on either the Keep all elements on first half button or the

depending on which end you want to remove members from. If you clicked on Keep all Keep all elements on second half button members on second half, you will remove members, one at a time, from the first half (end) of the spool. Click the Keep all members on first half button then click on the member you want to remove. All members from there to the end of the spool will be removed. In the view below, members have been removed from the second half of Spool_001.

5. To add members to a spool, activate the Add Members option. There are two ways to add members to a spool. q You can redefine the range of the spool by clicking the Define new range feature and click on the Define elements in range . The Analyze Network dialog box displays. Under the Path tab the range is undefined. Proceed in defining the range as button described in Creating a Spool. Select the beginning and end of the spool to include the new members.

The other method is to click the Append another range to current selection button . The Analyze Network dialog box displays. Proceed as has been described to define the new range of members you want to add to the current spool.

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6. The new range of members are added to Spool_002.

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7. Click OK and then Close the Create Spool dialog box.

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Renaming a Spool
This task shows you how to rename a spool. 1. Click on the Create Spool button to bring up the dialog box showing the list of spools in the current document. Select the spool you want to rename and click on the Modify button. The Modify dialog box will display.

2. 3. 4.

Enter the new name for the spool and press Enter. When finished click OK. The spool will be renamed. To revert to the default naming convention click on the Use ID Schema button .

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Deleting a Spool
This task shows you how to delete a spool.

1.

Click on the Create Spool button current document.

to bring up the dialog box showing the list of spools in the

2. 3.

Select the spool you want to delete and click the Delete button. When finished click Close. The spool will be deleted.

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Analyzing Networks
This section discusses ways in which you can analyze networks. Analyze Network for Connections Viewing Related Objects

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Analyze Network for Connections


This task shows you how to analyze a network for connections. This function will show you all objects connected to any selected object. You can also use it to view all possible paths between two selected objects. 1. To see all objects connected to any selected object, click Analyze - Networks in the menu bar, with your document open. The Analyze Networks dialog box will display.

2. Select the Network tab and then select the object whose connections you want to see. The entire network will highlight and the Analyze Networks box will display the number of objects there are in the network. In the image below the smaller run is not highlighted because it is not connected to the bigger run.

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3. To see all possible paths between two objects click the Path tab in the Analyze Networks box, then click the two objects. If there is a path between the two objects, it will highlight. If there are two or more possible paths, the Current Path field in the Analyze Networks box will display how many paths there are when you click on the down arrow. To see another path (if there is one) select it in the Current Path field.

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Viewing Related Objects


This task shows you how to view all the objects related to a selected object. "Related" refers to objects that are directly connected, as well as objects that are an organizational element, such as line IDs. To use this function properly you must disable the Automatic Expand option for the specifications tree. To do this click Tools - Options, go to General - Display and then the Tree tab, and uncheck Automatic Expand. 1. With your document open, click Analyze - Related Objects in the menu bar. The Current Selection Panel will display (see below). 2. Make sure the View related objects option is checked, and select the object whose relatives you want to see. All objects related to the selected object will display in the Current Selection Panel.

3.

You can also select one of the related objects shown in the Current Selection Panel to see which objects they are related to.

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4. 5.

If you check Reframe on selection and then click on one of the objects in the Current Selection Panel, the object will display in your screen even if it was not currently showing. Checking the Freeze box will freeze the contents of the Current Selection Panel and it will no longer be updated.

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Routing Tasks
This section explains some routing tasks that are in addition to the ones explained in the Basic Tasks section. Aligning a Run to an Existing Surface Routing in 3D with the Compass Routing at an Offset of a Routable Edgeline: Routing Parallel to a Run Route a Run along a Spline Fix broken routables

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Aligning a Run to an Existing Surface


This task shows how to align a run to an existing surface or edge while in directional routing mode. This function uses the compass to align a run to the surface or edge. It is assumed that you have taken the steps necessary to start a run. See Routing a Run. 1. In the directional routing mode move the compass that shows at the end of the run to the edge whose angle you want to emulate.

2. 3. 4. 5.

The Z axis of the compass (it may read W) assumes the angle of the edge against which it is held. At the same time the last segment of your run assumes the angle of the compass' Z axis. Click once at the end of the segment to move the compass back to it. You can repeat the action to make the run align with any other edge or surface in the area. Double click to end the run.

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Routing in 3D with the Compass


This task shows you how to use the compass to route in any direction.

1.

Click on the Route a Run button The Routing dialog box is displayed.

2. 3. 4.

Click on the Directional Routing button. Select the type of run and enter other values. See Routing a Run for more details. Click at the point where you want to start your run from. This places the compass at that point.

To begin routing click and drag the compass so that its Z axis (it may read W) is pointing in the direction in which you want to route. Every time you want to change direction drag the Z (or W) axis of the compass.

5.

Double click, or click OK to end your routing.

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You can also double click on the compass to bring up the Compass Manipulation dialog box, which allows you to enter values to modify compass direction and/or location.

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This task shows you how to route a run at an offset of a routable. This function allows you to create a run paralleling an existing run, a defined distance apart. 1. Click the Create an Offset Route button. 2. Select a segment of the run to which you want an offset. The compass is placed on the segment. 3. The direction in which the Z axis of the compass is pointed determines where the new run will be placed: you can place the new run or runs to the inside, to the outside or stacked on top of the existing run by adjusting the compass. 4. Enter your options in the Run dialog box. 5. or Constant Clearance button. If you click the Constant Radius button the radius of the Click either the Constant Radius turns will be maintained but the offset may vary. If you click the Constant Clearance button the offset will be maintained but the radius of the turns may change. Click OK. The new runs will be created. A negative offset may be entered to offset in the opposite direction to the compass Z direction. In the illustration below the runs have been created with the Constant Clearance option.

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Edgeline: Routing Parallel to a Run


This task shows you how to route parallel to, or at an offset of, a routable. See also Routing at an Offset of a Routable and Position Segment Relative to a Plane. This function is used when you have an existing run and want to route parallel to it, or at a certain clearance from it. It is sometimes known as edgeline routing. You can also place an offset plane on a surface and use it as a reference point. 1. Display the run you want to route parallel to and click on the Run button displays. 2. Click on the Edgeline button . The Distance field will display and the Offset and Clearance . The Run dialog box

buttons will appear on the Run dialog box.

If you click the Offset button the distance between the two runs will be measured from centerline to centerline. If you click the Clearance button the distance between the two nearest edges will be measured. If there is a part on a piping or tubing line the distance will be measured from the part. If there is no part the distance will be measured from the line. 3. Enter the distance between the two runs. If you enter 0 and click the clearance button, the two runs will touch at the edges. 4. Click at the starting point. The compass will display at that point. 5. Move the compass so that the Z axis points in the direction that you want to route, which should be in the direction of the run that you want to parallel. You can do this by moving it manually, or by clicking the second mouse button once and then toggling the shift key.

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6.

Once you have the direction selected, route toward the run you want to parallel. Once the centerline of the target run is highlighted you can press the Shift key to toggle between various "solutions," or various sides. In the images below there are only two solutions and you can route on two sides of the target run.

7. 8.

Select the target run after you have decided which side you are routing on. Begin routing and double click to end. The finished run is shown below.

You can place an offset plane on a surface and use it as a reference to route parallel to, or to keep a certain clearance from. After placing the offset plane use the procedure described above.

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Route a Run along a Spline


This task shows you how to route a run along a spline. 1. Import the model which contains the spline into the Piping Design workbench.

2. 3.

4. 5.

Click on the Route from Spline button. Select type of run and enter other options. Note: The SAG option is used to define the maximum distance a segment can be from the spline. The run that is created consists of straight segments, as you can see in the illustration below. The smaller the SAG number entered, the closer the run will resemble the spline. But this will also cause more segments to be created. Select Create connection to curve if you want a connection between the run and the spline. If this option is checked the run will move if the spline is moved. Click on the spline. The run is created.

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This task shows you how to fix - or rejoin - routables in which segments have become separated. In the illustration below, the dotted line - the broken routable indicator - shows that a run has become separated at that point.

You can re-join the run in one of several ways, depending on the nature of the break and your requirements. The methods are as follows: 1. Bring up the Definition dialog box for the run, then place the mouse pointer over the broken routable indicator and click the right mouse button. This will display a pop-up menu. Click Create Segment. 2. Bring up the Definition dialog box, then drag one of the segment handles to re-join the run.

3. Bring up the Definition dialog box. An arrow will display at each end of the broken (depending 201 on circumstances) to re-join the run. In the Version 5 Release 15 routable indicator. Drag one of the arrowsPage Piping Design illustration below, one segment of the run has been moved to connect to the portion of the run still connected to the pump.

4. In certain cases you will see the Auto Route option beneath the Create Segment option in the pop-up menu (See Step 1). This happens when a segment connecting two parallel routables (which are on different X-Y planes) is broken.
q

Select Auto Route. The

Auto Route dialog box will display.

Click on the Toggle

button. Options for re-joining the run will be shown as a dotted line.

Click OK to make your selection.

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Building Piping Parts


This section explains ways of creating and using resources. Create a Part with Specified Type Define Graphic Representations for a Part Define Properties for a Part Change the Parameters of a Part Defining the Part Type Building a New Unique Reference Generating Resolved Parts from Parametric Parts Requirements for Building Parts

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Create a Part with Specified Type


This task shows you how to create a part with a specified type. You can also modify the type of some existing parts. See Defining the Part Type. Before you create parts you should specify where they will be stored. A default directory is specified but if you change it see Understanding Project Resource Management. The parts are normally moved from this directory into the catalog. You should also create a graphic representations file and specify where it is located. (See Defining Directory Paths and Define Graphic Representations for a Part.) You can create some parts as a light object, as explained below. To learn more about light objects see Creating a Light Object. 1. Click on the Build Piping Part button . The Create Part dialog box appears.

2. Click the Display Class Browser button next to the Component Type field. The Class Browser appears.

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3. The Class Browser allows you to select the type of piping part you want to create. Navigate to the type you want by clicking on the "plus" sign next to each directory, or by using the three navigation buttons at the bottom. You can also filter for certain types. For instance, you can enter "elbow" in the Filter field and hit enter to see all elbow types. Click OK after making your selection. Certain parts can be created as light objects - as of R13 these were weld, straight routable part and bendable. If you select one of these types in the class browser then the Create Part dialog box will display a checkbox "Make light . The default is checked. If you do not want to create a part as a light object then object" uncheck this. 4. The File Open button is used to bring up a part, say, if you did not finish creating it and had to close the application. Using the File Open button you can navigate to the directory where the part is stored. 5. The Define Properties button brings up the Properties box, allowing you to change properties if needed.

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6.

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The Override Parameters button button brings up a dialog box which allows you to override a parameter. When you click on a parameter on the left side of the box and then click on the arrow to bring it on the right side, that means the parameter can be overridden. (See Change the Parameters of a Part.) When you place this part the application will try to determine a value for that parameter. If it cannot, then you will be asked to enter one. For a stretchable part, such as a piping stretchable, the "Length" attribute must be defined as an override parameter.

7. to create a design table and associate it to the part you are creating. For more Click the Design Table button information on this see the Infrastructure document - Advanced Tasks - Using Knowledgeware Capabilities. 8. Click the Formula button to create formulas and parameters. See the Knowledgeware document mentioned above for more information. 9. The Define Connector button 10. The Connector Specs button 11. The Manage Representations button 12. Click the Define ID Schema button name for the part. The Set Type button lets you create and manage graphic representations. next to the Symbol Name field if you want the application to generate a lets you associate specifications to connectors. allows you to add connectors.

13. lets you define the type of the part.

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14. Enter a name for the part in the Symbol Name field and hit Enter. Click Apply or OK. The part will be created. In the illustration below it has been named Elbow1.

The part has been created but it still does not have a graphic representation - it has no "looks". You will learn how to create one or more graphic representations for the part in subsequent tasks. If you are creating a part as a light object you do not need to create geometry. Instead you can save the part. 15. You must save the part to the directory specified in the resource management file. Double click on the part (Elbow1 in the image above) to make it active and then use the File menu to save it.

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Define Graphic Representations for a Part


This task shows you how to create multiple graphic representations for a part. See also Manage Graphic Representations. Once you have created a part and specified a type, you can create one or more graphic representations, i.e., create the body of the part. You can define multiple graphic representations when you need to show more than one graphic of the same component. For instance, you may need to show a pipe as "double", which is like a 3D version, as "single", which means represented by a single line, or "envelope", which also includes the working area needed around the pipe or equipment. These three categories are defined in this application. A fourth category is also included, "exact", which is normally used for detailed representation. You can create these three graphics of the same pipe and place whichever one you prefer in a document. Before you create multiple representations you should set up a Graphic Representations file. (You do this by creating a file - a default is provided if you want to use it - and noting its location in your resource management file. See Understanding Project Resource Management.) A Graphic Representations file allows you to classify each graphic that you create into a specific category. In addition to the four categories that are defined in the application and that were described above, you can create categories based on your specific needs. NOTE: If you are creating a part as a light object you do not need to create additional representations. The application will be able to generate double and single representations for the part. You can, however, change the wording 'double' and 'single' in the text file. 1. When you create a part as explained in Create piping part with specified type, it is given the first classification listed in your Graphic Representations file. In this example it is Double as shown in the illustration below. To start making graphic representations for the part, you will first create a graphic for the Double representation that you have already created. To do this double click on Elbow1 to bring up the Part Design product. (Not all users may have a license for Part Design - contact your system administrator.)

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2. Create your part (in this case an elbow) using Part Design. (See Part Design documentation if you need help.) You have now created the Double graphic representation of the part.

3. To create a second graphic representation, double click on Elbow1 (Elbow1.1) to return to Piping Design. 4. Click on the Build Piping Part button to display the Create Part dialog box and click on the elbow to make it active. The buttons in the Create Part dialog box will become active. 5. Click on the Manage Representations button box will display. . The Manage Graphic Representations dialog

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6. The Defined column shows which representations exist for the part. If a name has No against it you can create a representation by clicking on No. It will change to Yes and the graphic name will be added to the specifications tree. You now need to create a body for it, as described above. In the illustration below you can see both double and single representations. The single representation is the white line running through the 3D elbow.

7. If the value for a graphic in the Activated column is Yes it means you can see that graphic. (You can toggle between Yes and No by clicking on it.) If you check the box Expand representations you can see more than one representation of that part in the same document - if the representation exists.

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Define Properties for a Part


This task shows you how to add properties to a part. 1.

With the part displayed click on the Build Piping Part button box and then click on the Define Properties button

to display the Create Part dialog

. The Properties dialog box will display.

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2. 3.

Click on the Piping tab to display properties and enter the values you want. Click Apply or OK.

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This task shows you how to change the parameters of a part. 1.

Select a part, in this case an elbow at the end of a run, and click the Edit Part Parameters button dialog box displays.

. The Manage Override Parameters

2. 3. 4.

The box displays parameters that can be overridden for the part you selected. In this case only the CutAngle can be overridden. Parameters that can be overridden are assigned to a part when you build a part of a specified type. When you select the parameter the current value appears in the = box next to Edit value of the current parameter. Enter the new value, for example 30deg, and click Apply. The cut angle of the elbow will be updated to 30 degrees.

5.

Click OK to close the dialog box.

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Defining the Part Type


This task shows you how to define a part type. You can only define the type of a part that does not already have a type assigned to it. This means that the part must be newly created, or it should be an existing part that has no type assigned (such as a CATPart from a product such as Systems Routing). Piping Design is used as an example here. Substitute directories as needed. 1. Click the Set Object Type button . The Set Object Type dialog box displays.

2.

Click the Open Existing Part button next to the Filename field and navigate to the part you want to modify. Click Open on the File Selection dialog box. The file will display in the Filename field. Click the Display Class Browser button next to the Component Type field. The Class Browser will display. Expand the tree in the Class Browser and select the part type that you want to assign to the part. Click OK. The type will be assigned. Click OK in the Set Object Type dialog box.

3.

4.

5.

At this point a copy of the part is saved in the CATTemp directory under C:\..\..\Local Settings\Application Data\DassaultSystemes. Proceed with the Build Part cycle, i.e., Define Properties, Formulas, associate a Design Table, manage Override Parameters, Define Connectors, Associate Specifications to the Connectors, and Manage Graphic Representations (as applicable).

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6.

To save the part, activate the part level in your product, then click File - Save As.

Save the part in \..\..\intel_a\startup\EquipmentAndSystems\Piping\PipingDesign\ ComponentCatalogs\Parametric. (Replace Piping\PipingDesign with the workbench you are in.)

7.

FOR EQUIPMENT ARRANGEMENT ONLY You can select the part in your document to bring up the Class Browser. This will only work if the part you select has not had a type assigned to it, such as when you are building the part. Also, note that when you use this method of assigning a type you will only be able to assign the Resource type. You will not be able to select any other type. To follow this procedure, click the Set Object Type button (in the Create Part dialog box or in the toolbar). The Set Object Type dialog box displays. Click the part to display the Class Browser and select the type. You can continue building the part.

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Building a New Unique Reference


This task shows you how to build a new unique reference. A unique reference is considered unique because it acquires certain unique values once you place it. This command is useful when you make a copy of your design, but you want to change values/features in one or more parts in that copied design. If you change the original part then the change will take effect in both documents. If you make a new unique reference then the change will only take effect in that document. If the command button is not in your toolbar you can add it by following these steps: Click Tools - Customize, select Command tab - All Commands. Select Build New Unique Reference and drag it into a toolbar.

Open your document and select the Product under which it resides. 1. 2. Click the Build New Unique Reference button showing the unique parts in your document. . The List of Unique References dialog box displays,

3.

Select the part (you can select more than one) for which you want to make a new reference and click Apply and/or OK. The reference is created. The 'old' reference is deleted and replaced with the reference you just created. You need to save your changes.

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Generating Resolved Parts from Parametric Parts


This task shows you how to generate resolved parts from parametric parts. Each parametric part that you use to generate resolved parts must refer to a design table. The design table must have a column called "PartNumber", which should have a value. This value is used to name the generated resolved part. 1. Create a directory and place in it the parametric CATPart documents, associated design table documents and CATShape documents, if any. Create a second directory to hold the resolved parts when they are created. 2. Open a command prompt window and change to the directory ...intel_a\code\command. Type the following and press Enter: CATCloGenerateResolvedParts.bat XXX YYY where XXX is the full path name of the directory you created in Step 1 to hold parametric parts; and YYY is the directory created to hold the resolved parts. For UNIX enter CATCloGenerateResolvedParts.sh /XXX /YYY (replace XXX with the full path name of the directory you created in Step 1 to hold parametric parts; and YYY is the directory created to hold the resolved parts). For Structures Applications Only: If you are using this task to resolve sections for structures applications like Structure Functional Design, you must add the following at the end of the commands listed above: -appl Structure 3. After the program finishes executing, the parts are placed in YYY - the directory you created to hold the resolved parts. Each part has as its name the entry from the part number column of the design table. The design table association is removed from the generated resolved part. 4. Add the parts to a catalog. To add the parts to an existing catalog see Modifying a Catalog. To create a new catalog see Creating a Catalog. If a part does not get added to the catalog it may not have a part type (component object type) defined. In that case you may need to add the part to a catalog individually.

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Requirements for Building Parts


This task lists certain requirements for building parts. You should incorporate these when you are building parts, or part behavior will not be as expected. Instructions for building parts are given elsewhere in this manual, including in the section Building Parts. Connectors are explained in the section Connectors. Instructions for using the Part Design product are given in the Part Design User Guide. The column headings below mean:
q

Part Type: The part type to which the requirements apply. Geometrical requirements: The requirements you must incorporate when you are creating the geometry for the part. Properties: The requirements you must incorporate when defining these properties. Override parameters: The properties shown here must be defined as override. Connector type: The type of geometry needed for creating connectors.

Part Type

Geometrical Requirements Regular object: q No requirements

Properties
q

No requirements

Override Parameters Piping: q PipeLength

Connector Type Regular object: q Use existing geometry

Light object: Straight


q

HVAC:
q

Light object:
q

No geometry required

Diameter Width Height DuctLength

(stretchable)

Define new geometry

Regular object: q PartBody named using the default representation name (i.e. "Double")
q

No requirements

Piping: q No override parameters

New geometry

Profile sketch and Rib feature need to exist in the primary PartBody. PartBody named "Hidden" Spine sketch needs to exist in the "Hidden" OpenBody named "RibPath" which will be empty

HVAC:
q

Diameter

Bendable/Flexible
q

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Light object:
q

No geometry required No requirements OK to cut: q Yes for cut elbows


q

Piping: q Cut Angle

Use existing geometry

No for elbow with set angles

HVAC:
q

Cut Angle: Elbow


q

Diameter Width Height DuctLength

Actual angle of the elbow

Turn Angle:
q

Maximum angle that the elbow can turn No requirements Piping: q No requirements
q

No requirements

Use existing geometry

HVAC: Inline Part


q

Diameter Width Height

Regular object: q No requirements

No requirements

Outside Diameter Weld Offset Nominal Size

Regular object: q Use existing geometry

Inline Weld

Light object:
q

Light object:
q

No geometry required

Define new geometry

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q

Regular object: q No requirements

No requirements

Outside Diameter Outside Diameter2 Weld Offset Nominal Size Nominal Size2

Regular object: q Use existing geometry

Branch Weld

Light object:
q q

Light object:
q

No geometry required

New geometry

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Using ENOVIA
The following information is provided as a brief understanding of the ENOVIA environment and what is needed to work with ENOVIA in conjunction with the CATIA Engineering and System suite of products. Please refer to ENOVIA documentation for more detailed information on specific ENOVIA usage and functionality. The ENOVIA, CATIA and DELMIA products based on Dassault Systemes' industry-renowned V5 enterprise architecture provide a complete solution for customer PLM requirements. The ENOVIA product line provides the PDM component of the overall solution. With the ENOVIA product, users can effectively manage the entire product life cycle of their data, including data management, work flow management, people and organization management, and many other aspects of their product and business. Creating a Product Importing a Product Using Work Packages Saving a Work Package Organizing Work Packages Also refer to the Customizing section.

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Creating a Product
This task explains how you should create a product. ENOVIA and CATIA should be running and connected.

. You should be in the ENOVIA home page You should familiarize yourself with the directory structure in ENOVIA. At the top level you will have a directory called product class root - this usually encompasses all the activity in your company. Under this you may have several product class directories. Under the product class will be the product directories. Product displays in this application, the other two are only displayed in ENOVIA. Users will mostly interact with the product. It is created at individual project level - in a shipyard it will be created for each ship that is designed - and work packages, explained later in this section, are created under the product. The product class directories may not be created in smaller projects, but the product class root and the product directories should always exist. 1. Information about creating all three levels is provided in ENOVIA documentation. Briefly, to create a product you should be in the Product Class View. Right click on the product class, select New and then Product in the menus that display. Enter a name for the product in the product ID field. Add to the Name and Description fields for informational purposes if you want. The newly created directory displays in the Product Class View.

2. Click the Save button to save your changes. A Characteristics window displays after you create a directory. You do not need to enter any information in it. Read the ENOVIA user guide to learn more about this window.

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Importing a Product
This task explains how you import a product, and work packages, from ENOVIA. You need to import the product because you will be creating work packages under it. The top level directories - product class root and product class - remain in ENOVIA, only the product is imported. You must import the product (and existing work packages) each time you start a new session. 1. In the Product Editor, right click on the product and select Send To - XXX, XXX being the application you are sending it to (such as CATIA V5). The product displays in the specifications tree.

2. You also need to import all the work packages that you need from ENOVIA to this application each time you start a new session. The process is as described above (select the document

associated with the work package and go to Step 2 above). Note that if you send a work package then the product is also sent - you do not need to send both. You can use filters to determine which work packages you need. It is best, though not essential, to import all the work packages that you need in one operation.

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Using Work Packages


This task explains the concept of work packages and how to create them. You can save work packages in an ENOVIA database, or save them to a local drive or server. You should also refer to Connections Between Work Packages and Managing Publications. Work packages are necessary for efficient data organization and concurrent engineering. The biggest benefit, perhaps, is that they allow you to organize data in easily manageable units. Concurrent engineering refers to the practice of having several people, maybe even hundreds, work on the same project. If the design is created in one document then only one person can work on it. Creating several work packages provides the answer, by creating several documents under one root document. Each document (or work package) contains the portion of design that one person is working on - such as placing equipment in one compartment of a ship. "Publications" are automatically (see below) created at the locations at which different documents connect. Each work package thus 'knows' where it belongs within the product. If something is moved - say equipment to which a run connects - then the user will be alerted about it. The steps central to using work packages are explained below. Work packages must be organized in a certain way. See Organizing Work Packages to learn how to do it. 1. CREATE A WORK PACKAGE: To create a work package, select the product and, in the menubar, click Insert - New Product. In the simple example below two work packages have been created. One contains the equipment and the other contains the run and piping that connect the two pieces of equipment. Thus, the person who owns the equipment work package can open the document at the same time that the piping engineer is working on his work package.

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2. ADD DOCUMENTS: However, in order to be able to route from the equipment, the piping engineer will need to be able to see the equipment. In order to do this the piping engineer will need to import the equipment document. See Importing a Product for more information. Once he has imported both documents he can make the piping document active and begin routing in it. When he saves, the piping information will be saved in the piping document. 3. PUBLISH CONNECTORS: As stated earlier, publications need to be created so that a connection can be established to objects in other work packages. To take the example given above, the piping engineer has both documents open, but he has write access only to the piping document, which he created. When he routes between the equipment publications are only created in his own document. Publications are needed so that the connections between components are retained. To ensure that publications are created even when someone without write access to a document connects equipment, connectors must be published. In this case the equipment engineer needs to publish the connectors on the equipment in his document so that when the piping engineer creates runs publications are created on the equipment also. In most cases this is done when the part is placed, because most parts do not exist in isolation and need to be connected to something. To learn how to create connectors and publish/unpublish them see Creating Connectors.

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Saving a Work Package


This task gives a brief explanation about a simple save operation after creating or working on work packages. To learn more about the Save operation, and what the various options mean, you must see ENOVIA documentation. 1. Click the Save in ENOVIA LCA Server button 2. Click OK to save the work package. . The Save in ENOVIA dialog box displays.

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Organizing Work Packages


This task explains how you should organize the work packages that you create. This type of organization is usually done by an administrator. See ENOVIA documentation for more information on components. 1.Work packages must always be created at the same level in the specifications tree, under the Product. However, users can create "components" using the Component Editor, and group work packages under these components. 2.To create a component, expand your tree in the Product Editor so that the Product is visible. Right click on the Product, select Send To and then Component Editor. The Component Editor opens with your Product visible. 3.Right click on the Product and select Insert Child. In the Product pane that displays, make sure Generic Component is selected in the Type field. Enter a name for the component in the Product Component ID field, in this example PipingComponent. Make entries in the Name and Description fields (for informational purposes) if you want to, and click Add or OK. The component you created displays under the Product.

Make entries in the Name and Description fields (for informational purposes) if you want to, and click Add or OK. The component you created displays under the Product.

4.Save your changes.

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5.When you open the Product Editor again you will see three columns, with the first column showing the product and the newly created components, the second column showing the work packages and components, and the last column showing characteristics - if you select an object. If you do not see work packages in the second column then right-click on the product and select Open Assembly in Instance View.

6.To group one or more work packages under the component, right click on a work package and select Copy.

7.Next, right click on a component, and select Special Paste - Link. The work package will be grouped under that component.

8.Save your changes.

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Creating and Modifying Connectors


This section explains ways of creating, modifying and deleting connectors. Create Connectors Associate Attributes to a Connector Use the Compass to Manipulate Connectors Modifying or Deleting Connectors Creating Duplicate Connectors Using the Plane Manipulator Hide/Show Connectors

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Create Connectors
This task shows you how to create a connector. Connectors can only be created on objects that have existing geometry that satisfies the rules of connector creation. If existing geometry is not present, you will have to create the geometry. 1. If the resource is not active, make it active by double-clicking in the specifications tree.

2.

Click the Build Connector button. This will bring up the Manage Connectors dialog box. You will not be able to add a connector on the instance of a part using the Add command in the Manage Connectors dialog box. You can only add connectors on the reference of a part (the part in the master catalog), using the Create Part command. However, you can add a connector to a unique part using the Manage Connectors dialog box. The Manage Connectors dialog box will list all connectors on the selected part. To see a connector and its associated geometry on the part, select a connector from the list. Adding a connector is explained below; Delete, Modify and Duplicate are explained elsewhere in this section. To Publish a connector means you are allowing people who do not have write access to your document to establish a connection. This is explained further in Using Work Packages. You can Publish or Unpublish connectors using the two buttons.

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3.

Click the Add button. The Add Connectors box displays.

Select the type of connector - piping, HVAC, etc. In some applications the flow direction field will be available. The piping (or tubing) part connector has flow direction built in and you must select a flow direction also from the drop down menu. The mechanical part connector has no flow direction. Another type of connector - the nozzle connector - will be available if you are placing a connector on a nozzle. A nozzle connector must be placed on the end of the nozzle that connects to equipment. A part connector is placed on the end that connects to the pipe or duct. An electrical part connector should only be placed on a socket. The electrical part connector should be placed on the end of the socket that connects to equipment. A cableway part connector should be placed on the free end of the socket that does not connect to equipment. When you are placing a connector on a Bendable, such as a bendable pipe, you must use the Define New Geometry option. You must not use existing geometry to place the connector. You can name each connector by selecting in the Name field. This is useful for some functions, such as designing using a schematic.

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The concept of Publishing or Unpublishing a connector is explained above. Check the checkbox as necessary. Face, orientation and alignment are explained below. The orientation, alignment and face must be defined correctly before a connector can be created. To explain what these are, the face is the surface to which you attach a connector. As an example, if you want to attach a clock to your office wall, the wall is the face. You want the numeral "12" to be up, so you orient the clock accordingly. This is the orientation. The alignment is the direction in which the clock face is pointed - normally it would be perpendicular to the wall. When creating a connector, the alignment always has to be perpendicular to the face. The face is generally defined using a face of the part, such as the end of a pipe. Alignment is usually defined using a line, such as the not-shown line along the centerline of a pipe. Orientation is defined using the xy plane, or another plane or face to define an "up" direction. In the illustration below the Z axis indicates the alignment of the connector. It also indicates the direction in which routing will occur. The X and Y axis together define the orientation. They are useful when attaching two resources.

It is necessary to select geometry in the part to which you want to attach a connector so that these three characteristics are correctly defined. If the part does not have the necessary geometry then you must create it. 4. If you want to create a connector using the part's existing geometry click the Use existing geometry option.

Click the Select Face button to select a face. Selectable faces will highlight as you move your pointer over the part.

Click this button to select the alignment. You will only be able to indicate the alignment by selecting a line - from the construction geometry, or elsewhere in the part if there is one. You can only select a line that is perpendicular to the face plane.

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Click this button to select the orientation. You will only be able to select a plane that is perpendicular to the face you selected. If you cannot find a plane to select, click the Swap Visible Space button (see below) to make the construction geometry visible, and select a plane.

Some connector types require you to place a datum point. The datum point is placed by clicking this button and then clicking a 3-D point on the part. The datum point is used as follows:
q

Lofted reservation section: Datum is used to define where the spline will start and end when creating lofted reservations. Tubing & waveguide parts: Datum is used to define where the spline will start and end when creating flexible tubes. Hangers: See Hanger Design documentation.

You can display the part construction geometry, if there is any, to make it easier to select existing geometry. Do this by:
q

Right click on the part entry in the specifications tree. Click Hide/Show. The part will disappear from the screen.

Click the Swap Visible Space button . The part will reappear on your screen with the construction geometry visible. Clicking the button again will toggle you back.

5.

The fields under Classify Connector will become available after you have successfully selected the geometry explained in Step 4. Click on the down arrows to make your selection. Select a type. For Flow direction, select In, Out, InOut or None. Select the Face type. A Hole connection allows a routable to pass through it - it is useful for placing parts like clamps along a run without cutting a tube. A Face connection will stop a routable and not allow it to pass through. Select an alignment. Choose an orientation: Circular will allow the connector to attach to another connector at any orientation; round ducts and pipes, for instance, do not need a well-defined "up" direction because they can rotate. A Rectangular orientation is used for parts like rectangular ducts; they do not have a strict ''up" direction. Up allows the connector to attach to another connector or part in the up position: horizontal trays, for instance, require a well-defined "up" position. You can also use the "up" orientation for a hole connector. In the image below, the connector on the right has the up orientation, the connector on the left does not.

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6.

The number in the Number field is assigned by the application. This can be significant because when you are creating a new connector, you have the option of using the alignment and orientation used in the previous connector after you select the face. You can choose to do this, or select a new alignment and/or orientation. Click OK. The new connector will be listed in the Manage Connectors box. To define new geometry for placing a connector, select the option Define new geometry, then click on the Select plane button . The Define Plane box will display.

7.

8.

Use the functions provided by the Define Plane box to reposition the connector, if necessary, as explained below. (The colors of the buttons may be slightly different in some applications.)

face.

Click the Define Plane button to redefine the plane as well as the origin by clicking once on the

Click the Define Plane using Compass button to redefine the plane using the compass.

Click the Define 3-point Plane button to define the plane by clicking on any three points with your pointer. The connector will be placed on the first point you click.

Click the Define Line-Point Plane button to select the plane by clicking on a point and a line, like an edge. The connector will be placed on the first point you click.

Click the Define Line-Line button to select the plane by clicking on two lines. The plane will be defined by the first line selected. But if the two lines are parallel the plane will be defined as the plane in which both lines exist.

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Click the Define plane at center of circle button to select the plane by clicking three points on the edge of a circle. This method is used for multi-CAD documents, usually for CGR circles. You can click at points where two lines meet or in the center of a face. The Z axis of the plane manipulator will be placed according to the right hand rule. If you click clockwise the Z axis will point into the object. If you click counter clockwise the Z axis will point out from the object.

Click the Define plane at product origin button and then the object to place the plane manipulator on the origin of the object. The plane manipulator axis will match that of the product.

Click the Define Orientation button to change the orientation. Click the button and then click a point or a line. If you click a point the X axis will point to it. If you click a line the X axis will become parallel to the line.

Use the Move Origin buttons to define the plane. Define Origin at Plane or Compass allows you to define the origin using the compass or plane command. You use the compass or plane as the base plane along which the origin can be selected. Define Origin at Point or Center of Face lets you

9.

Define Origin at Center of Circle allows to select select the origin by clicking on a point or face. the origin by clicking at three points - the origin will be placed in the center of an imaginary circle drawn using those three points. The plane and orientation will not change when using this command. Click OK. The connector will be placed and the Add Connector dialog box will display again.<

10. Make your selections in the fields under Classify Connector as described in Step 5. Click OK.

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Associate Attributes to a Connector


This task shows you how to associate attributes to a connector. NOTE: This task was formerly called Associate Specifications to a Connector. "Associating attributes" means assigning specific attributes to connectors. If a value has been assigned to the attribute then it is also associated with the connector. When you build a part, it inherits all the attributes that you have assigned to the sub-class to which it belongs (this is done in the Feature Dictionary). Values are assigned to these attributes using the Edit - Properties function. Now you need to associate some of these attributes to connectors, to help in the designing process. If you assign a certain end style to a connector, for instance, the part placement function will know what kinds of parts are compatible with the end style assigned to that connector and filter accordingly. A piping part is used here as an example. The process is the same for other types of parts too. 1. With the part displayed click the Build Part button to display the Create Part dialog box.

2. Select the part and click the Associate Attributes to Connector button Associate Attributes to Connectors dialog box. to display the

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ATTRIBUTES: This section of the box displays all the attributes entered in the Connector Attributes file (see below). You will need to decide which ones you want to associate to specific connectors. The drop down arrow allows you to select how many of each attribute you want to be available to you nominal size and end style have two attributes each in this example. Click the down arrow and make your selection. Click Assign when you have finished. The second pane displays the connectors on your part and the attributes associated with them. In the example above, for instance, Connector 1 is associated with EndStyle, while Connector 2 is associated with EndStyle2. You can use the Edit - Properties function to edit the values assigned to these attributes. The third pane will display how many of each type of attribute are associated with the part, and the values, if any, assigned to them. You can also use it to change the attribute assigned to each connector. To display the attributes, select one of the attributes in the second pane, say EndStyle. The window displays all the available end styles on the part and their values.

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To change the attribute associated with a connector: Click on the attribute beneath the connector in the second pane. Then, in the third pane, select the attribute you want to replace it with. In the example above, for Connector 1, if you want to change EndStyle to EndStyle2, select EndStyle in the second pane and EndStyle2 in the third pane. Click OK when you have finished.

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CONNECTOR ATTRIBUTES FILE The Connector Attributes file controls the attributes that are displayed in the Associate Attributes to Connectors dialog box. A part may have dozens or even hundreds of attributes associated with it. Since only some of these need to be associated with connectors, the Connector Attributes file gives you a way of controlling the number. There are sample ConnectorAttributes.txt files for each application, located in the directory ...intel_a\startup\EquipmentAndSystems\XXX\ YYY\ComponentCatalogs where XXX is the discipline, like Piping, and YYY is the application, like Piping Design. Sample files for Equipment Arrangement are located a little differently: ...intel_a\startup\EquipmentAndSystems\Equipment\XXX\ EquipmentArrangement\ComponentCatalogs where XXX is a discipline like Piping. This simply allows for placing different types of equipment (piping equipment, HVAC equipment etc.) in their own directories. If you want to display more or different attributes in the Associate Attributes to Connectors dialog box then make appropriate changes in the ConnectorAttributes.txt file using a text editor like WordPad. The location of the Connector Attributes file must be correctly referenced in the project resource management file. You must save the CATPart file to the directory in which you store the parts that you create.

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Using the Compass to Manipulate Connectors


This task shows you how to use the compass to manipulate connectors placed on resolved parts. You can use the compass to manipulate connectors placed on resolved parts only. Use this method when adding a new connector, or by using the Modify command. Both are explained below. 1. To manipulate while adding a connector, drag the compass and place it over the connector while the Define Plane box is displayed. 2. To manipulate using the Modify command, select the resource, click the Manage Connectors button and, in the Manage Connectors dialog box, select the connector in the connectors list. Click the Modify button. 3. The Modify Connectors box will display. You can now drag the compass and place it over the connector. 4. Click on one of the handles on the compass and manipulate the connector to the desired position. You can change alignment, orientation and origin using the compass.

5. Click OK on the Modify Connector or the Define Plane dialog box when done. Remove the compass from the connector by dragging it to the axis.

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Modifying or Deleting Connectors


This task shows you how to modify or delete connectors. You will not be able to modify or delete a connector that has constraints or connections. You will not be able to modify or delete a connector on the instance of a part using the Modify or Delete commands in the Manage Connectors dialog box. You can only modify or delete connectors on the reference of a part (the part in the master catalog). You need to use the Create Part command to modify a reference part. However, you can modify or delete a unique part using the Manage Connectors dialog box. 1. To delete a connector select the resource by double clicking in the specifications tree and click the Build Connectors button. This will display the Manage Connectors dialog box. 2. Select the connector in the connectors list and click the Delete button. The connector will be deleted. 3. To modify a connector click the Modify button in the Manage Connectors box. The Modify Connectors dialog box displays.

4. Follow the procedures described in Step 4 and subsequent of Creating Connectors.

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Creating Duplicate Connectors


This task shows you how to create one or more duplicate connectors. You can only make duplicate connectors on a resolved part. Connectors can only be duplicated on the same part. With your resolved part displayed, click the Build Connectors button. This will open the Manage 1. Connectors dialog box. 2. Select the part. This will display all connectors on it and also display a list in the dialog box.

3. Select the connector you want to duplicate and click Duplicate in the Manage Connectors dialog box. The Duplicate Connectors dialog box displays.

4. Enter the spacing between the connectors and the number of connectors you want.

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5. Drag the compass and place it on a surface with the Z axis pointing toward the direction in which you want the new connectors located. The two illustrations below show how you can change the location of the new connectors by changing the direction of the Z axis.

6. Click OK.

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Using the Plane Manipulator


This task shows you how to use the plane manipulator. You can use the plane manipulator to change the orientation, alignment, plane and location of the plane you propose to create. The X and Y axis indicate the orientation and the Z axis indicates the alignment. For example, if you create a connector and route from it, routing will occur in the direction indicated by the Z axis.

1. To change the orientation of an axis, click on the dot at the end of it. It will flip 180 degrees.

2. To move the manipulator along any axis, click and drag on that axis. The manipulator will move and the distance will display. 3. Click on the origin (red square) and drag to move the manipulator to a new plane. 4. To change the orientation you can also click and drag any of the arcs in the manipulator to rotate it. It will rotate in increments, which is 15 degrees in the image below.

To change the degree of rotation click Tools-Options, select Equipments & Systems and select the General tab. Enter the degree of rotation in the Snap Angle field. For instance, if you enter 45, the manipulator will snap in increments of 45 degrees, counting its starting position as 0. It will snap to the nearest 45 degree step - if you move it to 88 degrees from its starting position it will snap to 90 degrees.

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Show/Hide Connectors
This task shows you how to hide or show connectors. Connectors may be hard to select during certain processes, such as when you are in cache mode, or trying to select a connector in a hole. This step makes them visible so that you can select easily. 1. Click the Show/Hide Connector button . This button may be located in the lower toolbar. 2. Select the part whose connectors you want shown. The connectors display.

3. To hide the connectors, click the Show/Hide Connector button and select the part again.

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Transferring a Document to Another Site


Documents can be transferred to other computers or networks. However, there are some factors you need to consider to ensure that the documents display correctly. You must either transfer the following to the new computer or network, or ensure that they can be accessed from there:
q

Line IDs used in the document. Each line ID you create has a file associated with it. These may be in the default directory, or your system administrator may have designated a different directory. To find out which directory it is click on Tools - Project Management select the Browse tab and scroll to the directory under Resources for your application. Resolved parts. These may be in the default directory, or your system administrator may have designated a different directory. To find out which directory it is click on Tools - Project Management select the Browse tab and scroll to the directory under Resources for your application. The setup data, such as that relating to standards, specifications catalog and design rules. If you want to make changes to the document at the new site then you must also move the relevant catalogs. If you only want to view it then you do not need to move the catalogs. To find out more about setup data read Understanding Project Resource Management.

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Migrating V4 Models to V5
This section explains how you can migrate your V4 models to V5. To explain the process briefly, you have to convert the classes and attributes in your V4 Project Registration Model to an XML file and ftp it to a V5 directory. You have to do the same with the classes and attributes in your V5 Feature Dictionary. A tool compares these two XML files and another tool then imports the classes and attributes that do not exist in V5 from the V4 XML file and makes them available to you in V5. You also have to export V4 piping lines, standards and parts to V5 and bring all the migrated data together before migrating the model. The migration process places a part into the new V5 document from a V5 catalog of migrated parts. Piping parts are migrated once and placed into a V5 catalog from which they are selected as needed, based on the attributes of the V4 part that is to be migrated. A process is also available to export all piping parts as catalog parts from a piping model. Another process allows you to create parts from an import file and place these parts in a catalog. If you decide not to use the sample directories provided with this application for your data then you must enter your new location, as needed by this process. To learn how to customize line thickness, see documentation for Interactive Drafting in the section Advanced Tasks/Manage Standards. Once defined, line thickness is applied to elements as a property. You should generally follow the following sequence for migrating models: Create a directory structure if you plan to store your migrated data in a location other than the location in which the sample data is stored. Classes and attributes:
q

Export V4 Project Registration Data Export V5 Feature Dictionary Data Compare the XML Output Import the XML Output

V4 piping data:
q

Export V4 Standards Data Export V4 Catalog Parts Export V4 Piping Lines

You created a directory structure earlier, but you also need to create/modify set up data, which refers to design

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rules, standards, etc. Migrate the V4 Model to V5 Additional tools:


q

Export Parts from a V4 Model Import Parts from Other Software

Creating a Directory Structure Exporting the V4 Project Registration Model Exporting the V5 Feature Dictionary Comparing the XML Output Importing the XML Output Exporting V4 Standards Data Exporting V4 Catalog Parts Exporting V4 Piping Lines Creating/Modifying Setup Data Migrating the V4 Model Exporting Parts from a V4 Model Importing Parts from Other Software

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Creating a Directory Structure


This task shows you how to create directories for your migrated V4 data. Data that you migrate from V4 into V5 will usually be stored in directories that are separate from the directories in which V5 generated data is stored. Sample directories are included with this application for storing migrated data. The default location is: ...intel_a\startup\EquipmentandSystems\MigrationDirectory\XXX where XXX is a discipline like Tubing or Piping. You can continue using the sample directories if you want. However, if you choose to store your data elsewhere you should take the following steps.

1. 2.

Create a directory and give it any suitable name. Create a DiscreteValues directory under it and move into it the data from the sample DiscreteValues directory. Create directories for all the disciplines that are of interest to you (Piping, HVAC, etc.). Recreate the directory structure under them as it exists under MigrationDirectory. You do not need to move the sample data - sample catalog, sample specifications, etc. - into your newly created directories if you do not intend to use it. Change the entries in your project resource management (PRM) file to reflect the new location of your data. The sample PRM file points to the default locations. Most entries are under the heading AEC Migration Discipline Resources.

3.

4.

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Exporting the V4 Project Registration Data


This task shows how to convert class and attribute data from the V4 Project Registration Model to XML format, in preparation for importing it to V5. You need to convert the classes and attributes in the V4 Project Registration Model to XML format and export it to a V5 directory so that they can be compared with the classes and attributes that exist in the V5 Feature Dictionary, and later imported into it. You do not need to do this if you did not make any modifications to your V4 Project Registration Model - that is, you did not define classes and attributes of your own. 1. You can convert (and export) all the classes and attributes in the Project Registration Model or you can convert classes and attributes by context. If you convert by context you will only convert those that are associated with the context you select, such as HVAC or Process. To convert by context you should either be in the application that sets the context, or click Context - Discipline/Role/Workshop in the menu bar. The Context Definition box will display.

2. Select the context you want. In the image above the context Process Discipline is selected.

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3. You now need to change a setting. Click Settings - User Interface Level in the menu bar to display the AEC Frame User Interface Mode box.

4. In the Display Information On field select Current Context Only. If you have not selected a context then select All Project. 5. Now you need to enter the command that will create the XML file. In the key-in line enter /aecrprj and hit Enter. The Report the Project Registration box displays.

6. Enter the directory in which you want to save the XML file and check the line Report All Data in One File. Click OK. The XML file will be generated and stored in the directory you specified. If you specified All Project then the file name will be Preg_All.xml. If you specified a context then the name will be related to that context. NOTE: An html file will also be generated. You do not need this file and can delete it. 7. Place the XML file in the directory ...intel_a\startup\EquipmentandSystems\MigrationDirectory\dictionary\ V4_Exported_XML so that it is available to your V5 applications. The V4 project registration model must be moved to the following directory, by ftp or any other method: ...intel_a\startup\AEC\preg. The project registration model is used by both Plant and Ship Review applications and by the migration process.

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Exporting V5 Feature Dictionary Data


This task shows how to export V5 Feature Dictionary data to XML format and make it available for comparison with the XML file of V4 Project Registration Model data. This process is also used when comparing two V5 feature dictionaries. As part of the process of converting a V4 model to V5, you need to convert class and attribute data in a V5 Feature Dictionary to XML format. The XML file will be placed in a specific directory at a location where it will be available to your V5 applications. When you use this command then all the feature dictionaries listed in your project resource management (PRM) file will be "exported" - in actual fact the classes and attributes they contain will be converted to XML format for further processing. To determine the location of the CATfct files, the application examines the entry "ImporterCATfcts" in the PRM file. This entry should indicate the location of your CATfct files. If left blank the default location is: ...intel_a\resources\graphic. The sample PRM files provided with this application are in: ...intel_a\startup\EquipmentandSystems\ProjectData. To determine which type of data is exported, the exporter program examines the value of the Visible field for each application in the PRM file. In the V4 to V5 Migration section of the PRM file there are resources named CATPiping, CATTubing, etc. If the value of the Visible field for these resources is No, then the data will not be migrated, if it is Yes, it will be migrated. This step is not needed if you did not define new classes and attributes in V4. 1. Change to the directory ...intel_a\code\bin at a command prompt and take the following steps: If you changed the location of your installation execute: set CATDisciplinePath=XXX\startup\EquipmentandSystems\ProjectData (see note below) set AECMIGR_PROJECT=Project where XXX is the directory path to your installation. If you want to use a PRM file with a name other than "Project" then change the word "Project" to the name of your file (AECMIGR_PROJECT=XXX). Execute: catstart.exe -run CATAecDictionaryExporter.exe -env Environment_name ...\application data\ DassaultSystemes\CATEnv .
q

--direnv

Replace Environment_name with the name of the environment you are using. Your system administrator should be able to give you this information. Replace ..\application data\ DassaultSystemes\CATEnv with the full path to your environment directory, in this case CATEnv. The environment file (...\CATEnv\Environment_name.txt) must have correct settings for CATDictionaryPath (...intel_a\code\dictionary) and CATGraphicPath (...intel_a\resources\graphic). If it has a setting for CATDisciplinePath it should be the same as the path you defined above. Do not leave this setting blank. This command will override the path you set in an earlier step (set CATDisciplinePath). You should adjust your steps accordingly.

After you execute the command, the Data Export Application dialog box displays.

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2. The Choose Modeler for Export window displays all the modelers available to you. Simply put, a modeler contains the list of applications whose CATfct files will be exported. The PlantShip Modeler seen here includes all plant-ship applications as of R10. Select the modeler you need. Even if an entry is highlighted, as in the image above, you should click on it. 3. In the Output File field browse to or enter the directory path and name of the file where you want the XML output to be placed. If you select an existing file then it will be overwritten. If you enter the name of a file that does not exist then a new file will be created. 4. Once you have filled in these fields the Export button will become available. Click on it to generate the XML content. A message will inform you when the process is complete. The image below shows an excerpt from a generated XML file.

5. Click Quit when you are finished.

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The next step will be to compare the classes and attributes contained in the V4 and V5 XML files.

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This task shows how to compare the V4 and V5 classes and attributes. This task should be performed after you have exported the V4 project registration model and the V5 feature dictionary. Your goal is to have a mapping table that shows the V4 classes and attributes you want to import and their corresponding V5 classes and attributes. Once you have converted and exported the V4 and V5 classes and attributes, the two must be compared to determine which ones do not exist in V5. This is done by a tool developed for the purpose. Once you have run this tool it will produce three files which tell you: which classes have problems (do not exist in the mapping table or the XML file of V5 classes), which classes need to be added to V5 and an overall report of what the tool has performed. This step is not needed if you did not define new classes and attributes in V4. Before you begin this process you must set the directory path - this tells the tool the directory path in your installation. Open a command prompt and move to the directory intel_a\code\bin.
q

In Windows, press Enter after typing: set AECMIGR_DIRECTORYPATH= XXX\startup\EquipmentandSystems\MigrationDirectory where XXX is the directory path to your installation. Do the same in Unix, but replace "set" with "export". The user can check the current path by executing the comparator, or executing CATAecDictionaryComparator -h. The comparator will show the path as the first line of output.

1. To run the tool open a command prompt, change to the directory ...intel_a\code\bin, and enter the following: CATAecDictionaryComparator -i (V4file) (V5file) -m (name of mapping table) -o (name for output) Where:
q

(V4file) is the XML file which contains the V4 classes. It must include the XML extension. (V5file) is the XML file which contains the V5 classes. It must include the XML extension. (name of mapping table) is the name of the mapping table against which you want to compare. The default mapping table provided with this application is V4ToV5ObjectMapping.csv. You must include the .csv extension. The mapping table is in the following directory: intel_a\startup\EquipmentAndSystems\MigrationDiretory\Dictionary\Mapping Table. (name for output) is the name for the three output files. If you enter the name MAR, for instance, then three files will be produced: MAR.html, MAR.xml and MAR.csv.

An entry may look like this: CATAecDictionaryComparator -i Preg_ALL.xml catpiping.xml -m V4toV5ObjectMapping.csv -o MAR

2. When the tool (called Comparator) has finished running it will produce three reports and place them in the following Page 257 directories: XML and CSV files in Version 5 Release 15 Piping Design intel_a\startup\EquipmentandSystems\MigrationDirectory\Dictionary\DDL_Files and the HTML file in ...\Reports.

Open the HTML file in a Web browser to see a full report. The report begins with a table of contents that is hyperlinked to the entries. (The names in parentheses are internal names.) The entries in the report are color coded as follows:
q

Green: No action was taken. The V4 class appears in the mapping table and the XML file of V5 classes. Blue: The V4 class appears in the mapping table, but not in the V5 XML file. Red: The V4 class was not found in the mapping table or V5 XML file. Orange: V5 mapping does not exist in the mapping table ("no mapping"), or is badly mapped.

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3. Open the XML file (using a text editor like Wordpad) to see a list of the classes that do not exist in the V5 feature dictionaries and can be imported. <Class Name="PipingPartFunc" DisplayName="Piping Part Function" Superclass="Component_Function" Creator="System" Domain="PIP" UUID="b7acacd1_83_3a707981_10"> 4. Open the CSV file using Microsoft Excel. It will look similar to the image below, except that it will not have the entries shown in the first line (shaded red).

In the first three columns this table displays existing in V4. with whatever you want the Page 259 Versionclasses 5 Release 15You should fill in the 4th, 5th and 6th columns Piping Design

corresponding entry to be in V5. In column 7 you should enter the domain, or application. (PIP=Piping Design, PID= Piping and Instrumentation Diagrams, EQT= Equipment Design, HVA=HVAC Design, etc.) An asterisk in the Attribute column indicates that the entry is a class. If it has attributes then the lines that follow it will list the attributes under the same class name. In the example above, Line 2 shows a class. Lines 3, 4 and 5 show that the entries are attributes of the class Piping Line and are called Size, Part Description and Design Speed.

NOTE: V5 entries should refer to the internal name of the class or parent. The internal name is the name within the application and is not the one the user sees. Frequently it is similar, though, and the class name Piping Line may have the internal name PipingLine. You can find the internal name by looking at the V5 XML file where it's referred to as Name and Superclass. 5. Once you have entered the information you need to copy and paste it into the mapping table - in the current example it is V4ToV5ObjectMapping.csv, found in intel_a\startup\EquipmentandSystems\MigrationDirectory\Dictionary\MappingTable. However, you should not directly modify the table the table with the .csv extension. In this same directory you will find a table with the same name but with the extension .xls. Modify this table, save it, and then save it again as a .csv file also. It is faster for this application to read .csv files.

6. If you have V4 classes and attributes that do not have equivalent classes and attributes in V5 then you must repeat the steps explained in Importing the XML Output. You can repeat these steps as many times as you want - until you are satisfied that your mapping table has all the V4 classes and attributes you want and the corresponding V5 classes and attributes.

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Importing the XML Output


This task shows you how to import the class and attribute data in the XML output file after the comparing process, as explained in Comparing the XML Output. The xxx.XML file that is generated at the end of the comparing process contains the list of V4 classes and attributes that do not exist in V5 and that need to be added to the CATfct files. The entries will be added to the relevant CATfct file - if the class and attribute belong to the V4 HVAC discipline then they will be added to the V5 HVAC CATfct file. The importing process described here creates these classes and attributes in V5 using the Feature Dictionary. This step is not needed if you did not define new classes and attributes in V4. 1. Change to the directory intel_a\code\bin at a command prompt and execute the following: catstart.exe -run CATAecDictionaryImporter.exe -env DefaultEnvironment -direnv ...\application data\ DassaultSystemes\CATEnv. The Data Import Application dialog box displays.

2.

3. 4.

The Choose Modeler for Import window displays all the modelers available to you. Simply put, a modeler contains the list of applications whose CATfct files will be updated with new classes, if there are any. The PlantShip Modeler seen here includes all plant-ship applications as of R10. Select the modeler you need. Even if an entry is highlighted, as in the image above, you should click on it. In the Input File field browse to or enter the name of the XML file that was output by the comparing process (Comparing the XML Output). The file is placed in the directory: intel_a\startup\EquipmentandSystems\MigrationDirectory\Dictionary\DDL_Files. Once you have filled in these fields the Import button will become available. Click on it to begin the importing process. Your existing CATfct files will not be overwritten. If they do not contain a class or attribute that exists in the XML file then it will be added. The process will create a new CATfct file if something is added to it. The new file name will contain the word "new". If an existing CATfct file to which an entry was added was named XXX.CATfct, then the new file will be XXX_new.CATfct You should examine the new file and rename it as necessary - in most cases you will want it to have the original name, XXX.CATfct.

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5.

A report appears in the Data Import Application dialog box window at the end of the process, listing all classes and attributes that were added.

6.

Click Quit when you are finished.

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Exporting V4 Standards Data to V5


This task shows how to export your V4 standards and specifications data to V5. You need to export the data associated with your V4 standards - such as ASTL - and specifications, like CS150R, so that when your V4 catalog parts and design models are converted to V5 they have access to this data. 1. To begin with you need to set the working units in your V4 session so that they are the same as contained in your tables: if the length in the tables is in inches you should set the length to inches in your session. Plane angle should in most cases be degrees. 2. In the PROSETUP function open the Tables menu and the Import Export submenu.

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3. Set the Import/Export toggle switch to Export. 4. Select a standard, such as ASTL. 5. Enter a file name, say All_tables, in the Content List File Name field. The table type and table name of all tables that are exported will be included in this file. The file itself will need to be moved to V5 and is needed in the migration process. 6. Select all the tables you want to export in the Table Type list. The tables will display in the Contents List as you select them. If more than one table is associated with a table type then the table names will display. Select all or as many as you need. You do not need to export certain tables. These are: End dimension, Part dimension, End symbol definition, Pipe support, Insulation specs and ISO part mapping. 7. When you have selected all the tables for one standard you can change to another standard and repeat the process with the tables associated with it. You may not need to select your specifications tables again. 8. When you have selected the tables you need from all your standards click the Apply button. All the tables you selected will be placed in the ...setup\PRO\table directory. The file All-tables will also be placed there. 9. Go to the PIPSETUP function, and the menu Catalog - Pipe Spc - Create. Select a Pipe Spec name and note which tables your specification uses. One way to determine this is to note the table name - the name of the specification will be included in it (not all tables are named this way). Note the table names because they are needed in a later step. 10. Transfer, by ftp or any other method, all the tables as well as the All_tables file to your V5 application. They should be placed in the following directory: intel_a\startup\EquipmentAndSystems\MigrationDirectory\PipingSystems\ V4_Exported_Tables. 11. You now need to edit the All-tables file (using a text editor like Notepad) to include the name of the V5 directory where each table must be placed. It is best to make a copy of the All_tables file and edit the copy. The entries as exported from V4 will look like this: /*Table,Filter*/ Nominal OD,ASTL-Nominal_OD Schedule,ASTL-Schedule Wall Thickness,ASTL-Wall_Thickness End Style,ASTL-End_Style Rating,ASTL-Rating Material Category,ASTL-Material_Category You need to change the header and add a comma and the name of the directory as a third field. The directory name must either be a standard name (ASTL) or specification name (CS150R) for the transparent automatic parts, compatibility rules and process function mapping rules tables. For an example see MigrationDirectory\Piping Systems\V4_Exported_Tables\V5_TableMigrationList_sample.txt. V4 Table Type,V4 Table Name,V5 Folder Name Nominal OD,ASTL-Nominal_OD ,ASTL Schedule,ASTL-Schedule ,ASTL Wall Thickness,ASTL-Wall_Thickness ,ASTL End Style,ASTL-End_Style ,ASTL

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Rating,ASTL-Rating ,ASTL Material Category,ASTL-Material_Category,ASTL 12. If a table is used in more than one specification then you may have to duplicate the rows. Refer to the notes you made in Step 9 to identify the tables used by a specification. In the example below, the table 3D Part Function - In-line Instrument, FUNCTION_TABLE_INLINE_INSTRUMENT does not mention any specifications. If you want to use it in all four specifications then you must duplicate the rows and add the specification name to each row. 3D 3D 3D 3D 3D Part Part Part Part Part Function Function Function Function Function Inline Instrument,FUNCTION_TABLE_INLINE_INSTRUMENT,CS150R Inline Instrument,FUNCTION_TABLE_INLINE_INSTRUMENT,CS300R Inline Instrument,FUNCTION_TABLE_INLINE_INSTRUMENT,CS600R Inline Instrument,FUNCTION_TABLE_INLINE_INSTRUMENT,SS150R In-line Instrument,FUNCTION_TABLE_INLINE_INSTRUMENT

Make sure there are no trailing blanks at the end of each row. 13. Open a command prompt window and change directories to intel_a\code\command. Enter the following line and hit Enter: CATAecV4ToV5PipingTables.bat (name of file) where (name of file) is the name of the file which you edited in Step 10. It should include the file extension. You need to edit the bat file if you use a standard that is not named ASTL. Find the letters ASTL in the file and change them to the name of your standard. All the tables will be placed in the following V5 directory (unless you set the AECMIGR_DIRECTORYPATH variable to a different location): intel_a\startup\EquipmentAndSystems\MigrationDirectory\PipingSystems\ V5_Migrated_Tables 14. Move the tables to wherever you need to have them. You will need to add references to these tables in the appropriate CATProduct and catalog files. See MigrationDirectory\Piping for an example.

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Exporting V4 Catalog Parts


This task shows how to export your V4 catalog parts to V5. This process will migrate the parts geometry and parts attributes from your V4 library to V5. Before you perform this procedure you should export project registration and standards data, which is explained elsewhere in this section. The process described here is the preferred method of exporting parts. However, if for some reason you do not want to export the V4 library, or you do not have access to it, you can export parts directly from a V4 model. The procedure is described in Exporting Parts from a V4 Model. 1. Parts in compressed form cannot be migrated. If your catalog is in compressed form then you must re-create it in uncompressed form using standard V4 procedures. This requires adding to your DCLS file following declarative: CATAEC.SETUP.PRO.CATALOG_COMPRESSION=FALSE; You may also need to set the MAXTIM variable appropriately, such as: catia.MAXTIM_CPU=150000;. The uncompressed parts geometry will be placed inside "timestamp" details (*.library files) in the following directory: ...setup\PRO\APD\lib. The catalog file will be placed in the following directory: ...setup\PRO\catlg. 2. In the same ...\catlg directory, create an index type file and name it PRTMGXXX, where XXX is your catalog number. The V4 sample catalog number is frequently 005 and that is the number that will be used in this document. You need to create a special file - you can name it migrateXXX which will be used to create the index file. You can create this input file by copying an existing file (convert1_catalog_parts, which is in the same directory) and editing it. Enter the following in the file:

/* */ *TYPE create_CCAPS_index *INPUT /aecsite424/setup/PRO/catlg/PRTDA005 *OUTPUT /aecsite424/setup/PRO/catlg/PRTMG005 *KEYS PARTDEF CATEGORY 8 PARTDEF PARTTYPE 8

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PARTNUM PARTNO 40 PIPESIZE SIZE 40 ELCATLOG ELTIME 16 STANDATA STANDARD 8 VNDRCODE VNDRCOD 40 PARTNAME PARTNAME 40 PIPESPEC ENDS 40 ENDSPEC ENDS 40 ENDSPEC RATG 40

See ...MigrationDirectory\Piping Systems\V4_CatalogMainFile\migrate999 for an example.

3.

Also in the ...\catlg directory enter at a prompt: run catutil -l RF0CPT -i migrate005 -o migrationindex.out This will create the file PRTMG005 in the ...\catlg directory. Ignore error messages "Undefined Attribute Group Name". This only indicates that pipes do not have part end styles and parts do not have pipe end styles.

4.

Move the the PRTMG005 file to its V5 location, in the directory: ...intel_a\startup\EquipmentAndSystems\MigrationDirectory\PipingSystems\ V4_CatalogMainFile

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5.

Move all the <timestamp> files that were created when you uncompressed your V4 catalog to their V5 location: ...intel_a\startup\EquipmentAndSystems\MigrationDirectory\PipingSystems\ V4_Catalog_Details. They are called timestamp files because each file will have a date and time stamp for a file name as shown below:

2001248204613737.library 2001248204623132.library 2001248204625529.library 2001248204627914.library 2001248204630318.library

6.

You must migrate the standard encode/decode tables from V4 using CATAecV4ToV5PipingTables before you start the migration of piping parts. The migrated tables must reside in ...MigrationDirectory\Piping Systems\V5_Migrated_Tables\ASTL (or another directory with your standard's name).
In V5, open a command prompt window and change directories to ...intel_a\code\command. Type in the following and hit Enter: CATAecV4ToV5PipingCatalog.bat 005 (replace the numerals 005 with your catalog number). This will create your V4 parts in V5, placing them in ...intel_a\startup\EquipmentAndSystems\MigrationDirectory\PipingSystems\ V5_Generated_CATParts (unless you set the AECMIGR_DIRECTORYPATH variable to a different location). Each part will have a unique, generic part name. For Unix execute the script CATAecV4ToV5PipingCatalog.sh 005 (replace 005 with your catalog number). Create a parts catalog, a suggested name being PipingParts005.catalog, and place the parts in it. See ...MigrationDirectory\Piping\Piping Design\ComponentCatalogs for an example.

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8.

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Exporting V4 Piping Lines


This task shows how to export your V4 piping lines to V5. The piping line data in V4 is converted to XML format using this process, and can then be imported into your V5 application using the Importing Line IDs function. This task should be performed only after you have a satisfactory mapping table because this process looks for attributes in the mapping table. You also need to copy the file PlantShipLineIDImport.dtd from intel_a\startup\EquipmentAndSystems\Piping\SampleData to intel_a\startup\EquipmentAndSystems\MigrationDirectory\LineLists\ImportFiles. 1. Place a copy of the V4 Process_Shared.model, which contains the V4 shared piping lines, into the V4Models directory in your V5 application. The default location for this directory is intel_a\startup\EquipmentAndSystems\MigrationDirectory\LineLists. You can ftp this file to V5 or use any other method for transferring it. The data in this file will be used to generate the XML data. The model you use to export piping line data does not have to be Process_Shared.model. Any piping model can be sent to this program and its line data exported to an import file. To start the process of converting the V4 lines to XML format, open a command prompt window, change to the directory intel_a\code\command and enter the following at a DOS prompt: CATAecV4ToV5LineIDs.bat Process_Shared. (For Unix enter: CATAecV4ToV5LineIDs.sh Process_Shared ) Click Enter. After the conversion process ends the generated XML file will be placed in the LineLists\ImportFiles directory. It is normal for some attributes to be not transferred to V5 from V4. You can ignore any messages you get during the conversion process that read "...no V5 attribute in table." However, there may be some attributes that you do want to add to V5, such as Unit Name. In such cases you must create the attribute in V5 using the Feature Dictionary, re-export the V5 feature dictionary, add the new attribute to the mapping table and repeat the process of importing piping lines described here. 3. You can now use the Import Line IDs function in Piping Design to import the piping lines in the XML file into your application.

2.

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Creating/Modifying Setup Data


This task shows you how to create or modify setup data that is needed to use your migrated V4 models. Data that you migrate from V4 into V5 will usually be stored in directories that are separate from the directories in which V5 generated data is stored. Sample directories are included with this application for storing migrated data. The default location is: intel_a\startup\EquipmentandSystems\MigrationDirectory\XXX where XXX is a discipline like Tubing or Piping. You need to create the following setup data in the directory that you use to store your resources, and which is referenced in the project resource management file. If you continue to use the sample directories the changes should be made there, if you choose to create a new location, that is where the setup data should be added. In the instructions below it is assumed that you have created a new location. If you continue to use the sample directories then you should adjust the instructions accordingly. 1. Discrete Values You will need a set of discrete value text files as a default set of possible values for piping attributes. You can copy these from the sample migrated piping discipline (\intel_a\startup\EquipmentAndSystems\MigrationDirectory\DiscreteValues) into your own \DiscreteValues directory. You can throw away what you do not want, and edit what you want so you are satisfied with your set of text files. Also, if you had user-defined attributes defined in your V4 Project Registration Model containing a discrete list of values, then you will need to create a discrete values text file in your \DiscreteValues directory containing the name of your mapped V5 attribute name and the values you want available in V5 for your user-defined attribute. 2. Design Rules \intel_a\startup\EquipmentAndSystems\MigrationDirectory\PipingSystems\V5_Migrated_Tables contains a directory called DesignRules. Move this directory to your \Piping directory. Copy the design rules catalog from the sample piping discipline into your \Piping\DesignRules directory. Borrow additional design rule resources as desired from the sample piping disciplines, and rename and edit them as desired. When you are satisfied you have all of the design rule data you want, you are ready to edit the design rules catalog. Rename the design rules catalog you copied, as desired. Bring up the application again and edit your design rules catalog as needed. Change the links to reference your own text files. Take out previous entries ("Remove description") and add your own entries. Refer to the section Standards and Design Rules for more information. 3. Standards Under your \Piping directory create a directory called Standards. Your migrated standard data in \intel_a\startup\EquipmentAndSystems\MigrationDirectory\PipingSystems\V5_Migrated_Tables is separated in different directories for each standard. Move these standard directories to your \Piping\Standards directory. Copy the piping standards catalog from the sample piping discipline into your \Piping\Standards directory. Borrow additional standard resources as desired from the sample piping disciplines, and rename and edit them as desired. When you are satisfied you have all of the standard data you want, you are ready to edit the standards catalog. Rename the standards catalog you copied, as desired. Bring up the application again and edit your standards catalog as needed. Take out previous entries ("Remove description") and add your own entries. Refer to Standards and Design Rules for more information. 4. Specifications Under your \Piping directory create a directory called Specification. Your migrated spec data in \intel_a\startup\EquipmentAndSystems\MigrationDirectory\PipingSystems\V5_Migrated_Tables is separated in different directories for each specification. Move these specification directories to your \Piping\Specification directory. Copy the piping specification catalog from the sample piping discipline into your \Piping\Specification directory, or copy a sample empty specifications catalog from \intel_a\startup\EquipmentAndSystems\MigrationDirectory\PipingSystems\V5_Catalog. Or create a new material specifications catalog by following the instructions in Creating a Specifications Catalog. Borrow additional specification resources as desired from the sample piping disciplines, and rename and edit them as desired. When you are satisfied you have all of the specification data you want, you are ready to edit the specifications catalog. Rename the specifications catalog you copied, as desired. Bring up the application again and edit your specifications catalog as needed. Take out previous entries ("Remove description") and add your own entries. You will notice that the specifications catalog has two logical sections under each specification - you see a list of tables and then a list of parts. At this time, you are only editing the table entries. After you have built your parts catalog, you will come back to this specifications catalog and edit and add entries for your parts. Refer to Creating a Specifications Catalog for more information.

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Under your \Piping directory create a directory structure called \PipingDesign\ComponentCatalogs\CatalogXXX, where XXX is your catalog number. See the sample migrated piping discipline for an example. In the \CatalogXXX directory you will place your migrated catalog parts and your parts catalog. You will probably not want to borrow and edit an existing piping parts catalog because of the number of part entries you would have to delete. You can copy the empty sample catalog in \intel_a\startup\EquipmentAndSystems\MigrationDirectory\PipingSystems\V5_Catalog, and rename it. Bring up the application and add all of your parts to it. Refer to Modifying a Catalog for more information. You can use the Create/Modify catalog button to add your parts to the catalog. 6. PRM File Edit the project resource management (PRM) file because the final two steps need to reference your standard data. In \intel_a\startup\EquipmentAndSystems\ProjectData\Project.xml, you can define a new discipline in that PRM file, or copy it and rename it (e.g., ProjectABC.xml), and then edit the Migration section to reference your new discipline resources. Before bringing up the application during the next steps, you need to set the CATDisciplinePath variable. In Windows: set CATDisciplinePath=XXX\startup\EquipmentAndSystems\ProjectData In UNIX: export CATDisciplinePath=XXX\startup\EquipmentAndSystems\ProjectData Where XXX is your installation path. When you bring up the application and open a piping document, you must go to Tools + Project Management and choose your discipline to make it active. 7. Specifications Catalog Now that you have built your parts catalog, you can edit the parts sections of your piping specifications catalog. You need to define part queries in your specifications catalog. To aid you in defining these queries, you will need to reference your V4 class catalog definitions. In V4, go to the PIPSETUP function and to the menu Catalog + Options, set your catalog number, then go to Catalog + Pipe Spc + Generate. Select All, and then Export. The file CLSEXxxx, where xxx is your catalog number, will be created in setup/PRO/catlg. You will need to reference this file as you define your class queries in your V5 specifications catalog.

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The first row of your CLSEXxxx file contains "/*". The fifth row contains "*/". Rows 2, 3, and 4 begin with PSPEC. You can consider row 4 as containing the column headings of attribute names. The rows that follow, starting with row 6, each contain a "part class query", with encoded values for certain attributes. An asterisk ("*") beside a value indicates that this is a value for a "generic attribute", whose encoded value will be used in the part number of a fully resolved piping part. You will see that the fourth part entry, row 9, has a pipe specification of CS150R, a pipe standard of ASTL, a part category of Valve, a part function of Gate Valve, a size range from .5 to .75, a (generic) material category of CS (carbon steel), a (generic) material code of A105, a rating1 of 800, a wall thickness1 of .0000, an end style1 of SW (socket weld), an end style2 of TH (threaded), and other (2/3/4) wall thickness values of .0000. See Creating a Specification Catalog to learn how to create an attribute filter file and use it to define all your part queries. CREATING A V5 ATTRIBUTE FILTER FILE You can edit the V4 CLSEXxxx file and turn it into a V5 attribute file by following these instructions: a. In Windows NT, copy CLSEXxxx to CLSEXxxx.txt. Open CLSEXxxx.txt. Remove rows 1(/*), 2, 3, 5, and 6(*/). Old row

b. c.

d. e. f.

(e.g., Piping\Standards\ASTL\ASTL-MaterialCategory.txt) to edit each row in this column: change CS* to Carbon steel*; CS to Carbon steel; etc. h. Rename the column called Material code to MaterialCode. You will likely not have to edit the rows under this column, but

g.

4 (PSPEC,Standards,Category ...) should now be the top row and the remaining rows should be the V4 queries. Copy CLSEXxxx.txt to V5SpecxxxInput.csv. Open V5SpecxxxInput.csv. It will open in Microsoft Excel. Save it as V5SpecxxxInput.xls. Open V5SpecxxxInput.xls. You may wish to save this beginning version and then save intermediate versions as you edit this file, because it will take several hours. (Hint: Replace All will do most of your work. If you have many catalogs, you may wish to merge all of your V5SpecxxxInput.xls files together into one file, then edit headers and values once, then break the file apart again. This is so you will not have to do the same Replace All operation in many different files.) The first row contains the headers for each column. Delete all columns that are completely empty under the header name. You may also wish to delete the Primary Option Flag column and the Wall thickness columns. Rename the column called Standards to Standard. In front of this column insert a new column called PartType. For each row, under the column called PartType, enter the appropriate V5 part type. Use the entries in the two columns Category and Function to determine the approximate name of the part type, and use the part type browser in CATIAV5 to determine the exact name of the V5 part type. For example, for Category/Function Branches/Tee, use PartType Tee. For Category/Function Valve/Gate Valve, use PartType Gate Valve. For Category/Function Flanges/Blind flange, use PartType Blind Flange (note the f became F). For Category/Function Elbows/90 Degree Elbow, use PartType Elbow (and delete any duplicate rows, because 45 Degree Elbow will also map to Elbow). For Category/Function Gasket/, use PartType Gasket. And for Category/Function Pipe/, use PartType Pipe with bends (do not use V5 Pipe; V4 pipes are bendable pipes not straight pipes). Then delete the columns Category and Function. Rename the column called Material category to MaterialCategory. Refer to your material category encode/decode table

j. Rename the column called Part code to PartCode. Make sure every code in the column is in your part code table (e.g., k. Rename the column called Rating 1 to Rating. Refer to your rating encode/decode table (e.g., 300 to 300#; etc.

check your material code encode/decode table (e.g., Piping\Standards\ASTL\ASTL-MaterialCode.txt) table to make sure. If you edit any value with an * at the end, make sure it still has an * at the end after you finish your edit. i. Rename the column called Part name to PartName. The rows under this column will likely already have the decoded values.

Piping\Standards\ASTL\ASTL-PartCode.txt).

Piping\Standards\ASTL\ASTL-Rating.txt) to edit each row in this column: change 150 to 150#; change

l. Rename the column called Schedule 1 to Schedule. Refer to your schedule encode/decode table (e.g.,

m. Rename the column called End style 1 to EndStyle. Refer to your endstyle encode/decode table (e.g., change RF to RAISED FACE; etc.

Piping\Standards\ASTL\ASTL-Schedule.txt) to edit each row in this column: change STD to STANDARD; change STD* to STANDARD*; change XS* to EXTRA STRONG*; change 160 to SCHEDULE 160; etc. Be careful to maintain existing *, but do not add * when not needed. Piping\Standards\ASTL\ASTL-EndStyle.txt) to edit each row in this column: change BW to BUTT WELD; Piping\Standards\ASTL\ASTL-EndStyle.txt) to edit each row in this column: change SW to SOCKET

n. Rename the column called End style 2 to EndStyle2. Refer to your endstyle encode/decode table (e.g., WELD; etc.

o. Rename the column called Start size range to MinOutsideDiameter(in). You may wish to change in (inches) to mm row values, changing them from V4 nominal size values to V5 actual size values (outside

(millimeters) or m (meters) or to another unit, depending upon the unit your data uses. You will be editing the

number, not nominal size character string).

diameter real Refer to both your nominal size table (e.g.,

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Piping\Standards\ASTL\ASTL-NominalSize.txt) and your standard pipe dimensions table (e.g., Piping\Standards\ASTL\ASTL-PipeDimensions.txt). Find the unit used for OutsideDiameter in your
standard pipe dimensions table and use that unit for MinOutsideDiameter. Your standard pipe dimensions table may have different outside diameter values for the same nominal size for different schedules. Edit the V4 nominal size value in the MinOutsideDiameter(in) column with the appropriate V5 outside diameter value, taking care to use the correct value for the schedule defined in your row. You may wish to use a slightly smaller value to insure against any roundoff errors. For example, you may change 0.5 to 0.84 (or

p. Rename the column called End size range to MaxOutsideDiameter(in). You may wish to change in (inches) to mm row values, changing them from V4 nominal size values to V5 actual size values (outside

smaller to 6.62).

slightly smaller to 0.83) and change 6 to 6.625 (or slightly

(millimeters) or m (meters) or to another unit, depending upon the unit your data uses. You will be editing the

diameter real number, not nominal size character string). Refer to both your nominal size table (e.g., Piping\Standards\ASTL\ASTL-NominalSize.txt) and your standard pipe dimensions table (e.g., Piping\Standards\ASTL\ASTL-PipeDimensions.txt). Find the unit used for OutsideDiameter in your

standard pipe dimensions table and use that unit for MaxOutsideDiameter. Your standard pipe dimensions table may have different outside diameter values for the same nominal size for different schedules. Edit the V4 nominal size value in the MaxOutsideDiameter(in) column with the appropriate V5 outside diameter value, taking care to use the correct value for the schedule defined in your row. You may wish to use a slightly larger value to insure against any round off errors. For example, you may change 4 to 4.5 (or

larger to 6.63).

slightly larger to 4.55) and change 6 to 6.625 (or slightly

q. Now save your file. Also save it as an intermediate file for any future reference. Copy this file several times, one for each

V5SpecxxxInput_CS150R.xls and V5SpecxxxInput_CS300R.xls). r. Edit each of these input specification files. Remove the rows that do not apply to this specification, and then delete the PSPEC column. Save each file. s. Start CATIAV5R14. Open your Piping Specifications catalog. Double-click on the first specification defined, but not

Specification you have defined in it. Name the new files with each specification name (e.g.,

Default. Select the icon for Create/Modify Catalog. Define the Application as Piping. Define the Parts directory (e.g.,

Piping\PipingDesign\ComponentCatalogs\Catalogxxx). Define the Attribute filter (e.g., Piping\Specification\V5SpecxxxInput_CS150R.xls). Select Documents: File base (since Model Migration can only be done in File base, not ENOVIA base). Select OK. This may take an hour or

8.

more, depending upon the number of catalog part documents and the number of rows in your attribute filter input file. When done, save your Piping Specifications catalog and then repeat the process for each of your piping specifications. t. You now have a completed migrated Piping Specifications catalog. Piping Lines After performing the task Exporting V4 Piping Lines, you will have an Import file that you can use in V5 to create your V4 piping lines in V5. Before performing the Import step of that task, you had to set up your piping discipline and PRM file. You will likely want to copy the V4 migrated piping lines and catalog from \intel_a\startup\EquipmentAndSystems\MigrationDirectory\Piping\SampleData\PipingLines to your own piping lines directory (\Piping\SampleData\PipingLines). This will be the piping lines catalog your PRM file should reference and which your Import Line IDs operation will update.

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Migrating the V4 Model


This task shows how to migrate V4 models to V5. This task should only be attempted after all the other tasks in this section have been completed. Before performing this task you should make sure that options are correctly set in your project resource management file. These options help you control which portions of a model you want to migrate - if you want to migrate only certain parts of it. If your V4 model has data from Piping and Instrumentation Diagrams, Piping Design, HVAC Design, Structures and Equipment Arrangement, you can decide which type of data you want to migrate by setting these options. If you choose to only migrate Tubing data, then you can do so. See Understanding Project Resource Management, AEC V4 V5 Migration section, on how to set the options. NOTE: The sample PRM file references "Big Scale" structures catalogs. Because of this you have to set the CATCGMBigScale variable to 1 before migrating structures models, shown below. 1. Move your V4 model (by ftp or any other means) to the same platform as V5, in this case Windows.

2.

Set the following variables. In Windows, open a command prompt window and change to the directory ...intel_a\code\command. Enter the following: set CATDisciplinePath=XXX\intel_a\startup\EquipmentandSystems\ProjectData where XXX is the directory path to your installation. In Unix use the command "export" instead of "set". For Structures models only, you need to set the following: set CATCGMBigScale=1 (in Unix replace set with export). The batch shells CATAECV4ToV5Migration.bat (Windows) and CATAECV4ToV5Migration.sh (Unix) assume you edited the project resource management (project.xml) file. If you copied and renamed it then you must edit this batch shell and replace "Project" with your own file name (as referenced by AECMIGR_PROJECT variable). For Tubing Design use the batch shell CATAECV4ToV5MigrTubing.bat (.sh for Unix). For all other applications use the batch shell named above. For Tubing Design, when migrating models, the project resource management file must reference a proper tube dimensions table in order to map outside diameter to nominal size. In the PRM file find the 'TubingDimensions' entry and correct the location if necessary. At the ...intel_a\code\command prompt, enter CATAECV4ToV5Migration.bat (.sh for Unix) to execute a bat file. (For Tubing use the file named in Step 2). This will bring up the Migration Batch dialog box.

3.

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4. 5.

In the Target Directory field enter (or navigate to by clicking the button) the directory where the migrated V4 model will be stored. Click the Browse File button and, in the box that displays, navigate to the directory where you stored your V4 models. Select (you can select more than one if you want to) a model and click Open. The V4 model will display in the V4 Documents to Migrate window of the Migration Batch dialog box. You can use the Remove button to remove files you do not want to migrate.

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6.

7.

If you are migrating a 2-D model then you need to set the path for certain files by clicking the Options button. The process is explained in the Infrastructure User Guide: Customizing Customizing Settings - General - Compatibility - V4 Data Reading - and scroll down to PROJECT File Path. Click the Migrate button. When the process is complete the Migrate Report will display. You can also to see the report. If the migration was successful you will get an OK click the Report button message. If you get a message that says "Error during migration" then you must check for mistakes and repeat the process. Your V4 model is migrated as several documents, as explained below.

8.

The V4 model will be migrated as several documents, and each one will display in the specifications tree when you expand it.. Each object in the document will be in a separate document. To open the document click File - Open on the application menu bar and navigate to the directory you specified in the Target Directory field. The document with the same name as the V4 document is the "master" document, which contains (references to) all the components. Other documents underneath it will have identifying letters - such as EQ for Equipment - to indicate what they contain. The document will contain references to all parts - piping or tubing documents, for instance, will contain references to all parts that are in the piping or tubing line. Similarly, equipment documents will contain references to parts and nozzles that make up the equipment. You need all the files to recreate the document.

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Exporting Parts from a V4 Model


This task shows you how to export parts from a V4 model to the V5 catalog. This step can be used as an alternative to exporting your entire V4 catalog as described in Exporting V4 Catalog Parts. You do need to migrate piping lines and standards data as described elsewhere in this section. You can export piping line data from any piping model. When you use this procedure the exported parts will not be generic parts, which is the preferred method of exporting V4 parts to V5. The exported parts will be fully resolved or non-specification parts. Unless you set the variable AECMIGR_DIRECTORYPATH to a different location prior to executing the batch shell, the V4 model from which parts will be exported should reside in the following directory: ...intel_a\startup\EquipmentAndSystems\MigrationDirectory\SampleV4Models. The input directory for pipe geometry is ...MigrationDirectory\PipingSystems\V4_Catalog_Details.

1.

Place your V4 model in the V5 directory listed above. You can ftp it or place it there using any other method you prefer. In V5, open a command prompt window and change to the directory: ...intel_a\code\command. Enter the following line and press Enter: CATAecV4ToV5ModelParts.bat XXX.model where XXX is the name of your V4 model. In Unix execute the following command: CATAecV4ToV5ModelParts.sh XXX.model

2.

3.

The generated parts will be placed in the directory: ...MigrationDirectory\PipingSystems\V5_Generated_CATParts. Each part will have a unique part number. Parts with the same part number will not be duplicated.

4.

Place these parts in your V5 parts catalog and modify your specifications catalog. You can now migrate the model using the procedure described in Migrating the V4 Model.

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Importing Parts from Other Software


This task shows you how to import parts into V5 from third-party software. The process involves exporting part data attributes and values - to a prescribed XML format, and applying it to a template CATpart (or the physical shape of the part) created in V5. This process can also be used to create resolved parts and is especially useful when you have to create a large number of parts. 1.Create a set of template CATParts, corresponding to the parts that you want to import. You can create the parts by following instructions given in Building Parts. The parts must have the part type defined. q They can contain part geometry or they could also be empty, allowing you to add geometry later.
q

They should have the attributes defined - when you run the command explained below, only the attribute values from the imported part will be added or changed in the template CATPart. The attributes should already exist. Pre-existing attributes will not be erased - they will remain after the procedure has been executed. If the CATParts have multiple representations then they will have corresponding CATShape documents. To create the body or physical shape of the part you will have to use the Part Design product, for which a separate license is required. You could, however, get by with the set of sample parts provided with this application if you remove any link to a design table.

Sample template CATPart documents are in the directory: ...intel_a\startup\EquipmentAndSystems\MigrationDirectory\PartGeneration\TemplateCATParts

2.Define a set of part definition files, or one file containing all part definitions. A part definition file is in XML format and must follow the structure as shown in the sample part definition file which is in: ...MigrationDirectory\PartGeneration\PartDefinitions

A portion of the sample part definition file is shown above.


q

You must have separate entries for each size. As you can see, GateFLHW 6 inches and GateFLHW 4 inches have separate entries.

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The name you enter in the Part Name field will be used to name the part in this application (the part number). The Type field refers to the part type as defined in the feature dictionary. The Template field names the template CATPart document you are using. You can use the same CATPart document for creating different sizes of that part. You can change the attribute names and values as needed, but make sure you follow the format shown above. You can also add a line showing a new attribute, again following this format.

You can use a special program - if you have one or can write one - to extract data from your parts. Or you can use the sample file mentioned above and enter the data in that file. 3. Before you run the commands described in Steps 4 & 5, you must edit the script and enter the location of the Migration Directory (AECMIGR_DIRECTORYPATH) on your installation. The script is named CATAecPartGeneration.bat and is located in ...intel_a\code\command. Using a text editor like Notepad, change the words "Your Path" in the DIRECTORYPATH field to define the directory path in your installation. A portion of the part generation script is shown below.

If the value of CNEXTOUTPUT equals CONSOLE then a window will inform you of the progress of the process. If you change the value of CONSOLE to a file name and location then the results of the process will be saved in that file. 4.After you have the part definition file and the template CATParts set up, you can run the command to add attributes to the template CATPart and generate resolved parts. The template will not change. Open a command prompt window and change to the directory: ...intel_a\code\command. Enter the following and press Enter: CATAecPartGeneration.bat XXX.xml where XXX is the name of your part definition file. You can run this command several times, if you have more than one part definition file. You will get error messages if there are inconsistencies, such as if the part type in the template CATPart does not match the part type listed in the part definition file (this has been left in the sample part definition file as a test case). A message will inform you when the process is complete and the generated parts will be placed in the directory ...MigrationDirectory\PartGeneration\ResolvedCATParts. For Unix run the command: CATAecPartGeneration.sh XXX.xml

The two images below show the template CATPart "Gate Valve FLHW" and a 4-inch gate valve FLHW after it was generated using the sample part definition file. You can see that the attribute values and geometry have changed.

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5.To place the parts you just generated in a catalog, move them from ...MigrationDirectory\PartGeneration\ResolvedCATParts to your desired location. Then you can add them to a new or existing catalog, using the create/modify catalog command.

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Creating a 2-D Isometric drawing


This section describes how to create a 2-D isometric drawing from a 3-D document. There is also a function called Drawing Production that allows you to customize the drawings and create them to scale. Setup Requirements Creating an Isometric Drawing from a 3-D Document Generating a PCF File Using Mapping Tables

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This task shows how to complete the setup requirements for creating an isometric drawing from a 3-D document.

It is recommended that you obtain Alias I-Run V3. The setup process is greatly shortened if you use V3 instead of V2, and you do not need to install Microsoft VC++ 6.0 compiler. The setup process using both versions is given below. This procedure only works on the Windows platform. Version 2 You must install certain third party software for this procedure to work. These are Alias I-Run V2, Microsoft VC++ 6.0 compiler and two files from Alias I-Run that may only be available if you have a developer's license. The objective of this setup is to ensure that all applications have access to correct directory paths so that they can work with each other. When you are done with setup you will have generated a file that acts as interface between Piping Design and the third party software, and you will have created certain directories that are needed to create and store the isometric drawings. If necessary, you can also use three design rules table to map terms used in this application to terms used in Alias I-Run. The function also uses the Bolting design table to obtain certain values. See Rules Overview to find out which tables to use.

1. Install the third party software mentioned above. Check to see if the following two Alias files have installed: pisogen.lib; encrypt.lib. If they have not installed then obtain them and install them in the following directory: ...Alias\I-Run 2.0\Development. Using any text editor open the file CATIALinkIso.bat, which is in the following directory: ...intel_a\code\command. There are two 2. fields which you may need to edit. For the entry ISOGEN_DIR = enter the location where I-Run is installed, including the drive letter. For the entry DEV_STUDIO_DIR = enter the location where Visual C++ is installed.

3. In a command prompt window change directories to... intel_a\code\command, enter CATIALinkIso and hit enter. 4. When the file has stopped executing it will have created the file CATIAPcf2Dxf.exe. Move this file from the intel_a\code\command directory to the intel_a\code\bin directory. This file creates the interface between Piping Design and the third party software.

5. Open the I-Run Project Manager: Programs - Alias Isometrics - I-Run V2 - Project Manager.

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You need to create three directories that will be used when generating isometric drawings. The process will be mentioned briefly here because full documentation for using I-Run is provided by Alias and should have been loaded along with the application. 6. Click the Create New Isometric Directory button on the Project Manager. A dialog box will display in which you can enter the name and location of a directory. Click Create Directory and then OK and the directory will be created. It will display in the Project Manager - in this example it is IsogenRoot.

7. Select the directory you just created (in this example IsogenRoot) and click the Create New Project Directory button. A dialog box will display in which you can enter a directory name. Click OK to create the directory (Project1 in this example). 8. Select the directory you just created and click the Create New Style Directory button. This directory is used for user-defined configuration of drawings. Under Template Styles select a template. Some templates are not intended for DXF-type files and you will not be able to generate a drawing if you select a template for any other file format. Read I-Run documentation for the correct templates. You can modify the template after you have selected it. Enter a name for the directory and click OK. The directory will be created.

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9. In Piping Design click Tools - Options, select Equipment & Systems - Piping Design and the ISOGen Setup tab. If you are doing this for the first time there will be no entries in the fields Root, Project and Style directory. You do not have to enter anything in the first two fields. In the Style field, navigate to the directory you just created. You must not enter anything in the field I-Run.exe path. The field Error File lists the name and location of the file where errors in generating drawings are noted.

For Units, select the units you want displayed in the 2-D drawing that will be generated, i.e. weight can be displayed in the drawing in kilograms or pounds. 10. Version 3 Install Alias I-Run V3. In Piping Design click Tools - Options, select Equipment & Systems - Piping Design and the ISOGen Setup tab. If you are doing this for the first time there will be no entries in the fields Root, Project and Style directory. Enter the full path where the I-Run executable is located in the I-Run.exe path field (the default installation for Alias is: Program Files\Alias\I-Run v3\I-Run.exe). Follow Steps 6 to 9 above.

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Creating an Isometric Drawing from a 3-D Document


This task shows how to complete create an isometric drawing from a 3-D document. You need to complete the setup requirements first. 1. With your document open click the Generate ISO button displays. . The Generate ISO dialog box

The select options buttons allow you to select what you want to convert. 2. to select by line ID. When you click this button a dialog box Click the Select Line IDs button will display all line IDs available to you, from which you can make your selection. Everything belonging to the line ID will be converted. 3. Click the Select Spool button button to select by spool. When you click this button all spools available to you will be displayed. Select one or more. Everything belonging to the spool(s) will be converted.

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4. Click the Select Elements button Networks dialog box will display. to select a range. When you click this button the Analyze

Click the Network tab and then an object in your document. All objects connected to it will be selected and the name of the object will display in the Selected Object field. All objects connected to the selected object will be converted. You can also select a range within your document. To do this click the Path tab in the Analyze Networks box, select the first object in your range (its name will display in the From Object field) and select the last object in your range (its name will display in the To Object field). It is better to select the objects in the specifications tree, but you can select in the viewer also. All objects within the range will be converted.

5.

Enter a file name for the isometric drawing and hit Enter when you are using the Select Elements options. In other cases a default file name will be generated for the drawing, but it is best to give your own file name because default file names can confuse. If you are converting everything belonging to a line ID, for instance, the file name will be that of the line ID. If you perform the step again the application will create a second file with the same name and the letter "A" (or whatever sequence it is) attached.

6.

Check the box Display ISO drawing if you want to see the drawing when it is generated. If you do not check the box the drawing will be stored and you can view it later.

7.

Click OK to generate the drawing. The Converting Data window will display progress.

8.

When the drawing has been generated the New Drawing dialog box displays. Select any of the options you want and click OK.

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9.

If you had checked the Display ISO Drawing option then the drawing will display. It will contain various kinds of information and will display dimensions. You can change unit dimensions by going to the ISOGen Setup tab described in Setup Requirements.

A large drawing will be split into manageable sections and only the first section will display initially. 10. To view the drawing later click the View ISO Drawing button in the toolbar. A window will open at the Drawings directory. This is a subdirectory of the Style directory you created earlier.

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Generating a PCF File


This task shows how to generate a PCF format file from a 3-D document.

1.

You need to create certain directories, with a specific structure, that will be used by the process. You can give then any name you want. There should be a root directory, in this illustration it is called IsogenRoot. Within this directory there should be a second directory, in this example Project1. Within the second directory there should be a third directory, called usersCheck in this example. In addition, you must create a directory within the second directory called Inputs (the generated PCF file will reside in this directory). When you are done you should have this structure:

2.

In Piping Design click Tools - Options, select Equipment & Systems - Piping Design and the ISOGen Setup tab. If you are doing this for the first time there will be no entries in the fields Root, Project and Style directory. Navigate to the directories you just created, in the first three fields, as shown below. You do not need to enter anything in the Error File field.

3.

With your 3-D document open, follow Steps 1 to 4 as explained in Creating an Isometric Drawing. A file with the .pcf extension will be generated and stored in the directory ...IsogenRoot\Project1\Inputs. You can view the file using a text editor.

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Using Mapping Tables


This task explains the usage of mapping tables specifically for generating isometric drawings. Mapping tables are how the applications determine which Alias symbol to place in a 2-D drawing for a given 3-D part. They are also needed to map attributes, and display information in a drawing. This application comes with tables that contain the mapping needed for the sample parts provided. However, if you build new parts, or create new attributes, then you need to modify the mapping tables accordingly. The tables are in the directory ...intel_a\startup\EquipmentAndSystems\Piping\DesignRules. Do not change the location or file name of the tables. The table structure and column headings must not be modified. Use the tab key to move between columns, and do not add leading or trailing spaces to your entries.

1.

If you add a new attribute then you need to modify the file Piping-ISOAttributeMapping.txt. Mapping the attributes and adding the "Type" in the table allows you to display these attributes in the generated drawing. The attributes can be displayed in the generated drawing.You will need to see Alias documentation to find out how to customize the display. Entering the information in the attribute mapping table allows the information to be picked up. There are three columns in the table: q Type: You can enter attributes as one of three types - pipeline, component and description. There is a fourth type in the column, attr-categoryXX, and its usage is explained below.

Any attribute that is typed as 'pipeline' will display in a specific area of the generated drawing, depending on the format you select. If the attribute has a value then the value will be displayed; if there is no value then the value field will be left blank. The following image shows one format you can use to display the information in a drawing.

If the attribute belongs to a component then enter 'component' in the type field. There are several customizable lines in the table that you can modify. The lines display the Alias attribute but not the corresponding V5 attribute. If you create an attribute that corresponds to the listed Alias attribute then you can remove the words USER-DEFINED and enter your attribute. You can also add new lines if you want, entering the V5 and Alias attributes. The display of component attributes in a drawing depends on how you customize it. Use 'description' as the type if you want the values for the attributes to display in a Description column. You can format Alias to add a column with the heading Description to the generated drawings. The values of attributes you type as description will display in this column. The type ATTR-CATEGORYXX is used to add a column to the drawing, to display additional attributes. Some attributes are typed like this in the sample mapping table. To add columns change

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one of the blank lines in the table. There are several lines in the table that read ATTR-CATEGORYXX USER DEFINED USER DEFINED (XX is a number). These are essentially blank lines. If you want to display an attribute value in a column then change the entries 'USER DEFINED' to reflect the names of V5 and Alias attributes. The attribute will be added to the columns already displayed. A drawing can have a maximum of 20 columns. The image below shows one format for displaying attributes in columns in the generated drawing.

In the column AttributeName enter the attribute name used in this application. In the column ISOGenAttributeName enter the equivalent Alias attribute name. You will have to see Alias documentation to determine which name to use.

If you add a new end style then modify the table: Piping-ISOEndStyleMapping.txt 2. The table has two columns:
q

EndStyle: Enter the end style from Piping Design. ISOgenEndStyle: Enter the equivalent Alias end style. You need to refer to Alias documentation to determine which end style to enter.

3.

If you add a new piping symbol then you need to modify the table: Piping-IsoSymbols.txt. Parts have an attribute, Symbol Name, and you need to modify the table if you create a part with a value that is not shown in the table. The table has two columns:
q

Piping-Symbol: Enter a symbol name attribute value that is not included in the table. Iso-Symbol: Enter the equivalent Alias symbol. You need to refer to Alias documentation to determine which symbol to enter.

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Drawing Production
This section explains how to customize and create a 2-D drawing from a 3-D document. It differs from the function "creating isometric drawings" in that the drawing production function allows you to customize the way your 2-D drawing will appear. Another significant difference is that a drawing produced using this function is created to scale. Some 2-D endstyle graphics are included with this application. If you need more graphics then you must create them. The catalog in which endstyles are stored is called Graphic Replacement True View Catalog. It is in the following directory: ...intel_a\startup\EquipmentandSystems\Piping (or other discipline)\PipingDesign (or other application)\DrawingCatalog. You need to place all endstyle graphics in the file GraphicReplacementTrueView.CATPart, which is in the same directory, and then link a graphic name in the catalog to the actual graphic. Creation of the drawing correctly also depends on a design table. See Rules Overview and Modifying Design Rules to find out more. Drawing Production Settings Generating a Drawing Defining 2D Endstyle Symbols

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Drawing Production Settings


This task shows you how to change the settings that affect the appearance of your 2-D drawing. Unlike earlier versions, the appearance of the 2-D drawings that you generate using this function is now controlled by entries in a file, which is in XML format. You need to use a text editor to open this file and change the entries (it is recommended that you make a copy and change that). You will be able to generate drawings with the default settings - you only need to change them if you want to customize. This task explains how to find the file and how its contents are set up. You need to make sure of a setting before you can use this process. Go to Tools - Options - Mechanical Design - Drafting, open the Administration tab, and uncheck the option Generative View Style. 1. The default file provided with this application is called EquipmentAndSystems-3-DLayout.xml. It is located in the directory ...intel_a\resources\standard\generativeparameters. It is recommended that you make a copy of the default file to make changes in and replace the default file with your copy. Do not change the location or file name.

2.

The first part of the file, between the lines "Drafting application parameters" and "End of Drafting parameters" refers to options in the Drafting application. The Drawing Production function uses the Drafting application to generate 2-D drawings, and a fuller explanation will be found in Drafting documentation. These entries are: AxisLines, CenterLines, Fillets, HiddenLines, Threads, 3DPoints, Wireframe, Using3DColors, Using3DSpec. The possible values for all of these (except Fillets) are Yes or No. For Fillets the values are: none, boundaries, symbolic, original edges, projected original edges. The remainder of the file is organized by application, each one contained within the headings "Start Application XXX" and "End Application XXX". The entries relating to Piping Design are explained below. Other applications have similar entries. The drawing production function allows you to create up to three graphic representations for each object. Mirroring this, in the default file each application is divided into four sections. The first section under each application contains settings that apply to all the graphic representations you may create in your 2-D drawing. Following this section are settings for individual graphic representations, identified by GR_1, GR_2 and GR_3.

3.

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4.

The entries in the top section under each application are: q Visible: Yes means this type of part (i.e. piping part) will be generated in the drawing. No means it will not be generated.
q

Color: The RGB value of the color of the generated part. LineType: The value showing line type - bold, dashed etc. This is further explained in the Drafting application documentation. EndStyleSymbol: Yes means an end style symbol will be displayed in the drawing for each piping part. FabricationBreakSymbol: Yes means a symbol will display at the ends of each spool. CornerBendPoint: If set to Yes, the intersection of adjacent pipe and tube segments will display a point.

The following entries do not apply to all applications:


q

FB-Dimension: When set to Yes, you can get information on the actual dimensions (as it applies to the 3-D part) of a part in a 2-D drawing, using the Technological Feature Dimension function. CenterofGravitySymbol: A symbol is displayed at a part's center of gravity when set to Yes.

Entries defining individual graphic representations are: Single (double, envelope, etc.): Type of graphic representation. If you do not want a representation to display enter the words _NoGeneration after it, like Double_NoGeneration. MaxNominalSize: Pipes larger than this value will not be generated in the 2-D drawing. No entry means there is no limit. MinNominalSize: Pipes smaller than this value will not be generated in the 2-D drawing. No entry means there is no limit. LineGapping: Yes means line gapping will display. LineGappingValue: The length of a gap in a line at a point where it is crossed by another line, in millimeters. CenterLines: Yes means a center line will display (available in objects with a "double" graphic representation), CenterLinesExtensionLength: The length by which a center line will extend beyond a pipe.

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6.

Endstyles Some 2-D endstyle graphics are included with this application. If you need more graphics then you must create them. The catalog in which endstyles are stored is called XXX2DSymbolsCustomization.Catalog (XXX stands for the application, such as Piping). It is in the following directory: ...intel_a\startup\EquipmentandSystems\Piping (or other discipline)\PipingDesign (or other application)\DrawingCatalog. You need to place all endstyle graphics in the file XXX2DSymbolsCustomization.CATDrawing, which is in the same directory, and then link a graphic name in the catalog to the actual graphic. When you create a new endstyle (or modify an existing one) you must enter the correct size in the EndDiameter column of the catalog. Samples included with the application are sized at 25.4 mm, which is the actual size of the detail. This size is important because it is used to scale the endstyle to the size of the component to which it is attached. All endstyles provided with this application, except butt weld, can be scaled. The vertical dimension of your detail will be interpreted as the end diameter. Therefore, the value you enter in the EndDiameter column should reflect this.

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Generating a Drawing
This task shows you how to generate a 2-D drawing from a 3-D document. Piping parts have been used in this task. The procedure is the same for all types of parts. You need to make sure of a setting before you can use this process. Go to Tools - Options - Mechanical Design - Drafting, open the Administration tab, and uncheck the option Generative View Style. 1. Open the 3-D document from which you want to generate a drawing. 2. 3. 4. On the menu bar, click Start - Mechanical Design - Drafting. The New Drawing box will display. Click OK. A new drawing will open. Click Windows - Tile Vertically so that you can view both your documents. Select a view for your document. In the image below, the Front View has been selected by clicking the Front View button your document. . You should select a view that allows you to best manipulate and view

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A Generative View Style dialog box will display. If it is not already selected, you need to select the XML file that contains the settings you want to use to generate your drawing.

5.

You can select one or more objects in the document, and the generated drawing will include only these. To select, click the objects(s) in the specifications tree. If you do not select any object then the entire document will be used to generate the drawing. You must have the Drafting workbench active, and select a view function by clicking one of the View buttons, as described above, before you can do the following. To make Drafting active click anywhere on the drawing. The make a view function active click on a button. If you have a run displayed in your document, it may interfere with the following steps because you may not be able to select the center line. You can display a run as Line/Curve section, or "hide" it, to more conveniently complete the following steps. 6. Define a plane - this will determine the view in the generated drawing. To define a plane, click two objects (if it is a pipe you must click the center line) or the face of a part to define the X and Y axes. After you click the first object or face, you can move the pointer over the document and the Oriented Preview box will display a preview. In the image below the user has selected the X axis. The Preview box is displaying what the plane will be if the user selects the displayed center line for a Y axis.

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7.

Click to complete selection of the plane. A preview will display in your drawing.

8.

You can use the manipulator to change the view. Click anywhere in the document when you are done to create the 2-D image. The image below was made after selecting the "single" graphic representation.

The following image shows a "double" graphic representation. The center line will only display as a straight line. It will not follow a curve, if one is present.

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You can get more information on manipulating 2-D drawings in Drafting documentation.

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Defining 2D Endstyle Symbols


This task shows you how to create your own endstyle symbols. Some endstyle symbols are provided with this application. if you want to create your own, single or double line, symbols then follow the procedure described below. As of Release 14, you can customize only endstyle, center of gravity and fabrication break symbols. 1. You will first need to create a catalog, using the standard catalog facility provided. Click Infrastructure Catalog Editor in the menu bar to open the editor, and then open the CATfct file for the application, in this and navigate to the CATfct case Piping. To open the CATfct file click the Open User Dictionary button file you are using. The sample file is CATPipingSample.CATfct, located in ...intel_a\resources\graphic. 2. Click the Add Catalog Template button to display the Add Catalog Template dialog box and make sure the entries match those displayed in the image below.

Click OK to create a catalog. 3. Select Endstyle in the specifications tree and the Reference tab to display all the part descriptions.

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Delete the descriptions you do not need - right click on a description and, in the drop down menu, select Remove Description. 4. You now have to link the remaining descriptions to an actual drawing. You do this by double clicking on the description to bring up the Description Definition dialog box and following steps explained below. One sequence you could follow is: q Open the drawing that contains the 2D geometry you want to link to a description. NOTE: Each endstyle symbol must be defined in a separate view in the 2D drawing, and each symbol MUST be defined in a 1 inch by 1 inch (25.4 mm) size. Each detail must have the same name as the one that appears under the NAME field in the catalog, and to which you will link.
q

Tile the screen so that you can see the drawing as well as the catalog. Double click on the description (if you haven't done so already) to bring up the Description Definition dialog box. Click on Select External Feature in this box. Select the 2D view containing the geometry you want to associate. The association between the description and the symbol is done. Repeat these steps to associate other symbols to descriptions. Save the catalog and the drawings. Point to the catalog in the project resource management file.

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Schematic Driven Design


This section discusses ways of creating a 3-D document from a schematic. When you are creating the 3-D document you must follow this placing order: place your major equipment, place nozzles on them, create the runs, place primary parts such as valves and, lastly, place the secondary parts such as pipes, flanges etc. You must also set the Schematic Driven flag. Click Tools - Options, select Equipment & Systems, click the Design Criteria tab and check the Schematic Driven box. Placing Parts Using a Schematic Creating a Run Using a Schematic Analyzing Schematic Driven Design

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Placing Parts Using a Schematic


This task shows how to place equipment and parts using a schematic drawing. The procedure below describes placing equipment. The same method is used for placing parts. You must follow the parts placement order described in Schematic Driven Design. You must also set the Schematic Driven flag described in the same section. Beginning Release 15, 3D versions of runs must be 'associated' with the corresponding schematic, if you want to do schematic driven parts placement on a run. Runs will automatically be associated if you create them in Release 15 using a schematic. Runs that are not associated with the corresponding schematic must be associated by you - if you want schematic driven parts placement. See Analyzing Schematic Driven Design to learn how to do this. In order to place equipment you must be in the Equipment Arrangement workbench. To create a run and place parts you should be in the appropriate workbench. If the Function Driven flag in the project resource management file is set to 2, then schematic driven parts placement will not be possible in Equipment Arrangement. 1. Click the Place Equipment button . Two dialog boxes display - the Place Equipment box and the Schematic Browser box. If the Schematic Browser box does not display the schematic you want to use to place parts then click the Open Schematic Diagram button and select the schematic you want to use to place parts. If your resources are stored in ENOVIA then you first need to import it using procedures described in the ENOVIA section of this manual.

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Click the equipment you want to place first, in this case EQ-19. 2. NOTE: Use of the Select Mode buttons is explained in Placing Parts. Refer to that task.
q

If the equipment you selected has a part number defined then you do not have to do anything more than place it. If the Part Type was not defined (it will display in the Place Equipment box), then you need to click on the down arrow in the Part Type field and select a part type.

If the Clear Filter button is enabled it means that values from a previous part placement exist in the Filter Definition dialog box. (See Step 5.) Click the button if you want to clear these values.

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If you want to change the values of one or more properties of the part you want to filter for, then click the Filter Definition button to display the Filter Definition dialog box. Select the property whose value you want to change and then select the new value from the drop down box in the Value field. (The Value field will display after you select a property.) This new value will appear in the Override value column. The values in the Override value column will be used when searching for parts in the catalog. The Override button brings up the Manage Override Parameters dialog box, allowing you to change attribute values. The Flip Part button allows you to flip parts that can be flipped, such as a reducer. The Move/Rotate button displays the Move/Rotate dialog box, allowing you to manipulate the part. The Pipe Selection and Pipe Segment Shortcut buttons are shortcuts that let you select part type. The Change to Schematic Mode button lets you toggle between schematic and non-schematic mode. You will exit the command when you click this button and need to click the Place Part command again.

3.After you define the Part Type, the Part Selection box will display and you can select a part. If both Function Type and Part Type were defined then the Part Selection box will display when you click on any equipment in the schematic and you can select the part.

4.Click in your 3-D document to place the equipment.

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Parts and equipment have "ordered placement" capability. To give an example, in the image below if you have placed the valves 1 and 3, then valve 2 will only place between those two. You will not be able to place it to the right of valve 3.

5.Using the procedure described above, continue to place all equipment and nozzles you want to from the schematic. If you assigned names to connectors when you added them (both in the 3-D and schematic application) then your 3-D nozzles will be placed at the correct connector on the equipment - the nozzle will place on the connector which has the same name as the connector in the schematic application.

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Creating a Run Using a Schematic


This task shows how to create a run using a schematic drawing. You must follow the parts placement order described in Schematic Driven Design. You must also set the Schematic Driven flag described in the same section. Beginning Release 15, 3D versions of runs must be 'associated' with the corresponding schematic, if you want to do schematic driven parts placement on a run. Runs will automatically be associated if you create them in Release 15 using a schematic. Runs that are not associated with the corresponding schematic must be associated by you - if you want schematic driven parts placement. See Analyzing Schematic Driven Design to learn how to do this. As a visual aid, runs that are associated display a check mark in the specifications tree . You can use a schematic with a branched run, or a run that is not connected to other objects. In order to place equipment you must be in the Equipment Arrangement workbench. To create a run and place parts you should be in the appropriate workbench. 1. Click the Route Run button . The Schematic Browser and Run dialog boxes display. . Runs that are not associated display an X

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Note: Some of the buttons display after you have selected a run. In the schematic displayed in the Schematic Browser, click on the run you want to create. The 3-D 2. viewer will show a possible route. The function can distinguish the schematic objects (equipment and nozzles only) between which the run existed, and select their 3-D equivalents to route between.

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3. If you want the application to show you possible paths between two objects, then select your beginning and end points and click the Display Alternate Path button field showing the number of possible paths: actual paths. 4. by clicking on the down arrow. This affects the Select From/To or Logical Line display of objects in the specifications tree, and the Route Through Hangers option (see below). If you select Logical Line only the logical line will display in the tree. If you select From/To then the objects routed from and to will also display. 5. Once you have a route you want to accept, click OK or the Create the Run button and the run will be created. If you click the button you can select another run. If you click OK you will exit the command. If you named the connectors when you created them (in both the schematic and 3-D applications) then the run will be created between connectors that have the same name as in the schematic. 6. if you want to define a route yourself, such as through one Click the User Defined Path button or more hangers. To route though hangers, click the button and then select the hangers you want to . The first click displays a

. Subsequent clicks show the

route through. The User Defined Path button is only available when the two points you want to route between exist in the 3D window.

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The Run dialog box displays other options. These are regular Routing options that are explained in Routing a Run, and allow you to route as you would normally. The Reframe button zoom in on an object in the 3-D viewer. FOR HVAC DESIGN ONLY allows you to

displays in the Type field if the 2D segment you select has the Equivalent The Ductulator button Diameter property defined and valuated. The Ductulator is a tool for calculating the area of a rectangular or square duct that is equivalent to the diameter of a given round duct. It enables you to place the correct-sized duct. Click the Ductulator button to being up the Duct Size Computation dialog box.

The diameter of the line you clicked on is displayed in the Equivalent Diam field. Select a value for the Inside Height property to obtain a value for Inside Width. Or select a value for Inside Width to obtain Inside Height. You should select by clicking on the down arrow next to each field - the values displayed are obtained from your catalog. The Exact Result field displays the exactly computed result - instead of this figure the application will select a size that is available to you. The Aspect Ratio field displays the aspect ratio of the two values.

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This task shows how to analyze a document that has been created using a schematic. This function allows you to determine that parts placement is in accordance with the schematic drawing. This procedure allows you to compare the 3-D document you created to the schematic from which it was created for errors and inaccuracies. You can only analyze equipment and parts, not routes.

1. With the 3-D document open, click on Analyze - Functional Physical Integration - Analyze Functional Physical Integration Status. The Analyze Functional Physical Integration dialog box displays, with the associated schematic drawing open. If your 3-D document and schematic are not associated then you need to click the Open button, navigate to the schematic and select it.

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The buttons below the tree are used to open a document or manage the display of the tree and schematic. You can click on the down arrow next to the field that reads Logical Line to select another element, which will then display in the tree. Click the Selected Objects option and click on a part in the schematic. Information about the part will appear in the Functional Status 2. window. If the schematic function is associated with a 3-D part then the relevant information will display in the Related Physical Objects window. The two can be dissociated by clicking on the Dissociate button.

3. If the schematic function you clicked is not associated with an object in the 3-D document then the Related Physical Objects window will suggest 3-D objects to which it can be associated, if there are any. In the image below Vessel Function can be associated with two objects in the 3-D document. If you want to associate it then select an object and click the Associate button.

You can also associate a schematic function with a 3-D object by using the Analyze function in the menu bar. With your 3-D document open click Analyze - Functional Physical Integration - Associate Functional Physical Objects. The Associate Functional Physical Objects window will display. Click the Open button to open the schematic you want to use, and select the function you want to associate. Make sure From/To is selected in the drop down menu, and select Entire Model. The window will display the 3-D objects you can associate to. Select one and click Apply and OK. NOTE: It is possible to associate one schematic run segment to more than one 3D run.

You can create an Exception for certain objects, in which case you will not be able to associate to them. These objects will also be overlooked by the Analyze function. With your 3-D document open, click Analyze - Functional Physical Integration - Manage Exceptions. The Exception Manager will display. Select the object for which you want to create an exception and click Create. You can use the same procedure to remove the Exception. 4. Use the Clear List button to clear the entries in the Functional Status window. Select an entry and click Properties if you want to see its properties. 5. Click Analyze. The Inconsistencies dialog box displays, listing any errors. In the illustration below the entries indicate that the valve is not connected to the tank or the pump - only a run is present, there are no pipes or elbows.

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Penetration Management Usage


This section discusses penetration management; which refers to the process of routing a pipe or a duct - as an example - through a structure. If you are working with a ship, for instance, you may need to create penetrations through bulkheads, move objects, or reroute your pipe or duct, in order to do so. The penetration management function works within the ENOVIA environment only - and you must be in the ENOVIA Product Structure. You must take certain setup steps before using the function. See Penetration Management Setup to learn how to set up the function.

Querying for Penetrations Create a Cutout Sketch Adding an Object to a Penetration

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Querying for Penetrations


This task shows you how to query your document to identify penetrations and cutout solutions. Within the overall design process, querying is done after a penetration request has been created, to determine what these requests are. The subsequent step will be to create cutout sketches. There are two methods for querying penetrations. You can query locally by selecting the object (bulkhead, plate, etc.); or select the product in the specifications tree, which will generate a list of all penetrations in the product and all sub-tier products in your document. 1. With your document open, click on the Penetration Management button Management dialog box opens. Select the object which is being penetrated. . The Penetration

2.

The object you selected will appear in the Selected object to query field. The Penetration Management dialog box lists the penetrations associated with the object you have selected and the current status. To retrieve geometry that has not been loaded from ENOVIA, select the penetrations you want to query, then click the Load Geometry button updated. . The list of penetrations will be

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3.

To create a cutout sketch you will select one or more penetrations from the list. This process is explained in Creating a Cutout Sketch.

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Creating a Cutout Sketch


This task shows how to create a cutout sketch for a penetration. The sketch may be created using penetration design rules, by selecting from a list of cutout shapes, or by creating the cutout manually. When creating a cutout using design rules, the cutout shape and clearance are defined by penetration cutout rules and the penetration shapes catalog. 1. Select the penetration from the Penetration Management dialog box. The related objects highlight in your document, and will be used in calculating the penetration location.

2. Click the Create Cutout Sketch button and the Create Cutout Sketch box will display. Select the Rules tab is you want to use the design rules to create a cutout sketch.

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3.

The Create Cutout Sketch dialog box displays the shape and size for the proposed sketch, as computed by the design rules. Click OK if you accept it. If, instead, you want to select a sketch from a catalog, then select the Standard Catalog tab and the Catalog Browser button .

The Catalog Browser displays. Select a sketch to place it.

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4. 5.

If you want to create a sketch then select the Manual Sketch tab. The Sketcher will open. Create your sketch and click the Exit Workbench button. The sketch will be placed. The Place on Side buttons allow you to place the cutout sketch on one side or the other of a

6.

structure, and is used for visibility purposes. Click OK. You must save the document before you can take the next step.

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Adding an Object to a Penetration


This task shows you how to add an object to a penetration. By adding an object to a penetration you are associating the cutout sketch you created earlier to the penetration record. Before you take this step you must save the document in ENOVIA. 1. With your document open click the Penetration Management button and query the penetrations. The Penetration Management dialog box will open listing the active penetrations. Select the penetration for which you want to add an object.

2. Click the Add Object to Penetration button displaying the Penetration ID you selected. . The Add Objects to Penetration dialog box opens

3. Select the cutout sketch(es) in your document, or from the specifications tree, that you want to add to the penetration and click OK. The objects are added. 4. Click OK to close the Penetration Management dialog box.

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Hole Placement
This section explains placing, defining, modifying and querying holes on piping parts. Placing a Hole on a Part Modifying a Hole Querying Hole Properties

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Placing a Hole on a Part


This task shows how to define and place a hole on a part. When you place a hole you are creating a point from which to route so as to add a run and smaller duct, pipe or tube. When you define the hole you are editing certain default parameters such as the diameter, orientation and tangent direction to meet the requirements of the hole you want to create and route from. There is no length (or depth) parameter to a hole although it appears so when placed in your document. When defining and placing a hole you should set the connector display options. Go to Tools - Options Equipment & Systems. Select the Display tab, scroll down to 3D Viewer Display Options and check the Part connections and Part connectors options. 1. With your document open, click the Place Hole button . The Hole Parts dialog box opens displaying choices for round or rectangular holes on either round or rectangular ducts or pipes.

2.

Select the desired hole type. The tangent-plane appears as a visual aid. Move it to the location you have chosen for the hole and click.

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3.

When you click to place the hole the Manage Override Parameters dialog box opens displaying the list of parameters that you can edit.

5. 6.

Edit the parameters as necessary to meet the intended design. Click Apply after you edit each parameter to update the product. When finished editing the parameters click OK. The hole is placed. To modify the hole further, see Modifying a Hole.

When placed, the hole has a connector from which you can continue routing.

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Modifying a Hole
This task shows you how to modify a hole that has been placed on a part.

1.

With your document open, select the hole you want to modify in the document or in the specifications tree.

2.

Click the Edit Part Parameters button

. The Manage Override Parameters dialog box opens.

For rectangular parts, i.e. ducts, the hole is placed on the Side: Top, Bottom, Left or Right. When placing a hole on round parts such as tubes, pipes or round ducts the hole placement surface parameter is the Orientation Angle. Tangent Angle is used only with holes placed on round parts. Set this to change the tangent of the connector for subsequent routing. When set to zero, the tangent angle will be the same as the orientation angle. The Inset is the origin of the hole. Making this a positive value, say 1 inch, 'insets' the origin of the hole into the part 1 inch below the surface. A negative value will raise the origin of the hole above the part surface. This is parameter used for both round and rectangular parts. (After 'insetting' the hole in the part you will not be able to select it in the 3D viewer. Click the Edit Part Parameters button and select the hole from the specifications tree.) Center Offset is used when placing a hole on a rectangular part. Set this value to adjust the side-to-side location of the hole. For rectangular hole parts the hole size is modified using the Height and Width parameters. 3. Make the necessary changes to the parameters and click Apply to see the effect. 4. Click OK when finished. The hole is modified.

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Querying Hole Properties


This task shows you how to query a hole. When you query a hole, as with other objects, you are querying its properties. 1. 2. Select the hole in the document or in the specifications tree. Right click to display the drop down menu and select Properties. The Properties dialog box opens. Click the various tabs to obtain the desired information. The Object tab includes information regarding the hole's parent Line ID.

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Working With Bendables


This section explains how to extract data and perform design checks on bendable pipes and tubes. Extract Bending Data from Bendable Pipes and Tubes Design Checks for Bendable Pipes and Tubes

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This task shows you how to extract bending data from Bendable Pipes and Tubes and transfer it into a Microsoft Excel worksheet. Bending data can be fed into Bending machines to precisely create bends in bendable tubes and pipes.
q

The standard macro supplied with this product displays bending data in a sample format. However, a user with some Microsoft VBScript experience can change the script supplied to change the format. The sample script assumes that the bendable objects are placed on a run under a distribution system or a logical line. For more information on placing parts, see Placing a Part.

1. Using Windows Explorer, locate the intel_a\code\command subdirectory. 2. Copy the files PslTubingExtract.CATScript

and PslTubingExtractTemplate.xls to C:\temp (with read-write access). Select the two files and click the right mouse button. Click Properties in the drop-down menu that displays. The Properties dialog box will display. Uncheck the Read-Only option.

3. In the specifications tree, select the line (piping or tubing) under which the run containing the bendable objects has been placed.

4. Click Tools - Macro - Macros. The Macro dialog box will display. Select External File from the drop down list, select PslTubingExtract.CATScript and click Select. The Select Page 331 Version 5 Release 15 Piping Design External File dialog box will display. Select PslTubingExtract.CATScript and click Open. This will again display the Macro dialog box. Select PslTubingExtract.CATScript and click Run. Data will be extracted from the bendable objects and displayed in an Excel worksheet, part of which is displayed below. (The application will create the table, but you must have Excel installed!)

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Design Checks for Bendable Pipes and Tubes


This task shows you how to perform design checks on bendable pipes and tubes. The design checks will tell you whether the radius of a bend, the total length of the run and the rest length are within prescribed limits. The rest length is the straight segment between two nodes (with bend radius).

Click the Update button whenever you see it active (not greyed out) during this process. Also, don't forget that you need to have the Knowledge Expert product installed for this process. In the following example the maximum bend radius will be checked. 1. 2. Click Start - Infrastructure - Knowledge Expert to enter the Knowledge Expert workbench. Set up your options correctly or you will not be able to do the following steps correctly. q Click Tools - Options and select General from the left column of the window.
q

Click the General tab. Select Automatic for the Update function. Click Product in the left column of the window and scroll to the Product Structure tab. Under the Specification Tree function make sure the Relations and Automatic Expand options are selected.

3. 4.

Make the run active.

Click the Insert Rules button

and navigate to the KnowledgeRules directory.

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5. 6.

Select Bendable_CheckMaxBendRadius.CATProduct and click Open. If the desired bend radius violates the bend radius rules, a red light will show against the relevant CATProduct line icon in the specifications tree, in this case CATKWEBendRadiusCheck.1. If there is no violation then a green light will show next to it. In the illustration below the red button is showing (with the mouse pointer pointed at it).

7.

To change the maximum bend radius do the following: Each check has a parameter element beneath it in the specifications tree - in this case it is MaxBendRadius. Double-click on the element to display the Edit Parameter dialog box. Enter your maximum bend radius in this box. To check for rest length and total run length select the appropriate CATProduct in the Load Report dialog box. Make sure it has the word "check" in it.

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Computed Attributes
This section provides several tables, each of which lists Knowledgeware computed attributes and methods for a specific product or discipline. Unlike the Feature Dictionary attributes, which are user customizable, you cannot modify the value of computed attributes. Computed attributes are so called because the software computes their values based upon other data in your document. For example: In the Compartment and Access product, you can create a compartment consisting of 6 boundaries: 4 walls, a floor and a ceiling. There is a computed attribute (for compartments) called TotalSurfaceArea that is calculated based on the individual surface areas of each boundary. Also included in these tables are methods. Methods can take input parameters and return values which enable you to define checks and rules based on the values you provide. Please note that the computed attributes and methods in the PlantShipLayout Knowledgeware dictionary can apply to several products and disciplines. This dictionary contains higher-level object types that other products and disciplines can inherit. You can access computed attributes and methods in Knowledgeware rules and checks. Computed attributes are also accessible through the Edit - Search dialog, the Tools - Report Definition dialog, and the Insert Link Template dialog when defining a text template (in schematic diagrams). The organization of these computed attributes and methods matches that of the Knowledgeware dictionary. Piping

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Piping
The following computed attributes and methods are in the PipingLayout Knowledgeware dictionary. Not all methods take input parameters, and for those that do, the parameters are described in the Description column. Whether you can see the value returned by the method depends upon how you are using it in Knowledgeware. For example, if you write a Knowledgeware rule or check causing a component to display differently based on the outcome of that rule or check, you won't see the calculated value; just the result of the calculated value. You can see the value returned by a computed attribute in:
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A report you generate through the Tools - Report Definition dialog. The text displayed in your diagram, after you define a text template using the Insert Link Template dialog. The Edit - Properties dialog, providing the administrator configured them to display as described in Changing the Display Order of Properties.

Object Type PipingBendablePipe

Attribute/Method Name CumulativeLength

Description Total length of a "Pipe with bend" object. This includes the computation for all bends. Compares the pipe's bend radius (at each segment) with the bend rule radius. The bend rule radius is derived from the values for the pipe's nominal size, material category and schedule.

PipingBendablePipe

IsBendRadiusConsistent()

PipingBendablePipe

Compares the bending rule mini grip length with the length of each bendable segment. Bending IsMinimumGripLengthConsistent() rule mini grip length is derived from the values for the pipe's nominal size, material category and schedule. NodeBendAngle NodeBendRadius NodeNumber NodeRotationAngle NodeSlopeAngle NodeX Bend angle of a specific node of a run. Bend radius of a specific node of a run. Node number that is generated automatically during route definition. Rotation angle for a specific node on a run. Slope angle for a specific node on a run. Absolute X Coordinate for a specific node on a run. The axis where X is defined by the first two segments (node 1 and node 2) of a bendable. The Y and Z axes are rotated and transformed relative to X. Absolute Y Coordinate for a specific node on a run.

PipingBendablePipe PipingBendablePipe PipingBendablePipe PipingBendablePipe PipingBendablePipe PipingBendablePipe

PipingBendablePipe

NodeX_LocalAxis

PipingBendablePipe

NodeY

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PipingBendablePipe

NodeY_LocalAxis

The axis where Y is defined by the first two segments (node 1 and node 2) of a bendable. The X and Z axes are rotated and transformed relative to Y. Absolute Z Coordinate for a specific node on a run. The axis where Z is defined by the first two segments (node 1 and node 2) of a bendable. The X and Y axes are rotated and transformed relative to Z. The length between 2 nodes on a run Total number of hex bolts Diameter of each hex bolts Length of each hex bolt Total number of stud bolts Diameter of each stud bolts Length of each stud bolt Returns a list of the objects that are members of a line, between two selected points. Other piping lines that join the selected line are also included. Total dry weight of an object. This is computed by multiplying the length with the dry weight per unit length. Total wet weight of an object. This is computed by multiplying the length with the Wet weight per unit length. Returns the name of the piping line to which the object belongs. Returns a pointer to the piping line to which the object belongs. Returns the name of the spool to which the object belongs. Checks if the pipe specification attribute of the input piping part function is "in spec." (That is, its pipe specification value is derived from its piping line.) Checks if the input object has the same nominal size as anything connected to it. Checks if the input object has the same pipe specification as anything connected to it. Returns the name of the piping line to which the object belongs. Returns a pointer to the piping line to which the object belongs.

PipingBendablePipe

NodeZ

PipingBendablePipe

NodeZ_LocalAxis

PipingBendablePipe PipingGasket PipingGasket PipingGasket PipingGasket PipingGasket PipingGasket PipingLine

SegmentLength HexBoltCount HexBoltDiameter HexBoltLength StudBoltCount StudBoltDiameter StudBoltLength FromToTable

PipingLine

TotalDryWeight

PipingLine

TotalWetWeight

PipingPart PipingPart PipingPart

ParentPipingLineName ParentPipingLineObject ParentPipingSpoolName

PipingPartFunc

IsInPipeSpec()

PipingPartFunc PipingPartFunc PipingPartFunc PipingPartFunc

IsNominalSizeConsistent() IsPipeSpecConsistent() ParentPipingLineName ParentPipingLineObject

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PipingPartFunc PipingPartFunc PipingPartFunc PipingPartFunc PipingPartFunc PipingPartFunc PipingPartFunc PipingPartFunc PipingPartFunc PipingPartFunc PipingPartFunc PipingPartFunc PipingPartFunc PipingPartFunc

PhysicalEndStyle PhysicalMaterialCategory PhysicalMaterialCode PhysicalOutsideDiameter PhysicalPartCode PhysicalPartName PhysicalRating PhysicalSchedule PhysicalStandard PhysicalWallThickness PhysicalWeightDry PhysicalWeightWet ParentICLoopName ParentICLoopObject

Returns a string describing the endstyle type: threaded, butt-weld, plain-end, raised-face. Material used to create the part: carbon steel, stainless steel, copper, aluminum. Industry standard code that identifies the material used to create the part. The outside diameter of the pipe. Industry standard code that identifies the part. User-assigned name for the part. Industry standard code that describes how much pressure the material can withstand. Industry standard code that describes the wall thickness of the pipe. Industry standard for the part. For example: ASTL, Iron, PVC. Thickness of the material used to create the part. Dry weight of an object. Wet weight of an object. Returns the name of the instrumentation and control loop to which the object belongs. Returns a pointer to the instrumentation and control loop to which the object belongs. Defines the bottom Z elevation of a specific duct. You can use this parameter to label the required elevations while drafting. Compares the actual pipe length with the maximum design length, which is derived from the values for nominal size and material category. Defines the top Z elevation of a specific duct. You can use this parameter to label the required elevations while drafting. Returns true if the input object has the same nominal size as anything connected to it. Returns true if the input object has the same pipe specification as anything is connected to it. Returns the name of the piping line to which the object belongs. Returns a pointer to the piping line to which the object belongs. Returns the name of the piping line to which the object belongs. Returns a pointer to the piping line to which the object belongs.

PipingPipe

BottomElevation

PipingPipe

IsTotalLengthConsistent()

PipingPipe

TopElevation

PipingPipeFunc PipingPipeFunc PipingPipeFunc PipingPipeFunc PipingSpool PipingSpool

IsNominalSizeConsistent() IsPipeSpecConsistent() ParentPipingLineName ParentPipingLineObject ParentPipingLineName ParentPipingLineObject

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PipingSpool

TotalDryWeight

Total dry weight of an object. This is computed by multiplying the length with the dry weight per unit length. Total wet weight of an object. This is computed by multiplying the length with the wet weight per unit length.

PipingSpool

TotalWetWeight

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Customizing
This section describes ways in which you can customize the Piping Design workbench. The task Setting Up the Application describes the various steps you have to take, and the order in which you have to do them, to set up Piping Design.

Customizing Settings (3-D) Setting Up the Application Project Resource Management Feature Dictionary: Creating Classes and Attributes Cache Mode Penetration Management Creating Reports Catalogs Line ID Catalogs Standards and Design Rules Resource Map Using Knowledgeware Checks Defining Options Working with ENOVIA

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Customizing Settings
This section describes the settings that you can access through the Tools - Options command in the menu bar. These settings are stored in permanent setting files and will not be lost when you end your session. Some of these settings affect the looks of the workbench. Others affect the way certain functions behave. Still others are necessary to have access to certain functions. When they are necessary for a function they are also identified in that specific task. 1. Click Tools - Options in the menu bar. The Options dialog box displays. 2. Click Equipment & Systems under the Options heading in the left column. Tab pages become available in the main window. These apply to more than one application.

These tab pages allow you to customize the following:


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General settings Display settings Design Criteria Standards

3.

Not all options in these pages are relevant for all applications. Also available to you are pages listed below the heading Equipment & Systems. These are specific to the applications mentioned.

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Click Piping Design to customize.

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ISOGen Setup

The Piping Design heading under Equipment and Systems contains a tab for setting options for generating isometric drawings. You can:
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View and select directories necessary for the process. Select the units in which values should display.

Directory Structures

The directories needed for generating isometric drawings are noted in the fields above. The fields for Root Directory, Project Directory and Error File are populated by the application. You will need to enter directories for the fields Style Directory and I-Run.exe path. See Creating an Isometric Drawing - Setup Requirements for more information.

Units

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Select the units in which you want values to display in the generated 2-D drawing. Click on the down arrow and make your selection.

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Setting Up the Application


This application provides you with powerful tools for creating and managing system designs. Before you can begin using it, however, you need to set it up so that it is correctly tailored to your needs. This task describes broadly the different steps that are needed. The individual steps listed here are explained elsewhere in this manual, and links are provided in most cases. You need to understand these thoroughly. Most of the steps described here will be performed by a system administrator or someone who is in a similar position. You may be able to change the order in which these steps are laid out, but it is recommended that you follow the order given below, at least in the beginning. 1. Create classes, subclasses and attributes in the feature dictionary. Every part you create will belong to a certain class and subclass, and will have certain attributes. For instance, if you want to create a part, say a threaded ball valve, it will be under the subclass "ball valve", which in turn will be under the class "valve". Some classes and subclasses are provided with the application, but most users will want to create others of their own. In addition, each part you create will have certain attributes, such as size. Attributes are also added in the feature dictionary. Make changes to the project resource management (PRM) file to point to your resources (such as line list catalogs, user dictionaries, etc.). (It is recommended that you do not keep your resources in the default installation. That is because when you install a service pack or new release your setup modifications may be overwritten. It is recommended that, after you install the application, you make a copy of the subdirectory ...intel_a\startup\EquipmentandSystems (maintaining the default directory structure) and store your resources at this location. The PRM file should point to resources at this location.) The PRM file identifies resources to the application. Specifically, the PRM file identifies each resource and its location (directory path). The PRM file also organizes the resources by discipline and application, associating resources to specific applications. Therefore, you get the correct resource, equipment catalog for instance, for the resource you are working in. The project administrator needs to define a PRM file for the project, identifying the location of all resources needed by the application. The file is in XML format and can be edited with any text or XML editor. At this stage in the setup process you will not be able to enter the location and/or names of all resources, but you need to enter all that you can. You need to return to the project resource management file at the end of the process and enter names and locations of resources you will have created by then. Modify the object naming rules. Every object that you create (except a run), or part that you place, in your design document can be given a unique identifier. This identifier usually consists of a prefix that identifies the type of object or part it is, followed by a unique number. When you create an object or place a part in your document the application will generate a name as defined by the naming rules that are associated with the object being created. A set of default rules is included with this application, but most users will want to modify these rules to suit their own requirements. You need to do it at this step.

2.

3.

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4.

Make any changes you want to the general design rules. This application incorporates intelligent design functions. This means that as you design, the application ensures your designing meets certain criteria. These criteria are established by the design rules. For instance, the compatibility design rules will match the threaded end of a pipe to the threaded end of a part. There are different sets of design rules. Some are specific to a standard. Others are specific to a specifications catalog. And there are still others that apply every time you are placing a part. These last are known as "global" or "general" design rules. Although you cannot add a new design rule to the general design rules, you can modify existing ones; and, you can add attributes for informational purposes to the Design Rules Catalog. Compartment and Access does not use general design rules. Map the functional physical classes. As explained below, this means "mapping" each class to a function. The feature dictionary has both functional and physical classes. A functional class is a more abstract concept - it assigns a function to an object. Functional classes are used mostly in 2-D (schematic) designing, where designers only have to assign a function to objects they place in their designs, without having to specify exactly which physical part goes at that location. In 3-D design you place physical objects, with unique part numbers. But you will use a schematic to assist in creation of 3-D design, which is why you need to link each physical class to a function. That is what is meant by mapping the functional physical classes. As an example, the physical subclasses butterfly valve and globe valve are mapped to the throttle valve function, whereas the subclass diaphragm actuator is mapped to the valve operator function. You add these mappings in a mapping table. The application has one table that is global or general in nature. In addition, each specifications catalog has a separate mapping table. For this step you only need to map the general mapping table. Raceway & Conduit Design, Hanger Design and Compartment and Access do not have functional physical mapping tables. Create your standards. A sample standard is provided with this application but almost all users will be creating one or more standards. The simplest explanation of a standard is that it is a collection of specifications. You use a standard because it ensures that all the parts you place, and the manner in which you place them, will meet certain minimum requirements or their attributes will be within a certain range. The specifications themselves apply to many different properties, such as material or pressure ranges, maximum bend angles, maximum or minimum length, etc. As an example, if you define your standard by material, then the list of allowable nominal sizes for stainless steel will be different than the sizes for carbon steel. When you create a standard you should also create design rules specific to that standard. HVAC Design, Hanger Design and Compartment and Access do not have standard-related design rules.

5.

6.

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7.

Build parts and create a master catalog. You will need to build the parts you intend to use and place them in a master catalog. During actual use, the parts available to you will depend on the standard and specifications you are using. When you modify the catalog (the most common occurrence is adding a new part) you must synchronize the specifications catalog. This is done by resolving the queries associated with the part type family. Create the specifications catalog(s). A specifications catalog allows you to specify which parts can be used for a certain project or part of a project. A specifications catalog allows you to further refine the choices available in a parts catalog. If you are building a system for conveying hot gases under pressure, for instance, you will only want to use pipes and parts that have a certain heat tolerance, are made of certain materials and have a certain pressure rating. You achieve this by defining in the specifications catalog what the properties should be for the parts you want to use. When you place parts using the specifications catalog, you will only be able to use parts from the main catalog that meet the criteria you have defined in that specifications catalog. You should synchronize the specification catalog whenever you modify the master catalog (the most common occurrence is adding a new part). This is done by resolving the queries associated with the part type family.

8.

When you create a specifications catalog you should also create design rules for that specifications catalog, such as welding rules, turning rules, etc. You should also define the functional physical mapping table for the specifications catalog. Raceway & Conduit Design, Hanger Design and Compartment and Access do not have specifications-related design rules or functional physical mapping tables. Do not forget to enter the names and locations of the resources you just created in the project resource management file.

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Project Resource Management


Users need to manage their resources in a way that is different from what they have been used to. Previously, system administrators could click Tools - Options in the menu bar, navigate to a tab and field, and enter information. Information such as directory paths for various resources without which the application cannot function - line list catalogs, user dictionaries, catalogs, etc. The same information is still needed, but the way of entering it is different. Administrators can no longer enter it using the Tools - Options dialog boxes. Instead, they need to enter the information in one file, which is in XML format. What they enter will be visible in the Options dialog boxes, but it cannot be changed there. Using the PRM Command Understanding Project Resource Management Checking a PRM File for Errors Organizing Resources in PRM File List of PRM Resources and Flags

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Using the PRM Command


This task shows how you can select a project for your session. 1. From the appropriate CATIA workbench, launch the project resource management (PRM) command by selecting Tools - Project Management - Select/Browse from the menu bar. The Project Resource Management dialog box is displayed:

Note that when the dialog box opens the last project that you used is selected. The Select tab lists all the XML projects setup found in the directory defined by the environment variable CATDisciplinePath. This list begins with a CNEXT project which contains only the applications with their resources as defined and delivered with CNEXT. 2. Select the project of your choice, here Project. The corresponding PRM file is read and the disciplines it contains are listed. 3. Select the corresponding discipline, here Piping. Click OK to use the project and discipline you have selected.

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4. The following step is used for informational purposes only - to see a list of resources for a particular discipline. To select a project you only need to take the steps explained above. Select the Browse tab. Once a project and a discipline have been selected, the dialog box lists all the applications defined for the chosen discipline, the description of the active application, and the list of resources of that application. The list of resources displayed is always that for the active application. You should also note that the applications displayed include the applications under that particular discipline, and any applications that are at the project level, which means above the discipline in the PRM hierarchy. In the example below, the Piping discipline displays Piping Design and PID, which are part of that discipline. It also displays the Equipment, Hanger Design and Penetration Management applications, because some of their resources have been placed at the project level. The reason for placing them at the project level is that most disciplines make use of these applications.

When the Project Resource Management dialog box first displays, as explained in Step 1, it may contain a third tab - XML Parsing Error. This indicates that there is an XML syntax error in the file that corresponds to the Project you have chosen.

Click the XML Parsing Error tab to display the error, as shown in the image below.

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You will need to correct the PRM file to get rid of the error. Errors in defining resources in the PRM file are explained in Checking a PRM File for Errors.

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Understanding Project Resource Management


This task shows you how to manage project resources like catalogs and dictionaries. These changes can only be made at system administrator level. For a more complete list of resources and flags see List of PRM Resources and Flags. The project resource management (PRM) file identifies resources (such as line list catalogs, user dictionaries, etc.) to the application. Specifically, the PRM file identifies each resource and its location (directory path). The PRM file also organizes the resources by discipline and application, associating resources to specific applications. Therefore, you get the correct resource, equipment catalog for instance, for the resource you are working in. It's hierarchical structure allows you to share resources, so that you do not have to place duplicate copies of the same resource in several directories. The PRM file is also used for certain other purposes, such as setting flags. These are explained below. A sample file is provided with this application, and it is best to make a copy of it and edit it. The default location is ...intel_a\startup\EquipmentAnd Systems\ProjectData and the file is named Project.xml. The application will function even if the user does not enter information particular to his site, but nothing can be saved. Therefore, the first task an administrator needs to do is enter information relevant to his site or project. 1.If there is more than one project at your site you will need to make a project resource management file for each project. You can name the file anything you want to and change its location too (see below). However, you must set the variable in the Environment Editor. You do this by opening the Environment Editor dialog box and entering against the line CATDisciplinePath the directory in which your project resource management files are:

If you have more than one project resource management file then by default the application will start with the file named Project.xml, if there is such a file, or the last file used. If you wish to select another resource management file you must open it by clicking Tools - Project Management. Go to the Select tab and select the file and discipline you need. This dialog box shows each resource available to you, unless the value of "Visible" (see below) against a resource or application is set to No. 2.The resource management file is organized into several sections to make it easier to manage and utilize resources. The image below shows its hierarchical structure, with an exception, which is explained below. "Other disciplines" refers to other disciplines like Tubing, or AEC V4 to V5 Migration Discipline, that are placed at the same level. They are not shown in this image for reasons of space.

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The Project box refers to the project for which the PRM file has been created, and will frequently be identified by the file name. In this case it is Project.xml. When you look at the Project.xml file you will see that the resource listings begin with project resources. Any resources you place under the heading Project Resources can be used by all applications that are included in the file. In the sample file you will see items like zones, feature dictionary and application-generated object names in this section. All disciplines and applications shown under project resources will be able to access the resources identified under the heading project resources. The next level is the discipline level. All resources placed under a discipline, such as Piping, can be used by all the applications which are listed under it. In the example above, Piping Diagrams, Piping Design and Equipment applications are shown under the Piping Discipline. Resources such as various catalogs and report definitions are listed at the discipline level and can be accessed by all applications that belong to that discipline. The next level of resource management is the application itself. Any resource referred to at this level can only be used by that application. Resources like catalogs, files that contain connector attributes and resolved parts directories are listed at this level. Equipment Arrangement and Hanger Design have been placed under several disciplines. These applications are considered multi-discipline because their resources are used by all disciplines. When you are working in these disciplines you may need Equipment or Hanger resources. However, in different disciplines you may not use the same resources from Equipment Arrangement or Hanger Design and this structuring allows you to place different different resources under each discipline. For instance, under the Piping Discipline, Equipment Arrangement may have a different catalog (with Piping related equipment only) than under the HVAC Discipline.

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Equipment and Hanger applications have also been placed at the project resource level, primarily to allow sharing of resources, under the headings "Equipment Application Resources" and "Hanger Design Application Resources." To explain: If you are working in Piping Design you are in the Piping Discipline. You select the discipline by clicking Tools - Project Management, or simply by opening an application, which will activate the correct discipline. For this to happen your PRM file must be set up correctly. Now, while in the piping workbench, you want to place equipment in your document, and you launch Equipment Arrangement. When you do so you will only have access to equipment resources that are identified in the PRM file under the piping discipline, for instance the "piping equipment catalog," containing piping related equipment. But let us assume that in your project you have certain types of equipment that are used by all disciplines. You can create a catalog that contains all this common equipment and identify it under "Equipment Application Resources" at the project level (it should not be identified under discipline also). When you do this you will have access to this catalog when you open Equipment Arrangement under any discipline. Some applications have the entry "Visible = yes". If you set the value to No then this application cannot be used and will not be visible in the Tools - Project Management dialog box. 3. A resource entry looks like this:

<Resource Name="PipingIDSchema" Description="Piping ID Schema Directory"> <ID Type="Path" Driver="File" Location="..\..\EquipmentAndSystems\Piping\DataDictionary"/> </Resource>
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You should not change the Resource Name, even if you replace a resource with a different one. You can change the Description if you want to - this is a brief explanation of the resource. The Type field refers to file type. If the Type field says Catia, it refers to a file type unique to Catia, such as .catalog. The type Misc is used for resources which are of a type not unique to Catia and must be opened in another way. The type Path is similar, except that in the Location field only the directory in which the resource is located is named. If your resources do not reside in Enovia, enter File in the Driver field. Define the Location field as follows: As shown in the resource example above, the location entry is relative - it is relative to the entry you made in the Environment Editor as shown in Step 1. The entry in the location field will be added to the entry you had in the Environment Editor and it is in that location that the application will look for the resource. Which is why it is preferable to enter absolute paths - including the drive letter - in the location field. If your resources are Enovia-based, enter EnoviaV5 in the Driver field. For Enovia-based resources, all you need to enter in the Location field is the file name of the resource without the file extension. For instance, the catalog PipingParts.catalog would be entered as PipingParts. The Location field usually gives the location of the resource. If this is a directory path then you can change the location, with an associated change in the PRM file. This entry is sometimes used to enter a value for a flag or behavior, such as 0 or 1, or True and False. Some resources have the entry "Visible = yes". If you set the value to No then this resource cannot be used and will not be visible in the Tools - Project Management dialog box. Some resources have the entry Access="RW" or "R". These refers to file permissions: read-write or read.

When you change from using file-based resources to Enovia-based resources: You must go through the PRM file and change the "Driver" and "Location" entries as noted above. This must be done for all resources that

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have been placed in the Enovia database. 4.The Project Resources listed in the sample Project.xml file are described in following sections, beginning with the resources referred to under Project Resources: q ID schema resources: The "location" lists the directory where the rules for naming objects are stored. Use the default location provided in the sample file. You need to have this for every application you use. In addition, there is an entry for "MultiDisciplineIDSchema." This location is used for objects -such as zones that are used by all disciplines.
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User dictionary resources: In the location field enter the name of the CATfct file for each application. You do not need to enter the location. The CATfct file is used to store all the classes and attributes created by you. The default names for CATfct files in each application are included in the sample project.xml file and you should use these names unless you have created a different CATfct file, or changed the default name. There is also a MultiDisciplineUserDictionary - this CATfct file can be referred to by all applications. Zones catalog: The zones that you create need to be stored in a catalog accessible to all users, because they are shared. The default location is CATMldZone.catalog. Even though zones are only created in schematic applications, other applications may use them when documents are moved from schematic to 3D. Enter a different name or location if you change them. Discrete values: Many attributes have discrete values and this directory is used to store them. Schematic driven: This is a flag that needs to be set for schematic driven routing and parts placement. If the value of "Location" is set to 0 then individual users can check or uncheck an option that allows schematic driven 3D design. If the value is set to 1 then the option "schematic driven" is always selected and users cannot uncheck it. (In Equipment Arrangement, schematic driven parts placement is not possible if the Function Driven flag is set to 2.) Delete Part On Run: This entry is used to control whether all parts on a run will be deleted when you delete the run. If you enter the value of "Location" as 1 then the parts will be deleted. If you enter the value 0 then the parts will not be deleted when you delete the run. Graphic representations: When you create graphic representations for a part you need a file in which to store the categories (single, double, etc.). That file is created within an application, as you will see later. There is also a file under Project Resources because the categories must be available to all applications. If you add a new category you must include it in this file too. Enter a new location and file name if you want to change them. Penetration openings catalog: The profiles of the holes you may want to make through walls and partitions to pass pipes and ducts are noted in this catalog. If you make a new profile you must enter it here too. Enter a new location and file name if you want to change them. ID Sequence Number directory: The IDSequenceNumbers directory contains the last sequence number that was generated for an object. You should specify a location for it. Importer CATfcts: This lists the location of your CATfct files, and is used when migrating V4 models to V5. If you change the location of the CATfct files you must enter the new location in the "Location" field. You do not need to do anything if you continue to use the default location. Reference Grid System: Location of the CATPart that contains the reference grid definition used by applications. You need to modify this entry if you change the location of the CATPart or rename it. Discipline super class: This is a text file that lists the object classes that will be visible in a class browser when you are in the Equipment Arrangement workbench. You can have files at project, discipline and application level. The filter will only work with a user-generated PRM file. Computed attributes: This entry shows the location of the ComputedAttributes.txt file. The computed attributes contained in this file will display in the Properties dialog box. You can change the location of this file, and update the PRM file accordingly. You can also change the entries in the file. Unique reference part number options & partially resolved reference part number options: These two entries define how a placed part will be named. 'Unique reference' parts are those that have at least one property (or all properties) that can have infinite values. An HVAC duct is an example. 'Partially resolved' parts are those in which the values of all properties are defined by a design table. Valves are an example. In this entry, if you enter 1 in the Location field then the name of the placed part will be derived from the design table. If you enter 2 then the name will be derived from the object naming rules. Publication Based Connections: This entry controls whether publication based connections will be used

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when establishing connections between elements in different work packages. When this flag is on (the value in the Location field is 1), the system will use publication based link technology. This link technology is intended to improve support for configuration management, revision management and concurrent engineering. When working in an ENOVIA environment, publication based connections are used for all cross document connections, regardless of the setting of this resource. 5.The next level, as explained above, is the Discipline level. Resources placed under the Discipline category can be used by all the applications in that discipline. The sample Project.xml file places the following resources at the Discipline level. Each entry names the file and gives its default location. If you intend to use different resources, which is likely, then you must enter the new file name and location, as appropriate. The following resources are referenced, but not all disciplines will have all of these resources.
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Specifications catalog Insulation specifications catalog Material specifications catalog Standards catalog Design rules: You need to use the default location and file name Parts catalog name and location: contains parametric parts Piping lines shared catalog: The file where shared piping lines are stored and its location. Sample data directory: This is the location where the reports you run will be stored. Report definitions directory: The formats (definitions) you create for running reports are stored in this directory.

6.In addition to resources placed at the Project and Discipline levels, resources are also placed at the application level and are only available to the application under which they are placed. 2-D applications have all or most of the following resources. q Component catalog: The parts catalog.
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Shared instrument lines catalog. Annotation catalog. Sample data directory: When you create graphic representations for a part you need a file in which to store the categories (open, closed, etc.). If you add a new category you must include it in this file too. Enter a new location and file name if you want to change them. Design rules for Equipment Arrangement: This is used when assigning a part type to a 2D part. The parts catalog for Equipment Arrangement: This is used when assigning a part type to a 2D part.

3-D applications will have most of the following resources or entries.


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Graphic representations file: When you create graphic representations for a part you need a file in which to store the categories (single, double, etc.). If you add a new category you must include it in this file too. Enter a new location and file name if you want to change them. Connector attributes file: This file lists the attributes that will be inherited (from the part) by a connector when you are placing it on a part. If you want to make changes to the attributes you want a connector to inherit you must do it in this file. Do not change the name of this file. Resolved parts: When you place a parametric part in a document it assumes specific dimensions. Once a part has specific dimensions it is placed in the Resolved Parts catalog. The location of the default Resolved Parts catalog is listed here. Design rules: You need to use the default location and file name.

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Parts catalog name and location: contains parametric parts Report definitions directory: The formats (definitions) you create for running reports are stored in this directory. Graphic 2D Symbols Catalog: For Piping, this is the catalog in which the 2-D equivalents of 3-D endstyles are stored. For Equipment, this catalog contains 2-D symbols for center of gravity. See Drawing Production for more information. Growth Factor: Some applications allow you to reserve space in some parts for future growth. You can, for instance, reserve space in a conduit for future growth. The space saved for future growth will be equal to the value you enter in the "Location" field. If you enter 0.2 it means that 20 percent of the space in a conduit will be reserved for future growth and you will only be allowed to use 80 percent of the space in it. Function Driven: This is a flag that controls parts placement in Equipment Arrangement. The value in the Location field dictates: 1 - Function driven equipment placement is possible; 2 - Only functionless equipment placement is possible. (Schematic driven parts placement is not possible in Equipment Arrangement.); 3 - Both function driven and functionless equipment placement are possible (a final Tools Options setting is needed. See Functionless Parts Placement in Equipment Arrangement documentation.) Hanger Cable Clearance: The value in the Location field is the cable clearance, in millimeters. This value plus the diameter of the cable you are routing must be less than the tier spacing of the hanger. The cable clearance value is assigned when a hanger is placed. HVAC Up Direction: The value in the Location field determines the 'Up' direction of a part that is placed on a run. There are two numerals in this field - the first dictates the up direction for a part placed on a horizontal run, the second is for a vertical run. Thus, if the value is 00, the Up direction will the same for both horizontal and vertical runs. The values are: 0 - follow the run's Up Direction; 1 - Up direction will follow the X axis; 2 - follow Y axis; 3 - follow Z axis.

7.The AEC Migration Discipline refers to a product that enables you to migrate V4 models to V5. It has Piping Design, Piping and Instrumentation Diagrams, Equipment Arrangement, Tubing Design and HVAC Design resources under it. Most resources have been described above and do not need further explanation. Enter the location and file names if they are different from those in the sample Project.xml file. In addition, under the heading AEC V4 V5 Migration there are several options you should know about. They are explained below. AEC V4 V5 Migration There are several options that you need to set to True or False. The first several are about migrating data to Piping and Instrumentation Diagrams, Piping Design, Equipment Arrangement, Tubing Design and HVAC Design and Structures. If a V4 model has data of all these types, but you have set two of them to False, then you will only receive V5 data relating to the applications set to True. If you want data of all types to be migrated then you must set all the options to True. Other options are:
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Create runs without parts: If set to True a run will be migrated without the parts. ImportPipingLine (or other type of line): If set to True a line will be created in the V5 Piping Line catalog if it does not exist. When set to False, the migration process will stop if the line does not exist in V5. Mapping Table: You need to enter the location and name of the migration mapping table if you change the default name or location. MigratedPIDNoShowSheetFormat: The sheet format (also known as title block) will not be visible if the value of "Location" is set to False. MigrateXXXWithMissingLines: If set to True the sheet will be migrated even if some Lines cannot be. If set

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to False the migration process will stop if missing lines are encountered.
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MigratedXXXSheetSize: Enter the size in the Location field: Letter, Legal, A0, ISO/A1, ISO/A2, ISO/A3, ISO/A4, ISO/A, ANSI/B, ANSI/C, ANSI/D, ANSI/E, ANSI/F, ANSI).

8.In addition to some of the resources explained above, the Structure Discipline includes the following resources or entries: q Sections catalog: If you change the default location of the AISC_BigScale catalog then enter the location in this entry. The location should include the directory AISC in which the catalog should reside, so that the path reads: ......AISC\AISC_BigScale.catalog.
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Structure sections path: The path of the directory in which the available sections are stored. The default location is ...startup\components\StructuralCatalogs\ModelsResolved. Structure Thickness List: This is the location of the thickness list sample file, which contains the list of thicknesses that can be applied to a plate. Structure openings catalog: Location of the openings parts catalog. Structure materials catalog: Location of the structure materials catalog. Structure detail design: Location of the catalog that contains user defined features. Naming section characteristics: Location of the NLS file that lists names of sections whose names should not be changed. This is for internal use. Do not change anything in this entry. Structure Functional Connections Catalog: Location of the Structure Functional Connections Catalog. This catalog contains the names of connection types between objects. Project Bounding Box: This specifies the dimensions of your project - if you are designing a ship then it will be set within these dimensions. You can define the unit used for measuring - the default is millimeter - and change the default values for each direction. The values are measured from the origin (000).

9.Make sure to save your changes.

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Checking a PRM File for Errors


This task shows how you can check a project resource management (PRM) file for certain errors. This tool will only check required and optional resources in the PRM file for errors. Required resources are those that the application needs, such as catalogs. Optional resources are those without which the application can still be used, and example is the ID sequencing number. There are other resources in the PRM file that are not checked at all - these are resources that add functionality to the application. Examples of these are flags that are set through the PRM file - these cannot be checked for errors because there is no way of telling what the user has set them to. See Using the PRM Command for information about syntax errors in the PRM file. The environment variable CATDisciplinePath should be defined to point to the directory where your PRM files are stored. 1. Click Tools - Project Management - Validation in the menubar to bring up the Project Management Validation dialog box. The image below shows part of it without any selections having been made. The active project, discipline and application will be selected by default when the dialog box opens.

2. Select a Project, Discipline and Application as necessary. If you select ALL in the Discipline and Application fields then the entire project resource management file will be checked (required and optional resources only). 3. Click Apply after you have made your selection. The dialog box will display the resources that have errors. The errors are explained below. q If there are no errors then a message will state that all required - or optional - resources are okay, in the Status column.
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Select a resource to see more information about the error in the Selected Resource field below. Click on the column headings to sort by that heading. A Y in the Required column shows if a resource is required. No entry means it is an optional resource.

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4. The errors are explained below. Also see the PRM task for more information. q Resource definition has incorrect type: The value of the 'Type' field in the resource's PRM entry is incorrect. The Type field refers to file type. See the PRM task for more information.
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Resource not found in the project management xml file: There is no entry for the resource in the PRM file. Resource Data not found: The file or directory corresponding to the resource cannot be found at the location defined in the PRM file. Access specified for location for resource is not correct: Some entries have a field called 'Access'. This refers to the permissions set for the file corresponding to the resource. One common error is that some files need to have access set to RW (read-write) and not R (read only).

5. You can save the report. Click the Export button and enter a file name and location in the Save dialog box that displays. The file must be saved in .htm format.

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Organizing Resources in PRM File


This task shows how you can organize and change the location of resources in a project resource management (PRM) file. This function is also sometimes referred to as "using an alias". After an initial setup effort, this allows you to change the location of resources as shown in the PRM file by simply changing the directory path on one line. This makes it easier to use a different set of resources, for instance, especially if you have organized like resources into individual directories. 1. You need to add the data at the beginning of the PRM file. In the sample PRM file the data is shown beneath the following line: <!-- Aliases in the project file --> 2. Under this line, you need to identify the organizational name (the alias name) in which you want to group certain resources, and the directory path to it. The following line is an example. You need to follow the format shown in it. <Alias Name="Startup_Directory" Value="..\..\EquipmentAndSystems\" /> You can use any alias name. You can replace ..\..\EquipmentAndSystems\ with an absolute path, in which case the application will look for the resource at that location. The following is an excerpt from the sample PRM file, to show what the beginning of the file looks like: <!DOCTYPE Project SYSTEM "Project.dtd"> <Project Name="Sample_Project"> <!-- Aliases in the project file --> <Alias Name="Startup_Directory" Value="..\..\EquipmentAndSystems\" /> <Alias Name="Components_Directory" Value="..\..\components\" /> <Alias Name="MultiDiscSample" Value="MultiDiscipline\SampleData\" /> <!-- ************** PROJECT RESOURCES ************** --> 3. <!-- ID SCHEMA RESOURCES --> You now need to replace the value of the Location field for each resource that you want to place in the organizational element you just created - in this case it is Startup Directory. The Location field should read: Location="${Startup_Directory}\Piping\DataDictionary"/> In the example above, the application will replace the words "Startup Directory" with the value ..\..\EquipmentAndSystems\ so that the directory path of the resource is actually read as ..\..\EquipmentAndSystems\Piping\DataDictionary. Whenever you want to change the location from the directory "EquipmentAndSystems" to another directory you only need to change it once in the appropriate line in the Aliases section. You need to do this for all resources you want grouped under a certain organizational element.

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4.

You can enter more than one alias name in the Location field for a resource. For instance, using the example given above, you can enter the following: "${Startup_Directory}\${MultiDiscSample}\EquipmentComputedAttributes.txt" in which case the application will look for the directories defined under the two alias names (..\..\EquipmentAndSystems\MultiDiscipline\SampleData) followed by the file name (EquipmentComputedAttributes.txt). You also have the ability to add the Path field to a resource. This is a matter of choice and provides the same functionality as using the Location field only. In the following example, both Location and Path fields are used: Location="EquipmentComputedAttributes.txt" Path="${Startup_Directory}\${MultiDiscSample}"/> The application will read it as ..\..\EquipmentAndSystems\MultiDiscipline\SampleData\ EquipmentComputedAttributes.txt. Instead of adding the alias names to a PRM file, as explained in Steps 1 & 2, you can add an environment variable to your environment file. To use the same example given in Step 2 above, you would add the following line in the environment file: set Startup_Directory=..\..\EquipmentAndSystems\ You can use an absolute path also. You then need to replace the value of the Location fields in the PRM file, as explained in Step 3 above. The application uses the following order to determine if an alias is used:
q

5.

6.

The environment file. The project resource management file. The application management resource file.

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List of PRM Resources and Flags


A list of the resources and flags used in the sample project resource management file is provided here. The list is generally in alphabetical order. However, where a resource name is preceded by an application name, then the application name is usually dropped. (This may not be the case when a resource is unique to just one application.) For instance, the resource IDSchema exists for most applications, and is listed as PipingIDSchema, EquipmentIDSchema, etc. This resource is listed only as IDSchema below.

1. Annotation Catalog: Catalog of text templates. Text templates allow the user to quickly and easily annotate a diagram or drawing. Catalog: The parts catalog for 2D applications, e.g. PIDCatalog. The parts catalog for 3D applications is generally referred to as a "parts catalog", e.g. PipingPartsCatalog. Catalog locations can be changed, with an associated change in the PRM file. Computed Attributes: This entry shows the location of the ComputedAttributes.txt file. The computed attributes contained in this file will display in the Properties dialog box. You can change the location of this file, and update the PRM file accordingly. You can also change the entries in the file. Color Schema Directory: When you assign default colors to objects using the feature dictionary, a file is created for each object containing that definition. These files are stored in this directory, defined under "Location." CompAccessPlateGenerationOptions (Compartment Access Plate Generation Options): A file in which attribute values for Structures plates, that are generated from Compartment and Access wall geometry, can be defined. Connector Attributes: This file lists the attributes that will be inherited (from the part) by a connector when you are placing it on a part. If you want to make changes to the attributes you want a connector to inherit you must do it in this file. Do not change the name of this file. Create XXX Run Without Parts: XXX is an application name, such as Piping. If set to True a run will be migrated (from V4 to V5) without the parts. Delete Part On Run: This entry is used to control whether all parts on a run will be deleted when you delete the run. If you enter the value of "Location" as 1 then the parts will be deleted. If you enter the value 0 then the parts will not be deleted when you delete the run. Design Rules Catalog: Usually preceded by an application name. You need to use the default location and file name. Discipline Super Class: This is a text file that lists the object classes that will be visible in a class browser when you are in the Equipment Arrangement workbench. You can have files at project, discipline and application level. The filter will only work with a user-generated PRM file. Discrete values: Many attributes have discrete values and this directory is used to store them.

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Equip Design Rules Catalog: This is used by 2D applications when assigning a part type to a 2D part. Equip Parts Catalog: This is used by 2D applications when assigning a part type to a 2D part. Function Driven: This is a flag that controls parts placement in Equipment Arrangement. The value in the Location field dictates: 1 - Function driven equipment placement is possible; 2 - Only functionless equipment placement is possible. (Schematic driven parts placement is not possible in Equipment Arrangement.); 3 - Both function driven and functionless equipment placement are possible (a final Tools - Options setting is needed. See Functionless Parts Placement in Equipment Arrangement documentation.) Graphic 2D Symbols Catalog: For Piping, this is the catalog in which the 2-D equivalents of 3-D endstyles are stored. For Equipment, this catalog contains 2-D symbols for center of gravity. See Drawing Production for more information. Graphic Representations: When you create graphic representations for a part you need a file in which to store the categories (single, double, etc.). That file is created within an application, as you will see later. There is also a file under Project Resources because the categories must be available to all applications. If you add a new category you must include it in this file too. Enter a new location and file name if you want to change them. Growth Factor: Some applications allow you to reserve space in some parts for future growth. You can, for instance, reserve space in a conduit for future growth. The space saved for future growth will be equal to the value you enter in the "Location" field. If you enter 0.2 it means that 20 percent of the space in a conduit will be reserved for future growth and you will only be allowed to use 80 percent of the space in it. Hanger Cable Clearance: The value in the Location field is the cable clearance, in millimeters. This value plus the diameter of the cable you are routing must be less than the tier spacing of the hanger. The cable clearance value is assigned when a hanger is placed. HVAC Up Direction: The value in the Location field determines the 'Up' direction of a part that is placed on a run. There are two numerals in this field - the first dictates the up direction for a part placed on a horizontal run, the second is for a vertical run. Thus, if the value is 00, the Up direction will the same for both horizontal and vertical runs. The values are: 0 - follow the run's Up Direction; 1 - Up direction will follow the X axis; 2 - follow Y axis; 3 - follow Z axis. ID Schema Resources: The "location" lists the directory where the rules for naming objects are stored. Use the default location provided in the sample file. You need to have this for every application you use. In addition, there is an entry for "MultiDisciplineIDSchema." This location is used for objects -such as zones - that are used by all disciplines. ID Sequence Number: The IDSequenceNumber directory contains the last sequence number that was generated for an object. You should specify a location for it. Import...: Usually followed by a type of line, such as Piping Line. Used when migrating V4 data to V5. If set to True a line will be created in the V5 Piping Line catalog if it does not exist. When set to False, the migration process will stop if the line does not exist in V5. Importer CATfcts: This lists the location of your CATfct files, and is used when migrating V4 models to V5. If you change the location of the CATfct files you must enter the new location in the "Location"

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field. You do not need to do anything if you continue to use the default location. Instrument Line Attribute Filter: A file that defines the list of instrumentation related attributes used to filter the Instrument Line ID selection list. Instrument Lines Catalog: The file where shared instrument lines (line IDs) are stored. Insulation Spec Catalog: Usually preceded by an application name, such as HVAC. If you intend to use different resources, which is likely, then you must enter the new file name and location, as appropriate. Line ID Attribute Filter: A file that defines the list of attributes used to filter the application Line ID selection list. Lines Catalog: Usually preceded by an application name. The file where shared lines (line IDs) are stored. Material Spec Catalog: Usually preceded by an application name, such as HVAC. If you intend to use different resources, which is likely, then you must enter the new file name and location, as appropriate. Migrate...: Usually followed by an application name. This option is used when migrating V4 data to V5. Set the value of Location to True if you want data of this type to be migrated into your V5 document. Set it to False if you do not want it migrated. Migration Mapping Table: The migration mapping table maps V4 classes and attributes to V5. There are other mapping tables specific to applications, such as Tubing Migration Mapping Table, which maps V4 tubing detail names to V5, and Structures Migration Mapping Table, which maps structures names from V4 to V5. Migrated PID No Show Sheet Format: The sheet format (also known as title block) will not be visible if the value of "Location" is set to False. Migrated XXX Sheet Size: XXX is an application name, such as PID. Enter the size in the Location field - Letter, Legal, A0, ISO/A1, ISO/A2, ISO/A3, ISO/A4, ISO/A, ANSI/B, ANSI/C, ANSI/D, ANSI/E, ANSI/F, ANSI). Migrate XXX With Missing Lines: XXX is an application name, such as PID. If set to True the sheet will be migrated even if some Lines cannot be. If set to False the migration process will stop if missing lines are encountered. Molded Conventions: Location of a file that contains the rules defining molded conventions for structural objects. Naming Section Characteristics: Location of the NLS file that lists names of sections whose names should not be changed. This is for internal use. Do not change anything in this entry. Offsheets Catalog: Usually preceded by an application name, such as PID. The catalog of offsheet symbols to be used in a schematic diagram.

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Orientation Naming Convention: This is a variable that defines the ship coordinate system, whether it is American or European. For American convention enter the following in the Location field: CATStrOrientNamingUSAConv. Partially resolved reference part number options & unique reference part number options: These two entries define how a placed part will be named. 'Unique reference' parts are those that have at least one property (or all properties) that can have infinite values. An HVAC duct is an example. 'Partially resolved' parts are those in which the values of all properties are defined by a design table. Valves are an example. In this entry, if you enter 1 in the Location field then the name of the placed part will be derived from the design table. If you enter 2 then the name will be derived from the object naming rules. Parts Catalog: The parts catalog for 3D applications, e.g. PipingPartsCatalog or TubingPartsCatalog. Contains parametric parts. If you intend to use different resources, which is likely, then you must enter the new file name and location, as appropriate. Penetration Openings Catalog: The profiles of the holes you may want to make through walls and partitions to pass pipes and ducts are noted in this catalog. If you make a new profile you must enter it here too. Enter a new location and file name if you want to change them. Project Envelope: (Bounding Box) Location of a file that specifies the dimensions of your project if you are designing a ship then it will be set within these dimensions. You can define the unit used for measuring - the default is millimeter - and change the default values for each direction. The values are measured from the origin (000). Project Parameters: Location of a file that defines a ship's coordinate system. Project Reference Planes: Location of a file that contains user-defined project reference planes used in some Structures applications. Publication Based Connections: This entry controls whether publication based connections will be used when establishing connections between elements in different work packages. When this flag is on (the value in the Location field is 1), the system will use publication based link technology. This link technology is intended to improve support for configuration management, revision management and concurrent engineering. When working in an ENOVIA environment, publication based connections are used for all cross document connections, regardless of the setting of this resource. Reference Grid System: Location of the CATPart that contains the reference grid definition used by applications. You need to modify this entry if you change the location of the CATPart or rename it. Report Definitions: Usually preceded by an application name, such as Hanger. The formats (definitions) you create for running reports are stored in this directory. Resolved XXX Parts: (XXX is an application name.) When you place a parametric part in a document it assumes specific dimensions. Once a part has specific dimensions it is placed in the Resolved Parts catalog. The location of the default Resolved Parts catalog is listed here. Schematic Driven: This is a flag that needs to be set for schematic driven routing and parts placement. If the value of "Location" is set to 0 then individual users can check or uncheck an option that allows schematic driven 3D design. If the value is set to 1 then the option "schematic driven" is always selected and users cannot uncheck it. (In Equipment Arrangement, schematic driven parts placement is not possible if the Function Driven flag is set to 2.)

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Specifications Catalog: Usually preceded by an application name, such as Piping. If you intend to use different resources, which is likely, then you must enter the new file name and location, as appropriate. Standards Catalog: Usually preceded by an application name, such as Piping. If you intend to use different resources, which is likely, then you must enter the new file name and location, as appropriate. Structure Detail Design Catalog: Location of the catalog that contains user defined features. Structure Drawing Symbols Catalog: Location of the catalog that contains the 2D symbols used in the drawing production function. Structure Functional Connections Catalog: Location of the Structure Functional Connections Catalog. This catalog contains the names of connection types between objects. Structure Hull Model: The location of the CATpart that contains the hull you want to use in your ship design. This hull feature will automatically be loaded when you create a system. Structure Hull Feature Name: The name of the hull feature defined in the CATpart document that is specified in the PRM resource 'Structure Hull Model'. Structure Materials Catalog: Location of the structure materials catalog. Structure Openings Catalog: Location of the openings parts catalog. Structure Sections Catalog: If you change the default location of the AISC_BigScale catalog then enter the location in this entry. The location should include the directory AISC in which the catalog should reside, so that the path reads: ......AISC\AISC_BigScale.catalog. Structure Sections Path: The path of the directory in which the available sections are stored. The default location is ...startup\components\StructuralCatalogs\ModelsResolved. Structure Thickness List: This is the location of the thickness list sample file, which contains the list of thicknesses that can be applied to a plate. Unique reference part number options & partially resolved reference part number options: These two entries define how a placed part will be named. 'Unique reference' parts are those that have at least one property (or all properties) that can have infinite values. An HVAC duct is an example. 'Partially resolved' parts are those in which the values of all properties are defined by a design table. Valves are an example. In this entry, if you enter 1 in the Location field then the name of the placed part will be derived from the design table. If you enter 2 then the name will be derived from the object naming rules. User Dictionary: Usually preceded by an application name. In the location field enter the name of the CATfct file for each application. You do not need to enter the location. The CATfct file is used to store all the classes and attributes created by you. The default names for CATfct files in each application are included in the sample project.xml file and you should use these names unless you have created a different CATfct file, or changed the default name. There is also a MultiDisciplineUserDictionary - this CATfct file can be referred to by all applications.

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Zones Catalog: The zones that you create need to be stored in a catalog accessible to all users, because they are shared. The default location is CATMldZone.catalog. Even though zones are only created in schematic applications, other applications may use them when documents are moved from schematic to 3D. Enter a different name or location if you change them.

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Feature Dictionary: Creating Classes and Attributes


The feature dictionary editor allows you to create, delete and manage object classes. Object classes are classifications under which you create various objects, like components, for storing in the catalog. You may, for instance, want to have several object classes under valve_function, one of them being check_valve_function, and create various types of check valve functions under the class. Each of these check valve functions can have one or more physical parts under it. The physical parts are linked to the function in a mapping table called the Function Physical Mapping table in order to become available in the Class Browser during parts placement. In addition to that documentation, you may want to learn how to define class names in a CATfct file. Also refer to the Understanding Project Resource Management. If you choose to delete the sample CATfct file provided with this application and create a new one then any resource that uses attributes or subclasses will be unusable. You will need to create a new parts catalog, for instance, and add new parts in it. You will not have this problem if you use the sample CATfct file to add classes to. You will learn more about these in this section. Starting the Feature Dictionary Editor Creating a New Object Class Adding Properties to an Object Class Defining Discrete Values for a Property Generating a Report Creating a New Feature Dictionary Opening a Reference Dictionary Mapping the Functional Physical Classes Defining User Names for Classes & Attributes Comparing Feature Dictionaries Opening a Document Without CATfct File

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Mapping the Functional Physical Classes


This task shows you how to add new Function and Physical subclasses to the Function Physical Mapping table. When new object classes (subclasses) are added to the Feature Dictionary they must be "mapped" in the FunctionalPhysicalMapping tables - the subclasses must be mapped to the physical part types. Only by mapping the new classes will they become available in the Browser during parts placement. In the following paragraphs the term 'NewSubclass' is used for illustrative purposes only. In actual practice substitute the class you are adding, e.g., 'Drain_Valve' for NewSubclass. 1. While in the Piping Design workbench, click File - Open. Navigate to ..\intel_a\startup\EquipmentAndSystems\Piping\DesignRules, remove the Read Only status and open Piping-FunctionalPhysicalMapping.CATProduct. From Release 13 you have the capability of modifying the text table directly, instead of going through the CATProduct. To do so, open the XXXFunctionPhysical.txt file and make your changes. Go to Step 4 if you are changing the text file. 2. Expand Relations in the tree and double click the FunctionPhysicalMapping node. The Knowledge Advisor workbench is activated. Double click the same node again to bring up the Design Table for FunctionPhysicalMapping.

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3. Click the Edit Table button. The Piping-FunctionPhysicalMapping.txt file will open in Notepad. You can now add, delete and modify entries in the table. 4. Start on a new line at the bottom of the table and enter NewSubclassFunction in the Function Name column. Note: The column headings in the .txt file are Function Name and Physical Part and represent the columns Function and Part Type, respectively, in the design table. You must enter 'internal' function and part type names. To obtain the internal names open the feature dictionary in the feature dictionary editor and click the Generate Report button. Specify a location for the file. In the report, the name shown against 'Object Key' - under each function or part type - is the internal name that you need to use. 5. Use the tab key to separate the columns. In the PhysicalPart column, enter NewSubclassPhysical. File and Save the txt file. 6. Now when you reopen the FunctionPhysicalMapping Design Table, the new line is added.

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Defining User Names for Classes & Attributes


You may need to change class or attribute names in the feature dictionary sometimes - to another language, for instance. Or, in the case of user created class names, you may want to add spaces or certain characters that this application does not permit normally. Ways of doing this are explained below. You will come across references to the CATfct file elsewhere in the feature dictionary documentation. Briefly, the CATfct file is the file which stores the user-created classes that you see in each feature dictionary. The CATfct file must be kept in the default location, though you can change its name with a corresponding change in the project resource management file. The basic classes - the classes that display when you create a new feature dictionary and that cannot be deleted - are stored in a .feat file. CHANGING USER CLASS NAMES: The CATfct file is linked to another file which is of the type CATNls. The classes that you see in the feature dictionary are actually defined in the CATNls file. It is set up this way so that users can customize class names without having to change the dictionary. When you add a new subclass you cannot use certain characters or even spaces. You cannot add the class Piping Valve - it has to be PipingValve. Only alphanumeric characters can be used, without any spaces. If you want to override these restrictions you can create a CATNls file and enter your preferred names. The format of a CATNls file is reproduced below. To use your own name enter the subclass name as you created it in the first column, followed by your preferred name.

PipingValve = "Piping Valve"; PipingPipeFunc = "Pipe Function"; PipingPartFunc = "Piping Part Function";
If you create a new CATNls file you have to follow a naming convention so that the application can recognize it. If your feature dictionary is named CATPipinguser, then the CATNls file must have the name CATPipinguserNLS with the extension CATNls. Thus the file would be named CATPipinguserNLS.CATNls. All CATNls files must be stored in the directory ...intel_a\resources\msgcatalog. CHANGING BASIC CLASS NAMES: Basic class names are those that you see when you create a new feature dictionary. These classes are stored in a .feat file, which in turn is linked to a CATNls file. Feat files must be located in the directory ...intel_a\resources\graphic. The Piping Design file, for instance, is named CATPiping.feat. The corresponding CATNls file is in the directory ...intel_a\resources\msgcatalog. In the case of Piping Design the file is named CATPipingNLS.CATNls. The format of the file is as described above, and you need to change it in a similar manner. CHANGING ATTRIBUTE NAMES: All attribute names are contained in the file CATPlantShipModelerAttrNLS.CATNls, which is in the directory ...intel_a\resources\msgcatalog. You cannot create a new file for attributes - you must use the existing file. Enter a name using the conventions described above.

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Extreme caution must be used in changing names because all documents linked to them will be affected. It is recommended that the basic class names not be changed. For the same reason you should not delete attributes and classes.

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Page 373 Version 5 Release 15 Comparing Feature Dictionaries

This task shows how to compare the classes and attributes in two feature dictionaries. A separate task allows you to import classes and attributes from one feature dictionary into another. This task allows you to compare the classes and attributes in one feature dictionary to those in a second one. There can be several uses for this function, one of them being importing the classes and attributes that a subcontractor has added to a feature dictionary into the feature dictionary maintained by the main contractor. Your goal is to have a mapping table that shows the classes and attributes in the feature dictionary you want to import and the classes and attributes in the feature dictionary you are comparing against. This is done by a tool developed for the purpose. Before you run this tool you must "export" both feature dictionaries, explained elsewhere. Exporting them converts them into XML format, which is needed to compare the two. Once you have exported them and run the comparing tool (called comparator) you will get three files which tell you: which classes have problems (do not exist in the mapping table or the XML file of your feature dictionary), which classes need to be added to your feature dictionary and an overall report of what the tool has performed. Before you begin this process you must set the directory path - this tells the tool the directory path in your installation.
q

In Windows, open a command prompt and press Enter after typing: set AECMIGR_DIRECTORYPATH= XXX\MigrationDirectory where XXX is the directory path to your installation. In Unix: export AECMIGR_DIRECTORYPATH= XXX/MigrationDirectory where XXX is the directory path to your installation. The user can check the current path by executing the comparator, or executing CATAecDictionaryComparator -h. The comparator will show the path as the first line of output.

1.Export your own feature dictionary (Dictionary_B) and the feature dictionary you want to compare against (Dictionary_A). The process is explained in Exporting the V5 Feature Dictionaries. 1.To run the tool enter the following at a DOS prompt: CATAecDictionaryComparator -i (Dictionary_A) (Dictionary_B) -m (name of mapping table) -o (name for output) -V5 Where:
q

(Dictionary_A) is the XML file which contains the classes and attributes from the feature dictionary you are comparing against. It must include the XML extension. (Dictionary_B) is the XML file which contains classes and attributes from your feature dictionary. It must include the XML extension. (name of mapping table) is the name of the mapping table against which you want to compare. If you do not have a mapping table create an empty workbook using MS Excel, with a .csv extension. Enter the file name in this field - include the .csv extension. The mapping table should be in the following directory: intel_a\startup\EquipmentAndSystems\MigrationDirectory\Dictionary\Mapping Table. (name for output) is the name for the three output files. If you enter the name MAR, for instance, then three files will be produced: MAR.html, MAR.xml and MAR.csv.

An entry may look like this: CATAecDictionaryComparator -i Dictionary_A.xml Dictionary_B.xml -m V5toV5ObjectMapping.csv -o MAR

2.When the tool (called Comparator) has finished running it will directories: 374 XML and CSV files in Version 5 produce Releasethree 15 reports and place them in the followingPage Piping Design intel_a\startup\EquipmentandSystems\MigrationDirectory\Dictionary\DDL_Files and the HTML file in ...\Reports.

Open the HTML file in a Web browser to see a full report. The report begins with a table of contents that is hyperlinked to the entries. (The names in parentheses are internal names.) The entries in the report are color coded as follows:
q

Green: No action was taken. The class appears in the mapping table and the XML file of V5 classes. Blue: The class appears in the mapping table, but not in the XML file of your feature dictionary (Dictionary_B. Red: The class was not found in the mapping table or XML file of your feature dictionary (Dictionary_B). Orange: Mapping does not exist in the mapping table ("no mapping"), or is badly mapped.

3.Open the XML file (using a text editor like Wordpad) to see a of the classes that do not exist in your feature dictionary and can be imported. Page 375 Version 5list Release 15 Piping Design <Class Name="PipingPartFunc" DisplayName="Piping Part Function" Superclass="Component_Function" Creator="System" Domain="PIP" UUID="b7acacd1_83_3a707981_10"> 4.Open the CSV file using Microsoft Excel. It will look similar to the image below.

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In the first three columns this table displays classes in the feature dictionary you are comparing against - Dictionary_B. You should fill in the 4th, 5th and 6th columns with whatever you want the corresponding entry to be in your feature dictionary - Dictionary_A. In column 7 you should enter the domain, or application. (PIP=Piping Design, PID= Piping and Instrumentation Diagrams, EQT= Equipment Design, HVA=HVAC Design, etc.) An asterisk in the Attribute column indicates that the entry is a class. If it has attributes then the lines that follow it will list the attributes under the same class name. In the example above, Line 2 shows a class. Lines 3, 4 and 5 show that the entries are attributes of the class Piping Line and are called Size, Part Description and Design Speed. NOTE: Entries should refer to the internal name of the class or parent. The internal name is the name within the application and is not the one the user sees. Frequently it is similar, though, and the class name Piping Line may have the internal name PipingLine. You can find the internal name by looking at the XML file, where it's referred to as Name and Superclass. 5.Once you have entered the information you need to copy and paste it into the mapping table - in the current example it is V5ToV5ObjectMapping.csv.

5.If Dictionary_A has classes and attributes that do not have equivalent classes and attributes in Dictionary_B then you must repeat the steps explained in Importing the XML Output. You can repeat these steps as many times as you want - until you are satisfied that your mapping table shows all the classes and attributes you want from Dictionary_A and their corresponding Dictionary_B classes and attributes. 5.Import the classes and attributes that do not exist in your feature dictionary (Dictionary_B) by using the process explained in Importing the XML Output.

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Opening a Document Without CATfct File


This task shows you how to open a design document without the associated CATfct file. This function can also be used to view a single part. You should only view the document using this process - you should not make modifications to it. Examples from the Piping Design workbench are used here. The process is the same for other workbenches. This function can be useful in various situations. A common scenario is when one user sends a document to another user but does not send the relevant CATfct file. The document can be opened if it was created in Release 13 or later. But if it was created in an earlier release then the sender of the document must first take certain steps so that it can be opened without a CATfct file. 1. If the document you want to open was created using a CATfct file from Release 13 or later then all you have to do is click File - Open. If the document was created using a CATfct file from R12 or an earlier version then the document must first be 'cleaned' by the person who created it or who is sending it. To prepare the document, he will have to import the CATfct file from the earlier version into his own environment, and then perform a step that is known as 'cleaning' or upgrading the document. Those processes are explained below. 2. To import a CATfct file you should be in the version into which you want to import the file. Open the CATfct file by clicking File - Open and navigating to the file you want (it must be the CATfct file that applies to the document that is to be cleaned). The default location is ...intel_a\resources\graphic and the default name will be CATXXXSample.CATfct, where XXX is the product name, such as Piping or HVAC. Click Tools - Upgrade CATfct (in the toolbar) to import the file. You have to save the file. 3. After the current CATfct file has been upgraded with the earlier version, the document needs to be cleaned. To clean the document, open it and click File - Desk.

4. Right click on the product (in this case test.CATProduct) and, in the drop down menu that displays, select CATDUAV5. The CATDUA V5 dialog box displays.

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5. This dialog box allows you to both check the file for errors, and clean it if necessary. To check the file: q Select Long or Short message in the drop down box.
q

Select Open html output file. Select Check. Click Run.

An output file will be generated and displayed.

6. Click the file (test.CATProduct) to see the report. The error "backup startup is not declared" means the document has not been cleaned. 7. To clean the document, select Open html output file and Clean and click Run. The document will be cleaned and a report generated. For more information about the process see the Infrastructure User's Guide - Using the Data Upward Assistant.

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Cache Mode
This section discusses ways in which you can design efficiently in cache mode, as well as tips about using it. Working in Cache Mode

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Working in Cache Mode


This task discusses steps you should take to design efficiently in cache mode. Cache mode refers to designing without loading all the technological data of objects in your document. It is recommended because it allows quicker loading of documents and execution of commands. However, you may need to take certain steps to design efficiently in this mode, which are discussed here. This task also explains ways of executing certain commands while in cache mode. 1. When you are using the command Place Object from Catalog while you are in cache mode you will not be able to place a part on a connector because connectors are not loaded. To change that part to button and then click the part. That part will be converted design mode click the Analyze Item to design mode and connectors will be visible. It is recommended that you redefine the location of the CATCache directory. This directory is used to store certain design elements (cgr files) that are used when visualizing a document in cache mode. If the file name of an element is too long then the visualization will not be correct - this is a Windows limitation. Because the full path name is used in the file name, you should redefine the location so that the path name is short - as short as you can make it. To redefine the path name click Tools Options - Infrastructure - Product Structure and select the Cache Management tab. Enter the new path in the Path to the Local Cache field.

2.

3.

Wireframe geometry, such as the sections on trapeze hangers, are not visible in cache mode, which also means they cannot be selected. If you want to be able to see them in cache mode then check the option Save Lineic Elements in CGR. You can find it in Tools - Options - Infrastructure - Product Structure and the CGR Management tab.

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Penetration Management
This section discusses penetration management setup. The penetration management function works within the ENOVIA environment only - and you must be in the ENOVIA Product Structure. Penetration Management Setup

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Penetration Management Setup


This task explains the setup process for defining a penetration cutout sketch, and identifies some of the processes involved. Penetration management uses design rules that are Knowledgeware-based. To modify the sample rules provided with this application, or to create new design rules, you must know how to use Knowledgeware. Read the documentation for that product to get more information. In addition, you must incorporate certain data particular to this application when creating new rules. That is explained below. You may also need to refer to ENOVIA-LCA documentation for ENOVIA-specific tasks. If the Penetration Management Tools toolbar is not displayed then click View - Toolbars and select it. Penetration management refers to the process of routing a pipe or a duct - as an example - through a structure. If you are working with a ship, for instance, you may need to create penetrations through bulkheads, move objects, or reroute your pipe or duct, in order to do so. The penetration management function works within the ENOVIA environment only - you must be in the ENOVIA Product Structure. 1. Modify the project resource management (PRM) file to reflect the location/names of your resource files. The penetration function uses three PRM resources. The names are: PenetrationCutoutRules, PenetrationOpeningsCatalog, and PenetrationShapesCatalog. Sample rules and catalog are provided with this application. The location is ...intel_a\startup\components\PenetrationCatalog. See Understanding Project Resource Management for more information about the PRM file.

2.

The outlines of openings are dependent on the shapes defined in the Penetration Shapes catalog. You cannot define an outline in the design rules that does not have a corresponding shape in the catalog. Shapes defined in the sample catalog are: oblong, round, rectangular, square and rectangular radius corner. You can change the values of the parameters of the shapes in the catalog, and you can add new shapes to it. You can remove, replace or rename the sample shapes. Each shape is a parametric part created with the Part Design product, and is stored in the same directory as the catalog. The oblong shape document, for instance, is OblongShape.CATPart. See Part Design documentation for information about using that product. To add a shape you must create it with Part Design and store it in the catalog using standard catalog building procedures. See Creating a Catalog and associated tasks in the Catalog section to learn more about creating and modifying catalogs. These are standard parametric parts and there are no special requirements for building them. When building new shapes you should note that the description name you use in the catalog is the name that will display when you are creating a cutout sketch. Most penetration cutout designing will be done using the design rules, although you have the capability of manually defining cutouts, as explained later in this section. The rules work with the shapes in the catalog to determine the final size of the opening. You can add various parameters to the rules using Knowledgeware. However, the function of the sample rules supplied with this application is mainly to determine the shape of the outline, based on the shapes available in the catalog; and calculate the size of the opening. The cutout size is calculated from the sizes of the objects involved in the penetration, with the addition of required clearances.

3.

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4.

Design rules can be modified, and new ones created, using Knowledgeware. However, there are certain points you must incorporate in a design rule for it to work correctly with this function. The following information is meant for an administrator, or whoever is creating the design rule. You can see examples in the sample rule, which is reproduced below. A penetration cutout rule should: q Create a variable (defCutout) to hold the DefinePenetrationCutoutShape object, which will communicate the cutout definition to the penetration management command.
q

Calculate the size of the cutout, using attributes of the penetrating and penetrated objects. The NewDefinePenetrationCutoutShape function creates the temporary object that holds the cutout definition. The penetrating object (p1) and penetrated object (p2) are specified. The ShapeName attribute selects the parametric part that defines the shape. The SkewTolerance attribute sets the allowed SkewTolerance for the penetration. The SetAttributeDimension function (or another SetAttributeXXX function) specifies a parameter name in the parametric part, and its value. This function is used repeatedly to set each parameter of the parametric part.

A sample rule is reproduced below:

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Creating Custom Reports


This section discusses ways in which you can customize your report generation.

Defining the Report Format Generating a Report Generating a Report from a Macro Creating a Toolbar Shortcut for a Macro Generate a Bolt Report

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Defining the Report Format


You use this function, together with the function described in Generating a Report, to get the values of properties of objects in a document. This task shows you how to define the report format. Examples from the Piping workbench are used here. Substitute the appropriate resource or directory when working in another workbench.

Before you generate a report you need to define its format. This means deciding which properties you are interested in. This report format is kept in a file which you can use to generate reports from other documents. It is recommended that you use queries, as explained below, if you will be modifying a document and running a report on it repeatedly. If you do not use a query the report may not update after you modify a document. To use this function you must first make sure of a setting. Click Tools - Options - General Parameters and Measure and click on the Language tab. Under Language check Load extended language libraries. Either check All Packages, or uncheck this option and load the packages you will be using.

1.

Click Tools - Report - Define. The Report Definition dialog box displays.

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2.

You can toggle between Yes and No for the Column headings Sort, GroupBy and Sum. A blank means No. To toggle click beneath the column heading. In the example above, for the attribute Name, Sort is No, Group By is Yes and Sum is No. The report name field is informative. You can use the button next to it to open an existing report. You will need to enter a report name and location when you click the Save As button. Enter a report title - you can enter anything but you must have a title. Check the Show Inherited Attributes box if you want to.

3.

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4.

Click on the down arrow and select the dictionary related to your program. In this case the EquipLayout package has been selected. See Using Knowledgeware Packages for more information. Select the type of object. The list of attributes you will see in Step 6 will depend on the type you select here. However, when you generate a report you will get values for all objects in the document that have the attributes included in your report format. If you want to limit the objects for which you get a report you must create a query (Step 8).

5.

6. 7.

Select an attribute in the Attribute field and click the Add button. The attribute will be added in the window. Add as many attributes as you want to. Select Yes or No for the column headings. q Sort: You only Sort by one of the attributes - if you select Name the report will sort in alphabetical order.
q

GroupBy: If you select Yes for one of the attributes, the report will group objects by that attribute. Sum: For dimensional attributes like length. If you select Yes the report will sum up the attribute you selected. For 3D applications it can compute dimensions like length from the document. You must select the correct option in the Generate a Report dialog box - you may need to select the objects and choose the 'currently selected objects' option. For 2D applications attributes must have values defined. Quantity: If you select the Quantity checkbox and the Group By column heading, a Quantity field will be added to the report. It will display a number, which shows how many parts that attribute is common to. For instance, if you group by class name and select the quantity checkbox, the report will show how many objects with the same class name exist in your document.

8.

You can further refine your report by using the Edit - Search function to define a query. This will allow you to generate a report on a narrower selection of check valve, say, of a certain size, instead of all check valves in your document. The queries you create will be available for selection when you click the arrow in the Query Name field above. Detailed instructions on using the Search function can be found in the Infrastructure User Guide under Basic Tasks - Selecting Objects. Briefly, click Edit Search to bring up the Search dialog box. Select the Advanced tab, then select a workbench, type of object and attribute you are interested in. Clicking the Add to Favorites button brings up the Create a Favorite Query dialog box, where you can name the query and save it.

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Generating a Report
This task explains how to generate a report listing values of selected properties. Before you do this you need to define the report format. Examples from the Piping Design workbench are used here. Substitute the appropriate resource or directory when working in another workbench. 1. Click Tools - Report - Generate. The Generate Report dialog box displays.

2. Click the Open button and select the format you want to use for your report, in this case NewReport. 3. If you had defined a query in your report format then check Objects From Predefined Query. 4. If you select one or more objects in the document then check the option Currently Selected Objects. 5. Check All Objects in Document if you want a report on all objects in your document. 6. Click OK and select a format, such as HTML, when you are prompted. The report will be generated. It shows values for all properties defined in your report format for all objects in the document that have them. Where an object does not have a property the report displays asterisks.

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7. Click Insert in Doc if you want to display these values in your document. To generate the report from a schematic and insert it in a schematic, click on the Insert in Doc button and click anywhere in your drawing. To generate the report from a 3-D document and insert it in a drafting document, click on the Insert in Doc button and select the sheet or view in the specifications tree. Do not select a point in the sheet. The XY Coord dialog box will pop up - enter the location where you want to insert the report. The data will be placed at the location. It can be moved to another location later by click and drag. 8. Click Save As to save the report. Specify a file name and location. If you save the file as XML type, then you can reference two stylesheets that are provided with this application to make the file easier to read. One of the two stylesheets also allows you to sort. The stylesheets are located in the directory ...intel_a\startup\Equipmentand Systems\ReporterData. The stylesheet ReportTable_Sample.xsl changes the looks of the report. The stylesheet ReportTable_SampleSort.xsl allows you to change the looks and sort. Instructions are given in the file itself. But, briefly, in order to use the stylesheet ReportTable_Sample.xsl you need to: q Open your report with a text editor like Wordpad.
q

Add the following line in the header information (it should be the first or second line in the file): <?xmlstylesheet type="text/xsl" href="ReportTable_Sample.xsl"?>

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Generating a Report from a Macro

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This task shows you how to create a new report that lists the attributes of an object. As an alternative you can use the methods described in Generating a Report and Defining the Report Format. The report will list the values of attributes like pressure, length, diameter, open/close position etc. These values will only be displayed if they have been added to the object and if the attribute is included in the report. 1.Select the object for which you want to generate a report. You can select objects in the specifications tree or by using the Edit - Search command.

2.Click Tools-Macro-Macros. The Macro dialog box displays. If the file CATSchAttrValueWYSIWYG.CATScript is not displayed in the box then select External File in the Macro In field, click Select and navigate to the directory Intel_a\code\command. Select the file named above and click Open. The file will display in the Macro dialog box.

If you want to edit the script that creates the report, click Edit. You need to have some knowledge and experience of Visual Basic to edit scripts. 3.Select the file and click Run. The Report Generation dialog box will display, asking you to enter the name of a template. Four templates are provided with this application for four types of reports: Part, Instrument, FromTo (for lines) and Equipment. They reside in the Intel_a\code\command directory. Enter the full directory path, based on your setup, and change the last word to one of the four types mentioned above. Your selection will be based on the type of object for which you are seeking to generate a report.

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4.Click OK. The report will appear in the form of an Excel spreadsheet. If the object has attributes associated with it, and these attributes are entered in the report, then they will display.

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5.If an attribute is not entered in the report you can add it by clicking on an empty column and entering it.

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Creating a Toolbar Shortcut for a Macro


This task shows you how to create a button in the toolbar to run a macro. Macros are used to generate reports (see Generating a report). Creating a button for a macro in the toolbar automates part of the process involved in generating a report. 1. Click Tools-Customize. The Customize dialog box displays.

2. 3. 4.

Select the Commands tab and select Macros in the Categories column. All macros are displayed in the Commands column. Click and drag the macro to the toolbar in which you want to place it. The toolbar will display a button that you can click to generate the report. To customize the icon on the button you just created click on Show Properties and then on the Icon button. Icons available to you will be displayed. Select one and click Close.

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Generate a Bolt Report


This task shows you how to generate a bolt BOM (bill of materials) report . The bolt report provides the name, code material, length and diameter for all bolts in your product. The macro generates a report based on rules tables in Specification in CS150R-BoltingRules.txt and in Standards in ASTL-EndDimension.txt. The BoltingRules table has the following column headings:
q

Min_Nominal Size Max_Nominal Size Part Name Part Code Material Code

The EndDimension table has the following column headings:


q

EndStyle Rating NominalSize EndDiameter EndThickness HexBoltCount HexBoltLength HexBoltDiameter StudBoltCount StudBoltLength StudBoltDiameter

When complete, the report displays the values for all attributes defined in the column headings of the two text files except for nominal size. See Rules Overview and Modifying Design Rules to find out more. The design tables have to have the correct entries for accurate reports. The bolt report function does the following:
q

Looks for gaskets with a minimum of two connectors that are connected to a flange or valve (one of the connections must be to a flange). Attributes like EndStyle and NominalSize from the flange are used to obtain the bolt count data, using the End Dimensions rules table. If one of the connections is to a valve that has the parameter BoltThrough with a value of Yes, then its bolt count is half of the count found in the table.

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To generate a report for the bolts in your document, first make sure the Product is active (highlighted blue). 1. Go to Tools - Macro - Macros. The Macros dialog box displays. If the file CATAttrPipingBOMReport.CATScript does not display initially, click Select and navigate to the directory intel_a\code\command. Select the file named above and click Open. The file displays in the Macro dialog box.

2. Click the Run button. The Report Generation dialog box opens. Enter the file name (and the path) where you want your report created.

3. The Report Generation Complete advisory appears when your report generation is complete. The report is created as an html file if you used the .html file extension. You can also create files as .csv and .txt files by using those file extensions.

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4. Now you can navigate to where your report is stored and open the file to view the report.

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Catalogs
The following tasks relate to using catalogs for the purpose of placing parts in the Piping Design product.

Creating a Catalog Creating Sub-Catalogs Modifying a Catalog Creating a Specifications Catalog

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Creating a Catalog
This task explains how to create a catalog. The Catalog facility is a standard facility provided with the V5 Product line. For detailed information regarding Catalogs, please see the Infrastructure documentation - Advanced Tasks - Using Catalogs. If you are creating a catalog of resolved parts then it is recommended that have no more than about 500 documents in each catalog, so that performance does not suffer. In this case you may need to create several catalogs. To learn how to do this see Creating Sub-Catalogs. Catalogs that point to parametric parts are smaller, and you can have one catalog. This task explains creation of the main catalog. Creation of the specifications catalog and standards is explained elsewhere (not all applications use them). Also, piping parts are used in this example. The procedure is the same for other types of parts (tubing, equipment, etc.). You should be in the workbench (such as Piping Design) for which you want to create a catalog. 1. Open the Catalog Editor by clicking on Start-Infrastructure-Catalog Editor. The Catalog Window opens with a basic catalog structure in the left column. Catalogs are created analogous to books, with the book being at the top level, chapters under it, and, if necessary, sub-chapters under them, and with pages (or parts) at the lowest level. Each family contains references to one or more parts. The illustration below shows the Catalog Editor. The column to the left is where your chapters and families are displayed. The column to the right will display parts when you click on a family.

2. Rename the root chapter (Chapter.1 above) to XXX Part to reflect the application you are working in. In the case of Piping Design, for instance, it will read Piping Part. If you do not do this you will have an extra level in the tree. To rename, right click on it, select Chapter.1 Object - Definition. Enter the new name in the dialog box that displays.

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3. Select the chapter under which you want to create the catalog (in this case Piping Part). Click the Create/Modify Catalog button . The Create/Modify Part Catalog dialog box displays.

4. Select the application in which you want to create the catalog by clicking the down arrow in the Application field. If you want to add specific parts to your catalog then create a parts list file with a text editor. Enter the names of the parts you want to add, each name on a separate line. This is also the process used in modifying a catalog. The Attribute Filter field can be left blank, it is not needed for this process. If you want to have a log of the process then enter a file name in the Message Log field. The file will be created.

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5. Click the button next to the Parts Directory field and navigate to the directory where your parts are stored. The default location is ...intel_a\startup\\EquipmentandSystems\XXX\XXXX\ComponentCatalogs\Parametric, where XXX\XXX is the application, such as Piping\PipingDesign. If you have both a Parametric and Resolved parts directory and you want to create catalogs for both then you need to run the command twice. Click OK to begin creating the catalog, which may take a few minutes. A dialog box will inform you of the progress. The image below shows part of a Piping Design catalog.

Chapters and families are displayed in the first column. The second column will display parts (often called descriptions) when you select a family. You can display different kinds of information by selecting the tabs (Reference, etc.) in the second column. The tab Generative Data is used for specifications catalogs.

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The Keywords tab displays the keywords (attributes) associated to the object. In addition, each chapter may contain one or more keywords created by the application: as of Release 14 these were three: PartType, GenericList and ReferenceStatus. These are used by the application for specific purpose. Do not delete or modify them. 6. Save your changes. You should become familiar with some of the terminology used with reference to catalogs. In the example above: q The first entry (catalogX.catalog) is the file name. When you save the catalog you will give it a file name which will display here.
q

Piping Part is the root chapter. Branch, Elbows, Flanges, etc., are chapters. Tee, Elbow, Blind Flange, etc., are families.

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Creating Sub-Catalogs
This task explains making sub-catalogs. You may need to create several catalogs if you are creating a catalog of resolved parts. It is recommended that you keep the size of each catalog to about 500 documents. Most users will, therefore, need to create several catalogs if they are pointing to resolved parts. This task explains how to use sub-catalogs, and to view them all through one master catalog. The standard catalog creation facility is used to create the sub-catalogs. In fact, Steps 1 to 4 are exactly the same as described in the task Creating a Catalog. Creating a master catalog and linking it to the sub-catalogs involves an additional step that is also explained here. 1.Open the Catalog Editor by clicking on Start-Infrastructure-Catalog Editor. The Catalog Window opens with a basic catalog structure in the left column. Catalogs are created analogous to books, with the book being at the top level, chapters under it, and, if necessary, sub-chapters under them, and with pages (or parts) at the lowest level. Each family contains references to one or more parts. The illustration below shows the Catalog Editor. The column to the left is where your chapters and families are displayed. The column to the right will display parts when you click on a family.

2.Rename the root chapter (Chapter.1 above) to XXX Part to reflect the application you are working in. In the case of Piping Design, for instance, it will read Piping Part. If you do not do this you will have an extra level in the tree. To rename, right click on it, select Chapter.1 Object - Definition. Enter the new name in the dialog box that displays.

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3.Select the chapter under which you want to create the catalog (in this case Piping Part). Click the Create/Modify Catalog button . The Create/Modify Part Catalog dialog box displays.

4.Select the application in which you want to create the catalog by clicking the down arrow in the Application field. 5.There are now two ways in which you can create a sub-catalog. q If the parts you want in your sub-catalog are stored in one directory - and there are no other parts in that directory then click the button next to the Parts Directory field and navigate to the directory where your parts are stored. Click OK and all the parts in that directory will be placed in the catalog. The application will automatically determine what the chapter and family are and create them accordingly. If you have only reducing tees in the directory it will create the chapter Branch, then the family Reducing Tee under it, and place all the parts in it. If you have reducing tees and blind flanges in it, it will create the chapters Branch and Flanges, and the families Reducing Tee and Blind Flanges under them.
q

If your parts are in one directory but you want to store them in separate catalogs, then you need to create a text file for each sub-catalog that you want to make. Give the files any names you want. In each file list the names of the parts (each must be on a separate line) that you want to place in a sub-catalog. After you select the directory in which your parts are, click the button next to the Parts List field and navigate to the text file you created. Click OK.

The Attribute Filter field can be left blank, it is not needed for this process. If you want to have a log of the process then create a file and enter the location in the Message Log field. 6.Make as many sub-catalogs as you need to and save each one as you make it. 7.You may now want to make a master catalog and link it to all your sub-catalogs - this makes it convenient to view all your . Enter the parts. Repeat Steps 1 & 2 as explained above, then select your catalog and click the Add Chapter button chapter name in the dialog box that displays, for instance, Branch. The chapter displays beneath your catalog.

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8.Open the sub-catalog you want to link to in this application - Tile Vertically or Horizontally so that you can view both. , and then select the family you want to Select a chapter in your master catalog. Click the Add Link to Catalog button link to in the sub-catalog. The family will display beneath the chapter in your master catalog. Add as many chapters and families as you want to and save the master catalog. In the image below both catalogs have been opened and tiled vertically.

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Modifying a Catalog
This task explains how to modify a catalog. Modifying refers to adding a new part you have created to a catalog, or updating a catalog after changing the attribute values of a part. In the example below a new part - belonging to a new chapter and family - will be added to a catalog. 1. Place the part you created in the directory to which the catalog points. If you are modifying a part it will already be in that directory. 2. Create a text file (give it any name you want), with a text editor like Wordpad, and enter the name of the new part you want to add or the part you have modified. In this example the part to be added is: M_EXPJNT_FLRF.CATPart. Enter each part on a separate line. 3. Enter the workbench to which the catalog belongs. Click File - Open and navigate to the catalog you want to modify. It opens in the Catalog Editor. 4. Click the Create/Modify Catalog button . The Create/Modify Part Catalog dialog box displays.

If you want to add parts only to existing chapters and families then check the Add Components to Existing Families checkbox. In the specifications tree, select the chapter or family to which you want to add (or modify) parts (you need to do this before you click the Create/Modify Catalog button). As an example, if you select the chapter Fitting shown in Step 8, then new parts will only be added to the existing five families shown. New families will not be created, even if your parts list contains them. Parts will not be added to any other chapter. 5. If the parts are stored on a file system then select File Base and follow the steps below. If they are stored in ENOVIA then select ENOVIA Base and enter the names of all parts in a text file as explained in Step 2. You can also load all parts in memory (if they are in the catalog), in which case they will display in the Select Documents window, and select the parts to process. (To load into memory, first open the catalog, then click File - Desk, all the lines display, select the lines, right-click on the selected line and select Open in the drop down menu.)

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6. Select the application in which you want to modify the catalog by clicking the down arrow in the Application field. 7. Click the button next to the Parts Directory field and navigate to the directory where your parts are stored. The default location is ...intel_a\startup\\EquipmentandSystems\XXX\XXXX\ComponentCatalogs\Parametric, where XXX\XXX is the application, such as Piping\PipingDesign. 8. Click the button next to the Parts List field and navigate to the text file you created, containing the names of new and modified parts. Click OK to begin modifying the catalog, which may take a few minutes. A dialog box will inform you of the progress. 9. The part M_EXPJNT_FL-RF is added to the catalog. The family to which it belongs did not exist in the catalog so the family is also created. The chapter (FITTING) to which it belongs exists in the catalog so it is placed under that chapter.

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Creating a Specifications Catalog

This task shows you how to create a specifications catalog.An example from the Piping workbench is used here. The process for other workbenches is the same - simply use the relevant CATfct file and terminology. For instance, in the Tubing workbench you would use Tubing Part instead of Piping Part. A specifications catalog allows you to specify which parts can be used for a certain project or part of a project. The parts or the main catalog typically contains all the parts available to you. However, in many circumstances you will only want to use parts that have certain properties - if you are building a system for conveying hot gases under pressure, for instance, you will only want to use pipes and parts that have a certain heat tolerance, are made of certain materials and have a certain pressure rating. You achieve this by specifying in the specifications catalog what the properties should be for the parts you want to use. The specifications catalog will not contain copies of the parts, but when you place parts using it, you will only be able to use parts from the main catalog that meet the criteria you have specified in that specifications catalog. The specifications catalog provides another important function - it can generate new parts for a project without increasing the number of parts in the main catalog. This is done because the specifications catalog can apply a value to an attribute on a part in the main catalog. This attribute is referred to as generic attribute. This can significantly reduce the number of parts you have in your main catalog. The way it works is like this: say you have four projects in your company that use pipe made of four different materials. You do not have to create four main catalogs, or add four pipes to one catalog, each with a different material defined. Instead what you can do is add one pipe to your main catalog with the attribute 'materialcode' (or any term you choose) but with no value defined for this attribute. Now, when you create the attribute filter file (explained in Step 9 below) you list the material you want for a particular project and put an asterisk after it. The material you have listed will be defined for the property materialcode. All you have to do is make four specifications with the four different materials you need. In addition to specifying the properties of parts, you also have to associate rules tables. This application incorporates intelligent design functions. This means that as you design, the application ensures your designing meets certain criteria. These criteria are established by the design rules. For instance, the design rules will match the threaded end of a pipe to the threaded end of a part. (You can override the rules if you want.) When you use the provided template to create a specifications catalog you can modify the design rules (see Modifying Design Rules) but you cannot add new rules. 1. Click Start - Infrastructure - Catalog Editor to start the Catalog Editor.

2. Open the CATfct file associated with your application. To do this, click the Open User Dictionary button to display the Open User Dictionary dialog box and navigate to the directory where your CATfct files are. The default location is intel_a\resources\graphic. In this example the CATPipingSample.CATfct file will be opened. You can add default rules to your specifications catalog (explained below). These rules appear in a separate chapter named "Default". The rules in the Default chapter will apply to all specifications that you create - if they are not defined in that specification. When you are placing a part using a particular specification, the application first determines if relevant rules are defined under that specification. If they are defined then it will use those rules. If they are not defined then it will use the rule under the Default specification. This saves you having to associate rules for each specification that you create.

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3. Click the Add Catalog Template button the image below only one file is open.

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. The Add Catalog Template dialog box displays, listing all CATfct files that are open. In

4. Select the application (Piping), and then click on the down arrow in the Template Type field and make your selection - in this case Material Specification. Enter a name for the specifications catalog in the Template Name field. If you are creating default rules you must enter the name Default. Click on the Browser button next to the Part Type field and make your selection. In this case it is Piping Part because this is a Piping specifications catalog. Click OK. The Default chapter and the default design rules display in the specifications tree.

In applications where you can create both a material specifications catalog and insulation specifications catalog, there may be differences in the design rules that appear in each type of catalog.

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5. You now need to associate the actual design rules table (which is how design rules are defined) to each of the design rules in the specifications tree. Double click on a rule and then click the Add Component button displays. . The Description Definition dialog box

6. Click the Select Document button. In the File Selection box that displays navigate to the directory where the design rules tables are. They are CATProduct type files. (From Release 13 you can link directly to the text tables that define each rule.) The default directory is intel_a\startup\EquipmentandSystems\XXX\Specification (where XXX is your application) and then the specification itself, say Cs150r. Open the Cs150r directory and select the text file (or table) that corresponds to the rule that you double-clicked, in this case BranchingRules. Click Open on the File Selection box and OK on the Description Definition box. The table will be associated with the rule and display in the Catalog Editor.

If you click on the Reference tab you will be able to see the full directory path. 7. Associate all the rules with the corresponding tables using the procedure described above. There is a slightly different process for associating the FunctionalPhysicalMapping tables. If you associate to the CATProduct then you need to associate with one file. If you associate with the text files then you will need to associate with one text file for each function, following the process given above. (From Release 13 the sample catalog points to text files.) Also, in the Description Definition dialog box you should make sure to enter the actual function name in the Name field. For instance, if you are associating the text table XXX_FunctionPhysical-Branch.txt, the function name for it is XXXBranchFunc, where XXX is the application, such as Piping. 8. After you have associated the rules you can create one or more specifications. To do this, select the root chapter and click the Add . Enter a name in the Chapter Definition dialog box. Chapter button 9. You need to take a couple of preparatory steps before you begin the process of creating a specifications catalog. q All the parts you want the catalog to contain must be placed in a directory.
q

You must create an attribute filter file - in text or Excel format. The purpose of the file is to identify the parts that you want the specification catalog to point to. You can place this file in any location - but you need to navigate to it in the following step. Part of a file is shown below:

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1. The first line contains the properties, or keywords. You can add any property that is defined for a part. 2. You can add "Min" or "Max" before a property to identify the minimum or maximum value the catalog should point to. If a part has a property value outside this range it will not be included. 3. If you add an asterisk (*) after a property (in the column heading) then the value of that property in the part will be replaced by the value you enter in this file. You can also add the asterisk after a particular value. The value has to be 'character type' - not a figure. So, if you place an asterisk in the column heading then this behavior will apply to all parts. If you place it against a particular value, then it will only apply to that particular part. The usage is explained at the beginning of this task. 4. You can give the file any name. 10. Click the Create/Modify Catalog button . The Create/Modify Catalog dialog box displays.

Select the application in which you want to create the catalog by clicking the down arrow in the Application field. In the Parts Directory field, navigate to the directory where your parts are. If you want to add specific parts to your catalog then create a parts list file with a text editor. Enter the names of the parts you want to add, each name on a separate line. This is also the process used in modifying a catalog. In the Attribute Filter field navigate to the file you created in Step 9. If you want to have a log of the process then enter a file name and location in the Message Log field. The file will be created. Check the Add Components only to Existing Families checkbox if you do NOT want new families to be created - parts will only be added if a family exists in the catalog. This should not be checked if you are creating a new catalog.

11. Click OK to create the catalog. Save it when done.

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Line ID Catalogs
This section discusses steps needed for line IDs customization. Displaying Line ID Properties in Catalog Modifying/Updating a Lines Catalog

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Displaying Line ID Properties in Catalog


This task explains how you can display line ID properties in the lines catalog. Taking the steps below also displays the properties in the Select/Query Line ID dialog box. From Release 14 onward, all properties that have values can display in the lines catalog as catalog keywords. However, you must enable the display by taking the actions described here. If you do not do so then only two properties, as defined in the Attribute Filter file, will display. 1. In order to enable the display of catalog keywords you need to make a change in the project resource management (PRM) file, and enter the properties you want displayed in the Attribute Filter file. To change the PRM file, open it with a text editor and locate the resource LineIDAttributeFilter. The entry is at the application level: for Piping Design it is under the heading Piping Design Application. It reads: <Resource Name="LineIDAttributeFilter" Visible="yes"> </Resource> The entry will be commented out - disabled - in the sample PRM file you get with this application. To enable it remove the comment notation which is <!-- at the beginning of the entry and --> at the end of the entry. Piping & Instrumentation Diagrams has a second entry at the application level InstrumentLineAttributeFilter. You should enable this also if you intend to use filtering on instrument lines. 2. Once you have enabled it in the PRM file, you need to make appropriate entries in the Attribute Filter file. The sample file is located in the directory ...intel_a\startup\EquipmentAndSystems\XXX\SampleData where XXX is the discipline, like Piping. The file name is PipingLineAttributeFilter.txt. The sample file has only two entries - for Piping it is NominalSize and PipeSpecification, for HVAC it is EquivalentDiameter and DuctSpecification and so on. Open the file and add the properties that you want displayed in the catalog. 3. To recap, from Release 14, line properties will display in the catalog as keywords once you have: q Enabled the attribute filter resource in the PRM file.
q

Added properties you want displayed in the attribute filter file. Valuated the properties. Updated the catalog.

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Modifying/Updating a Lines Catalog


This task explains how to modify a lines catalog. Piping resources are used below - replace with the appropriate resource or directory in a different workbench. You will need to modify the lines catalog if you want the catalog to display the attributes that have been added to line IDs from Release 14 onward. You also need to update the catalog when you create a new line, or change the value of one of the attributes. 1. Enter the workbench to which the catalog belongs. Click File - Open and navigate to the catalog you want to modify. It opens in the Catalog Editor. The image below shows some of the lines and their attributes before updating.

2. Click the Create/Modify Catalog button . The Create/Modify Part Catalog dialog box displays.

3. If the lines are stored on a file system then select File Base and follow the steps below. If they are stored in ENOVIA then select ENOVIA Base and enter the names of all lines in a text file as explained in Step 4. You can also load all lines in memory (if they are in the catalog), in which case they will display in the Select Documents window, and select the lines to process. (To load into memory, first open the catalog, then click File - Desk, all the lines display, select the lines, right-click on the selected line and select Open in the drop down menu.) 4. If you want to update all the lines then you do not need to take this step (unless you are using ENOVIA). This step is necessary only if you want to update some of the lines in the directory, or if you are using the ENOVIA Base option. Create a text file (give it any name you want), with a text editor like Wordpad, and enter the name of the new line you want to add or the line you have modified. Enter each line ID on a separate line. For ENOVIA-based you must enter the names of all lines you want to add or update. 5. Select the application in which you want to modify the catalog by clicking the down arrow in the Application field.

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6. Click the button next to the Parts Directory field and navigate to the directory where the lines are stored. The default location is ...intel_a\startup\EquipmentAndSystems\XXX\SampleData\PipingLines where XXX\XXX is the application, such as Piping\. The file is CATPspPipingLine.catalog. 7. If you want to modify selected lines then click the button next to the Parts List field and navigate to the text file you created in Step 1. Click OK to begin modifying the catalog, which may take a few minutes. A dialog box will inform you of the progress. 8. If you were updating a pre-Release 14 lines catalog then it will be updated with additional attributes. The image below shows some of the lines in the updated catalog.

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Standards and Design Rules


Ways of creating and modifying standards and design rules are discussed in this section. Rules Overview Modifying Design Rules Creating and Modifying Standards Adding an Attribute to a Standard Modifying the Object Naming Rules Add Computed Attribute to Object Name Adding an Attribute to General Design Rules Adding a New Part Size

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Rules Overview
This task provides an overview of the functions that use each design rule (as of R10). Click on the links to get more information. Not all products use each of these rules. See Modifying Design Rules for links to an explanation of each of the rules, and to learn more about rules and how to modify them. 1. Compatibility Parts placement (catalog filtering)
q

Bending
q

Values for attributes Bend Radius and Grip Length used by two Knowledge Expert rules. (See Using & Modifying Knowledgeware Rules.) Values for attribute Minimum Tangent Length is used in the routing a run function to establish the minimum length of a segment. Values for attribute Maximum Length used by Knowledge Expert rule. (See Using & Modifying Knowledgeware Rules.)

Length

Used by the routing a run function. q The Outside Diameter value is used to determine the envelope size of a run.
q

Dimension

The Bend Diameter value is used to calculate the turn (bend) radius of a run and is displayed in the Run dialog box. The Wall Thickness values are used to determine wall thickness when placing a part.

Automatic Parts ISO Mapping rules - attributes, endstyles and symbols. End Dimension

Parts Placement Isogen function - creating a 2-D drawing from a 3-D document.
q

Drawing Production Generating a bolt (bill of materials) report. Bolt (bill of materials) report to obtain attribute values. Isogen, to obtain attribute values for the 2D drawing.

Bolting
q

Branching Shop Fabrication Welding

Parts placement. Filter for parts in a catalog when placing a part in a branch situation. Outputs value which is picked up by the Welding Rule table. Parts placement, to determine type of weld to be placed between parts.

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Used by the routing a run function. q It is used to establish the bend radius of a run if there is a value in the BendRadius column.
q

Turn

If there is no value in the bend radius column then the bend radius is calculated by multiplying the value in the DiameterFactor column by the value in the Bend Diameter column of the Dimension design table. If the value in the NumberofMiterCuts column is other than 0 then elbows are mitered.

Insulation

Parts Placement

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Modifying Design Rules

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This task shows you how to modify the design rules. Also see Understanding Project Resource Management.There are links at the end of this task explaining each design rule, and you can also consult a Design Rules Overview. This application incorporates intelligent design functions. This means that as you design, the application ensures your designing meets certain criteria. These criteria are established by the design rules. For instance, the design rules will match the threaded end of a pipe to the threaded end of a part. (You can overrule the rules if you want.) The design rules in turn depend upon certain tables where the basic data is entered. You can modify or add to these tables if you want different or additional design rules. Typically, only the system administrator, or a designated person familiar with industry standards, will make such a change. The tables that come with the application are in the following directories: ...\intel_a\Startup\EquipmentAndSystems\XXX\DesignRules ; Standards and Specification (XXX stands for an application, such as Piping). If you want to modify the general design rules, which apply to all designing, you must modify the tables in the DesignRules directory. For design rules particular to a standard, look for tables in the Standards directory; and for design rules particular to a specifications catalog, look for tables under the Specification directory. To explain further: General design rules apply to all designing. Design rules you place in a particular standard apply only when you use that standard during design time. It is done this way because values may vary from standard to standard. Design rules you place in a specifications catalog apply only when you use that specification. In making changes you should not alter the structure beneath the EquipmentAndSystems directory. NOTE: From Release 13 design rules catalogs can point directly to the text files that define a rule - these are the files referred to in Step 1 below. If a catalog points directly to a text file then, to modify, use the procedure in Step 1. If your catalog points to a CATProduct then you can follow both procedures: the one in Step 1, or the one described in Steps 2 & 3. 1. You should only modify the text files - those with a .txt extension. Files with a CATProduct or catalog extension should not be modified. To modify, open the file with a text editor like Notepad and make your changes or additions. Do not change the table structure or column headings. Use the tab key to move between columns, and do not add leading or trailing spaces to your entries. 2. You can also modify the tables by opening them in the application. To do this drag onto the workbench the CATProduct file associated with the table you want to modify. If you want to modify the Piping-Compatibility.text table then drag the Piping-Compatibility.CATProduct file onto the workbench. Double click on the table in the specifications tree to bring up Knowledge Advisor.

3. Double click on the file again to display the Compatibility table. Click on the Edit table button to display the text file that you can modify. The rules explained in Step 1 apply. Save the changes you make to the text table. You do not need to save the CATProduct file.

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4. Click on the links below to learn how each design rule functions. Not all rules apply to each application.

Rules Overview Compatibility Rule Bending Rule Length Rule Dimension Rule Using & Modifying Knowledgeware Rules Automatic Parts Rule End Dimensions Rule Bolting Rule Branching Rule Shop Fabrication Rule Turn Rule HVAC Turn Rule Welding Rule Insulation Thickness ISO Attribute Mapping Rule ISO Endstyle Mapping Rule ISO Symbols Mapping Rule

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Creating and Modifying Standards


This task shows you how to create or modify standards. This task uses a piping standard as an example - the procedure is the same for other types of standard too. Substitute the appropriate application or directory. The simplest explanation of a standard is that it is a collection of specifications. How detailed these specifications are, or which areas they apply to, can vary from standard to standard, and on users, who can modify the standards. You use a standard because it ensures that all the parts you place, and the manner in which you place them, will meet certain minimum requirements or be within a certain range. The specifications themselves apply to many different properties, such as material or pressure ranges, maximum bend angles, maximum or minimum length, etc. A standard works by providing the ability to define values for attributes that are discrete. The values of the attributes are used during various operations in the setup or design process. Example: Anytime the user is trying to define a value for "Nominal Size" the user will be prompted to select from a predefined list that comes from a standard. Standards are not used for part selection. When you decide to use a certain standard, such as ASTL, which is supplied with this application as a sample, you will only have access to specifications that meet that standard. You set the standard in the Project Resource Management file. Almost all users will be creating their own standards. You can use a different directory location as long as you specify it in the project resource management file, but it is recommended that you keep the same directory structure as the samples. The samples are located in the ... intel_a\Startup\EquipmentAndSystems\Piping\Standards directory. A standard basically consists of design rules and attributes. You can change the values in design rules tables, but you cannot add new rules or remove any existing ones. In earlier releases the design rules in a standards catalog pointed to CATProduct files, which in turn pointed to text tables. From Release 13 the design rules can point directly to the text files, rather than to CATProduct files only. You should, therefore, tailor the procedure described below to suit your catalog. For instance, if you do not intend to point to CATProduct files then Step 4 will not be necessary. 1. The first step in creating a new standard should be to create the specifications that the new standard will contain. To do this, make a directory, say MAR, under the Standards directory and at the same level as the ASTL standard supplied with this application. Enter the directory name in upper case, even though Windows will display it in upper/lower case. 2. Copy all the files under ASTL into the new directory. 3. Edit all the text files - those of file type .txt - using a text editor like Notepad to reflect the values you want to define for your standard. The CATProduct file types should not be modified except as noted below. You should change the words ASTL in the file name to reflect your new standard, MAR, but do not change the rest of the file name. The table structure and column headings must not be modified. Use the tab key to move between columns, and do not add leading or trailing spaces to your entries. This is also the step you follow when you need to modify the tables in an existing standard. 4. If the design rules will point to CATProduct files: Change the prefix - ASTL - in the CATProduct-type files to reflect your new standard. Change the CATProduct file's prefix in Windows Explorer. You also need to rename the file within the application. To do this open it in the application (see Step 12), right click on it in the specifications tree, and change the name in the Properties dialog box that displays. You also need to change the CATProduct files so that they point to the renamed table. And you need to change a reference in the catalog so that it points to the renamed CATProduct file. This is explained below. But first create the standard using the Catalog Editor as explained here.

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5. Click Start - Infrastructure - Catalog Editor to start the Catalog Editor. The Catalog Editor will display.

6. Open the CATfct file associated with your application. To do this, click the Open User Dictionary button to display the Open User Dictionary dialog box and navigate to the directory where your CATfct files are. The default location is intel_a\resources\graphic. In this example the CATPipingSample.CATfct file will be opened. (CATfct files contain classes and attributes.) 7. Click the Add Catalog Template button files that are open. . The Add Catalog Template dialog box displays, listing all CATfct

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8. Select the application and click on the down arrow in the Template Type field to make your selection, in this case Standard. Enter a name for the standard. Click on the Browser button next to the Part Type field to display the Class Browser. Select the line Piping Part and click OK. Click OK on the Add Catalog Template dialog box, which should add the standard MAR to the specifications tree with the attributes displayed, as shown in the image below.

9. You now need to make sure the attributes that display in the application point to the text files (tables) you just to display created. Double click on an attribute, say MaterialCode, and click on the Add Component button the Description Definition dialog box. 10. Click the Select Document button. In the File Selection box that displays navigate to the MAR directory you created in Step 1 and select the file that corresponds to the attribute that you double-clicked, in this case MaterialCode. Click Open on the File Selection box and OK on the Description Definition box. The table will be associated with the attribute. Do this for all the attributes as well as the design rules that appear at the end of the list. You can link the design rules to corresponding text files using the method described above. If you do so you do not need to follow the steps given below. If you want to link design rules to a CATProduct then take the following steps. 11. You now need to point the CATProduct files in the MAR directory to the corresponding text file (table). And you need to change references in the new standard so that they point to the renamed CATProduct files. To make these changes you need to change a setting in your Options. Click Tools - Options - Infrastructure, select Product Structure and click the Tree Customization tab. Under Specification Tree Order click on Relations so that Yes appears in the Activated column. 12. To point the .CATProduct files to the renamed text files, begin by opening the .CATProduct file in the application one way is to drag the file from Windows Explorer onto the workbench. It will display in the specifications tree. In this example the file BendingRules will be changed - in the illustration below it has been opened.

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13. Double click on the entry Bending Rules - make sure to click on the entry beneath Relations as shown above - to enter the Knowledge Advisor workbench. 14. Right click on BendingRules to bring up a menu and select Properties. The Properties dialog box will display.

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15. Click on the button next to the File Path field, navigate to the renamed text file and select it. Click Open. Save your change. You need to do this for each .CATProduct file. 16. You now need to change the references in your new standard (MAR) so that they point to the CATProduct files. To do this open MAR.catalog in the application by dragging it onto the workbench from Windows Explorer. The catalog can be found in the Standards directory. 17. The catalog will display in the Catalog Editor. Double click on the .CATProduct file - in this case BendingRules - to to display the Description Definition dialog box. make it active and then click the Add Component button 18. Click the Select Document button. In the File Selection box that displays navigate to the MAR directory you created in Step 1 and select the CATProduct file that corresponds to the CATProduct that you double-clicked, in this case BendingRules. Click Open on the File Selection box and OK on the Description Definition box. The file will be associated with the CATProduct. Do this for all the CATProducts. 19. Click File - Save to save the changes once you are done. The General Design Catalog The General Design Catalog is used to store attributes whose values are the same in all standards. For instance, the pipe specification CS150R has the same value in all standards, because it is referring to a carbon steel pipe with a 150-pound rating. Another example: the attribute "okay to cut" has only two possible values, Yes or No, in all standards. The General Design Catalog was created so that you do not have to enter such attributes in all the standards you create, but instead enter them one time in this directory. The application will first check the standard to see if the attribute is located there and, if it does not find it, will refer to the General Design Catalog. If you create a new standard, you need to incorporate it in the design rules or the new standard will be ignored by the rules. To incorporate it you must add the new standard in the appropriate column in the rules tables.

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Adding an Attribute to a Standard


This task shows you how to add an attribute to a standard. You can only add an attribute that has discrete values. 1. Create a text file - with Notepad or another text editor - and enter values for the new attribute. Refer to one of the existing text files to see the format. Save the file in the directory where the other files are located. Give the file the same name as the attribute and follow the naming convention as evident in the existing files. The default location of the ASTL standard, which is provided with this application as a sample, is ...intel_a\Startup\EquipmentandSystems\Piping\Standards 2. Now you need to add the attribute under the standard (which is ASTL in this example) and link it to the file you just saved. To do this open the PipingStandards.catalog in the application. (Use File-Open or drag it on to the workbench from Windows Explorer.)

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3. Double click on the standard to which you want to add an attribute - in this case ASTL - to make it active and click on the Add Family button . The Component Family Definition dialog box displays.

4. Enter a name for the new attribute. Under Type select Standard. Click OK. The new attribute will display in the list of attributes under ASTL.

5. Double click NewAttribute to make it active and click the Add Component button Definition dialog box displays. . The Description

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6. Click the Select Document button and, in the File Selection dialog box that displays, navigate to the file you created in Step 1. Select the file and click Open. The values in the text file are now linked to the attribute you just created. 7. You can also use the procedure described above to create an attribute in the "default" directory.

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Modifying the Object Naming Rules


This task shows you how to modify or define the object naming rules. See also Understanding Project Resource Management. Also see Add Computed Attribute to Object Name if you want to add a computed attribute. Examples from the Piping Design product are used in this task. The procedure is the same for all products that have this function - substitute the appropriate file or object when using another product. Every object that you create (except a run), or part that you place, in your design document can be given a unique identifier. This identifier usually consists of a prefix that identifies the type of object or part it is, followed by a unique number. This enables users, for instance, to maintain a history of each part - when it was serviced, or repaired or replaced - and schedule servicing and replacement dates. When you create an object or place a part in your document the application will suggest a name for it - the default name. (In many cases you have the option of rejecting this name and entering a different name, or renaming it.) The default name is based on certain rules. A set of default rules is included with this application, but most users will want to modify these rules to suit their own requirements. You can modify or define the naming rules in the following way: 1. Open the Feature Dictionary Editor. From the main menu, click Start - Infrastructure - Feature Dictionary Editor. 2. Click the Open User Dictionary button . The Open User Dictionary dialog box displays.

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3. Navigate to the directory where your .CATfct files are stored. The default is .. intel_a\resources\graphic. The CATfct files contain a list of all the object classes. Select and open the file associated with the product you are working with, i.e. Piping or Tubing, etc. All the classes in the file are displayed in the Feature Dictionary.

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4. Select a class in the specifications tree and click the Define ID Schema button ID Schema dialog box will display. . The Define

If the class does not have object naming rules defined then the Inherited From field will indicate the parent from which they are derived. If the class has rules defined then the same class name will display, as in the image above. If no rules exist for this class then they will be created when you take the following steps. 5. You have two options In the ID usage field, Instance and Reference, and you usually have to define naming rules for each object using both options. The naming rules you define under the Instance option are used by the application when you are placing a part in a document. The naming rules you define using the Reference option are used by the application when you build a component for placing in a catalog. Most users will define naming rules for an object using both options. Depending on your needs, you can choose to simplify the procedure by defining rules for the parent function, which is Piping Part Function in the example above, and these rules will be inherited by all the objects under it. Select Yes or No for Sequence number. Yes or No cannot be selected if you have Reference as the ID usage. Minimum length refers to the number of digits in the numbering scheme. For instance, 3 means the number will show up as 001.

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6. Click the Define/modify ID schema button display. . The Define/modify ID schema dialog box will

7. In this dialog box you can define what you want to appear in the name of an object, in this case the object being Piping Part Function. The dialog box has a window in the lower half which displays the current naming scheme. You can delete one or more of the fields using the Delete field/Delete all fields buttons .

Click Add after entering or selecting a value in a field. You can choose to have more than one attribute value displayed in a name, for instance when you want to add a Separator at more than one place. Click Add after selecting each one. You can select the order in which the values will appear in a name by using the Up or Down arrows or the buttons in the Insert mode field. If you want to use computed attributes in the object name then see Add Computed Attribute to Object Name. 8. Select one of the attributes from the drop down list in the Attribute name field

. If you select Nominal size, for instance, the object name will display the nominal size of the object. These attributes are for the Piping Part class only - other classes will have different attributes displayed. You can display more than one attribute in the name.

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9. Enter any value you want displayed in the Constant field. If you enter PP (for Piping Part), all piping part names will display this value. You can add a constant to a name anywhere you require it. For instance, you may begin a name with PP, and end it with WR for a project name. 10. The Program field is used to execute a program that will then add a value to the name. You can create your own programs, but some sample programs are provided with the application and are listed below. Enter a program name in this field if you want it to be executed. For instance, if you enter CATPspEncSchedule in the field, then the short value of the Encoded Schedule attribute will be added to the name (the short value of Extra Strong is XS.). These programs are Standards-based and will execute based on the standard you have defined in your Options. The default standard is ASTL. The following list shows the programs provided with the application as a sample, and the attributes they refer to:
q

CATPspEncRating - Encoded Rating CATPspEncRating2 - Encoded Rating2 CATPspEncRating3 - Encoded Rating3 CATPspEncRating4 - Encoded Rating4 CATPspEncNominalSize - Encoded Nominal Size CATPspEncNominalSize2 - Encoded Nominal Size2 CATPspEncNominalSize3 - Encoded Nominal Size3 CATPspEncNominalSize4 - Encoded Nominal Size4 CATPspEncSchedule - Encoded Schedule CATPspEncMaterialCategory - Encoded MaterialCategory CATPspEncMaterialCode - Encoded MaterialCode

11. The Domain program field is used to execute a program that will add the name of the domain to which the object belongs. Domain in this case refers to an object to which the object to be named is connected. For instance, when naming a nozzle it is preferable to add the name of the equipment to which it is connected. One sample domain program is provided with the application, and provides this function: CATPspConnectedEquip. 12. The Separator field is used to add separators, such as a hyphen or semi colon, after the domain field. 13. Use the buttons in the Insert mode field to organize the name. Append field to list will move a field to the end of the name. The other buttons are used when you are adding a field, to position it in the name.

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14.

FOR HVAC DUCTS If you want to place 'heavy' HVAC ducts then you need to change the file that defines the object naming rules. (You do not need to make any change if you are placing 'light' parts.) If you are placing heavy parts then navigate to the directory ...intel_a\startup\EquipmentAndSystems\HVAC\DataDictionary. The default files are named sch-CATHvaHVACXXXXDuct1.xml where XXXX represents a shape like FlatOval. Rename this file so that the application does not recognize it - you can add a SAVE at the end, for instance. You need to use the corresponding file that has the _HV at the end of the file name. This file is in the same directory, and normally directly beneath the file for light parts. To use this file simply remove the _HV. As an example:
q

Rename sch-CATHvaHVACXXXXDuct1.xml to sch-CATHvaHVACFlatOvalDuct1_SAVE.xml Remove the _HV from the file sch-CATHvaHVACFlatOvalDuct1_HV.xml

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Add Computed Attribute to Object Name


This task explains how you can display computed attribute values in an object name. Computed attributes are so called because their values are computed by the application from other data. You can add them to object names, but the process is different from that explained in Modifying Object Naming Rules. See the section Computed Attributes if you want to learn more about the attributes. 1. To add computed attributes to an object name you need to make or change entries in an ID Schema file which is located in the directory defined for the XXXIDSchema resource in your project resource management file. The default in the sample file is ...EquipmentAndSystems\XXX\DataDictionary where XXX is the discipline, such as Piping or HVAC. An IDSchema file for each class will exist in this directory if object naming rules have been defined for it. As an example, the piping class Reducing Bushing has a file named sch-CATPipReducingBushing.xml. If there is the numeral 1 after the file name then it is for a reference part. If there is no numeral then it is for an instance part.

2. You can use a computed attribute that is defined for a particular class or its parent, and that has been exposed in Knowledgeware. To learn more about exposed attributes see Using Knowledgeware Packages. You should also see Knowledgeware documentation to learn more about Knowledgeware. 3. The contents of the sample ID Schema file look like this:

<?xml version = "1.0" encoding="ASCII"?> <!DOCTYPE Doct SYSTEM "schemaid.dtd"><!-- @version: --> <Doct> <schema_CST value="RED"/> <schema_CST value="-"/> <schema_SeqNbr seq_IEND="6" seq_NMIN="3" seq_ISTART="1"/></Doct>
4. You need to add a line after the word <Doct> to define the computed attribute you want displayed in the object name. To add the attribute insert the following line: <schema_ATT value = "XXXXX"/> where XXXXX is the computed attribute such as ParentPipingLineName. Save the file (do not change the file type).

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Adding an Attribute to General Design Rules


This task shows you how to add an attribute to the general design rules. In addition to design rules that are specific to a standard or to a specification catalog, this application has design rules that apply every time you are placing a part. Although you cannot add a new design rule, you can modify existing ones; and, you can add attributes for informational purposes to the Design Rules Catalog. For instance, you can create an attribute called VendorName and link it to a list of approved vendor names. You can now assign a vendor name to an object at parts creation time; information that will always be available to the user. When you want to add an attribute that doesn't change from one standard to the next you add it here under Discrete Values. You can only add an attribute that has discrete values. 1. Create a text file - with Notepad or another text editor - and enter values for the new attribute. Refer to one of the existing text files to see the format. Save the file in the directory where the other files are located. Give the file the same name as the attribute and follow the naming convention as evident in the existing files. The default location of the DesignRules catalog is ...intel_a\Startup\EquipmentAndSystems\Piping\DesignRules 2. Now you need to add the attribute under the general design rules and link it to the file you just saved. To do this open the ...DesignRules catalog in the application. (Use File-Open or drag it on to the workbench from Windows Explorer.)

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3. An attribute can only be added under the DiscreteValues column. Double click on it to make it active and click on the Add Family button . The Component Family Definition dialog box displays.

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4. Enter a name for the new attribute. Under Type select Standard. Click OK. The new attribute will display in the list of attributes under DiscreteValues.

5. Double click new attribute, in this case VendorName, to make it active and click the Add Component button . The Description Definition dialog box displays.

6. Click the Select Document button and, in the File Selection dialog box that displays, navigate to the file you created in Step 1. Select the file and click Open. The values in the text file are now linked to the attribute you just created. Save your changes.

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Adding a New Part Size


This task explains how you can add a new nominal size to a part. Part sizes available to you during part placement are governed by text tables contained within standards. You need to modify these tables as explained below. You also need to modify the part design table. 1. Open the file nominalsize.txt for the standard to which you want to add the size. The location of the sample file is ...intel_a\startup\EquipmentAndSystems\XXX\Standards\YYY where XXX is the application or discipline, such as Piping, and YYY is the standard, such as ASTL. 2. Add the nominal size to the file. Note that the size should be added in order, and should not be inserted just anywhere in the file. Also, follow the convention as you see it in the file. The two columns have the same value in different formats (e.g. .125 and 1/8in). The reason is that the first format is used where shorter text is needed, such as in file naming. 3. Add the size to the design table for the part. The design table is usually located in the same directory as the part. The location of the sample parts is ...intel_a\startup\EquipmentAndSystems\XXX\YYY\Componentcatalogs\Parametric where XXX and YYY are the discipline and application. Follow the convention as you see it in the file. 4. Modify your parts catalog and specifications catalog so that the new part size is available to you. The process of modifying the parts catalog is explained in Modifying a Catalog. Specifications catalogs are explained in Creating a Specifications Catalog. Steps 9 and 10 are relevant for modifying. Depending on the part size that you are adding, and your specific setup data, the tables associated with the following may also need to be modified: q Function physical mapping
q

Turn Rule Bending Rule Length Rule Dimensions rules (pipe dimension, tube dimension, etc.) Bolting Rule Branching Rule Shop Fabrication Rule End Dimensions Rule

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The chart below is a quick reference of some of the resources included with this application (as of R14). Ways in which these resources are used are described elsewhere in this user guide. Most columns are self-explanatory. Some that may need additional information are explained below. Controlled by PRM: Whether the resource has an entry in the project resource management file. Usually this is the location of the resource. NLS: National Language Support (NLS) files contain resource names that can be defined by the user. If you change to another language, for instance, you will need to change the names in the NLS files. In the column below, 'Yes" means that the files have terminology (such as the values of attributes) that needs to be changed if you change NLS files. NLS files are located in the directory: intel_a\resources\msgcatalog. Units: These files contain units that were defined in the metric system by default. If you choose to go to another system you must modify these files. Administrator: Files that have "No" against them cannot be modified. Others can be modified as noted. Depending on the file type, files can be modified using Wordpad (text or XML files), Excel, or within the relevant application itself (CATProduct, catalog or CATDrawing files).

File name

File Type

Controlled by PRM

NLS

Units

Administrator

Contents

Object ID Schema definition (startup\\EquipmentAndSystems\\Piping\\DataDictionary) sch-CATPipPipingPart xml Directory Path sch-CATPipPipingPartFunction xml Directory Path Design Rules setup data (startup\\EquipmentAndSystems\\Piping\\DesignRules) PipingDesignRules Piping-AttributeFilter Piping-AttributeFilter Piping-AutomaticParts Piping-AutomaticParts Piping-Compatibility Piping-Compatibility catalog CATProduct txt CATProduct txt CATProduct txt Yes No No No No No No

Yes Yes

No No

Yes - Administrator Yes - Administrator

Object ID Schema Definition Object ID Schema Definition

Yes No Yes No Yes No Yes

No No No No No No No

Yes - Administrator No Yes - Administrator No Yes - Administrator No Yes - Administrator

Catalog containing the list of rules available for a project. Attribute filter used for catalog filtering Automatic parts rules. Used during parts placement Connectivity compatibility definition rules. Used during parts placement and catalog search.

PipingCutoutClearance Piping-CutoutClearance Piping-FunctionPhysicalMapping Piping-FunctionPhysical

CATProduct txt CATProduct txt

No No No No

No No No Yes

No Yes No No

No Yes - Administrator No Yes - Administrator Function/Physical mapping rules. Used during parts placement and 2D/3D Integration and validation. Defines the allowable penetration clearance values for Pipes.

Piping-ISOAttributeMapping

CATProduct

No

No

No

No File containing the mapping between CATIA Piping attributes and ISOGEN attributes. Used in the ISOGEN interface.

Piping-ISOAttributeMapping

txt

No

No

No

Yes - Administrator

Piping-ISOEndStyleMapping

CATProduct

No

No

No

No

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File containing the mapping between CATIA Piping End Style attribute values and ISOGEN End Style attribute values. Used in the ISOGEN interface.

Piping-IsoSymbols

CATProduct

No

No

No

No File containing the mapping between CATIA Piping Symbol names and ISOGEN Symbol names. Used in the ISOGEN interface. Schematic design starter document containing all sample rules and checks Piping schematic design starter document containing all Piping sample rules and checks Document containing all sample design checks

Piping-IsoSymbols

txt

No

No

No

Yes - Administrator

AllDiagramsStarterDocument

CATProduct

No

No

No

Yes - Administrator

PipingDiagramStarterDocument PipingDiagramChecks

CATProduct CATProduct

No No

No No

No No

Yes - Administrator Yes - Administrator

Standard independent attributes (startup\EquipmentAndSystems\\Piping\\DesignRules\\DiscreteValues) PipingOKToCut.txt PipingSymbolName.txt txt txt No No No Yes No No Yes - Administrator Yes - Administrator Discrete list that contain two values: Yes or No. This is used to indicate if an elbow can be cut or not. Discrete list of part symbols used during part creation.

insulation specification setup data (startup\EquipmentAndSystems\Piping\InsulationSpecification And FG or GW) PipingInsulationSpecifications FG-PipeThicknessRule.CATProduct FG-InsulationThicknessRangeTable.txt catalog CATProduct txt Yes No No Yes No Yes No No Yes Yes - Administrator No Yes - Administrator Insulation thickness definition as a function of size and temperature. Catalog containing the insulation specification and insulation thickness definition data.

Part definition data (startup\\EquipmentAndSystems\\Piping\\PipingDesign\\ComponentCatalogs) ConnectorAttributes txt Yes Yes No Yes - Administrator File contains the list of attributes that can be assigned to connectors. Used during part build. File contains the list of graphic representations(Single, Double, etc.). Used during part build. Fully resolved piping catalog. Can be used in ENOVIA-LCA as a sample catalog. There is a specification catalog that is syncronized with this catalog (See PipingSpecificationsResolved.catalog).

GraphicRepresentations

txt

Yes

Yes

No

Yes - Administrator

PipingResolvedCatalogs.zip

zip

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes - Administrator

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Yes - Administrator

README.txt

txt

No

Yes

No

No

Template piping parts catalog. This tempate can be used as a starter for defining small nested piping catalogs. For more information see the README file. This file contain instruction of how to use the starter template catalog defined in: PipingResolvedCatalogsTemplate.zip

Parts Catalog (startup\\EquipmentAndSystems\\Piping\\PipingDesign\\ComponentCatalogs\\Parametric) PipingParts.catalog B_TEE_WM-BW B_TEE_WM-BW B_TEE_WM-BW EL_90_WM-BW-LR EL_90_WM-BW-LR EL_90_WM-BW-LR_Single PIPE_HV-BENDABLE-BW PIPE_HV-BENDABLE-BW catalog CATPart txt CATShape CATPart txt CATShape CATPart txt Yes No No No No No No No No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes - Administrator Yes - Administrator Yes - Administrator Yes - Administrator Yes - Administrator Yes - Administrator Yes - Administrator Yes - Administrator Yes - Administrator Piping Catalog points to all parts that can be placed using the "Place Piping Parts" command. TEE Piping part definition Design table definition TEE Single line graphic representation Elbow Piping part definition Design table definition Elbow Single line graphic representation Pipe with bend Piping part definition Design table definition

Drawing Customization data (startup\EquipmentAndSystems\\Piping\\PipingDesign\\DrawingCatalogs) PipingPartsAnnotations ATSDefinitions-PipingParts catalog CATDrawing No No Yes Yes No No Yes - Administrator Yes - Administrator Catalog containing the association between text template Drawing document containing the text templates for 3D object classes. Associate 2D symbols to specific Piping drawing customization. Such as single line display, etc. This catalog is used in conjunction with GVS to decide when these special application symbols should be used. Drawing document containing the 2D symbols that are used for piping drawing customization.

Piping2DSymbols-Customization

catalog

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes - Administrator

Piping2DSymbols-Customization

CATDrawing

No

Yes

Yes

Yes - Administrator

Diagram Component Catalogs (startup\EquipmentAndSystems\\Piping\\PipingDiagrams\\ComponentCatalogs) PID_ANSI.catalog PID_ANSI_Equipment.catalog PID_ANSI_Equipment_.CATProduct PID_ANSI_Instruments.catalog PID_ANSI_Instruments_.CATProduct PID_ANSI_PipingFunction.catalog PID_ANSI_PipingFunction_.CATProduct catalog catalog CATProduct catalog CATProduct catalog CATProduct Yes No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No Yes - Administrator Yes - Administrator Yes - Administrator Yes - Administrator Yes - Administrator Yes - Administrator Yes - Administrator Parent catalog of Piping diagram components Catalog of Piping diagram components Diagram reference components Catalog of Piping diagram components Diagram reference components Catalog of Piping diagram components Diagram reference components

Piping Design

PID_ANSI_OnOffSheets.catalog PID_ANSI_OnOffSheets_.CATProduct PID_DIN_.... PID_ISO_....

catalog Yes Version 5 Release 15 CATProduct No

No No

No No

Yes - Administrator Page 441 Yes - Administrator

Catalog of Piping diagram off sheets Diagram off sheets Similar to the ANSI sample catalogs Similar to the ANSI sample catalogs

Sample Data (startup\\EquipmentAndSystems\\Piping\\SampleData)


Drawing Annotation Data for Diagrams

PipingAnnotations

catalog

No
Design Rules

Yes

No

Yes - Administrator

Catalog containing hierarchy of sample diagram text templates

Rule_PipingBendablePipe_MaxBendRadius Rule_PipingBendablePipe_MaxLength Rule_PipingBendablePipe_MinGripLength

CATProduct CATProduct CATProduct

No No No

No No No

No No No

No No No

Rule for checking maximum bend radius during Bendable creation. Rule for checking maximum Run Length during Bendable creation. Rule for checking maximum Bendable Length during Bendbale creation.

Import Line List XML Definition

PipingLineIDImportSample

xml

No
Sample Reports

Yes

Yes

Yes - Administrator

Sample Piping line definition. This XML file when imported will generate the sample Piping line list.

PipingDiagramPartReportSample PipingPartsListReportSample PipingPartsListReportSample

txt txt xls

No No No

Yes Yes Yes

No No No

Yes - Administrator Yes - Administrator Yes - Administrator

Sample parts list report in txt file Sample parts list report in txt file Sample parts list report in Excel file This report contains the From component and the TO component for every line that is reported. This report contains the From component and the TO component for every line that is reported. Sample report for generating In-Spec or Out-Of-Spec status. Report definition is in txt format. Sample report for generating In-Spec or Out-Of-Spec status. Report definition is in Excel format. Sample report for generating Pipe cut length. Definition is in txt file format. Sample report for generating Pipe cut length. Definition is in Excel file format.

PipingFromToReportSample.txt

txt

No

Yes

No

Yes - Administrator

PipingFromToReportSample.xls

txt

No

Yes

No

Yes - Administrator

PipingSpecificationStatusReportSample

txt

No

Yes

No

Yes - Administrator

PipingSpecificationStatusReportSample PipingPipeCutLengthReportSample PipingPipeCutLengthReportSample

xls txt xls

No No No

Yes Yes Yes

No No No

Yes - Administrator Yes - Administrator Yes - Administrator

Piping Lines data (startup\\EquipmentAndSystems\\Piping\\SampleData\\PipingLines) CATPipPipingLine CATPspPipingLine20010507093800 catalog CATProduct Yes No Yes Yes No Yes Yes - Administrator Yes - Administrator Piping Line catalog. Contains a list of all the sample Piping lines. Sample Piping line definition file. There are more lines in this directory, however, the definition is identical.

Pipe Specification data (startup\\EquipmentAndSystems\\Piping\Specification)

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PipingSpecifications

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catalog Yes Yes Yes

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PipingSpecification_sample_CS150R

txt

No

Yes

Yes

Yes - Administrator

PipingSpecifications-Resolved.catalog

catalog

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes - Administrator

PipingSpecifications-Template.catalog CS150R-BoltingRules CS150R-BoltingRules CS150R-BranchingRules CS150R-BranchingRules CS150R-FunctionPhysicalMapping CS150R-FunctionPhysical-Branch CS150R-FunctionPhysical-BranchConnection CS150R-FunctionPhysical-InLineInstrument CS150R-FunctionPhysical-Reducer CS150R-FunctionPhysical-Terminator CS150R-FunctionPhysical-Pipe CS150R-FunctionPhysical-Valve CS150R-ShopFabricationRules CS150R-ShopFabricationRules CS150R-TurnRules CS150R-TurnRules CS150R-WeldingRules CS150R-WeldingRules

catalog CATProduct txt CATProduct txt CATProduct txt txt txt txt txt txt txt CATProduct txt CATProduct txt CATProduct txt

No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No

Yes No Yes No No No No No No No No No No No Yes No No No Yes

Yes No Yes No Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes No Yes No Yes

Yes - Administrator No Yes - Administrator No Yes - Administrator No Yes - Administrator Yes - Administrator Yes - Administrator Yes - Administrator Yes - Administrator Yes - Administrator Yes - Administrator No Yes - Administrator No Yes - Administrator No Yes - Administrator

Specification catalog. This catalog will be used during specification driven parts placement and specification driven bend definition. Sample piping specification query definition in a text file. This file shows the format of how the external definition of specificaiton query is dfined. Resolved specification catalog. This specification catalog corresponds to the sample resolved piping parts catalog that is provided with the product (See PipingResolvedCatalogs.zip). An empty specification template. Can be used as a starter for defining a specification catalog. Bolting rule definition file. Used during bolt report generation and in ISO extraction. Branch rule definition file. Used during parts placement to automatically select the branch part. Function/Physical mapping rules. Used during parts placement Function/Physical mapping rules. Used during parts placement Function/Physical mapping rules. Used during parts placement Function/Physical mapping rules. Used during parts placement Function/Physical mapping rules. Used during parts placement Function/Physical mapping rules. Used during parts placement Function/Physical mapping rules. Used during parts placement Shop/Fabrication rules. Used during part placement of weld objects. Turn rule definition. Used during run layout definition. Welding rules. Used during parts placement to automate weld selection.

Standards definition (startup\\EquipmentAndSystems\\Piping\\Standards) PipingStandards catalog Yes Yes No Yes - Administrator Standard catalog. Contains definition of data/rules that will vary by standard.

Piping Design

ASTL-BendingRules ASTL-BendingRules

CATProduct txt

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No

No Yes

No Yes

No Page 443 Yes - Administrator

No

ASTL-DimensionCode

txt

No

Yes

No

Yes - Administrator

ASTL-EndDimension ASTL-EndDimensions ASTL-EndStyle ASTL-LengthRules ASTL-LengthRules

txt CATProduct txt CATProduct txt

No No No No No

Yes No Yes No Yes

No No No No Yes

Yes - Administrator No Yes - Administrator No Yes - Administrator

Bending rules. Bending rule definition. Used to validate manufacturability of bendable Pipes. File containing the allowable values for dimension code. Used during catalog creation and part build. Dimension at the endof the fitting. This dimension is based on the the outside diameter, rating and the end style of the part. File containing the allowable values for End Style. Used during catalog creation and part build. Length rules. Used during run creation to identify design violations in relation to length. File containing the allowable values for Material Category. Used during catalog creation and part build. File containing the allowable values for Material Code. Used during catalog creation and part build. File containing the allowable values for Nominal Size. Used during catalog creation and part build. File containing the allowable values for Part Code. Used during catalog creation and part build. File containing the allowable values for Part Name. Used during catalog creation and part build. File containing the allowable values for Rating. Used during catalog creation and part build. File containing the allowable values for Schedule. Used during catalog creation and part build. Pipe dimension definition. Such as out side diameter, wall thickness, bend diameter. Used during run definition and parts placement. File containing the allowable values for Wall Thickness. Used during catalog creation and part build.

ASTL-MaterialCategory

txt

No

Yes

No

Yes - Administrator

ASTL-MaterialCode

txt

No

Yes

No

Yes - Administrator

ASTL-NominalSize

txt

No

Yes

No

Yes - Administrator

ASTL-PartCode

txt

No

Yes

No

Yes - Administrator

ASTL-PartName

txt

No

Yes

No

Yes - Administrator

ASTL-Rating

txt

No

Yes

No

Yes - Administrator

ASTL-Schedule ASTL-PipeDimensions ASTL-PipeDimensions

txt CATProduct txt

No No No

Yes No Yes

No No Yes

Yes - Administrator No Yes - Administrator

ASTL-WallThickness

txt

No

Yes

No

Yes - Administrator

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Using Knowledgeware Checks


This section discusses checking a document for design errors and applying design rules to a document. You need to have the product Knowledgeware in order to use these functions fully. However, a sample file is provided with 3D applications, and a sample catalog is provided with 2D applications; several checks and design rules are incorporated into the sample file and sample catalog. If you use the sample file to create your 3D documents you do not have to obtain Knowledgeware in order to use these functions, but without Knowledgeware, you cannot create new checks or new design rules, you cannot edit them, and you cannot import checks into your document. The sample catalog provided with 2D applications allows you to import checks and rules into your document, however you need Knowledgeware to create new checks and rules and edit existing checks and rules. Enough documentation is provided here to enable you to use the sample file and catalog. However, to be able to use all Knowledgeware functions you need to refer to the documentation for that product. Before you can use this function you must make sure the settings are correct. Click Tools - Options - General Parameters and Measure and click on the Language tab. Under Language check Load extended language libraries. Either check All Packages, or uncheck this option and load the packages you will be using. A second setting you must make sure of is: Click Tools - Options - Infrastructure and click the Tree Customization tab. Activate Parameters and Relations.
Using Knowledgeware Packages Importing Checks from Knowledgeware (3D) Opening a Sample Document Checking a Document for Design Errors

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Using Knowledgeware Packages


This task shows you how to load and use Knowledgeware packages (may also be known as dictionaries). You should see Knowledgeware documentation if you want to learn more about it. Knowledgeware provides certain functions that are used by all applications. In search and report definition functions, for instance, it allows users the capability of searching for objects, or defining how a report should be structured. This is achieved by 'exposing' objects and their attributes in Knowledgeware through the use of what are known as packages. A package is specific to an application or group of applications, and contains a list of objects and their attributes that have been exposed. The PlantShipLayout package, for instance, contains objects and attributes that are used by several applications, whereas the PipingLayout package contains the list of objects and attributes for piping applications. These packages must be loaded before you can use certain functions. There is a setting you must enable before you can load and use these packages.

1.

Click Tools - Options - General - Parameters and Measure and click on the Language tab. Under Language check Load extended language libraries. Either check All Packages, or uncheck this option and load the packages you will be using.

2.

If you check All Packages then packages for all applications - including many you do not need - will be loaded, and may slow operations. You may instead want to load selected packages.

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3.

There are several ways in which you can view the contents of each package. One way is to open the Knowledge Expert workbench, click the Expert Check button and click OK in the Check Editor

to display dialog box to display the Check Editor: XXXX dialog box. Click the Browser button the browser. This displays packages in the left column, objects in the middle column, and attributes (and programs) of the selected object in the third column. Check the Show Inherited Attributes checkbox if you need to.

4.

Following is a list of packages used by Equipment & Systems applications: q PlantShipLayout - Several applications, should always be loaded.
q

ProductPackage - All applications, should always be loaded. CompAccessLayout - Compartment & Access ElectricalShipbuilding - 2D electrical Conduitlayout - Raceway & Conduit Design EquipLayout - Equipment Arrangement HangerLayout - Hanger Design HVACLayout - HVAC applications InstrLayout - Several applications PipingLayout - Piping applications PlantArrangement - Plant layout RacewayLayout - Raceway & Conduit Design TubingLayout - Tubing applications WaveguideLayout - Waveguide applications

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Importing Checks and Rules from Knowledgeware


This task shows you how to import checks (and rules) from Knowledgeware into your 3D document. Obviously, you must have Knowledgeware installed to do so. Before you can use this function you must make sure the settings are correct. Click Tools - Options General - Parameters and Measure and click on the Language tab. Under Language check Load extended language libraries. Either check All Packages, or uncheck this option and load the packages you will be using. A second setting you must make sure of is: Click Tools - Options - Infrastructure and click the Tree Customization tab. Activate Parameters and Relations. 1. With your document open, make the root object in the specifications tree active, and then click Start Infrastructure - Knowledge Expert. The application will open and you will see new entries in the specifications tree. Now you have to import the sample checks and rules provided with this application. 2. button. The Load Report box will display. Navigate to the directory where Click the Insert Rules the sample files are stored and import the files for the application you are running. The default directory and files you need to import are listed below: For Piping Design: ...intel_a\startup\EquipmentAndSystems\MultiDiscipline\SampleData Import the following files for Piping Design, HVAC Design and Tubing Design:
q

PhysicalPartsConnectivityCheck.CATProduct PhysicalPartsInconsistentNameCheck.CATProduct

3. The checks and rules you have imported will display in the specifications tree.

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4. Double click on the root product in the specifications tree to exit Knowledgeware and return to your workbench.

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Opening a Sample Document

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This task shows you how to open the sample documents provided with this 3D application. The sample documents have some checks and rules incorporated and you can use them without having Knowledgeware. 1.Click File - Open. The File Selection box will open. 2.Navigate to the directory where the sample files for the application you are running are stored by default: ...intel_a\startup\EquipmentAndSystems\MultiDiscipline\SampleData 3.See Importing Checks and Rules from Knowledgeware for a list of sample files. 4.When you open one of these document a message will display warning you that the file is Read Only. Click OK on the message box. The sample file will open with all the checks and rules displayed in the specifications tree.

5.Make your changes and then use the File - Save As function to save the file and give it a new name.

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Checking a Document for Design Errors


This task shows you how to check a document for design errors. This function allows you to check the entire document for certain errors, such as unconnected elements. The full list of errors for which you can check is given below. The procedure is the same whether you have Knowledgeware installed, or you are using the sample files (for 3D) or catalog (for 2D) provided with this application. 1. With your document open, right click on the entry RuleBase in the specifications tree. In the drop down menu that displays, select RuleBase object. In the sub-menu that displays select Manual Complete Solve. Your document will be checked for design errors.

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2. The checks which came up with errors will have a red button against them. The checks that had no errors will have a green button. In the image below the check Unconnected Elements failed, which means there is one or more element in your document that is not connected to anything.

3. To see which elements failed the check, right click on the check, in this case UnconnectedElem. In the drop down box that displays select UnconnectedElem object. In the sub-menu that shows select Highlight Failed Components. The failed elements will be highlighted in the specifications tree. Some elements will also highlight in the viewer.

4. For diagrams products you can check for the following errors using the sample catalog provided with this application: General Design Checks have the following in addition to unconnected elements:
q

Unconnected Coincident Element: Elements and connectors can be coincident, or occupying the same space, but not be connected to each other. Unconnected On/Off Sheet: On/Off sheet connectors in your document that are not linked to other documents. Flow Direction Conflict: Flow direction is not consistent in linked elements. Invalid Zone Boundary: A zone has a gap in the boundary. Invalid Part Type: Part type selected has invalid attributes. Invalid Part Number: Part type is incompatible with defined function. Undefined Part Number: No part number assigned.

Other checks are:


q

Inconsistent Name Check: This application employs a naming convention. This error means that an element has been named in violation of the rules defined by you. Inconsistent Nominal Size: This signifies that elements of different nominal size have been connected. Inconsistent Pipe Spec Check: This signifies that elements with different specifications have been connected.

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q

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Inconsistent Equiv Diameter Check: Ducts of different equivalent diameter have been connected. Out of Pipe Spec (for piping part functions only): Pipe specification is not derived from the line. Out of Duct Spec: Duct specification is not derived from the line.

For 3-D products you can perform the inconsistent name and unconnected element checks using the sample file.

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Defining Options
This section explains how to define certain options. Finding Sample Data on Various Platforms Specifications Tree

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Finding Sample Data on Various Platforms


This task shows you how to find sample data that is provided with the application if you are using a platform other than Windows. In Windows, catalogs and other sample data are usually stored in a subdirectory under intel_a. Intel_a in turn resides in whichever drive and directory you have installed the application in. Directory paths for sample data in this user guide refer to the intel_a directory. You can find the directories used in other platforms by referring to the list below. q Windows: ...\intel_a\
q

AIX: .../aix_a/ HPUX: .../hpux_a/ IRIX: .../irix_a/ SOLARIS: .../solaris_a/

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Changing Specifications Tree Setting


This task shows you how to change the specifications tree settings so that the objects in the tree display in an organized manner of your choice. The default display setting for objects in the specifications tree is single-tier, and the objects appear in the order in which they were placed in the document. By changing the Tools -> Options settings they can be organized in two ways, by product and, as an additional step, by application group also. If you do not check the option as described below you will be unable to collapse the specification tree display and it looks as shown below. After you check the Products option the objects will be organized under the Products node and the tree can be collapsed. The Products node is simply an organizational element. After you check the Application Grouping option the objects will be further grouped by type.

1. With your document open, go to Tools -> Options -> Infrastructure -> Product Structure and click the Product Structure tab. Check to activate the Products option. The objects in the specifications tree will be organized under the Products node.

2. To organize the specifications tree in application groups go to Tools -> Options -> Equipment & Systems and click the Display tab.

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Under Specifications Tree, activate the Show application grouping option: Objects in the specifications tree will be organized under type of object. (You can expand the Products node to see the ungrouped elements.)

When working with Design Rules such as Attribute Filters and FunctionPhysicalMapping, or during parts creation, turn on the Relations and Parameters options. 3. Go to Tools -> Options -> Infrastructure -> Product Structure and click the Tree Customization tab. The Specification Tree Order table displays: You can toggle any of the entries from Yes to No and back by clicking in the Activated column.

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Working with ENOVIA


This section discusses some of the set up and customizing processes for ENOVIA. Setup for Enovia Using Catalogs Resources That Must be Placed in ENOVIA

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Setting Up for ENOVIA


This task lists some of the options that need to be set, and steps that need to be taken, before using ENOVIA. In general, you need to do the normal setup procedure when you use ENOVIA. However, there are some processes that are done differently and these are listed in this task. They are explained in more detail elsewhere in this section. 1. Most project resources need to be saved in ENOVIA. The project resource management file needs to be set up so that it is pointing to resources in ENOVIA. 2. Some options need to be set differently. Click Tools - Options to get to the Options dialog box and then: q Select General and the Document tab. In the Linked Document Localization window select ENOVIA LCA and click the UP button. The ENOVIA LCA line should be the first in the list.
q

Select Catalog Editor in the Infrastructure section. Check: Allow family component dynamic resolution in catalog. In the Folder field enter or navigate to the directory where resolved catalog parts will be generated. This only needs to be done before saving a resolved parts catalog in ENOVIA. You can leave the option checked.

3. Catalogs need to be saved in ENOVIA in a certain way. This is discussed elsewhere. 4. Cross document relationships: To ensure that cross document links are properly managed in the ENOVIA environment, you should correctly set the value of the resource "PublicationBasedConnections" in the project resource management file. See Understanding Project Resource Management for more information. Also, in both the CATIA and ENOVIA environments, the following environment variable should be defined: CrossDocLink=1

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Using Catalogs
This task gives an overview of how catalogs must be stored and used in ENOVIA. 1. Catalogs that are stored in ENOVIA must point to parts that are resolved. This means that no design table can be associated with them, and all values must be defined. 2. Only catalogs with descriptions that point to CATPart or CATProduct documents should be stored in ENOVIA. Catalogs with descriptions that point to text files must be kept on disk. Examples are design rules and standards catalogs. 3. The entire master catalog should not be stored as one entity. Users should divide their catalogs so that there are no more than about 500 parts for each catalog. Users should create a separate catalog for each family - gate valve, pipe with bends, etc. This is how the sample catalog provided with this application is organized. This type of organization is not only necessary to conserve memory resources, but is also easier to work with. See Creating Sub-Catalogs to learn how you can do this. Click here to see the list of resources that can be placed in ENOVIA.

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Resources That Must be Placed in ENOVIA


The following resources - identified by discipline below - must be placed in ENOVIA. As of Release 13, resources not mentioned here should not be placed in ENOVIA. HVAC Discipline RESOURCE HVACParts.catalog CATPspHVACLine.catalog HVAC_ANSI.catalog HVAC_ANSI_Equipment.catalog HVAC_ANSI_HVACFunctions.catalog HVAC_ANSI_Offsheets.catalog Diagrams catalog Diagrams catalog Diagrams catalog Diagrams catalog Piping Discipline RESOURCE PipingParts-Resolved.catalog CATPspPipingLine.catalog PID_ANSI.catalog PID_ANSI_Equipment.catalog PID_ANSI_Instruments.catalog PID_ANSI_Offsheets.catalog PID_ANSI_PipingFunctions.catalog PipingSpecifications.catalog PipingSpec_F-Master.catalog Diagrams catalog Diagrams catalog Diagrams catalog Diagrams catalog Diagrams catalog This catalog needs to be regenerated and pushed every time you modify the Piping Parts catalog. This catalog needs to be regenerated and pushed every time you modify the Piping Parts catalog. Equipment Discipline RESOURCE PipingEquipmentAndNozzle-Res.catalog HVACEquipmentAndNozzle.catalog TubingEquipmentAndNozzle-Res.catalog WaveguideEquipmentAndNozzle-Res.catalog ElectricalEquipmentAndComponent.catalog Waveguide.catalog Waveguide_Equipment.catalog Waveguide_WaveguideFunction.catalog 3-D electrical catalog COMMENT COMMENT COMMENT

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Waveguide_Offsheets.catalog Structure Discipline RESOURCE AISC_Resolved.catalog AISC_Bigscale.catalog StructureMaterials.CATMaterial Tubing Discipline RESOURCE TubingParts.catalog CATTubTubingLine.catalog Tubing_SAE.catalog Tubing_SAE_Equipment.catalog Tubing_SAE_Instruments.catalog Tubing_SAE_OnOffSheets.catalog Tubing_SAE_TubingFunction.catalog TubingSpecifications.catalog Diagrams catalog Diagrams catalog Diagrams catalog Diagrams catalog Diagrams catalog This catalog needs to be regenerated and pushed every time you modify the Piping Parts catalog. Waveguide Discipline RESOURCE WaveguideParts.catalog CATPspWaveguideLine.catalog Electrical Discipline RESOURCE Electrical_ANSI.catalog Electrical_ANSI_Equipment.catalog Electrical_ANSI_Offsheets.catalog Electrical_ANSI_PartFunctions.catalog Electrical_Cables.catalog Diagrams catalog Diagrams catalog Diagrams catalog Diagrams catalog Diagrams electrical catalog Hanger Discipline RESOURCE HangerParts.catalog COMMENT COMMENT COMMENT COMMENT COMMENT

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Conduit Discipline RESOURCE ConduitParts.catalog CATCndConduitLine.catalog Raceway Discipline RESOURCE RacewayParts.catalog CATRwyRacewayLine.catalog Other RESOURCE CATMidZone.catalog SpaceReservation.catalog CompartmentAccess-Resolved.catalog COMMENT COMMENT COMMENT

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Workbench Description
The Piping Design workbench has the following toolbars.

General Environment Toolbar

Design Modify Toolbar

Design Create Toolbar

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Build Create Toolbar

Piping Line Management Toolbar

General Design Toolbar

Rename Toolbar

Penetration Management Toolbar

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Design Create Toolbar


The Design Create toolbar contains the following tools.

See Creating a Run See Routing at an Offset of a Routable See Route a Run along a Spline See Route a Run Within a Pathway See Placing a Part on a Run

See Placing a Hole on a Part

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Fabricate Toolbar
The Fabricate toolbar contains the following tools.

See Managing Spools Generate ISO: See Creating an Isometric Drawing from a 3D Document

View ISO: See Creating an Isometric Drawing from a 3D Document

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Build Create Toolbar


The Build Create toolbar contains the following tools.

See Building Piping Parts See Create Connectors See Modify Product Subtype

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Piping Line Management Toolbar


The Piping Line Management toolbar contains the following tools.

See Create a Line ID See Select a Line ID or Query a Line ID See Transfer Members of a Line ID See Rename a Line ID See Delete a Line ID See Merging Line IDs See Import a Line ID

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Design Modify Toolbar


The Design Modify Toolbar contains the following tools.

See Edit Part Parameters See Flipping Elements See Update Part See Changing the Size or Spec of a Part

See Connecting Parts See Disconnecting Parts See Connect a Run See Disconnecting a Run See Creating an Offset Connection Between Segments See Create graphic representations for a part See Display Flow Direction

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General Environment Toolbar


The General Environment Tool Bar contains the following tools:

See Generating Detail Information

See Changing the Current Axis See Using Offset Planes

Advanced Offset Plane See Manipulation Handle Mode

Toggle Dimming Mode

Snap to steps off current axis

Snap to steps off last position

Snap to XY construction plane

Snap to all construction planes Snap to elevation (Z) construction plane

Snap to Drafting elements

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General Design Toolbar


The General Design Toolbar contains the following tools.

Align Toolbar Align Sides: See Aligning Elements Align Center: See Aligning Elements Rotate to Align: See Aligning Elements See Distributing Elements Align Planes: See Aligning Elements

Snap Toolbar See Snap Resources Together Snap Three Points: See Quick Snap Resources Snap Center of Polygon: See Quick Snap Resources Snap Surface: See Quick Snap Resources

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Rename Toolbar
The Rename toolbar contains the following tools.

See Rename an Object

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Glossary A
annotation Used in schematic diagrams to annotate lines and components. Annotations may be entered manually, derived from an attribute, or placed by means of a text template as part of an annotations catalog. Annotation Tag Style. In schematic diagrams; employed when creating a text template. Characteristics of an object, such as length, flow rate, etc. Also referred to as property.

ATS attribute

B
boundary branch branching A two or three dimensional reservation of space, used to separate or define portions of an area. Routed object that is connected to another routed object at a mid-point between nodes. The act of routing from an existing routable. The routing starts at a point between two nodes, not from a node.

C
catalog child closed loop run compass component group A collection of parts and parts component catalog data. There are several types of catalog, such as a specifications catalog, standard catalog. A status defining the genealogical relationship between two objects. A run whose ends are joined to each other. A tool for defining direction. Used in schematic diagrams. Two or more connected components assembled to make up an individual assembly that can be stored and placed from a catalog A mechanism for identifying and organizing Conduit routes and the components placed in them. A line ID. Location on a resource (components, parts, item reservation, etc.) used to attach other resources. Connectors can be created, modified or deleted. A geometric or dimension relation between two elements. The physical shape of an area. The XYZ locations.

conduit line connector

constraint contour coordinates

D
definition The physical characteristics of an element. Changing the definition changes the shape of an element.

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discrete values distribution system document downcomer

Values, usually of an attribute, that are pre-defined. Instead of entering a value you select a value in a drop-down box. An object used for organizing and grouping elements, mainly routables and resources, that distribute some commodity (fluid, air, etc.). The file in which a drawing or a project is created, sometimes also referred to as model. Document is the preferred terminology. The legs of a hanger.

E
element Any of the features contained in a document, such as component, line, etc.

F
fabrication Used in HVAC Design. A contiguous grouping of connected HVAC parts. Analogous to spools in Piping Design or welded assemblies in Tubing Design. A surface on an object, usually item reservation or part. The document in which object classes are defined.

face feature dictionary

G
grab graphic representation A Windows feature for clicking and dragging. A geometric representation of an object. An object may have multiple graphic representations.

H
HVAC line hanger hole A mechanism for identifying and organizing HVAC routes and the components placed in them. A line ID. Supports used for routing cables, pipes, etc. An opening through an object.

I
I & C loop intel_a item reservation Stands for Instrumentation & Control Loop. It is an object used for grouping and organizing instrumentation and control objects. A Windows directory in which this application is stored and executed by default. A two or three dimensional reservation of space, in which one or more objects can be placed.

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L
line ID A mechanism for identifying and organizing routes and components. Conduit, HVAC, Piping, Raceway,Tubing lines and I & C loops are line IDs.

M
master member mirror The controlling object in a relationship. Such a relationship can be created between some objects. Belonging to or part of, as in belonging to a line ID.

N
node nozzle Symbols that mark the end of segments in routables. They can be used to move or manipulate segments. A piece of pipe welded to a piece of equipment or vessel with a flanged end to which a pipe can be connected.

O
object class offset plane An object class is the classification or type of object. A command used to define a reference plane.

P
parent part part types path reservation pathway piping line plane manipulator properties A status defining the genealogical relationship between two objects. The geometric representation of a 3D object. Object classes. A two or three dimensional reservation of space, in which assembly lines, conveyor belts, etc., can later be created. Path reservation. A mechanism for identifying and organizing piping routes and the components placed in them. A line ID. A geometric tool to change the orientation, alignment, plane and location of a plane that is to be created. Characteristics of an object, such as length, flow rate, etc. Also referred to as attribute.

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R
raceway line reference plane routable run A mechanism for identifying and organizing raceway routes and the components placed in them. A line ID. A plane that has been defined as an aid to performing certain functions, such measuring distance. Anything that can be routed, typically: run, path reservation and boundary. A two or three dimensional reservation of space, in which pipes and parts can later be placed.

S
scaling set point An operation that resizes features to a percentage of their initial sizes. The alignment point for a routable, such as run or path reservation, for which a section is defined. The set point determines, for example, whether the routing line drawn for a boundary represents the bottom left, bottom right, or bottom center of the boundary. There are three possible set points for a boundary and nine possible set points for a path reservation and run. The following object in a relationship. Such a relationship can be created between some objects. Join, as in snap together. Also snap to a grid, in which the position of an object is automatically adjusted to a grid. A two or three dimensional reservation of space, in which equipment, pipes and parts can later be placed. A graphic display of the organizational structure of all elements in a document. A grouping of objects. All objects in a spool must be contiguous and connected to each other. A collection of specifications. A location on a routable used as a reference point for routing when the centerline is not used. It is also used in placing parts. The support line is defined by the set point (see above). A mechanism for organizing and grouping elements, mainly routables and resources.

slave snap space reservation specifications tree spool standard support line

system

T
tubing line turn angle A mechanism for identifying and organizing tubing routes and the components placed in them. A line ID. The angle formed between two lines.

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waveguide line welded assembly

A mechanism for identifying and organizing waveguide routes and the components placed in them. A line ID. Used in Tubing Design. A contiguous grouping of connected tubing parts. Analogous to spools in Piping Design and fabrication in HVAC Design.

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Index
A
activate parent add new nominal size AIX, sample data analyze related objects attribute filter attributes adding to a standard adding to general design rules associating to a connector creating generic attributes, computed auto parts convert query axis changing the current

B
bendables design checks extracting data bolt BOM report branching a run building parts, requirements

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C
cache mode CATCache directory location make wireframe geometry visible catalog creating creating sub-catalogs modifying specifications terminology catalogs updating line IDs catalogs in ENOVIA CATDUA V5 change axis and snap compass changing the size or spec of a part checks checking a document importing from Knowledgeware open a sample document clash detection class and attribute, user defined closed loop routable command Activate Products Parent Adjust Run Extremity Align Center Align Side Align Two Planes Analyze Item Build Connectors Build New Unique Reference

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Build Piping Part Clash Detection (Off) Clash Detection (On) Clash Detection (Stop) Connect Parts Create an Offset Route Create an Offset Segment Connection Create Line ID Create Spool Delete Line ID Disconnect Parts Distribute Force Update Generate ISO Import Line ID Manage Graphic Representations Merge Line ID Move/Rotate Part on the Run Penetration Management Place Equipment/Part from schematic Place Hole Place New Part Under Active Parent Place Piping Part Query Auto Parts Quick Translate Rename Line ID Resize/Respec Part Rotate to Align Route a Run Route a Run from schematic Select/Query Line ID Set Object Type

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Show/Hide Connector Snap Snap Center of Polygon Snap Surface Snap Three Points Transfer Elements Transfer Line ID Transfer Run Update Part Validate Run Turns View ISO Drawing compass routing in 3D with computed attributes add to object name displaying in Edit - Properties dialogs Piping Connector Attributes file connectors associate attributes creating duplicating manipulating with compass modify on reference part modifying or deleting plane manipulator show/hide create new unique reference create resolved parts using batch creating a catalog creating light objects creating reports

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cross document connection custom reports customizing settings

D
datum point defining plane design rules importing from Knowledgeware Knowledgeware open a sample document Overview dictionary, Knowledgeware display connectors display values documents saving drawing production creating symbols generate drawing settings drawing, 3-D to 2-D Ductulator

E
edit properties of an object electrical part connector elements aligning

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distributing transfer end styles ENOVIA setup Enovia create a product importing poduct organizing work packages save operation saving work package Enovia directory structure ENOVIA, customizing ENOVIA, user tasks exception, schematic driven design extremity adjusting the

F
feature dictionary comparing NLS name for class, attribute open file without CATfct Filter Attributes filter for Line ID filter shown properties flip flow direction change display force update functional physical classes

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map

G
generate drawing generate resolved parts/sections generative view style generic attribute graphic representations defining manage grid step setup

H
hole modifying placing on part querying properties HPUX, sample data

I
insert report in drawing IRIX, sample data ISOGen setup, options isometric drawing create mapping tables setup

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K
Knowledgeware checking a document importing checks opening sample document using packages Knowledgeware checks

L
Line ID attribute filter file/entry changing size/spec of parts in creating customizing deleting displaying properties filter attributes filter/select importing merge modifying the properties of querying renaming select/filter transfer members updating catalog line thickness

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M
macro creating a shortcut for manage publications mapping functional physical classes migrating V4 models directory structure modifying a hole move/rotate in-line parts moving document multi-CAD document defining plane for connector

N
network analyze analyze for connections changing size/spec of parts in node edit table nodes deleting display coordinates of moving opening a closed run nozzle connector

O
object auto-route between edit or display properties of filter properties of

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query for connections renaming object class managing object naming rules add computed attribute objects search for offset connection create between segments offset planes open file without CATfct options defining naming rules Options settings options settings Options, settings

P
packages, Knowledgeware parent-child relationship parts adding nominal size assigning values connecting create create graphic representation create resolved parts using batch creating light object define properties define type

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disconnecting exporting V4 to V5 flip inserting modifying connector on reference move in-line parts multi-place override parameters parametric to resolved place under active parent place using schematic placing requirements for building rotate in-line parts rotating values assigned pathways route within a penetration management penetrations add object associate creating cutout sketch query for setup piping lines Comparator exporting V4 to V5 plane manipulator preview parts product parent project registration model exporting

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project resource management Access field alias, using checking errors file Location field organizing resources resource list selecting project Type field Visible properties change display order edit or display filtering internal names publication based connections in PRM publications manage publish connectors

Q
query a Line ID query for penetrations Quick Snap

R
rename Line ID

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objects report bolt BOM define a query define format format generate generating from macro insert in drawing query recommended toolbar shortcut reservation routing from resolve parts/sections resource Quick Snap rotate using definition panel snap and rotate snap together resource description resource map resources controlled by PRM create parent-child relationship guide to routable display information about fixing broken route at an offset of routing from end of routing align to surface along a spline

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at a slope at an offset of routable auto-route edgeline edgeline to offset plane from item reservation in 3D modes parallel to a run run section parameters using a schematic within pathway rules tables design tables modifying run changing a section changing angle of segment close creating modifying move or adjust extremity open single or double display transfer transitional objects turn radius error using definition dialog box

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sample data finding on various platforms save documents schematic design schematic driven design analyze associate objects create an Exception place parts routing search command sections parametric to resolved segment fit for parts assembly segments align adjacent create an offset connection between make parallel to compass base plane make parallel to offset plane make parallel to Z axis position relative to a plane selecting a Line ID setup, application show/hide connectors Solaris, sample data specifications creating a catalog specifications catalog adding specifications default rules spool add/remove members

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changing size/spec of parts in create in new document creating deleting modify properties renaming select/query transfer standards adding an attribute creating and modifying stretchable, length attribute

T
toggle manipulator handle mode toolbars Build Create Design Create Design Modify Fabricate General Design General Environment Piping Line Management Rename transfer elements transfer run transferring document transitional objects turn errors turn radius, invalid

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U
unique reference update connections update part button updating lines catalog

V
V4 migration migrating model V4 to V5 Integration attribute filter file setup data V4 to V5 integration comparing outputs export parts from V4 model exporting catalog parts exporting piping lines exporting standards data exporting tables exporting V4 classes exporting V5 dictionary import XML importing parts form software migrating the model values assigning to parts viewing related objects

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W
work package connections cross document connection manage publications workbench description entering the