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BUSINESS, 9B
A NEWS:
Obituaries 2A, 6A
Local 3A
INSIDE
Nation &World 4A
Editorials 9A
Weather 10A
B SPORTS: 1B
B BUSINESS: 9B
Stocks: 9B
C LIFE: 1C
Birthdays: 3C
Television: 4C
Movies: 4C
Puzzles: 5C
D CLASSIFIED: 1D
Comics 8d
How you can go
and chalk it up.
LIFE, 1C
Suspect named in Grant St. homicide
Edward Lewis
elewis@timesleader.com
WILKES-BARRE A 19-year-old
man police identied Wednesday as the
suspect in the deadly shooting Sunday
morning was free on bail when he
attempted to kill another man earlier
this year.
Police obtained an arrest warrant for
Joshua Carlos Ovalles, of Kent Lane,
Wilkes-Barre, charging him in the slay-
ing of Vaughn Kemp, 24, outside 174
S. Grant St. Ovalles was still at large
Wednesday night.
Witnesses told police Ovalles and
Kemp were arguing in front of the house
when Ovalles red several rounds,
according to the criminal complaint.
An autopsy revealed Kemp died from
multiple gunshot wounds. He became
the sixth homicide victim within the
city limits this year.
In another development Wednesday,
the city condemned the Grant Street res-
idence for a cockroach infestation under
the health code. The residents were
forced to leave, and it will not reopen
Joshua Carlos Ovalles, already
a suspect in a January shooting,
charged in death of Vaughn Kemp.
Aimee dilger | The Times Leader
The city has condemned 174 S. Grant St. as unfit for human habita-
tion.
Edward Lewis | The Times Leader
West Pittston police are seen outside a house on Liberty Street where two
people were arrested by federal agents on Wednesday.
Edward Lewis
elewis@timesleader.com
WEST PITTSTON
Federal agents with the
Department of Homeland
Security arrested two people
Wednesday on charges they
were distributing synthetic
designer drugs known as bath
salts.
Todd A. Morgans, 34, and
Christa Lee Policare, 20, were
arrested when agents raided
their house at 217 Liberty St.
early Wednesday morning.
Morgans and Policare were
indicted by a federal grand
jury Tuesday on conspiracy
to distribute a controlled sub-
stance, notably bath salts. The
indictment became unsealed
on Wednesday.
Neighbors in the residen-
tial neighborhood reported
hearing two gunshots when
agents forced their way inside
the two story house that had
a Confederate ag hanging on
the front porch and security
cameras mounted near the
front door, a front window and
rear door.
Two dogs were shot and
killed. The animals were taken
away by the SPCA of Luzerne
County.
I saw a bunch of cops pull
up and jump out of the car,
said neighbor Bruce Tobin. I
looked down the street and we
heard them bust in the door
and the next thing you heard
were gunshots, two gunshots.
We didnt know any of this
was going on in our neighbor-
hood. Its a shame, there are a
lot of kids in this area.
A 13-year-old girl was also
removed from the house,
neighbors said.
Joe Biscotto of Liberty
Street said he has complained
about the house for more than
a year. He said people would
cause disturbances at all hours
of the night, including barking
like animals and yelling.
There has been all types of
activity where the drug bust
happened, Biscotto said.
People acting crazy, people
Police raid W. Pittston home, arrest 2 on bath salts charges
Two dogs were shot and killed as authorities stormed the residence
See BATH SALTS | 10A
See HOMICIDE | 10A
Pete G. Wilcox | The Times Leader
Rose Yanko of Wilkes-Barre holds a sign above her head as uninsured Pennsylvanians protest out-
side state Rep. Tarah Toohils office in Hazleton on Wednesday. Demonstrators were angry Toohil
supported stripping Medicaid expansion language from a welfare-related bill last week.
Bill OBoyle
boboyle@timesleader.com
MOUNTAIN TOP
Charles Ferner calls his
son a real hero.
Ferner, of Mountain
Top, said his son,
retired Lt. Col.
Timothy Ferner,
reported a multi-
mi l l i on- dol l a r
fraud case, blow-
ing the whistle
on an improper
deal that was
condoned by his
superiors.
The law rm that rep-
resented him James,
Hoyer, Newcomer &
Smiljanich, P.A., of
Tampa, Fla. said Ferner
bucked the chain of com-
mand putting his career
on the line to expose the
fraud, waste and abuse.
According to the law
rm, major defense contrac-
tor Science Applications
International Corporation
agreed to pay the U.S.
government $5.75 million
to settle allegations that it
circumvented the bidding
process and induced the
Air Force to award
the company lucra-
tive contracts.
Ferner, 49, a
career military man
with 27 years in the
U.S. Air Force, led
the whistle blower
suit in 2010.
Ferner gradu-
ated from Scranton
Prep High School and
attended The University
of Scranton before n-
ishing his degree at the
University of California
at Irvine. He is the son
of Charles and the late
Beverly McCarthy Ferner
of Mountain Top.
Ex-Mountain Top man
blows whistle on
military fraud case
Ferner
See FRAUD | 10A
Jennifer Learn-Andes
jandes@timesleader.com
Daniel Chipego worked
as Luzerne County deputy
controller for only three
months this year but will
still receive a county pen-
sion because of a pension
law anomaly.
The amount is so minus-
cule $1.50 a month
county retirement board
members plan to propose
a lump-sum payout to get
him off the pension rolls.
It would probably cost
us more per month to do
the check, board mem-
ber John Evanchick, a
deputy sheriff, said dur-
ing Wednesdays meeting.
The pension must be
offered because Chipego
is 63, and state pen-
sion law says employees
are eligible for pension
once they reach age 60,
regardless of how long
theyve worked for the
county, said county retire-
ment coordinator Rick
Hummer.
County ofcials were
surprised to learn about
the loophole last year
when Thomas Cooney
received a $71 monthly
pension after two years
as a county commis-
sioner. Former sheriff
John Gilliam, also a two-
year employee, received
a monthly pension in the
same amount.
Typically, employees
must have ve years of
county employment to
be vested, or eligible, to
receive a pension.
A$1.50
a month
pension?
County examines laws quirks
See PENSION | 10A
Toohil
Steve Mocarsky
smocarsky@timesleader.com
HAZLETON About a dozen area residents
marched into state Rep. Tarah Toohils district ofce
Wednesday to ask why she voted against Medicaid
expansion in Pennsylvania.
They didnt get answers because Toohil wasnt
there, but they left questions and concerns with
staffers, who promised Toohil would get back to
them.
RoseYanko of Wilkes-Barre said she has been
a licensed practical nurse for nearly 20 years and
couldnt afford health insurance while she was work-
ing. Now, she has liver disease and has been putting
off a biopsy for four years because
she cant afford to pay for one.
Im a single mother with two
daughters who just graduated col-
lege. Im the only parent that they
have, and I want to live. I dont want
liver cancer. I want something to be
done, and there are 700,000 other
people (in Pennsylvania) who need
coverage beside myself, Yanko said.
Yanko said Toohil ipped the
script on health care, breaking promises she made
during campaigns. She and other demonstrators
said they came out after learning Toohil, R-Butler
Township, spoke on the House oor last week, advo-
cating that language authorizing Medicaid expan-
sion be stripped from a welfare-related bill that had
bipartisan approval in the Senate, which the House
Rules Committee did.
Brian Symone, an employee at Schuylkill Medical
Center, said his employer and other safety net hos-
pitals, which he said are required to treat everyone,
with or without insurance, would be out of business
in a matter of years without Medicaid expansion and
if cuts to Medicaid continue.
Alex Mclean of Hazleton said he works in a
health care facility and cant afford company health
care insurance premiums. Now I have to decide
whether Im going to continue working in a profes-
sion I enjoy or end up going to a better paying job
that will also offer me the insurance that I desperate-
ly need due to a shoulder injury that I got at work.
Toohil said in a phone interview later Wednesday
that she is not necessarily opposed to Medicaid
Demonstrators questionToohils
take on Medicaid expansion
See MEDICAID | 10A
PAGE 2A THURSDAY, JULY 11, 2013 NEWS www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER
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OBITUARIES
Charneski, Mary Ann
Ferack, Michalene
Gimble, Elizabeth
Goldstein, Evelyn
Jayne, Catherine
OHara, Ann Marie
Pegarella, Teresa
Salansky, Stephen
Skovira, Anne
Wilk, Mary
Zurilla, Nickolas
Pages 2A, 6A
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Issue No. 2013-170 2013-192
CORRECTION
A STORY IN
WEDNESDAYS Page
3A BRIEFS misstated
where an alleged drug
transaction took place
Tuesday. The brief
should have said the
incident that led to the
arrest of six people
took place outside
not inside Schiels
Market on Hanover
Street.
A HEADLINE ON
A PHOTO CAPTION
that ran on Page 4C
Saturday needs to be
corrected. The head-
line should have read,
Polish American
Congress holds
Holocaust memorial.
More OBITUARIES | 6A
MARYANN CHARNESKI
July 9, 2013
Mary Ann Charneski,
70, passed away on
Tuesday, July 9, 2013,
at the Wilkes-Barre
General Hospital.
She was born in
Wilkes-Barre on June 20,
1943, a daughter of the
late Francis and Mary
Chupka Bielecki. Mary
Ann was a graduate of
Meyers High School,
class of 1961.
She hadbeenemployed
by the American Cigar
Company and later at
Kmart, prior to her
retirement in 1998.
She was a member of
St. Andrews Parish in
Wilkes-Barre.
Mary Ann was a lov-
ing and devoted wife,
mother, grandmother
and sister. She cherished
her grandsons.
Surviving are her hus-
band of 45 years, Leon
C. Charneski; children,
Lee Ann Shaver and her
husband, Brian, Wilkes-
Barre Township, John
Charneski and his wife,
Bernadette, Larksville,
and Diane Rokosz and
her husband, John,
Plymouth; grandsons,
Jonathan, Jacob and
Noah Rokosz; brothers,
Frank Bielecki and his
wife, Sylvia, Sheatown,
Peter Bielecki and his
wife, Peggy, Wilkes-
Barre, James Bielecki,
Las Vegas, Nev.; sis-
ter, Theresa Bielecki,
Sheatown; nieces and
nephews.
Funeral services will
be held 9 a.m. Saturday
at Nat & Gawlas Funeral
Home, 89 Park Ave.,
Wilkes-Barre, with
a Mass of Christian
Burial at 9:30 a.m. in
St. Andrews Parish,
316 Parrish St., Wilkes-
Barre. Interment will be
in St. Marys Cemetery,
Hanover Township.
Friends may call 5 to 8
p.m. Friday at the funer-
al home.
In lieu of owers,
memorial donations
may be made to Good
Shepherd Academy,
316 N. Maple Ave.,
Kingston, PA 18704; or
to St. Andrews Parish,
316 Parrish St., Wilkes-
Barre, PA 18702.
Online condolences
may be made by visiting
Mary Anns obituary at
www. nat andgawl asf u-
neralhome.com.
Mary Elizabeth
(Jackson) Wilk, 90, of
Avoca, passed away
Tuesday, July 9, 2013,
at the Commonwealth
Hospice, Regional
Hospital, Scranton.
She was born in
Avoca on Oct. 10,
1922, a daughter of the
late Henry and Julia
Jackson.
Mary was a member of
Queen of the Apostles
Parish (Ss. Peter and
Paul Church), Avoca.
She attended St. Marys
Parochial School and
was a graduate of
Duryea High School.
She retired after
40 years of employ-
ment from the Old
Forge Lamp and Shade
Factory, Old Forge.
After retirement, Mary
enjoyed reading books
and loved to be with
her family and friends,
especially with her
beloved dog, Walter.
In addition to her
parents, she was pre-
ceded in death by her
husband, Frank Wilk,
who died in 1977; her
daughter, Mary Wilk
Houston; and sisters,
Betty Nixon, Theresa
Williams and Gert
James.
She is survived by
her son, Frank and his
wife, Donna, Glendale;
her brother, John and
his wife, Barbara,
Maryland; her son-
in-law, Earl Houston,
Avoca; grandchildren,
Brian Houston and
his wife, Jennifer, and
Francis Paul Wilk;
gre at - gra ndc hi l dre n,
Abigail, Zachary and
Benj amin Houston;
many nieces and neph-
ews.
Funeral services will
be 9:30 a.m. Saturday
at Kiesinger Funeral
Services Inc., with
a Mass of Christian
Burial at 10 a.m. in
Queen of the Apostles
Church, Hawthorne
Street, Avoca. Father
Phillip Sladicka will
officiate. Friends may
call 8:30 a.m. until ser-
vices. Interment will be
at Ss. Peter and Paul
Cemetery, Avoca.
Online condolences
may be made to www.
k i e s i nge r f u ne r a l s e r-
vices.com.
MARY ELIZABETH
(JACKSON) WILK
July 9, 2013
Jerry Lynott
jlynott@timesleader.com
WILKES-BARRE TWP.
The board overseeing the opera-
tions of the Mohegan Sun Arena
at Casey Plaza approved insur-
ance coverage for the installation
of a new roof and for liability pro-
tection for itself.
The continuation of an existing
policy and the addition of a new
one were voted on Wednesday at
the regular monthly meeting of
the Luzerne County Convention
Center Authority.
The premium for Directors
& Ofcers insurance coverage
increased to $7,780 up $112 from
last year through carrier State
National. It provides $3 million in
aggregate coverage and a $2,500
deductible. It also provides
employment practices liability
insurance against wrongful termi-
nation, discrimination and sexual
harassment claims by employees.
Joe Joyce of Joyce Insurance
Group, Pittston, the agent han-
dling the policy, told the board
its very difcult to nd higher
limits of coverage. He said the
policy is very good with unlimit-
ed defense costs. Sometimes the
defense costs can be more than
the award, Joyce said.
If a claim resulted in a verdict
with an award of $1 million and
$2 million in defense costs, the
policy picks up both costs, he
explained.
The board approved the addi-
tion of a builders risk insurance
policy through its carrier Chubb
for $1.5 millionincoverage for the
installation of the roof. The board
last week awarded the contract
to low-bidder Dunmore Roong
for the $1.2 million job.
The boards construction com-
mittee was designated to approve
change orders on an emergency
basis for the project.
Other components of the
arena that opened in 1999 will
be inspected at a total cost
of $42,000. High Concrete of
Denver submitted a quote of
$19,980 to inspect the pre-cast
concrete throughout the build-
ing. Premium Builders of Wilkes-
Barre offered quotes of $6,300
for the windows and casings and
$11,220 for the exterior metal
panels. Quad 3 Group of Wilkes-
Barre will participate in the
inspections.
Rebecca Bonnevier, general
manager of the arena for SMG,
said the facilitys ranking moved
up further in the top 10 of Mid-
Year Top Stops by Venues Today.
The ranking was amended to
ninth place on the list from 10th
for venues with seating capacity
between 5,000 and 10,000. The
rankings were determined from
total gross dollars for events held
between Oct. 16, 2012 to May 15
of this year.
Arena board OKs insurance for newroof
Roger DuPuis
rdupuis@timesleader.com
WILKES-BARRE Not all who serve
our country wear a uniform.
When the 68th annual Wyoming Valley
Veterans Day Parade steps off at Kingston
Corners on Nov. 10, its theme will be
honoring those who have served in the
nations armed forces, as well as members
of their families who provided love and
support on the home front.
The U.S. Navy will be the host branch
for this years event.
Retired Navy Lt. Cmdr. Susan Allen, a
Dallas resident, recalled how her husband
cared for their two small children during
her deployments.
I know that when I was away, he han-
dled everything, said Allen, who retired
in 2008 and is serving as chairwoman of
this years parade committee.
Cmdr. Albert C. Seeman lives in Plains
Township, and has served as commanding
ofcer of the Navy Operational Support
Center in Avoca since May 2012. His wife
and two children, ages 6 and 8, are back in
the Washington, D.C., area, where Seeman
knows the challenges of family life can be
difcult to bear when he is not there.
His children were toddlers when
he was deployed overseas in Iraq and
Afghanistan. Now, although he may not
be as far away, the demands on both par-
ents are more intense as their children are
older and sometimes, more in need of
guidance and discipline.
It can be difcult, trying to be a father
from 260 miles away, Seeman said. Im
trying to be the dad over the phone.
Such struggles, common to military
families throughout history, are the reason
kith and kin of service personnel will be
honored at this Novembers parade.
Gathered to discuss the annual event
Wednesday, Allen, Seeman and retired
Capt. Robert Ambrose, of Mountain Top
said one of the things they appreciate
about the region is how appreciative the
community is of its veterans, whether
serving or retired.
Allen, herself a self-described Navy
brat who spent many years in Bucks
County, believes the states strong tra-
dition of military service may explain
that: she recently heard a statistic that
during World War II, one out of every
17 Americans in uniform was from
Pennsylvania.
In D.C., you cant shake a stick with-
out hitting someone in uniform, Seeman
joked. Here, if you go to the gas station in
uniform, people want to talk with you, ask
about your service.
Anyone who wants to support this years
parade may call Staff Sgt. Christopher
Keen at 288-6641, or visit the committees
Facebook page.
Veterans Day Parade to honor service members families
WILKES-BARRE A
Luzerne County judge on
Monday reduced the bail
amount of a Wyoming man
who is accused of setting
re to his own apartment.
Judge Fred Pierantoni
reduced Kennith Searfoss
bail from $50,000 to $5,000
after a request by Searfoss
attorney, and noted that
Searfoss must reside with
his mother if 10 percent of
his bail is posted.
Searfoss, 28, was charged
in January after a neighbor
reported seeing Searfoss
in his apartment banging
something on the wall. The
woman then said she saw
Searfoss leave and noticed
black smoke before calling
911.
A re marshal deter-
mined the re was incen-
diary and started in two
separate locations inside the
apartment in the kitchen
and living room.
Searfoss allegedly told
police he started the re
because he wanted to com-
mit suicide.
Searfoss attorney made
the request to reduce her
clients bail because an
application to the countys
drug treatment court pro-
gram is currently being
considered.
WILKES-BARRE A
city man who assaulted his
roommate and chased him
with a knife in December
was sentenced Tuesday in
Luzerne County Court to
27 days time served to one
year in prison.
Marcello Rosado, 29,
of Hughes Street, was
sentenced on two counts
of simple assault. Rosado
pleaded guilty to the charg-
es in June.
According to court
papers, on Dec. 12 a man
reported Rosado assaulted
him and his wife and then
chased him about two city
blocks while yelling, Im
going to kill you. Police
said Rosado believed his
roommate had punctured a
bicycle tire.
Luzerne County Judge
Lesa Gelb said Rosado must
pay $2,770 in medical bills
and is to have no contact
with the man and woman.
WILKES-BARRE A
woman who was under
the inuence of bath salts
and believed people were
living in the walls of her
apartment, was sentenced
Monday to 30 to 60 months
in state prison.
Luzerne County Judge
William Amesbury sen-
tenced Amber Sutton, 28,
with a last known address
of Luzerne Avenue, West
Pittston, on charges of
endangering the welfare
of children and criminal
mischief.
Sutton also received two
years probation. She previ-
ously pleaded guilty to the
charges.
According to court
papers, police said Robert
Hospodar and his girlfriend,
Sutton, were using bath
salts and were plunging
knives in walls, believing
there were 90 people living
inside the walls of their
apartment on Luzerne
Avenue on March 18, 2011,
according to the criminal
complaint.
A 5-year-old girl was
inside the residence at the
time, police said.
Hospodar was sentenced
in May 2012 to to nine to
23 months in the county
prison on a child endanger-
ment charge. Hospodar
pleaded guilty to the charge.
WILKES-BARRE A
Hunlock Township man
serving a six-to-12-year pris-
on sentence for assaulting
and injuring a 1-month-old
boy has appealed his case to
the state Superior Court.
Kevin Lee Getz, 26, of
White Oak Drive, led the
appeal through his attorney,
Matthew Comerford.
Luzerne County Judge
David Lupas sentenced
Getz in February on charges
of aggravated assault,
simple assault, endangering
the welfare of children and
COURT BRIEFS
reckless endangerment.
Getz pleaded guilty to the
charges in December.
State police at Wyoming
and Edwardsville police
said Getz injured the infant
in August 2011 when he
lived on Herman Street,
Edwardsville. The boy
suffered broken bones and
was treated at Geisinger
Medical Center in Danville,
according to the criminal
complaint.
WILKES-BARRE A
Luzerne County judge on
Wednesday scheduled a
hearing date for next week
on a request by a city man
to be released on nominal
bail on charged he robbed a
clerk at the R/C Movies 14.
Sean Patrick Flavin, 34,
led the request through
his attorney, Thomas
Cometa, arguing Flavin
should be released on
nominal bail because it has
been more than 180 days
since he was charged and
he has not been brought to
trial yet. State law permits
the request.
Flavin is scheduled to
stand trial in September.
On Aug. 19, city police
allege Flavin was armed
with a handgun and threat-
ened Colin Henry as Henry
left the ticket ofce at the
theater.
Judge Fred Pierantoni
scheduled a bail hearing
date for July 19.
Sewer line repairs, freworks among concerns at Luzerne meeting
B. Garret Rogan
Times Leader Correspondent
LUZERNE - Borough council
discussed sewer repairs and re-
works enforcement regulations
during Wednesday nights regu-
lar council meeting.
Three sections of municipal
sewer line were identied as
being in urgent need of repair.
Estimates for the work to be
done to storm water lines on
Bennett, Miller and Walnut
streets place costs at more than
$12,000.
While that amount is less
than the minimum $18,500 that
would prompt the work to be
bid out to contractors, it does
impose a signicant nancial
burden on the borough.
Citing that concern among
others, council and Luzerne
Borough Sewer Authority
member Bill Turcan cited his
belief that the authority should
assume maintenance responsi-
bilities for all of the boroughs
sewer lines. Turcan explained
that it is only currently respon-
sible for all of the sanitary
sewer lines and roughly half of
the storm water lines.
Turcan went on to explain that
the matter has repeatedly come
up at authority meetings but has
never been held up for a vote.
While he does intend to force a
vote on the matter at the next
meeting, he refused to speculate
on the outcome.
In other matters, a heated
exchange between residents on
what reworks are illegal within
the borough and the manner in
which police should respond to
themled to council member Kurt
Santayanas suggestions that the
boroughs reworks ordinance
be eliminated.
The boroughs current ordi-
nance prohibits essentially all
reworks, including such mun-
dane items as sparklers and caps.
Santayana stated his prefer-
ence to have borough police be
directed to enforce state law
forbidding the use of large-scale
reworks without a permit. His
motion failed to garner a second
and no vote was held.
Councils next regular meet-
ing is scheduled for Aug. 14
at 7 p.m.
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER THURSDAY, JULY 11, 2013 PAGE 3A
NANTICOKE The
Greater Nanticoke Area
School Board voted unani-
mously Wednesday to restore
physical education, library ser-
vices, music and art classes in
elementary grades, to resume
an old practice of contribut-
ing $5,000 annually to the
Mill Memorial Library, and to
revise the dress code to allow
jeans and collarless shirts as
long as they are clean.
During a special meeting
the board also voted to con-
tract cafeteria services out for
the rst time in the districts
history, hiring Metz Culinary
Management, one of two
companies that handle most
cafeteria contracts in Luzerne
County school districts.
This is like a new begin-
ning for the district, board
member Tony Prushinski said
of the decision to bring back
programs cut two years ago
after the state slashed public
education funding under Gov.
Tom Corbett.
Prushinski said the educa-
tion committee, which he
chairs, had pushed for the
restorations and gured most
of the cost can be covered the
rst year at least by savings
realized when the district
brought two classes in-house
that were being handled con-
tractually by the Luzerne
Intermediate Unit. The LIU
provides a variety of services
to area districts, primarily spe-
cial education.
We saved between
$250,000 and $300,000,
Prushinski said, which should
cover 90 percent or more
of the cost of bringing back
three workers furloughed two
years ago: physical education
teacher Eric Speece, music
teacher Ellen Rutkowski, and
part-time library aide Monica
Kochanski. Any additional
cost can be covered using
money from the district fund
balance, a reserve built up over
years that currently stands at
about $7 million.
The board also voted to post
for three positions, another
physical education teacher, an
English as Second Language
teacher, and a high school
assistant principal. Prushinski
said the ESL teacher is need-
ed because a current teacher,
Michelle Kordeck, will switch
to the elementary art position
and will have to be replaced.
Superintendent Tony
Perrone said contracting Metz
wont cost the district money
because the company guar-
anteed a minimum $100,000
prot from cafeteria sales. He
also noted the workers remain
under district control.
Long-time board watchdog
Hank Marks questioned the
wisdom of restoring the pro-
grams when the district still
has $22 million in debt from
massive construction and
renovation projects done years
ago, but both Prushinski and
board President Ryan Verazin
defended the decision.
This is personal for me,
Verazin said. Im not going to
deprive kids in this district.
My fear was that we would
have a child come to kinder-
garten and they would have no
art or music until sixth or sev-
enth grade, Prushinski said.
Perrone said the board
decided to loosen the dress
code because of the high per-
centage of low-income student
enrollment. Some of these
families have jeans and cant
afford anything else, Perrone
said, stressing the clothes still
had to be neat and clean.
DUPONT
Local connection to
Hotshots ceremony
A former Dupont man participated
in the honor guard for one of the
Arizona reghters killed last month
while battling a wildre.
Len Lojewski said his son, Eric, 37,
a San Bernardino County forest re-
ghter, drove a vehicle in the proces-
sion Wednesday carrying Christopher
MacKenzie to Hemet, Calif., where he
grew up. Lojewski said his son sent a
text message to inform him about his
involvement in the ceremony.
Lojewski, of Dupont, said his
son had worked with 30-year-old
MacKenzie who was one of the 19
Granite Mountain Hotshots killed on
June 30 battling the Yarnell Hill re.
HARRISBURG
College tuition costs
going up once again
Tuition is going up this fall at the
states 14 public universities.
Ofcials said it will cost $194 more
per year to attend schools in the
Pennsylvania State System of Higher
Education. Thats up 3 percent from
last year.
The annual cost of tuition for in-
state residents now totals $6,622.
Rates are also going up for non-resi-
dent and graduate students.
About 115,000 students attend the
schools, and about 90 percent are from
Pennsylvania. The system is receiving
nearly $413 million in state aid, the
same amount as last year. Ofcials say
that covers about one-quarter of the
institutions operating costs.
HARRISBURG
New state law funds
anti-gang crime unit
A bipartisan group of senators high-
lighted the inclusion of $2.5 million
in the state budget to create a new
Mobile Street Crimes
Unit in the Attorney
Generals Ofce to
ght gang activity
across Pennsylvania.
The ve senators
Majority Leader
Dominic Pileggi, and
Sens. John Rafferty,
Ted Erickson, Lisa
Baker, R-Lehman Township, and John
Yudichak, D-Plymouth Township
collaborated to pass legislation, now
Act 200 of 2012, making it a crime
to recruit criminal gang members
and toughening sentences for various
crimes committed by street gangs.
Act 200 added Pennsylvania to a list
of more than two dozen states which
have anti-gang recruitment laws. The
senators said funding the new Mobile
Street Crimes Unit is part of an ongo-
ing effort to crack down on gang activ-
ity in Pennsylvania.
Our job as state legislators is to
make sure that law enforcement has
the tools and resources needed to ght
the scourge of gang activity across the
commonwealth, Baker said. Gangs
are often on the move, so the Mobile
Street Crimes Unit allows them to
strike back wherever the need arises,
providing an indispensable weapon for
protecting our communities.
WILKES-BARRE
Private hearing for
murder suspects
Attorneys for two half-brothers
charged in the shooting deaths of
three people in Plymouth last summer
appeared in Luzerne County Court
Wednesday for a private hearing with a
judge regarding expert fees and associ-
ated costs in their clients case.
Attorneys for Sawud Davis, 16,
and Shawn Hamilton, 19, both
of Nanticoke and formerly of
Philadelphia, had requested an in cam-
era hearing a private hearing held
with defense attorneys and a judge
to discuss the costs.
According to prosecutors, Davis
was in a Plymouth apartment dur-
ing an alleged drug transaction and
pulled out a .40-caliber pistol. He red
multiple rounds, said prosecutors, kill-
ing Bradley Swartwood, 21, Nicholas
Maldonado, 17, both of Plymouth, and
Lisa Abaunza, 15, of Duryea, and injur-
ing 19-year-old Daniel Maldonado.
At a preliminary hearing in October,
Hamilton said he was the lone gun-
man, not his half-brother. Both
Hamilton and Davis are formerly of
Philadelphia and had been residing on
East Ridge Street in Nanticoke. Davis
attorney has made a request to have
his case transferred to juvenile court
and Hamilton face the death penalty if
convicted of rst-degree murder.
GNArestores trimmed programs
Physical education,
library services,
music and art classes
will be back this fall
Mark Guydish
mguydish@timesleader.com
WILKES-BARRE Crime is not solely a city
problem.
If anyone at Wednesdays Luzerne County Crime
Watch Coalition meeting needed such a reminder,
members of Sweet Valleys neighborhood watch
organization, formed in October, gave testament
to the fact.
We saw an increase in vagrancy, said Mickey
Donaghey, a resident of the rural community
who joined about 50 people from across Luzerne
County at the county Emergency Management
building to discuss grassroots anti-crime efforts.
We saw a lot of juveniles on the streets with no
adult supervision, vandalism, quads on the high-
ways, added fellow member Tom Becker.
Were trying to protect our little slice of heav-
en, Donaghey added.
The good news? Donaghey and Becker said they
believe the groups efforts have borne fruit in the
form of less crime and improved presence by state
police who patrol their area.
The bad news? They and other civic-minded par-
ticipants know they will have to maintain constant
vigilance and to have faith that their efforts
make a difference.
We dont know what we prevent. We have no
idea, said Charlotte Raup of the Wilkes-Barre
Crime Watch Coalition, who led the gathering.
We cant measure crime-prevention. Is it work-
ing? I hope so.
That hope attracted representatives from about
15 different neighborhood watch groups, from
Hazleton to Avoca, to the meeting for a refresher
from Raup and Luzerne County District Attorneys
Ofce Detective Charles Chaz Balogh on best
practices for crime watch activities.
Everyone here knows your neighborhood better
than your local police, Balogh said. Every cop in
Luzerne County would agree with me, too you
guys know when something is out of place.
Among Baloghs instructions: Be observant.
Take notes and photos. Always travel in pairs when
on crime watch patrol, as per local crime watch by-
laws. Stay in public view. Call the police.
But as Balogh and Raup also took pains to point
out, crime watch volunteers are not police, and
should never act like them dont carry weapons,
dont attempt to apprehend suspects and dont
interfere with police when they are interviewing
or arresting suspects.
Were not vigilantes. Were just the eyes and
ears of the police. Thats it, Raup said.
Balogh and Raup also gave participants advice
on common sense steps everyone can take to avoid
becoming victims, from locking their cars and not
leaving valuables in plain sight to how best they
should secure the doors and windows on their
homes.
More than this, they also advised residents how
to engage more volunteers in the cause, including
elderly residents who may not be willing or able to
participate in street patrols.
Balogh recommended creating iers with infor-
mation about watch groups, as well as knocking on
doors and talking to neighbors in person.
The elderly are a huge asset, he said. Even
though they may not go out on patrols, those
people become window watchers, they see every-
thing.
How to spot meth labs, meanwhile, was a con-
cern shared by many on Wednesday. It is to be the
topic of a Sweet Valley community picnic on June
27 at the North Lake pavilion, as well as at the next
Luzerne County Crime Watch Coalition meeting
on Oct. 9.
Raup also encouraged members to foster such
discussions at their own gatherings.
Youve got to be able to do these topics your-
self, she said, offering to provide information on
everything from meth labs to sexual abuse and
nancial crimes against the elderly.
For more information, visit www.wbcrimewatch.
org or the Luzerne County Crime Watch Coalition
page on Facebook.
Pete G. Wilcox photos | The Times Leader
Luzerne County Detective Chaz Balogh talks to area wide crime watch coalition members about the bylaws at
Wednesdays crime watch coalition meeting.
Crime watch meeting attracts residents
fromacross Luzerne County
Roger DuPuis
rdupuis@timesleader.com
Red Cross issues call for blood donors
With more families on vaca-
tion, the July 4th holiday and
college students back home, the
summer months traditionally
are difcult for the American
Red Cross to maintain blood
supplies. But this year seems
even more lean.
Inlight of thelowergures, the
American Red Cross issued an
emergency request Wednesday
for platelet and blood donors of
all blood types to roll up a sleeve
and give because many fewer
donations than expected were
received in June and the rst
week of July.
We are counting on gen-
erous volunteer blood and
platelet donors to step up and
give now, said Maria Elena
Geyer, chief executive ofcer
for the Red Cross Northeastern
Pennsylvania Blood Services
Region. Every two seconds
someone in the U.S. needs
blood. Each day donations come
up short, less blood is available
for these patients in need.
Nationwide, donations
through the Red Cross were
down approximately 10 per-
cent in June, resulting in about
50,000 fewer donations than
expected. The shortfall is similar
to what the Red Cross experi-
enced in June 2012.
June can be among the most
challenging months of the year
for blood and platelet donations
as regular donors delay giving
while they adjust to summer
schedules. High school and col-
lege blood drives account for
as much as 20 percent of Red
Cross donations during the
school year. Donations from
those who usually give at these
drives drop by more than 80
percent when school is out
for the summer. In addition, a
mid-week Independence Day
holiday reduced the number of
blood drives scheduled in early
July. Many sponsors, especially
businesses, were unable to host
drives because employees took
extended vacations.
The Red Cross urgently needs
donations to ensure an adequate
blood supply is available for
patients all summer long. Each
day, the American Red Cross
Northeastern Pennsylvania
Blood Services Region needs
approximately 450 donors to
step forward and give blood.
Eligible donors with types O
negative, B negative and Anega-
tive blood are especially encour-
aged to give. Type O negative
is the universal blood type and
can be transfused to anyone who
needs blood. Types A negative
and B negative can be trans-
fused to Rh positive or negative
patients.
There is also an urgent need
for platelet donations. Platelets
a key clotting component of
blood often needed by cancer
patients - must be transfused
within ve days of donation, so
its important to have a steady
supply of platelets on hand.
Andrew M. Seder
aseder@timesleader.com
IN BRIEF
LOCAL
Baker
LOCAL BLOOD DRIVES
Today and tomorowfrom1:30 to 6:30 inside The Laurel
Mall in Halze Township, The Wyoming Valley Mall in Wilkes-
Barre and The Mall at Steamtown in Scranton.
For more information on donating call 1-800-RED CROSS
(1-800-733-2767) or visit redcrossblood.org to make an
appointment. Ablood donor card or drivers license, or
two other forms of identifcation are required at check-in.
Individuals who are 17 years of age, weigh at least 110 pounds
and are in generally good health may be eligible to donate
blood. High school students and other donors 18 years of
age and younger also have to meet certain height and weight
requirements.
Balogh offers tips on crime prevention to attendees at the
Luzerne County EMA Building in Wilkes-Barre.
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER NATION WORLD THURSDAY,JULY 11, 2013 PAGE 4A
Victims of the attack were in the courtroomas
Dzhokhar Tsarnaev entered his plea.
Denise Lavoie
AP Legal Afairs Writer
BOSTON His arm in a cast and his face swol-
len, a blase-looking Dzhokhar Tsarnaev pleaded
not guilty Wednesday in the Boston Marathon
bombing in a seven-minute proceeding that marked
his rst public appearance since his capture in mid-
April.
As victims of the bombing looked on, Tsarnaev,
19, gave a lopsided smile to his sisters upon arriv-
ing in the courtroom. He appeared to have a jaw
injury and there was swelling around his left eye
and cheek.
Then, after he leaned over toward a microphone
and said, Not guilty over and over in a Russian
accent, he was led out of the courtroom, making a
kissing motion with his lips toward his family as he
left. His sister sobbed loudly, resting her head on a
woman seated next to her.
He faces 30 federal charges, including using a
weapon of mass destruction to kill, and could get
the death penalty if prosecutors choose to pursue
it.
The proceedings took place in a heavily guarded
courtroom packed not only with victims but with
their families, police ofcers, members of the pub-
lic and the media.
Tsarnaev looked much as he did in a photo
widely circulated after his arrest, his hair curly and
unkempt. He appeared nonchalant, almost bored
during the hearing. The cast covered his left fore-
arm, his hand and his ngers. The April 15 attack
killed three people and wounded more than 260.
Authorities say Tsarnaev orchestrated the attack
along with his older brother, Tamerlan Tsarnaev,
who died following a shootout with police three
days after the bombing.
Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was arrested on April 19
when he was found hiding in a boat in a suburban
backyard. He was initially charged in the hospital,
where he was recovering from wounds suffered in
a police shootout.
Tsarnaevs two sisters, both in Muslim garb,
were in court Wednesday. One was carrying a baby,
the other wiped away tears with a tissue. His par-
ents remained back in Russia. Reporters and spec-
tators began lining up for seats in the courtroom
at 7:30 a.m. as a dozen Federal Protective Service
ofcers and bomb-snifng dogs surrounded the
courthouse.
Four hours before the hearing, the defendant
arrived at the courthouse in a four-vehicle motor-
cade that included a van, a Humvee and a state
police car. A group of about a dozen Tsarnaev sup-
porters cheered as the motorcade arrived. The dem-
onstrators yelled, Justice for Jahar! as Tsarnaev
is known. One woman held a sign that said, Free
Jahar. Lacey Buckley, 23, said she traveled fromher
home in Wenatchee, Wash., to attend the arraign-
ment. Buckley said she has never met Tsarnaev but
came because she believes hes innocent.
I just think so many of his rights were violated.
They almost murdered an unarmed kid in a boat,
she said.
Boston bombing suspect pleads not guilty
AP Photo
This courtroom sketch depicts Boston Marathon bombing
suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev during his arraignment in fed-
eral court Wednesday.
Amid criticism, Rail World Inc. president
arrives in devastated Quebec town.
David Crary
Associated Press
LAC-MEGANTIC, QuEBEC
The head of a railway company
whose train crashed into a Quebec
town, killing at least 15 people,
blamed the accident on an employee
who he said had failed to properly
set the brakes.
Edward Burkhardt, president
and CEO of the railways parent
company, Rail World Inc., made his
comments Wednesday during his
rst visit to the town where some
60 people remain missing following
Saturdays ery crash. He arrived
with a police escort and was heckled
by angry residents,
He said a train engineer has been
suspended without pay.
I think he did something wrong
We think he applied some hand
brakes but the question is did he
apply enough of them, Burkhardt
explained. He said he applied 11
hand brakes, we think thats not true.
Initially we believed him but now we
dont.
Burkhardt said that he had stayed
in Chicago to deal with the crisis in
his ofce, where he was better able
to communicate with insurers and
ofcials in different places during
what he described as 20-hour work
days.
The railway boss promised an
energetic response to the humanitar-
ian crisis.
At a press conference, shortly
before Burkhardt was due to arrive
in Lac-Megantic, Quebec Premier
Pauline Marois faulted the com-
panys response in the wake of the
disaster.
We have realized there are seri-
ous gaps from the railway company
from not having been there and not
communicating with the public,
Marois said.
She also announced a $60-million
fund to help victims in Lac-Megantic
and to rebuild the town.
Quebec police inspector Michel
Forget said they were pursuing a
wide-ranging criminal investigation
but had ruled out terrorism as a cause.
Forget said an array of other pos-
sibilities remain under investigation,
including criminal negligence. Other
ofcials have raised the possibility
that the train was tampered with
before the crash early Saturday.
The heart of the towns central
business district is being treated as a
crime scene and remained cordoned
off by police tape not only the 30
buildings razed by the re but also
many adjacent blocks.
On downtowns main street Rue
de Laval police positioned a truck
near the perimeter of the no-go zone,
which prevented news crews from
getting direct photo and video views
of the search operations being con-
ducted by some 200 ofcers.
Police ofcials left no doubt that
the hunt for the missing people was
taxing they said two ofcers were
withdrawn from the sector because
of worries about their physical con-
dition.
The Montreal, Maine & Atlantic
Railway train broke loose early
Saturday and hurtled downhill
through the darkness nearly seven
miles before jumping the tracks at 63
mph in Lac-Megantic.
Employee improperly set brakes, rail CEOsays
AP Photo
Richard LeFebvre awaits the arrival Wednesday of Edward Burkhardt, president of the
railway company that owns the train that derailed in Lac-Megantic, Quebec, outside a high
school in Lac-Megantic that is serving as a shelter for evacuees.
Martha Mendoza
Associated Press
SOuTH SAN
FRANCISCO, CALIF.
As Flight 214 descended
over San Francisco Bay, both
Asiana Airlines pilots were in
new roles.
In the left seat of the cock-
pit sat a pilot with just 35
hours of experience ying a
Boeing 777 who was landing
the big jet for his rst time at
San Francisco International
Airport. At his right was a
trainer making his rst trip
as an instructor pilot.
While the two men had
years of aviation experience,
this mission involved unfa-
miliar duties, and it was the
rst time they had own
together. The ight came
to a catastrophic end when
the airliner crash-landed
Saturday, killing two passen-
gers and injuring many oth-
ers.
Experts say investigators
trying to piece together what
went wrong will be consider-
ing the pairing of the pilots,
who were assigned to work
together through a tightly
regulated system developed
after several deadly crashes
in the 1980s were blamed in
part on inexperience in the
cockpit.
The National
Transportation Safety Board
is denitely going to focus
on what type of policy Asiana
had in terms of crew pair-
ing, former NTSB Chairman
James Hall said.
Pilots are typically paired
by management, and are not
allowed to choose their own
ights nor who they are part-
nered with.
Massachusetts Institute of
Technology aeronautics pro-
fessor Mary Cummings said
its common for two commer-
cial pilots to be assigned to
the same ight without ever
working together before.
Airlines have standardized,
formal procedures to facili-
tate teams of strangers.
The military tries to have
crews work together more
permanently, she said.
Research would tell you
that crew pairing with the
same people over longer peri-
ods of time is safer, she said.
When two people y togeth-
er all the time, you get into a
routine thats more efcient.
You have experience commu-
nicating.
Details emerging frompilot
interviews, cockpit recorders
and control-tower communi-
cations indicate that pilot Lee
Gang-kuk, 46, who was half-
way through his certication
training for the Boeing 777,
and his co-pilot and instruc-
tor Lee Jeong-Min, thought
the airliners speed was being
controlled by an autothrottle,
which was set for 157 mph.
Inspectors found that
the autothrottle had been
armed, or made ready for
activation, said NTSB chair-
man Deborah Hersman.
But investigators are
still determining wheth-
er it had been engaged.
Probe: Asiana pilots unfamiliar with plane, each other
AP Photo
An injured South Korean passenger, who was aboard Asiana Airlines
Flight 214, is moved to an ambulance upon his arrival at the Incheon
Airport in Incheon, South Korea, Wednesday.
HARRISBURG
Corbett defends
gas royalty bill
Gov. Tom Corbett is defending legisla-
tion that an oil and gas royalty owners
group said undermines some landown-
ers negotiating rights when dealing with
Marcellus Shale drilling companies.
Corbett signed the bill without public
comment Tuesday after it won over-
whelming support from the Republican-
controlled Legislature in June. In a letter
to lawmakers, Corbett said he believes the
new law enhances the efciency of drill-
ing for oil and gas while limiting environ-
mental damage and protecting the rights
of landowners and leaseholders.
The law is designed to advance the
Marcellus Shale industrys ability to
vacuum up natural gas through the recent
advent of underground, horizontally
drilled bores that can extend out thou-
sands of feet from the vertical well bore,
sometimes even crossing property lines.
LAS VEGAS
Wildfre burns in
mountains
A massive mountain wildre that made
Las Vegas smell like a campre destroyed
six structures at a desert ranch and left
two of the more than a thousand reght-
ers with minor injuries, ofcials said
Wednesday.
It wasnt immediately clear if any homes
were destroyed on the ranch several miles
from woodsy Mount Charleston hamlets
where crews were protecting more than
400 homes, a canyon hotel and a scenic
alpine lodge and cabins.
One of the buildings that burned in
the Carpenter 1 re was a commercial
structure at Prospect Springs, u.S. Forest
Service spokeswoman Suzanne Shelp said.
More than 270 additional reghters
arrived Tuesday to help battle the re
sparked by lightning July 1, bringing to
1,077 the number of people ghting the
blaze about 25 miles northwest of down-
town Las Vegas.
BEIRUT
Rebels dispute
sarin gas claims
Syrias main Western-backed opposition
group on Wednesday rejected Russian
accusations that rebels made sarin nerve
gas and used it in a deadly chemical
attack outside Aleppo in March.
The Syrian National Coalition called
the charges desperate and fabricated.
Russia is a key ally of President Bashar
Assads regime.
use of chemical weapons is an explo-
sive issue, potentially guiding whether
the West increases its aid to rebel forces.
President Barack Obama called chemical
weapons use by the Assad government a
red line, while such accusations against
the rebels could reinforce Western misgiv-
ings about arming them.
LAKELAND, FLA.
Sex scandal rocks
police department
Nearly a dozen police ofcers in
Lakeland are under investigation after
state and local ofcials uncovered a wide-
spread sex scandal that has unfolded over
eight years.
According to ofcials, the investigation
centers on Sue Eberle, a Lakeland Police
crime analyst who says she had consen-
sual and sometimes coerced sex with
police ofcers and one reghter and
was propositioned by a municipal worker.
Eberles accounts of the liaisons were
largely corroborated by her sexual part-
ners and others within the police depart-
ment, and published in a 59-page report
from the countys top prosecutor.
The state attorney says he cant pros-
ecute the cases because of a lack of physi-
cal evidence and because of how much
time has passed since some of the encoun-
ters. However, Lakelands mayor says the
ofcers and employees involved are under
an internal investigation.
BRIEFS
AP PHOTO
In the shadow of a beast
The main church in the town of San Damian Texoloc,
Mexico stands in front of the Popocatepetl volcano
as is spews ash and vapor Tuesday. On Saturday,
Mexicos National Center for Disaster Prevention
raised the volcano alert fromStage 2 to Stage 3, the
final step before a Red alert, when possible evacua-
tions could be ordered.
Maggie Michael
Associated Press
CAIRO Authorities
escalated their crackdown
Wednesday on the Muslim
Brotherhood, ordering the
arrest of its top leader for
inciting violence this week in
which more than 50 people
were killed in clashes with
security forces.
One week after the mili-
tary overthrew President
Mohammed Morsi and began
moving against his Muslim
Brotherhood movement,
prosecutors issued a warrant
for the arrest of the groups
supreme leader, Mohammed
Badie, as well as nine other
leading Islamists.
According to a statement
from the prosecutor generals
ofce, they are suspected of
instigating Mondays violence
outside a Republican Guard
building that grew into the
worst bloodshed since Morsi
was toppled.
Members of the
Brotherhood and other
Islamists have denounced
Morsis ouster and have
refused offers by the military-
backed interim leadership
to join any transition plan
for a new government. They
demand nothing less than
Morsis release from deten-
tion and his reinstatement as
president.
The warrants highlight
the armed forces zero-
tolerance policy toward the
Brotherhood, which was
banned under authoritarian
leader Hosni Mubarak. The
military already has jailed ve
Brotherhood leaders, includ-
ing Badies powerful deputy,
Khairat el-Shaiter, and shut
down its media outlets.
This just signals that dicta-
torship is back, said Muslim
Brotherhood spokesman
Ahmed Aref.
We are returning to what is
worse than Mubaraks regime,
which wouldnt dare to issue
an arrest warrant of the gen-
eral leader of the Muslim
Brotherhood.
Foreign Ministry spokeman
Badr Abdel-Atti gave the rst
ofcial word on Morsi in days,
saying the ousted leader is in a
safe place and is being treated
in a very dignied manner.
No charges have been leveled
against him, Abdel-Atti said.
For his own safety and
for the safety of the country,
it is better to keep him.
Otherwise, consequences will
be dire, he added.
Thousands of Muslim
Brotherhood supporters are
continuing a sit-in at the
Rabaah al-Adawiya Mosque
near the Republican Guard
building that was the site of
Mondays clashes that killed
54 people, most of them
Morsi supporters.
The Islamists have accused
the troops of gunning down
protesters, while the military
blamed armed backers of
Morsi for provoking its forces.
News of the arrest warrants
did not surprise the protest-
ers, who saw the move as
an attempt to pressure the
groups leadership to end the
demonstration.
We expected it, said
Ayman el-Ashmawi. Even if
they arrest the biggest num-
ber of Muslim Brotherhood
members, we want to say that
the Muslim Brotherhood will
leave this square only over our
dead bodies or the return
of Dr. Mohammed Morsi.
Egypt orders arrest of MuslimBrotherhood leader
WILKES-BARRE A
Pittston marketing company
has led a lawsuit in Luzerne
County Court against a
Mazda Miata parts dealer,
alleging a failure to pay
almost $40,000 in outstand-
ing bills.
Joel Lipperini, of Genesis
Marketing, led the suit
through his attorneys, Stuart
ONeal and Harry McGrath,
of West Conshohocken,
against Marc Cefalo and his
businesses, Planet Miata,
in Swoyersville, and Cefalo
Speedworkz, Larksville.
The suit alleges that
between January 2004 and
April 2009, Genesis pro-
vided advertising, marketing
and business strategy ser-
vices to Cefalo and his busi-
nesses.
The services included
Internet advertisement,
website creation and man-
agement, website banner ad
placement, graphic designs,
marketing plans, search
engine accessibility and oth-
ers, according to the suit.
The suit says a total of
$39,042 is owed, which
includes interest and late
fees, and that Cefalo has not
offered or asserted any objec-
tions to the amounts billed.
The suit says Cefalo con-
tinues to receive nancial
benet from the services
Genesis provided, and is cur-
rently still using a logo on
the Planet Miata website.
Onecount of unjust enrich-
ment is alleged in the suit,
and requests that a judgment
be made in Lipperinis favor
for the amount owed, as well
as attorneys fees, costs and
interest.
Cefalo did not return a
message seeking comment
Wednesday, but a letter
he wrote to Lipperini was
included as an exhibit in the
lawsuit where he explains
his businesses have seen a
need to change marketing
direction.
The undated letter from
Cefalo to Lipperini says that
the letter is a formal noti-
cation that Planet Miata is
terminating all services and
association with Lipperini
and his business, and that
Planet Miata was instructing
Lipperini to cease providing
any future services with the
business.
The letter requests that
all websites be registered to
Cefalo by April 22, 2009, and
that once proof of the switch
is received arrangements
will be made with regard to
payment of the outstanding
involves for the months of
Jan., Feb., and March and up
to April 15, 2009.
Cefalo wrote that he felt
his business was being held
back as a result of Genesis
marketing strategies and
that Cefalo has spent thou-
sands of dollars for services
and received little value
over a six-month period.
You have been increasing-
ly difcult to get a hold of,
Cefalo wrote. You have also
allowed monthly invoices to
accumulate without forward-
ing them to us in a timely
manner despite repeated
requests for you to do so.
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER NEWS THURSDAY, JULY 11, 2013 PAGE 5A
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Mazda parts dealer sued over failure to pay $40,000
Sheena Delazio
sdelazio@timesleader.com
Ciavarella appeal seeks rehearing on judge recusal, statute of limitations
Ex-Luzerne County Judge
Mark Ciavarellas attorneys
want a federal court to dis-
miss his conviction on three
counts and reconsider his
contention that the trial
judge should have recused
himself.
Ciavarellas attorneys,
William Ruzzo and Al Flora
Jr., led a brief Tuesday
arguing the Third Circuit
Court of Appeals had erred
in upholding all but one of
12 convictions received by a
jury following a trial before
U.S. District Judge Edwin
Kosik in February 2011.
Ruzzo and Flora argue the
appeals court should rehear
the case because it did not
apply the proper legal tests
in deciding whether Kosik
should have recused him-
self. In the 2011 trial, Flora
had explicitly asked Kosik
to recuse himself following
several testy exchanges that
Flora contended showed a
bias.
In the initial appeal follow-
ing Ciavarellas conviction,
that argument was made
again, citingcomments Kosik
made in personal responses
to letters from citizens.
The appeals court con-
ceded Kosick shouldnt have
made the comments he did
in the letters, but said that
did not rise to the level set
by the U.S. Supreme Court
requiring recusal. In the brief
led Tuesday, Ruzzo and
Flora argue that the appeals
court cited the wrong cases
in making that determina-
tion, and that rulings in other
cases which dealt directly
with comments made out-
side the court proceedings
should be used in deter-
mining whether recusal was
required.
The brief also argues the
appeals court erred by not
addressing Ciavarellas con-
tention the jury should have
been advised of the statute
of limitations for three of the
charges. Ruzzo and Flora
admit they did not request
such an instruction be given,
but contend that failure was
plain error that could be
corrected by the appeals
court by reversing the convic-
tion on the three counts.
Ciavarella was convicted
on 12 of 27 counts and sen-
tenced to 28 years in what
has widely been called the
Kids for Cash scandal, a
label he repeatedly and vehe-
mently rejected, insisting
he never incarcerated chil-
dren in exchange for money.
Ciavarella and former Judge
Michael Conahan, who
worked out a plea deal and is
serving a sentence of 17-1/2
years, received millions of
dollars from the owner and
the developer of private,
for-prot juvenile deten-
tion and treatment centers.
Mark Guydish
mguydish@timesleader.com
PAGE 6A THURSDAY, JULY 11, 2013 OBITUARIES www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER
Obituary POlicy
The Times Leader publishes free obituaries, which
have a 27-line limit, and paid obituaries, which can run
with a photograph. Afuneral home representative can
call the obituary desk at 570-829-7224, send a fax to
570-829-5537 or email to ttlobits@civitasmedia.com.
If you fax or email, please call to confrm. Obituaries
must be submitted by 7:30 p.m. for publication in
the next edition. Obituaries must be sent by a funeral
home or crematory, or must name who is handling
arrangements, with address and phone number.
More OBITUARIES | 2A
TERESA M.
PEGARELLA, 85, of
College Street, Nanticoke,
passed away early
Wednesday morning at
Birchwood Nursing and
Rehabilitation Center,
Nanticoke.
Funeral arrange-
ment details and a com-
plete obituary will be
announced by Davis-
Dinelli Funeral Home, 170
E. Broad St., Nanticoke.
NOTICE
TO ALL
VETERANS
and ex-service personnel who have loyally served
their country in peace and in war.
If you were honorably discharged and
live anywhere in the State of
Pennsylvania, you are now entitled to a
burial space at no cost in the veterans
memorial section at
Chapel Lawn Memorial Park
RD 5 Box 108, Dallas, PA 18612
Tis ofer is available for a limited time
only. Special protection features are
available for your spouse and minor
children with National Transfer
Protection. Tis limited time ofer is also
extended to members of the
National Guard and Reserve.
Space is limited.
Conditions - Burial spaces cannot be for
investment purposes. You must register
for your free burial space.
1-800-578-9547 Ext. 6001 And you dont have to buy a casket.
Kniffen OMalley
Wilkes-Barre & Avoca
823-7157 457-2801
BestLifeTributes.com
Viewing before
Cremation
Brian Leffer
Ann Marie Theresa
OHara, of Wilkes-Barre,
passed away July 9, 2013,
at Hospice Community
Care, Geisinger South
Wilkes-Barre.
She was born in Wilkes-
Barre on July 24, 1938, a
daughter of the late Frank
and Anna Kology.
A graduate of Coughlin
High School, Ann Marie
retired from Kings
College where she was
employed in the house-
keeping and food service
departments. Prior to her
employment at Kings
College, she worked at
the Silver Queen in East
End. While raising her
children, Ann Marie oper-
ated a day care center in
her home.
She was a member of St.
John the Baptist Catholic
Church prior to its merg-
er with St. Dominics. She
was a current member
of St. Benedicts Parish.
She was also a member of
the Ladies Ancient Order
of Hibernians, St. John
Neumann Division.
She was preceded in
death by an infant daugh-
ter, Ann; three brothers,
Lawrence, Frank and
Leonard; and a sister,
Genevieve Wyrwas.
Surviving are her hus-
band of 56 years, John J.
Jack OHara; daughters,
Sharon Monie and her
husband, Thomas, Plains
Township, Tracie Thorsen
and her husband, John,
Lancaster, Kellie Knesis
and her husband, Justin J.,
Wilkes-Barre; son, John J.
OHara and his wife, Amy
(Delikat), Matthews,
N.C.; ve grandchildren,
Sarah Monie, Victoria,
Katherine and John
Thorsen and Quinlan
OHara.
The family extends
thanks to the staff and
physicians at Geisinger
Wyoming Valley
Medical Center, Hospice
Community Care of
Geisinger South Wilkes-
Barre and Timber Ridge
Healthcare Center for
their tender loving care of
Ann Marie.
Funeral services will
be conducted 9:30 a.m.
Saturday at Yanaitis
Funeral Home, 55 Stark
Street, Plains Township.
AMass of Christian Burial
will follow at 10 a.m. in
St. Benedicts Parish,
155 Austin Ave., in the
Parsons section of Wilkes-
Barre, celebrated by the
Rev. Joseph Kearney.
Friends may call 5 to 8
p.m. Friday at the funeral
home. Interment will be
in St. Marys Cemetery,
Hanover Township.
In lieu of owers, dona-
tions may be made to St.
Josephs Center, 2010
Adams Ave., Scranton,
PA 18509; or the SPCA,
524 E. Main St., Wilkes-
Barre, PA 18702.
ann Marie theresa (KOlOgy)
Ohara
July 9, 2013
Stephen Michael Tib
Salansky, of Harveys
Lake, died Monday, July
8, 2013, at Geisinger
Wyoming Valley Medical
Center.
Born in Jackson
Township, he was a son
of the late Stephen M.
and Catherine Novak
Salansky. He attended
Lehman area schools.
Stephen was a U.S.
Army veteran of World
War II and was a
member of Our Lady
of Victory Church,
Harveys Lake.
Surviving are his wife,
the former Rose Hudak;
daughter, Gwen Keating,
Sweet Valley; brother,
Paul Salansky and his
wife, Sue, Meeker; grand-
children, Eileen, Jill, and
Laura Keating; numerous
nieces and nephews.
Funeral will be
held privately at the
convenience of the
family.
Arrangements are
entrusted to the Richard
H. Disque Funeral Home,
2940 Memorial Highway,
Dallas.
stePhen Michaeltib salansKy
July 8, 2013
Anne H. Skovira, 54,
of Huntsville Road,
Shavertown, passed away
on Tuesday at Celtic
Health Care, Inpatient
Unit, Geisinger South
Wilkes-Barre.
Anne was born in West
Wyoming on Oct. 8,
1958. She was a daugh-
ter of the late Edmund
and Helen Klocko
Pieczynski.
She was a graduate
of Bishop OReilly High
School, Kingston, class of
1976.
Anne worked in her
familys restaurant for
several years and she was
also a trained dental assis-
tant, employed by several
local dentists.
She was married
in 1983 to Stephen
Steve G. Skovira.
They lived locally in
Kingston, Larksville and
Shavertown.
Anne was an accom-
plished baker. Her choco-
late chip cookies were
legendary. She also made
delicious cheesecakes and
many other desserts for
her family and friends to
share.
She was a member
of St. John the Baptist
Church, Larksville,
where she served as a
CCD teacher. She also
enjoyed volunteering her
time at the annual church
bazaar.
Anne is survived by her
husband of 29 years, Steve
Skovira, at home; daugh-
ters, Trinity, Ryleigh and
Kaylie, all at home; broth-
ers, Ed, Wyoming, John,
Dallas, James, Danville,
Va., Paul, Wyoming,
Tom, Kingston; sister,
RoseMary, Wyoming;
numerous nieces, neph-
ews, aunts, uncles and
cousins.
Funeral services will
be held at 9:30 a.m.
Saturday at Andrew
Strish Funeral Home, 11
Wilson St., Larksville. A
Mass of Christian Burial
will be at 10 a.m. in St.
John the Baptist Church.
Interment will follow
in St. Johns Cemetery,
Dallas. Family and
friends may call 5 to 9
p.m. Friday and 8:30 a.m.
until services Saturday.
In lieu of owers,
donations can be made
in Annes memory to
the Medical Oncology
Associates Prescription
Fund, 382 Pierce St.,
Kingston, PA 18704; or to
the Geisinger Foundation
at https://donate.geising-
er.org.
anne h. sKOvira
July 9, 2013
ELIZABETH
BETTY GIMBLE,
71, of Larksville, passed
away Wednesday in
Hospice Community Care,
Geisinger South Wilkes-
Barre.
Funeral arrangements
are pending from Kielty-
Moran Funeral Home
Inc., 87 Washington Ave.,
Plymouth.
baranOWsKi - Alfred, funeral
10 a.m. Friday at Kopicki
Funeral Home, 263 Zerbey Ave.,
Kingston. Mass of Christian
Burial 10:30 a.m. in St. John the
Baptist Church. Friends may call
6 to 8 p.m. today.
barrett - Paul, celebration of
life 9 a.m. today at McLaughlins
The Family Funeral Service,
142 S. Washington St., Wilkes-
Barre. Funeral Mass 10 a.m.
in the Church of Holy Saviour,
Wilkes-Barre.
breese - Brenda, funeral
services 10 a.m. Saturday in New
Covenant Christian Fellowship
Church, 780 S. Main St., Wilkes-
Barre. Friends may call 5 to
8 p.m. Friday and 9 a.m. until
services Saturday.
cOhen- Joan, funeral services
2 p.m. Saturday at Harold C.
Snowdon Home for Funerals Inc.,
420Wyoming Ave., Kingston.
Friends may call noon until
services.
Dennis - Daniel, memorial
service with calling hours 5 to
6 p.m. today at Yeosock Funeral
Home, 40 S. Main St., Plains
Township.
Diaugustine - Vincent, funeral
services 11 a.m. today at Mayo
Funeral Home Inc., 110 Chestnut
St., Berwick.
DOris - Lucy, funeral services
9:30 a.m. Friday at Curtis L.
Swanson Funeral Home Inc.,
corner of routes 29 and 118,
Pikes Creek. Mass of Christian
Burial 10 a.m. in Our Lady of
Mount Carmel Church, Lake
Silkworth. Friends may call 6 to 8
p.m. today at the funeral home.
evans - Jack, funeral 11 a.m.
today at Richard H. Disque
Funeral Home Inc., 2940
Memorial Highway, Dallas.
hOrny - Sally, funeral services
9 a.m. today at Nat & Gawlas
Funeral Home, 89 Park Ave.,
Wilkes-Barre. Mass of Christian
Burial 10 a.m. in St. Patricks
Church, 580 Elmira St., White
Haven.
JaiKes - Ruth, family and
friends will meet for Mass 10
a.m. today in St. John the Baptist
Church, Larksville.
Kunec - Joseph, friends may
call 4 to 7 p.m. today with
religious services at 6:15 p.m.
today at Michael J. Mikelski
Funeral Home, 293 S. River St.,
Plains Township.
lObruttO- Sam, viewing hours
5 to 8 p.m. today at Graziano
Funeral Home Inc., Pittston
Township. Funeral services with
military honors 9 a.m. Friday
at the funeral home. Mass of
Christian Burial 9:30 a.m. in St.
Joseph Marello Parish, William
Street, Pittston.
MacieJcZaK - Eric, memorial
service 1 p.m. Saturday at
the home of Elaine Barrett
Fitzgerald, Mildred.
Maga - Stephen, funeral
services 9:30 a.m. today at
Anthony Recupero Funeral
Home, 406 Susquehanna Ave.,
West Pittston. Ofce of Christian
Burial with divine liturgy 10:30
a.m. in St. Nicholas Church.
MOtOn- Wandra, services 6:30
p.m. today at Mount Zion Baptist
Church, Wilkes-Barre. Friends
may call 5:30 p.m. until services.
Those attending interment in
Maple Hill Cemetery are asked to
meet at 10 a.m. Friday at Knifen
OMalley Funeral Home Inc., 465
S. Main St., Wilkes-Barre.
nOss - Howard, memorial
services 7 p.m. today at Stanley
S. Stegura Funeral Home Inc.,
614 S. Hanover St., Nanticoke.
Friends may call 5 p.m. until
services.
rOss - Jane, friends may call
4 to 6 p.m. today at Harold C.
Snowdon Funeral Home Inc., 140
N. Main St., Shavertown.
savage - Mark, friends may
call 4 to 5 p.m. Friday at Yeosock
Funeral Home, 40 S. Main St.,
Plains Township.
sylvester - Wendy, memorial
services 2 p.m. Friday at Mayo
Funeral Home Inc., 77 N. Main
St., Shickshinny. Friends may call
1 p.m. until services.
ulanOsKi - Robert, funeral
Saturday with memorial Mass
of Christian Burial 10 a.m. in St.
John Bosco Roman Catholic
Church, Conyngham. Friends
may call 9 a.m. until Mass.
Funerals
Evelyn Goldstein,
of Riverview Towers,
Pittsburgh, and formerly
of Wilkes-Barre, died
Wednesday morning, July
10, 2013, in Pittsburgh.
Born in Scranton, she
was a daughter of the late
Max and Sarah Shuer.
Prior to retirement, she
was an insurance agent
for Penn Millers Insurance
Company.
She was a member of the
former United Orthodox
Synagogue, Ohav Zedek
Synagogue and the Jewish
Community Center, all of
Wilkes-Barre, as well as
other civic and religious
organizations.
Evelyn was preceded in
death by her loving hus-
band, Isadore, on March
6, 2000; one brother; and
six sisters.
She is survived by her
children, son, Harvey
Goldstein, Wilkes-Barre;
daughters, Joyce Payavis
and her husband, Peter,
Pringle, Saralee Leiber
and her husband, William,
Pittsburgh; granddaugh-
ter, Melissa Payavis;
brother, Leonard Shuer,
Pittsburgh; many nieces
and nephews.
Funeral service will
be 1 p.m. Friday at the
Rosenberg Funeral Chapel,
348 S. River St., Wilkes-
Barre. Ofciating will be
Rabbi Raphael Nemetsky
of Congregation Ohav
Zedek. Interment will be
in Anshe Sfard Cemetery,
Demunds. Shiva will be
observed 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Friday and 2 to 4 p.m.
Sunday at The Woodlands.
For more information,
visit www.rosenbergfuner-
alchapel.com.
evelyn
gOlDstein
July 10, 2013
Michalene Ferack, 58,
of Avoca, died Wednesday,
July 10, 2013, at the
Hospice Unit at Regional
Hospital of Scranton.
She is survived by her
husband, John Ferack.
Together, they celebrated
their 30th anniversary on
June 18, 2013.
Born in Scranton, she
was a daughter of the
late Robert and Dorothy
Olshefski Travis and a
graduate of Mid Valley
High School. She also
graduated from The
University of Scranton,
earning a masters degree
in microbiology.
She was a corpo-
rate microbiologist at
Preferred Meal Systems,
Moosic, and a member
of Ss. Peter and Paul
Church, Avoca.
To all who knew
Michalene, her number
one priority was her
family. Her kids were
her life and she would
do anything for them.
Her husband, John, was
her soul mate. No mat-
ter how hard times got,
they always stood by each
other and got through any
situation together. When
Michalene got sick, her
husband and kids came
together and did what-
ever they had to do to
try and get her better.
Michalene loved her pets
and going to the casino
with Grandma.
Her family extends a
special thank you to Dr.
Lisa Thomas and her
staff, especially Megan.
Surviving are two
daughters, Amy and Kelly,
and a son, John Jr., all
at home; three brothers,
Robert Travis, Dunmore,
Gordon Travis, Archbald,
and Stephen Travis,
Dickson City; an uncle,
Joseph Olshefski; mother-
in-law, Theresa Ferack;
brothers-in-law, sisters-in-
law, aunts, uncles, cousins,
nieces, nephews, great-
nieces and great-nephews.
Friends may call 5 to 8
p.m. Friday at the Frank T.
Mazur Funeral Home Inc.,
601 Dundaff St., Dickson
City. A Christian wake
service will be celebrated
at 7:30 p.m. by the Rev.
Philip Sladicka. Cremation
will follow at Maple Hill
Crematory, Archbald.
For directions or to
leave an online condo-
lence, visit www.mazurfu-
neralhome.com.
Michalene FeracK
July 10, 2013
Catherine L.
(Roughsedge) Jayne, of
Hanover Township, went
home to be with her Lord
and Savior on Friday, July
5, 2013, surrounded by
her loving family. A wife,
mother, granny and great-
granny, her life revolved
around her family.
Born in Wilkes-Barre
on Sept. 5, 1956, she was
a daughter of Catherine L.
Roughsedge and the late
William D. Roughsedge.
She attended the Welsh
Bethel Baptist Church,
Wilkes-Barre.
Cathie faithfully cared
for her family and friends.
She loved to have her
family together and thor-
oughly enjoyed cooking
and baking from scratch.
A woman of faith and
the heart of her fam-
ily, Cathie loved life. She
loved to get in the car
and go. She liked to go
shopping at ea markets,
antique stores, estate
sales and, most of all, the
grocery store.
She enjoyed playing
cinch and pinochle. She
enjoyed playing games
with her husband, kids
and grandchildren, pro-
claiming to be the reign-
ing Clue and Cootie cham-
pion since childhood.
Cathie loved spending
time with her husband,
Don; they were insepara-
ble. They did everything
together, including travel,
hunting and shing.
She always looked for-
ward to spending her
summer with all her
family at the Thousand
Islands, Harveys Lake
and by her pool. If she
was with family, she was
happy. Cathie also had a
love for animals.
She also anticipated
going to Myrtle Beach
every fall.
She was preceded in
death by her father, William
D. Roughsedge, in 1997.
Cathie is survived by her
loving and faithful husband
of 38 years, Don; daughter
and son-in-law, Christine
and William May; daugh-
ter and son-in-law, Tricia
and Fran Giovinazzo;
grandchildren, Casey,
Alexis, Derek, Jamie,
Anthony, Billy, Brooklyn
and Emily; great-grand-
daughter, Raegan; broth-
ers, William Roughsedge
and his wife, Maureen,
David Roughsedge and
his wife, Lois, C. Thomas
Roughsedge and his wife,
Jennifer; sisters, Diane
Lorenzotti and her hus-
band, Ralph, Marilyn
Jones and her husband,
Daniel, Tricia Flannery;
numerous nieces, neph-
ews and cousins.
The family is deeply
grateful for the outpour-
ing of love, prayers and
support in many heart-
felt forms from too many
people to name individu-
ally but including friends,
family and neighbors. A
special thanks is given
to Dr. Mark Schiowitz,
the staff at the Wilkes-
Barre General Hospital
critical care unit, Kindred
Hospital and Hospice
Community Care.
Family and friends are
invited to attend a memo-
rial service at 11 a.m.
Saturday in the Welsh
Bethel Baptist Church,
290 Parrish St., Wilkes-
Barre, with her pastor, Don
Hartshorne, ofciating.
Memorial donations
may be made to Welsh
Bethel Baptist Church
Memorial Fund.
Beyond nancial dona-
tions, Cathie lived by the
golden rule: treat others
the way you would like to
be treated. In her mem-
ory, do a random act of
kindness, make someone
laugh, send a card, give a
hug or say I Love You to
a special friend.
Arrangements are
entrusted to the Daniel
J Hughes Funeral &
Cremation Service, 617
Carey Ave., Wilkes-Barre.
catherine l. (rOughseDge)
Jayne
July 5, 2013
nicKOlas e. Zurilla
July 5, 2013
Nickolas E. Zurilla, 59,
of West Union Street,
Nanticoke, passed away
July 5.
Born in Nanticoke,
he was a son of the late
Nickolas H. and Mary M.
Ronczka Zurilla. He was
a graduate of Nanticoke
High School and proudly
served in the U.S. Marine
Corps.
He was employed as a
heavy equipment opera-
tor and was a member of
the International Union of
Operating Engineers and
Teamsters Local #401.
Our beloved Nick was
the go-to man and a con-
stant source of entertain-
ment, laughter and wis-
dom for his family and
friends.
In addition to his par-
ents, he was preceded in
death by his grandmother,
Sadie Zurilla; and uncles,
Edward and Chester
Ronczka.
Surviving are his sis-
ter, Diane Washik and
her husband, Mark S.
Washik; daughter, Kristy
Place; granddaughter,
Ella Place; nephew, Mark
N. Washik; niece, Nicole
Washik; cousin, Cora
Ronczka Washik; and
numerous cousins living
out of state.
A memorial ser-
vice will be held at
7 p.m. Friday at the
Stanley S. Stegura
Funeral Home Inc., 614 S.
Hanover St., Nanticoke,
with deacon Thadeus
Wadas ofciating. Final
interment will be in the
family plot at Holy Trinity
Cemetery, Newport
Township. Friends may
call 5 p.m. until time of
service.
In lieu of owers, the
family requests donations
be made in Nicks mem-
ory to the Marine Corps
Association Foundation.
WILKES-BARRE A
heroin sale occurred in a car
while it was being driven
from Lee Park Avenue and
Division Street in Hanover
Township to a parking lot
on Hanover Street in Wilkes-
Barre, according to charges
led.
State police troopers with
the Vice and Narcotics Unit
arrested six people after the
alleged heroin exchange took
place Tuesday afternoon.
Some of those arrested
have previously been arrest-
ed on prior drug offenses in
Luzerne County.
Nelson Soto, Lamar
Thomas Brown, Khalif
Mitchell, John E. Simpson,
Teara PerryandAdamJames
Apitiliasimov were arraigned
on drug related charges by
District Judge Diana Malast
in Plains Township, and all
were jailed at the Luzerne
County Correctional Facility
for lack of $25,000 bail each.
TUNKHANNOCK
A former treasurer of the
Noxen Fire Volunteer Fire
Department accused of
stealing $34,183 in funds
acknowledged she had a
gambling problemwhen con-
fronted by the chief about
the missing money, arrest
papers said.
Robin Ann Gorton-
Parrish, 42, of Luzerne
waived her preliminary hear-
ing Wednesday, sending
charges of theft and forgery
to Wyoming County Court.
District Judge Carl Smith
allowed her to remain free on
$50,000 unsecured bail.
Arrest papers led by
Pennsylvania State Trooper
Edward Urban said Gorton-
Parrish used a department-
issued automatic teller
machine card to unlawfully
withdraw $17,651 in funds
and wrote out $16,532 in
checks to cash and herself,
including two on which she
forged the department presi-
dents name.
The alleged thefts came
to light on June 14 while the
departments annual carnival
was under way.
According to the afdavit
of probable cause to sup-
port the arrest and ling of
charges: On June 13 depart-
ment Chief Lewis Hackling
attempted to cash a check
worth $1,140 issued to him
from the department as
reimbursement for materi-
als he bought for the depart-
ment. However, instead
there being a balance of
approximately $20,000 in
the account, Hackling was
informed that there were
insufcient funds to cash the
check.
When Hackling later sent
a text message to Gorton-
Parrish about the depart-
ments checkbook and what
other checks were going to
bounce, she sent a text mes-
sage saying she was sorry
for what she did and asked
if she could repay the money.
Hackling said Gorton-
Parrish mentioned she had
a gambling problem and that
she needed to seek help for
issues, including gambling.
Hacklingmet withGorton-
Parrish and her ex-boyfriend
and member of the depart-
ment Matthew McCormack
at the Wyoming Valley Mall
where she handed over the
checkbook and an empty
cash box.
A review by the depart-
ment determined she wrote
out 11 checks and made
15 cash withdrawals from
ATMs in Wilkes-Barre.
Between April 11 and June
13 Gorton-Parrish made a
minimal deposit or none at
all of money from depart-
ment fundraisers.
None of the $2,100 raised
from the breakfast was
deposited. Only $990 of
the $5,322 from the pow-
wow was deposited and
$5,249 was missing from
the cash box for the carnival.
Gorton-Parrish who held
the elected treasurer posi-
tion for approximately 2 1/2
years, was the custodian of
the cash box and start-up
funds for the carnival. She
was responsible for issuing
the stand cash boxes and
taking custody of them and
their contents at the end of
the night.
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER NEWS THURSDAY, JULY 11, 2013 PAGE 7A
Woman charged with stealing $34,000 fromNoxen fre company
Jerry Lynott
jlynott@timesleader.com
1900 MEMORIAL HWY. SHAVERTOWN 1-800-49-SHOES
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Thursday, July 11
through
Saturday, July 13
Mon - Sat 10-5
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Four of six arrested in
drug sale have records
Edward Lewis
elewis@timesleader.com
K
PAGE 8A THURSDAY, JULY 11, 2013 www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER
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Editorial
Obamacare rules:
Its loosey-goosey time
MALLARD FILLMORE DOONESBURY
SEND US YOUR OPINION
Letters to the editor must include the writers name, address and daytime phone
number for verifcation. Letters should be no more than 250 words. We reserve
the right to edit and limit writers to one published letter every 30 days.
Email: mailbag@timesleader.com
Fax: 570-829-5537
Mail: Mail Bag, The Times Leader, 15 N. Main St.,
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711
oThEr oPiNioN: hEALTh rEForM
We would expect no less from
Americas modern and growing wel-
fare state:
The U.S. Department of Health
and Human Services says it will not
attempt to verify individual eligibil-
ity for Obamacare insurance subsi-
dies.
It instead will rely on self-report-
ing, with minimal efforts to verify
the accuracy of the information, The
Wall Street Journal reports.
The administration says that since
it delayed the employer mandate
until 2015 an illegal act, we con-
tend, given it violates the law passed
by Congress it cant expect indi-
viduals to provide documentation
that their employers dont offer
health insurance and, thus, they will
be eligible for taxpayer-subsidized
plans.
Allow us to translate: Government-
subsidized health insurance will be
available to all, with no checks or
balances, and likely forever, despite
promises of, someday, a robust
verication process.
After all, theres likely no way the
government will be able to corral all
of these horses stampeding out of
the barn.
Nod-nod, wink-wink. Hey, whats a
little (or a lot of) fraud, eh?
If you had any doubt that
Obamacare is anything other than
the latest in a long line of entitle-
ment programs, none should remain.
The Journal calculates that costs
associated with the loosey-goosey
verication standard could explode
by as much as a quarter of a trillion
dollars in the rst 10 years.
Obamacare must be taken out. For
surely, it will take out America.
The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review
Paycard fees hurt
low-paid workers
oThEr oPiNioN: WAgES
You must spend money to make
money. That axiom may be true, but
it doesnt follow that you must spend
money to get the money you already
made.
Yet thats what is happening as
an increasing number of employers
change their payroll systems to issue
prepaid cards theyre like debit
cards instead of traditional pay-
checks or direct deposits to workers
bank accounts.
The argument in favor of the
paycards is obvious for employers;
theyre cheaper to issue.
Theres an argument that the cards
are advantageous for workers, too;
funds become available on payday
without the delay of waiting for and
cashing a check.
But there is a big drawback with
the cards, one that hits Americas
lowest-paid workers the hardest at
some of the nations largest employ-
ers, including Wal-Mart.
Most of the cards charge the cus-
tomers the workers a fee to get
their money from an ATM. Thats not
right.
A charge of $1.50 per withdrawal,
for example, may not seem like a
lot, but those fees can add up, espe-
cially if there are other costs such as
monthly charges for statements, card
replacement, inactivity or using a
bank other than the one that issued
the card.
An employee at a McDonalds in
Milwaukee told The New York Times
that he spends $40 to $50 a month on
fees associated with his pay, and he
earns only $7.25 an hour.
Thats a sizable chunk of his income.
While proponents of the cards argue
that they still are cheaper than using
check-cashing services, which typi-
cally charge at least a 3 percent fee,
his experience refutes that.
Government agencies also are
starting to introduce the plastic pay-
ment method.
For example, Allegheny County
is planning to use the cards to issue
payments to foster parents.
Thats the wrong way to go. State
and local governments should be try-
ing to protect workers and consum-
ers from exploitation, not using the
service just because they can save a
few bucks on payroll processing.
When it comes to employee com-
pensation, the paycards might even
be illegal in Pennsylvania.
According to the state Department
of Labor and Industry, depending
on the details of each card program,
fees may constitute invalid deduc-
tions from employee wages, which
are prohibited under the states Wage
Payment and Collection Law. New
Yorks attorney general has started
an inquiry into the practice.
Theres nothing wrong with paying
employees with debit cards, as long
as there are no charges associated
with using them. Workers are enti-
tled to receive full payment of their
wages.
With the use of paycards grow-
ing, regulations are needed to pro-
tect consumers and prevent gouging
workers who are just trying to collect
what theyre owed for their labors.
(c)2013 Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
Visit the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette at
www.post-gazette.com
Distributed by MCT Information
Services
Your oPiNioN: LETTErS FroM our rEAdErS
A letter to
lawmakers: Shut
down station
This is a letter recently sent to
state Sen. Lisa Baker and State Rep.
Karen Boback:
From the time of PVR Partners
Chapin Dehydration Stations zon-
ing hearing in March of 2011, when
the Monroe Township zoning board
approved the permits because they
thought Gov. Tom Corbetts Act
13 would prevent them from not
approving the permit, to todays
third accidental blow off in nine
months, leaving the residents with
a terrible taste in their mouths and
dizziness, this gas processing facility
has been one big mistake.
After 9 months, PVR Partners,
the owners of the facility, still hasnt
given the residents a safety plan.
From my understanding, one was
supposed to be in place before the
station went on line.
From Tom Corbett on down,
nobody had the common sense to
see that such an industrial facility
has no business existing next to
where people live, children play, and
animals graze.
As a citizen of Pennsylvania, I
demand that you, Sen. Lisa Baker
and State Rep. Karen Boback do
whatever it takes to shut down the
Chapin Dehydration Station perma-
nently, so that the residents can go
back to living a peaceful life in the
country, free from worry that the sta-
tion will blow up, or that they will
suffer serious health problems from
breathing the harmful emissions.
This was built in a residential area
on your watch. Our legislators are
supposed to work for us, and it is
up to us to demand that they do, or
they will no longer be able to hold
such an ofce of public trust.
Twenty or more families are look-
ing to you to protect them from one
Green Monster as they call it, on
Route 309 on the Luzerne County
border. It shouldnt be hard to see
what is the right thing to do.
Scott Cannon
Plymouth
Rethink dress
code for GNA
students
I am writing in regard to the pos-
sible change in Nanticoke Areas
school dress code.
I do feel it is wise to rethink the
dress code. Uniforms do help to curb
the incidence of children being teased
because of how they are dressed how-
ever not every child has been able to
wear a uniform because many parents
in Nanticoke nd it difcult to buy
uniforms for their children.
If the code were changed to ban
hoodies, short skirts or shorts and
boys underwear from being displayed
because of their drooping pants that
would most likely appease everyone.
The other issue I see with a
change in dress code is it needs
to be decided and shared with the
public well in advance of the start of
the school year. Sometimes parents
buy clothes a little at a time or when
there is a sale.
Hop to it decision-makers; get
the ball rolling on this and make it
known in a timely fashion!
Rita Rasmus
Nanticoke
Discontinue
prayer at public
meetings
On June 13, 2013, I addressed
Wilkes-Barre City Council objecting
to government-led prayer and urging
council to remove prayer from gov-
ernment meetings. I detailed why I
object to governmental prayer in a
follow-up written piece now avail-
able on justinvacula.com, was since
featured in local media and was most
recently backed by the Freedom
From Religion Foundation (FFRF)
who joined me in my dispute with
Wilkes-Barre City Council.
FFRFs three-page letter argues
that government prayers are exclu-
sionary, unnecessary, inappropriate
and divisive while noting that council
members may pray on their own time
rather than during public meetings
in which they lend power and pres-
tige to religion in a governmental
endorsement which excludes 19% of
a nonreligious American population.
FFRF also states that [t]he state
of the law regarding the constitu-
tionality of government-sponsored
prayers is unstable, afrms the
secular character and founding of
the United States, and notes Jesus
exaltation during his Sermon on
the Mount address do not be like
the hypocrites, for they love to pray
standing in synagogues and on the
street corners to be seen by others.
when you pray, go into your room,
close the door and pray to your father
who is unseen (Matthew 6:5-6).
The letters nal paragraph reads,
The solution is simple: discontinue
ofcial, government prayers at your
meetings. We urge you to concen-
trate on civil matters and leave
religion to the private conscience
of each individual. If government
meetings must show reverence, let
it be for our secular and godless
Constitution, which enshrines the
greatest American invention the
separation of state and church.
I will once again address council
in its next open meeting including
public comment on July 11, 2013.
I hope to see local residents at this
meeting and encourage them, like
me, to prepare ve-minute remarks
addressing council whether they
deantly continue prayer or remove
it from the sessions.
Justin Vacula
Exeter
Hypnotherapist
wants to help
smokers quit
I am a certied hypnotherapist and
practice at the Holistic Health Center
in Tunkhannock. I am writing you to
inform people that hypnosis is a prov-
en effective method to quit smoking.
There are many people out there
who feel trapped, or feel that they
will never be able to kick the habit. I
want to give those people some hope.
There is a method to quit and its
been around for hundreds of years.
Anyone can be hypnotized. In fact
we are hypnotized every day without
even knowing it. Just take a look at
those TV commercials. They are the
modern form of hypnosis. For those
of you who are scared of hypnosis,
I just want to let you know that all
hypnosis is self-hypnosis. I dont
control your mind .n fact you are in
control all the time. I cannot make
you do anything you dont want to
do. Thank you and I hope I can help
some people who think that there is
no way out of the habit.
Ronald Dean
Laceyville
Aprimer onhow
bodys bloodpumps
It recently occurred to me that the
amount of oxygen that is left in the
blood decreases as it travels from the
point where the blood is oxygenated
(in the lungs) to more distant parts of
the body. The farther away a part of the
body is from the more highly oxygen-
ated blood supply the less oxygen will
be available for this part of the body.
Those tissues that are closer to
the heart where the highly oxygenat-
ed blood is pumped to the rest of the
body would have an easier time to
get a full supply of oxygenated blood
to meet its needs. And those tissues
farther from this oxygenated blood
supply would have a harder time to
get its full share of this oxygenated
blood. This would also be true for
the brain and its circulatory system.
It is also well known that when a
person exercises, blood is diverted
from different parts of the body to
the muscles involved in the exercise.
This would also have a bearing
on the amount of oxygen that a tis-
sue normally recieves. And all of
this could have an effect on how an
organ or body tissue works.
Jacob Corney
Edwardsville
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER THURSDAY, JULY 11, 2013 PAGE 9A SERVING THE PUBLIC TRUST SINCE 1881
PAGE 10A THURSDAY, JULY 11, 2013 NEWS www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER
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91/64
Los Angeles
79/67
Washington
86/70
New York
83/70
Miami
89/77
Atlanta
85/71
Detroit
79/59
Houston
95/76
Kansas City
86/66
Chicago
80/57
Minneapolis
84/66
El Paso
97/77
Denver
94/68
Billings
94/66
San Francisco
67/54
Seattle
71/53
Toronto
76/59
Montreal
73/59
Winnipeg
86/69
SEVEN-DAY FORECAST
HIGH
LOW
TEMPERATURES
ALMANAC NATIONAL FORECAST
PRECIPITATION
Lehigh
Delaware
Sunrise Sunset
Moonrise Moonset
Today Today
Today Today
Susquehanna Stage Chg Fld Stg
RIVER LEVELS
ACROSS THE REGION TODAY
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation today. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Shown is
todays weather.
Temperatures are
todays highs and
tonights lows.
SUN & MOON
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy,
c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.
Wilkes-Barre
Scranton
Philadelphia
Reading
Pottsville
Allentown
Harrisburg
State College
Williamsport
Towanda
Binghamton
Syracuse
Albany
Poughkeepsie
New York
PHILADELPHIA
THE JERSEY SHORE
FRI SUN
MON TUE
SAT
WED
TODAY
83
61
A thunder-
storm in
spots
81 57
A p.m.
t-storm
possible
87 62
A thunder-
storm pos-
sible
87 64
Sunny
88 67
A p.m.
t-storm
possible
84 58
Partly
sunny, a
shower
86 63
A couple
of thun-
derstorms
COOLING DEGREE DAYS
Degree days are an indicator of energy needs. The more the
total degree days, the more energy is necessary to cool.
Yesterday 11
Month to date 124
Year to date 324
Last year to date 334
Normal year to date 213
Anchorage 71/55/pc 69/56/s
Baltimore 87/67/t 85/65/t
Boston 83/68/t 74/61/c
Buffalo 74/60/pc 76/60/pc
Charlotte 84/70/t 84/67/t
Chicago 80/57/s 83/61/s
Cleveland 76/60/pc 78/61/s
Dallas 102/79/pc 102/76/s
Denver 94/68/pc 97/65/t
Honolulu 88/75/pc 88/74/s
Indianapolis 82/60/s 83/62/s
Las Vegas 96/75/t 98/84/t
Milwaukee 78/59/s 78/64/s
New Orleans 89/76/t 91/73/t
Norfolk 87/73/t 82/70/t
Okla. City 99/74/pc 98/73/s
Orlando 91/73/t 90/73/t
Phoenix 101/87/t 105/88/t
Pittsburgh 76/58/t 80/57/pc
Portland, ME 80/65/t 72/63/c
St. Louis 85/64/s 87/65/s
San Francisco 67/54/pc 67/54/s
Seattle 71/53/pc 73/53/s
Wash., DC 86/70/t 88/67/t
Bethlehem 2.57 -0.23 16
Wilkes-Barre 5.80 -0.06 22
Towanda 4.44 +0.32 16
Port Jervis 3.47 -0.37 18
In feet as of 7 a.m. Wednesday.
Today Fri Today Fri Today Fri
Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. 2013
July 15 July 22
July 29
First Full
Last New
Aug 6
5:41 a.m.
8:59 a.m.
8:37 p.m.
10:14 p.m.
THE POCONOS
Highs: 76-82. Lows: 56-62. Variable cloudiness today with a couple of
showers and a thunderstorm; humid.
Highs: 79-85. Lows: 68-74. Humid today with a couple of drenching
showers and thunderstorms; watch for flash flooding.
THE FINGER LAKES
Highs: 75-81. Lows: 56-62. Sun and clouds today with a shower or
thunderstorm around. Partly cloudy tonight.
NEW YORK CITY
High: 83. Low: 70. Variable cloudiness today with a couple of showers
and a thunderstorm; humid.
High: 86. Low: 70. Humid today with a couple of drenching showers
and thunderstorms; watch for flash flooding.
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton International Airport
through 7 p.m. Wed.
High/low 84/68
Normal high/low 82/61
Record high 101 (1936)
Record low 46 (1894)
24 hrs ending 7 p.m. Trace
Month to date 0.47"
Normal m-t-d 1.14"
Year to date 15.67"
Normal y-t-d 18.97"
83/61
80/62
86/70
84/65
84/60
83/64
84/64
79/58
84/59
82/56
78/56
78/59
80/64
82/64
83/70
Summary: Showers and drenching, gusty thunderstorms will stretch from Florida
and Louisiana to Maine, and more sporadic fashion over the Southwest today.
Strong storms will reach from Tennessee to Colorado.
walking down the alley barking like dogs,
theyd be ghting, theyd be screaming at
2, 3 and 4 oclock in the morning.
West Pittston police assisted in the raid
and kept Liberty Street closed for most of
the day.
A Dodge Ram truck parked in front of
the house was searched.
According to the indictment,
Morgans and Policare conspired to dis-
tribute 7,000 grams or more of a mix-
ture or substance known as bath salts
since December 2011. The indictment
also seeks the forfeiture of the property,
a bank account in the name of Morgans,
a 2005 Chevrolet Colorado pickup
truck, and $700,000.
The indictment does not say the source
of the money or howMorgans and Policare
obtained the substance.
Morgans and Policare appeared
before U.S. Magistrate Judge Malachy
E. Mannion in Scranton late Wednesday
morning. They are being held pending a
detention hearing at a later date.
In October 2011, the U.S. Drug
Enforcement Administration issued
an order designating certain synthetic
substances illegal under the Controlled
Substance Act.
Nothing could be worse than bath
salts, Biscotto said. All drugs are bad
but bath salts, it alters your behavior and
makes people crazy. Im glad police came
and made the arrests. They did a great
job.
Bath salts
From page 1A
until the city re-inspects
it, Wilkes-Barre Municipal
Affairs Manager Drew
McLaughlin said.
Court records say
Ovalles is facing felony
charges for the near
fatal shooting of Michael
Kubiak on Jan. 9. Kubiak
was shot several times in
the face, leg and chest
while he was driving
Ovalles with intentions to
buy heroin, according to
arrest records.
Kubiak drove himself
to Wilkes-Barre General
Hospital where he was
found stumbling in the
parking lot.
In the latest case, an
unnamed witness told
police he was attending
a party at the house and
was talking to another
man in front when Kemp
showed up and soon
thereafter, Ovalles.
As Ovalles and Kemp
were arguing, a large
group of people walked
from the back yard to the
front. One person from
the group yelled, East
side as Ovalles respond-
ed, West side and
allegedly discharged two
rounds from a handgun
in the air, the complaint
says.
The unnamed witness
ran to the back and heard
more gunre. He identi-
ed Ovalles by his street
name, Jay Crim.
A second unnamed wit-
ness told police he was at
the party when Ovalles
arrived at about 12:30
a.m.. A large group of
people including Kemp
gathered in front. Ovalles
was overheard saying, I
have a problem with this
guy, referring to Kemp,
and I am going to get
my gun, according to the
complaint.
The second witness
entered the house and
heard two gunshots. He
went back outside, seeing
Ovalles holding a gun and
Kemp throwing a beer
bottle at Ovalles.
Police allege in the
complaint the second
witness saw Ovalles re
more rounds at Kemp
who was running toward
the backyard and Ovalles
driving away in a Honda
Civic.
Police were called to
the house on a report of
a large ght with shots
red and found Kemp
lying in the backyard.
Kemp was transported
to Geisinger Wyoming
Valley Medical Center,
where he was pronounced
dead at 2:05 a.m. Sunday,
about 45 minutes after he
was shot.
The complaint says
Kemp was shot in the
lower back and buttocks
area, indicating he was
running away from the
gunman.
District Judge Martin
Kane signed the arrest
warrant for Ovalles, who
has not been captured.
Police consider Ovalles
to be armed and danger-
ous. He is described by
police as a Hispanic male,
6 feet 2 inches tall, about
190 pounds, black hair
and brown eyes. Anyone
with information about
Ovalles whereabouts is
asked to call 911.
Ovalles was free on
$100,000 bail on charges
he attempted to kill Kubiak
in January. He was also
free on $1,000 bail on
heroin possession charges,
according to court records.
Homicide
From page 1A
Medicaid
From page 1A
Ferner retired early from the Air
Force in 2010 and moved to New
Zealand, his wifes native country. He
lives on a 25-acre alpaca farm and is
taking classes at a local university
there. He was not available for com-
ment Wednesday.
Law rms statement
According to Angie Moreschi, com-
munications director/investigator at
James Hoyer Newcomer & Smiljanich,
the law rm issued a press release
detailing the case that has caught
national attention.
The release states: This was a case of
fraud, waste and abuse involving taxpay-
er moneythat one militaryofcer refused
to accept. Its been a frustrating and life
changing ordeal for Lt. Col. Ferner, but
we salute his effort to expose wrongdo-
ing, even though it put his career on the
line by bucking the chain of command.
According to the release, Ferner
was chief of staff for the Coalition and
Irregular Warfare Center at Nellis Air
Force Base in Las Vegas when SAIC
was awarded a multi-million-dollar
contract in 2007 to help CIWC develop
enhanced warfare capabilities in the
ght against terrorism. Ferner became
suspicious that normal contract proce-
dures were bypassed and was alarmed
that his military supervisors condoned
and wanted to cover up the violation.
Ferner is quoted in the release, stat-
ing: We were basically paying guys to
sit around at computers and play games.
The more contractors that came in, the
less work that got done. And the more
that occurred, the angrier I got, because
we were not being good stewards of the
taxpayers money. It was wrong. It was
illegal and it was immoral.
Told to keep quiet
The release states Ferner reported
his concerns up the chain of command,
but his efforts to expose the wrongdo-
ing were rebuffed.
He was toldto keepquiet, the release
states. When he wouldnt, he eventually
faced retaliation. His superiors threat-
ened to deploy him to Afghanistan while
he was undergoing cancer treatment.
Ultimately, Ferner was red from his job
and relegated to a menial position with
little to no responsibility.
The whistle blower suit was joined
by the U.S. Department of Justice. As
a reward under the False Claims Act
for exposing fraud against the govern-
ment, Lt Col Ferner received nearly
$1 million of the nearly $5.75 million
SAIC paid back to the government.
The Justice Department issueda state-
ment on the settlement:
Federal contracts must be awarded
based on full disclosure and fair deal-
ing. It is completely unacceptable for
taxpayer dollars to be paid under cir-
cumstances where the integrity of the
contracting process has been under-
mined.
SAICs viewpoint
Jennifer A. Gephart, spokeswoman
for SAIC, said the company acknowl-
edges a settlement has been reached
with the Department of Justice in the
amount of $5.75M. She provided a
statement from the company on the
settlement:
SAIC disputes the allegations
brought in a complaint by DOJ, but
agreed to settle to avoid cost of pro-
tracted litigation. SAIC was and con-
tinues to be fully cooperative with the
federal government and transparent in
disclosure of information to the DOJ.
Charles Ferner said he is proud of
what his son did to expose fraud.
If he had kept his mouth shut he
probably could have made general,
he said.When I moved here from
New Jersey, I wanted my kids to go to
Scranton Prep and be educated by the
Jesuits. His actions speak well for that
education.
Several other pension oddi-
ties came up Wednesday:
Michael Shucosky will start
receiving a $1,445 monthly
retirement later this month
even though he still works in
county government.
Shucosky is permitted to
receive a pension for past coun-
ty employment while working
as county court administrator
because his current position is
funded and controlled by the
state, ofcials said.
The county pension was
based on Shucoskys more
than 14 years of employment
in county-funded family court,
Hummer said.
Shucosky is eligible to collect
the pension because he turned
60 last month. Former county
employees with less than 20
years of employment generally
must wait until age 60 to receive
a pension, while those with
20-plus years can retire at 55.
Former county District
Attorney Jackie Musto Carroll
is permitted to continue receiv-
ing a county pension even
though she was recently hired
as a part-time assistant county
solicitor for $39,885, Hummer
said.
The state pension law says
retirees can return to work part-
time as long as they work fewer
than 1,000 hours annually.
Hummer said at least one
other retiree still works part-
time for the county, and he
monitors payroll hours. If retir-
ees exceed 1,000 hours, he must
halt their pension because they
would be considered full-time.
Another pension quirk
allowed Musto Carroll to start
collecting a $1,005 monthly pen-
sion last year when she was 52.
Musto Carroll had 12 years of
county employment at the time,
and the law allows employees
with more than eight years of
service to collect pensions early
if theyre involuntarily elimi-
nated through a layoff or loss of
a re-election campaign. Musto
Carroll lost a campaign against
District Attorney Stefanie
Salavantis in November 2011.
Elizabeth (Decker)
Topolski, who ran the protho-
notarys ofce in 2009 after
Jill Morans resignation until
Carolee Medico Olenginski
took ofce, returned to county
employment in the court sys-
tem in January 2012 and is
seeking pension credit for her
prior county employment.
State law allows employees to
buy back past full-time county
employment if they left and
later returned to work a prac-
tice that increases their future
pension.
The board tabled Topolskis
request Wednesday because
county Manager Robert
Lawton, a board member, ques-
tioned if the county can force
Topolski to pay interest on the
purchase price to compensate
the fund for losing out on poten-
tial investment earnings when
her initial employee contribu-
tions were withdrawn.
Topolski received $4,483
the money she paid into the
fund plus interest when she
left county employment, and
thats the amount Hummer stat-
ed must be paid back to buy the
credit. Hummer said he and the
board solicitor reviewed the law
after the meeting and saw no
authority permitting the board
to charge Topolski additional
interest.
In addition to the Shucoskys
pension, the board approved
four monthly pensions over
$1,000 Wednesday: Florence
Muth, $3,723; Al Guerin,
$2,796; Al Flora, who was
terminated as chief public
defender in April, $2,682; John
Sieminski, $2,312; and Paul
McGarry, $2,308.
Pension
From page 1A
Fraud
From page 1A
Pete G. Wilcox | The Times Leader
Police investigate a shooting in Wilkes-Barre on Tuesday night. Police said a 37-year-old man was
shot in the leg on Harkins Lane. The name of the victim was not released. Police said the man
was transported to a local medical facility for a non-life threatening gunshot wound. A firearm
was found on the sidewalk in the area of 43 Harkins Lane. Police said the gunman fled the area
after the shooting that was reported at 9:26 p.m.
Investigation continues
expansion, but she does have trepi-
dation about costs down the road
and that the federal government
might leave Pennsylvania holding
the bag. She said she didnt think it
was appropriate to have the expan-
sion language in a bill that included
language on changing the name of
the Department of Public Welfare,
which she opposes.
Toohil also said it doesnt make
sense to her to pump more money
federal or otherwise into a
Medicaid system that is broken
and currently doesnt provide enough
access to high-quality care, noting
that many physicians in the area no
longer accept Medicaid patients.
Toohil said she believes AdultBasic
a state-subsidized health insur-
ance plan for the working poor
should be reinstated, and more study
of the Medicaid system is needed.
She thinks establishing more free
clinics could help people who cant
afford insurance until the Medicaid
system is xed. And she encouraged
those who cant afford insurance or
treatment, such as Yanko, to come
to her ofce for help nding possible
solutions.
Guy Anthony, a demonstrator
from Montgomery County, said fed-
eral dollars would pay for the expan-
sion for the rst three years and 90
percent after that. He said if federal
funding decreased, Pennsylvania
could drop out of the program.
Told what Anthony said, Toohil
responded that it would be hard to
discontinue the expansion because
you already created dependency.
Anthony, said it was encourag-
ing to see the Senate put partisan-
ship aside and put together a plan
that addressed all these concerns
that (Toohil) claims to have. He
said the House Republican plan
is to create a task force to study
all the other studies that theyve
already studied and then send a
recommendation on those studies
back to the House.
Thats the plan: Do nothing; study,
study, study it to death. My question
you can put to her is, while theyre
studying it, does she have any idea
how many of the 700,000 people are
going to be dead by the time theyre
done studying? Anthony said.
Mark Dent
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
STATE COLLEGE
The theme song from
Skyfall crackles out
of raised speakers in a
hotel ballroom festooned
with chandeliers. Youve
heard Adeles lyrics. She
sings about standing tall
together when the sky
crumbles, where worlds
collide and days are
dark.
As the song fades out, Franco
Harris takes the stage alone,
wearing a navy sports coat. His
hair is thinning, but his beard is
thick. He has a microphone in
his hand, a captivated
audience at his feet and
another mans legacy on
his mind rather than his
own.
In the wild month of
November 2011, when
Penn State football coach
Joe Paterno was red,
Harris visited State
College several times.
Driving back to Pittsburgh from
one of these jaunts, he called Bob
Capretto, his friend and a former
Penn State football player. Mr.
Capretto remembers Harris say-
ing, Look Bob, Im going to
be very vocal about this. Youd
better distance yourself from me
because there are going to be
people coming after me.
The rst time Harris spoke
out in support of Paterno in the
wake of the Jerry Sandusky child
sexual abuse scandal, Meadows
Casino and Race Track halted a
sponsorship deal it had recent-
ly made with him. Pittsburgh
Mayor Luke Ravenstahl then
asked him to step down as the
chair of the Pittsburgh Promise
charity.
In the weeks following his
dismissal in 2011, Ravenstahl
received more criticism, and
Harris was quickly reinstated.
Appreciation for his former
coach and a gut feeling drove his
actions.
It was a start where you really
felt that you didnt know where
this was going, he said. You
felt kind of alone. In my wildest
dreams I wouldnt have guessed
where weve come out today.
Harris one-man rebellion has
HARRIS
Ronald Blum
AP Sports Writer
NEW YORK We may
never know exactly what Alex
Rodriguez and Ryan Braun are
being accused of in Major League
Baseballs Biogenesis investiga-
tion if they beat the rap.
Thats because details likely
will be caught in a tangle of legal
gymnastics involving MLB, the
players union and probably an
arbitrator, who could rule no dis-
cipline is warranted.
Lengthy proceedings make it
nearly a certainty most, if not all,
suspensions would be served in
2014.
Among the early legal issues:
Does the commissioners ofce
have the right to announce any
suspensions before grievances are
decided by an arbitrator? Can a
player not previously disciplined
under the drug agreement be sus-
pended for more than 50 games
because of multiple violations?
Two people familiar with the
investigation said if manage-
ment and the union cant agree
on the process, arbitrator Fredric
Horowitz likely would be asked
to decide. The people spoke on
condition of anonymity because
no public statements were autho-
rized.
MLB has spent most of the
year investigating about 20 play-
ers for their links to Biogenesis
of America, including A-Rod and
Braun, both former MVPs. Miami
New Times reported in January
that the closed Florida anti-aging
clinic had distributed banned
performance-enhancing drugs to
major leaguers.
Lawyers for the commission-
ers ofce have been interview-
ing players and many, including
Braun, have refused to answer
questions about their dealings
with Biogenesis, the two people
said. Braun was interviewed in
late June, and Rodriguez is sched-
uled to be interviewed Friday.
Braun and Rodriguez have said
they didnt do anything that mer-
its discipline.
The players refusal to respond
to MLBs questions were rst
reported by ESPN and the New
York Daily News.
MLB hopes to complete the
player interviews in mid-July but
is not sure whether it will meet
that schedule. Management then
will have to decide what disci-
pline it intends to impose.
Baseballs joint drug agreement
calls for a 50-game suspension
for a rst offense, 100 games for
a second and a lifetime ban for a
third. Among the players linked
to Biogenesis, Torontos Melky
MLBdrug probe litigation could be lengthy
Jerome Pugmire
AP Sports Writer
MONT- S AI NT- MI CHEL,
FRANCE Halfway through the
Tour de France, Chris Froome
appears unstoppable after
extending the lead on his rivals
in the time trial on Wednesday.
A l t h o u g h
Froome missed
out on his second
stage win by 12
seconds to win-
ner Tony Martin
of Germany, the
stage 11 perfor-
mance felt like
a big victory
for the British rider because his
challengers were at least two
minutes slower.
My biggest race today was
with the other GC riders,
Froome said. Ive extended
my lead so Im very happy with
that.
Spanish rider Alejandro
Valverde is still in second place
overall but 3 minutes, 25 seconds
behind Froome, while Alberto
Contador improved to fourth but
is 3:54 behind.
Meanwhile, the 2010 Tour
champ Andy Schleck and 2011
winner Cadel Evans lost massive
time.
Im happy with my shape,
Froome said. I think Ive shown
in the mountains that I can hold
my own and time trial, also.
As the two-time world time
trial champion, Martin did
not disappoint over the 20.5-
mile route in Normandy from
Avranches to the breathtaking
island citadel of Mont-Saint-
Michel.
Hats off to Tony Martin,
Froome said. It just goes to
show what class he has.
Froome was quicker over the
Tour leader Froome gains bigger lead on rivals
AP Photo
Beads of sweat poor down as Tony Martin rides through the individual time trial
during the eleventh stage of the Tour de France on Wednesday.
Harris crusade is defending late PSU coach Paterno
Drs Diet Plan & John Brady, M.D.
has relocated to 161 Main Street, Luzerne 570 -338-2521
We look forward to seeing you in our new convenient, state-of-the-art location.
Board Certifed 20 years of Experience General Medicine www.thedoctorsdietplan.com
80011083
NOTICE TO ALL PATIENTS
FROOME
See HARRIS | 4B
See MLB | 4B
See FROOME | 4B
Robert Kraft claims he was
duped, though the owner of
the New England Patriots
seemed to have plenty of
warnings before taking tight
end Aaron Hernandez
in the 2010 NFL draft.
The fact Hernandez
was left untouched by
other teams until mid-
way through the fourth
round despite his obvi-
ous physical skills was
one. So was an inci-
dent while Hernandez
was at the University
of Florida, when the
17-year-old allegedly
refused to pay for two
drinks at a bar andthen
sucker-punched an employee
who tried to collect.
And then there was a
psychological prole from a
scouting service widely dis-
tributed among NFL teams
that ranked him on the bot-
tom of the scale for social
maturity and indicated there
could be problems ahead.
Hernandezs responses
suggest that he enjoys living
on the edge of acceptable
behavior and that he may be
prone to partying too much
and doing questionable
things that could be seen as
a problem for him and his
team, said the report by
Human Resource Tactics,
which was obtained by Wall
Street Journal.
If Kraft was duped, so
were fans who shelled out
100 bucks for a No. 81 jer-
sey. They didnt have access
to psychological proles,
didnt know much about
Hernandez other than he
was a big tight end with soft
hands.
They loved him because
he could catch touchdown
passes, and they cheered
before last season when he
was given a new $40 million
contract to be Tom Bradys
biggest target.
Now Hernandez sits in a
jail cell, charged with a mur-
der portrayed in court docu-
ments as a cold-blooded exe-
cution. He has pleaded not
guilty to the charge. Hes also
being investigated in connec-
tion with a double killing in
Boston last year involving a
car rented in his name.
Millionaire sports hero
one day, just another inmate
the next. There may never
have been such a spectacular
fall by an active player.
During the weekend,
the Patriots held an event
for fans to exchange their
Hernandez jerseys for oth-
ers.
The conversations on the
drive to the stadium must
have been awkward. How do
you tell a kid that the athlete
he or she idolized whose
name was stitched across
their back is an accused
killer?
There are other conversa-
tions that should be just as
uncomfortable: Howcan par-
ents promote hero worship
of athletes when they know
so little about the person in
the uniform? Why are we
so quick to idolize someone
based simply on their ability
to throw or catch a ball?
Hernandez is, of course,
innocent until found guilty.
Thats a basic tenet of our
legal system, and sometimes
things arent always what
authorities say.
But the account of semi
pro player Odin Lloyd being
lured to an early morning car
ride and then shot to death
at what was supposed to be
a bathroom stop is chilling.
So is the police narrative of
Hernandezs reaction when
they asked him later about
a body being found nearby.
They said he didnt ask who
died.
Whats with
all the ques-
tions? police said
Hernandez asked
before shutting the
door on them. He
returned with his
attorneys business
card, but didnt
respond when police
told him they were
investigating the
death, according to
court records. This
isnt just another NFL play-
er arrest, something weve
become accustomed to over
the years. This is uncharted
territory, as evidenced by the
way Kraft and the Patriots
handled it.
Criticize them for signing
Hernandez in the rst place,
sure, but within 90 minutes
of his arrest, they cut him
despite knowing theyd have
to take a hit on the salary
cap. His locker was quickly
cleaned out, and they fur-
ther washed their hands of
him with the jersey trade-in
weekend at Gillette Stadium.
What weve generally seen
in the past when athletes
run afoul with the law, teams
generally stick with their
stars especially through the
legal process like the Ravens
did with Ray Lewis, said
Ramsey Poston, a crisis
communication expert who
heads Tuckahoe Strategies,
a public relations rm in
Denton, Md. This is a very
different move, one that sug-
gests to me that the organi-
zation takes its reputation
very seriously.
The Patriots should have
quit there, but Kraft talked
to a select group of media on
Monday and said Hernandez
seemed like a nice enough
guy. Respectful, likable, he
even gave Kraft a check for
his late wifes charity after
signing a new contract.
Maybe Kraft didnt read
the psychological review,
though it hardly matters.
Because in football in all
sports, really the urge to
win trumps everything and
teams with the most tal-
ented players win more than
others.
Its why baseball teams
reward known steroid users
with fat new contracts, and
why players such as Pacman
Jones keep getting chances
in the NFL.
Indeed, Hernandez was
a winner on the eld, help-
ing the Patriots get to their
last Super Bowl, where he
caught a touchdown pass
and led the teamin receiving
yards.
Sometimes, though,
theres a price to pay for put-
ting winning ahead of every-
thing.
Fans, meanwhile, prob-
ably wont give it a second
thought except to ponder
who the Patriots might nd
to replace Hernandez. Not
their fault he was drafted by
the team, certainly not their
fault he was charged with
murder.
Besides, when it comes
to hero worship, theres
always another player. And,
of course, another jersey to
be had.
TimDahlberg is a national sports
columnist for TheAssociated Press.
Write to himat tdahlbergap.org or
http://twitter.com/timdahlberg
timesleader.com
THETIMES LEADER
Thursday, July 11, 2013
SPORTS
Hernandez
shows perils of
hero worship
Tim
Dahlberg
AP Sports
Columnist
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Yankees shortstop Derek Jeter, center, grounds out in the first inning as Rochester first baseman
Chris Colabello, right, awaits the throw and home plate umpire Chad Whitson watches from behind at
PNC Field in Moosic on Wednesday night. Jeter is on a rehab assignment with the RailRiders.
See RAILRIDERS | 4B
Rochester pitcher silences RailRiders
By DAVE ROSENGRANT
drosengrant@timesleader.com
MOOSIC For the rst
time since Derek Jeter
was in town with the
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre,
the RailRiders lost a ball
game.
Rochester and a
power outage at PNC
Field ruined Jeters
party on Wednesday
night as starting pitch-
er Liam Hendriks held
SWB in check over eight
innings allowing just one
run on three hits as the
Red Wings stopped the
RailRiders six-game win
streak with a 5-1 win at
PNC Field.
Jeter, meanwhile saw
a lot of action in the
eld being a part of six
plays, but the 39-year-old
Yankee captain looked a
bit rusty having trouble
on an exchange once and
committing a throwing
error on another.
The third inning was an
eventful frame for Jeter.
First, he took a one-
hopper, backed up,
planted on his left foot
and threw a strike to
rst. Two batters later,
he charged a bouncer to
the left side then threw to
third on a elders choice.
The very next ball in play
was hit up the middle that
Jeter went to his left and
got to, but no out was
recorded on the ineld
single. He got a chance
on the next ball in play
again. This time a hard
grounder hit mildly to his
right. He had a little trou-
ble getting a grip on the
ball, but threw to second
in time for the force out.
Then in the fourth
inning with two outs,
he charged once again,
elded the slow-hopper
throwing to rst to get
the out. On the next
opportunity he wasnt
so fortunate going to his
left then bouncing a ball
on the throw to rst that
went for an error.
I felt good. There was
a lot of different situa-
tions that happened. It
was good to do an array
of things there, said
Jeter, who signed auto-
graphs during the 21-min-
ute delay while the lights
on the left side of the eld
were out.
During his press con-
ference he said that he
had not been informed
yet by New York person-
nel where he would be
playing today because the
Yankees game had just
concluded. But if his time
with the RailRiders is up,
he enjoyed it.
The fans have been
great to me while Ive
Jeter makes six
plays in the feld
and commits an
error at short
PAGE 2B THURSDAY, JULY 11, 2013 SCOREBOARD www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER
BWBL raises funds with tournament
Photo provided
The Backyard Wiffle Ball League (BWBL) recently hosted its 9
th
annual BWBL
Charity Classic to benefit local resident Dan Peck. Peck recent underwent both
heart and liver transplants within a week of each other. A 15-team WIFFLE ball
tournament was held at the Leagues Diamond City Park at Fred Banks and
Eddie Degnan Field in the North End section of Wilkes-Barre. Through the entry
fees and concession sales, the BWBLwas able to donate $1,500 to Peck to help
defray some of his medical costs. Pictured: Andy Peck; Dan Peck; Kevin Sickle,
BWBL commissioner.
U11 Stoners second at Whitewater
Photo provided
The Greater Pittston Stoners recently finished second in the U11 division at
the Whitewater Soccer Tournament in Forty Fort. Pictured are team members.
First row, from left: Sydney Maguire, Morgan Beppler, Caitlin McDonough,
Abby Giunta, Lauren Parente. Second row: Sarah McCormick, Hannah Waleski,
Abigail Yatsko, Tierney Porfirio, Amanda McCormick. Coaches: Robert Yatsko
and Jason McDonough.
Pocono Downs Results
Tuesday, July 09, 2013
First - $13,000 Pace 1:52.0
1-Nassau County (An McCarthy) 2.80 2.10 2.10
2-Im Banksy (Th Jackson) 13.60 8.00
6-Enjoy The Ride (Mo Teague) 5.60
EXACTA (1-2) $50.60
50 CENT TRIFECTA (1-2-6) $343.80
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $85.95
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (1-2-6-8) $1,947.00
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $97.35
Scratched: Natives Revenge
Second - $12,000 Trot 1:57.4
7-Mystical Cheetah (Ma Romano) 24.40 9.40 3.40
1-Callmeclassylady (Er Carlson) 4.40 2.80
3-Abbiesgotattitude (An McCarthy) 2.10
EXACTA (7-1) $92.00
50 CENT TRIFECTA (7-1-3) $190.80
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $47.70
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (7-1-3-2) $736.40
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $36.82
DAILY DOUBLE (1-9) $2.80
DAILY DOUBLE (1-7) $32.80
Scratched: Chicago Fire
Third - $13,000 Pace 1:56.0
6-Barefoot Beauty (Do McNair) 2.40 2.10 2.10
5-Fancy Desire (Ty Buter) 3.00 2.40
4-Mysticity (Ke Wallis) 2.60
EXACTA (6-5) $7.40
50 CENT TRIFECTA (6-5-4) $25.20
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $6.30
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (6-5-4-3) $223.60
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $11.18
PICK 3 - 15% TAKEOUT (1-7-6) $145.40
Scratched: Somenicebeach
Fourth - $9,000 Pace 1:52.2
5-No Bu (Ja Morrill Jr) 2.60 2.20 2.10
8-Open Water (Er Carlson) 7.40 4.20
2-Art Of Illusion (An McCarthy) 2.10
EXACTA (5-8) $27.80
50 CENT TRIFECTA (5-8-2) $48.20
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $12.05
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (5-8-2-3) $269.60
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $13.48
Scratched: Shamderock, Ya Gotta Go
Fifth - $8,500 Trot 1:55.4
2-Cds Eldorado (Ge Napolitano Jr) 4.00 2.20 2.10
5-Divas Photo (Ja Morrill Jr) 2.60 2.80
4-Savage Pride (Th Jackson) 3.60
EXACTA (2-5) $8.60
50 CENT TRIFECTA (2-5-4) $26.20
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $6.55
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (2-5-4-7) $200.40
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $10.02
Sixth - $9,000 Pace 1:51.1
5-American Gi (Ke Wallis) 23.00 10.80 5.00
7-Battle Call (Ty Buter) 14.80 7.00
1-Pembroke Dewey (Ge Napolitano Jr) 2.80
EXACTA (5-7) $253.20
50 CENT TRIFECTA (5-7-1) $1,547.40
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $386.85
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (5-7-1-6) $29,562.20
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $1,478.11
PICK 3 - 15% TAKEOUT (5-2-5) $347.80
PICK 3 - 15% TAKEOUT (6-2-5) $347.80
Seventh - $10,000 Trot 1:55.2
1-C-O-To Bluegrass (Si Allard) 7.00 3.20 3.40
2-Worthy Advantage (Jo Drury) 4.80 5.40
6-Meadowbranch Red (Br Simpson) 8.20
EXACTA (1-2) $33.80
50 CENT TRIFECTA (1-2-6) $407.60
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $101.90
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (1-2-6-5) $1,735.40
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $86.77
Scratched: Rebel Strike
Eighth - $15,000 Pace 1:51.1
7-Hawaii And Sun (Th Jackson) 7.00 5.00 4.60
4-Charger Blue Chip (Er Carlson) 8.20 5.20
9-Cheyenne Reider (Ho Parker) 4.00
EXACTA (7-4) $60.80
50 CENT TRIFECTA (7-4-9) $532.00
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $133.00
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (7-4-9-1) $2,919.80
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $145.99
Ninth - $10,000 Trot 1:55.1
3-Dcs Piggy Bank (Ja Morrill Jr) 4.40 3.20 3.60
4-Fortissimo (Ma Romano) 7.80 8.00
6-Js Miss Linda (Ty Buter) 8.20
EXACTA (3-4) $41.40
50 CENT TRIFECTA (3-4-6) $302.80
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $75.70
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (3-4-6-7) $992.40
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $49.62
PICK 3 - 15% TAKEOUT (1-7-3) $213.20
Tenth - $15,000 Pace 1:51.4
5-Evenin Of Pleasure (McCarthy) 2.40 2.10 2.10
3-Lyons Meandragon (Ty Buter) 7.40 3.00
1-Allaboutme Hanover (Ja Morrill Jr) 3.60
EXACTA (5-3) $12.20
50 CENT TRIFECTA (5-3-1) $41.00
BULLETIN BoARD
BULLETIN BoARD
CAMPS/CLINICS
JP Andrejkos Monarch Basketball
Camp will be held at Kings College on
July 15-19. The camp is open to boys
ages 8-16 and will run from9 a.m. to
3:30 p.m., except for Friday (9 a.m.-
noon). The registration fee includes:
a camp T-shirt, awards, prizes, and
access to the colleges swimming pool.
For more information, call JPAndrejko
at 208-5900, ext. 5769, or email at
jpandrejko@kings.edu.
Kings College Field Hockey Camp will
be held July 15-19 from9 a.m. to noon.
Camp shirts and awards are included.
For more Information, call Cheryl Ish at
208-5900 ext. 5756.
Red and White Softball Skills Clinic
will be held July 15-19 from9 a.m.
to noon at the MMI Prep Athletic
Complex. The camp is open to all area
girls entering grades 4-9 in the fall.
The registration fee is $85, or $75 if
registered by July 1. To register, or for
more information, send your name,
phone number and camper name and
grade to mmisoftball@yahoo.com.
West Side Soccer Club will have a
Challenger Sports British Soccer
Camp. The camp runs fromJuly
15-19, at Hopkins Park in Edwardsville.
Challenger is the worlds leading
soccer camp. Visiting British coaches
stay with host families. All campers
receive a newsoccer ball, T-shirt,
evaluation and poster. For more
information on the camp and/or being
a host family, visit www.WSUSC.org or
call Matthewat 779-7785 and Ian at
877-439-9195.
LEAGUES
Checkerboard Inn Bowling League has
openings for teams in the upcoming
2013-2014 season. This is an 80
percent handicapped mens league
that bowls on Wednesdays at 6:45 p.m.
at Chackos Family Bowling Center.
League play is 34 weeks and will begin
in August 2013. For more information,
call Chackos or Frank Lipski at 675-
7532.
Dick McNulty Bowling League needs
two teams to fll their Tuesday night
winter bowling league. The league is
a mens league with an 80 percent
handicap. The league bowls on Tuesday
nights at 6:30 p.m. at Chackos
Family Bowling Center n Wilkes-Barre.
Call Wendy Thoman at 824-3086
or Fred Favire at 215-0180 for more
information.
MEETINGS
Kingston/Forty Fort Little League
Board of Directors will meet Sunday,
July 14, at 6 p.m. at the Forty Fort
borough building. Interested members
are encouraged to attend.
old Forge Gridiron Alumni Club will
hold its next monthly meeting on
Wednesday, July 17, at 7 p.m. in the
Cafe Rinaldi banquet room. Anyone
over the age of 21 who played at
least one year of varsity football
at Old Forge High School, and is
interested in becoming a member
of the club, is invited to attend. A
social will immediately followthe
meeting. For more information, email
OFGridironAlumniClub@yahoo.com.
PHYSICALS
Nanticoke Area Physical Examinations
for fall sports will be conducted at
the ofce of Dr. Jon Olenginski, 4 East
Main St., Nanticoke. Acompleted
PIAA-CIPPE formis required prior to
being given an exam. No physicals
will be done without a formsigned
by a parent/guardian. CIPPE forms
are available online at www.gnasd.
com<http://www.gnasd.com/> and
at the principals or athletic directors
ofces at the high school. No one will
practice without a physical exam.
Exams for football, boys soccer and
feld hockey will be Saturday, July 20
from8:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Exams for
girls volleyball, girls soccer and girls
volleyball will be Saturday, Aug. 10,
from8:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. If players
cant attend on their scheduled dates,
they may attend on the other day.
Wyoming Area Sports Physicals will
take place on the following dates for
the following sports: Girls Volleyball
9-12, Girls Field Hockey grades 7-12,
Cross Country grades 7-12 and Golf
grades 9-12 on July 17 at 3:15 p.m.
Girls and Boys Soccer grades 7-12,
Cheerleading grades 9-12 and Girl
Tennis grades 9-12 on July 24 at 3:15
p.m. All physicals will be done in the
feld house at the football stadium.
No physical will be done without
a complete PIAA/CIPPE physical
formsigned by a parent/guardian. If
you have not returned a completed
physical formyou may pick one up
at the Principals ofce or Nurses
ofce and bring it on the day of your
physical. If you are unable to attend
your scheduled physical day, you may
attend another day.
REGISTRATIoNS/TRYoUTS
Plymouth Shawnee Indians will be
having signups for youth football
and cheer at the Westover Field on
Rowe Lane Monday to Thursday from
5:30-7 p.m. Eligible children must be
between ages 5-14 years old and live
in the Plymouth, Courtdale, Pringle
and Luzerne areas. Parents are asked
to bring two proofs of residency, a
copy of a birth certifcate, one current
photo and a doctors note clearing the
child to play. Call 301-9744 for more
information.
UPCoMING EVENTS/oTHER
Backyard Wife Ball League is
hosting a Wife Ball and Horse Shoe
Tournament on Saturday, July 20, at 9
a.m. Its open to anyone age 12 and up.
Deadline to register is July 13.
Business Association of the Greater
Shickshinny Area will be holding its
14th annual golf tournament at the
Rolling pines in Berwick on July 16
from1-5 p.m. Registration begins at
12:30 p.m. with a 1 p.m. shotgun start.
Registration fee is $70 per golfer, $280
per foursome. For more information
or to register contact Rich Lapinski
542-7620, Brian Philips 542-5330,
fax 542-4045 or email brian.harvis@
epix.net.
Butler Township Police ofcers
Association will have its annual golf
tournament Friday, July 19, at Sand
Springs Country Club. The tournament
will have a shotgun start at 8:30
a.m. and the format will be four-man
scramble. The cost per player is $70
and the cost per teamis $280, which
includes green fees, cart, bufet dinner
after party, beverages, snacks, door
prizes, gifts and cash awards. The
tournament is limited to 100 golfers
and the deadline to enter is July 15.
Mail checks to Butler Township Police
Ofcers Association, 415 W. Butler
Drive, Drums, PA, 18222. For more
information or to reserve a spot in the
tournament, call 233-6664.
Crestwood Comet Football Golf
Tournament will be held Saturday,
July 13, at Sand Springs Country
Club with a shotgun start at 8 a.m.
Following golf there will be food and
refreshments inside the clubhouse.
Cost is $80 per player and $320
per foursome and includes golf cart,
prizes, food and refreshments, and a
gift. The booster club is also seeking
hole sponsors for $50 and $100.
For further information call Ken
Givens at 201-294-9673 or kgivens@
atlanticirrigation.com.
Helping Hands Society, a non-proft
organization for special needs children
in Hazleton, will have its second
annual Divots in the Dark night golf
tournament sponsored by Pedri
LawOfce, LLC. The tournament
will be held Friday, July 19, at 7:30
p.m. at Edgewood in the Pines.
Those not interested in golfng may
still register to eat and drink for
$30. For those interested in golfng
as well as the cookout the cost is
$50. Golfers will walk to four holes
with assistance fromglowsticks
and up lighting. All attendees can
participate in the two golf contests
that will be laid out close to the club
house. For more information or to
register call 455-4958 or visit www.
helpinghandssociety.com. Golfers
should register as soon as possible so
there are enough glowin the dark golf
balls for all players. All proceeds will go
to the services provided at the Helping
Hands Society.
Keystone Volunteer Fire Company No.
1 will have a golf tournament Saturday,
July 13 at Sand Springs Country Club.
The tournament will be a four-man
scramble with registration from12:30
p.m. to 1:15 p.m. The tournament
begins at 1:30 p.m. The cost is $75 per
person and all proceeds will beneft the
equipment fund. For more information,
call Scott Card at 956-3916.
Misericordia University will host a golf
tournament to beneft MUAthletics
Monday, July 22, at Huntsville Golf
Club. The cost of the captain and
crewevent is $175, includes cart,
greens fees, lunch, dinner, on-course
refreshments, range time and prizes.
Registration begins at 10 a.m. with
a shotgun start at 11 a.m. Acocktail
reception will be held at 4:30 p.m. with
awards and dinner to followat 5:30
p.m. Asilent auction featuring a variety
of sports items, including tickets to
Phillies, Yankees and Eagles games, will
be held fromfor 4:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
with a live auction at 7 p.m. For more
Pauly Friedman 5K Family Walk/
Run, conducted by Family Service
Association of NEPA, will be held
Sunday, Aug. 11, at Misericordia
University in Dallas. Registration is at
8:30 a.m. The race starts at 9:30 a.m.
To register, call 823-5144. The event
is open to all ages and walk-ups will
be accepted on race day. This beneft
walk/run will help raise money for FSA
NEPAs Help Line.
Penn State Wilkes-Barre Alumni
Constituent Society will have its
18th annual Penn State Masters Golf
Tournament at Blue Ridge Trail Golf
Club in Mountain Top on Friday, July 12.
Registration and lunch begin at 11:30
a.m., while the tournament begins at
1 p.m. with a shotgun start. An awards
banquet will begin at 6:30 p.m. where
tournament and prize winners will be
announced. For more information, call
Karen Brace-Hodle in the Penn State
Wilkes-Barre Development Ofce at
675-9228 or email klb14@psu.edu.
Rowan Elise Frederick Memorial Golf
Tournament, sponsored by Dukeys
Cafe, to beneft The Childrens Hospital
of Philadelphia will be Sunday, July
28, at Sand Springs Golf Club. The
tournament will start at 8 a.m. with a
captain and crewformat. The cost is
$80 a person, which includes carts,
green fees and equal prizes for three
fights. There will also be a hot bufet
and refreshments at Dukeys. For more
information, call Dukeys at 270-6718,
John Kebles at 881-0237, Ken Coley at
762-3397, Kevin Nichols at 239-6147 or
Tony Rasimas Jr. at 239-9825.
Wife Ball and Horse Shoe
Tournament to Beneft Fallen
ofcers Remembered will be
Saturday, July 20, at 9 a.m. at Diamond
City Park, 345 Madison St. in Wilkes-
Barre. The tournament is for ages 12
and up. The deadline to register is July
13. The fee is $10 to enter the wife
ball tournament and $10 to enter the
horse shoe tournament. The wife ball
tournament will be double elimination,
with a minimumof three players on the
feld and a maximumof fve players on
the feld. Amaximumof eight players
can bat and all must be registered. The
horse shoe tournament will have two
players per team. The rain date will
be Aug. 10. For more information, call
Kevin Sickle at 704-8344.
Wyoming Valley West Aquatics will
have its third annual Classic Car Show
on Saturday, July 20, at Wyoming
Valley West High School. Registration
costs $10 per car. All proceeds will
beneft the Wyoming Valley West
swimming, diving and water polo
teams. Trophies will be awarded to
the top 25 cars plus best of show
and executive directors choice.
Registration is from9 a.m. to noon.
The judging will followfrom12:30-
2:30 p.m. Trophies will be given out at
3 p.m. All cars are welcome, including
muscle cars, classics, race cars,
bikes, trucks and kit cars. For more
information, call Billie Jo Zawatski at
283-2997.
LOCAL CALENDAR
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Todays Events
LITTLE LEAGUE
District 16 10-11 Baseball
South Wilkes-Barre at Mountain Top, 6 p.m.
District 31 10-11 Baseball
West Pittston at Back Mountain American, 6 p.m.
District 16 Senior Baseball
Nanticoke vs. Plains/North Wilkes-Barre winner at
Avoca/Dupont/Pittston City, 5:45 p.m.
District 31 Senior Baseball
Tuesdays winner at Northwest, 6 p.m.
State Major Softball
(at Stroudsburg Little League)
Back Mountain vs. Section 7 champ, noon
Section 5 Major Softball
Carbino Club at Plains, 6 p.m.
AMERICAN LEGION BASEBALL
Senior Division
Greater Pittston vs. Mountain Post B at Mountain
Post, 3 p.m.
Greater Pittston vs. Mountain Post A at Mountain
Post, 5:45 p.m.
Friday, July 12
LITTLE LEAGUE
State Major Softball
(at Stroudsburg Little League)
Back Mountain vs. Section 8 champ, 5 p.m.
Section 5 Major Softball
Carbino Club at Plains, 6 p.m. (if necessary)
Saturday, July 13
LITTLE LEAGUE
Section 5 Major Baseball
(at Archbald Little League)
Back Mtn. American vs. North Pocono, 5:30 p.m.
Plains vs. Archbald, 7:30 p.m.
CYCLING
8 a.m.
NBCSN Tour de France, stage 12, Fougeres
to Tours, France
GOLF
5:30 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Scottish Open, frst
round, at Inverness, Scotland
12:30 p.m.
TGC LPGA, Manulife Financial Classic, frst
round, at Waterloo, Ontario
3 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, John Deere Classic, frst
round, at Silvis, Ill.
4 p.m.
ESPN2 USGA, U.S. Senior Open Champion-
ship, frst round, at Omaha, Neb.
6 p.m.
TGC Web.com Tour, Utah Championship, frst
round, at Sandy, Utah<
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
1 p.m.
YES Kansas City at N.Y. Yankees
7 p.m.
MLB Texas at Baltimore
7 p.m.
CSN Washington at Philadelphia
MINOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7 p.m.
SE2, WYLN Buffalo at Lehigh Valley
SOFTBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN World Cup, round robin, United States
vs. Canada, at Oklahoma City
WNBA BASKETBALL
9 p.m.
ESPN2 Los Angeles at Tulsa
BASEBALL
American League
BALTIMORE ORIOLESReinstated LHP Wei-
Yin Chen from the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP Josh
Stinson from Norfolk (IL).
OAKLAND ATHLETICSSelected the contract
of RHP Sonny Gray from Sacramento (PCL). Op-
tioned RHP Dan Straily to Sacramento.
National League
MILWAUKEE BREWERSOptioned RHP John-
ny Hellweg to Wisconsin (MWL).
PITTSBURGH PIRATESSigned INF Erich
Weiss to a minor league contract.
American Association
EL PASO DIABLOSSigned LHP Jorge Lugo.
KANSAS CITY T-BONESReleased RHP Eric
Gonzalez.
LAREDO LEMURSSigned LHP Matt Dunbar.
Released LHP James Mannara.
ST. PAUL SAINTSReleased C Mark Radm-
acher.
WICHITA WINGNUTSReleased RHP Ben Gra-
ham.
Frontier League
EVANSVILLE OTTERSSigned C Brian Erie.
GATEWAY GRIZZLIESTraded C Matt Mirabal
to Washington for future considerations. Signed
RHP Ethan McKenzie.
United League
The SAN ANGELO COLTSSigned OF Justin
Reed. Released OF Matt Wright.<
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
NBAAnnounced the resignation of executive
vice president, team marketing and business op-
erations Chris Granger, to become the president
of the Sacramento Kings, effective Aug. 1. An-
nounced the resignation executive vice president,
basketball operations, Stu Jackson. Named Rod
Thorn president, basketball operations.
ATLANTA HAWKSSigned F Paul Millsap to a
two-year contract.
CHARLOTTE BOBCATSSigned CAl Jefferson
and C Cody Zeller. Waived F Tyrus Thomas.
CHICAGO BULLSSigned G-F Mike Dunleavy,
G Tony Snell and F Erik Murphy.
DETROIT PISTONSSigned F Josh Smith to a
four-year contract.
GOLDEN STATE WARRIORSPicked up the
2014-15 option on the coach Mark Jackson.
INDIANA PACERSRe-signed F David West.
Signed G C.J. Watson.
LOS ANGELES CLIPPERSAcquired G J.J.
Redick from Milwaukee and sent G Eric Bledsoe
and F Caron Butler to Phoenix. Los Angeles re-
ceived F-G Jared Dudley from Phoenix and Mil-
waukee received two future second-round draft
picks. Re-signed G Chris Paul to a fve-year con-
tract and F Matt Barnes and C Ryan Hollins.
LOS ANGELES LAKERSRe-signed C Robert
Sacre.
MIAMI HEATRe-signed C-F Chris Andersen to
a one-year contract.
NEW ORLEANS PELICANSWaived F Lance
Thomas. Renounced their rights to F Lou Amund-
son, G Xavier Henry and G Roger Mason Jr.
Signed C Greg Stiemsma.
NEW YORK KNICKSRe-signed G Pablo Pri-
gioni to a multiyear contract.
PORTLAND TRAIL BLAZERSAcquired F
Thomas Robinson from Houston for the rights to
F Kostas Papnikolaou and F-C Marko Todorovic
and two future second-round picks. Signed F
Dorell Wright.
TORONTO RAPTORSTraded C Andrea Barg-
nani to the NewYork for F Steve Novak, C Marcus
Camby, G-F Quentin Richardson, a 2016 frst-
round draft pick and second-round draft picks in
2014 and 2017.
UTAH JAZZAcquired C Andris Biedrins,
F Richard Jefferson, G Brandon Rush, 2014
and 2017 frst-round draft picks and 2016 and
2017 second-round picks from Golden State
and a 2018 second-round pick and cash con-
siderations from Denver. Re-signed G Randy
Foye and traded him to Denver and sent G
Kevin Murphy to Golden State. Golden State re-
ceived G Andre Iguodala from Denver and sent
the Nuggets a 2018 second-round draft pick.
WASHINGTON WIZARDSSigned G Eric
Maynor. Re-signed G Garrett Temple and F Mar-
tell Webster.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
DETROIT LIONSSigned QB Matthew Stafford
to a three-year contract extension to 2017.
SAN FRANCISCO 49ERSWaived TE/LS Kyle
Nelson.
Canadian Football League
CFLFined Calgary OL John Gott and Saskatch-
ewan DL Jermaine McElveen an undisclosed
amount for their involvement in an altercation af-
ter the whistle and Calgary LB Juwan Simpson
for a dangerous tackle on Saskatchewan WR
Weston Dressler in a July 5 game. Fined Edmon-
ton OL Cliff Louis an undisclosed amount for a
dangerous block on Hamilton DL Eric Norwood in
a July 7 game.
GYMNASTICS
National Collegiate Gymnastics Association
NCGANamed Jen Miller-McEachern executive
director effective Aug. 1.<
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
ANAHEIM DUCKSSigned D Alex Grant to a
one-year contract.
BOSTON BRUINSSigned GTuukka Rask to an
eight-year contract.
CALGARY FLAMESSigned C Mikael Backlund
to a two-year contract.
EDMONTON OILERSAcquired F David Perron
from St. Louis for LW Magnus Paajarvi and a 2014
second-round draft pick.
LOS ANGELES KINGSSigned LW Maxim Kit-
syn to a three-year entry level contract and RW
Brian ONeill to a one-year contract.
MONTREAL CANADIENSSigned F Gabriel
Dumont to a two-year contract.
NEW JERSEY DEVILSRe-signed D Marek
Zidlicky.
NEW YORK RANGERSAgreed to terms with
D Justin Falk.
OTTAWA SENATORSRe-signed D Mark
Borowiecki to a two-year contract and F David
Dziurzynski to a one-year contract.
PHOENIX COYOTESNamed Newell Brown as-
sistant coach.
PITTSBURGH PENGUINSSigned F Matt
DAgostini to a one-year contract.
SAN JOSE SHARKSNamed Joe Will general
manager of Worcester (AHL). Promoted Jon Gus-
tafson to vice president of business operations for
Worcester. Re-signed G Alex Stalock and F Matt
Pelech to a one-year contract. Signed D Rob Da-
vison and D Adam Comrie to one-year contracts.
WASHINGTON CAPITALSSigned D Karl Al-
zner to a four-year contract. Re-signed F Peter
LeBlanc to a one-year contract.
American Hockey League
NORFOLK ADMIRALSSigned RW Zack Stor-
tini and D Nolan Yonkman to one-year contracts.<
SOCCER
Major League Soccer
CHIVAS USAAcquired F Erick Torres from Club
Deportivo Guadalajara.
D.C. UNITEDSigned M Collin Martin.
LA GALAXYNamed Mike Munoz to the Acad-
emy coaching staff.<
BASEBALL
Favorite Odds Underdog
American League
Blue Jays -$125 INDIANS
RAYS -$200 Twins
TIGERS -$162 White Sox
YANKEES -$130 Royals
Red Sox -$135 MARINERS
Rangers -$127 ORIOLES
National League
Nationals -$135 PHILLIES
BRAVES -$120 Reds
Cards -$135 CUBS
DBACKS -$150 Brewers
Giants -$135 PADRES
DODGERS -$162 Rockies
Home Run Derby
Player ...............................................Odds
Chris Davis .......................................... 3/1
Prince Fielder ..................................... 7/2
Bryce Harper ....................................... 5/1
Robinson Cano.................................... 5/1
Yoenis Cespedes................................. 6/1
David Wright ........................................ 7/1
Carlos Gonzalez.................................. 8/1
Michael Cuddyer................................ 10/1
LATEST LINE
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $10.25
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (5-3-1-4) $84.20
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $4.21
Eleventh - $14,000 Trot 1:54.3
3-Twin B Spike Man (Ke Wallis) 6.20 4.60 2.10
4-Defner (Ty Buter) 9.40 4.80
5-S F Aceinthehole (Ja Morrill Jr) 2.60
EXACTA (3-4) $52.00
50 CENT TRIFECTA (3-4-5) $203.20
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $50.80
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (3-4-5-2) $551.40
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $27.57
Twelfth - $11,000 Pace 1:50.4
5-Andy Roo (Ge Napolitano Jr) 3.80 3.00 3.20
4-Loadedupntruckin (An McCarthy) 9.80 8.00
7-Excel Nine (Ma Romano) 4.20
EXACTA (5-4) $44.00
50 CENT TRIFECTA (5-4-7) $215.60
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $53.90
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (5-4-7-6) $1,040.00
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $52.00
PICK 3 - 15% TAKEOUT (5-3-5) $45.60
Scratched: Hes Unbelievable
Thirteenth - $13,000 Trot 1:55.3
3-Lindys Tru Grit (Ja Morrill Jr) 4.40 2.40 2.20
1-Andy Revrac (Si Allard) 3.40 3.00
4-Jo Pas Donato (Th Jackson) 2.60
EXACTA (3-1) $8.80
50 CENT TRIFECTA (3-1-4) $34.80
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $8.70
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (3-1-4-6) $152.00
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $7.60
Scratched: Moon Lit Trail
Fourteenth - $9,000 Pace 1:53.0
2-Fox Valley Hermia (Ma Miller) 3.40 2.40 2.40
6-Highly Thought Of (Th Jackson) 14.40 5.40
3-Bling (Ge Napolitano Jr) 2.40
EXACTA (2-6) $43.40
50 CENT TRIFECTA (2-6-3) $122.60
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $30.65
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (2-6-3-7) $870.80
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $43.54
LATE DOUBLE (3-2) $9.00
Total Handle-$526,114
International League
North Division
W L Pct. GB
Pawtucket (Red Sox) 52 40 .565
Lehigh Valley (Phillies) 49 45 .521 4
Buffalo (Blue Jays) 46 45 .505 5
Rochester (Twins) 47 47 .500 6
RAILRIDERS 46 46 .500 6
Syracuse (Nationals) 38 54 .413 14
South Division
W L Pct. GB
Durham (Rays) 59 35 .628
Norfolk (Orioles) 49 43 .533 9
Charlotte (White Sox) 41 53 .436 18
Gwinnett (Braves) 39 54 .419 19
West Division
W L Pct. GB
Indianapolis (Pirates) 59 35 .628
Louisville (Reds) 46 48 .489 13
Columbus (Indians) 42 52 .447 17
Toledo (Tigers) 39 55 .415 20
Wednesdays Games
Columbus 4, Indianapolis 4, tie, 12 innings, susp.,
rain
Norfolk at Gwinnett, 6:05 p.m.
Buffalo at Syracuse, 7 p.m.
Louisville at Toledo, 7 p.m.
Durham 5, Charlotte 1
Pawtucket at Lehigh Valley, 7:05 p.m.
Rochester at Scranton/Wilkes-Barre, 7:05 p.m.
Thursdays Games
Norfolk at Gwinnett, 12:05 p.m.
Charlotte at Durham, 7:05 p.m.
Toledo at Columbus, 7:05 p.m.
Buffalo at Lehigh Valley, 7:05 p.m.
Syracuse at Scranton/Wilkes-Barre, 7:05 p.m.
Rochester at Pawtucket, 7:05 p.m.
Indianapolis at Louisville, 7:05 p.m.
Fridays Games
Gwinnett at Durham, 7:05 p.m.
Buffalo at Lehigh Valley, 7:05 p.m.
Rochester at Pawtucket, 7:05 p.m.
Charlotte at Norfolk, 7:05 p.m.
Indianapolis at Louisville, 7:05 p.m.
Syracuse at Scranton/Wilkes-Barre, 7:05 p.m.
Toledo at Columbus, 7:15 p.m.
Eastern League
Eastern Division
W L Pct. GB
Binghamton (Mets) 53 33 .616
Portland (Red Sox) 45 42 .517 8
Trenton (Yankees) 45 44 .506 9
New Britain (Twins) 44 45 .494 10
New Hmpshr (B.Jays) 43 46 .483 11
Reading (Phillies) 38 51 .427 16
Western Division
W L Pct. GB
Harrisburg (Nationals) 50 41 .549
Erie (Tigers) 46 42 .523 2
Akron (Indians) 44 46 .489 5
Bowie (Orioles) 43 45 .489 5
Richmond (Giants) 42 47 .472 7
Altoona (Pirates) 39 50 .438 10
Tuesdays Games
No games scheduled
Wednesdays Games
West at East, (n)
Thursdays Games
Portland 0, Binghamton 0, tie, 3 innings, comp.
of susp. game
Portland at Binghamton, 6:35 p.m.
Trenton at New Britain, 7:05 p.m.
Richmond at Bowie, 7:05 p.m.
Harrisburg at Erie, 7:05 p.m.
New Hampshire at Reading, 7:05 p.m.
Altoona at Akron, 7:05 p.m.
New York - Penn League
McNamara Division
W L Pct. GB
Aberdeen (Orioles) 13 10 .565
Hudson Valley (Rays) 13 11 .542
Staten Island (Yankees) 11 10 .524 1
Brooklyn (Mets) 9 13 .409 3
Pinckney Division
W L Pct. GB
Jamestown (Pirates) 15 8 .652
Williamsport (Phillies) 13 8 .619 1
State College (Cardinals) 14 9 .609 1
Batavia (Marlins) 10 11 .476 4
Auburn (Nationals) 7 14 .333 7
Mahoning Valley (Indians) 7 16 .304 8
Stedler Division
W L Pct. GB
Tri-City (Astros) 14 9 .609
Lowell (Red Sox) 12 9 .571 1
Vermont (Athletics) 10 12 .455 3
Connecticut (Tigers) 7 15 .318 6
Wednesdays Games
Jamestown 8, Hudson Valley 4
Aberdeen 2, State College 1
Vermont at Batavia, 7:05 p.m.
Williamsport at Connecticut, 7:05 p.m.
Auburn 2, Brooklyn 0, 4 innings, susp., rain
Tri-City at Mahoning Valley, ppd., rain
Staten Island at Lowell, 7:05 p.m.
Thursdays Games
Auburn 2, Brooklyn 0, 4 innings, comp. of susp.
game
Tri-City at Mahoning Valley, 6 p.m., 1st game
Staten Island at Lowell, 7:05 p.m.
Jamestown at Hudson Valley, 7:05 p.m.
Vermont at Batavia, 7:05 p.m.
Brooklyn at Auburn, 7:05 p.m.
State College at Aberdeen, 7:05 p.m.
Williamsport at Connecticut, 7:05 p.m.
Tri-City at Mahoning Valley, 8:30 p.m., 2nd game
Fridays Games
State College at Aberdeen, 7:05 p.m.
Brooklyn at Auburn, 7:05 p.m.
Vermont at Batavia, 7:05 p.m.
Williamsport at Connecticut, 7:05 p.m.
Jamestown at Hudson Valley, 7:05 p.m.
Staten Island at Lowell, 7:05 p.m.
Tri-City at Mahoning Valley, 7:05 p.m.
FI Ght sChEDULE
July 12
At Texas Station Casino, Las Vegas (ESPN2),
Chris Avalos vs. Drian Francisco, 10, junior feath-
erweights; Glen Tapia vs. Abie Han, 10, junior
middleweights.
July 13
At The Casino, Monte Carlo, Monaco, Khabib
Allakhverdiev vs. Souleymane Mbaye, 12, for
Allakhverdievs WBA World-IBO junior welter-
weight titles; Max Bursak vs. Prince Arron, 12,
for Bursaks European middleweight title; Ilunga
Makabu vs. Dmytro Kucher, 12, cruiserweights;
Denis Grachev vs. Edwin Rodriguez, 10, light
heavyweights.
July 19
At Rockingham Park, Salem, N.H., (ESPN2),
Olusegun Ajose vs. Hank Lundy, 10, junior wel-
terweights.
At the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino, Las Vegas
(SHO), Badou Jack vs. Farah Ennis, 10, super
middleweights.
July 20
At Fantasy Springs Casino, Indio, Calif. (FSN),
Frankie Gomez vs. Demarcus Corley, 10, junior
welterweights; Randy Caballero vs. Miguel Ro-
bles, 10, junior featherweights.
July 21
At Areneta Coliseum, Quezon City, Philippines,
John Riel Casimero vs. Mauricio Fuentes, 12, for
Casimeros IBF junior fyweight title.
July 23
At Tokyo, Koki Kameda vs. John Mark Apolinario,
12, for Kamedas WBA World bantamweight title.
July 26
At Thunder Valley Casino Resort, Lincoln, Calif.
(ESPN2), Juan Carlos Burgos vs. Daulis Prescott,
10, junior lightweights; Josenilson Dos Santos vs.
Miguel Gonzalez, 10, lightweights.
July 27
At Macau, China (HBO), Evgeny Gradovich vs.
Mauricio Munoz, 12, for Gradovichs IBF feath-
erweight title; Juan Francisco Estrada vs. Milan
Melindo, 12, for Estradas WBO and WBA Su-
per World fyweight titles; Andy Ruiz Jr. vs. Joe
Hanks, 10, heavyweights; Genesis Servania vs.
Konosuke Tomiyama, 10, super bantamweights.
At San Antonio (SHO), Andre Berto vs. Jesus
Soto Karass, 12, welterweights; Omar Figueroa
vs. Nihito Arakawa, 12, for the interim WBC light-
weight title; Diego Chaves vs. Keith Thurman, 12,
for the interim WBA World welterweight title.
Aug. 1
At Bangkok, Thailand, Kompayak Porpramuk vs.
Koki Eto, 12, for Porpramuks interim WBA World
fyweight title.
Aug. 2
At Buffalo Run Casino, Miami, Okla. (ESPN2), Ja-
vier Fortuna vs. Luis Franco, 10, featherweights.
Aug. 3
At Uncasville, Conn. (NBCSN), Curtis Stevens vs.
Saul Roman, 10, middleweights; Eddie Chambers
vs. Thabisco Mchunu, 10, cruiserweights; Tomasz
Adamek vs. Tony Grano, 10, heavyweights; To-
masz Adamek vs. Tony Grano, 10, heavyweights.
Aug. 9
At Morongo Casino Resort & Spa, Cabazon, Calif.
(ESPN2), Emmanuel Tagoe vs. Gerardo Robles,
12, for the vacant IBF Inter-Continental super
featherweights title; Rustam Nugaev vs. Jose
Hernandez, 10, lightweights.
At Indio, Calif. (SHO), Deontay Wilder vs. Sergei
Liakhovich, 10, heavyweights.
Aug. 10
At Panama City, Panama, Anselmo Moreno vs.
William Urina, 12, for Morenos WBA Super World
bantamweight title; Oscar Escandon vs. Nehomar
Cermeno, 12, for the interim WBA World junior
featherweight title.
Aug. 12
At Tokyo, Shinsuke Yamanaka, vs. Jose Nieves,
12, for Yamanakas WBC bantamweight title;
Akira Yaegashi vs. Oscar Blanquet, 12, for Yae-
gashis WBC fyweigh title.
Aug. 16
At U.S. Cellular Field, Chicago (ESPN), Andrzej
Fonfara vs. Gabriel Campillo, 12, for the IBO light
heavyweight title; Artur Szpilka vs. Mike Mollo, 10,
heavyweights.
Aug. 17
At Cardiff, Wales (HBO), Nathan Cleverly vs. Ser-
gey Kovalev, 12, for Cleverlys WBO light heavy-
weight title.
At Revel Resort, Atlantic City, N.J. (HBO), Dan-
iel Geale vs. Darren Barker, 12, for Geales IBF
middleweight title; Jonathan Romero vs. Kiki Mar-
tinez, 12, for Romeros IBF super bantamweight
title.
At Cancun, Mexico, Takashi Miura vs. Sergio
Thompson, 12, for WBC junior lightweight title.
Aug. 23
At Bangkok, Thailand, Nobuo Nashiro vs. Den-
kaosan Kaovichit, 12, for the interim WBA World
super fyweight title.
At Dover (Del.) Downs Hotel & Casino, Amir Man-
sour vs. Maurice Harris, 12, for the vacant U.S.
Boxing Association heavyweight title.
At Las Vegas, Argenis Mendez vs. Arash Usma-
nee, 12, for Mendezs IBF super featherweight
title; Claudio Merrero vs. Jesus Marcelo Andres
Cuellar, 12, for the interim WBA World feather-
weight title.
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER BASEBALL THURSDAY, JULY 11, 2013 PAGE 3B
TUESDAYS LATE BOXES
Cardinals 9, Astros 5
Houston St. Louis
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Altuve 2b 5 0 1 1 MCrpnt 2b 4 3 3 3
Wallac 3b 5 1 1 1 Beltran rf 5 1 2 1
JCastro c 3 0 0 0 Hollidy lf 3 1 1 2
JDMrtn rf-lf 5 0 1 1 SRonsn ph-lf 0 0 0 0
C.Pena 1b 3 0 1 0 Craig 1b 5 0 3 2
MDmn ph 1 1 1 0 YMolin c 2 1 0 0
Krauss lf 2 0 0 0 T.Cruz c 1 0 0 0
Harrell p 0 0 0 0 Freese 3b 4 1 3 0
Carter ph 0 1 0 0 Descals ss 4 1 2 0
BBarns cf 3 1 0 0 Jay cf 3 1 1 1
RCeden ss 2 0 0 0 Wnwrg p 2 0 0 0
Elmore ss 2 0 2 1 MAdms ph 1 0 0 0
BNorrs p 2 0 1 0 Siegrist p 0 0 0 0
Pareds rf 2 1 0 1 Choate p 0 0 0 0
Blazek p 0 0 0 0
Mujica p 0 0 0 0
Totals 35 5 8 5 Totals 34 915 9
Houston 000 001 004 5
St. Louis 210 311 01x 9
DP - Houston 3. LOB - Houston 8, St. Louis 8.
2B - Wallace (4), M.Carpenter 2 (27), Beltran (11),
Descalso 2 (16). HR - Holliday (13). S - Wain-
wright. SF - M.Carpenter.
IP H R ER BB SO
Houston
B.Norris L,6-8 5 11 7 7 1 5
Harrell 3 4 2 2 2 0
St. Louis
Wainwright W,12-5 7 5 1 1 1 9
Siegrist 1 0 0 0 0 2
Choate 0 1 1 1 0 0
Blazek 2-3 2 3 3 3 0
Mujica S,24-25 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
Choate pitched to 1 batter in the 9th.
HBP - by Harrell (Holliday), by B.Norris (Y.Molina),
by Wainwright (J.Castro).
Umpires - Home, Mark Wegner; First, Laz Diaz;
Second, Tim Timmons; Third, Rob Drake.
T - 3:20. A - 43,836 (43,975).
Athletics 2, Pirates 1
Oakland Pittsburgh
ab r hbi ab r hbi
Crisp cf 4 0 1 0 SMarte lf 4 0 1 0
Reddck rf 3 0 0 0 Tabata rf 4 0 1 0
Dnldsn 3b 3 0 0 0 McCtch cf 3 0 0 0
Lowrie ss 4 0 1 0 PAlvrz 3b 3 1 1 1
Cespds lf 4 0 1 0 RMartn c 3 0 0 0
Jaso c 4 1 1 0 GJones 1b 2 0 0 0
Balfour p 0 0 0 0 GSnchz ph-1b 1 0 0 0
Moss 1b 3 1 1 2 Mercer 2b-ss 3 0 0 0
Sogard 2b 3 0 0 0 Barmes ss 1 0 0 0
Straily p 1 0 0 0 Snider ph 1 0 0 0
Doolittl p 0 0 0 0 Grilli p 0 0 0 0
CYoung ph 1 0 0 0 Cole p 2 0 0 0
Cook p 0 0 0 0 Watson p 0 0 0 0
DNorrs c 0 0 0 0 JHrrsn ph-2b 1 0 0 0
Totals 30 2 5 2 Totals 28 1 3 1
Oakland 000 200 000 2
Pittsburgh 010 000 000 1
DP - Oakland 1, Pittsburgh 2. LOB - Oakland
4, Pittsburgh 4. 2B - Jaso (11). HR - Moss (16),
P.Alvarez (23). SB - S.Marte (28). S - R.Martin.
IP H R ER BB SO
Oakland
Straily W,6-2 6 1-3 2 1 1 3 7
Doolittle H,13 2-3 0 0 0 0 1
Cook H,14 1 0 0 0 0 0
Balfour S,24-24 1 1 0 0 0 2
Pittsburgh
Cole L,4-2 7 5 2 2 2 4
Watson 1 0 0 0 0 1
Grilli 1 0 0 0 1 1
Umpires - Home, Wally Bell; First, Alfonso Mar-
quez; Second, Scott Barry; Third, Mike DiMuro.
Red Sox 11, Mariners 8
Boston Seattle
ab r hbi ab r hbi
Nava lf 5 1 1 0 BMiller ss 5 0 3 4
Victorn rf 5 2 2 1 Frnkln 2b 5 0 1 0
Pedroia 2b 5 1 2 3 Ibanez lf 5 1 0 0
D.Ortiz dh 5 3 4 1 KMorls dh 5 2 3 3
Napoli 1b 5 1 1 2 Seager 3b 5 1 2 0
Sltlmch c 4 2 2 0 Smoak 1b 4 1 1 0
Iglesias ss 5 0 2 1 MSndrs rf 3 2 2 1
Holt 3b 4 0 1 2 Zunino c 4 0 0 0
BrdlyJr cf 4 1 1 1 Ackley cf 3 1 1 0
Totals 42111611Totals 39 813 8
Boston 015 110 030 11
Seattle 232 000 010 8
DP - Boston 1, Seattle 1. LOB - Boston 10, Se-
attle 6. 2B - D.Ortiz 2 (21), Saltalamacchia (24),
B.Miller 2 (4). 3B - M.Saunders (2). HR - Victorino
(4), Pedroia (6), D.Ortiz (18), Napoli (11), Bradley
Jr. (2), K.Morales 2 (13). SB - D.Ortiz (3). SF -
Holt.
IP H R ER BB SO
Boston
Webster 2 1-3 6 7 7 2 2
Aceves 2-3 1 0 0 0 0
Breslow W,3-2 2 1-3 3 0 0 0 2
A.Bailey H,7 1 2-3 1 0 0 0 1
Tazawa 1 2 1 1 0 1
Uehara S,6-9 1 0 0 0 0 0
Seattle
Iwakuma 3 8 6 6 0 3
Beavan L,0-2 2 2 2 2 1 2
Farquhar 1 2-3 1 0 0 1 4
Furbush 2-3 2 2 2 1 1
Capps 1-3 2 1 1 1 1
Luetge 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 1
HBP - by Beavan (Nava). WP - Iwakuma.
T - 3:44. A - 21,072 (47,476).
Dodgers 6, Diamondbacks 1
Los Angeles Arizona
ab r hbi ab r hbi
Crwfrd lf 4 2 1 0 Eaton cf 4 0 0 0
Puig rf 3 0 1 0 GParra rf 4 0 0 0
AdGnzl 1b 4 0 1 3 Gldsch 1b 4 0 1 0
HRmrz ss 4 0 0 0 A.Hill 2b 4 1 1 0
Ethier cf 4 1 2 0 MMntr c 3 0 0 0
A.Ellis c 4 1 1 0 Prado 3b 4 0 1 1
Schmkr 2b 4 1 2 1 Kubel lf 3 0 0 0
HrstnJr 3b 4 0 0 0 Gregrs ss 3 0 1 0
Howell p 0 0 0 0 Kenndy p 0 0 0 0
Belisari p 0 0 0 0 Sipp p 0 0 0 0
Nolasco p 2 1 2 1 Pollock ph 1 0 0 0
Punto ph-3b 1 0 0 0 Putz p 0 0 0 0
Ziegler p 0 0 0 0
C.Ross ph 1 0 1 0
DHrndz p 0 0 0 0
Totals 34 610 5 Totals 31 1 5 1
Los Angeles 010 122 000 6
Arizona 000 000 100 1
E - Hairston Jr. (3), M.Montero (3), Eaton (1). DP
- Los Angeles 1, Arizona 2. LOB - Los Angeles 7,
Arizona 5. 2B - Nolasco (2), A.Hill (10), C.Ross
(12). SB - Ethier (3). S - Nolasco, Kennedy. SF
- Ad.Gonzalez.
IP H R ER BB SO
Los Angeles
Nolasco W,6-8 7 4 1 1 0 5
Howell 1 1 0 0 0 1
Belisario 1 0 0 0 0 0
Arizona
Kennedy L,3-5 5 2-3 9 6 5 3 2
Sipp 1-3 1 0 0 0 1
Putz 1 0 0 0 0 1
Ziegler 1 0 0 0 0 0
D.Hernandez 1 0 0 0 0 1
HBP - by Belisario (M.Montero), by Kennedy
(H.Ramirez).
T - 2:57. A - 23,409 (48,633).
Padres 2, Rockies 1
Colorado San Diego
ab r hbi ab r hbi
LeMahi 3b 4 0 0 0 EvCarr ss 4 1 2 0
Blckmn cf 4 0 0 0 Amarst 2b 4 0 2 2
Cuddyr rf 2 0 0 0 Headly 3b 3 0 0 0
WRosr c 4 1 2 0 Quentin lf 4 0 1 0
Pachec 1b 3 0 0 0 Guzmn 1b 4 0 0 0
Colvin lf 3 0 0 0 Denorf rf 0 0 0 0
Arenad ph 1 0 1 1 Blanks rf-1b 4 0 0 0
Rutledg 2b 4 0 1 0 Venale cf 3 0 1 0
JHerrr ss 3 0 0 0 Hundly c 3 1 1 0
Chacin p 2 0 0 0 Stults p 3 0 2 0
WLopez p 0 0 0 0
CDckrs ph 1 0 0 0
Ottavin p 0 0 0 0
Totals 31 1 4 1 Totals 32 2 9 2
Colorado 000 000 001 1
San Diego 001 000 10x 2
DP - Colorado 1. LOB - Colorado 6, San Diego
8. 2B - W.Rosario (14), Ev.Cabrera (12), Venable
(8). 3B - Amarista (3). SB - Rutledge (7).
IP H R ER BB SO
Colorado
Chacin L,8-4 6 5 1 1 2 4
W.Lopez 1 4 1 1 0 1
Ottavino 1 0 0 0 0 1
San Diego
Stults W,7-7 9 4 1 1 3 5
Mets 10, Giants 6
New York San Francisco
ab r hbi ab r hbi
EYong cf-lf 3 1 1 0 GBlanc cf 5 1 2 0
DnMrp 2b 4 0 1 1 Tanaka lf 4 1 1 0
DWrght 3b 3 2 2 0 Scutaro 2b 4 0 2 0
Byrd rf 4 2 2 4 Sandovl 3b 3 0 1 2
Satin 1b 2 2 0 0 Pence rf 5 2 2 0
I.Davis 1b 0 0 0 0 Belt 1b 2 2 1 0
ABrwn lf 5 0 1 2 Affeldt p 0 0 0 0
CTorrs p 0 0 0 0 Dunnng p 0 0 0 0
Recker c 5 1 1 2 Noonan ph 1 0 1 1
Quntnll ss 5 1 3 1 BCrwfr ss 4 0 2 0
Gee p 3 0 0 0 Quiroz c 4 0 0 1
Rice p 0 0 0 0 Zito p 1 0 0 0
Lagars ph-cf 2 1 1 0 Abreu ph 1 0 1 1
Mijares p 0 0 0 0
Posey 1b 1 0 0 0
Totals 36101210 Totals 35 613 5
New York 000 302 050 10
San Francisco 020 011 101 6
E - Recker (3), Dan.Murphy (11). DP - New York
1, San Francisco 1. LOB - New York 8, San Fran-
cisco 11. 2B - D.Wright (20), Quintanilla (6), San-
doval (9). HR - Byrd (14), Recker (5). SB - Belt
(4). CS - E.Young (6). S - Scutaro, Quiroz, Zito.
SF - Dan.Murphy, Sandoval.
IP H R ER BB SO
New York
Gee 6 2-3 9 5 5 5 3
Rice W,4-5 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
C.Torres 2 4 1 0 0 1
San Francisco
Zito 6 7 5 5 4 5
Mijares L,0-2 1 1-3 3 1 1 1 3
Affeldt 1-3 1 3 3 2 0
Dunning 1 1-3 1 1 1 1 0
WP - Affeldt.
AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Boston 55 37 .598 6-4 W-1 31-16 24-21
Tampa Bay 51 40 .560 3 9-1 W-6 30-18 21-22
Baltimore 50 42 .543 5 1 4-6 W-1 26-19 24-23
New York 49 42 .538 5 2 7-3 W-1 26-21 23-21
Toronto 44 46 .489 10 6 4-6 W-1 25-21 19-25
Central Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Detroit 50 40 .556 7-3 W-1 27-17 23-23
Cleveland 47 44 .516 3 4 4-6 L-1 26-19 21-25
Kansas City 43 45 .489 6 6 6-4 L-1 22-22 21-23
Minnesota 37 50 .425 11 12 1-9 L-3 21-23 16-27
Chicago 35 53 .398 14 14 3-7 L-1 19-21 16-32
West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Oakland 54 37 .593 7-3 W-3 28-14 26-23
Texas 53 38 .582 1 6-4 L-1 27-19 26-19
Los Angeles 43 46 .483 10 7 7-3 L-1 24-25 19-21
Seattle 40 50 .444 13 10 5-5 L-1 22-23 18-27
Houston 32 58 .356 21 18 2-8 L-2 17-32 15-26
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Atlanta 52 39 .571 5-5 L-1 29-13 23-26
Washington 47 44 .516 5 4 6-4 W-1 27-18 20-26
Philadelphia 45 47 .489 7 6 6-4 L-1 23-20 22-27
New York 40 48 .455 10 9 7-3 W-4 17-27 23-21
Miami 33 57 .367 18 17 4-6 W-1 19-26 14-31
Central Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
St. Louis 54 34 .614 6-4 W-4 26-16 28-18
Pittsburgh 53 36 .596 1 4-6 L-4 29-17 24-19
Cincinnati 51 40 .560 4 5-5 W-1 30-16 21-24
Chicago 40 48 .455 14 9 7-3 W-4 20-23 20-25
Milwaukee 37 53 .411 18 13 5-5 L-1 22-26 15-27
West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Arizona 47 43 .522 5-5 L-2 24-18 23-25
Los Angeles 44 45 .494 2 6 8-2 W-3 25-21 19-24
Colorado 43 48 .473 4 8 3-7 L-1 26-21 17-27
San Diego 41 50 .451 6 10 1-9 W-1 26-19 15-31
San Francisco 40 50 .444 7 10 2-8 L-4 25-20 15-30
StandingS StatS
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Tuesdays Games
Kansas City 3, N.Y. Yankees 1
Oakland 2, Pittsburgh 1
Texas 8, Baltimore 4
Cleveland 3, Toronto 0
Chicago White Sox 11, Detroit 4
Tampa Bay 4, Minnesota 1
Chicago Cubs 7, L.A. Angels 2
St. Louis 9, Houston 5
Boston 11, Seattle 8
Wednesdays Games
N.Y. Yankees 8, Kansas City 1
Baltimore 6, Texas 1
Toronto 5, Cleveland 4
Oakland at Pittsburgh, (n)
Detroit 8, Chicago White Sox 5
Minnesota at Tampa Bay, (n)
L.A. Angels at Chicago Cubs, (n)
Houston at St. Louis, (n)
Boston at Seattle, (n)
Thursdays Games
Toronto (Dickey 8-9) at Cleveland (Salazar 0-0),
12:05 p.m.
Minnesota (Pelfrey 4-6) at Tampa Bay (M.Moore
12-3), 12:10 p.m.
Kansas City (E.Santana 5-5) at N.Y. Yankees
(Pettitte 6-6), 1:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Sale 5-8) at Detroit (Ani.San-
chez 7-5), 1:08 p.m.
Boston (Dempster 5-8) at Seattle (E.Ramirez
0-0), 3:40 p.m.
Texas (Darvish 8-4) at Baltimore (Mig.Gonzalez
6-3), 7:05 p.m.
Fridays Games
Chicago White Sox at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Kansas City at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
Minnesota at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Toronto at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
Texas at Detroit, 7:08 p.m.
Houston at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m.
Boston at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Tuesdays Games
Oakland 2, Pittsburgh 1
Philadelphia 4, Washington 2
Atlanta 6, Miami 4
Chicago Cubs 7, L.A. Angels 2
Milwaukee 2, Cincinnati 0
St. Louis 9, Houston 5
L.A. Dodgers 6, Arizona 1
San Diego 2, Colorado 1
N.Y. Mets 10, San Francisco 6
Wednesdays Games
Miami 6, Atlanta 2
Cincinnati 6, Milwaukee 2
N.Y. Mets 7, San Francisco 2
Washington 5, Philadelphia 1
Oakland at Pittsburgh, (n)
L.A. Angels at Chicago Cubs, (n)
Houston at St. Louis, (n)
L.A. Dodgers at Arizona, (n)
Colorado at San Diego, (n)
Thursdays Games
Washington (Zimmermann 12-3) at Philadelphia
(K.Kendrick 7-6), 7:05 p.m.
Cincinnati (Latos 8-2) at Atlanta (Hudson 5-7),
7:10 p.m.
St. Louis (Westbrook 5-3) at Chicago Cubs
(E.Jackson 5-10), 8:05 p.m.
Milwaukee (Gallardo 7-8) at Arizona (Miley 5-7),
9:40 p.m.
Colorado (Pomeranz 0-2) at L.A. Dodgers
(Capuano 2-6), 10:10 p.m.
San Francisco (Bumgarner 9-5) at San Diego
(Marquis 9-4), 10:10 p.m.
Fridays Games
St. Louis at Chicago Cubs, 4:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
Washington at Miami, 7:10 p.m.
Cincinnati at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Milwaukee at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
Colorado at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.
San Francisco at San Diego, 10:10 p.m.
Mets 7, Giants 2
New York San Francisco
ab r hbi ab r hbi
EYong lf 3 1 0 0 GBlanc cf 3 0 0 0
DnMrp 2b 5 1 2 2 AnTrrs ph-cf 1 0 0 0
DWrght 3b 4 0 1 0 Tanaka lf 4 0 1 0
I.Davis 1b 4 2 1 0 Posey c 4 0 1 0
Byrd rf 5 1 1 2 Sandovl 3b 3 0 1 0
Niwnhs cf 4 0 0 0 Pence rf 4 0 0 0
Buck c 4 1 2 2 Belt 1b 2 2 1 0
Quntnll ss 3 0 0 0 Abreu 2b 3 0 0 1
ZWhelr p 2 1 1 1 BCrwfr ss 4 0 2 1
ABrwn ph 1 0 0 0 M.Cain p 0 0 0 0
Edgin p 0 0 0 0 Kickhm p 2 0 0 0
Hwkns p 0 0 0 0 Kontos p 0 0 0 0
Noonan ph 1 0 0 0
Affeldt p 0 0 0 0
J.Lopez p 0 0 0 0
Scutaro ph 1 0 0 0
Totals 35 7 8 7 Totals 32 2 6 2
New York 300 022 000 7
San Francisco 000 000 101 2
E - Posey (4), B.Crawford (10). LOB - New York 8,
San Francisco 7. 2B - Dan.Murphy (22), Buck (8),
Z.Wheeler (1). 3B - Belt (1). HR - Byrd (15). SB -
E.Young (15). S - Z.Wheeler. SF - Abreu.
IP H R ER BB SO
New York
Z.Wheeler W,3-1 7 3 1 1 3 5
Edgin 1 1 0 0 0 1
Hawkins 1 2 1 1 0 0
San Francisco
M.Cain L,5-6 2-3 2 3 3 3 1
Kickham 5 1-3 5 4 4 3 6
Kontos 1 0 0 0 0 1
Affeldt 1 0 0 0 0 1
J.Lopez 1 1 0 0 0 1
WP - Z.Wheeler.
Umpires - Home, Todd Tichenor; First, CB Buc-
knor; Second, Adam Hamari; Third, Bill Miller.
T - 2:55. A - 41,679 (41,915).
Reds 6, Brewers 2
Cincinnati Milwaukee
ab r hbi ab r hbi
Choo cf 4 2 3 0 LSchfr rf 4 1 1 0
Cozart ss 4 2 0 0 Segura ss 4 0 1 0
Votto 1b 3 1 1 0 CGomz cf 2 0 0 1
Phillips 2b 5 0 2 3 Lucroy c 3 0 1 0
Bruce rf 4 1 2 2 Weeks 2b 4 0 0 0
Frazier 3b 3 0 0 0 YBtncr 1b 4 0 0 0
Paul lf 3 0 1 0 Halton lf 3 1 1 1
DRonsn lf 0 0 0 0 Bianchi 3b 1 0 0 0
Mesorc c 3 0 0 1 Hellwg p 1 0 0 0
Leake p 3 0 0 0 D.Hand p 0 0 0 0
Chpmn p 0 0 0 0 McGnzl p 0 0 0 0
Badnhp p 0 0 0 0
JFrncs ph 1 0 0 0
Kintzlr p 0 0 0 0
Totals 32 6 9 6 Totals 27 2 4 2
Cincinnati 111 010 200 6
Milwaukee 100 010 000 2
E - Bianchi (3). DP - Cincinnati 1, Milwaukee
2. LOB - Cincinnati 8, Milwaukee 4. 2B - Choo
(21), Votto (17), L.Schafer (12). HR - Halton (1).
SB - C.Gomez (21). CS - Segura (4). S - Leake,
D.Hand. SF - Mesoraco, C.Gomez.
IP H R ER BB SO
Cincinnati
Leake W,8-4 8 1-3 4 2 2 4 2
Chapman 2-3 0 0 0 0 1
Milwaukee
Hellweg L,0-3 4 1-3 4 4 4 5 1
D.Hand 2 3 2 2 1 0
Mic.Gonzalez 2-3 1 0 0 0 0
Badenhop 1 1 0 0 0 0
Kintzler 1 0 0 0 0 2
HBP - by Hellweg (Frazier).
Umpires - Home, Mike Everitt; First, Quinn Wol-
cott; Second, Dan Bellino; Third, Tim Welke.
T - 2:58. A - 35,239 (41,900).
Marlins 6, Braves 2
Atlanta Miami
ab r hbi ab r hbi
Pstrnck ss 4 0 1 0 Ruggin lf 3 1 0 0
Heywrd rf 4 0 0 0 Lucas 1b 5 2 2 0
J.Upton lf 3 0 0 0 Stanton rf 2 1 1 2
FFrmn 1b 4 1 1 0 Ozuna cf 4 0 0 0
CJhnsn 3b 4 1 2 1 Polanc 3b 5 1 3 3
Uggla 2b 3 0 1 1 DSolan 2b 5 0 0 0
BUpton cf 4 0 1 0 Hchvrr ss 3 0 2 0
G.Laird c 3 0 0 0 Mathis c 4 0 1 1
Mahlm p 2 0 0 0 JaTrnr p 3 0 1 0
DCrpnt p 0 0 0 0 Qualls p 0 0 0 0
Trdslvc ph 1 0 0 0 Pierre ph 1 1 1 0
Ayala p 0 0 0 0 Cishek p 0 0 0 0
Varvar p 0 0 0 0
Totals 32 2 6 2 Totals 35 611 6
Atlanta 010 001 000 2
Miami 400 000 02x 6
E - C.Johnson (8). DP - Atlanta 1. LOB - Atlanta 6,
Miami 12. 2B - F.Freeman (18), C.Johnson (20),
Uggla (8), Stanton (10), Polanco (9), Hechavarria
(7). 3B - Ja.Turner (1).
IP H R ER BB SO
Atlanta
Maholm L,9-8 4 1-3 7 4 4 5 3
D.Carpenter 1 2-3 0 0 0 1 1
Ayala 1 1-3 3 2 2 0 0
Varvaro 2-3 1 0 0 1 0
Miami
Ja.Turner W,3-1 7 4 2 2 3 5
Qualls H,6 1 0 0 0 0 2
Cishek 1 2 0 0 0 2
WP - Ja.Turner.
Umpires - Home, Brian Knight; First, Gerry Davis;
Second, Dan Iassogna; Third, Mark Carlson.
T - 2:58. A - 23,921 (37,442).
Yankees 8, Royals 1
Kansas City New York
ab r hbi ab r hbi
AGordn lf 3 0 0 0 Gardnr cf 0 2 0 0
Dyson cf 0 0 0 0 AlGnzlz rf 0 0 0 0
AEscor ss 3 1 0 0 ISuzuki rf-cf 4 0 1 0
EJhnsn ss 0 0 0 0 Cano 2b 4 2 3 3
Hosmer 1b 4 0 2 1 Hafner dh 2 0 0 0
BButler dh 4 0 1 0 V.Wells ph-dh 2 1 2 0
Mostks 3b 4 0 0 0 Almont lf 3 1 0 0
L.Cain cf-rf 4 0 1 0 Overay 1b 4 1 1 4
Lough rf-lf 4 0 0 0 Nunez ss 4 0 1 0
Giavtll 2b 4 0 1 0 L.Cruz 3b 4 1 1 0
Kottars c 3 0 1 0 CStwrt c 4 0 0 0
Totals 33 1 6 1 Totals 31 8 9 7
Kansas City 000 000 010 1
New York 103 004 00x 8
DP - Kansas City 1. LOB - Kansas City 7, New
York 4. 2B - Hosmer (17), Cano (18). HR - Cano
(21), Overbay (11). SB - Gardner (12), Cano (6).
IP H R ER BB SO
Kansas City
W.Davis L,4-8 5 6 8 8 3 6
J.Gutierrez 2 3 0 0 0 0
Coleman 1 0 0 0 0 3
New York
Nova W,4-2 8 5 1 1 2 6
Chamberlain 1 1 0 0 0 0
W.Davis pitched to 4 batters in the 6th.
HBP - by J.Gutierrez (Gardner), by W.Davis
(Gardner). WP - W.Davis.
Umpires - Home, Paul Nauert; First, Doug Ed-
dings; Second, Dana DeMuth; Third, Angel Her-
nandez.
T - 2:43. A - 35,781 (50,291).
Nationals 5, Phillies 1
Washington Philadelphia
ab r hbi ab r hbi
Span cf 5 0 0 1 Revere cf 4 0 1 0
Dsmnd ss 4 0 2 0 Rollins ss 4 0 0 0
Harper lf 5 0 1 0 Utley 2b 4 0 1 0
Zmrmn 3b 5 1 1 1 DBrwn lf 4 0 0 0
Werth rf 3 1 2 1 MYong 3b 4 0 1 0
AdLRc 1b 4 0 0 0 DYong rf 3 0 0 0
Rendon 2b 4 2 2 1 Ruf 1b 3 1 1 1
WRams c 4 1 2 1 Ruiz c 4 0 2 0
GGnzlz p 3 0 0 0 Lee p 1 0 0 0
Clipprd p 0 0 0 0 Frndsn ph 1 0 1 0
Tracy ph 0 0 0 0 LuGarc p 0 0 0 0
Hairstn ph 1 0 0 0 DeFrts p 0 0 0 0
RSorin p 0 0 0 0 Diekmn p 0 0 0 0
Totals 38 510 5 Totals 32 1 7 1
Washington 000 022 001 5
Philadelphia 000 000 100 1
E - Desmond (11), De Fratus (1), Diekman (1). DP
- Washington 2, Philadelphia 2. LOB - Washing-
ton 8, Philadelphia 7. 2B - Desmond (24), Harper
(8), Rendon (12), M.Young (16). HR - Zimmerman
(11), Werth (10), Rendon (4), W.Ramos (4), Ruf
(1). S - Lee.
IP H R ER BB SO
Washington
G.Gonzalez W,7-3 7 6 1 1 2 5
Clippard H,16 1 1 0 0 0 0
R.Soriano 1 0 0 0 0 0
Philadelphia
Lee L,10-3 7 9 4 4 0 6
Lu.Garcia 1 0 0 0 1 1
De Fratus 0 1 1 0 0 0
Diekman 1 0 0 0 1 2
De Fratus pitched to 2 batters in the 9th.
WP - Lu.Garcia.
Umpires - Home, Gary Cederstrom; First, Ker-
win Danley; Second, Lance Barksdale; Third, Vic
Carapazza.
T - 2:50. A - 34,513 (43,651).
Orioles 6, Rangers 1
Texas Baltimore
ab r hbi ab r hbi
Kinsler 2b 3 1 0 0 McLoth lf 4 1 1 0
Profar lf 4 0 0 0 Machd 3b 5 1 3 1
N.Cruz rf 4 0 1 0 Markks rf 5 0 1 0
ABeltre 3b 4 0 1 1 A.Jones cf 4 0 2 0
Przyns dh 4 0 2 0 C.Davis 1b 3 0 0 0
Andrus ss 2 0 0 0 Wieters c 3 1 0 0
Morlnd 1b 3 0 0 0 Hardy ss 2 1 0 0
G.Soto c 3 0 0 0 BRorts 2b 3 1 1 1
EBeltre cf 3 0 0 0 Reimld dh 4 1 2 3
Totals 30 1 4 1 Totals 33 610 5
Texas 000 001 000 1
Baltimore 002 400 00x 6
DP - Baltimore 1. LOB - Texas 5, Baltimore 10.
2B - Pierzynski (13), A.Jones (23). 3B - Machado
(3). HR - Reimold (5).
IP H R ER BB SO
Texas
Lindblom L,1-3 5 1-3 9 6 6 4 1
Burns 1 2-3 1 0 0 3 1
R.Ross 1 0 0 0 0 0
Baltimore
W.Chen W,4-3 7 3 1 1 3 4
Tom.Hunter 2 1 0 0 0 1
WP - Lindblom, Burns.
Umpires - Home, Bill Welke; First, Adrian John-
son; Second, Brian ONora; Third, Fieldin Cul-
breth.
Tigers 8, White Sox 5
Chicago Detroit
ab r hbi ab r hbi
De Aza cf 3 1 1 0 AJcksn cf 5 0 2 1
AlRmrz ss 5 0 1 1 TrHntr rf 5 2 2 0
Rios rf 4 0 0 0 MiCarr 3b 5 1 3 1
A.Dunn 1b 4 0 1 0 Fielder 1b 4 2 3 3
Kppngr dh 4 1 1 0 VMrtnz dh 4 1 3 1
Gillaspi 3b 4 2 2 1 JhPerlt ss 3 0 0 0
Viciedo lf 3 0 2 1 Dirks lf 4 0 0 0
Bckhm 2b 3 1 1 2 Avila c 4 0 1 2
Flowrs c 3 0 0 0 RSantg 2b 3 2 1 0
Tekotte ph 1 0 0 0
Totals 34 5 9 5 Totals 37 815 8
Chicago 010 200 200 5
Detroit 212 003 00x 8
DP - Chicago 1, Detroit 1. LOB - Chicago 6, De-
troit 7. 2B - Al.Ramirez (21), Viciedo (11). 3B -
A.Jackson (2). HR - Gillaspie (7), Beckham (2),
Fielder (16). CS - A.Jackson (2). SF - Beckham.
IP H R ER BB SO
Chicago
Axelrod L,3-6 5 2-3 11 7 7 2 3
Troncoso 1-3 3 1 1 0 0
Purcey 1 0 0 0 0 1
Si.Castro 1 1 0 0 0 1
Detroit
Porcello W,6-6 6 7 3 3 0 6
B.Rondon 1 2 2 2 1 1
Smyly H,10 1 0 0 0 0 1
Benoit S,8-8 1 0 0 0 2 1
WP - B.Rondon 2.
Umpires - Home, Will Little; First, Chad Fairchild;
Second, Jeff Kellogg; Third, Eric Cooper.
T - 3:06. A - 39,085 (41,255).
Blue Jays 5, Indians 4
Toronto Cleveland
ab r hbi ab r h bi
Reyes ss 4 0 1 0 Bourn cf 5 2 3 0
Bautist rf 4 0 0 0 ACarer ss 4 1 2 1
Encrnc 1b 4 0 0 0 Kipnis 2b 4 0 0 0
Lind dh 4 1 1 0 Swisher 1b 4 0 1 0
ClRsms cf 3 1 1 0 Aviles pr 0 0 0 0
MIzturs 3b 2 1 0 0 Brantly lf 4 1 1 1
Thole c 2 0 0 0 CSantn c 3 0 1 0
Arencii ph-c 1 1 1 0 Giambi dh 3 0 1 1
Bonifac lf 3 1 1 2 Raburn ph-dh 1 0 0 0
Kawsk 2b 3 0 1 2 Chsnhll 3b 3 0 0 0
Stubbs rf 4 0 0 0
Totals 30 5 6 4 Totals 35 4 9 3
Toronto 000 000 203 5
Cleveland 010 000 012 4
E - Kawasaki (6), Bourn (2), Stubbs (3). DP - To-
ronto 2, Cleveland 2. LOB - Toronto 6, Cleveland
10. 2B - Lind (17), Col.Rasmus (17). SB - Bourn
(13).
IP H R ER BB SO
Toronto
E.Rogers 6 4 1 1 3 7
McGowan H,1 1 0 0 0 1 1
Cecil BS,1-1 2-3 3 1 1 1 1
Wagner W,2-3 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
Janssen H,1 2-3 2 2 1 1 0
Delabar S,1-4 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Cleveland
Masterson 6 2-3 4 2 2 5 6
Guilmet 2-3 0 0 0 0 1
Pestano 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
R.Hill L,0-1 2-3 0 1 1 1 1
J.Smith 0 2 2 1 1 0
Shaw 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
J.Smith pitched to 4 batters in the 9th.
HBP - by J.Smith (Reyes).
Umpires - Home, Manny Gonzalez; First, Tony
Randazzo; Second, Larry Vanover; Third, Brian
Gorman.
T - 3:17. A - 14,134 (42,241).
MaJOR LEagUE ROUndUP
AP Photo
the Washington nationals anthony Rendon follows through after hitting a
double off Philadelphia Phillies relief pitcher Justin de Fratus in the ninth
inning of a game on Wednesday in Philadelphia. Phillies catcher Carlos Ruiz,
right, looks on. Washington won, 5-1.
Gonzalez, long ball
leads Nats over Phils
The Associated Press
PHILADELPHIA Gio
Gonzalez tossed seven sharp
innings, the Nationals hit a
pair of consecutive homers off
Cliff Lee and Washington beat
the Philadelphia Phillies 5-1
Wednesday night.
Anthony Rendon and Wilson
Ramos hit back-to-back shots
off Lee to start the fth and
Ryan Zimmerman and Jayson
Werth did it to open the sixth.
Gonzalez (7-3) gave up one
run and six hits, striking out
ve to win his fourth straight
start. The lefty has eight qual-
ity starts in a row.
Lee (10-3) had allowed
nine homers in his rst 135
2-3 innings this year before
yielding four in a span of eight
batters.
Darin Ruf hit a solo shot
for the Phillies, who failed to
reach .500 for the rst time
since June 7.
Yankees 8, Royals 1
NEW YORK Robinson
Cano hit a three-run homer,
Lyle Overbay added a grand
slam and the New York
Yankees snapped out of their
offensive funk with a victory
over the Kansas City Royals.
Ivan Nova delivered another
impressive pitching per-
formance and the Yankees,
held to one run each of the
previous three days, stopped
a three-game slide. They
watched two more players
get banged up, though, when
slumping Travis Hafner and
speedy Brett Gardner left with
injuries.
Hafner came out with
a bruised left foot, while
Gardner departed with a
bruised right leg after getting
hit by a pitch for the second
time.
The team said X-rays on
both were negative and they
were day to day.
Marlins 6, Braves 2
MIAMI Giancarlo
Stanton hit a two-run double
to end a 10-game RBI drought,
and the Miami Marlins broke
a ve-game losing streak by
beating Atlanta.
Stanton had been in a
3-for-26 slump before he put
the Marlins ahead in their
four-run rst inning against
Paul Maholm (9-8). Placido
Polanco added three hits and
three RBIs.
Mets 7, giants 2
SAN FRANCISCO
Former Giants prospect Zack
Wheeler pitched seven sharp
innings, Marlon Byrd homered
again and the New York Mets
completed their rst sweep in
San Francisco since 1994 with
a win.
Daniel Murphy and John
Buck each had two hits and
drove in two runs as the Mets
won their fourth in a row,
including three straight over
the slumping World Series
champions. The Giants have
lost 16 of 19.
Wheeler (3-1), a former
Giants rst-round draft pick,
took a shutout into the sev-
enth. He allowed one run and
three hits overall, striking out
ve and walking three.
Reds 6, Brewers 2
MILWAUKEE Mike
Leake scattered four hits over
8 1-3 innings and Brandon
Phillips had three RBI, lifting
the Cincinnati Reds to a win
over the Milwaukee Brewers.
The Reds put the leadoff
runner on base in each of
the rst seven innings and
snapped a three-game losing
streak.
Orioles 6, Rangers 1
BALTIMORE Wei-Yin
Chen returned from the
disabled list to pitch seven
innings of three-hit ball, and
the Baltimore Orioles got a
three-run homer from Nolan
Reimold in a victory over the
Texas Rangers.
Manny Machado had
three hits and an RBI for the
Orioles, who won for only
the third time in nine games.
Baltimore will seek a split
of the four-game series on
Thursday night.
tigers 8, White Sox 5
DETROIT Prince Fielder
homered, Rick Porcello
pitched six solid innings and
the Detroit Tigers bounced
back with a victory over the
Chicago White Sox.
Detroit allowed 23 hits in an
11-4 loss to the White Sox on
Tuesday, but it was the Tigers
who did the slugging early on
in this game. Fielder lined a
two-run shot to right eld in
the rst inning for his 16th
homer of the year.
Alex Avilas two-run single
in the third put Detroit ahead
5-1.
Blue Jays 5, indians 4
CLEVELAND Munenori
Kawasaki hit a two-run single
with the bases loaded in the
ninth inning and the Toronto
Blue Jays beat the Cleveland
Indians 5-4 Tuesday night.
Kawasaki, who broke an
0-for-18 slump, lined a 1-2
pitch from Joe Smith into
left-center eld to score two
runs. A third run scored when
center elder Michael Bourn
booted the ball for an error.
The Associated Press
PHILADELPHIA Former
Phillies All-Star catcher
Darren Daulton has been diag-
nosed with brain cancer.
A statement released by
Philadelphia radio station 97.5
The Fanatic says Daulton has
glioblastoma. The American
Brain Tumor Association calls
that form of cancer highly
malignant.
Daulton had hosted a
nightly radio show at the sta-
tion before doctors found two
tumors on his brain on June
27.
He had an operation to
remove them on July 1.
The statement says Daulton
has returned to his home near
Clearwater, Fla., to continue
recuperating with his immedi-
ate family and friends. He will
eventually begin treatments
there.
Daulton played 14 1/2 of
his 15 major league seasons
with Philadelphia and was a
key part of the Phillies NL
championship team in 1993.
He nished his career with the
1997 World Series champion
Florida Marlins.
Former All-Star Daulton has brain cancer
MAJOR LEAGUE LEADERS
NATIONAL LEAGUE
BATTING_YMolina, St. Louis, .344; Cuddyer,
Colorado, .336; Craig, St. Louis, .329; MCarpen-
ter, St. Louis, .322; Segura, Milwaukee, .319; Vot-
to, Cincinnati, .318; Posey, San Francisco, .316.
RUNS_MCarpenter, St. Louis, 69; CGonzalez,
Colorado, 66; Holliday, St. Louis, 64; Votto, Cin-
cinnati, 62; Choo, Cincinnati, 59; SMarte, Pitts-
burgh, 58; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 57; JUpton,
Atlanta, 57.
RBI_Goldschmidt, Arizona, 74; Craig, St. Louis,
71; Phillips, Cincinnati, 67; DBrown, Philadelphia,
64; CGonzalez, Colorado, 63; Bruce, Cincinnati,
62; PAlvarez, Pittsburgh, 58.
HITS_Segura, Milwaukee, 114; MCarpenter, St.
Louis, 109; Craig, St. Louis, 108; Votto, Cincin-
nati, 108; YMolina, St. Louis, 106; Goldschmidt,
Arizona, 104; GParra, Arizona, 103.
DOUBLES_MCarpenter, St. Louis, 27; Bruce,
Cincinnati, 26; YMolina, St. Louis, 26; GParra,
Arizona, 26; McCutchen, Pittsburgh, 25; Posey,
San Francisco, 25; Rizzo, Chicago, 25.
TRIPLES_CGomez, Milwaukee, 9; SMarte, Pitts-
burgh, 8; Segura, Milwaukee, 8; Span, Wash-
ington, 7; CGonzalez, Colorado, 6; Hechavarria,
Miami, 5; DWright, New York, 5.
HOME RUNS_CGonzalez, Colorado, 24; PAl-
varez, Pittsburgh, 23; DBrown, Philadelphia, 23;
Goldschmidt, Arizona, 21; Beltran, St. Louis, 19;
Bruce, Cincinnati, 18; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 16;
Uggla, Atlanta, 16; JUpton, Atlanta, 16.
STOLEN BASES_ECabrera, San Diego, 31;
SMarte, Pittsburgh, 28; Segura, Milwaukee, 27;
CGomez, Milwaukee, 21; Revere, Philadelphia,
21; McCutchen, Pittsburgh, 18; Pierre, Miami, 18.
PITCHING_Zimmermann, Washington, 12-3;
Wainwright, St. Louis, 12-5; Lynn, St. Louis,
11-3; Corbin, Arizona, 10-1; Lee, Philadelphia,
10-3; Marquis, San Diego, 9-4; Bumgarner, San
Francisco, 9-5; SMiller, St. Louis, 9-6; Maholm,
Atlanta, 9-8.
STRIKEOUTS_Harvey, New York, 147; Kershaw,
Los Angeles, 129; Samardzija, Chicago, 128;
Wainwright, St. Louis, 126; Lee, Philadelphia,
125; Latos, Cincinnati, 120; Bumgarner, San
Francisco, 116.
SAVES_Grilli, Pittsburgh, 28; RSoriano, Wash-
ington, 24; Mujica, St. Louis, 24; Kimbrel, Atlanta,
24; Romo, San Francisco, 20; Chapman, Cincin-
nati, 20; Papelbon, Philadelphia, 19.
AMERICAN LEAGUE
BATTING_MiCabrera, Detroit, .366; DOrtiz, Bos-
ton, .327; Pedroia, Boston, .321; Trout, Los An-
geles, .320; ABeltre, Texas, .318; Machado, Bal-
timore, .318; Donaldson, Oakland, .316; Loney,
Tampa Bay, .316.
RUNS_MiCabrera, Detroit, 70; CDavis, Baltimore,
63; Trout, Los Angeles, 63; Bautista, Toronto, 60;
DeJennings, Tampa Bay, 60; AJones, Baltimore,
60; Encarnacion, Toronto, 56.
RBI_MiCabrera, Detroit, 93; CDavis, Baltimore,
85; Fielder, Detroit, 69; NCruz, Texas, 68; Encar-
nacion, Toronto, 68; Cano, New York, 62; DOrtiz,
Boston, 62.
HITS_MiCabrera, Detroit, 129; Machado, Balti-
more, 126; Trout, Los Angeles, 115; ABeltre, Tex-
as, 114; Pedroia, Boston, 114; AJones, Baltimore,
111; Ellsbury, Boston, 107.
DOUBLES_Machado, Baltimore, 39; Trout, Los
Angeles, 29; Mauer, Minnesota, 27; CDavis, Balti-
more, 26; Pedroia, Boston, 24; JhPeralta, Detroit,
24; Saltalamacchia, Boston, 24; Seager, Seattle,
24.
TRIPLES_Ellsbury, Boston, 7; Drew, Boston,
6; Trout, Los Angeles, 6; Gardner, New York, 5;
DeJennings, Tampa Bay, 5; LMartin, Texas, 5;
Kawasaki, Toronto, 4; HKendrick, Los Angeles, 4.
HOME RUNS_CDavis, Baltimore, 33; MiCabrera,
Detroit, 29; ADunn, Chicago, 24; Encarnacion, To-
ronto, 23; NCruz, Texas, 22; Ibanez, Seattle, 22;
Cano, New York, 21.
STOLEN BASES_Ellsbury, Boston, 36; McLouth,
Baltimore, 24; RDavis, Toronto, 23; Altuve, Hous-
ton, 21; Trout, Los Angeles, 21; Kipnis, Cleveland,
20; AlRamirez, Chicago, 19; Rios, Chicago, 19.
PITCHING_Scherzer, Detroit, 13-0; Colon, Oak-
land, 12-3; MMoore, Tampa Bay, 12-3; Tillman,
Baltimore, 10-3; Masterson, Cleveland, 10-7;
Buchholz, Boston, 9-0; FHernandez, Seattle, 9-4;
CWilson, Los Angeles, 9-6; Verlander, Detroit,
9-6; Sabathia, New York, 9-7.
STRIKEOUTS_Darvish, Texas, 157; Scherzer,
Detroit, 146; Masterson, Cleveland, 137; FHer-
nandez, Seattle, 136; Sale, Chicago, 123; Ver-
lander, Detroit, 122; DHolland, Texas, 114.
SAVES_Nathan, Texas, 30; JiJohnson, Baltimore,
30; MRivera, New York, 29; Balfour, Oakland, 24;
Frieri, Los Angeles, 22; AReed, Chicago, 22;
GHolland, Kansas City, 22.
This Date In Baseball
July 11
1914 Babe Ruth made his major league debut
for the Boston Red Sox and received credit for a
4-3 victory over Cleveland. He was removed for a
pinch hitter in the seventh, and Duffy Lewis single
led to the winning run.
1944 Phil Cavaretta set an All-Star game re-
cord by reaching base safely fve straight times
triple, single, three walks to lead the NL to a 7-1
victory over the AL at Forbes Field in Pittsburgh.
1950 The All-Star game returned to Comiskey
Park, the site of the frst game, and was won by
the NL 4-3 on Red Schoendiensts 14th-inning
home run off Ted Gray. It was the frst extra-inning
All-Star game, the frst time the NL won at an AL
park and the frst All-Star game shown on network
television.
1961 Despite a record seven errors and pitcher
Stu Miller getting blown off the Candlestick Park
mound by a gale wind, the NL edged the AL 5-4
in the frst of two All-Star games played that year.
1967 Tony Perezs home run off Catfsh Hunter
in the 15th inning gave the NL a 2-1 win in the
longest game in All-Star history. The game was
played in Californias Anaheim Stadium.
1973 Jim Northrup of Detroit knocked in eight
runs, batting in the leadoff spot, to lead the Tigers
to a 14-2 romp over the Texas Rangers.
1978 Steve Garvey keyed the NLs 7-3 All-
Star victory at San Diegos Jack Murphy Stadium
with a game-tying, two-run single and a triple that
sparked a four-run eighth inning.
1985 Nolan Ryan of the Houston Astros be-
came the frst pitcher in major league history to
reach the 4,000-strikeout mark when he fanned
New Yorks Danny Heep leading off the sixth in-
ning. The Astros beat the Mets 4-3 in 12 innings
on Bill Dorans ffth hit of the game.
1995 Jeff Conines solo shot in the eighth in-
ning gave the NL a 3-2 victory in the All-Star
game. Craig Biggio and Mike Piazza also hom-
ered for the NL.
2000 Derek Jeter of the New York Yankees
went 3-for-3 with two RBIs and a run scored as
the AL defeated the NL 6-3 in the All-Star game.
Jeter became the frst Yankee to win the All-Star
game MVP.
PAGE 4B Thursday, July 11, 2013 SPORTS www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER
Harris
From page 1B
MLB
From page 1B
Froome
From page 1B
RailRiders
From page 1B
The Times Leader staf
PLAINS TWP Kaya
Swanek pitched a no-hitter as
Plains defeated Carbino Club
5-0 in ve innings Wednesday
night in Section 5 senior soft-
ball action.
Swanek also strucky out six.
At the plate, she went 3-for-3
with a single, a double and a
home run with 3 RBI while
Keighlyn Oliver was 2-for-4
with two singles and two RBI
and Elizabeth Ellsworth was
2-for-3 with two hits and one
RBI.
Section 5 Tournament play
continues today at Plains
Tokach Field at 6 p.m.
AMERICAN LEGION
Wilkes-Barre 4, Back
Moutain 3
Wilkes-Barre tied up the
game in the top of the sev-
enth before Back Mountain
answered in the bottom of the
frame for a walk-off victory.
Deep Patel doubled, tripled
and drove in a run for Back
Mountain while picking up
the win in relief. Nick Oley
and Lee Eckert added two hits
apiece.
Nick Preston went 2-for-4
with a double to lead Wilkes-
Barre.
Wilkes-Barre
AB R H BI 2B3BHR
John Yurkoski 2b 3 0 0 0 0 0 0
Jason Hoggarth 2b1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Nick Preston p 4 1 2 0 1 0 0
Matt DeMarco ss-cf3 1 1 1 1 0 0
Eric Kerr c 3 0 1 0 0 0 0
John Zionce cf 3 1 1 0 0 0 0
Eric Shorts cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Vito Malacari 1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Wil Amsbury 1b-3b3 0 0 0 0 0 0
S.P. Williamson 3b 3 0 1 1 0 0 0
Nick Zarola rf 3 0 1 0 0 0 0
Mike Kendra lf 2 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals 29 3 7 2 2 0 0
Back Mountain
AB R H BI 2B3BHR
Nigel Stearns cf-p 4 1 1 0 0 0 0
Deep Patel ss-p 4 1 2 1 1 1 0
Pat Condo p-ss 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Connor Balloun dh3 1 1 0 0 0 0
Greg Petorak lf 3 0 1 1 0 0 0
Nick Oley 2b 2 0 2 0 0 0 0
Cody Paraschak rf 3 0 0 0 0 0 0
Dylan Pilger c 3 0 0 1 0 0 0
Jon Strausser 1b 3 0 0 0 0 0 0
Lee Eckert 3b 3 1 2 0 1 0 0
Totals 28 4 9 3 2 1 0
Wilkes-Barre 011000 1 3
Back Mountain 001002 1 4
Wilkes-Barre IP H R ER BB SO
Preston (L) 6.1 9 4 3 1 3
Back Mountain IP H R ER BB SO
Condo 3.0 4 2 0 1 4
Stearns 3.0 1 0 0 1 5
Patel (W) 1.0 2 1 1 0 0
JUNIORLITTLELEAGUE
DISTRICT 16 ALL-STAR
Hanover 4, Plains 2
Kevin Rimmer picked up the
win, while Joey Wheeler had
two hits in the Hanover vic-
tory.
Sean Hart had a double,
single and an RBI, Mike
Piscotty had two hits and two
RBI and Matthew Clarke had
one hit and one RBI to con-
tribute.
Plains Taylor Chronowski
had two hits, while James
Costano and James Kopsik
each had hits.
Hanover plays at North
Wilkes-Barre at 5:45 p.m. on
Friday in the championship
series.
Swanek hurls no-hitter
For The Times Leader/Eric Seidle
Kaya Swanek of Plains slides into second base for a double during Wednesday nights softball win over Carbino Club.
evolved into a widely resonating move-
ment. Hes pestered the universitys
board of trustees constantly, sometimes
crashing their meetings, other times
signing up for the public comment ses-
sions.
Hes hosted several heavily-attended
pro-Paterno rallies. On 36-hour notice
in December, Harris found out NCAA
president Mark Emmert was scheduled
to speak at a luncheon in California,
flew from Pittsburgh to ask one ques-
tion about the NCAA sanctions then flew
back that night.
Most recently, he helped endorse three
candidates for the trustees May alumni
elections. Before their victory was official
he addressed the current trustees at their
meeting, saying, Well never understand
your lust for power, board of trustees, but
we will never back down.
Whether Harris is flying to California,
commanding attention at a trustees meet-
ing or espousing his views on TV, many
involved say he is not only the key link
holding this chain of protest together,
but the original designer.
If its not Franco, I dont know who it
is, Penn State trustee Anthony Lubrano
said. Without that notoriety, without
that push, I think it wouldve been much
easier to just say, You know what, were
just moving on and were not looking
back at this at all.
Ruffling feathers
After screening the mini-movie The
Framing of Paterno, passing out dia-
grams of the infamous Lasch Building
coaches locker room and bringing
up possible conspiracy theories at his
Upon Further Review rally in the State
College hotel ballroom, Harris asks the
crowd, Who can we believe in? Who can
we trust?
Quickly, somebody yells, You Franco.
Even when discussing heated issues,
he sounds remarkably calm, almost
soothing.
His steady cadence masks the complex-
ity or, as many would say, the extreme-
ness of his rhetoric.
There is no reluctance when it comes
to divulging his hard-core beliefs about
Paterno, who died in January 2012. Harris
discussed how after analyzing Paternos
grand jury testimony he now thinks
Paterno was briefed by somebody on
what to tell the grand jury because of lan-
guage he considers unusual.
Another one of his major points cen-
ters on a conspiracy to fire Paterno that
he believes is linked to John Surma, the
former trustees vice chairman, who is the
CEO of U.S. Steel.
His evidence toward this conclusion is
largely based upon a frayed relationship
between Paterno and Mr. Surmas broth-
er, Victor Surma, a former Penn State
football player, depicted in a series of
emails recovered from a 2007 Penn State
lettermans listserv group.
Neither Victor Surma nor John Surma
responded to interview requests.
Harris qualifies his theory by saying
hes just showing information, a strate-
gy that parallels the way radio host Glenn
Beck and other well-known contrarians
often portray arguments, presenting a
view for several minutes to a like-minded
audience and then telling those people
they dont have to accept the premise
that its just a possibility.
They are listening, though. Whether
that influence is being used for good is
another question.
Harris has been joined at most of the
Upon Further Review events by docu-
mentary filmmaker John Ziegler, who
directed The Framing of Joe Paterno,
and Ray Blehar, a Penn State graduate
and former federal government analyst
who has tirelessly studied the Freeh
report and authored numerous rebuttals
of it.
In State College, Blehar attempted
to discredit the testimony of some of
Sanduskys victims, saying they exagger-
ated how small and young they were when
they were sexually violated by Sandusky.
In a later email exchange, Blehar wrote,
[prosecutor Joe] McGettigan coached
many of the witnesses into changing
their stories.
He said his purpose of dissecting
their testimony was to draw attention to
Pennsylvanias child protective services.
In late March, the name of Victim 2
was leaked on Zieglers website. His
prison interview of Sandusky, broad-
cast on the Today show, prompted the
Paterno family to disavow him, saying
in a statement that Zieglers interview
was transparently self-serving and yet
another insult to the victims and anyone
who cares about the truth in this tragic
story.
Harris continues to associate with Mr.
Ziegler, assigning him to the panel at
his April presentation in State College
and his May presentation in the Lehigh
Valley.
As Penn State continues to move on
from the Sandusky scandal and Harris
and his team veer further toward per-
sonal vendettas and the questioning
of Sandusky victims, how long can the
grace period endure?
Chuck Franzetta was a senior when
Harris arrived on campus as a freshman.
He said he respects Harris as an athlete,
person, humanitarian and businessman,
but considers his actions detrimental
to the university, preventing Penn State
from showcasing its academic achieve-
ments and thwarting football coach Bill
OBrien from assembling and leading the
best team.
Further, he questions the veracity of
Harris message. Of the board of trust-
ees, which Mr. Harris has accused of con-
spiracy, Franzetta points out that four of
the 32 board members in November 2011
were former football players who respect-
ed Paterno.
Three of them, Dave Joyner, Paul
Suhey and Steve Garban, were captains.
Mr. Franzetta said he has asked Harris
via email and in person to discontinue his
actions.
Their attacks on those people are
wrong, Franzetta said. I get a little
emotional about that. Theyre wrong.
They shouldnt be doing that. They are
going after people who are good, decent
people who have committed themselves
to this university. I guess at some point
somebody has to stand up and say,
Stop it, shut up.
Cabrera, Oaklands Bartolo
Colon and San Diegos
Yasmani Grandal have served
50-game penalties following
positive testosterone tests.
The drug agreement speci-
es that if a suspension for a
rst PED offense is challenged
by the union, the violation is
not made public unless the
penalty is sustained in arbitra-
tion. However, discipline for
second and third offenses are
announced and served while
the grievance is litigated.
There also is a provision
stating the commissioners
office may publicly announce
the discipline of a player if the
allegations relating to a play-
ers violation of the program
previously had been made
public through a source other
than the commissioners office
or a club or their employees.
The sides or the arbitrator
will have to decide whether
the media accounts of
Biogenesis are covered by that
clause.
Each players case probably
will be handled in a separate
arbitration, which could slow
down the process while the
sides secure dates before
Horowitz or agree to retain
other arbitrators.
The three players who
already have served suspen-
sions also may claim they
cant be penalized under a
provision prohibiting mul-
tiple disciplines for the same
use. In addition, they cant
be penalized for conduct that
took place before they were
given notice of their positive
drug test.
rst two time splits but slowed down in
the last section. Martin won in just over
36 minutes.
Im not sad at all with that, said
Froome, who also nished second behind
countryman Bradley Wiggins on last years
longer time trial. I gave that time trial
everything I had.
He was the only rider to get within a
minute of Martin, with Belgian Thomas
De Gendt 1:01 behind in third.
Martin was lucky to be racing after he
lost consciousness on his team bus after
his crash in the opening stage. His left
lung was bruised and layers of skin were
shredded off his back.
At night, I couldnt sleep either on my
left or right sides or on my back, Martin
said.
He was not the only one having sleepless
nights.
His mother Bettina Martin said at the
nish line of his rst-day crash, I was very
shocked, very worried, and needed a long
time before I was back to normal again.
Still, nothing would deter Martin, who
won the penultimate stage of the 2011
Tour, also a time trial, and nished second
to Wiggins in the time trial at the London
Olympics.
The goal was always to continue the
Tour de France because its a big honor,
Martin said. When doctors said OK,
I kept the focus on todays stage. I knew
I would not be 100 percent for the team
time trial (last week), but I had a good
chance to recover for today.
There are still some deeper wounds
that are left to heal, but its not that painful
anymore.
Others had a more painful day.
Contador looked stern-faced and tense
when he prepared to start. The Spaniard
nished in 15th place, 2:15 behind Martin;
Evans was 2:30 slower, and Schleck n-
ished 4:44 behind Martin.
No ones won the Tour de France yet
and no ones lost it. We have to get to Paris
yet, Contador said. Chris Froome is in
impressive form and is a great climber, but
there are still many stages left.
Even though Evans is 6:54 behind
Froome in 14th place, he has not given up.
I think we will get a few chances, the
Australian said. In the last four days (of
the race) we will give everything.
The team of Mark Cavendish, winner
of the fth stage, believes someone threw
urine at the British rider along the route.
To do something disrespectful like that
is really sad and ruins the whole atmo-
sphere, Froome said.
The 12th stage today is one of two con-
secutive at days for sprinters, taking the
riders on a 135.5-mile route from Fougeres
to Tours in the Loire valley, a picturesque
region of ancient chateaux and vineyards.
The climbers will face a medium moun-
tain stage on Saturday and daunting
ascent of Mont Ventoux on Sunday. It
gives Froome another chance to crush his
wilting rivals.
been here. I didnt realize there
were that many Yankees fans in
Scranton. I gured Pennsylvania
might be more Phillies or
Pirates, said Jeter, who nished
Wednesday 0-for-3 with a pair
of groundouts and a strikeout
looking. Ive enjoyed meeting
most of Scranton while Ive been
here.
RailRiders starter Jose
Ramirez (1-2) struggled getting
through the rst inning. The
23-year-old had to throw 40
pitches and gave up three runs
on two hits and two walks. The
big blow of the frame came from
Chris Colabello, who hit a three-
run homer. It was his second in
as many games and No. 23 of the
season to put the RailRiders in
a rst-inning hole for the fth
straight game.
The second inning wasnt
much better as he was pulled
getting just one out and walking
two more. His nal line was three
runs, two hits and four walks
allowed in just 1 1-3 innings. His
struggle with command showed
throwing 56 pitches with the
majority of them (31) missing
the strike zone.
Rochester added a pair of runs
in the third against right-hander
Caleb Cotham to up the lead to
5-0.
During the recent stretch
of success, getting down
early wasnt a problem for the
RailRiders. But this time ve
runs was too much to overcome.
Especially since Hendriks was
on his game not allowing a hit
until J.R. Murphys hard single
to left with one out in the fth
inning.
The RailRiders avoided the
shutout getting a run in the
bottom of the eighth when
Adonis Garcia doubled then
scored on a double play ball.
Red Wings 5, RailRiders 1
Rochester RailRiders
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Farris lf 4 0 1 1 Jeter ss 3 0 0 0
Beresford 2b 3 1 1 0 Ibarra ss 1 0 0 0
Herrmann rf 5 1 1 0 Adams 3b 4 0 0 0
Colabello 1b 5 1 2 3 Martinez rf 4 0 0 0
Fryer dh 4 0 0 0 Ruiz dh 4 0 0 0
Mitchell cf 5 1 1 1 Johnson 1b1 0 0 0
Bernier ss 4 1 1 0 Murphy c 3 0 1 0
Olmedo 3b 5 0 1 1 Garcia cf 3 1 1 0
Butera c 2 0 0 0 Neal lf 3 0 1 0
Maruszak 3 0 0 0
Totals 37 5 8 5 Totals 29 1 3 0
Rochester 302 000 000 5
RailRiders 000 000 010 - 1
E Bernier (6), Jeter (1), Ramirez (1). LOB
ROC 12, SWB 3. TEAM RISP ROC 2-for-14,
SWB 1-for-3. 2B Bernier (14), Garcia (1). HR
Colabello (23). SB Fryer (4), Mitchell (15). GIDP
ROC 1 , SWB 1.
IP H R ER BB SO
Rochester
Hendricks (W, 2-6) 8 3 1 1 2 6
Eppley 1 0 0 0 0 0
RailRiders
Ramirez (L,1-2) 1.1 2 3 2 2 4
Spence .2 0 0 0 0 1
Cotham 4.2 4 2 2 0 3
Betances 2.1 2 0 0 1 2
WP Betances
HBP Butera (by Cotham), Beresford (by Be-
tances)
Umpires Home, Chad Whitson; First, Jon
Saphire; Second, John Tumpane; Third, A.J. John-
son
T 2:48 (21 minute delay) A 9,765 (10,000)
Rochester 302 000 000 5
RailRiders 000 000 010 - 1
E Bernier (6), Jeter (1), Ramirez (1). LOB ROC
12, SWB 3. TEAM RISP ROC 2-for-14, SWB
1-for-3. 2B Bernier (14), Garcia (1). HR Co-
labello (23). SB Fryer (4), Mitchell (15). GIDP
ROC 1 , SWB 1.
THe T.L. exPReSS
The RailRiders six-game losing streak ended on Wednesday with a
5-1 loss to Rochester. It was their frst loss at PNC Field since June 22.
RailRiders at the plate: SWB was held to just three hits a single
by J.R. Murphy in the ffth, a double by Adonis Garcia and a single by
Thomas Neal.
RailRiders on the mound: Jose Ramirez didnt fare well in the
start lasting just 1 1-3 innings giving up three runs on two hits and
four walks in taking the loss. Josh Spence got the last two outs of
the second inning. Caleb Cothamdid a good job out of the bullpen
tossing 4 2-3 innings allowing two runs on four hits. He didnt walk
any and fanned three. Dellin Betances worked the fnal 2 1-3 innings
allowing just two hits.
Riding the Rails: Infelder David Adams ofcially joined the
RailRidersroster on Wednesday after being optioned fromNewYork
on Monday. To make roomon the 25-man roster, infelder Josh Bell
was granted his release. In other player moves, infelder/outfelder
Ronnier Mustelier was transferred to the Gulf Coast League Yankees
to begin a rehab assignment.
Attendance: 9,765
Time of Game: 2:48 (The game was also delayed by 21 minutes
due to a power failure)
Todays Game: Scranton/Wilkes-Barre welcomes Syracuse to PNC
Field for a short two-game series beginning at 7:05 tonight.
Todays Probables: RailRiders righty Michael Pineda (1-0, 3.60) vs.
Syracuse RHP Caleb Clay (2-2, 1.65)
Captain RailRider: Yankees captain Derek Jeter went 0 for 3 in the
game grounding out twice and striking out looking. He also played
shortstop for seven innings making an error. He said afterwards that
he did not knowwhere he was playing today.
On Deck: The nine-game homestand concludes on Friday. On
Saturday, the RailRiders head to Bufalo for a three-game set starting
with a doubleheader on Saturday to close out the frst half of the
schedule.
Today at PNC Field: Thursday means Thirsty Thursday with $1
beers and $1 Pepsi products fromwhen the gates open for two hours.
On The Radio: All games can be heard on WYCK 1340-AM, 1400-
AM, 100.7-FM
On TV: The next televised game by WQMY(My Network) will be
Friday for the 7:05 p.m. contest.
HowThey Scored
ROCHESTER FIRST: Eric Farris grounded out. James Beresford
reached safely on an error. Chris Herrmann singled advancing
Beresford to third. Chris Colabello hit a three-run home run. Eric
Fryer walked. Jermaine Mitchell struck out. With Doug Bernier
batting, Fryer stole second. Bernier walked. Ray Olmedo fied out.
REDWINGS 3-0
ROCHESTERTHIRD: Eric Fryer grounded out. Jermaine Mitchell
singled then stole second. Doug Bernier reached on a felders
choice, Mitchell safe at third. Ray Olmedo hit an infeld single bringing
in Mitchell and moving Bernier to second. DrewButera was hit by a
pitch to load the bases. Eric Farris grounded into a felders choice,
Butera out at second and Bernier scored. James Beresford grounded
out. REDWINGS 5-0
RAILRIDERS EIGHTH: Adonis Garcia doubled. Thomas Neal
singled, Garcia moved to third. Addison Maruszak grounded into a
double play, but Garcia scored. Walter Ibarra struck out.
REDWINGS 5-1
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER SPORTS Thursday, July 11, 2013 PAGE 5B
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Couples looks to break through in US Senior Open
The Associated Press
OMAHA, Neb. Fred
Couples feels like hes overdue
for a win.
Hes played seven events on
the Champions Tour this year,
has been in the top ve in six of
them and comes into the U.S.
Senior Open today off three
straight runner-up nishes.
I would like to win some-
thing, he said Wednesday,
adding that he even came in
second in a member-guest
tournament in California last
month.
Couples most recent vic-
tory was just under a year
ago at the 2012 Senior British
Open. He looked ready to win
two weeks ago in the Senior
Players Championship, but
a back-nine collapse left him
tied for second behind Kenny
Perry.
Couples said his bothersome
back is feeling ne, so if the
man nicknamed Boom Boom
for his prodigious drives can
nd the fairway at Omaha
Country Club, no one would
be surprised if this is the week
he breaks through.
Fred still hits the ball a tre-
mendous distance, Bernhard
Langer said. He hasnt lost
any distance, maybe gained
some with the equipment and
all that. Hes capable of produc-
ing very low scores. Wherever
he tees up, hes one of the main
favorites, no doubt about it.
Couples, Perry, Langer, Tom
Watson and David Frost are
among the top contenders at
the 6,700-yard, par-70 Omaha
Country Club.
The fourth of the ve senior
majors will be a test of stamina
for the 50-and-over golfers,
especially with weekend highs
forecast in the low 90s with
high humidity. The course is
hilly, featuring elevation and
topographical changes that
belie the popular image of the
central plains.
Nebraska, youd think at
and hot, Perry said. I got the
hot part right, but its the hilli-
est golf course Ive ever been
on.
Drives in the fairway will be
at a premium with the rough
cut high and the greens small
and sloped. The 312-yard 13th
hole is drivable, but the course
features the second-longest
par-3 in U.S. Senior Open his-
tory in the 230-yard third hole
and the third-longest par-4 in
the 494-yard 10th.
The 53-year-old Couples
scaled-back schedule begins
to ramp up now. After the
U.S. Senior Open, he plays the
British Open at Muireld and
Senior British Open at Royal
Birkdale in consecutive weeks
which might be a little
much, he said.
For a man with a notoriously
bad back, the schedule is tax-
ing, in no small part because
of the challenge the Omaha
Country Club presents. Even in
the best of circumstances, golf-
ers will nd themselves with a
good number of side-hill and
downhill lies. And then theres
that gnarly, 4-inch rough.
If I drive it in the rough and
dont have a great lie, Im not
going to do too much out of
it, Couples said. Ill probably
play it safe.
Roger Chapman will try
to become the rst defend-
ing champion to repeat since
Allen Doyle in 2006. Chapman,
who also won the Senior PGA
Championship last year, has
not been able to recapture his
2012 magic. He has one top-10
nish in 13 events.
Notable rst-time entrants
are Colin Montgomerie, who
turned 50 last month and tied
for ninth in the Senior Players
Championship; Rocco Mediate,
who lost a playoff to Tiger
Woods in the classic 2008 U.S.
Open at Torrey Pines; and
Duffy Waldorf, who has six
top-10s in 11 Champions Tour
events this year.
Perry, the Charles Schwab
Cup points leader, is looking
for his second win of the year
in a senior major. He shot
three straight rounds in the
60s to win the Senior Players
Championship by 2 shots
over Couples and Waldorf in
Pittsburgh.
Anything that has major
attached to it was always
my one goal, Perry said.
Obviously, our majors out
here probably are not looked
upon like they are on the PGA
Tour, but yet theyre still a
major. It still will be attached
to your name.
Stricker the man to beat at
John Deer Classic
SILVIS, Ill. Steve Stricker
might be the only golfer on the
PGA Tour who isnt peeking
ahead to Muireld and next
weeks British Open.
Strickers single-minded
focus on TPC Deere Run, com-
bined with his recent domi-
nance of the course, makes him
the man to beat at this week-
ends John Deere Classic.
The 46-year-old Stricker
is skipping the Open
Championship as part of a plan
to spend more time with his
family. But Stricker won the
John Deere Classic three times
from 2009-11.
Hes not about to pass on a
shot at a fourth title just down
the road in Illinois.
Stricker and native Iowan
Zach Johnson headline a eld
left a bit thin because many of
the worlds top golfers are pre-
paring for the British Open.
AP photo
Fred Couples practices chipping out of a sand trap Wednesday at the Omaha Country Club ahead of the U.S. Senior Open golf tournament in Omaha, Neb., First
round of the golf competition begins today.
UNCreviewing mens basketball issues
The Associated Press
CHAPEL HILL, N.C.
North Carolina ath-
letic director Bubba
Cunningham said
Wednesday the school is
gathering information on
potential improper con-
duct by members of the
mens basketball team
a month after the drug
arrest of leading scorer
P.J. Hairston.
Cunninghams state-
ment didnt name any
player specifically. But
the AD did say he and
coach Roy Williams will
support the appropriate
disciplinary measures
for any player if war-
ranted at the completion
of the universitys inves-
tigation.
We take these mat-
ters very seriously and
are looking into these
reports and the infer-
ences they contain
with all due diligence,
Cunningham said. It
is my practice not to
comment on the indi-
viduals involved or the
details surrounding these
reports until we have suf-
ficient understanding of
the facts involved. We
are still gathering infor-
mation, learning informa-
tion from other sources,
and we will not comment
until we have a strong
grasp of each individual
situation.
The school started
gathering informa-
tion after Hairston was
arrested June 5 during a
license checkpoint in
Durham.
Hairston and two
passengers were each
charged with misdemean-
or marijuana possession.
Officers also seized
a 9mm handgun and
ammunition during the
stop, with Durham police
spokeswoman Kammie
Michael saying the pistol
was found on the ground
outside the rental vehicle
during the search.
Police havent linked
the gun to Hairston or
his passengers.
All three are scheduled
for an August court hear-
ing.
Hairston was driving a
rented vehicle linked to
a convicted felon facing
pending drug charges at
the time of the arrest.
Trades and new
contracts become
ofcial around NBA
Brian Mahoney
AP Basketball Writer
Just about every NBA
team would like Dwight
Howard.
Only the Houston
Rockets could get him,
and on Wednesday some
of his other suitors either
announced their backup
plans or were still work-
ing on them.
Paul Millsap is headed
to Atlanta. The Dallas
Mavericks are consider-
ing Andrew Bynum. The
Golden State Warriors
have acquired Andre
Iguodala.
The Los Angeles
Clippers never had to
look beyond their top
target, with Chris Paul
committing to stay on the
rst day of free agency.
They also added Darren
Collison, Jared Dudley
and J.J. Redick to a team
that won the Pacic
Division last season, sur-
passing the Lakers as the
best team in Los Angeles.
Its hard to see that
changing after Howard
passed on re-signing with
the Lakers and instead
opted for the Rockets in
a deal that still hadnt
become ofcial as of
Wednesday night.
That was the rst day
transactions could be
completed and contacts
signed following the
completion of the NBAs
moratorium period. The
Rockets couldnt wait
to talk about their All-
Star center, getting ned
$150,000 by the league
on Tuesday for premature
comments about Howard
on TV and in social
media.
The rest of the league
waited until rules allowed
Wednesday.
The Clippers held a
press conference for Paul,
the three new players and
the re-signed Matt Barnes
and Ryan Hollins on what
Paul called one of the
biggest days in franchise
history.
While they were cel-
ebrating, Bynum was
meeting with Dallas,
another team that wanted
Howard.
Bynum was part of the
four-team trade that sent
Howard from Orlando to
Los Angeles last summer,
but never played a game
for Philadelphia because
of knee problems.
The Cleveland
Cavaliers have already
offered him a contract,
and the Mavericks are
weighing the risk.
At this point, were
having medical discus-
sions and well have the
opportunity to get with
him and his agent and
better understand the
risks involved and make
a good decision for our
franchise, said Donnie
Nelson, the teams presi-
dent of basketball opera-
tions. Currently, we still
need help and support in
our front court and were
going to turn over every
stone.
Charlotte got bigger
by adding former Utah
center Al Jefferson, while
his former Jazz teammate
Millsap is also bound for
the Southeast Division
with the Hawks.
Atlanta missed out on
Howard, and forward
Josh Smith left for a $54
million, four-year deal
with Detroit, but the
Hawks bounced back by
giving Millsap a two-year,
$19 million contract.
The Jazz also got
involved in the deal that
landed Iguodala with the
Warriors, who gave him
a four-year, $48 million
deal last week. Golden
State cleared more than
$24 million by sending
Richard Jefferson, Andris
Biedrins and Brandon
Rush to the Jazz along
with four draft picks and
cash. Denver received
guard Randy Foye from
the Jazz.
Chris Andersen signed
a $1.7 million, one-year
deal to stay with the
Miami Heat, who will
have to hold off some
stronger challengers next
season in the Eastern
Conference. Indiana re-
signed power forward
David West and added
C.J. Watson as a backup
point guard, while the
Chicago Bulls improved
their outside shooting by
signing Mike Dunleavy.
The New York Knicks
hope they did, too, with
the acquisition of Andrea
Bargnani. However, the
former No. 1 overall pick
from Italy struggled dur-
ing an injury-plagued
2012-13 season for the
Toronto Raptors, who
shipped him to New York
for Steve Novak, Quentin
Richardson, Marcus
Camby and three future
draft picks.
The NBAs other big
deal of the offseason,
the trade sending Kevin
Garnett and Paul Pierce
from Boston to Brooklyn,
will be completed Friday.
The Nets could pay
more than $70 million in
taxes in the rst season of
the NBAs harsher penal-
ties for teams who exceed
the limit.
Teams resort to backup
plans in wake of Rockets
signing of Dwight Howard
K
PAGE 6B Thursday, July 11, 2013 SPORTS www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER
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Staford signs $53M, 3-year extension with Lions
Larry Lage
AP Sports Writer
ALLEN PARK, Mich.
Matthew Stafford ended a
conversation.
Stafford signed a $53
million, three-year exten-
sion with the Detroit
Lions to stay under con-
tract for $76.5 million
over the next ve seasons.
The deal came a month
after the 25-year-old quar-
terback answered another
round of questions about
his future with the team.
I dont want to go for
the next three years talk-
ing about, Well, youve
got two years left. Youve
got one year left; now
youre getting
franchised, said
Stafford, who
had two years
left on the deal
he signed as the
No. 1 overall
pick in the 2009
draft. Thats just
something Im not
about. I want to
be about the team. I want
to help the team out if I
can in cap space, whatever
it is. I want good players
around me as a quarter-
back.
Stafford and the Lions
agreed to terms Tuesday
on the deal that will pay
him another $41.5 mil-
lion in guarantees, and
he signed the contract
Wednesday morning to
answer the question about
where hell play in the near
future.
It was important
too to remove that dia-
logue, Lions President
Tom Lewand said. Not
that Matthew would let
it become a distraction
or that we would let it
become a distraction. But
as he said, he was not the
kind of person that
wants to go into
next year talking
about one year left
on a contract or
possibly going into
a franchise tag.
This way we avoid
that.
The deal clears
some salary cap
space for a franchise des-
perately seeking success
with only one playoff vic-
tory since winning the
1957 NFL title.
Detroit hasnt won much
in large part because its
last Pro Bowl quarterback
was Greg Landry in 1971.
The last time the Lions
were a league power in
the 1950s they were led
by Hall of Fame QB Bobby
Layne, who like Stafford
played at Highland Park
High School in Dallas.
Theyre counting on
Stafford to make playoff
appearances a regular
occurrence, not something
that has happened only
once in 2011 in 13
years.
Stafford
NASCARissues no
penalties for roof faps
The Associated Press
DAYTONA BEACH,
Fla. NASCAR declined
on Wednesday to penal-
ize the 31 cars that failed
inspection in the Sprint
Cup and Nationwide
Series at Daytona.
NASCAR conscated
the teams roof aps,
which are designed to
keep cars on the ground
during spins and wrecks
at high speeds, for further
inspection.
Thirty-one cars, includ-
ing 16 in the Sprint Cup
Series, failed inspec-
tion before Thursdays
practices at Daytona
International Speedway.
Based upon our
inspection and subse-
quent review, it was our
determination that the
functionality and safety
aspects of the roof aps
were not compromised
and the on track com-
petition would not be
impacted, NASCAR vice
president of competition
Robin Pemberton said.
Moving forward we will
work with the roof ap
manufacturer and the
race teams to evaluate
and optimize the associat-
ed installation hardware,
review the process in its
totality and communicate
in a timely manner to the
garage area any revisions
that we determine need
to be made.
The roof-ap spac-
ers had been illegally
machined down to reduce
weight.
NASCAR inspectors
made those Cup teams
install new, unaltered
roof aps before drivers
were allowed on the track
for the rst of two prac-
tices.
Inspectors then went
to the Nationwide garage
and found similar issues
on 15 cars.
The Cup cars involved
included all three Joe
Gibbs Racing entries
(Kyle Busch, Denny
Hamlin and Matt
Kenseth), all three Roush
Fenway Racing entries
(Greg Bife, Carl Edwards
and Ricky Stenhouse Jr.),
all three Michael Waltrip
Racing entries (Clint
Bowyer, Martin Truex
Jr. and Michael Waltrip)
and both Roger Penske
Racing entries (Joey
Logano and defending
series champion Brad
Keselowski). Cars driv-
en by Jamie McMurray,
Trevor Bayne, Casey
Mears, Marcos Ambrose
and Aric Almirola also
failed inspection.
Nationwide drivers
busted include Bayne,
Brian Vickers, Reed
Sorenson and Travis
Pastrana.
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER Thursday, July 11, 2013 PAGE 7B
Here is breaking news from
recent scientific studies.
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This pollution causes al-
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New ultra air purifier used by
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EPA: Indoor air has 100 times the pollution of outdoor
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No fan - runs silent. No filters to replace.
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Over 20 independent scientific studies
around the world proved the effectiveness
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SGS Natec Institute - Hamburg, Germany - Testing AirFree

efficiency
in reducing airborne mold and bacteria in office rooms equipped with
carpet and central air conditioning - Reduction: mold 99%, bacteria
99%
EMSL Analytical, Inc. - Cinnaminson, NJ - Efficacy of an Air Sanitizer -
Reduced bacteria by 85% and fungi by 69.64%
SP Swedish National Testing and Research Institute - Boros, Sweden
- Testing efficiency indoor reducing ozone level - Ozone reduction of
26%
Universidad Complutense de Madrid - Madrid, Spain - Influence in
reducing airborne bacteria and fungus - Bacteria reduction 99%,
fungus reduction 69%
Campana - Sopaulo, Brazil - Test the efficiency of air purification -
Reduced fungus 100%, reduced bacteria 83%
Ambientalis - Portugal - Evaluate efficiency of AirFree

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TSS ceramic core in destroying microorganisms - 100% reduction of
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Dirty Air
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Lasts virtually
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Uses less
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than a 60 watt
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High-tech
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99.9% of all
pollution
Fresh Clean Air
Out
Murray Evans
Associated Press
OKLAHOMA CITY
Its a pivotal time in the
history of their sport and
the members of the U.S.
team at the eighth World
Cup of Softball are aware
of that.
The World Cup, which
will begin today at ASA
Hall of Fame Stadium,
also will include teams
from Canada, Australia,
Japan and Puerto Rico.
It will be one of the last
major international soft-
ball events before the
International Olympic
Committee meets in
Buenos Aires, Argentina,
from Sept. 7-10.
During that meeting,
either wrestling, squash
or softball/baseball will
be added to the program
for the 2020 Olympics.
So is this week an oppor-
tunity to make a positive
impression on the IOC
voters?
I think were always
trying to show the world
that softball is a great
sport and deserves to be
back in the Olympics,
said U.S. inelder Lauren
Chamberlain, who starred
for Oklahoma during
the Sooners run to the
NCAA title this spring.
Were just staying posi-
tive about the whole
thing. There are a ton of
little girls out there who
want the same thing.
Fellow inelder Lauren
Gibson, the Southeastern
Conference player of the
year at Tennessee, echoed
that sentiment.
It would be really
good to get it back, said
Gibson, whos starting
her third year on the U.S.
squad. Obviously, weve
all dreamed about being
in the Olympics. That was
one of our goals when
we were little. Were just
going to out and work
hard and have fun and
hopefully showcase soft-
ball so that people will
want to put it back into
the Olympics. Thats what
were trying to do.
Softball made its
Olympic debut in 1996
in Atlanta. The U.S. won
the gold medal that year,
then again in 2000 in
Sydney and in 2004 in
Athens. Japan beat the
U.S. for the gold in 2008
in Beijing, after the IOC
voted in July 2005 to drop
softball (and baseball)
from the Olympics.
Ever since, efforts have
been ongoing to have
the IOC reconsider its
decision. Most recently,
softball and baseball
international federations
have paired together, g-
uring their sports stood
a better chance of jointly
regaining Olympic sta-
tus instead of competing
against each other.
One by-product of the
absence of softball from
the Olympics is that
international events like
the World Cup - rst held
in 2005 - have gained an
added importance in the
sport. After nishing
second behind Japan in
2005, the U.S. has won
every World Cup played
since.
The Americans have
posted a 39-4 record in
World Cup play, losing
only to Canada and Japan
in 2005 and Canada in
2010 and 2011. But while
the U.S. has the worlds
most consistent national
team, it isnt invincible.
In their last meeting
during the 2012 World
Championships, Japan
beat the U.S. 2-1 in 10
innings for the title.
Its always gold
or bust for us, said
Valerie Arioto, a former
California star also enter-
ing her third year on
the U.S. squad. Were
always looking at the gold
medal. Last year was a
little disappointing, but
I think the day after (the
loss), we were ready to
compete again and ready
to get back at it and get
that gold medal. Nothing
is going to stop us. Were
a young team and that
might work to our advan-
tage.
PAGE 8B Thursday, July 11, 2013 SPORTS www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER
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World Cup of Sofball: Making major Olympic pitch
PAGE 9B THURSDAY, JULY 11, 2013 www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER
BUSINESS
SECTI ON B
Clock running out
on loan talks
The defeat of a student loan bill in
the Senate on Wednesday clears the
way for fresh negotiations to restore
lower rates, but lawmakers are racing
the clock before millions of students
return to campus next month to nd
borrowing terms twice as high as
when school let out.
Republicans and a few Democrats
blocked a White House-backed pro-
posal that would have restored 3.4
percent interest rates on subsidized
Stafford loans for one more year. The
failed stopgap measure was designed
to give lawmakers time to take up
comprehensive college affordabil-
ity legislation and dodge 6.8 percent
interest rates on new loans.
Fed ofcials cant
agree
Federal Reserve ofcials seem far
from a consensus on the question
thats consumed investors for months:
When will the Fed slow its bond
purchases, which have fueled spend-
ing, supported economic growth,
driven up stocks and kept mortgage
rates near record lows?
Minutes of their June policy meet-
ing show many members felt the job
markets improvement would have to
be sustained before the Fed would
scale back its bond purchases.
And many thought the purchases
should extend into 2014, according to
a summary of economic forecasts that
are released with the minutes.
Vintage Apple
goes for nearly
$388,000
An original Apple computer from
1976 has sold at auction for nearly
$388,000.
Known as the Apple 1, it was one of
the rst Apple computers ever built.
It sold Monday for $387,750 at a
Christies online-only auction. Bolaf,
an Italian collections company, says
in a statement that it bought the com-
puter. The seller was a retired school
psychologist from Sacramento, Calif.
Vintage Apple products have
become a hot item since Steve Jobs
death in October 2011. Jobs joined
forces with Steve Wozniak to build
computer prototypes in a California
garage, and Wozniak built the Apple
1.
Another Apple 1 was sold in May
for a record $671,400 by a German
auction house. It broke a record of
$640,000 set in November.
Business Briefs
$3.46 $3.43 $3.32
$4.06
on 7/17/2008
K
Ground broken for long-simmering I-81 project
Judge: Apple conspired to raise e-book prices
Larry neumeister
Associated Press
NEW YORK Apple Inc. broke antitrust laws
and conspired with publishers to raise electronic
book prices signicantly in spring 2010, a federal
judge ruled Wednesday, citing compelling evi-
dence from the words of the late Steve Jobs.
U.S. District Judge Denise Cote said Apple knew
that no publisher could risk acting alone to try to
eliminate Amazon.coms $9.99 price for the most
popular e-books so it created a mechanism and
environment that enabled them to act together in a
matter of weeks to eliminate all retail price compe-
tition for their e-books.
Apple seized the moment and brilliantly played
its hand, Cote said. She wrote that Apples deals
with publishers caused some e-book prices to rise
50 percent or more virtually overnight.
The Manhattan jurist, who did not determine
damages, said the evidence was overwhelming
that Apple knew of the unlawful aims of the con-
spiracy and joined the conspiracy with the specic
intent to help it succeed.
Her decision was not surprising, since she had
urged Apple to settle before trial and said the com-
pany had only a slimchance of winning. Government
ofcials and industry experts have said e-book pric-
es have declined and stabilized since rising after
Apple entered the market.
Cote identied ve trial witnesses as notewor-
thy for their lack of credibility, including Eddy
Cue, a top Apple executive described as Jobs right-
hand man.
Apple spokesman Tom Neumayr said the
Cupertino, Calif.-based company will appeal.
Apple did not conspire to x e-book pricing and
we will continue to ght against these false accusa-
tions, he said. Weve done nothing wrong.
Assistant Attorney General Bill Baer called the
ruling a victory for millions of consumers who
choose to read books electronically.
He said the judge agreed with the Justice
Department and 33 state attorneys general that
executives at the highest levels of Apple orchestrat-
ed a conspiracy with ve major publishers.
Through todays court decision and previous
settlements with ve major publishers, consumers
are again beneting from retail price competition
and paying less for their e-books, he said.
The publishers that had settled were Hachette,
HarperCollins, Simon & Schuster, Holtzbrinck
Publishers, doing business as Macmillan, and The
Penguin Publishing Co. Ltd., doing business as
Penguin Group.
In her ruling, Cote said the conspiracy harmed
consumers in numerous ways.
She said some had to pay more for e-books, others
bought a cheaper e-book rather than the one they
preferred to purchase and others deferred a pur-
chase altogether rather than pay the higher price.
Although she acknowledged that many of Apples
practices in its dealing with publishers would indi-
vidually be legal, Cote said they collectively fur-
thered the goal of raising e-book prices across the
board.
Andrew M. seder
aseder@timesleader.com
DUPONT Ofcials broke ground
Wednesday on a multi-phased, $41.9
million project that will bring the rst
trafc roundabouts to Luzerne County,
among other things.
When complete, possibly by late
2015, the work will reshape the Avoca
interchanges off I-81, open up a por-
tion of the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton
International Airport property for
development and provide easier access
for vehicles from an industrial park to
and from the interstate that in turn will
alleviate congestion on Duponts thor-
oughfares.
Pennsy Supply Inc., of Annville
will perform the work that required
the cooperation and approval of the
Federal Aviation Administration, the
airports Bi-County Board of Directors,
PennDOT and local municipalities.
Charlie Adonizio, the immediate
past president of the Greater Pittston
Chamber of Commerce, said once
completed, the project will entice
companies to take a closer look at
becoming tenants in the Grimes
Industrial Park and it will bring jobs
and additional tax base to Greater
Pittston.
This will be the catalyst, Adonizio
said.
Its a catalyst thats long been prom-
ised. Back in the late 1980s the portion
of the project connecting the industrial
park to I-81 through the airport was
rst suggested. Rosemary Dessoye,
now the chambers director, remem-
bers sending out letters to tenants
of what was then called the East ern
Distribution Center, now the Grimes
Industrial Park, on her rst day of
work, Nov. 1, 1989. The letters were
seeking letters of support for the proj-
ect.
The cost was just too high and the
project lingered on the back burner as
other projects in the region, including
the Casey Highway in Lackawanna
County, proceeded.
But it picked up steamin recent years
thanks to State Rep. Mike Carroll,
D-Avoca. Once the I-81 interchange
was coupled with the connector road
project, it began to gain traction in a
hurry.
Carroll, who received praise from
multiple ofcials Wednesday during
the groundbreaking, called the project
a great, great day for Greater Pittston
and a great, great day for Lackawanna
and Luzerne counties.
Its an excellent improvement for
Northeastern Pennsylvanias transpor-
tation and infrastructure network,
said George Roberts, the executive for
PennDOTs District 4 in Dunmore.
Oil prices jump 2 percent on sharp decline in US supplies
The Associated Press
NEW YORK The price of oil
rose nearly 2 percent Wednesday as
the U.S. government reported another
steep decline in the nations supplies
of oil and gasoline.
By late morning, benchmark crude
for August delivery was up $1.94, or
1.9 percent, to $105.47 a barrel on the
New York Mercantile Exchange.
Oil has risen about $12 a barrel, or
13 percent, in the past two weeks to
the highest level since early May of
last year. The initial catalyst was tur-
moil in Egypt. The country controls
the Suez Canal, a critical channel for
oil and gas shipments from the Middle
East. But now oil is rising on signs
of increased demand in the U.S., the
largest consumer of oil and gasoline.
Rising oil prices have reversed a
steady decline in the price U.S. driv-
ers pay at the pump. The average
price for a gallon of gas rose 2 cents
to $3.50. Thats the biggest one-day
increase since May 18. The price is
still 14 cents cheaper than a month
ago.
The government reported that
crude supplies declined by 9.9 mil-
lion barrels in the week ended July 5,
more than twice the decline expected
by analysts. Gasoline supplies were
expected to rise, but instead fell by
2.6 million barrels.
In the past two weeks, oil supplies
have dropped 20.2 million barrels,
while gasoline supplies have fallen 4.3
million barrels.
At 373.9 million barrels, the nations
oil supplies are 1.1 percent below year-
ago levels, the Energy Departments
Energy Information Administration
said in its weekly report.
The drop in supplies suggests stron-
ger demand and underlines the signs
of economic recovery shown in last
weeks stronger-than-expected U.S.
hiring report.
A report from The Organization of
Petroleum Exporting Countries fore-
casting rising global demand in 2014
also helped boost prices.
The Vienna-based group said it
expected additional global demand
to reach 1 million barrels a day next
year, compared to an annual increase
of around 800,000 barrels a day in
2013.
AIMEE DILGER | THE TIMES LEADER
James May, a PennDOT spokesman, shows Luzerne County Municipal Planning Organization
Coordinator nancy snee a map of the $42 million project which will include new on and off
ramps along exit 178 of i-81.
ViDeO OnLine
To see state Rep. Mike Carroll
discussing the long road to get
the project started, go to you-
tube.com/timesleadervideo
JPMorgCh 54.83 -.06 +25.6
JacobsEng 56.05 +.07 +31.7
JohnJn 89.24 +.36 +27.3
JohnsnCtl 36.04 -.21 +17.5
Kellogg 65.97 +.05 +18.1
Keycorp 11.79 -.09 +40.0
KimbClk 98.59 +.06 +16.8
KindME 86.40 +.21 +8.3
Kroger 37.34 +.19 +43.5
Kulicke 11.24 +.06 -6.3
L Brands 50.61 +.04 +7.5
LancastrC 82.88 +.07 +19.8
Lee Ent 2.91 +.11+155.3
LillyEli 51.42 -.37 +4.3
LincNat 39.99 +.55 +54.4
LockhdM 111.52 +1.95 +20.8
Loews 45.00 -.27 +10.4
LaPac 16.20 +.53 -16.1
MDU Res 27.53 +.10 +29.6
MarathnO 36.24 -.13 +18.2
MarIntA 41.93 +.19 +12.5
Masco 19.90 -.10 +20.0
McDrmInt 8.84 +.13 -19.8
McGrwH 55.89 +.38 +2.2
McKesson 116.89 +.88 +20.6
Merck 47.96 +.34 +17.1
MetLife 48.61 -.17 +47.6
Microsoft 34.70 +.35 +29.9
MorgStan 25.34 -.10 +32.5
NCR Corp 33.95 +.59 +33.2
NatFuGas 61.98 +.03 +22.3
NatGrid 56.91 +.38 -.9
NY Times 12.52 -.14 +46.8
NewellRub 26.64 -.27 +19.6
NewmtM 26.61 -.46 -42.7
NextEraEn 81.63 +.28 +18.0
NiSource 29.89 +.18 +20.1
NikeB s 63.60 -.33 +23.3
NorflkSo 73.42 -.97 +18.7
NoestUt 42.33 +.14 +8.3
NorthropG 86.90 +1.37 +28.6
Nucor 44.16 -.63 +2.3
NustarEn 45.69 -.17 +7.6
NvMAd 12.88 -.12 -15.3
OGE Egy s 35.06 +.13 +24.5
OcciPet 89.28 -.66 +16.5
OfficeMax 11.02 -.17 +27.9
ONEOK 42.85 +.22 +.2
PG&E Cp 45.14 -.23 +12.3
PPL Corp 30.00 +.10 +4.8
PVR Ptrs 27.99 +.11 +7.7
Pfizer 28.44 +.09 +13.4
PinWst 57.09 +.31 +12.0
PitnyBw 14.29 +.04 +34.3
Praxair 117.16 -.43 +7.0
PSEG 32.41 +.14 +5.9
PulteGrp 19.02 -.03 +4.7
Questar 23.87 +.03 +20.8
RadioShk 2.83 -.22 +33.5
RLauren 180.02 +2.39 +20.1
Raytheon 68.18 +.74 +18.5
ReynAmer 50.49 +.29 +21.9
RockwlAut 87.50 -.66 +4.2
Rowan 34.98 -.23 +11.9
RoyDShllB 67.89 +.84 -4.2
RoyDShllA 65.22 +.66 -5.4
Ryder 60.24 -.45 +20.6
Safeway 24.45 -.53 +35.2
Schlmbrg 76.18 -.36 +9.9
Sherwin 184.85 +1.14 +20.2
SilvWhtn g 19.34 -.04 -46.4
SiriusXM 3.59 -.01 +24.2
SonyCp 21.77 -.01 +94.4
SouthnCo 44.23 +.11 +3.3
SwstAirl 13.14 +.04 +28.3
SpectraEn 35.29 -.30 +28.9
SprintNex 7.18 +.12 +26.6
Sysco 34.95 -.07 +11.4
TECO 17.16 +.16 +2.4
Target 72.03 +.26 +21.7
TenetHlt rs 43.17 -.75 +33.0
Tenneco 49.22 +.50 +40.2
Tesoro 50.62 -2.36 +14.9
Textron 27.28 +.39 +10.0
3M Co 113.43 +.08 +22.2
TimeWarn 61.01 -.27 +27.6
Timken 59.38 +.02 +24.1
UnilevNV 40.20 +.25 +5.0
UnionPac 157.63 -1.78 +25.4
Unisys 24.64 +.62 +42.4
UPS B 90.24 +.51 +22.4
USSteel 18.22 -.36 -23.6
UtdTech 97.79 -.23 +19.2
VarianMed 66.93 +.63 -4.7
VectorGp 16.57 -.05 +11.4
ViacomB 70.15 +1.07 +33.0
WestarEn 32.27 +.20 +12.8
Weyerhsr 28.74 +.01 +3.3
Whrlpl 119.62 +5.33 +17.6
WmsCos 33.18 -.35 +1.3
Windstrm 8.15 +.17 -1.6
Wynn 127.27 +.68 +13.1
XcelEngy 28.94 +.09 +8.3
Xerox 9.60 +.20 +40.8
YumBrnds 72.36 -.30 +9.0
Mutual Funds
Alliance Bernstein
CoreOppA m 16.38 +.07 +17.2
GlblRskAllB m14.89 -.02 -3.0
American Cent
IncGroA m 32.42 +.04 +19.8
ValueInv 7.57 ... +19.7
American Funds
AMCAPA m 24.91 +.04 +17.3
BalA m 22.46 -.02 +11.1
BondA m 12.38 -.03 -3.3
CapIncBuA m55.18 +.16 +6.4
CpWldGrIA m40.07 +.22 +9.3
EurPacGrA m42.49 +.26 +3.1
FnInvA m 46.82 +.04 +15.5
GrthAmA m 39.56 +.10 +15.2
HiIncA m 11.14 +.01 +1.4
IncAmerA m 19.33 +.03 +8.9
InvCoAmA m 34.58 +.11 +15.6
MutualA m 32.29 +.07 +15.1
NewPerspA m34.58 +.11 +10.6
NwWrldA m 53.63 +.11 -1.6
SmCpWldA m45.09 +.09 +13.0
WAMutInvA m36.36 -.02 +17.7
Baron
Asset b 58.00 +.03 +18.7
BlackRock
EqDivA m 22.26 -.03 +12.4
EqDivI 22.32 -.03 +12.6
GlobAlcA m 20.92 +.02 +6.0
GlobAlcC m 19.40 +.02 +5.5
GlobAlcI 21.04 +.02 +6.1
CGM
Focus 35.07 -.02 +19.7
Mutual 31.35 -.12 +10.3
Realty 30.26 -.03 +3.4
Columbia
AcornZ 34.63 +.08 +15.2
DFA
EmMkCrEqI 17.97 ... -11.2
EmMktValI 25.81 +.01 -12.7
USLgValI 27.63 -.06 +21.5
DWS-Scudder
EnhEMFIS d 10.32 -.04 -7.4
HlthCareS d 32.42 +.23 +24.3
LAEqS d 27.37 -.16 -16.3
Davis
NYVentA m 38.34 ... +19.1
NYVentC m 36.81 -.07 +18.6
Dodge & Cox
Bal 89.01 +.05 +15.2
Income 13.43 -.01 -1.7
IntlStk 37.20 +.10 +7.4
Stock 146.64 +.15 +21.3
Dreyfus
TechGrA f 37.24 +.27 +8.0
Eaton Vance
HiIncOppA m 4.51 ... +2.2
HiIncOppB m 4.52 +.01 +1.8
NatlMuniA m 9.30 -.02 -7.2
NatlMuniB m 9.30 -.02 -7.5
PAMuniA m 8.81 -.01 -2.3
Fidelity
BlChGrow 57.79 +.14 +17.8
Contra 88.36 +.05 +15.0
DivrIntl d 32.23 +.19 +7.6
ExpMulNat d 24.84 +.01 +13.5
Free2020 14.90 +.01 +4.8
Free2030 15.19 +.02 +7.0
GrowCo 109.16 +.37 +17.1
LatinAm d 37.03 -.37 -20.0
LowPriStk d 46.86 +.10 +18.6
Magellan 84.68 +.10 +16.1
Overseas d 35.16 +.17 +8.8
TotalBd 10.49 -.02 -2.9
Value 91.77 +.15 +20.2
Fidelity Advisor
ValStratT m 33.92 +.03 +15.3
Fidelity Select
Gold d 18.67 +.09 -49.5
Pharm d 17.90 +.12 +21.0
Fidelity Spartan
500IdxAdvtg 58.59 +.01 +17.2
500IdxInstl 58.59 +.01 +17.2
TotMktIdAg d 48.41 +.03 +17.7
First Eagle
GlbA m 51.66 +.11 +6.3
FrankTemp-Franklin
CA TF A m 7.08 -.02 -3.8
Income C m 2.31 ... +5.4
IncomeA m 2.29 +.01 +5.7
FrankTemp-Mutual
Discov Z 32.45 +.02 +13.3
Euro Z 23.15 +.03 +9.5
Shares Z 26.01 +.03 +15.7
FrankTemp-Templeton
GlBondA m 12.98 -.04 -1.2
GlBondAdv 12.94 -.04 -1.1
GrowthA m 21.65 +.11 +11.4
GMO
IntItVlIV x 21.85 -.07 +5.2
Harbor
CapApInst 48.19 +.19 +13.3
IntlInstl 63.29 +.37 +1.9
INVESCO
ConstellB m 23.78 +.11 +12.1
GlobQuantvCoreA m12.97+.04 +14.0
PacGrowB m 20.66 +.04 +1.9
JPMorgan
CoreBondSelect11.59 -.02 -2.7
John Hancock
LifBa1 b 14.31 +.01 +6.3
LifGr1 b 14.71 +.02 +9.2
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
52-WEEK YTD
HIGH LOW NAME TKR DIV LAST CHG %CHG
52-WEEK YTD
HIGH LOW NAME TKR DIV LAST CHG %CHG
Combined Stocks
AFLAC 58.50 -.02 +10.1
AT&T Inc 35.39 -.21 +5.0
AbtLab s 34.74 ... +10.8
AMD 3.98 -.07 +65.8
AlaskaAir 57.54 +1.61 +33.5
Alcoa 7.92 +.01 -8.8
Allstate 50.30 -.25 +25.2
Altria 36.50 +.23 +16.1
AEP 45.42 +.85 +6.4
AmExp 76.33 -1.28 +33.3
AmIntlGrp 45.72 -.06 +29.5
Amgen 102.06 +3.73 +18.4
Anadarko 88.62 +.26 +19.3
Annaly 11.53 -.23 -17.9
Apple Inc 420.73 -1.62 -20.9
AutoData 71.75 +.71 +26.0
AveryD 44.40 -.60 +27.1
Avon 21.86 -.10 +52.2
BP PLC 42.12 +.47 +1.2
BakrHu 48.78 -.18 +19.4
BallardPw 1.76 -.08+188.1
BarnesNob 17.44 -1.17 +15.6
Baxter 71.32 -.13 +7.0
Beam Inc 63.27 +.04 +3.6
BerkH B 114.88 -.92 +28.1
BigLots 34.38 +.15 +20.8
BlockHR 29.58 +.37 +59.3
Boeing 105.50 +.82 +40.0
BrMySq 44.86 +.32 +39.1
Brunswick 34.48 +.44 +18.5
Buckeye 70.98 +.47 +56.3
CBS B 51.17 -.12 +34.5
CMS Eng 27.54 +.09 +13.0
CSX 23.91 -.15 +21.2
CampSp 45.21 -.13 +29.6
Carnival 35.37 +.21 -3.8
Caterpillar 84.96 -.37 -5.2
CenterPnt 24.04 +.18 +24.9
CntryLink 35.46 +.07 -9.4
Chevron 122.90 -.37 +13.6
Cisco 25.41 +.26 +29.3
Citigroup 49.63 -.58 +25.5
Clorox 84.70 -.43 +15.7
ColgPalm s 58.62 -.36 +12.1
ConAgra 35.99 +.43 +22.0
ConocoPhil 63.53 +.03 +9.6
ConEd 57.88 ... +4.2
Corning 14.80 +.03 +17.3
CrownHold 42.25 +.38 +14.8
Cummins 113.70 +1.08 +4.9
DTE 67.57 +.74 +12.5
Deere 82.87 -1.04 -4.1
Diebold 34.90 -.11 +14.0
Disney 64.91 -.03 +30.4
DomRescs 57.39 +.05 +10.8
Dover 79.53 ... +21.0
DowChm 33.79 -.23 +4.5
DryShips 1.85 +.01 +15.6
DuPont 53.92 +.01 +19.9
DukeEngy 68.59 +.43 +7.5
EMC Cp 24.46 -.33 -3.3
Eaton 67.39 -.72 +24.4
EdisonInt 47.75 +.62 +5.7
EmersonEl 57.10 -.51 +7.8
EnbrdgEPt 32.12 +.32 +15.1
Energen 56.35 +.57 +25.0
Entergy 69.70 +.56 +9.3
EntPrPt 63.51 -.26 +26.8
Ericsson 11.71 +.17 +15.9
Exelon 30.57 -.24 +2.8
ExxonMbl 92.82 -.52 +7.2
FMC Corp 62.31 +.38 +6.5
Fastenal 45.77 -1.33 -1.9
FedExCp 103.00 -.15 +12.3
Fifth&Pac 23.97 -.27 +92.5
FirstEngy 36.81 ... -11.9
Fonar 6.30 -.04 +45.5
FootLockr 36.75 +.15 +14.4
FordM 16.72 -.12 +29.1
Gannett 26.06 +.10 +44.7
Gap 44.10 +.16 +42.1
GenCorp 16.75 -.04 +83.1
GenDynam 80.60 +.74 +16.4
GenElec 23.54 -.08 +12.1
GenMills 49.91 +.38 +23.5
GileadSci s 55.33 +.95 +50.7
GlaxoSKln 52.29 +.65 +20.3
Hallibrtn 44.13 -.18 +27.2
HarleyD 53.99 -.21 +10.6
HarrisCorp 50.17 +.27 +2.5
HartfdFn 31.77 +.22 +41.6
HawaiiEl 25.85 ... +2.8
HeclaM 2.78 +.01 -52.3
Heico 54.00 -.94 +20.6
Hess 68.73 +.16 +29.8
HewlettP 25.93 +.46 +82.0
HomeDp 79.40 -.30 +28.4
HonwllIntl 81.21 -.18 +28.0
Hormel 39.79 +.02 +27.5
Humana 84.93 -.25 +23.8
INTL FCSt 17.81 +.30 +2.3
ITW 71.19 +.05 +17.1
IngerRd 57.99 -.04 +20.9
IBM 192.25 +.95 +.4
IntPap 46.44 -.45 +16.6
Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD
Stocks of Local Interest
97.12 76.78 AirProd APD 2.84 96.53 +.57 +14.9
43.09 34.61 AmWtrWks AWK 1.12 41.75 +.29 +12.4
50.45 37.63 Amerigas APU 3.36 47.19 +.20 +21.8
33.28 24.06 AquaAm WTR .76 32.55 +.22 +28.0
35.94 24.38 ArchDan ADM .76 35.90 +.18 +31.1
437.23 341.98 AutoZone AZO ... 433.48 -1.08 +22.3
13.99 6.90 BkofAm BAC .04 13.37 -.16 +15.2
30.85 20.13 BkNYMel BK .60 29.33 -.01 +14.1
22.68 6.22 BonTon BONT .20 21.02 -.34 +72.9
60.70 43.65 CVS Care CVS .90 59.88 -.27 +23.8
74.99 39.01 Cigna CI .04 74.88 +.23 +40.1
43.43 35.58 CocaCola s KO 1.12 40.68 -.15 +12.2
43.74 31.04 Comcast CMCSA .78 42.91 +.24 +14.9
32.70 25.50 CmtyBkSy CBU 1.08 32.34 -.18 +18.2
51.29 22.51 CmtyHlt CYH .25 48.12 +.12 +56.5
65.85 40.06 CoreMark CORE .76 64.84 +.19 +36.9
60.08 43.59 EmersonEl EMR 1.64 57.10 -.51 +7.8
63.12 39.91 EngyTEq ETE 2.58 64.17 +1.74 +41.1
10.13 5.28 Entercom ETM ... 9.81 +.30 +40.5
15.75 11.14 FairchldS FCS ... 14.69 -.03 +2.0
5.15 3.59 FrontierCm FTR .40 4.02 +.03 -6.1
20.46 14.18 Genpact G .18 20.33 ... +31.2
9.79 5.14 HarteHnk HHS .34 9.65 -.03 +63.6
91.99 68.09 Hershey HSY 1.68 90.71 -.10 +25.6
43.98 24.76 Lowes LOW .72 43.39 -.42 +22.2
118.36 82.29 M&T Bk MTB 2.80 117.52 -.05 +19.3
103.70 83.31 McDnlds MCD 3.08 99.98 -.01 +13.3
32.10 24.31 Mondelez MDLZ .52 29.15 +.11 +14.5
22.89 18.92 NBT Bcp NBTB .80 21.99 -.17 +8.5
39.22 6.00 NexstarB NXST .48 38.39 -.14 +262.5
76.79 53.36 PNC PNC 1.76 74.59 -1.67 +27.9
33.55 27.74 PPL Corp PPL 1.47 30.00 +.10 +4.8
22.54 13.25 PennaRE PEI .72 19.65 +.10 +11.4
84.78 67.39 PepsiCo PEP 2.27 82.99 +.22 +21.3
96.73 82.10 PhilipMor PM 3.40 88.43 -.75 +5.7
82.54 60.98 ProctGam PG 2.41 79.80 +.23 +17.5
78.44 44.96 Prudentl PRU 1.60 77.43 -.67 +45.2
3.21 .95 RiteAid RAD ... 2.76 -.02 +102.9
26.17 15.07 SLM Cp SLM .60 23.25 -.02 +35.7
71.98 44.28 SLM pfB SLMBP 2.07 68.50 +1.50 +29.2
51.84 40.08 TJX TJX .58 51.77 +.51 +22.0
42.11 29.72 UGI Corp UGI 1.13 39.57 +.12 +21.0
54.31 40.51 VerizonCm VZ 2.06 50.54 -.42 +16.8
79.96 67.37 WalMart WMT 1.88 76.77 -.26 +12.5
47.92 37.65 WeisMk WMK 1.20 47.66 +.01 +21.7
43.08 31.25 WellsFargo WFC 1.20 42.07 -.63 +23.1
USD per British Pound 1.4921 +.0052 +.35% 1.6153 1.5509
Canadian Dollar 1.0509 -.0016 -.15% .9842 1.0227
USD per Euro 1.2878 +.0089 +.69% 1.3254 1.2254
Japanese Yen 100.25 -.73 -.73% 88.19 79.45
Mexican Peso 12.9522 +.0694 +.54% 12.6325 13.3332
6MO. 1YR.
CURRENCY CLOSE PVS. %CH. AGO AGO
Copper 3.10 3.08 +0.81 -16.06 -9.93
Gold 1247.40 1245.90 +0.12 -25.63 -20.81
Platinum 1368.10 1367.10 +0.07 -16.19 -4.26
Silver 19.15 19.13 +0.14 -37.97 -29.06
Palladium 712.50 696.05 +2.36 +1.58 +22.50
Foreign Exchange & Metals
RegBankA m 17.71 -.10 +24.7
SovInvA m 17.94 -.01 +12.6
TaxFBdA m 9.79 -.01 -4.7
Lazard
EmgMkEqtI d 17.51 -.04 -10.4
Loomis Sayles
BdInstl 14.87 ... +0.7
Lord Abbett
ShDurIncA m 4.55 ... -0.2
MFS
MAInvA m 24.89 +.04 +16.1
MAInvC m 24.00 +.03 +15.6
ValueI 30.29 ... +20.1
Merger
Merger b 15.96 +.01 +0.8
Metropolitan West
TotRetBdI 10.50 -.02 -1.9
TotRtBd b 10.50 -.03 -2.1
Mutual Series
Beacon Z 15.48 +.01 +15.9
Neuberger Berman
SmCpGrInv 23.62 -.01 +22.9
Oakmark
EqIncI 31.34 ... +10.0
Intl I 23.62 +.12 +12.9
Oppenheimer
CapApB m 47.20 +.10 +11.5
DevMktA m 33.68 -.01 -4.6
DevMktY 33.34 -.01 -4.4
PIMCO
AllAssetI 11.94 ... -3.6
AllAuthIn 10.11 -.01 -7.3
ComRlRStI 5.68 +.03 -13.5
HiYldIs 9.43 +.01 +0.9
LowDrIs 10.20 -.02 -1.9
TotRetA m 10.67 -.03 -4.0
TotRetAdm b 10.67 -.03 -3.9
TotRetC m 10.67 -.03 -4.3
TotRetIs 10.67 -.03 -3.8
TotRetrnD b 10.67 -.03 -3.9
TotlRetnP 10.67 -.03 -3.8
Permanent
Portfolio 45.21 -.01 -7.1
Principal
SAMConGrB m15.86+.01 +10.1
Prudential
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DOW
15,291.66
-8.68
NASDAQ
3,520.76
+16.50
S&P 500
1,652.62
+.30
RUSSELL 2000
1,020.42
+2.37
6-MO T-BILLS
.08%
...
10-YR T-NOTE
2.63%
-.01
CRUDE OIL
$106.52
+2.99
q q n n p p p p
q q p p p p p p
NATURAL GAS
$3.68
+.02
6MO. 1YR.
METALS CLOSE PVS. %CH. AGO AGO
PAGE 10B Thursday, July 11, 2013 www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER THURSDAY, JULY 11, 2013 PAGE 1C
LIFE
WORDPRESS.COM
Little hands can have a heyday on an artfully placed chalkboard surface.
Alexandria Abramian
The Orange County Register
W
eve seen them everywhere, from wine bars
to glossy decorating magazines: those chalk-
board walls that bring in a bit of retro chic
and function as a place to make lists, air your daily
afrmations or doodle to your hearts content.
Best of all, it can all be erased and made ready for
new creations in a matter of seconds.
For adventurous DIYers, getting the chalkboard wall
right requires a few lessons in skill, materials and self-
control. Fullerton-based husband and wife design team
Erin and Dan Benedict of Benedict August ( www.
benedictaugust.com ) have aced the application for
many clients, using chalkboard walls everywhere from
kitchens to nurseries.
Here are their rules for taking the trend out of the
classroom:
Raw materials: Rust-Oleums chalkboard paint
from Home Depot works well. Its best to apply with
foam rollers. They hold less paint than other rollers but
give you a smoother nish.
Keep it clean: Take special care to make sure the
wall is smooth. Any divots will collect chalk dust. So
take extra care in prep.
Worth the wait: Wait the full four hours between
coats, even if it feels dry to the touch before. And keep
in mind it usually takes about four coats of paint to get
a really even chalkboard nish.
Let it go: Remember that the wall will never look
for chalkboard walls
Alesson plan
Abrush with
Disney can
change a
girls life
Heidi Stevens
Chicago Tribune
So Ive started brushing
my daughters hair.
Shes 7. Its time.
Some would argue its
past time. Some would
argue she has spent the
better part of her life look-
ing rather unkempt.
I would reply with one
word: Jessie.
Jessie is the perfect-
ly coiffed titular star
of the Disney Channel
show about a 19-year-old
Manhattan nanny. Shes
quick with the acerbic
one-liners, bewildered by
her life and wracked with
insecurities about boys
and accessories.
Her hair, though, is
fantastic. As fantastic as
Londons from The Suite
Life on Deck and CeCes
from Shake It Up and
Allys from Austin and
Ally.
I know all about their
hair because my daughter
loves their shows with the
same level of zeal that I
devote to hating them.
The Disney princesses
are always coming in for
parental ack theyre
too doe-eyed, too empty-
headed, too prince-reli-
ant. But the princesses
are childs play. They
may be devoid of career
ambitions, but at least
they treat people well.
(Animated people, but
still.)
Disneys tween and
teen characters, packaged
for elementary-schoolers,
are wretched. Many of
them are mocking and
contemptuous and petty,
and theyve saturated the
marketplace so that even
if you limit screen-time
exposure, they and their
hair will still call out to
your kid from clothing
lines and lunchboxes and
stickers at the pediatri-
cians ofce.
What does all this have
to do with brushing my
daughters hair?
Until recently, she could
not be bothered. Washing
her hair was torture.
Brushing it was a waste of
her time. She eyed bows
with the same disdain she
directs at tomatoes.
I loved this. I loved that
she approached birth-
day parties and spring
musicals and rst days of
school with nary a glance
toward her hair.
Should we brush your
hair? Id ask, usually on
our way out the door.
SHOWUS YOUR
MODERN FAMILY
We want to know what your family looks like.
Family could be Mom, Dad, Grandma and Grandpa. It
could be the 10 cats that live with you. It might be ve
adopted children. You might be a single mom or dad. Or
you might have same-sex parents.
Whatever your situation, wed like to see your modern
family.
Send a photograph of your family to mbiebel@times-
leader.com. Please include names and ages for everyone
in the photo. Also, include what township or municipality
your family lives in. In the text of the email, tell us how you
dene family.
Meet the newmom and dad a.k.a. grandma and grandpop
Ashley May
York Daily Record
When Heather Robinson, a single mom, was severely injured
in a car crash in November 2010, her parents took care of her
13-month-old son, Christian. Without their help, she said, she
would have had to put him up for adoption.
They 100 percent took care of me and my son, Robinson
said.
Betsy Robinson, 68, and her husband, Russell, 69, cared for
their daughter and grandson for about two years in their Lower
Chanceford Township home.
I cant imagine not doing that, Betsy said.
Their time together forged a special bond. Even though
Heather and Christian now live in Alexandria, Va., they visit at
least every other week.
I miss him, Russell said.
While the Robinsons situation was partly fueled by need,
more and more grandparents are getting involved in their grand-
childrens lives. And their involvement extends beyond the holi-
days and usual family functions.
In fact, todays grandparents provide more care, money and
advice to grandchildren than they ever have, according to a
2012 AARP survey of 1,904 grandparents.
Becky Gillan, AARP senior vice president of research and
strategic analysis, said in some cases, grandparents are assum-
ing the role of primary caregivers.
Its not just taking the grandkids to their grandparents
place for Sunday brunch anymore, she said. Grandparents are
actively involved on a daily basis. They are involved nancially
helping with medical, education, dental expenses.
Gillan said grandparents indicate that its important for them
to spend money on and even spoil their grandchildren.
During the recession, the one thing grandparents didnt cut
back on was their grandkids, Gillan said.
Jean Koppen, director and research fellow with AARP, said
research also showed that Grandpa is more involved than he
ever was in playtime with the grandkids.
The boomers have grown up in a culture where there is less
of a gender role, Koppen said. Grandpa missed out when his
children were young, but he is not going to lose this second
chance.
Grandparents are making grandchildren more of a priority
and sharing responsibilities with parents.
They provide day care and want grandchildren to stay close:
More than one in 10 grandparents surveyed said they provide
day-care services while parents are working. Also, about seven
in 10 grandparents live within 50 miles of their closest grand-
children. More than one-third of the grandparents surveyed
indicated that their grandchildren had lived with them for more
than ve years.
Kelly Funke, 48, baby-sits both of her grandchildren, Brynn
Elicker, 2, and Rylan DeNunzio, 1. She baby-sits Brynn three
days a week and Rylan whenever his parents are out of town.
Baby-sitting is such a priority for Funke, she sometimes takes
vacation time from work to do it.
I say all of this with a smile, Funke said. Im glad that Im
able to do that.
She never wants her grandchildren to move away, because she
said she loves seeing them weekly.
I absolutely want them to stay close, Funke said. I thought
when my daughter moved to Palmyra, it was the end of the
world.
Brynn lives 10 minutes away,and Rylan lives an hour away.
Live-in grands
Some grandparents go one step further and offer their home
to their grandkids, as Mark Foreman of Dover Township did.
When Foremans stepson fell on hard times, Foreman took him
in along with his stepsons 6-year-old son Michael Hagarman,
his stepsons ancee and her two children.
Because Foreman, who works as a contractor with the govern-
ment, travels a lot for work, Foreman told his stepson that he
could stay at his place for as long as he needed.
They have the run of the place, Foreman, 56, said. I help
DCWVINC.BLOGSPOT.COM
Who says you cant have an outdoor chalkboard? See WALLS | 6C
See MOM |6C
See DISNEY | 4C
PAGE 2C THURSDAY, JULY 11, 2013 LIFESTYLE www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER
SPECIAL ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE 2013 WORLD RESERVE MONETARY EXCHANGE INC. 8000 FREEDOM AVE., N. CANTON OH 44720
WILKES-BARRE AREA RESIDENTS CASH IN: Pictured above and protected by armed guards are the Overstuffed Money Bags containing 10 indi-
vidual Vault Bags full of money that everyone is trying to get. Thats because each Vault Bag is known to contain over 100 U.S. Govt issued coins some
dating back to the early 1900s.
PENNSYLVANIA - The phone lines are ring-
ing off the hook.
Thats because for the next 2 days Vault Bags
containing valuable U.S. Govt issued coins are
actually being handed over to Wilkes-Barre
area residents who find their zip code listed in
todays publication.
Now that the bags of money are up for grabs
Pennsylvania residents are claiming as many
as they can get before theyre all gone. Thats
because after the Vault Bags were loaded with
over 100 U.S. Govt issued coins the bags were
sealed for good. But, we do know that some of
the coins date clear back to the early 1900s, in-
cluding: Silver, scarce, highly collectible, and
currently circulating U.S. Govt issued nickels,
dimes and quarter dollars, so theres no telling
what youll find until you sort through all the
coins, said Timothy J. Shissler, Chief Numis-
matist for the private World Reserve.
The only thing residents need to do is find
their zip code on the Distribution List printed
in todays publication. If their zip code is on the
list, they need to immediately call the National
Claim Hotline before the 2-day order deadline
ends.
Everyone who does is being given the 90%
pure Silver Walking Liberty coin for free just by
covering the Vault Bags each loaded with over
100 U.S. Govt issued coins for only
$
99 each as
long as they call before the deadline ends.
Since this advertising announcement cant
stop dealers and collectors from hoarding all
the valuable coins they can get their hands on,
the World Reserve had to set a strict limit of ten
Vault Bags per resident.
Coin values always fluctuate and there are
never any guarantees, but those who get in
on this now will be the really smart ones. Just
think what some of these coins could be worth
someday, said Shissler.
Each Vault Bag is loaded in part with high-
ly sought after valuable collector coins dating
clear back to the 1900s including a 90% pure
Silver Walking Liberty Half Dollar, an Eisen-
hower Dollar, some of the last ever minted U.S.
Dollars, Kennedy Half Dollars, Silver Mercu-
ry Dimes, rarely seen Liberty V Nickels, near-
ly 100 year old Buffalo Nickels and unsearched
currently circulating U.S. Govt issued nickels,
dimes and quarter dollars.
Were bracing for all the calls because there
are just hours left for residents to get the Silver
coins free, he said.
So, Wilkes-Barre area residents lucky enough
to find their zip code listed in todays publica-
tion need to immediately call the National Claim
Hotlines before the 2-day deadline ends to get
the Silver coins free. If lines are busy keep try-
ing, all calls will be answered.
LOADED WITH OVER 100 COINS: The
phone lines are ringing off the hook. Thats because
thousands of sealed Vault Bags each loaded with
over 100 U.S. Govt issued coins some dating back
to the early 1900s including: Silver, scarce, highly
collectible, and currently circulating coins are being
handed over to Wilkes-Barre area residents.
FREE: WALKING LIBERTY
RED BOOK COLLECTOR
VALUE $15 to $325
ENLARGED TO
SHOW DETAIL.
YEAR VARIES
1916-1947
VALUABLE:
90% PURE
SILVER
Who gets to claim the bags of money: Thousands of U.S. residents stand to miss the deadline to claim the money. Now Wilkes-
Barre area residents who find their zip code listed in todays publication and beat the 2-day deadline get to claim the bags of money for
themselves and keep all the U.S. Govt issued coins found inside.
I keep calling and cant get through: Thats because each Vault Bag is guaranteed to contain a free Silver Walking Liberty coin and
just that one coin alone could be worth up to $325 in collector value. So thousands of residents are calling to claim as many Vault Bags
as they can get before theyre all gone. In fact, since each Vault Bag fee has been reduced to just
$
99 nearly everyone is claiming at least
three bags. So if lines are busy keep trying, all calls will be answered.
How much are the Vault Bags worth: Coin values always fluctuate and there are never any guarantees, but heres why Pennsylvania
residents are claiming as many Vault Bags as they can get before theyre all gone. After the Vault Bags were loaded with over 100 U.S.
Govt issued coins including: Silver, scarce, highly collectible, and currently circulating U.S. Govt issued coins the bags were sealed for
good. But we do know that some of the coins date back to the early 1900s. That means theres no telling what youll find until you sort
through all the coins. So you better believe at just
$
99 the Vault Bag fee is a real steal since the free Silver Walking Liberty coin alone
could be worth between $15 to $325 in collector value.
Are the Silver Walking Liberty coins really Free: Yes. All Wilkes-Barre area residents who beat the 2-day deadline are instantly being
awarded a Silver Walking Liberty coin issued by the U.S. Govt between 1916-1947 free with each Vault Bag they claim.
Why is the Vault Bag fee so low: Because thousands of U.S. residents have missed the deadline to claim the money its being held
in limbo at the vaults of the World Reserve and it has to be moved out in the next 2 days. That means the money is up for grabs and now
any resident who finds their zip code on the Distribution List below gets to claim the bags of money for themselves and keep all the U.S.
Govt issued coins found inside. Each Vault Bag fee was set at
$
149, but residents who beat the 2-day deadline cover the reduced Vault
Bag fee of just
$
99 as long as they call the National Claim Hotline before the deadline ends at: 1-888-207-4579.
P6433A OF17228R-1
SSB940
THE WORLDRESERVE MONETARY EXCHANGE, INC. IS NOT AFFILIATEDWITHTHE U.S. MINT, U.S. GOVT, ABANK OR ANY GOVT AGENCY. IF FOR ANY REASON
WITHIN10DAYSOFRECEIVINGYOURPRODUCTYOUAREDISSATISFIEDWITHYOURPURCHASE, RETURNTHEENTIREPRODUCTFORAREFUNDLESSSHIPPING.
NORETURNS IF SEAL IS BROKEN. INSUREDMAIL IS STRONGLY RECOMMENDED. THE WORLDRESERVE IS NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR LOST RETURNSHIPMENTS.
STATE ZIP CODE DISTRIBUTION LIST
How to claim the bags of U.S. Govt issued coins: Read the important information listed below about
claiming the Vault Bags. Then call the National Claim Hotline before the 2-day deadline ends at: 1-888-207-4579
Vault Bags loaded with U.S. Govt issued coins are up for grabs as thousands of U.S. residents stand to miss the deadline to claim
the money; now any resident of Pennsylvania who finds their zip code listed below gets to claim the bags of money for themselves and
keep all the valuable coins found inside by covering the Vault Bag fee within the next 2 days
State zip codes determine who gets free Silver coins
PENNSYLVANIA
2013
DISTRIBUTION NOTICE:
SSB940
17814
17815
17821
17872
17976
17985
18201
18210
18216
18219
18222
18224
18225
18237
18249
18252
18254
18255
18350
18407
18411
18419
18424
18444
18507
18512
18517
18518
18601
18602
18603
18610
18612
18614
18615
18617
18618
18621
18622
18623
18625
18627
18629
18630
18634
18635
18636
18640
18641
18642
18643
18644
18651
18655
18656
18657
18660
18661
18701
18702
18704
18705
18706
18707
18708
18709
18711
18848
18853
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER COMMUNITY NEWS THURSDAY, JULY 11, 2013 PAGE 3C
OLIVER M. BOLIN
Happy Birthday!
Oliver Michael Bolin,
son of Steve and Kristen
Bolin, Exeter, is celebrat-
ing his sixth birthday
today, July 11. Oliver
is a grandson of Nancy
Fancher, Exeter; Stephan
Podskoch, Swoyersville;
Joseph Bolin, Pittston;
and Michael and Romaine
Korsun, Trucksville. He is
a great-grandson of Leo
and Marion Krawietz,
Trucksville. Oliver has a
brother, Lukas, 2.
FLOYD W. SUTTON
Floyd William Sutton,
son of Carl and Wendy
Sutton, Dallas, is cel-
ebrating his eighth birth-
day today, July 11. Floyd
is a grandson of John
Wagner, Pittston; the late
Mary Lynn Wagner; and
Carl and Andrea Sutton,
Canton. He is a great-
grandson of Ruth Celmer,
Plymouth. Floyd has a sis-
ter, Lydia, 4.
AYLAV.
SCHAPPERT
Ayla Verena Schappert,
daughter of Jude and Ali
Schappert, is celebrating
her rst birthday today,
July 11. Ayla is a grand-
daughter of Jude and Jean
Schappert, Ashley, and
John and Mickie Ostrum,
Wilkes-Barre. She is a
great-granddaughter of
Jean Schappert, Ashley,
and Helene Sirak,
Hanover Township.
ADDISON L.
STRENFEL
Addison Lily Strenfel,
daughter of Tim and
Shawna Strenfel,
Middletown, N.Y., is
celebrating her second
birthday today, July 11.
Addison is a granddaugh-
ter of Ed Strenfel and
Cathy and Gabe Metric,
all of Hanover Township,
and Bruce Lichtenstein
and the late Cindy
Guthrie and Jeff Hogan,
all of New York. She is
a great-granddaughter
of the late George and
Theresa Tomko, Hanover
Township, and the late
Edward and Angeline
Strenfel, Lake Silkworth.
HARPER G.
OLENICK
Harper Grace Olenick,
daughter of Tracey Eppley
and Joseph Olenick, is cel-
ebrating her rst birthday
today, July 11. Harper is
a granddaughter of James
and Doreen Brennan and
Grace and Joseph Olenick.
She has a brother, William
Eppley, 11, and a sister,
Cieraena Eppley, 7.
BRANDON M.
SNOPECK
JESSICA GOLDEN
Jessica Golden, daugh-
ter of Adrienne Maxwell
and Jeffrey Golden Sr.
celebrated her seventh
birthday June 2. Jessica
is a granddaughter of
Mary and Jerry Freeman,
Kevin Fox and Diane and
James Golden. She has
two brothers, Justin, 6,
and Jeffrey Jr., 18.
BRANDONA.
SMARGIASSI
Brandon Alexander
Smargiassi, son of Mike
and Sandie Smargiassi,
Duryea, is celebrating
his fth birthday today,
July 11. Brandon is a
grandson of Frank A.
Spudis, Pittston; the late
Grace Spudis; and Ron
and Nancy Smargiassi,
Dickson City. He has a
brother, Josh, 8.
COUGHLIN HIGH SCHOOL
Class of 1955 will hold its
annual picnic from noon
to 7 p.m. on Sunday at
Konefals Grove, Chase.
Cost is $25. For more
information, or to make a
reservation, contact Helene
at 570-693-4666. All
classmates are welcome.
Class of 1959 will meet
at 6 p.m. on July 18 at the
home of Jack and Kathy
Macey, 18 Mercer St.,
Plains Township. Plans for
the 55th class reunion to
be held on Oct. 11, 2014
at the Genetti Hotel and
Conference Center will
be discussed. All class
members and spouses are
invited.
Class of 1963 is holding its
50th anniversary reunion
on Oct. 19 at the Genetti
Hotel and Conference
Center, Wilkes-Barer.
Invitations have been
mailed and reservations
are due by the end of
August. If invitation not
received, contact Marcia
Rusenko Finn at 678-
5958. Addresses are still
needed for the following
classmates, Karen
White, Carol Kolanick,
John Belaus, Loretta
Blakeslee, Pat Franza,
Edward Mieneker, Vincent
Pisaneschi, Mary Poplawski,
Stanley Rudovitz, Tony
Sokol, Walter Sott, Harry
Stegura, Roxanne Walsh,
Diane Yankoski and Joyce
Yurkavage.
HANOVER AREA HIGH
SCHOOL
Class of 1976 is holding
a summer gathering at 3
p.m. on July 20. For more
information contact Kevin
Kwiatek at 570-262-0982,
Dave Rash at 570-236-1702,
or Maureen Mangino at
570-237-5219.
MEYERS HIGH SCHOOL
Class of 1952 will meet
at 1 p.m. on Wednesday at
Norms Pizza and Eatery,
Wilkes-Barre.
Class of 1963 is having
a get together at 6
p.m. on Wednesday at
Logans Roadhouse, 2310
Wilkes-Barre Township
Marketplace, Wilkes-Barre.
Family, friends and other
classmates are invited. For
more information contact
Maddy at 570-829-1529.
Classes of 1960-1971
combined reunion meeting
will be held at 7 p.m. on
July 18 at Cris Nics (the
old Barney Inn). Some
classmates are meeting
for dinner at 5:30 p.m.
For more information log
on to the Elmer L. Meyers
1966-1971 combined
reunion Facebook page
or contact debi_jenkins@
yahoo.com. Reservations
for the reunion should be
sent with checks made
payable to Meyers High
School combined reunion.
For invitation forms email
debi_jenkins@yahoo.
com with email or home
address. There will also be
an icebreaker on Oct. 25 at
the American Legion, Lee
Park Avenue, and a tour of
the high school on Oct. 26.
NORTHEAST HIGH
SCHOOL
Class of 1963 reunion
committee will meet at
7 p.m. on Wednesday
at the Duryea VFW.
Classmates are urged to
make reservations for the
50th anniversary reunion
to be held on Oct. 11 at
Colarussos LaPalazza.
Any graduates from
Northeast High School
from 1964-1966 are also
invited. Contact Michael
Hopkins at 457-0413. The
committee is seeking
addresses for the following
classmates, Richard Ash,
Grace Bahnweg Gilhooley,
Margaret Balchune, Theresa
Ann Cherone Poremba,
Robert Czar, Alan Dommes,
Patricia Gedrich Matthews,
Joseph Mashunas, Dolores
Struzzeri Lemardy, Anna
Mae Thomas, Carol
Menichini Marshal and
Catherine Purcell Hess. All
classmates are invited to
help plan the reunion.
PITTSTON HIGH SCHOOL
Class of 1957 will meet at
7:30 p.m. on Wednesday
at Tonys Pizza, City Line
Plaza. All class members
are invited.
PLYMOUTH HIGH
SCHOOL
Class of 1958 will hold a
reunion planning session
at 7 p.m. on Tuesday at
Happy Pizza, 40 W. Main
St., Plymouth. All class
members are invited. The
reunion will be held on Aug.
31 at the Ramada Hotel,
Public Square, Wilkes-
Barre. An icebreaker will
take place on Aug. 30
at Happy Pizza. Contact
information is needed on
Marjorie Bezdziecki, Jean
Ann Byczkowski, Cynthia
Cooper, Diane Davis,
Barbara Finn, Carolyn
Gluc, Linda Hearing, Elmer
Jones, Evan Kennedy, John
Oakschunas, Elizabeth
Purnell, Jane Schacht and
Sharan Stevens. Contact
Dottie at 570-954-7095 or
John at 570-287-0582 with
any information.
SCHUPP/SHUPP/SHUP
AND HAWK FAMILIES
The 15th annual Hawk
and Schupp, Shupp, Shup
family reunion will be held
on July 21 at the Don Laine
Campground, 790 57 Drive,
Palmerton. Festivities begin
at 11 a.m. with registration.
Lunch will be held at
noon. There will be food
and refreshments at the
campground store and grill
and participants can bring
their own food, possibly a
side dish to share. There is
an enclosed pavilion and
pool. A handmade item or
gift should be brought for
the Chinese auction. Also
needed are food items
such as fruits, vegetables
and pies and cakes that do
not have to be refrigerated
for a cake walk. Childrens
games will be held and
there is a game room. The
Genealogy of Conrad and
Elizabeth Borger Hawk,
1744-1990, will be available
for purchase.
WEST SIDE CENTRAL
CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOL
Class of 1971 is holding
a 60th birthday party for
graduates, spouses and
significant others from 1-7
p.m. on Sept. 1 at The Grove
at the Checkerboard Inn,
Carverton Road, Trucksville.
Emailed invitations have
been sent to those whose
addresses are on file.
Reservations may be made
through the Facebook
page, WSCCHS 1971, or by
contacting Kate Taroli or
Linda Hincken at KBTaroli@
gmail.com. A pay-as-you-
go ice breaker will be held
at 6:30 p.m. on Aug. 31 at
Grotto Pizza, Harveys Lake.
Brandon Michael
Snopeck, son of Danielle
and David Snopeck,
Edwardsville, is celebrat-
ing his fourth birthday
today, July 11. Brandon
is a grandson of Donna
Melton, Wilkes-Barre;
James Melton, Forty Fort;
and Joan Snopeck and the
late Walter Snopeck, West
Wyoming. He is a great-
grandson of Carol George,
Wilkes-Barre. Brandon
has a sister, Cassandra, 5.
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PAGE 4C THURSDAY, JULY 11, 2013 TV www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER
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Nah, shed invariably
reply.
And that always felt like
a victory. Like she was
headed out to enjoy what-
ever we were about to
enjoy for the sheer experi-
ence. Not for the chance
to look cute in photos or
show off her headband.
Once we arrived, shed
always dive in with aban-
don not a moment
spent wondering if her
braids would come loose
or her curls would drop.
Disney
From page 1C
She was the antithesis
of Jessie. Now she wants
me to brush her hair.
Sometimes she brushes
it herself. The other day
she asked me to re-create
a hairstyle in an American
Girl magazine and didnt
bother hiding her con-
tempt for my pitiful ren-
dering.
Have the Disney gals
shiny cascades of thick,
lovely tresses tangled
80006955 822-8222
We Accept
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All Major Credit Cards
C&D SEAFOOD
(By The Big Cow) www.cdqualityseafood.com
Route 309, Wilkes-Barre Twp. Boulevard
Store Hours
Wed. 9-5 Turs. & Fri. 9-6 Sat. 9-4
Haddock, Flounder, Scallops and much more! Dont forget the cole slaw!
Colossal Shrimp ............ 13
99 lb.
White Littleneck Clams...12
99/50
Jumbo Lump Crab Cakes.........2
99 ea.
9-10 oz. Lobster Tails ........14
99 ea.
Seafood Salad...................... 5
49 lb.
Fried Scallop Platter ....... 5
99 plus tax
X-Large Shrimp $9.99 lb
White LittleneckClams $12.99/50
Sea Scallop Pieces $5.99 lb
Seafood Salad $5.49 lb
Fresh Steamed Hardshell Crabs Available!
Haddock Sandwich Platter$4.75 plus tax
Large Shrimp $7.99 lb.
White Littleneck Clams $12.99/50
Jumbo Lump Crab Cakes $2.99 EA.
Seafood Salad $5.49 lb.
Fried Haddock Platter $5.99 plus tax
Haddock, Flounder, Scallops and much more! Dont foget the cole slaw!
Store Hours
Wed. 9-5 Turs. & Fri. 9-6 Sat. 9-4
Route 309, Wilkes-Barre Twp. Boulevard
We Accept
The Access Card &
All Major Credit Cards
822-8222 80009424
at participating locations with this coupon. 1 coupon per customer
Expires 7/21/13
BUY 1 DOZEN DONUTS
GET 6 FREE
Medium Iced Coffee
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CURRYS
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ALL JUNK CARS &
TRUCKS WANTED
VITO & GINO
288-8995
Forty Fort
Highest Prices Paid In Cash.
Free Pickup. Call Anytime.
BEL L ES
C O N S TRUC TIO N C O . IN C .
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1080 WB Township Blvd.
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702
Exit 165 off I-81, Route 309
at Blackman St.
570-824-0541
www.countryskiandsports.com
80011899
Market Street Pub
29 Market St., Jenkins Twp.
570-655-8091
Owen Street Pub
245 Owen St., Swoyersville
570-287-6074
Treat Yourself To Lunch!
Market St. Open For Lunch Fri. - Sun. | Owen St. Wed. - Sun.
Join Us For
HAPPY HOUR
Fridays & Saturdays 5-7
Try Our Exquisite Smaller Portion Foods Meant For
Tasting and Sharing From Our New Turtle Tapas Menu!
Dont just watch a movie, experience it!
All Stadium Seating and Dolby Surround Sound
ALL FEATURES NOW PRESENTED IN DIGITAL FORMAT
825.4444 rctheatres.com
3 Hrs. Free Parking At Participating Park & Locks with Theatre Validation
(Parenthesis Denotes Bargain Matinees)
All Showtimes Include Pre-Feature Content
Avoid the lines: Advance tickets available from Fandango.com
Rating Policy Parents and/or Guardians (Age 21 and older) must
accompany all children under 17 to an R Rated feature
*No passes accepted to these features.
**No restricted discount tickets or passes accepted to these features.
***3D features are the regular admission price plus a surcharge of $2.50
D-Box Motion Seats are the admission price plus an $8.00 surcharge
First Matinee $5.50 for all features (plus surcharge for 3D features).
Man Of Steel in RealD 3D/DBox
Motion Code Seating - PG13 - 150 min -
(12:15), (3:55), 7:10, 10:10
**Man Of Steel in RealD 3D - PG13
- 150 min - (12:15), (3:55), 7:10, 10:10
*Man Of Steel 2D - PG13 - (12:00), (1:45),
(3:40), (5:00), 7:00, 8:30, 10:00
*This Is The End - R - 110 min - (1:30),
(4:00), 7:15, 9:40
The Internship PG13 125 min
(1:00), (1:45), (3:35), (4:20), 7:00, 7:40, 9:35,
10:15
The Purge R 95 min
(12:40), (2:45), (4:50), 7:30, 9:45
Now You See Me PG13 120 min
(1:30), (4:15), 7:05, 9:35
After Earth PG13 105 min
(2:00), (4:20), 7:25, 9:45
Fast & Furious 6 PG13 135 min
(12:50), (1:30), (3:40), (4:20), 7:00, 7:25,
9:50, 10:10
Epic PG 110 min
(12:30), (3:00), 7:15, 9:40
The Hangover 3 R 105 min
(12:45), (3:00), (5:15), 7:40, 9:55
*Star Trek Into Darkness RealD 3D
PG13 140 min
(1:15), (4:15), 7:30, 10:20
Special Events
World War Z & World War Z RealD 3D -
8pm on Thursday, June 20th
Monsters University & Monsters University in RealD 3D -
8pm on Thursday, June 20th
Grown Ups 2 PG-13, 1 hr 41 min
7:05p, 9:30p
Pacifc Rim PG-13, 2 hr 11 min
7:20p, 10:10p
Pacifc Rim3D / DBox Motion Code
Seating PG-13, 2 hr 11 min
7:00p, 10:05p
Pacifc Rim3D PG-13, 2 hr 11
min 7:00p, 10:05p
Despicable Me 2 PG, 1 hr 38 min
12:00p, 2:00p, 2:20p, 4:40p, 5:00p,
7:00p, 7:50p, 9:20p, 10:05p
Despicable Me 2 in 3D PG, 1 hr 38
min 1:30p, 4:00p, 7:20p, 9:45p
The Lone Ranger PG-13, 2 hr 29
min 12:00p, 1:30p, 3:10p, 4:45p
8:00p, 10:05p
The Lone Ranger in DBox Motion
Code Seating PG-13, 2 hr 29 min
12:00p, 3:10p
The Heat R, 1 hr 57 min 1:00p,
2:00p, 3:40p, 4:40p, 7:20p, 7:45p,
10:00p, 10:20p
White House Down PG-13, 2 hr
17 min 12:15p, 1:10p, 3:15p, 4:10p,
7:00p, 10:00p
Monsters University G, 1 hr 42
min 12:45p, 3:20p, 7:00p, 9:35p
Monsters University 3D G, 1 hr
42 min 1:15p, 4:00p, 7:30p
World War Z PG-13, 1 hr 55 min
12:30p, 3:10p, 7:15p, 10:00p
Man of Steel PG-13, 2 hr 23 min
12:00p, 3:15p
This Is the End R, 1 hr 47 min
1:30p, 4:00p, 7:15p, 9:40p
Thursday July 11th Only
LONERANGER, THE(XD) (PG-13)
12:45 PM, 4:00PM, 7:15PM,10:30PM
newMovie
You must be 17 with iD or accompanied by a parent to attend R rated features.
Children under 6 may not attend R rated features after 6pm
**note**: Showtimes marked with a \\ indicate reserved seating.
DESPICABLEME2 (3D) (PG)
11:40aM1:20PM2:10PM4:40PM6:20PM
7:10PM9:40PMnewMovie
DESPICABLEME2 (DIGITAL) (PG)
10:00aM10:50aM12:30PM3:00PM
3:50PM5:30PM8:00PM8:50PM10:25PM
newMovie
HEAT, THE(DIGITAL) (PG)
11:00aM,12:25PM,1:50PM,3:15PM,4:40P
M.6:05PM,7:30PM,8:55PM,10:20PM
INTERNSHIP, THE(DIGITAL) (PG-13)
2:35PM8:40PM
KEVINHART: LET MEEXPLAIN
(DIGITAL) (R)
10:40aM12:40PM2:40PM4:45PM7:35PM
9:35PMnewMovie
LONERANGER, THE(DIGITAL)
(PG-13) 10:35aM11:40aM1:50PM
2:55PM5:05PM6:10PM8:20PM9:25PM
newMovie
LONERANGER, THE(XD) (PG-13)
12:45PM4:00PM7:15PM10:30PM
newMovie
MANOF STEEL(3D) (PG-13)
12:15PM3:45PM7:00PM10:10PM
MANOF STEEL(DIGITAL) (PG-13)
10:50aM2:05PM5:25PM8:45PM
MONSTERSUNIVERSITY(3D) (G)
11:35aM2:20PM5:05PM7:50PM10:35PM
MONSTERSUNIVERSITY(DIGITAL)
(G)10:20aM1:10PM4:10PM6:55PM
9:30PM
NOWYOUSEEME(DIGITAL)
(PG-13) 10:55aM(notonweD. JulY
10) 1:45PM(notonSun. JulY7 oR
weD. JulY10) 4:35PM(notonweD.
JulY10) 7:25PM(notonweD. JulY
10) 10:40PM
STARTREKINTODARKNESS
(DIGITAL) (PG-13)
11:15aM5:35PM
THISISTHEEND(DIGITAL) (R)
11:30aM2:15PM4:55PM7:40PM10:15PM
(notonweD. JulY10)
WHITEHOUSEDOWN(DIGITAL)
(PG-13) 11:20aM12:55PM2:30PM
4:05PM5:40PM7:20PM9:00PM10:25PM
WORLDWARZ (3D) (PG-13)
10:25aM1:25PM4:15PM7:05PM9:55PM
WORLDWARZ (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
12:00PM2:50PM5:45PM8:30PM
8
0
0
1
0
3
0
6
themselves around my
daughters psyche? Is she
assigned to years of stand-
ing in front of the mirror
feeling defeated?
Elisabeth Hasselbeck of The View joining Fox
NEW YORK (AP) Elisabeth Hasselbeck is leav-
ing the desk at The View for the couch on Fox News
Channels Fox & Friends.
The news network said that Hasselbeck
will join co-anchors Steve Doocy and Brian
Kilmeade on the three-hour morning show
Fox & Friends in September. Wednesday will
be her last day after a decade on The View.
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER PUZZLES THURSDAY, JULY 11, 2013 PAGE 5C
UNIVERSAL SUDOKU
MINUTE MAZE
W I T H O M A R S H A R I F & T A N N A H H I R S C H
CRYPTOQUOTE
GOREN BRIDGE
B Y M I C H E A L A R G I R I O N & J E F F K N U R E K
JUMBLE
B Y H O L I D A Y M A T H I S
HOROSCOPE
CROSSWORD
PREVIOUS DAYS SOLUTION
HOW TO CONTACT:
Dear Abby: PO Box 69440, Los Ange-
les, CA 90069
For more Sudoku go to www.timesleader.com
O N T H E W E B
Dear Abby: Legal
marijuana is making
my best friend stu-
pid, boring and insip-
id. Susan and I are
in our 50s and have
been best friends
off and on since
childhood. A decade ago, we started
taking better care of our friendship
because so few longtime friends were
still in our lives. Since then, I have
been careful not to be judgmental or
condescending because it was the
source of past friction.
Susan is a regular marijuana user,
which has sapped away all of her
ambition and curiosity. Even when
she isnt actually high, she lacks
the cleverness and mental acuity I
have always treasured about her.
Otherwise, her life is functional.
Shes in a good marriage, loves her
pets and enjoys her job. I think if I
said anything, it would cause a major
rift.
Should I just limit our time togeth-
er and accept this is how things
are going to be from now on? Im a
widow who has lost my parents and
others to illness. I have other friends
and family, but I dont want to lose
my old chum, even though being
around her is starting to make me
sad.
Friendship Going to Pot in
California
Dear FGTP: As people grow older,
long and well-established relation-
ships become more precious. But
much as we might wish otherwise,
relationships do not always remain
the same. Because you are no longer
receiving what you need from your
interactions with Susan, I agree you
may need to see her less often.
In light of your long relationship,
I dont think it would be offensive to
tell her you have noticed a change in
her and you miss the person she used
to be. However, are you absolutely
certain that what you have observed
is caused by marijuana? If youre not,
then consider sharing your observa-
tion with Susans husband, in case her
lack of sharpness could be the result
of another medication shes using or a
neurological problem.
Dear Abby: My husband and I have
been married for one year. Yesterday
I put all the pieces together and real-
ized hes been cheating on me.
I called the other woman, and af-
ter she regained her composure and
heard she is a mistress, she told me
everything. She gave me the answers
I desperately needed, and I am thank-
ful for her honesty and surpris-
ingly her compassion.
Now I need to move forward. I am
crushed, and even though he cant
explain why he cheated, I still want
to know why. He says hes going to
counseling, which is something I have
been begging him to do since I had a
miscarriage last summer.
Will he change? Or should I con-
tinue to pack the house and move on?
Crushed in Chicago
Dear Crushed: Much depends upon
the reason your husband started
cheating. If it was a way to avoid ex-
periencing the pain of the loss of the
baby, its possible that with counsel-
ing you can get beyond this.
I suggest you ask to be included in
one or more of the counseling ses-
sions. If he agrees, at least you will
know he is seeing a therapist. If not,
you will have to decide whether you
have had enough loss in one year, and
whether you have a future together.
DEAR ABBY
A D V I C E
Woman says pot use is clouding the mind of her lifelong best friend
To receive a collection of Abbys most
memorable and most frequently re-
quested poems and essays, send a busi-
ness-sized, self-addressed envelope, plus
check or money order for $3.95 ($4.50 in
Canada) to: Dear Abbys Keepers, P.O. Box
447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Postage
is included.)
ARIES (March 21-April 19). You
dont have to worry about your
trade secrets getting out. Even
if they did, others wouldnt know
what to do with them. Whats
relevant to you would be a lot of
work for others to get into.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20). You
used to have location envy, but
youre starting to realize that
you can connect with the world
you want to be a part of from
wherever you live right now. Use
the library and the Internet.
GEMINI (May 21-June 21). Youll
examine the elements that make
up your lifestyle. Its the people
you talk to, the pictures and
notes on your wall, the decor
and food. Bit by bit, youre build-
ing something beautiful.
CANCER (June 22-July 22). Dont
be afraid to speak your true
opinion today, especially when
you sense that youre with a
kindred spirit. Youll likely say
the thing the other person has
always thought, too.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). A hand-
shake will convey secret mean-
ing. Beware of the one who turns
the shake so that the top of your
hand faces the ground and his is
on top. This dominating person
wont treat you as an equal.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). Theres
wisdom in playing it cool, but not
so cool that you dont show emo-
tion. Showing your feelings, or
at least a glimpse of them, takes
confidence.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). By being
open to your wilder instincts,
you heighten the energy level
of everyone around you. But go
too far with this, and people get
jumpy.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21).
Someone will always say that the
ship is sinking, but dont be too
quick to jump off. Show a little
faith in your vessel. The same
goes for your idea, project or
relationship.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21).
Have you ever heard of deci-
sion fatigue? Youve felt it
every time you leave the grocery
store after a big shop. It drains
your willpower. Thats why fewer
options are better today.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19).
Youve created a steady stream
of activity and joy or at least
you thought thats what it was
going to be. Now it may feel
more like a hectic schedule. Cut
back now. Take it easy.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). In
food, bitterness is made palat-
able by adding something sweet,
salty or sour. As for internal bit-
terness, salty or sour thoughts
wont balance it at all. Go for the
sweetness, and youll get a deli-
cious result.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). Youve
let go of minor grudges and
resentments before, and now
youre in the same place all over
again. Should you forgive one
more time? No. Forgive a thou-
sand more times.
TODAYS BIRTHDAY (July 11). A
retreat in the next six months
will change your perspective and
help you earn big, too. Youll act
to improve your family dynamic
and influence your kin to lead
healthier lives. What you accom-
plish in September will put you
in the running for an award. Your
lucky numbers are: 4, 22, 19, 35
and 16.
MARKETPLACE
570. 829. 7130
800. 273. 7130
PLACE YOUR AD 24/7 AT TIMESLEADER.COM
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Thursday, July 11, 2013 PAGE 1D
Special Notices
Octagon Family Restaurant
375 W Main St, Plymouth, PA 18651
570-779-2288
THURSDAY SPECIAL
Large Pie for $7.95
In House Only
Cannot be combined with any other offer.
Home of the Original O-Bar Pizza
Legal Notices / Notices To Creditors
NOTICE OF FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT AND
NOTICE OF INTENT TO REQUEST RELEASE OF FUNDS
July 11, 2013
CITY OF WILKES-BARRE
40 EAST MARKET STREET
WILKES-BARRE, PA 18711
PHONE: (570) 208-4132
These notices shall satisfy two separate but related procedural
requirements for activities to be undertaken by the City of Wilkes-
Barre.
REQUEST FOR RELEASE OF FUNDS
On or about July 29,2013 the City of Wilkes-Barrewill submit a
request to the United States Department of Housing and Urban
Development for the release of Community Development Block
Grant funds under Title I of the Housing and Community Devel-
opment Act of 1974, as amended, to undertake a project known
as Demolition of the structure known as 282 North Pennsylvania
Avenue, Wilkes-Barre, PA.
FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT
The City of Wilkes-Barre has determined that the projects will
have no significant impact on the human environment. There-
fore, an Environmental Impact Statement under the National En-
vironmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) is not required. Addition-
al project information is contained in each Environmental Re-
view Record (ERR) on file at the Office of Economic & Com-
munity Development, 40 East Market Street, Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711, and may be examined or copied weekdays 9:00 A.M. to
4:30 P.M.
PUBLIC COMMENTS
Any individual, group, or agency may submit written comments
on the ERRs to the Office of Economic & Community Develop-
ment. All comments received by July 27, 2013 will be con-
sidered by the City of Wilkes-Barre prior to authorizing submis-
sion of a request for release of funds. Comments should specify
which Notice they are addressing.
ENVIRONMENTAL CERTIFICATION
The City of Wilkes-Barre certifies to HUD Thomas M. Leighton in
his capacity as Mayor of the City of Wilkes-Barre consents to ac-
cept the jurisdiction of the Federal Courts if an action is brought
to enforce responsibilities in relation to the environmental review
process and that these responsibilities have been satisfied.
HUDs States approval of the certification satisfies its responsib-
ilities under NEPA and related laws and authorities and allows
the City of Wilkes-Barre to use Program funds.
OBJECTIONS TO RELEASE OF FUNDS
HUD will accept objections to its release of funds and the City of
Wilkes-Barres certification for a period of fifteen days following
the anticipated submission date or its actual receipt of the re-
quest (whichever is later) only if they are on one of the following
bases: (a) the certification was not executed by the Certifying Of-
ficer of the City of Wilkes-Barre; (b) the City of Wilkes-Barre has
omitted a step or failed to make a decision or finding required by
HUD regulations at 24 CFR part 58; (c) the grant recipient or oth-
er participants in the development process have committed
funds, incurred costs or undertaken activities not authorized by
24 CFR Part 58 before approval of a release of funds by HUD; or
(d) another Federal agency acting pursuant to 40 CFR Part 1504
has submitted a written finding that the project is unsatisfactory
from the standpoint of environmental quality. Objections must be
prepared and submitted in accordance with the required proced-
ures (24 CFR Part 58, Sec. 58.76) and shall be addressed to the
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, HUD
Pennsylvania State Office, The Wanamaker Building, 100 Penn
Square East, Philadelphia, PA 19107-3380. Potential objectors
should contact HUD to verify the actual last day of the objection
period.
Thomas M. Leighton, Mayor City of Wilkes-Barre
Legal Notices / Notices To Creditors
LEGAL NOTICE
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE - UNITED STATES MAR-
SHALS SERVICE - NOTICE OF U.S. MARSHALS SALE - THE
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA vs. LINDA M. DILTS - Civil #12-
02590 - Public notice is hereby given, that by virtue of an Order
dated March 27, 2013, issued out of the United States District
Court for the Middle District of Pennsylvania on a judgment
rendered in Court on March 27, 2013, in the amount of
$59,009.48 plus interest from March 15, 2012in favor of The
United States of America and against LINDA M. DILTS, the fol-
lowing described real estate, located at 22 Carpenter Road Har-
veys Lake, PA 18618, shall be offered for sale. To obtain a
complete legal description please contact Jillian Hill at 215-825-
6305. PROPERTY LOCATION: 22 Carpenter Road, Harveys
Lake, PA 18618, Parcel/Folio # 74-D6S2A-002-014-000. The
above-mentioned properties offered up for sale on July 25, 2013
at 11:00 AM at the steps located at the South Main Street En-
trance of the Max Rosenn US Courthouse, which is located at
197 South Main Street Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701, at public auc-
tion, to the highest and best bidder by the U.S. Marshal for the
Middle District of Pennsylvania. And I will, accordingly offer the
real estate for sale to the highest and best bidder, for cashier's
check or teller's check. The following terms of sale apply to all of
the above listed properties. Terms of Sale: Ten percent (10%) of
the highest sum bid must be deposited by the highest bidder in
cashier's check or certified check with the Marshal immediately.
The balance of the purchase price shall be paid in cashier's
check or certified check within thirty (30) days after Marshals
Sale Otherwise, the purchaser will forfeit their deposit and the
Marshal may settle with a second bidder who has made the re-
quired deposit at the Marshal's Sale and thereby registered their
willingness to take the property at the highest price bid, provided
such second bidder deposits the balance of the purchase price
within 10 days after notice from the Marshal of the first bidder's
default. If no second bid be registered, the property may be sold
again at the risk of the defaulting bidder, and in case of any defi-
ciency in such resale, the defaulting bidder shall make good the
same to the person injured thereby and the deposit shall be for-
feited and distributed with the other funds created by the sale.
Bidder must have proceeds immediately available and on his
person in order to bid, bidder will not be permitted to leave the
sale and return with proceeds. The successful bidder takes the
real estate subject to, and shall pay all taxes, water rents, sewer
charges, municipal claims, and other charges and liens not di-
vested by the sale and must also pay all state and local realty
transfer taxes or stamps, to the extent the fund created by the
sale is insufficient to pay such transfer taxes. Distribution of Pro-
ceeds: A Schedule of Proposed Distribution of the proceeds of
sale will be filed with the Marshal within ten (10) days of confirm-
ation by Court Order of the sale. No Schedule of Distribution will
be filed if the property is sold to the Plaintiff for costs only. The
Marshal shall distribute the proceeds of sale in accordance with
the proposed Schedule of Distribution unless written exceptions
are filed with the Marshal not later than ten (10) days after the fil-
ing of the proposed schedule. For information concerning the
amount that Plaintiff intends to bid, for information regarding the
status if this sale, the exact location of the sale in the courthouse,
or for other information you may contact: Cathy Diederich at
(314) 457-5514, email: cathy.diederich@stl.usda.gov, or Jillian
Hill at 215-825-6305 or JHill@kmllawgroup.com. For a complete
list of all properties offered for sale by the Department of Agricul-
ture go to: http://www.resales.usda.gov/ The sale may be post-
poned in accordance with Pa. R.C.P. 3129.1 et seq. for up to 100
days. Please contact Cathy Diederich or Jillian Hill, Paralegal,
with KML Law Group, P.C., at the above phone numbers prior to
the scheduled sale date to confirm that the sale will proceed.
Dated June 21, 2013, Martin Pane, United States Marshal,
Middle District of Pennsylvania.
Medical/Health
The Greater Hazleton Health Alliance has
the following openings:
Radiology Supervisor FT
Cat Scan Tech Casual
(Ultrasound/Vascular Certification Preferred)
Physical Therapist (Rehab) FT
Physical Therapist (Home Health) FT
Operating Room & OB RNs Casual
(experienced preferred)
Home Health RNs FT & Casual
SDU/Endo/PACU Float RN - Casual
Med/Surg/Tele./Peds RNs FT/PT
Speech & Occupational Therapists Casual
Excellent benefit package for full time employees, which in-
cludes medical, dental, vision, tuition reimbursement, STD,
LTD, Life insurance and defined contribution plan.
Candidates interested can forward their resume in
confidence to: jobs@ghha.org
Employment Applications are available for download from our
web site at www.ghha.org
Special Notices
IF YOU'RE NOT
SELLING YOUR
JUNK
VEHICLES
or HEAVY
EQUIPMENT
TRACTORS,
TRAILERS,
SCHOOL
BUSES, DUMP
TRUCKS TO
HAPPY TRAILS
YOU'RE LOSING
MONEY
570-760-2035
570-542-2277
FREE PICK UP
ADOPT: Adoring, secure
couple longs to adopt your
newborn. Safe, beautiful
life forever. Love awaits.
Lori & Craig
888-773-6381
Expenses Paid
FOSTER
PARENT(S)
needed immediately
for teens or sibling groups.
Compensation, training, and
24 hour on-call support
provided. Please call
FRIENDSHIP HOUSE
(570) 342-8305 x 2058.
Compensation up to
$1200.00
per month per child.
Free Books: Normal
Christian Life By Watchman
Nee Economy Of God.
By Witness Lee
Www.Bfa.Org/Newbooks
ADOPT: A teacher hopes to
adopt a baby! I promise to
provide a lifetime of uncondi-
tional love & opportunities.
Expenses paid.
1-866-408-1543
www.AdeleAdopts.info
Christian Friends of Brother
Watchman Nee Want to
Meet & Share Thoughts.
Call 570-267-8250,
sdekw@yahoo.com.
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
VITO & GINO'S
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
MONTY SAYS
Today is the day Pro and his
staff will shine. Gentle and
Scoop. Forget it. Welcome to
al l hi s fri ends and guests!
Watch out for SPEED...He is
goi ng t o move FAST! ! !
Whooper and Speed and
Monty and JLasko best four-
some ever
Special Notices
Brides & grooms can now re-
gister at most travel agen-
cies for honeymoons. Try
honeyfund.com for ways your
guests can help towards your
dream vacancy!
bridezella.net
Legal Notices / Notices To Creditors
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that Letters Testamentary have
been granted in the Estate of
Marion June Jones, Deceased,
late of Nanticoke City, Luzerne
County, Pennsylvania, who
died on May 27, 2013. All per-
sons indebted to said Estate
are required to make payment,
and those having claims or de-
mands to present the same
without delay to the Executor,
Jeffrey L. Jones, c/o Jannell L.
Decker, Esq, 1043 Wyoming
Avenue, Forty Fort, PA 18704
PUBLIC NOTICE
I n accor dance wi t h t he
Pennsylvania Liquor Code, the
City Council of Wilkes-Barre
will hold a Public Hearing on
Tuesday, July 16, 2013 at 5:15
p.m., in City Council Cham-
bers, Fourth Floor, City Hall re-
lative to the transfer of a Li-
quor License for the premises
located at 245 South Main
Street, Wilkes-Barre, PA.
If special accommodations are
required for persons with dis-
abilities, please notify Melissa
Shatzel at (570) 208-4112 or
e - m a i l h e r a t
m s c h a t z e l @ w i l k e s -
b a r r e . p a . u s .
Jim Ryan, City Clerk
ESTATE NOTICE
Notice is hereby given that Let-
ters of Admi nstrati on have
been granted in the ESTATE
OF IRENE D. MIGLIORE, late
of WEST WYOMING BOR-
OUGH, (died December 28,
2012). Judy Ann Migliore and
Debra Jean Joyce, Co-Admin-
istratrixes, c/o Robert A. Go-
nos, Esquire, 88 N. Franklin
Street, Second Floor, Wilkes-
Barre, PA 18701
All persons indebted to said
estate are required to make
payments and those having
cl ai ms or demands are to
present the same without delay
to Attorney Robert A. Gonos
Lost & Found
FOUND, Black Lab, Neutered
Male, found out by Sordoni
Farm at Harveys Lake, found
Saturday afternoon. No collar
or Microchip. Call Blue Chip
Farm at 570-333-5265
Lost & Found
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-288-8995
FOUND, Dog, male, Approxim-
ately three years old. Black
and tan. Might be a Tahitian
mi x. No t ags, f ound near
Schuyl er Ave. i n Ki ngston.
570-954-6249
FOUND, sunglasses on the
Back Mountain trail in Luzerne.
Call: 570-287-5894
FOUND. Keys, i ncl udi ng a
Chevy key, others for identific-
ati on purposes at Harveys
Creek. 1 1/ 2 mi l es bel ow
Chase Rd & Rt e. 29.
570-696-1723
FOUND: female calico kitten,
mixed colors, about 10 weeks
old, yellow green eyes, scared,
found 2 blocks from General
Hospital. Call 570-825-2416
LOST:
HEARING AID
Wilkes-Barre or Kingston.
Call 570-760-1452
LOST. German Shepherd,
black & tan female, in vicinity
of Port Griffith, Jenkins Twp.
Very fri endl y, "Mol l y". RE-
WARD 570-654-2972, leave
message.
Attorney
DIVORCE No Fault
$295 divorce295.com
Atty. Kurlancheek
800-324-9748 W-B
FREE Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans. Carol Baltimore
570-283-1626
SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Free Consultation.
Contact Atty. Sherry Dalessandro
570-823-9006
Child / Elderly Care
DAYCARE
In my Kingston home. Licensed.
Accepting Co-ordinated Childcare
570-283-0336
Travel Entertainment
Black Lake, NY
Come relax & enjoy great fishing &
tranquility at its finest.
Housekeeping
cottages on the water with all the
amenities of home.
Need A Vacation? Call Now!
(315) 375-8962
daveroll@blacklakemarine.com
www.blacklake4fish.com
BROADWAY
SHOW
BUS TRIPS
BALTIMORE INNER
HARBOR & THE
NATIONAL AQUARIUM
Sat. August 10th $89
MOTOWN THE MUSICAL
Sat., Sept. 21st
$160 (Mezz Seats)
WICKED
Sat., Sept. 21st
$175 (Orchestra seats)
Pick Ups from Pittston &
Wilkes-Barre Park & Rides
CALL ROSEANN @ 655-4247
To Reserve Your Seats
CAMEO HOUSE
BUS TOURS
SUN., JULY 21 NYC
N.Y. Botanical Gardens
Wild Medicine Healing
Plants
From Around The World.
Dinner in the Real Little
Italy - Arthur Ave. - Bronx
Sat., Aug., 24
Wilmington
Docent Tour of Nemours
Mansion & Gardens
Brunch @ The Inn @
Montchanin Village..
and more
Oct., 6 & 7
FALLING WATER
570-655-3420
anne.cameo@verizon.net
Travel Entertainment
FUN GETAWAYS!
Taylor Swift Concert
7/19
9/11 Memorial with
Free Time in NYC
7/27
Kutztown
Folk Festival 7/6
Yankees/Tigers 8/9
Phillies/Dodgers 8/18
Washington DC
2 Day, 8/3 & 4
Includes Memorials
& Sightseeing
1-800-432-8069
NEW SHIPS
ON SALE
at TENENBAUMS TRAVEL
NOW!
NCLs BREAKAWAY
from only $734.00 per per-
son
ROYAL CARIBBEAN'S
QUANTUM OF THE SEAS
from only $1074.00
per person
Departs New York
to the Bahamas
Rates are per person,
based on two sharing one
cabin, subject to availability
and change.
Call 570.288.8747
for more info!
Money To Lend
We can erase your bad credit -
100% GUARANTEED. Attorneys
for the Federal Trade Commission
say theyve never seen a legitim-
ate credit repair operation. No one
can legally remove accurate and
timely information from your credit
report. Its a process that starts with
you and involves time and a con-
scious effort to pay your debts.
Learn about managing credit and
debt at ftc. gov/credit. A message
from The Times Leader and the
FTC.
Automotive
USED CAR
MANAGER
Salary $500/week,
commission 50%.
Call Steve Morenko
for appointment
718-4050 0R 675-3438
Banking / Real Estate / Mortgage
MORTGAGE
PROCESSOR
United One Resources is
seeking a part time mort-
gage processor. The suc-
cessful candidates should
possess excellent phone and
organizational skills, the abil-
ity to multi-task, be bi-lingual
in Spanish, conscientious
with an attention to detail,
work in a fast pace environ-
ment and successfully meet
daily goals. Previous credit
processing, banking or lend-
ing experience preferred but
not required. Hours: around
20-25 hours per week.
For consideration, forward
your resume to:
iwanttowork@
unitedoneresources.com
EOE M/F/D/V
Drivers & Delivery
CLASS A
CDL DRIVER
Owner Operators .95 cpm
plus fuel surcharge. Local driv-
ing positions out of Pittston.
845-616-1461
timesleader.com
Get news
when it
happens.
Get all the advertising inserts
with the latest sales.
Call 829-5000 to start
your home delivery.
K
PAGE 2D Thursday, July 11, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Production/Operations
PRODUCTION
AEP Industries, Inc.,
manufacturer of flexible packaging films in Mountaintop hiring
NIGHT SHIFT MACHINE OPERATORS
Starting at $ 10.50/hr. PLUS .50 /hr. for night shift; 60-90
day evaluation provides increase $$ based on
YOUR performance, attendance etc.
Full-time 12 hours shifts alternating / 3 & 4 day work weeks
(overtime pay every other)
EVERY OTHER WEEKEND A MUST
As a Machine Operator you will remove, inspect, and pack
finish product to specifications with strong opportunity for
promotion. You must be able to do some heavy lifting, MUST
know how to use a tape measure and scale,
and be a TEAM PLAYER.
Previous mfg. experience preferred.
Benefit Pkg. includes:
Medical, Dental, Vision, Life Ins., Vacation, Holiday pay
Applications accepted daily @
AEP INDUSTRIES, INC.
8 a.m. until 4 p.m.
20 Elmwood Avenue
Crestwood Industrial Park
Mountaintop, PA 18707
Email: grullony@aepinc.com
EOE * A drug free workplace
Sales / Business Development
SALES
CAREER OPPORTUNITY
EXPERIENCED SALES PERSONS
WANTED TO SERVICE NEW AND EXISTING
ACCOUNTS. COMPANY BENEFITS,
VACATION AND PAID TRAINING.
IF YOU WANT A CAREER AND NOT A JOB
CALL RICK AT 675-3283
TO SCHEDULE AN INTERVIEW MON-FRI
OR VISIT WWW.CMSEAST.COM
Commercial
Drivers & Delivery
OFFICE FURNITURE
INSTALLERS/
DELIVERY DRIVER
Earn up to $800
a week delivering office
furniture plus:
Home nights
No Weekends
Sign On Bonuses
CDL And Non
CDL Positions Available
Health Insurance
Paid Holidays
Send resume to
larry@edsioffice.com
or fax: 570-501-0587
Help Wanted General
PET STORE
Kennel Cleaner Mon-Sat 11-3
Apply in person
Pet Wonderland,Wilkes-Barre
Optical
Part time Monday-Friday
Machine Operator
Assembly
Final Lens Inspection
Send resume or apply in
person Mon-Fri 8:30-6pm
Luzerne Optical
180 N Wilkes Barre Blvd
Wilkes Barre, PA 18702
PUBLIC RELATIONS
Private special needs school
seeks motivated individual.
Applicants must possess:
Strong Communication/Inter-
personal, Organizational, and
Computer Skills. Send
resume to: info@
thegrahamacademy.com
Installation / Maintenace / Repair
EXPERIENCED MASON
Knowl edge of bri ck work,
stucco, pavers, concrete and
blocks. Must have own trans-
portation. Valid drivers license,
references and ability to work
on your own. $15 an hour.
Drug Free Work Place. Email
reply with resume/work history:
sam@barbosemasonry.com
Medical/Health
DENTAL SECRETARY/
ASSISTANT
The Noxen Health Center in
Noxen, Pa, has a full-time
Dental Secretary/ Assistant
position available. Hours are
8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.,
Mon thru Friday. Full benefit
package. Please go to
www.rhcnepa.com for further
details regarding this position
MEDICAL RECORDS/
FRONT DESK
RECEPTIONIST
Full-time position. Very busy
physicians group. Must be
experienced with electronic
medical records.Salary com-
mensurate with experience.
Send resume to:
The Times Leader
Box 4435
15 North Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711
RN/LPN
For busy surgical practice.
Experienced ONLY.
Part-time 3 days/week. Fax
resume to 570-714-3912.
NO PHONE CALLS!
Village at Greenbriar
Assisted Living
LPN
Full-Time
11pm-7:30am
PCAS
Part-Time
ALL SHIFTS
APPLY WITHIN:
4244 Memorial Highway
Dallas, PA 18612
Other
PROFESSIONAL
PET GROOMER
with experience.
570-829-5904
Project / Program Management
ASSISTANT
MANAGER
TRAINEE
3 people needed to assist
manager. Duties will include
recruiting, training & marketing.
Will train. Must be clean,
neat and professional.
Call Mr. Scott
(570) 288-4532 E.O.E
Sales / Business Development
RETAIL ART
MATERIAL
SALES
Mature, responsible individual
wanted Part-time for retail Art
Material Dept. Requires flex-
ible morning & afternoon week-
day hours + every Saturday.
Apply: Marquis Art & Frame
122 South Main St
Wilkes-Barre
Commercial
Hanover Twp
Parkway Plaza
Sans Souci Parkway
Commercial Space For
Lease 1,200 sq. ft. store-
front starting at $700/
month. Plenty of parking.
Central heat & air. Call
570-991-0706
Commercial
BEAR CREEK
$149,900
1255 Laurel Run Rd.
Bear Creek Twp., large commer-
cial garage/warehouse on 1.214
acres with additional 2 acre parcel.
2 water wel l s. 2 newer under-
ground fuel tanks. May require zon-
ing approval. For more information
and photos visit:
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 12-208
Call Charlie
COMMERCIAL
BUILDING
Luzerne. 2 bay garage & of-
fice. Parking for 30 vehicles.
Current auto dealer lease ex-
pires.
CALL 570-200-1320
DURYEA
REDUCED
$29,900
93 Main St.
Four units. 3 residential and
one storefront.Great corner
location, flood damaged home
being sold as is. For more info
visit: www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 12-1948
Call Tom
570-262-7716
NANTICOKE
212 E. Main Street
Building on Main St. near Anto-
nio's. Former business & res-
idential combination with 4
floors containing 3000+ sq. ft.
Walk-in street level entry both
front and back. Small off street
parking area in rear. Great op-
portunity with new Main St.
projects and foot traffic nearby.
$ 40,000. 570-760-7888 or
570-735-6879.
PITTSTON
$69,900
68 William St.
Great investment property with 3
units and separate utilities. Each
unit has 2 entrances and washer
hook up. Roof is 5 years old. For
more info visit:
www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
MLS 12-1897
Call Tom
570-262-7716
ATLAS REALTY, INC.
570-829-6200
Pittston
For sale
5 Unit
Money Maker
Available immediately. Fully
rented, leases on all five
units. Separate utilities, new
roof in 2007, 4 new gas fur-
naces, off street parking for 6
vehicles, 3 bay garage. Over
$29,000 in rents. A true
money maker for the serious
investor. Must Sell!
$150,000.
Call Steve at
(570) 468-2488
COMMERCIAL SPACE
Zoned for Restaurant, Deli or
Pizza. Hazle Street /Park Av-
enue Triangle, Wilkes-Barre.
Some equipment included.
Middle Eastern Bakery for rent
on Hazle St, Wilkes-Barre. Call
570-301-8200
SWOYERSVILLE
NEW LISTING
Busy, high visibility location. Body
shop, garage, car lot. Situated on
over 1 acre with 9,000 sq. ft. of
Commercial Space. $389,900
Call Joe 613-9080
JJ MANTIONE
613-9080
BEST $1 SQ. FT.
LEASES
YOULL EVER SEE!
WILKES-BARRE
Warehouse, light manufactur-
ing distribution. Gas heat,
sprinklers, overhead doors,
parking. Yes, that $1 sq. ft.
lease! We have 9,000 sq.ft.,
27,000 sq.ft., and 32,000 sq. ft.
There is nothing this good!
Sale or Lease
Call Larry @ 570-696-4000 or
570-430-1565
Commercial
WEST NANTICOKE
$139,900
30 E. Poplar St.
Multi - Family
5 apartments and a 2 car garage,
all rented. Off street parking for 8
cars. Great investment.
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-680
Tom Salvaggio
570-262-7716
WEST SIDE
Well established Italian Res-
taurant on the West Side with
seating for 75. Business only
includes good will, all furniture
and fixtures, all kitchen equip-
ment and del i very van for
$150,000. Building sold separ-
ately. Restaurant on 1st floor
and 2 bedroom luxury apart-
ment on 2nd f l oor f or
$250, 000.
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 12-3433
Call Charlie
WILKES-BARRE
$87,500
446 N. Main St.
Best of both worlds...Commercial
space plus 2-3 bedroom home
complete with detached garage and
off street parking with yard. Home
has been nicely remodeled with 1
3/4 baths, hardwood floors, move in
condition. Commercial space is
14x26 with endless possibilities.
www. atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-982
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
For Sale By Owner
DALLAS
Brick 2 story 3,200 sq. ft.
home, 2 acres, 4 bedrooms,
2.5 baths. Fireplace, hard-
wood floors. 20'x40' in-
ground pool with auto cover
and a large yard. $469,000
570-675-8955
DRUMS
REALTORS WELCOME
Near I80 & I81. One home,
2 units inside.$165,500 Well
maintained. 3 car garage, 1
acre of land. Near schools
shopping & parks. Country
setting. Pictures on
www.forsalebyowner.com
Listing #23930253
570-359-3010
570-436-2263
EXETER
39 Memorial Street
Great location near schools,
nice yard, 10 rooms, 4 bed-
rooms, 2 bath, gas heat,
private driveway. Detached
2 car garage. Walk-up attic,
f ul l basement . As I s.
$69, 900. 570- 474- 0340
PITTSTON TWP.
RENT TO OWN
2 bedroom, clean, needs no work. re-
modeled throughout. Minutes from I-
81 & PA Turnpike. $550/month.
570-471-7175 or 610-767-9456
For Sale By Owner
FORTY FORT
1670 MURRAY ST.
FOR SALE
BY OWNER
Qualified buyers only. Very
versat i l e 2 f ami l y home,
ranch style. Large lot. Beauti-
fully landscaped. $162,000.
Call 570-283-3469
leave message.
HANOVER TWP.
REALTORS WELCOME
Exceptional 3,165 sq. ft. home
in Liberty Hills. Heated in
ground pool, deck. Marble
flooring, wainscoting & crown
molding. New kitchen, Cherry
cabi nets & Brazi l i an hard-
wood floors, stainless steel ap-
pliances, granite counter tops.
Master bedroom with built-ins
& walk in closet. 3 fireplaces.
Lower level wet bar, theater,
exercise & laundry rooms.
Central vac & air, security & ir-
rigation systems. New roof,
furnace & pool liner. Pictures
on www.forsalebyowner.com.
L i s t i n g I D # 2 3 9 5 0 9 0 6 .
$318,000. Call 570-814-8010
for appointment.
HARVEYS LAKE
Barnum Street
Awesome lake view double
wi de, Mobi l e vi nyl si ded,
peaked roof, covered deck on
foundation two car detached
paved driveway 100x100 lot.
$120,000 Call: 404-271-6728
KINGSTON
Double block. Brings in $1,050
per month. Big back yard. Fully
rented. Great ROI. $74,999
570-430-1308
KINGSTON
100 Lathrop Street
Charming 2 story home in
desirable neighborhood.
2 bedroom, 1.5 bath with new
Kraft-Mai d ki tchen, quartz
counters & SS GE appliances.
Hardwood & tile, fireplace, sun
room and walk-up attic. 1 car
garage. Call 570-407-1660.
$159,000.
LAFLIN
Move in Ready!
3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, su-
per closet space, attic stor-
age. Open floor plan, with
ki tchen, fami l y & di ni ng
areas. Great room wi t h
cathedral cei l i ngs, hard-
wood floors & wood burning
fireplace. 1st floor, full size
l aundry room. Fi ni shed
basement with wet bar, slid-
ing glass doors to yard. Two
car garage. Design your
own backyard landscaping.
$174,000
570-814-8157 or eims-
tella@yahoo.com
MOUNTAIN TOP
5 Pine Tree Road
Five bedrooms, 2.5 baths, fam-
ily, living, dining & laundry
rooms. Eat in kitchen, finished
basement with storage room,
attached 2 car garage. Re-
duced to $229,900
For appointment call
570-474-5463
SHAVERTOWN
18 Genoa Lane
NEW LISTING!
For Sale By Owner
Executive downsize home, 4
bedrooms, 2.5 baths, private
back yard with 16 x 36 in
ground pool. Meticulously
maintained. $389,000
www.forsalebyowner.com
ID 23949718
or call 315-382-5295
For Sale By Owner
Hanover Township
New on the
Market!
3 Prince St., Hanover
Green/Hanover Twp.
Preferred Location.
3 BR, 2.5 Bath, All-Gas,
Ranch Home.
Quality Construction:
Freshly-Painted Interior &
Exterior. Large Eat-In Kit-
chen with New Flooring,
Plaster Walls, Refinished
Hardwood Floors
throughout, Refurbished
Tile Baths, New Roof, Win-
dows, & Patio Door
(Covered Patio). Finished
Basement with Dry Bar,
Large Laundry Room.with
Custom Cedar Closet,
Workshop & Outside En-
trance. Off street parking
for 6 cars. Large Level,
Fenced-Yard with Stucco
Shed. Professionally-Land-
scaped. Reasonable
Taxes. 1 Owner, Stable
Neighborhood.
$148,800
570-466-9843
PLAINS
39 SLOPE STREET
For sal e by owner, 3 bed-
rooms, 1 1/2 baths, modern
eat-in kitchen, large deck, off
street parking on a 50X150 lot,
nice neighborhood, all appli-
ances i ncl uded. Aski ng
$89, 000
570-310-1697
PLAINS TWP.
29 Jay Drive
2 st ory, 4 bedroom, 2. 5
baths, on half acre. Fenced
yard with heated in ground
pool.
$250,000.
570-235-1624
WEST PITTSTON
PRICE REDUCED!!
33 Delaware Ave.
2 bedroom ranch, completely re-
modeled, includes spare build-
ing lot, $39,900. 570-299-5415
WILKES-BARRE TWP.
Single House, 3 bedrooms. 1
bath, sunroom 10x25, kitchen,
dining room, parlor, & base-
ment. Gas baseboard, hot wa-
ter. 1448 sq ft. 50x130 ft lot,
75% fenced in. Buses to all
area schools nearby. Property
available to make a driveway.
$40,000. Call 570-822-2382
Houses For Sale
BERWICK
Wooded building lot consisting
of 2.64 acres within minutes of
Berwick. Country setting, but
close to conveniences.
Located on Confers Lane.
Price: $60,000
Call Patsy at 570-204-0983
STRAUSSER REAL ESTATE
570-759-3300
DALLAS
This 4 bedroom, 2.5 bath Cape
Cod style home has so much
to offer! Plenty of room for
everyone. Master bedroom
with walk in closet & full bath,
family room w/fireplace, rec.
room with half bath in lower
level. hardwood floors on 1st
fl oor, new wi ndows, above
ground pool .
MLS# 13-1109
$165,000
Call Tracy Zarola
574-6465
DALLAS
19 Glen Riddle Lane
Peaceful surroundings over-
whelm the senses when you
step foot on this lovely prop-
erty. Tudor style 2 story with 4
bedrooms and 2.5 baths, fam-
ily room with fireplace. Access-
ible outdoor deck from kitchen,
family room Basement area
can be finished off for addition-
al living space. MLS 13-1818
$284,500
Jay A. Crossin
Extension 23
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
Houses For Sale
DALLAS
$469,000
Beautiful well kept 2 story Co-
lonial features 3,900 square
feet, 5 bedrooms, 3.5 baths,
hardwood & tile floors, gor-
geous entry foyer, bui l t-i n
POOL, fenced yard, 3 car gar-
age.
ONE YEAR HOME
WARRANTY INCLUDED.
MLS 13-1932
Tracy Zarola
574-6465
696-0723
DALLAS
PRICE REDUCTION
$109,900
Beautiful home in a lovely set-
ting in the Village of Orange. 2
or 3 bedrooms, 1st floor bed-
room, hardwood flooring, large
eat in kitchen, 1st floor laundry,
2nd floor cedar closet. De-
tached garage, barn style shed
with loft, many upgrades. New
furnace, kitchen floor & re-
cently drilled private well & PIX
plumbing. Dont wait, make
t hi s home your s & enj oy
sereni ty on the back deck.
MLS# 13-283.
Call Donna Cain 947-3824 or
Tony Wasco 855-2424
Weichert Realtors
TradeMark
570-901-1020
DALLAS
Newberry Estate Exceptional
4 bedroom, 3 bath townhouse.
Hardwood floors. Bright & airy
kitchen. Finished lower level
with walk-out to patio. Enjoy
carefree living with swimming,
golf & tennis amenities.
MLS#13-2185. $199,000
Call Geri 570-862-7432
570-696-3801
DALLAS
Spacious Cape Cod in wonder-
ful Back Mountain Develop-
ment. tree lined streets & side-
walks with a country feel. Up-
dated windows & electric.
MLS#13-1913
$185,000
John Shelly
570-702-4162
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
DRUMS
Bright, sunny raised ranch with
beautifully landscaped yard. Cul-
de-sac location. Large oak kitchen
with skylights and beamed ceiling
in dining area. Wood burning fire-
place in the living room. Large Mas-
ter bedroom suite. Family room,
hobby room, huge garage and
deck.
MLS#13-1638
$164,900
Call Mary Ann Desiderio
570-715-7733
Smith Hourigan Group
Mountain Top
570-474-6307
GOULDSBORO
BIG BASS LAKE
REDUCED $120,000.
This large Chalet has a full kit-
chen on the ground floor with
full bath. Great for two families
to share, or in-laws quarters.
In Big Bass Lake Community
with indoor & outdoor pools,
club house, gym & lakefront
beaches. Conveniently loc-
ated near Rts. 380, 435 & 307.
Call Tom cell 516-507-9403
ONE SOURCE REALTY
570-842-3200
Houses For Sale
DUPONT
Reduced
$61,900
424 Simpson St.
Good condition Cape Cod. 3 bed-
room, 1 full bath in quiet neighbor-
hood. For more info and photos vis-
it: www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 12-4357
Brian Harashinski
570-237-0689
DURYEA
Commercial or Residential
Great opportunity to live and work
in the same location OR maintain
current tenant & rent out the store
front! Spacious two floor, 3 bed-
room living quarters with large open
concept commercial/office store
front. Newer roof, separate utilities
&200 AMP electrical service.
$65,000
CALL CHRISTINE
(570) 332-8832
JJ MANTIONE
613-9080
DURYEA
$129,900
136 Pettebone St.
Nice size, 2 bedroom, 2 bath home,
newer roof, vinyl siding, atone front,
replacement windows, fenced in
yard, above ground pool, off street
parking for 4 cars, gas heat, not af-
fected by flood in Sept., 2011.
Owner will look at offers.
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-1805
Call Lu-Ann
570-602-9280
DURYEA
REDUCED
$82,900
226 Church St.
Large 2 story with 3 bedrooms and
2 full baths. Extra large room sizes,
stained glass and natural woodo-
work. Not flooded in 2011. MLS
#13-190. For more information and
photos visit atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Charlie
EDWARDSVILLE
Priced to sell! Charming home
on a nice tree lined street. 3
bedrooms 1 bath, great room
sizes. Large eat in kitchen, 1
bedroom of f ers a wal k i n
closet, hardwood floors in bed-
rooms, 3 year ol d above
ground pool with deck, pool
comes with an extra, brand
new, liner, modern bathroom.
A great home at a great price
just waiting for its new owner.
Sold as is; inspections are for
buyer information only.
MLS #13-2085. $47,900
Call/text Donna Cain
947-3824 or Tony Wasco
570-855-2424
Weichert Realtors
TradeMark
570-901-1020
JENKINS TWP.
$239,000
Updated bi-level with 2nd story
master suite addition features a
jetted tub, separate shower, water
closet & two huge walk in closets!
Lower level has 2nd kitchen & can
function as an in-law suite. Fire-
place in 1st floor family room, all
new windows, central air & corner
lot.
This is a Must See!
Call Christine
332-8822
JJ MANTIONE
613-9080
K
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KINGSTON
SWOYERSVILLE
WILKES-BARRE
LEE PARK
PLYMOUTH
WAPWALLOPEN
SWEET HUNLOCK CREEK
TRUCKSVILLE
Call Jim McCabe to make an appointment
at 570-970-7450
KINGSTON
SWOYERSVILLE
WILKES-BARRE
LEE PARK
PLYMOUTH
WAPWALLOPEN
SWEET VALLEY/
HUNLOCK CREEK
TRUCKSVILLE
LARKSVILLE
WARRIOR RUN
Commercial
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New and used car dealership is now looking for an experienced
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Houses For Sale
DUPONT
Reduced
$61,900
424 Simpson St.
Good condition Cape Cod. 3 bed-
room, 1 full bath in quiet neighbor-
hood. For more info and photos vis-
it: www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 12-4357
Brian Harashinski
570-237-0689
DURYEA
Commercial or Residential
Great opportunity to live and work
in the same location OR maintain
current tenant & rent out the store
front! Spacious two floor, 3 bed-
room living quarters with large open
concept commercial/office store
front. Newer roof, separate utilities
&200 AMP electrical service.
$65,000
CALL CHRISTINE
(570) 332-8832
JJ MANTIONE
613-9080
DURYEA
$129,900
136 Pettebone St.
Nice size, 2 bedroom, 2 bath home,
newer roof, vinyl siding, atone front,
replacement windows, fenced in
yard, above ground pool, off street
parking for 4 cars, gas heat, not af-
fected by flood in Sept., 2011.
Owner will look at offers.
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-1805
Call Lu-Ann
570-602-9280
DURYEA
REDUCED
$82,900
226 Church St.
Large 2 story with 3 bedrooms and
2 full baths. Extra large room sizes,
stained glass and natural woodo-
work. Not flooded in 2011. MLS
#13-190. For more information and
photos visit atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Charlie
EXETER
13 Thomas Street
Handicap accessible. 2 bedroom
rancher with vinyl siding. Modern
kitchen and walk-in shower. Cent-
ral air conditioning. One car gar-
age. 3 season porch. Nice fenced
rear yard.
MLS # 13-2428. $95,000.
Ask for Bob Kopec
Humford Realty, Inc.
570-822-5126.
EXETER
362 Susquehanna Avenue
Completely remodeled, spec-
tacular, 2 story Victorian home,
with 3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths,
new rear deck, full front porch,
tiled baths & kitchen, granite
counter tops. All cherry hard-
wood floors throughout, all new
stainless steel appliances &
lighting. New oil furnace, wash-
er/dryer in first floor bath.
Great neighborhood, nice yard.
$174,900 (30 year loan,
$8,750 down, $739/month, 30
years @ 3.25%)
NOT IN FLOOD
Call Bob at
570-654-1490
WALSH REAL ESTATE
Houses For Sale
EXETER
$64,900
1156 Wyoming Ave.
Large home with 4 bedrooms, yard
with detached 2 car garage, private
yard. Home needs a little updating
but a great place to start!
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-865
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
FORTY FORT
1426 Wyoming Ave.
REDUCED $189,900
You will fall in love with the grand
Victorian with magnificent entry foy-
er, modern ki t chen wi t h new
counter tops, enclosed 3 season
side and rear porch. Renovated
large front porch, off street parking
and so much more! Property could
also be Professional office in home
use.
MUST SEE. MLS 12-3604
Jay A. Crossin
Extension 23
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
GLEN LYON
194-196 E. Main St.
Large home with mother in law
suite that can either be open to the
rest of the house or closed off with
its own entrance and used as an
apartment. This home has vinyl sid-
ing, newer electrical, replacement
windows, large yard and 2 car gar-
age. Home offer a 1st floor master
and bath, 3 fireplaces and tons of
room. Come check out all the pos-
sibilities for yourself.
MLS 13-2419
$87,500
John Polifka
570-704-6846
FIVE MOUNTAINS REALTY
570-542-2141
GLEN LYON
Large 5 bdrm, 2-1/2 bath
move-in condition home with
Home Warranty included. 3rd
floor has separate heat, small
kitchen and can greatly en-
hance home as bonus area or
rental income. Zoning is R-2.
MLS# 13-2241
$59,900
Call Dana Distasio
474-9801
GOULDSBORO
BIG BASS LAKE
REDUCED $120,000.
This large Chalet has a full kit-
chen on the ground floor with
full bath. Great for two families
to share, or in-laws quarters.
In Big Bass Lake Community
with indoor & outdoor pools,
club house, gym & lakefront
beaches. Conveniently loc-
ated near Rts. 380, 435 & 307.
Call Tom cell 516-507-9403
ONE SOURCE REALTY
570-842-3200
LEHMAN TWP.
477 Trojan Road
Nice 3 bedroom modular, 2
baths, finished basement. All
on six country acres
Offered @ $139,500
Call Jim for details
TOWNE & COUNTRY REAL
ESTATE CO.
735-8932 542-5708
Houses For Sale
HANOVER
Ideal location in Hanover Township.
Close to high school and shopping.
This duplex offers a new furnace,
newer roof, most replacement win-
dows, large yard, garage with work
area and off-street parking for a
great price. MLS# 13-757
$55,000 Call Cindy King 570-690-
2689 www.cindykingre.com
570-675-5100
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
209 Constitution Avenue
$269,900
Meticulously maintained 4 bed-
room, 2 story, vinyl sided, 5
year old home situated on a
generous lot. Large, modern
kitchen, 3 baths, 1st floor fam-
ily room, 2 car garage, deck
and soooo much mor e!
MLS#11- 2429
Call Florence Keplinger @
715-7737
Smith Hourigan Group
570-474-6307
HANOVER TWP
291 Vanessa Drive
Scenic view of the Wyoming
Valley. Located at the end of a
nice private road. Minutes to
Wyoming Valley Country Club,
Industri al Park & school s.
Close to Rtes. 81 & 309. Cus-
tom bui l t, 4 bedrooms & 4
baths. 1st floor family room
with wood burning fireplace.
formal dining room off the liv-
ing room. 1st floor laundry,
large enclosed patio with tile
floor, hardwood floors on first &
second f l oors. Large t wo
vehicle garage. Lower level re-
creation room with bar, extra
room with coal/wood burning
stove which can be used as
5th bedroom. Lots of closet
space.
Must See to Appreciate
MLS #12-4610
$269,900
Louise Laine 283-9100 x 20
HANOVER TWP.
227 Red Coat Lane
Liberty Hills
An absolutely wonderful, must see,
home with many desirable features
including hardwood, tile & Pergo
st yl e f l oori ng, oak wood t ri m
t hroughout , mast er bat h wi t h
garden tub & 1st floor laundry,
Lower level is A-1 grade including
family room with fantastic gas fire
place, wet bar, 3/4 bath & addition-
al 4th bedroom. The original own-
ers enjoyed this home for 13 years
and now it's your chance.
MLS# 13-2335
$265,000
Call Jim Banos
570-991-1883
For appointment
COLDWELL BANKER
RUNDLE REAL ESTATE
570-474-2340
Houses For Sale
HARVEYS LAKE
PRICE REDUCED! $62,900
22 Wood Street
Nice cottage with lake rights, close
to the public boat dock. New kit-
chen & living room ceilings & insu-
lation just completed. Enjoy this
place during the Summer months
or year round. Recently updated
with new roof & floors.
MLS#12-3820.
Call Pat Doty
394-6901
570-696-2468
HARVEYS LAKE
37 Marina Drive
Immaculate 3BR, 2.5 bath End
Uni t Townhouse! Cherry &
granite eat-in kitchen with ap-
pliances open to living room
with fireplace and sliders to
patio; large dining area & foy-
er; spacious master bedroom
suite; each bedroom has walk-
in closet; A/C; 1st floor laundry;
garage; Beach Membership &
Boat slip available.
Call Rae 570-899-1209
288-9371
HUNLOCK CREEK
Over 36 Acres of trails and views.
This meticulously maintained prop-
erty features 2 Ranch Homes with
Attached Garages, Detached 2-Car
Garage, and ponds. Walk-out base-
ment with coal burner. Additional
30.09 acres can be purchased.
MLS#13-1889
$429,000
Call Cindy King
570-690-2689
570-675-5100
WWW.CINDYKINGRE.COM
JENKINS TWP.
$239,000
Updated bi-level with 2nd story
master suite addition features a
jetted tub, separate shower, water
closet & two huge walk in closets!
Lower level has 2nd kitchen & can
function as an in-law suite. Fire-
place in 1st floor family room, all
new windows, central air & corner
lot.
This is a Must See!
Call Christine
332-8822
JJ MANTIONE
613-9080
NANTICOKE
West Green St.
Nice 2 bedroom ranch style
home, gas heat, finished base-
ment, vinyl siding, deck. Move
in condition.
Reduced to $69,500
Call Jim
TOWNE &
COUNTRY
REAL ESTATE
570-735-8932
570-542-5708
K
PAGE 4D Wednesday, July 10, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Houses For Sale
JENKINS TWP.
46 Old Mill Road
Stunning English Tudor in a desir-
able neighborhood. Modern kit-
chen with cherry cabinets, stain-
less steel appliances, island with
Jenn air and tile floor. Separate
glass surrounded breakfast room.
Family room with gas fireplace, and
hardwood floors. Formal dining
room with bay window. French
doors throughout. Master bedroom
suite with master bath, walk-in
closet and separate sitting room.
Lower level rec-room and office.
Two car garage. Pi ttston Area
School Di stri ct.
MLS#13-1076
Price Reduced
$298,000
Call
Sandra Gorman:
570-696-5408
Smith Hourigan Group
570-696-1195
KINGSTON
This 3 bedroom, 4 bath brick
town home offers a spacious
floor plan, high ceilings, re-
cessed lighting & rich hard-
wood floors. Cherry cabinets,
a large island, granite coun-
ters, stainless steel appliances
& over sized sink highlight the
kitchen. Corian counters &
European style tile & vanities
accent the baths. Finished
lower level (above ground).
2nd floor has new hardwood
Brazilian cherry floors. New
landscaped patio, all fenced in.
$279,900.
Call Ruth K Smith
570-696-5411
Smith Hourigan Group
570-696-1195
KINGSTON
$139,900
129 S. Dawes Ave.
Three bedroom, 2 bath cape
cod with central air, new win-
dows, doors, carpets and tile
floor. Full concrete basement
with 9' ceilings. Walking dis-
tance to Wilkes Barre. Electric
and Oil heat. MLS #12-3283.
For more information and
p h o t o s v i s i t
www. at l as r eal t y i nc . c om
Call Tom
570-262-7716
KINGSTON
$139,900
129 S. Dawes Ave.
Three bedroom, 2 bath cape cod
wi th central ai r, new wi ndows,
doors, carpets and tile floor. Full
concrete basement with 9' ceilings.
Walking distance to Wilkes Barre.
Electric and Oil heat. MLS #12-
3283. For more information and
photos visit:
www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Tom 570-262-7716
KINGSTON
58 1st Avenue
Reduced to sell fast. Quiet,
convenient street. 3 bedroom,
1 1/2 bath. Finished family
room, modern t hroughout.
MLS#11-3245. $148, 000
Call Joe Gilroy
Gilroy Real Estate
570-288-1444
570-690-0394
LAFLIN
New Price
$124,900
111 Laflin Road
Nice 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath Split
Level home with hardwood
fl oors, 1 car garage, l arge
yard and covered patio in very
convenient location. Great curb
appeal and plenty of off street
parking. Rt. 315 to light @
Laflin Rd. Turn west onto Laflin
Rd. Home is on left.
For more info and photos
visit: www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 12-2852
Keri Best
570-885-5082
Houses For Sale
KINGSTON
561 MERCER AVE.
This roomy 2-Story includes a
modern kitchen & bath, living &
dining rooms, 3 bedrooms & a
family room in the lower-level.
The yard is small, but there is
generous off-street parking.
Enjoy the outdoors from your
15 x 10 two-tier deck, or the
new front porch. This home in-
cludes 2 free-standing gas
stoves. For more details & to
view the photos online, go to:
www.prudentialrealestate.com
& enter PRU8N9T9 i n the
Home Search.
Listed at $94,500.
MLS#13-1538.
Call today to
schedule a private showing.
Mary Ellen Belchick 696-6566
Walter Belchick 696-2600
KINGSTON
MUST SEE THIS
KINGSTON GEM!
Charming three bedroom 2
story featuring pretty living
room. Formal dining room.
New ki tchen wi th stai nl ess
steel appliances. Beautiful
hardwood floors. Great third
f l oor mul t i -purpose bonus
room! Gas heat. Charming
front porch. Pri vate dri ve
provides plenty of off street
parking. Call Ruthie for an
appointment today!
MLS #13-754
$111,900
714-6110
Smith Hourigan Group
287-1196
KINGSTON TWP.
Bodle Road
2 story older home with up-
gr aded ki t chen & bat h,
Large living room, formal
dining room, lower level fam-
ily room. Hot water heat,
garage & carport. 1.1 acre
lot.
MLS #13-2320
$150,000
Besecker Realty
675-3611
KINGSTON
80 James St.
This stately 4 bedroom, 1.5 bath
Ki ngston home has the WOW
factor! Meticulously well cared for
with old world touches throughout.
Like a stained glass window, built
ins and tiled fireplace in living room.
Kitchen is modern eat in with wash-
er/dryer closet for convenience.
Large front porch, rear deck and
detached garage.
MLS 13-1761
$289,000
Jay A. Crossin
Extension #23
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
LAFLIN
PRICE REDUCED!
OAKWOOD PARK
If you like comfort & charm, youll
love this sparkling 4,100 + sq. ft. 5
bedroom, 4 bath two story tradition-
al home in perfect condition in a
great neighborhood. Nothing to do
but move right in. Offers formal liv-
ing & dining rooms, 1st floor family
room with fireplace, granite counter
tops in kitchen & baths, lower level
recreation room with fireplace &
wet bar.
MLS #13-549
Only $309,900
Barbara Metcalf
570-696-0883
570-696-380
SUGARLOAF
$309,000
Beautiful home in a beautiful
location. 2003 custom built
Cape Cod offers 4.89 cleared
acres. Heated in ground pool,
3 full baths, 1st floor master
bedroom & laundry & an mod-
ern kitchen. 2 car attached
gar- age wi th bonus room
above. Close to Humboldt In-
dus- trial Park & Eagle Rock
Resort. MLS# 13-894.
Call Donna Cain 947-3824 or
Tony Wasco 855-2424
Weichert Realtors
Trade Mark
570-901-1020
Houses For Sale
LAFLIN
3 bedroom Bi-Level situated on
lovely lot with formal dining
room, lower level family room
with gas fireplace, central air,
conven- iently located to inter-
states & Casino.
A Must See!
MLS #13-1100
$187,500
Marie Montante
881-0103
288-9371
LAFLIN
Impressive home with quality
construction. Two floors of liv-
ing space. double corner lot,
central air. Two complete kit-
chens, l i vi ng/di ni ng rooms.
Each bedroom has pri vate
bath. Lovely back yard with in
ground pool in need of repairs,
enclosed sun room, lots of
storage, and many other fea-
tures.
MLS#12-1441
$229,000
Call Nancy Answini
570-237-5999
JOSEPH P. GILROY
REAL ESTATE
570-288-1444
LAFLIN
$229,000
7 Concord Drive
Beautifully maintained 2 story
in Oakwood Park. 3 bedrooms,
2.5 baths with 2 car garage
and private rear yard. Mature
landscaping, gas/electric heat
with central air.
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-2215
Call Charlie
LAFLIN
$254,900
24 Fordham Road
Great Split Level in Oakwood Park,
Laflin. 13 rooms, 4 bedrooms, 2 1/2
baths. 2 car garage and l arge
corner lot. Lots of space for the
large or growing family.
www. atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-452
Call Charlie
LARKSVILLE
$149,900
511 E. State St.
Everythi ng you need i s i n thi s
house. 4 bedrooms, lower level
family room, den open, living/din-
ing room, nice yard with above
ground pool and covered patio, ex-
tra parking. 1 car garage. Very well
maintained home. Move right in!
MLS 13-2432
CALL COLLEEN
570-883-7594
MOOSIC
REDUCED
$87,500
R. 1104 Springbrook
Cape Cod home with endless
possibilities. 3-4 bedroom, 1
bath, central air, plenty of stor-
age. Enclosed porch, garage
with carport. Situated on 3 lots.
Di recti ons: 1-81, Exi t 180
Moosic (Rt. 11) L. onto 502,
straight 1/2 mile. Turn R onto
8th St., up hill, turn left, house
3rd on right.
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-607
Call Keri Best
570-885-5082
WARRIOR RUN
2 story, 2 bedroom with fenced in
yard, al l appl i ances i ncl uded.
$51, 900 Cal l Ed Appnel
570-817-2500
WALSH REAL ESTATE
570-654-1490
Houses For Sale
NANTICOKE
1210 S. Hanover St.
Large 3 bedroom 1 bath home with
a big yard. Possible off street park-
ing in the back off the alley. This
home has replacement windows on
the second floor and awnings over
the windows. This will be a great
home with a little TLC.
MLS# 13-2093
$59,900
John Polifka
570-704-6846
FIVE MOUNTAINS REALTY
570-542-2141
NANTICOKE
393 E. Noble St.
Check out this 4 bedroom, 1.5 bath
home with 1 car detached garage.
This home features a Jacuzzi tub,
newer roof, furnace, hot water heat-
er, replacement windows, fenced
yard and large covered deck.
MLS 13-613
$77,900
Call John Polifka
570-704-6846
FIVE MOUNTAINS REALTY
570-542-2141
NANTICOKE
Modern, well maintained 4 bed-
room home in move in condition.
Covered patio, in ground pool,
private fenced yard, ductless air,
vinyl siding. Immaculate!
MLS# 13-534
REDUCED TO $149,900
Call Ann Marie Chopick
760-6769
288-6554
NANTICOKE
$124,500
WOW A MODERN RANCH! King
size brick Ranch located on the
outskirts of Nanticoke, Open floor
plan with large sunny sunken living
room, tiled kitchen, formal dining
room 3 bedrooms. Bath with tiled
garden tub and glass shower. Fin-
ished lower level with fireplace, 3/4
bath with laundry area and carport.
Newer roof, furnace and electrical.
Newly landscaped back yard. Prop-
erty is a Must See!
MLS 12-4107
Michele Hopkins
570-540-6046
PITTSTON
$134,900
15 High St.
Well kept newly remodeled, 2 story
home, with modern kitchen, central
air, new triple pane replacement
windows and custom made blinds
for each window. Home is in move
in condition, with plaster walls and
design ceilings, plus much, much
more. A MUST SEE!
MLS 13-1088
Fred Mecadon
570-817-5792
PITTSTON
$64,900
62 Pine St.
Enjoy the warm weather in this
3 bedroom, 1 bathroom home
with great curb appeal, sun
room and patio. New roof and
newer windows.(Traveling N.
on Main St. Pittston turn R.
onto Pine St., home is on left).
MLS 13-1897
Call Keri Best
570-885-5082
PLAINS
$57,500
13 Warner St.
Move in ready starter home
with off street parking, fenced
yard, and a large deck! MLS
13-1862
Kevin Sobilo
570-817-0706
Houses For Sale
PITTSTON
PRICE REDUCTION
$169,900
69 Curtis St.
Spacious 3 bedrooms home, re-
built in 1980 with 2 full baths and a
3/4 master bath. Private pool area
with brand new liner, 2 car garage
with 1/2 bath and full 2nd story for
hobby room, etc. Located at the
end of dead end street, affords lots
of privacy.
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-2079
Call Charlie
PITTSTON
REDUCED
$106,900
67 Carroll St.
The WOW factor! Move right in and
enjoy this renovated home with no
worries! 3 bedrooms with lots of
closet space. 2 full baths including
a 4 piece master bath with custom
tile work, open floor plan with mod-
ern kitchen with island, corner lot
with off street parking and nice
yard. Come and take a look!
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-863
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
PITTSTON
REDUCED $109,000
25 Swallow St.
Grand 2 story home with Vic-
torial features, large eat in kit-
chen with laundry, 3/4 bath on
first floor, 2nd bath with claw
foot tub, lots of closet space.
Move in ready, off street park-
ing in rear. MLS 12-3926
Call Colleen
570-883-7594
PITTSTON
PENDING
Reduced $99,900
328 S. Main St.
3 story Victorial with 10 rooms, 4
bedrooms, 2 baths, 2 car garage
with newer driveway. Central air,
large yard. MLS 13-1073
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
Call Tom
570-262-7716
PLAINS
REDUCED
$199,900
4 Spruce Ave.
BIRCHWOOD HILLS
3 bedrooms, 3 baths. Hardwood
floors, central air. Finished base-
ment with fireplace, great yard, su-
per location. MLS 13-1251
www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Tom 570-262-7716
PLAINS TWP
$189,900
20 Nittany Lane
Affordable 3 level townhome fea-
tures 2 car garage, 3 bedrooms,
3.5 baths, lower level patio and up-
per level deck, gas fireplace, cent-
ral air and vac and stereo system
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-871
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
S. WILKES-BARRE
$105,000
43 Richmont Ave.
Near Riverside Park. Motiv-
ated seller, make reasonable
offer. 3 bedroom, 2 bath Cape
Cod, central air, hardwood
f l oor, above ground pool ,
f enced yard.
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-789
Tom Salvaggio
570-262-7716
Houses For Sale
SHICKSHINNY
2 story home in Huntington
Township offers quiet country
living. Living room, den, dining
room, eat in kitchen. 3 bed
rooms, bonus room, full bath. 2
car garage situated on 1.12
acres. Lower portion of rear
yard abuts Huntington Creek.
Part of property is in a Flood
Zone but not the structure.
MLS #13-2799
$105,900
Patsy Bowers
570-204-0983
Strausser
Real Estate
570-759-3300
SHICKSHINNY LAKE
Choice Location
A most unique & desirable
lakefront property. This is an
opportunity to
purchase a centrally situated
lot with an unmatched view of
this beautiful lake. If you are
looking for that special build-
ing site, this is it!
MLS# 11-1269
$159,900
Call Dale Williams
Five Mountains Realty
570-256-3343
SHICKSHINNY
ROSS TWP.
Very nice, totally remodeled Bi-
Level with 3 bedrooms,1.75
baths and partially finished
lower level on a nice country
lot in Lake Lehman School Dis-
trict.
MLS#13-2754
Call Ken Williams
570-542-8800
Five Mountains
Real Estate
570-542-2141
SUGAR NOTCH
113 Hemlock Street
3 huge bedrooms, with closet
space, 2 full modern tiled bath-
rooms, modern kitchen featur-
ing Mickey Mouse trim, tiled
floors and a breakfast counter,
and modern half bath off of
kitchen, back porch/deck and
yard leads to parking in rear on
corner lot. $72,772.
MLS# 13-2630
Call Vieve 474-6307 ex. 2772
Smith Hourigan Group
SUGAR NOTCH
127 Hemlock Street
Deep 40x170 lot, with room for
good parking in the rear. Sur-
round yourself in the warmth of
hardwood floors trim and pock-
et doors. Closet in each bed-
room, original vintage bath-
room wi t h cl oset and t ub.
$59, 900. MLS# 12-3049
Call Vieve 570-474-6307
ex. 2772
Smith Hourigan Group
WAPWALLOPEN
359 Pond Hill
Mountain Road
4 bedroom home features a great
yard with over 2 acres of property.
Situated across from a playground.
Needs some TLC but come take a
look, you wouldnt want to miss out.
There is a pond at the far end of
the property that is used by all sur-
rounding neighbors. This is an es-
tate and is being sold as is. No
sellers property disclosure. Will en-
tertain offers in order to settle es-
tate. MLS 11-962
$49,900
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
Houses For Sale
SWOYERSVILLE
Great investment property. On
corner lot. Close to all major
hi ghways & conveni ences.
Bring all offers. 1 unit needs to
be updated & you are all done.
MLS #13-1983
$160,000
Call Pat Doty at
570-394-6901
570-696-2468
SWOYERSVILLE
$119,900
115 Hemlock St.
Lots of updates in this roomy Cape
Cod in a desirable neighborhood.
Large eat in kitchen with new floor-
ing. Finished basement with theat-
er/rec room. Large l evel yard.
Pri ced to sel l !
MLS 12-4231
Call Kevin Sobilo
570-817-0706
SWOYERSVILLE
STEEPLECHASE
50 Grandville Drive
Outstanding 3 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath
townhouse out of the flood zone.
Formal dining room, family room,
master bedroom sui te, pri vate
guest suite also on upper level.
Central air and central vacuum.
Deck, garage + many extras.
Freshly painted and carpeted, so
move right in!
$169,900
MLS # 13-195.
Ask for Bob Kopec
Humford Realty Inc
570-822-5126
PENN LAKE
This pristine 2 year old log
home is truly an amazing ex-
perience. No expense spared
and the immaculate design in-
cludes, energy efficient Geo-
Thermal heating system, su-
perior wall foundation, 5-inch
wide hardwood plank floors,
42-inch kitchen cabinets, cus-
tom designed quartz counter
top, built-in finished 2 car gar-
age. To top it all off, it sits in a
perfect, private location.
MLS# 13-2048
$349,000
Robert Altmayer
570-793-7999
RUNDLE
REAL ESTATE
570-474-2340
TRUCKSVILLE
Elegance & comfort combine
to give you all you dream of.
1st floor mater,guest suite with
full bath,fabulous breakfast
r oom over l ooki ng pr i vat e
wooded yard. Plenty of built ins
and plantation shutters give
this home wonderful character.
MLS#13-2678
$459,000
Tracy Zarola
570-574-6465
570-696-0723
WEST PITTSTON
MULTI-FAMILY
Two houses for the price of
one! Two story i n front &
double-wide in rear. Great for 2
families or investor opportunity.
Off street parking & NOT in
flood zone. MLS #13-97.
$139,000
Call Cindy King Today!
570-690-2689
www.cindykingre.com
K
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Wednesday, July 10, 2013 PAGE 5D
Commercial
80003008
Rentals
Maple Manor
A Quality Manufactured Housing Community
New and Pre-Owned Homes for Sale!
Rentals Available
Select Homes for Lease with Option to Purchase
Financing Available to Qualified Buyers
18 William Street,
Taylor, Pa. 18517
Rental Office: 570-562-1931
www.umh.com
Licensed by the Pa. Dept. of Banking NMLS 200331
Autos For Sale
80002979
Houses For Sale
WEST PITTSTON
$109,900
214 Fremont St.
Very well cared for 3 bedroom
home in move in condition. Large
eat in kitchen, nice yard, freshly
painted bedrooms with new carpet.
Newer windows. Not Flooded
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-2032
Colleen Turant
570-237-0415
WEST WYOMING
Delightful 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath
Cape Cod in charming neigh-
borhood i s yours f or onl y
$115,000. Offers oversized liv-
ing room, modern kitchen with
breakfast room, and 1st floor
master bedroom.
Don't miss this one!
MLS #13-2722
Call Barbara Metcalf
570-696-0883
570-696-3801
WEST WYOMING
$74,500
384 Tripp St.
3 bedroom, 1 bath, 2 story with
large kitchen, dining room and liv-
ing room. Private rear yard, nice
neighborhood gas heat.
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-2179
Call Charlie
WEST WYOMING
Reduced - $89,900
1565 Shoemaker Avenue
Well taken care of Cape Cod with 3
bed, 1 bath, hardwood floors, de-
tached 1 car garage. MLS 13-2280
www.atlas realtyinc.com
Tom Salvaggio
570-262-7716
WHITE HAVEN
NEW LISTING
211 Wilkes-Barre Street
Enjoy this 2 story, 3 bedroom,
2 bath home. Recently up-
dated! Large living room with
stone fireplace. Eat-in kitchen
with new stove Large 1st floor
family room directly off the kit-
chen area with sliding glass
door to backyard. 2 car gar-
age with loft area for a great
workshop or additional living
space when finished. Addition-
al access to backyard alley.
From Mountain Top take 437
to White Haven, LEFT on the
Wilkes-Barre Street. White
Haven is 17 miles from Wilkes-
Barre and 4 miles from I-476
and I-80 interchange.
MLS # 13-2054
$109,900
Craig Yarrish
696-6554
696-2600
WHITE HAVEN
501 Birch Lane
Beautiful 4 bedroom, 3 bath. Enjoy
the amenities of a private lake,
boating, basketball courts, etc. The
home has wood floors and carpet-
ing throughout. French doors in the
kitchen that lead you out to the
large rear deck for entertaining.
The backyard has 2 utility sheds for
storage. MLS 12-1695
NEW PRICE
$174,900
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
Houses For Sale
WILKES-BARRE
PRICE REDUCED
$49,900
735 N. Washington Street
Spacious 2 story, 3 bedrooms with
2 car detached garage, good
starter home, needs TLC. MLS
#12-3887. For more information
and photos visit:
www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Tom 570-262-7716
WILKES-BARRE
37 Flick Street
Nice 2 possibly 3 bedroom home
with a large driveway and garage.
This home has a newer kitchen and
a full bath with laundry area on the
1st floor. There is a nice yard and
deck for your outside enjoyment.
There is a newer furnace and roof
also. Come and check it out.
MLS# 13-2103
$41,000
John Polifka
570-704-6846
FIVE MOUNTAINS REALTY
570-542-2141
WILKES-BARRE
PRICE REDUCTION
Charming 1,000+ sq. ft. 2 bedroom,
1/1/2 bath with separate driveway
on a quiet street. Lower level was
finished for former business - has
separate entrance, 1/2 bath & elec-
tric baseboard heat (not included in
total sq. ft).
MLS #13-1592 $49,000
Dana Distasio
570-715-9333
570-474-9801
WILKES-BARRE
75 Mercedes Drive
Beautifully kept split level in
desirable Barney Farms. 3 car
attached garage, fin- ished
basement & at t i c. Land-
scaped lot, covered deck with
custom pul l down shades.
Hard- wood living room, form-
al dining room both freshly
painted, cathedral ceilings in
living room & kitchen. Full wet
bar in fin- ished basement,
walk out patio for your
parties/cookouts.
Option to Rent.
MLS#12-1874
Ann Devereaux
570-212-2038
Classic Properties
570-587-7000
790 Northern Blvd.
Clarks Summit, PA 18411
WILKES-BARRE
$174,900
105 Plymouth Ave.
This lovely Bi-level home fea-
tures 3 bedrooms, 1 and 1/2
bathrooms, in ground pool with
pool bar and deck, central air.
Hardwood floors, gas fireplace,
finished lower level, fenced in
yard and 2 year garage with
ONE YEAR HOME WAR-
RANTY. (directions: Old RIver
Road to Dagobert, at 2nd stop
sign turn R onto Plymouth Ave.
Home is on left in 2nd block)
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-2144
Keri Best 570-885-5082
WILKES-BARRE
$99,900
77 Schuler St.
NOTHING to do but move right
in! This home has everything
you need...3 bedrooms, 2.5
baths, large fenced in yard,
screened in porch, off street
parking, quiet neighborhood.
Home recently remodeled in-
side & out. www.atlas
realtyinc.com. MLS 13-467
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
Houses For Sale
WILKES-BARRE
RIVER SIDE PARK
29 Amherst Street
A Charming, move-in ready
double. This well-kept home is
a must see. Spacious living
room and dining room, 3 bed-
rooms and 1.5 baths. 3rd floor
is a walk-up attic with 3 rooms
that can be converted into ex-
tra l i vi ng space. Off-street
parking for 2 cars. Offered at
$44,900. MLS#13-990.
Matt Hodorowski
570-714-9229
570-288-9371
WILKES-BARRE
$72,500
319 N. Washington Street.
Large 3 story home with 3 bed-
rooms of each of the 2nd and 3rd
floors. Hardwood floors in living
room and dining room, gas heat,
first floor laundry. 1 3/4 baths, large
eat in kitchen, central vac, alarm
system, low taxes.
MLS 13-2348
CALL COLLEEN
WYOMING
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday, June 30, 12-1:30
Great income in this 4 unit apt.
building plus building lot in
lovely setting on almost an
acre. Two-2 BR apartments,
and two-1 BR apartments.
MLS 12-4538
Call Nancy Answini
570-237-5999
GILROY REAL ESTATE
570-288-1444
YATESVILLE
$129,900
617 Willowcrest Dr.
End unit. 2 bedroom town-
home with master bath on 2nd
floor. Needs a little TLC.
MLS 13-569
Call Tom
570-262-7716
YATESVILLE
$159,900
12 Reid St.
Spacious Bi-level home in semi
private location with private back
yard, 3 season room, gas fireplace
in lower level family room. Re-
cently updated kitchen, 4 bed-
r ooms, 1 3/ 4 bat hs, gar age.
www. at l asr eal t yi nc. com
MLS 13-1949
Call Charlie
Houses For Sale
YATESVILLE
$169,900
603 Willowcrest Dr.
Super end unit townhouse, no fees.
2 bedrooms, 3 baths, central air,
electric heat, cathedral ceiling with
skylights. Large family room with
propane stove and its own duct-
less air. MLS 13-482
Call Tom 570-262-7716
Land (Acreage)
BEAR CREEK
LOT FOR SALE
Wonderful opportunity! Beautiful
3.45 acre wooded building lot for
your new home. Has a 200 front-
age on a paved road. Lot needs
well and septic. $37,500
MLS#13-157
Call Mary Ann Desiderio
570-715-7733
SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP
MOUNTAIN TOP
570-474-6307
Earth Conservancy
Land For Sale
Price Reduction
61 +/- Acres Nuangola
$88,000
46 +/- Acres Hanover Twp.
$69,000
Highway Commercial KOZ
Hanover Twp. 3+/-
Acres 11 +/- Acres
Wilkes-Barre Twp. Acreage
Zoned R-3
Sugar Notch Lot $11,800
See Additional Land for Sale
at:
www.earthconservancy.org
Call: 570-823-3445
LAFLIN
$32,900
Lot#9 Pinewood Dr
Build your new home in a great
neighborhood. Convenient loc-
ation near highways, airport,
casino and shopping
156 x 110 x 150 x 45
DIRECTIONS Rt 315 to laflin
Rd; make left off Laflin Rd onto
Pinewood Dr. Lot is on corner
of Pinewood Dr. and Hickory-
wood Dr. MLS 13-23
atlasrealtyinc.com
Call Keri Best
570-885-5082
LAFLIN
$99,500
2.44 acres of land zoned R-3 for
townhouse or could be used for
single family building lots (with ap-
proval). Public water and sewer
available. www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-1389
Call Charlie
LEHMAN
9 Acres on Lehman Outlet
Road. 470 front, over 1,000
deep. Wooded. $125,000. Call
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
MOUNTAIN TOP
VACANT LAND
2.87 wooded acres located in the
Ice Lakes MLS #13-1498 $89,900
Call Evelyn Hogan 262-5956
570-474-9801
MOUNTAIN TOP
S. Main St. & S. Church Rd.
Alberts Corners
Property for Sale
3.5 Commercially
Zoned Acres
Owner 011-44-7741870497
Susan 570-441-3909
NEWPORT TWP.
LOTS - LOTS-LOTS
1 mile south of L.C.C.C. Estab-
lished development with under-
ground utilities including gas.
Cleared lot. 100 frontage x
158. $30,500.
Lot 210 frontage 158 deep on
hill with great view $30,500.
Call 570-736-6881
SHAVERTOWN
Beautiful 1 acre building lot
located in established back
Mountain sub-division. Buy
now and start building your
dream home in the spring. Lot
has underground utilities, pub-
lic sewer and private well.
MLS #13-137. $62,400
Christine Pieczynski, 696-6569
Prudential
Poggi & Jones
REALTORS
Land (Acreage)
SHICKSHINNY
23+/- acres of wooded land and
farmland with barn in good condi-
tion and a nice travel trailer. Well
on property.
MLS#12-2572
$115,000
Ken Williams
542-8800
Five Mountains Realty
542-2141
SHICKSHINNY LAKE
Choice Location. Central water,
low ($140) association dues.
Priced to sell!
MLS# 11-1269
$159,900
Call Dale Williams
Five Mountains Realty
570-256-3343
SHICKSHINNY LAKE
Build your dream home on this at-
tractive 1.2 acre level lot with lake
privileges. Priced to sell. HOA FEE
IS $140 YEARLY.
MLS#13-40
$50,000
Call Barbara Metcalf
570-696-0883
LEWITH & FREEMAN
REAL ESTATE, INC
570-696-3801
WYOMING/EXETER
BUILDING LOTS
FOR SALE
$35,000 - $39,900
Build your new home here. 2
new developments, prices
range from $35,000 to
$39,900. Public water sewer
& gas available. NOT in flood
zone. Lot sizes range from
50x100 to 80x105. www.at-
lasrealtyinc.com
CALL CHARLIE
Lots
DALLAS TOWNSHIP
2 acres $39,900 or 7 acres
$89,900, blacktop road,
soil-tested and approved for
building. Nice woods, great
views, wide frontage, great
property/neighborhood for
kids, #1 rated Dallas School
District. Call 570-245-6288
DUPONT
Two lots, 80 x 140, sewage &
water. $15,000 each.
570-466-2468
EAGLE ROCK RESORT
99 Chestnut Drive
Wooded level buildable lot in
Four Seasons resort wi t h
Membership. Home owners
association fee of $620 a year.
Wi thi n wal ki ng di stance of
Choctow Lake. An amazing
quick sale price of $11,500.
MLS#13-1426.
Call Vieve
570-474-6307 Ext. 2772
Smith Hourigan Group
Jenkins Township
Lot for Sale on Cul-De-Sac in
Hi ghl and Hi l l s. 0.88 Acres.
$65,000. Call, 570-947-3375
WEST WYOMING
Fifth Street Manor
Two building lots in beautiful,
established development. Call
for information.
570-814-1316
Apartments /Townhouses
SHICKSHINNY
(1 mile north of town) Effi-
ciency, on Rte. 11. Includes
heat, air, garbage, satellite TV
& water. Coin-op washer/dry er
available. Tenant pays electric.
$575/ month + security. Appli-
ances. Plenty of parking.
570-793-9530
Back Mountain
2 bedroom, large modern eat in kit-
chen, bath, carpeting, large deck,
ample parking, No Pets. $595.
570-696-1866
DALLAS
HI-MEADOWS APARTMENTS
1075 Memorial Hwy.
Low & Moderate Income
Elderly Rentals Include:
*Electric Range &
Refrigerator
*Off Street Parking
*Community Room
*Coin Operated
Laundry
*Elevator.
*Video Surveillance
Applications Accepted
by Appointment
570-675-5944
8 a.m. - 4 p.m.
TDD Only,
1-800-654-5984
Voice Only,
1-800-654-5988
Handicap Accessible
Equal Housing Opportunity
KINGSTON
3 bedroom, 1.5 bath, 1st floor
laundry, very clean, all new in-
side. $850. 1st, last month
rent & security. Call
570-817-0601
Apartments /Townhouses
DALLAS
MEADOWS
APARTMENTS
220 Lake St.
Housing for the elderly & mo-
bility impaired; all utilities in-
cluded. Federally subsidized
program. Extremely low in-
come persons encouraged to
appl y. I ncome l ess t han
$12, 450. 570- 675- 6936
TDD 800-654-5984
8 am-4 pm, Mon-Fri.
Equal Housing Opportunity
Handicap Accessible
DALLAS
New 3 Bedroom, 2 l/2 Bath
townhouse, Hardwood floors,
eat in kitchen, 1st floor laundry
room, Deck off kitchen, off
street parking, No Pets, No
Smoking. $1350.00/month plus
utilities. Call Geri:
570-862-7432
LEWITH & FREEMAN
570-696-3801
EDWARDSVILLE
Spacious, luxurious, 2 bed-
rooms, 2nd floor, off street
parking. Brand new, high en-
ergy efficient windows & stove.
Washer/dryer hook up & dish-
washer. $650/month + utilities,
1 year lease, security, refer-
ences & credit check. No pets,
non smoking. Not approved for
Section 8. Call Rudy at
570-288-6889
FORTY FORT
2nd floor, 2 bedroom, wall to
wall carpeting, tile bathroom,
stove, refrigerator & dishwash-
er furni shed. Washer/dryer
hook up, off street parking, use
of yard & porches. Heat, pub-
lic water, sewer & recycling fur-
nished by landlord. No pets. 1
year lease, 1st month rent &
security required on signing.
$700/month.
570-655-0530
FORTY FORT
2nd floor, 1 bedroom apt.
$400 plus security & lease.
Call 570-814-8876
FORTY FORT
Large apartment, 2nd floor, 1
bedroom 1 bath, living room,
kitchen. All appliances, includ-
ing washer/dryer. Water/sew-
er paid. Off street parking, fire-
place. Convenient location.
$600/month + security. No
pets and no smoking. Call Don
at 570-814-5072.
GLEN LYON
1 bedroom, 2nd floor apt. Liv-
ing room, kitchen, full bath,
heat, hot water & garbage fee
included. Tenant pays electric.
$575/ month + security.
Call or text 201-304-3469
HANOVER TWP
Lee Park Avenue
Clean 2 bedroom apartment.
stove, refrigerator, washer/dry-
er & porch. No pet s, no
smoking. $500/month + secur-
ity. References. 570-262-6721
HANOVER TWP.
LEE PARK
Freshly painted, spacious, 3
b e d r o o m , 2 n d f l o o r ,
washer/dryer hook- up in kit-
chen, no pets. $625/month +
utilities, 1st, last & security.
TRADEMARK
REALTY GROUP
570-954-1992
HARVEYS LAKE
1 & 2 bedroom , wall to wall
carpet, appliances, Lake rights.
Off street parking. No pets.
Lease, security and refer-
ences. 570-639-5920
KINGSTON
SDK GREEN
ACRES
HOMES
11 Holiday Drive
A Place To Call Home
Spacious 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom
Apts.
Gas heat included
FREE
24 hr. on-site Gym
Community Room
Swimming Pool
Maintenance FREE
Controlled Access
Patio/Balcony
and much more...
570-288-9019
www.sdkgreen acres.com
Call today for
move-in specials.
Mountain Top
2nd floor. 5 rooms. Sun porch. Wall
t o wal l . Of f st r eet par ki ng.
$750/month - heat, water, sewage
& garbage pai d by owner. NO
PETS! 570-474-5568
Apartments /Townhouses
WILKES-BARRE
Mayflower
Crossing
Apartments
570.822.3968
1, 2, 3 & 4
Bedrooms
- Light & bright open
floor plans
- All major appliances
included
- Pets welcome*
- Close to everything
- 24 hour emergency
maintenance
- Short term leases
available
Call TODAY For
AVAILABILITY!!
www.mayflowercrossing.com
Certain Restrictions Apply*
KINGSTON
1st fl oor, spaci ous, 2 bed-
rooms, dining room, large liv-
ing room with fire place, mod-
ern kitchen and bath, carpet-
ing, garage available, No pets.
$595. 570-696-1866
KINGSTON
E. WALNUT ST.
2nd floor. Located in quiet
neighborhood. Kitchen, living
room, dining room, sunroom,
bath, 3 bedrooms; 2 large & 1
small. Lots of closets, built-in
linen closet & hutch. Hard-
wood & carpeted floors. Fire-
place. Storage room. Yard.
Washer / dryer, stove / fridge.
Heat and hot water included. 1
year lease + security. $950.
570-283-4370
KINGSTON
Huge 1st floor, 1 bedroom with
bath, very large living room.
Equi pped wi t h st and- up
shower. Modern. Off-street
parking. Gas heat, washer/dry-
er hook-up. Excellent Location.
$545+Utilities, Security and
references. 610-568-8363
KINGSTON
116 or 118 Main St.
2nd floor, totally modern & clean, 4
rooms, laundry room, attic, parking.
Wat er , sewer . No pet s. Non
smoking. $575 or $525 + utilities.
570-288-9843
KINGSTON
1st Floor, recently renovated, 2
bedrooms, with washer & dryer
hook-up, $650 per month, plus util-
ities, water and sewer included. Off
street parking. 570-443-0770
KINGSTON
705 Nandy Drive
Modern, clean 2 bedroom, all
appliances, central air & off-
street parking, No pets/ Non-
Smoking. $670/ month + utilit-
ies. 570-696-3915
KINGSTON
Deluxe, quiet, airy 3 bedroom,
2nd floor, 1.5 baths & office. All
appliances, washer/dryer in unit.
Wall-to-wall, C/A, garage, attic, no
pets/no smoking, lease.
570-287-1733
KINGSTON
E. WALNUT ST.
Light, bright, 3rd floor, 2 bed-
rooms, carpeted. entry sys-
tem, garage Extra storage &
cable TV included. Laundry
facilities. Heat & hot water
furnished. Fine neighbor-
hood. Convenient to bus &
stores. No pets. Refer-
ences. Security. Lease. No
smoker s pl ease. $730.
month. Call 570-287-0900
KINGSTON HOUSE
Nice, clean furnished room, starting at
$340. Efficiency at $450 month fur-
nished with all utilities included. Off
street parking. 570-718-0331
LAFLIN
Stunni ng, 3 bedroom town
home with lots of windows, 2.5
baths, living room, dining room
with deck, galley kitchen with
hardwood floors, family room
with patio, yard. Master bed-
room with cathedral ceiling.
New neutral carpeting. Wash-
er/dryer. 1 car garage, central
air. 2,000 sq. ft. $1,350/month.
570-954-2666.
K
PAGE 6D Wednesday, July 10, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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A.R.T.
APPLIANCE
REPAIR
We service all major
brands.
570-639-3001
Building & Remodeling
1ST. QUALITY
CONSTRUCTION
CO.
Roofing, siding, gutters, insulation,
decks, additions, windows, doors,
masonry & concrete.
Insured & Bonded.
Senior Citizens Discount!
State Lic. # PA057320
570-606-8438
ALL OLDER HOMES SPECIALIST
825-4268.
Remodel / Repair.
Kitchens and Baths
www.davejohnson
remodeling.com
Bathrooms/Kitchens
Carpentry A/Z 570-819-0681
FIND OUT HOW
TO BECOME A
MEMBER
OR CALL FOR
A QUALIFIED
CONTRACTOR
Building Industry
Association Of NEPA
411 MAIN ST.,
KINGSTON, PA 18704
Contact:
Janet Campis
www.bianepa.com
570-287-3331
Shedlarski
Construction
Home Improvement Specialist
Licensed, insured & PA registered.
Kitchens, baths, vinyl siding &
railings,replacement
windows & doors,
additions, garages, all phases of
home renovations. Free Estimates
570-287-4067
Chimney Service
A-1 ABLE CHIMNEY
Rebuild & Repair Chimneys. All
types of Masonry.
Liners Installed,
Brick & Block,
Roofs & Gutters.
Licensed & Insured
570-735-2257
CHIMNEY
REPAIRS
Parging. Stucco. Stainless Liners.
Cleanings. Custom Sheet
Metal Shop. 570-383-0644
1-800-943-1515
Call Now!
Cleaning & Maintenance
CONNIE'S CLEANING
15 Years Experience
Bonded & Insured
Residential Cleaning
Gift Certificates Available
570-430-3743
Connie does the cleaning!
LIGHT TO MEDIUM
HOUSECLEANING
for Greater Pittston/Plains
area. Reasonable rates.
Contact Julie 570-655-5009
Concrete & Masonry
A STEP-UP MASONRY
PA094695
Specializing in All Types of
Masonry. Stone, Concrete
Licensed & Insured Free
Estimates Senior Discount
570-702-3225
AAAAAAHH!!!
Why Scream?! Call
UNLIMITED!
MASONRY CONCRETE
CONTRACTORS
call today for your Free Estimate!
570-582-4719
D. PUGH CONCRETE
All phases of masonry &
concrete. Small jobs welcome.
Senior discount. Free est.
Licensed & Insured
288-1701/655-3505
KENS MASONRY
All phases of brick/block,
chimney restoration.
570-204-8601
L & A
CONCRETE
WORKS
Why Live With
Ugly Concrete?
Try Concrete
Resurfacing,
Stamped or Stenciled
Overlays
Licensed & Insured
PA088910
570-840-0803
Concrete & Masonry
WYOMING VALLEY
MASONRY
Concrete, stucco,
foundations, pavers, retaining wall
systems, flagstone, brick work,
chimneys repaired. Senior Citizens
Discount
570-287-4144
or 570-760-0551
Construction & Building
GARAGE
DOOR
Sales, service, installation
and repair.
FULLY INSURED
HIC# 065008
CALL JOE
570-735-8551
Cell 606-7489
Electrical
RNI ELECTRIC, LLC
Licensed & Insured
Retired Veteran
Panel upgrades.
New & old work.
25 Years Experience
570-814-8979
SLEBODA ELECTRIC
Master electrician
Licensed & Insured
Service Changes & Replacements.
Generator Installs.
868-4469
Fencing
ACTION FENCE
SPRING SALE:
Discounts on wood, vinyl,
chain link, aluminum and more!
Call today for a
FREE ESTIMATE!
570-602-0432
Gutter Repair & Cleaning
GUTTER CLEANING
Window Cleaning
Pressure Washing.
Insured. 570-288-6794
Handyman
Evan's Home
Improvement
Lending a hand since 1975.
All types of remodeling
projects!
570-824-6871
Hauling & Trucking
HAULING &
BUYING
JUNK CARS
& TRUCKS
Vito & Ginos
570-288-8995
Hauling & Trucking
A CLEAN
HOUSE IS
A HAPPY
HOUSE!
All KINDS of
HAULING &
JUNK
REMOVAL
SUMMER
CLEAN UP!
TREE/SHRUB REMOVAL
DEMOLITION
ESTATE CLEANOUT
Free Estimates 24 hour service
Small and large jobs!
570-823-1811 570-239-0484
A.S.A.P Hauling
Estate Cleanouts,
Attics, Cellars,
Garages, were cheaper than
dumpsters!.
Free Estimates,
Same Day!
570-855-4588
A.S.A.P HAULING
Estate Cleanouts, Attics,
Cellars, Garages, were
cheaper than dumpsters!.
Free Estimates, Same Day!
570-855-4588
AA CLEANING
A1 Always hauling, cleaning
attics, cellar, garage, one piece
or whole Estate, also available
10 & 20 yard dumpsters. 655-
0695 592-1813 or 287-8302
AAA CLEANING
A1 General Hauling
Cleaning attics, cellars, garages,
Demolitions, Roofing & Tree Re-
moval. Free Est. 779-0918 or 542-
5821; 814-8299
ALWAYS READY
HAULING
Property & Estate Cleanups,
Attics, Cellars,
Yards, Garages,
Construction Sites, Flood
Damage & More.
Cheaper Than a Dumpster!!
Same Day Service
Free Estimates
570-301-3754
BOB & RAY'S HAULING
We Haul Everything!
Cheap, fast, clean &
respectful. Keep Smiling
Free Estimates.
570-655-7458
570-604-5224
Mikes $5-Up
Hauling Junk & Trash from Houses,
Garages, Yards, Etc
826-1883 704-8846
Hauling & Trucking
Will Haul Anything
Clean cellars, attics, yards & metal
removal. Call Jeff
570-735-3330 or 570-762-4438
Landscaping
Foltz Landscaping
Skid-Steer
Mini Excavating New Landscapes/
Lawns. Retaining walls/patios.
Call: 570-760-4814
PA Landscaping &
Lawn Service Inc.
Lawn Cutting
Shrub Trimming, Mulching
Landscaping Services
25+ Years Exp.
570-287-4780
palandscaping@verizon.net
TOUGH BRUSH
& TALL GRASS
Mowing, edging, mulching, shrubs
& hedge shaping. Tree pruning.
Garden tilling. Spring Clean Ups.
Leaf removal. Weekly
& bi-weekly lawn care.
Fully Insured
Free Estimates
570-829-3261
Miscellaneous
GARAGE SALE LEFTOVER
ITEMS: Malibu Low voltage
lights, new 6 glass lights +
transformer $50. Werner wood
attic pull down steps $40. Mil-
waukee electric demo ham-
mer + bits $600. Corian 5'
vanity top + sink new $75.-
Antique aluminum glider $25.
Antique wicker doll carriage
$95. Fiberglass chimney clean-
ing rods $40. rusty old an-
tique iron wheel barrow $20.
570 288-9843
Mold Remediation
WATER DAMAGE
Restoration, Mold Testing and
Remediation
Service with Integrity
TEEM Environmental
Services, Inc.
Old Forge, Pa.
570-457-1894 or 457-6164
PA#085152
Painting & Wallpaper
A & N PAINTING
SUMMER SPECIAL
$100 + materials for average size
room. 18 years experience
Exterior Painting,
Power washing, Deck Staining.
570-820-7832
JACOBOSKY
PAINTING
We Are An Expert Building
Restoration Company.
High end painting, Power Washing
& Masonry. Please Call Only The
Best! 570-328-5083
Painting & Wallpaper
ATTENTION
Serra Painting
Book Now For
Summer & Save. All Work
Guaranteed Satisfaction.
30 Yrs. Experience
Powerwash & Paint
Vinyl, Wood, Stucco
Aluminum.
Free Estimates
You Cant Lose!
570-822-3943
Back Mountain
Painting
Over 30 Years Experience
570-675-1719
DAVE
WITKOSKY
PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Free estimates,
30 years experience
570-826-1719
or 570-704-8530
M. PARALIS PAINTING
Int/ Ext. painting, Power
washing. Professional work at
affordable rates. Free
estimates. 570-288-0733
MARTY'S PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Top Quality Work
570-468-9079
Paving & Excavating
EDWARD'S ALL
COUNTY
PAVING
*DRIVEWAYS
*PARKING LOTS
*ROADWAYS
*HOT TAR & CHIP
*SEAL COATING
Licensed and
Insured. Call Today
For Your
Free Estimate
570-474-6329
Lic.# PA021520
Roofng & Siding
BEST PRICE METAL
ROOF INSTALLATION
& OLD BARN
RESTORATION
LIC. & INS. 570-675-2430
Roofng & Siding
CORNERSTONE
CONSTRUCTION
Roofing Siding Carpentry
40 yrs. experience
Licensed & Insured
PA026102
Call Dan: 570-881-1131
J.R.V. Roofing
570-824-6381
Roof Repairs & New Roofs.
Shingle, Slate, Hot Built Up,
Rubber, Gutters & Chimney
Repairs. Year Round. Li-
censed/Insured
FREE Estimates
*24 Hour Emergency Calls*
Jim Harden
570-288-6709
New Roofs & Repairs, Shingles,
Rubber, Slate, Gutters,
Chimney Repairs.
Credit Cards Accepted
FREE ESTIMATES!
Licensed-Insured
EMERGENCIES
SPRING ROOFING
McManus
Construction
Licensed, Insured. Everyday Low
Prices. 3,000
satisfied customers.
570-735-0846
Tree Service
APEX TREE AND EARTH
Tree Removal, Pruning, Stump
Grinding, Hazard Tree
Removal, Grading, Drainage,
Lot Clearing.Insured.
Reasonable Rates
apextreeandearth.com
Serving Wyoming Valley,
Back Mountain &
Surrounding Areas.
570-550-4535
Apartments /Townhouses
KINGSTON
Location! Remodeled apart-
ment with off street parking.
electric heat. 1 year lease re-
quired. Credit check required.
No pets. $575/month. Call
Nicole 570-715-7757.
SMITH HOURIGAN
GROUP
570-474-6307
KINGSTON
Spacious, calm 2nd floor apt. 1
bedroom, living room, kitchen,
bat h, was her & dr y er .
$395/month + 1 year lease,
month security. No pets. No
smokers.
Call leave name & number
570-287-6587
LUZERNE
276 Bennett Street
2nd floor, 2 bedroom, large liv-
ing & dining rooms, den, tile
bath, kitchen with stove & re-
frigerator, washer/dryer hook
up, off street parking, water &
sewer paid. $600 + utilities &
securi ty. No pets/smoki ng.
References. 570-288-7309.
Leave message.
MINERS MILLS
2 br., 1st floor, $575 + $575
security. Refrigerator, range,
wat er & sewer i ncl uded.
Washer hook up $25 extra per
month.
Call Bernie 570-655-4815.
Rothstein Realty
1-888-244-2714
MINERS MILLS/W-B
1 bedroom, 2nd floor, stove/re-
frigerator,. Heat & hot water
paid. Clean & quiet. No pets.
$465/month. 570-472-3681
MOCANAQUA
2 bedroom, water & sewer in-
cluded. $525/month. Section 8 con-
sidered. Call 570-592-3497
NANTICOKE
Immaculate 1st floor, 1 bed-
room, 2 covered porches, kit-
chen, bath, living room and
basement. Appliances, range
with self-cleaning oven, mi-
crowave, refrigerator, dish-
washer. Off street parking, No
Smoking and No Pets. Secur-
ity, References and Lease.
$535+utilities. 570-477-5959
Nanticoke
1 bedroom, 1st floor, refrigerat-
or, stove, washer/dryer hook-
up & porch. $400/month + util-
ities, security & references.
Water, sewage, garbage in-
cluded. No smoking. no pets.
570-760-6959.
SWOYERSVILLE
2 bedroom, gas heat, central
ai r, washer/ dryer hookup,
st ove and f ri dge.
$500 + security. 570-822-7657
Apartments /Townhouses
NANTICOKE
Immaculate 2nd floor, private
entrance, bath, bedroom and
living room. Wall to wall carpet,
large kitchen with range and
fridge. Large attic storage. Sun
por ch, No pet s and No
smoking. Security, reference
and lease. $460+utilities.
570-477-5959
PARSONS
2 n d f l o o r 2 b e d r o o m,
washer/dryer, refrigerator &
stove. Heat included. Refer-
ences. No pet s Securi t y
$685/month. 570-332-9355
PARSONS
Spacious 2nd floor. 2 bed-
room, wall to wall, washer/dry-
er, refrigerator & stove. Heat
included. No pets. Security.
$685/month. 570-332-9355
PITTSTON
2nd floor, large & modern. 2
bedrooms, living room, com-
puter room, laundry room with
washer & dryer. Full bath, kit-
chen with stove, fridge & dish
washer. Fresh paint & carpet.
Wat er & t r ash i ncl . No
smokers, no pets. $550/month
+ security. 570-881-9789 after
6pm.
PITTSTON TWP.
Newl y remodel ed. 2 bed-
rooms, 1 bath. Full kitchen,
with appliances, living room
with marble fireplace & hard-
wood floors. Washer/ Dryer in-
cluded. Jacuzzi tub. Off street
parking. $800 + utilities. No
pets. Call (570) 540-6779
PLAINS
Modern 2 bedroom, 1 bath,
2nd floor apartment. Kitchen
with appliances. New carpet.
Conveni ent l y l ocat ed. No
smoki ng - no pet s.
$600 PER MONTH.
Call Rae
570-899-1209
LEWITH & FREEMAN
288-9371
PLYMOUTH
Spacious 2 bedroom, 2 floors,
central air, 1 baths, new
kitchen, dishwasher, stove,
refrigerator, washer-dryer, off
street parking, No smoking/No
pets. $550 month plus utilities.
570-814-6620
PLYMOUTH
Large 2nd floor apartment, 5
bedrooms, 2 full baths, 1 is a
master bathroom. All new
flooring, carpets & tile. Fresh
pai nt throughout, No pets,
please. 3 blocks from high
school. $750/month.
570-719-1111, leave message
SHAVERTOWN
One bedroom, living room & kit-
chen apartment. Security required.
No pets. $500/month + utilities.
Call Jolyn Bartoli
570-696-5425
Smith Hourigan Group
570-696-1195
Apartments /Townhouses
WEST PITTSTON
GARDEN VILLAGE
APARTMENTS
221 Fremont St., Housing for
the elderly & mobility impaired;
all utilities included. Federally
subsidized program. Extremely
low income persons encour-
aged to apply. Income less
than $12,450.
570-655-6555
TDD 800-654-5984
8 am-4 pm
Monday-Friday.
Equal Housing Opportunity
Handicap Accessible
WEST PITTSTON
1st floor, recently renovated, 2
bedrooms, washer/dryer hook
up, carport. Heat & hot water
included. $650/month.
570-881-0546
WEST WYOMING
2nd floor spacious 2 bedroom
apartment, modern kitchen &
bath. Heat & hot water fur-
nished. 1 year lease required,
1st month security. No pets.
off street parking. $600/month.
570-288-9831 after five.
WILKES-BARRE
401 Madison Street, 1st floor,
1 bedroom. $520/month. In-
cludes heat and water. Depos-
it, first months rent and lease.
No Pets. 570-290-9791
WILKES-BARRE
1 bedroom, Second Fl oor,
Heat and Hot Water included.
$460 a month, plus one month
security deposit. References,
No pets and No Smoking.
570-675-7768
WILKES-BARRE
2 bedrooms, Off street parking,
public transportation, church
and schools nearby. 1st & last
months rent + security. Call
570-817-0601 Between 5:30
and 10 p.m.
WILKES-BARRE
Studio Near Wilkes
Wood floors, parking, no pets, short
term OK. $425, all utilities included.
570-826-1934
WILKES-BARRE
/KINGSTON
Efficiency 1 & 2 bedrooms. In-
cludes all utilities, parking, laundry.
No pets. From $390 to $675.
Lease, securi ty & references.
570-970-0847
PARSONS -WILKES-BARRE
1st floor, 1 bedroom, spacious.
Cl ean, remodel ed. $550 /
month. Utilities by tenant. City
rental licensed. 570-825-2901
WILKES-BARRE
2nd floor - 4 nice rooms. Only one
quiet apartment below. Has stove,
new refrigerator, washer & dryer.
All widows are newer vinyl thermal
pane. New mini-blinds and curtains.
Your own private entrance. Small
back porch. Water & sewer in-
cluded. Close to town & bus stop.
$485/month. 570-650-3803
Apartments /Townhouses
Wilkes-Barre
2nd floor, 2 bedroom, freshly
painted, washer/dryer hook up.
$475+ security and utilities.
No Pets. 570-822-7657
WILKES-BARRE
3 BEDROOM, OFF STREET
PARKING, WASHER & DRY-
E R H OOK U P . N O
PETS.$575 + UTILITIES &
SECURITY. 822-7657
WILKES-BARRE
3 bedrooms, 2nd floor, mod-
ern, new flooring, refrigerator
stove, washer/dryer hookup,
heat & hot water i ncl uded.
$700. Secti on 8 Accepted
570-301-8200
WILKES-BARRE
Bedroom for rent in 5 bed-
room home. 1/2 mi l e from
Wilkes University. Eat-in kit-
chen dining room, living room,
2.5 baths to be shared. Cent-
ral air. Alarm system. All utilit-
ies included. $500 per mo.
Student or non student. Secur-
i t y & ref erences requi red.
Available 8/1/13 845-291-1948
WILKES-BARRE
142 S. FRANKLIN STREET
BEAUTFUL BROWNSTONE
APT IS A MUST SEE!! 3rd
floor, 2 bedrooms, office, 2 off
street parking spots, 14' ceil-
ings, hardwood & tile floors.
Stove, refrigerator, dishwash-
er, microwave, garabage dis-
posal, washer & dryer. 24 hour
maintenance. $1300 month +
securi ty, + uti l i ti es, 1 year
l ease. Cal l Jani ce at
570-706-6010
Wilkes-Barre
Country Living in the
City
2 bedrooms, Modern. Stove,
fridge, washer, dryer, parking,
deck. No dogs Near Cross
Valley. $495 + utilities.
570-417-5441
WILKES-BARRE
LODGE
Formerly The Travel Lodge
497 Kidder St., Wilkes-Barre
Rooms Starting at:
Daily $49.99 + tax
Weekly $199.99 + tax
Microwave, Refrigerator, WiFi,
HBO. 570-823-8881
www.WilkesBarreLodge.com
WILKES-BARRE
Newly renovated 2 bedroom, 1
bath, refrigerator with ice maker &
stove. washer/dryer hook up. Gas
heat with central air, new carpeting.
$600/month + utilities & 1 month
security. 570-237-5397
Wilkes-Barre North
Near General Hospital
518 N. Main St.
3 bedrooms, 1st floor. Stove,
fridge included. Washer / dry-
er hookup. Eat in kitchen. Off
street parking, 1 car. Tenant
pays gas & electric. Water in-
cluded. NO PETS. $560+ se-
curity. Call 570-814-1356
Apartments /Townhouses
WILKES-BARRE
PARRISH ST
Very Nice 4 Rooms + Bath,
2nd Floor. Perfect for Single or
Doubl e Occupancy Qui et
Building, Washer/dryer hook-
up. Off-Street Parking $520 +
utilities. Security. References.
Background check.
570-332-8792
WILKES-BARRE
SOUTH
SECURE BUILDINGS
1 & 2 bedroom apartments.
Starting at $440 and up. Refer-
ences required. Section 8 OK
570-357-0712
WILKES-BARRE
VICTORIAN CHARM
34 W. Ross St. Fully furnished,
Delightful 2nd floor, excellent
condition, brand new queen
bed, Secure, private off street
parking. Historic building is
non-smoking/no pets. Base rent
$700/month. Security,
references required. View at
houpthouse.com
570-762-1453
WILKES-BARRE
Cl ean & comfortabl e front
apartment of front & back du-
plex in nice area. $600/month
includes washer/dry-er hook
up, eat-in kitchen, refrigerator,
stove, dishwasher, front porch
& shared storage shed. Plenty
of off street parking. One year
lease + security required.
Call Michael 570-760-4961
WYOMING
2 bedrooms, 2nd fl oor, re-
cently remodeled. Washer &
dryer hookup. Off street park-
i ng. No pets. $550/mo. i n-
cl udes water & sewer.
570-714-7272
WYOMING
84 Fifth Street.
2 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, off
street parking, nice yard. Large
kitchen, 1st floor laundry with
washer/dryer. Mint condition
$800/month + 1 year lease &
security deposit.
Call Jill Hiscox
696-0875
696-3801
WYOMING
BLANDINA APARTMENTS
Deluxe 2 bedroom. Wall to wall
carpet. Some utilities by ten-
ant. No pets. Non-smoking.
El derl y Communi ty. Qui et ,
safe. Off street parki ng.
570-693-2850
Apartments /Townhouses
WYOMING
Modern 2 bedroom, 1.5 bath,
Townhouse style, Washer/Dry-
er hookup, Stove and Refriger-
ator, Basement. $750+utilities.
Call or Text 203-969-5650
Commercial
PITTSTON TWP.
$1,750/MONTH
3002 N. Twp Blvd.
Medical office for rent on the
Pittston By-Pass. Highly vis-
i bl e l ocati on wi th pl enty of
parking. $1,800 sq. ft. of beau-
tifully finished space can be
used for any type office use.
$1,750/ mo. plus utilities.
MLS 13-098
Call Charlie
KINGSTON
Approx. 1,100 Square Ft. of of-
fices (more if needed) with re-
ception area. First floor. Off
street parking. Central gas
heat with air. Private bath, very
modern. Located in historical
building. $595+.610-568-8363
LEASE SPACE
Kingston Koral Complex Great for
Wellness Center Businesses. Cus-
tom leases are available. 4300SF
Warehouse Space available, can
be divided and are built to Suit.
MLS#12-3041
Call Cindy
570-690-2689
www.cindykingre.com
570-675-4400
Commercial
NANTICOKE
Working restaurant with 2-Unit
Apartments for additional income.
Restaurant includes all commercial
restaurant equipment, tables and
chairs. Space features take-out
area and additional dining room
with seating for approx. 30. Side lot
can hold up to approx. 6 cars with
expansion. Each Apartments rents
for $475/per month.
MLS#13-1900
$129,900
Call Cindy King
570-690-2689
www.cindykingre.com
570-675-5100
PITTSTON
$69,900
68 William St.
Great investment property with
3 units and separate utilities.
Each unit has 2 entrances and
washer hoop up. Roof is 5
years old. For more info visit:
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 12-1897
Call Tom 570-262-7716
WILKES-BARRE
531 Scott St.
After 39 years the owner is retiring!
Turn key night club/bar, with res-
taurant potential in a PRIME loca-
tion. 2 bars with additional licensed
outside patio space. Owner is open
to creative financing. MLS 13-2446
$59,900
John Shelley
570-702-4162
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
Houses For Rent
DORRANCE TWP.
2 bedroom country cottage,
yard, garage, oil heat. $750 +
security. No pets.
610-759-7138
Get all the
advertising
inserts
with the
latest sales.
Call 829-5000
to start your
home delivery.
K
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Thursday, July 11, 2013 PAGE 7D
Automotive
339 Highway 315 Pittston
New and used car dealership is now looking for an experienced
Auto body Technician for a growing dealership.
The technician should be able to perform all aspects of damaged vehicles to pre accident
condition.
- Must have minimum of 5 years experience in the industry
- Must have current drivers license
- Must have own tools
- Excellent working conditions
- Salary based on experience
- Must be dependable
- Full time position 40 plus hours per week
- Excellent benefts, medical, dental, 401K
- Immediate openings available
Apply in person or email resume mwynn@kpautogroup.com
Autos For Sale
1553 Main Street, Peckville, PA 18452
Prestige
One AutO
WE BUY
VEHICLES!
Call Dan Lane @ 570-489-0000
*Tax, tags & license fees not included.
2004 VENTURE LS Ext. MiniVan 90840 ..................................................... $4,500
2004 CORVETTE 17167 .................................................................................. $26,986
2006 COBALT 68286........................................................................................... $6,900
2005 CROSS FIRE SRT-6 59014.................................................................. $17,999
2005 RAM 1500 QUAD 79407.................................................................... $16,999
2005 MUSTANG GT Convertible 32500 ................................................. $18,999
2007 E350 Passenger 56256....................................................................... $13,999
2007 MUSTANG GT Coupe 32569.............................................................. $17,495
2008 Ford KingRanch CREW 50457 .......................................................... $28,896
2010 MUSTANG V6 Convertible 40332................................................... $17,999
2009 CR-V EX SUV 42978.............................................................................. $17,990
2011 CRZ EX 6M Coupe 5870...................................................................... $15,999
2006 Hummer H3 50591 ............................................................................... $20,989
2011 SONATA SE 51600................................................................................. $15,999
2011 Mazda3 SPORT gt 49212................................................................... $16,990
2007 Mini COOPER S k 46153.................................................................. $13,999
2006 Nissan 350Z Convertible 22128 ..................................................... $20,980
2009 Nissan 370Z SPORT PKG 11575..................................................... $26,789
2003 Porsche BOXTER S 26998 ................................................................. $23,999
2004 Subaru WRX STI 60325...................................................................... $18,799
2010 Subaru Outbac SPORT 25683.......................................................... $19,890
2012 Subaru IMPREZA AWD 33059......................................................... $17,980
2009 Suzuki AWD SUV 30482 ..................................................................... $12,999
2006 RAV 4Limited SUV 123109 ................................................................. $11,990
2010 Toyota RAV4 I4 SUV 34739............................................................... $16,999
2007 TOYOYA FJ CRUZER 65231................................................................. $21,990
2010 Volkswagen SE SUV 22065................................................................ $17,499
2012 Volkswagen SE Sedan 32392............................................................ $14,999
2012 Volkswagen 2.5L Hatchback 30751 ............................................... $14,999
8
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0
0
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Rentals
Maple Manor
A Quality Manufactured Housing Community
New and Pre-Owned Homes for Sale!
Rentals Available
Select Homes for Lease with Option to Purchase
Financing Available to Qualified Buyers
18 William Street,
Taylor, Pa. 18517
Rental Office: 570-562-1931
www.umh.com
Licensed by the Pa. Dept. of Banking NMLS 200331
Commercial
PITTSTON
$69,900
68 William St.
Great investment property with
3 units and separate utilities.
Each unit has 2 entrances and
washer hoop up. Roof is 5
years old. For more info visit:
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 12-1897
Call Tom 570-262-7716
Houses For Rent
BEAR CREEK
Rent in exchange for labor. 3
bedroom, well water, septic.
$600/month + heat. No pets.
Quiet neighborhood.
973-887-1169
DORRANCE TWP.
2 bedroom country cottage,
yard, garage, oil heat. $750 +
security. No pets.
610-759-7138
DURYEA
Main Street
1/2double, 3 brs. 1.5 baths, on
st r eet par ki ng, no pet s.
$600/month + $300 security &
utilities. 570-714-5222.
570-954-8401
**********
AMERICA REALTY
288-1422
MANAGED
EDWARDSVILLE / KING-
STON / HOUSE BEAUTI-
FUL / REMODELED / KIT-
CHEN / CENTER ISLAND/
BUILT-INS / LAUNDRY / 1.5
BATHS / GAS FIREPLACE /
2 ENCLOSED PORCHES /
$900 + utilities / 2 YEAR
SAME RENT / EMPLOY-
MENT VERIFICATION / AP-
PLICATION REQUIRED /
NO PETS.
HARVEYS LAKE
Furnished Home. College stu-
dents welcome after August 20th
Wi-fi, Direct TV, lake rights, wash-
er/dryer. $1,200/month + utilities .
570-639-5041
HARVEYS LAKE
Cozy with loft + 2 small bed-
rooms, living room & kitchen.
All appliances, water sewer
trash. Security & first months
rent. NO PETS. $700.
570-762-6792
KINGSTON
Beautiful Single family
313 Wright Ave.
1800 sq ft, 4 large bedroom,
1.5 baths, closets, first floor
bath and laundry room. New
tile floors kitchen, bath,
laundry room, gas heat and hot
water, ceiling fans, new mod-
ern kitchen, new dishwasher,
new gas stove, new windows,
hardwood floors, beautiful in-
side, fireplace, new 200 amp
electric, hardwired smoke
detectors, dead bolt locks, full
basement, full attic storage,
residential street, nice yard,
front covered porch, two car
garage, private driveway, One
year lease, one month secur-
ity, background check, secur-
ity deposit, $1150. plus utilities,
available July 1, great landlord.
Call 215-527-8133.
KINGSTON
1/2 DOUBLE
65 N THOMAS AVE
Comfortable Spacious, nice
neighborhood. Eat-in kitchen
with stainless steel appliances,
washer/drying included. 3 bed-
rooms, 1 bath, fenced in back
yard. Dogs and Cats Okay.
$750/month+security.
Call: 570-639-5777
LUZERNE
392 Bennett St.
2 bedroom house
Gas heat. Washer/ dryer hook-
up, dish-washer, stove & refri-
gerator. Fenced in yard, par-
tially new carpet. Off-street
parking, yard. $680 + utilities.
(570) 288-3438
NANTICOKE
Beautiful, spacious 1 family
house, 3 large bedrooms, 2
baths, large living room, dining
room, eat-in kitchen. large fam-
i l y room. Pri vate parki ng.
$725/month + 1 months secur-
ity. Available now. Call
609-356-8416
SHAVERTOWN
2 bedrooms, modern kitchen
and bath, garage, deck and
large yard. $750/month+ se-
curity. Sewer and trash in-
cluded in rent. 570-675-4424
SHICKSHINNY
2 or 3 bedroom, deck with
view, fenced yard, section 8
welcome. $575 month.
570-814-8299
WILKES-BARRE
Safe, stable neighborhood,
beautiful 4 bedroom, 1.5 baths,
nice kitchen, nice back yard.
Off street parking. $775/mo +
utilities, security, references.
No pets. 570-766-1881
Houses For Rent
SOUTH WILKES-BARRE
HALF-DOUBLE
Nice neighborhood, big back-
yard. 6 rooms, carpeting
throughout. Remolded kit-
chen and bath, new energy
efficient windows throughout.
All appliances included. No
Pets, $675+utilities. 1 month
security, references and
credit check. 570-824-2935
WILKES-BARRE
2 bedroom, wall to wall carpet-
ing, small backyard, washer &
dryer hookup, no pets. $550 +
security & utilities. Call
570-822-7657
WILKES-BARRE
Si ngl e f ami l y, 3 bedr oom,
washer/dryer hookup. Fenced in
yard. $700 + utilities & security.
570-814-7562
Want To Rent
KINGSTON
2 bedroom, 1 bath, central air,
washer/dryer, off street park-
ing, great location, tenant pays
utilities. $500. 917-697-6696
Half Doubles
KINGSTON
PROPERTIES
CURRENTLY AVAILABLE
LARGE 1/2 DOUBLE
full kitchen, living room,
formal dining room & study.
4 bedrooms, 1.5 baths.
****************
1/2 DOUBLE
3 bedrooms, 1 bath
****************
TOWNHOUSE
3 bedrooms, 1 bath
*****************
Quiet residential neighbor-
hoods, utilities & heat by ten-
ant, no pets, no smoking. 1
month security, 1 year lease.
Call Rosewood Realty
570-287-6822
PLAINS
2 bedrooms, no yard. Modern
Kitchen and bath, Washer/dry-
er hook-up, Stove only. No
Pets, No Smoking. 2 car off-
street parking, wall to wall Car-
pet, gas heat. $475/month
+utilities. Security + 1st and
last months. Credit and Back-
ground Check. 570-639-1564
ASHLEY
2 bedroom, wall to wall carpet-
ing, modern bath & kitchen
with stove & refrigerator. Gas
heat , l arge yard, no pet s.
$575/month + securi ty. In-
cludes garbage & sewage, all
other other utilities by tenant.
After six call 570-864-1020.
DALLAS
Newer Half-Double, 2 bed-
rooms, 1.5 bath, Central Air,
Off Street parking. (No Pets).
$700/month. 570-675-4805
HANOVER TWP.
549 S. Main Street
3 bedrooms, kitchen, living
room, dining room, basement.
$595/month. No pets. Call
570-824-4899 or
570-239-4340.
PARSONS
Furnished 3 bedroom across
from park. Modern kitchen &
bat h. Of f st r eet par ki ng.
Fenced in yard. No Pets. $625
+ utilities & security.
570-704-8730
PITTSTON
1/2 DOUBLE, 2 BEDROOMS,
1.5 baths, central air & heat,
off street parking, deck & yard.
Dishwasher, stove & refrigerat-
or. 1st floor washer & dryer
hookup. Spray foam insulation.
New furnace, very cheap utilit-
ies. NO SMOKING. NO PETS.
$800 per month + security, ref-
erences & lease.
Call 570-237-7219
PITTSTON
2 bedrooms, 1 bath, living din-
ing room, kitchen with stove
and fridge. 2nd floor laundry
room. New flooring, fresh paint
and off street parking. Heat
water and sewer incl. $750/mo
+ security and references.
570-237-5478
PLAINS TOWNSHIP
Half-Double Completely ren-
ovated 3 bedroom, 1 bath,
qui et st reet , pri vat e dri ve
$800+utilities. 678-779-1467
PLYMOUTH
150-152 Center Ave.
3 bedrooms, gas heat, mod-
ern ki t chen, washer/ dryer
hookup. Yard with off street
parking. No Pets. $600/month,
lease, 2 month security and
credit check required.
1-845-889-4837
WEST PITTSTON
Quiet street, off street parking.
2 bedrooms plus computer room,
washer/dryer hookup, dry base-
ment. NO PETS. Non-smoker.
$625/month plus security and 1
year lease.
Call Mike after 4PM 570-760-1418
WILKES-BARRE
Half-Double
61 Custer Street
3 bedroom, Quiet street, street
parking, Washer/Dryer Hook-
up, Back Yard. $600+utilities.
Section 8, OK. 609-553-3122
WILKES-BARRE/EAST END
4 bedroom, 1.5 bath, wall to
wall carpet. Stove, dishwash-
er, washer/ dryer hook up.
Heat. garbage & sewer in-
cluded. Many Extras!. No
pets. $975 + security & refer-
ences. 570-824-4288
Sales
DALLAS
1995 Trailer, 56'x14', 2 bed-
rooms, 1.5 bath, no hallways.
Some appliances.
570-706-5201
SHAVERTOWN
BACK MOUNTAIN
3 bedrooms, 2 bath, move in
ready home, located at Echo
Val l ey Est at es, i n Back
Mountain. A very reason-
able price at $33,000. Will
help finance if qualified.
570-696-2143
Pets
ROTTIES HUSKIES Yorkies,
Chihuahuas
Labs & More.
Bloomsburg 389-7877
Hazleton 453-6900
Hanover 829-1922
POMERANIAN PUPPY
Beautiful, purebred,
16 weeks, white, fe-
male. Shots. $250.
570-579-5207, leave
message.
YORKIE TEACUP PUPPIES
AKC, Ready 8/10
Shots & dewormed. $800 + up.
570-436-5083
Want To Buy
BUSINESS
OWNER SEEKS
Lease /Option
on Executive
Mountain Top
home;
3/4 Bedrooms.
440-836-2150
Garden & Produce
PICK YOUR OWN
BLUEBERRIES!
8 am to 8 pm
Cosed Sundays
Sickler Blueberry
Farm
Vernon
570-333-5286
NO PETS IN THE FIELD!!
Autos Under $5000
BUICK CENTURY, 95'
Cash Price, $1,500
570-793-9834
DODGE 99' Grand
Caravan SE
1 Owner! 99,000 Miles. Cash
price, $3,300. 570-826-1672
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
DODGE '95 RAM 1500
X-CAB 4X4
GOOD WORK TRUCK!
$1,995
Call for details 570-696-4377
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
DODGE '04 QUAD
CAB 4X4
LIKE NEW $6,995
Call for details
570-696-4377
Econoline, Ford 92'
Conversion Van, 89,000 miles,
blue, good condition. $3,000 NEG.
570-709-3020
Pontiac '99 Bonneville
Automatic, 4 door, spacious,
with CD player. New anti-
lock brakes & new starter.
Great engine. Runs excel-
lent! Will need new tires &
very minor repair. $975.00
(570)852-7746
Autos Under $5000
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
FORD 02 TAURUS
Auto, V6. NICE, NICE CAR!
$2,995. Call for details
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
FORD 05 FREE
STYLE
3rd seat. AWD. One Owner.
$4,995. Call for details
570-696-4377
HONDA '03 ACCORD LX
4 door, 5 speed manual ,
114,500 original miles, runs
flawlessly, well care for, with
maintenance records. Noth-
ing fancy, just a solid running
car. $4,500, OBO.
570-905-7179
Autos For Sale
'05 CHEVY
Aveo LS Hatch
Sharp inside and out. Very well
maintained. Auto, 85K, Red
with privacy tint Pioneer speak-
ers, woofer and bluetooth. New
timing belt, water pump, much
more. 30 mpg highway. Served
as rel i abl e backup vehi cl e.
Save Big!! Local pickup only.
Call to inquire 570-762-7615
'2012 Appalachian
18' car trailer. Diamond Deck
with 4' dove's tail, 5' slide in
ramps Many extras only used
3 times. $2,200. 570-855-5719
Toyota 04 Celica GT
112K miles. Blue, 5 speed. Air,
power windows/locks, CD/cas-
sette, Keyless entry, sunroof,
new battery. Car drives and
has current PA inspection.
Slight rust on corner of
passenger door. Clutch slips
on hard acceleration. This is
why its thousands less than
Blue Book value. $6,500 OBO.
Make an offer! Call
570-592-1629
LEO'S AUTO
SALES
93 Butler Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
570-825-8253
Ford 98 Explorer XLT
4 door, 6 cylinder., auto, sun roof,
leather, 4WD. Good condition
$1,650
Chevy 97 Blazer
4 door, 6 cylinder., auto, 4WD,
new tires. Very good condition.
$1,550
Current Inspection
On All Vehicles
DEALER
WANTED!
ALL
JUNK
CARS!
CA$H PAID
570-301-3602
CHRYSLER 09
TOWN AND COUNTRY LX
Silver. Options include, dual
power sliding doors, DVD sys-
tem, Sirius satellite radio, MP3
single disc. Back up camera,
quad seating with table. Great
for trips. New plugs & wires &
front brakes. Serious inquiries
only $11,200, negotiable. Call
or text 570-574-6799.
FORD '09 MUSTANG GT
CALIFORNIA SPECIAL
4.6 liter, V8 engine, still under
warranty, performance white
clear coat, five speed manual,
traction control, 17" premium
wheels, hood scoop, Shaker
500 audio system, 6 CD, satel-
lite radio, heated seats, one
owner, like new. $19,000.
570-817-1803
NISSAN '07 ALTIMA
37,000 miles, 2.5S Automatic
CVT. Navy blue. Garage kept,
push button start, smart key
entrance, CD/Radio/Aux In,
well maintained. Set of 4
snow and regular tires
included. $12,500, OBO.
570-735-1005
Autos For Sale
ACME AUTO
SALES
343-1959
1009 Penn Ave
Scranton 18509
Across from Scranton Prep
GOOD CREDIT, BAD CREDIT,
NO CREDIT
Call Our Auto Credit
Hot Line to get
Pre-approved for a Car Loan!
800-825-1609
www.acmecarsales.net
AUTOS
11 AUDI S5 Convertible, Sprint
blue, black / brown leather
interior, navigation, 7 spd auto
turbo, AWD
08 PONTIAC GRAND PRIX blue,
auto, V6
07 BUICK LUCERNE CXL silver,
grey leather
06 VW JETTA GLS blue, auto,
sunroof
06 DODGE STRATUS SXT black,
auto 4 cyl
06 HYUNDAI SONATA GLS grey,
auto, 4 cyl
05 CHEVY MONTE CARLO LS
gold
05 INFINITI GX3 AWD grey, black,
leather, sunroof
05 CHEVY MONTE CARLO LT
white V6
05 AUDI 16 All Road. Green
2 tone, leather AWD
05 VW JETTA GLS grey, black
leather, sunroof, alloys
03 SUZUKI AERO Silver, 5 speed
02 VW BEETLE GLS lime green
5 speed, 4 cylinder
73 PORSCHE 914 green & black,
5 speed, 62k miles.
SUVS, VANS, TRUCKS, 4 X4s
08 FORD ESCAPE XLT blue, tan
leather, sunroof, 4x4
8 JEEP PATRIOT SPORT black,
4 cylinder, 5 speed 4x4
08 FORD EDGE SE white V6 AWD
07 DODGE CARAVAN SXT green,
4 door, 7 passenger mini van
06 DODGE DURANGO SLT grey,
3rd seat, 4x4
06 NISSAN MURANO SE
white AWD
06 MERCURY MARINER silver,
V6, AWD
06 JEEP COMMANDER LTD blue,
grey, 3rd seat, leather 4x4
06 PONTIAC TURANT red, grey
leather AWD
06 HONDA PILOT EX silver, 3rd
seat, 4x4
06 CHEVY 1500 SILVERADO REG
CAB truck red, 4x4
06 NISSAN EXTERA black, V6,
4x4
06 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE
LAREDO gold, V6 4x4
06 DODGE RAM 1500 QUAD CAB
Black, V8, 4x4 truck
06 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER LS
silver, 4x4
05 DODGE DURANGO SXT blue,
3rd seat 4x4
05 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER white,
V6, 4x4
05 CHEVY COLORADO CLUB
CAB grey 4x4 truck
05 CHRYSLER TOWN &
COUNTRY TOURING blue,
7 passenger mini van
05 FORD ESCAPE XLT Red,
V6 4x4
05 KIA SORRENTO LX silver,
V6 AWD
05 TOYOTA SIENNA LE gold,
7 passenger mini van
05 HYUNDAI TUSCON LX green
auto, AWD
04 CHEVY AVALANCHE LT
green, grey leather, 4 door
4x4 truck
03 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LTD
grey black leather sunroof 4x4
03 DODGE RAM 1500 SLT QUAD
CAB white & grey, 4x4 truck
03 FORD EXPEDITION XLT silver,
3rd seat, 4x4
03 NISSAN PATHFINDER black
V6 4x4
03 MITSUBISHI OUTLANDER XLX
red, V6, 4x4
02 MERCURY MOUNTAINEER
PREMIER black, tan leather
3rd row seat AWD
00 FORD F150 XLT SUPERCAB
blue, V8, 4x4 truck
01 FORD ESCAPE XLT red,
4 door, 4x4
01 DODGE DAKOTA CLUB CAB
SPORT blue, V6, 4x4 truck
99 FORD F 150 SUPER CAB
silver 4x4 truck
97 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LTD
4x4
CADILLAC '02
SEDAN DEVILLE
Black, all power, new brakes &
calipers, fully equipped. Excel-
lent interior, good body. Must
Be Seen to Be Appreciated!
$3,700, OBO. 570-287-8151
FORD '05 FOCUS ZXS
4 door, hatchback, 4 cylinder,
auto, all power. Premium ste-
reo, new tires & inspection, R-
title. 68k miles. Owner for 4
years. $3,800. 570-655-1156
or 299-9485, ask for Lucille.
TOYOTA ' 07 CAMRY
62,000 miles, one owner, well
equipped, security with glass
breakage, mags, dark grey
metallic, well maintained. Be-
low BB/NADA. $12,995, OBO.
570-472-3566
Boats & Marinas
BASSTRACKER '05
14' aluminum V with 15 hp
Yamaha 4 stroke fuel injected
motor, trailer, gas can, battery,
electric motor. Seats, oars, fish
finder. $3,000. 570-825-0848
Miscellaneous
LIKE
NEW
Used Tires &
Batteries
for $20
& Up
VITOS
&
GINOS
949 Wyoming
Ave. Forty Fort
288-8995
Motorcycles
'96 Harley
Davidson
1200 Sportster, 27,000 miles,
$3500
570-655-2923
HARLEY DAVIDSON 06'
1200 Custom Sportster
7,900 miles, excellent condi-
tion. Special seat and Chrome
accessories. $7,900.
570-510-8828
KAWASAKI '10
VILCAN 900
PRICE REDUCED!!!
Blue. Extremely low miles -
under 250 miles! Very lightly
used. Must sell. Asking
$5500. Call Ed at
570-814-9922
Trucks / SUVs / Vans
'03 CHEVY
Silverado. 2500 heavy duty.
extended cab. 6.0 liter engine,
loaded, auto. 51,900. Runs
like new. $14,500.
570-362-0823/570-655-2020
OLDS '99
BRAVADA
New parts.
Needs some body work.
$3,400.
(570)760-2791
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
DODGE '06 DAKOTA
CLUB CAB
6 speed. EXTRA SHARP!
$4995. 570-696-4377
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
GMC ENVOY 03
4X4, 3rd row Seat, SHARP
SUV!
$5,995. 570-696-4377
FORD '03 F350 XL
SUPER DUTY
DUMP TRUCK
Diesel, (330 HP, 560 pounds
of torque) auto tranny 4 door,
85,000 miles, 10 ft dump, all
wheel disk brakes, class 3
hitch, trailer brake controller,
new tires & new state inspec-
tion. cold air conditioning.Ex-
tra nice condition with no leaks
anywhere. $15,900 drives this
beauty home! 570-817-2952
Kia Sorento EX 05' Gray
4WD 4 door SUV. 99,400
miles. Clean title. Very good
condition. Excellent running
and handling. V6. Automatic.
Loaded with extras. $7,500.
Full details at your request.
570-793-3686
MAZDA TRIBUTE, 2008
4 Cyl i nder, 4 Wheel Dri ve,
Deep Red with new brakes,
battery and tires. Just detailed,
excellent condition. 46,000
miles. $12,000. 570-510-8828
Trucks / SUVs / Vans
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
FORD 00
WINDSTAR SEL
Leather, LIKE NEW! $2,995.
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
FORD 04 ESCAPE
4x4 1 Owner. Extra Sharp
SUV! $4,995.
CALL FOR DETAILS
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
FORD '04
EXPLORER XLT
Sunroof, 3rd row seat.
BARGAIN PRICE $4,995
Call for details
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
GMC 04 SIERRA
4x4
Ladder rack, tool box, ONE
OWNER. Bargain Price!
$4,995. 570-696-4377
JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE
Laredo 2005
82,000 miles, Well maintained,
excellent condition. Beige in
color, $12,500. 570-654-7451
or 570-466-4669
Auto Parts
Vito &
Ginos
LIKE NEW
USED
TIRES &
BATTERIES
$20 & uP
570-288-8995
Forty Fort
Auto Services
$ WANTED JUNK $
VEHICLES
LISPI TOWING
We pick up
570-822-0995
WANTED
Cars & Full Size Trucks.
For prices...
Lamoreaux Auto Parts 477-2562
Air Conditioners
AIR CONDITIONER Panason-
ic 5,000 BTU still in box $75.
570-472-3615
AIR CONDITIONERS, (1) Fri-
gidaire, 5450 BTU, $75. (1) LG
8000 BTU, $100. (1) Whirlpool
11,000, BTU, $150.
570-693-1454
Arts /Crafts /Hobbies
Barbie Dolls
(2) Anniversary (with gowns)
$20.00
570-825-2494
Antiques & Collectibles
COKE TRAYS (2) $40.00
CAMEL CIGARETTE TRAYS
(2) $20.00
570-825-2494
K
PAGE 8D Thursday, July 11, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
1,000
500
250
136
500
1,000
500
196
FORDREBATE...................................1000
FORD BONUS REBATE...................1000
FORD CREDIT REBATE...................500
OFF LEASE REBATE.....................500
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP.......736
139
$
16,499
FORD REBATE...................................500
FORD BONUS REBATE...................1000
FORD CREDIT REBATE.............,....1000
OFF LEASE REBATE.....................500
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP.......161
80
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied including Off Lease Rebate. **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $645 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 5/31/13.
WAS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32, 155
FORD REBATE................................... 2,000
OFF LEASE REBATE............................. 500
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP. ............. 656
2013 NEW 2013 FORD 2013
EXPL R 4X4
$
28 999
$
28 999
$
28 999
$
269
$
269
24
Mos.
Lease
For
All Wheel Drive, 3.5L Engine, MyFord
Display, PM, Auto. Climate,17 Steel Wheels,
CD, Keyless Entry, 3rd Row Seat,
MyKey, Cruise Control, PW
23 23
MPG MPG
OO
V V
E E
RR 10
10 10
TO TO
CHOOSE CHOOSE
FROM FROM
299
$
30,999
FORDREBATE...................................1000
OFF LEASE REBATE.....................500
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP.......486
985
80
FORD REBATE...................................500
FORD BONUS REBATE...................1000
FORD CREDIT REBATE..................1000
OFF LEASE REBATE.....................500
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP.......1216
FORDREBATE...................................1000
FORD LEASE REBATE.....................500
FORD CREDIT REBATE...................500
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP.......496
FORDREBATE...................................1500
FORD BONUS REBATE...................1250
FORD CREDIT REBATE...................500
OFF LEASE REBATE.....................500
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP.......1046
60
FORDREBATE...................................1000
FORD BONUS REBATE...................1000
FORD CREDIT REBATE..................1000
OFF TRADE-IN REBATE.....................750
OFF LEASE REBATE.............................500
FORD REGIONAL DISCOUNT...........750
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP.......716
60
69
FORD REBATE.............................................1500
FORD CREDIT REBATE.............................1000
OFF LEASE REBATE.................................500
FORD 5.0 LITER REBATE................................1500
FORD REGIONAL DISCOUNT OFF MSRP 1250
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP...................1311
0.9
$
1000
1.9
$
1500
1.9
$
1500
1.9
$
2000
1.9
$
2000
0
$
1750
7/31/13.
7/31/13.
7/31/13.
7/31/13.
7/31/13. 7/31/13.
7/31/13. 7/31/13. 7/31/13.
40
FORDREBATE...................................1000
FORD BONUS REBATE...................250
OFF LEASE REBATE.....................500
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP.......736
FORD REBATE...................................500
FORD CREDIT REBATE...................500
FORD BONUS REBATE...................1000
OFF LEASE REBATE.....................500
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP.......196
2014
2014
$
19,999
139
PRICE INCLUDES 2YR/30,000 MILE LIMITED MAINTENANCE PLAN
K
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Thursday, July 11, 2013 PAGE 9D
Antiques & Collectibles
$ Antiques
Buying $
Old Toys, model kits,
Bikes, dolls, guns,
Mining Items, trains
& Musical Instruments,
Hess. 474-9544
GRINDER, Sargent, with cut-
ting blades. $25. 570-654-3755
KETTCAR GO-KART
Adjustable seat, made in
Germany. Good condi ti on.
570-603-7415
Appliances
COOKER, Waterless and Alu-
minum, by kitchen Craft. 16
Qt., Good Condition. $10.
570-735-6638
Clothing
MEN'S SUIT, Beige, Summer
Suit, Haggar. Jacket size 46,
pants size 38. Excellent Condi-
tion. $20. 570-288-0060
Computer Equip. & Software
COMPUTER, Gateway. EV
series monitor, Keyboard, Two
Cambr i dge Sound Wor ks
Speakers, AMD ATHLON Pro-
cessor tower, Microsoft Win-
dows ME, Cannon bubble jet
printer, original start up and
software CD's manuals. Excel-
lent condition. $250. OBO.
570-235-6188
WOMEN'S CLOTHING
PLUS SIZE, in great condition.
Coats, dress pants. sweaters.
shi rts & much more. Very
cheap. Must See! Please call
570-693-3361
Furnances & Heaters
AFFORDABLE, clean, safe
and efficient wood heat. Cent-
ral Boiler OUTDOOR WOOD
FURNACE. Heats mul ti pl e
buildings. B & C Wood Fur-
naces LLC
570-477-5692
Furniture & Accessories
BEDROOM DRESSER, 9
drawer, with mirror, solid wood,
brown with color with gold and
black trim. $75. 570-706-5179
BUNK BEDS complete, beauti-
ful solid wood, excellent condi-
tion, includes 2 bunkie boards,
ladder, rails, comforters, cover,
bed skirt from LADD furniture
NC $375. MUST SELL. Call
696-6986 after 3pm Mon-Fri.
HEAD BOARD, for king size
bed. Good condition. $50.
570-288-0060
PATIO FURNITURE, 4 piece
wicker, like new. Used for 1
year. Includes cushions and
covers, plus round glass table
with 7.5 ft. umbrella. $300.
570-740-7446
ROCKER, maple, cushion on
seat-back. $70. 570-735-1589
Jewelry
NECKLACE
"Journey". Gold and 8
diamonds. From Littman Jew-
elers, in the box. Priced at
$700. Selling for $250.
570-407-0865
NECKLACE and EARRINGS,
Crystal, double strand. $25.
570-654-3755
Landscaping & Gardening
EDGE HOG, Black & Decker,
Electric Edger. Very good con-
di ti on. $20 OBO. TABLE
SAW, Craftsman, 10", 27"x44"
Cast Iron Table. 1/5 HP, belt
drive. Good condition. $125.
Call after 5 p.m. 570-655-3933
GARDEN HOSE Ames, Reel
Easy, automati cal l y wi nds.
Used twice. $22. Call after 1
p.m. 570-822-1227
LAWN MOWER, 22" cut $50.
WEED WACKER, needs
pri mer. Leave a message.
570-693-1454
Medical Equipment
BRUNO STAIRLIFT 2003
Model 1550
Factory Servi ced, 12 Ft 9"
track, 2 Remote Controls, Bat-
tery Operated. $600.00 OBO
Factory Service Available.
570-825-6918
JAZZY WHEEL CHAIR, needs
a battery. $300 Or best offer.
570-829-2411
Miscellaneous
GARAGE SALE LEFTOVER
ITEMS: MTD 14.5HP 42" cut
riding lawn tractor, new bat-
tery asking $400. BUNK BED
cot size complete, sheets $25.
M a p l e c o f f e e t a b l e
45"wx28"dx16:h $10. Solid oak
cabinet suitable for TV open-
ing 44" wx32"h, 2 drawers $25.
77 men's ties $5.
570-675-2647
ANTIFREEZE & COOLANT
(2) $5 each. 570-655-2154
ASH TRAY, Water Ford Crys-
tal, 7 ins. $130. CHINA CHER-
UBS, (2) Lefton, Hand Painted.
$35 for pair. Call any after-
noon. 570-788-0621
AVON BOTTLES, (19) in ori-
ginal boxes, some full. 1960's
to 80's. $50 for all.
570-639-1323
CAGES (2) for dogs, steel
2 2 " x 1 9 " x 2 3 " $ 2 0 . a n d
24"x30"x21", $25. Both in new
condition. 570-655-2154
CAMCORDER in carry case.
Almost new. $150.
570-675-4383
DISHES, Fruit pattern, service
for 8 plus serving pieces. $25.
PLANT STAND, hol ds 4
plants, with a brass finish. $7.
BEDSPREADS, (2) Floral, full
size with dust ruffles, pillow
shams and Priscilla Curtains.
$25 each. WINDOW SHADES,
Vinyl, roll up, tan color, like
new. $8 each. MIRRORS, for
walls, 24"x40" $10 each.
570-654-3755
LADDER 28' aluminum exten-
sion ladder $185. 570-287-
7684 after 5 pm
Miscellaneous
FILE CABINET, brown with
gold trim. 4 deep drawer, 27"
wide, 4 ft. high. Like new. $25.
570-654-4793
GARAGE SALE LEFT OVER
ITEMS: XBox PS2 game sys-
tem $10. 16 XBox games $8.
Custom VW Beetle seat cov-
ers $8. Nail gun with nails $25.
2 book cases $25. Box ladies
clothing size small $5.
New wall hanging $25. 2 new
verti cal bl i nds 64x62 $15.
each. Old wall mirror $5. Oak
wall quilt hanger $10.
570-823-4576
GARAGE SALE LEFTOVER
ITEMS: RCA 27" TV B&W re-
mote 435. 15" black/orange
never used Oklahoma tire cov-
er, never used $25. George
Forman grill $15. Set of 20
Ocean Wor l d of Jacques
Cousteau never used books
$25. Fluke multi meter never
used 87V/E2 kit, never used
$175. 570-825-5548
GARAGE SALE LEFTOVER
ITEMS: Cherry dining room set
$750. Walnut corner cabinets
$200. Oval kitchen table, 6
chairs $100. Dresser & mirror,
8 drawers $25. Troy Bilt snow
thrower $500. Mastercraft vari-
able speed band saw $150.
570-868-5568
GARAGE SALE LEFTOVER
ITEMS: Universal tripod $10.
Classic wood display easel $5.
Computer keyboard $5. 2 Fish-
er speakers 13x36 $40. Saud-
er computer desk with hutch
$75. Leather desk chair $25. 2
sturdy platforms 4x4 & 4x6
$35. 4 men's suits 46"L $40
each. 1 men's tuxedo 46"l $40.
570-474-2067
LUGGAGE, Samsonite Soft
Luggage/Wheel ed cart. (1)
Cranberry medium bag, (1)
Cranberry Garment Bag, (1)
Wheel ed cart. $50 for al l ,
Leave a message.
570-693-1454
PUNCH BOWL SET, Never
used, i n ori gi nal box. 18
pieces, $10. Leave a message.
570-693-1454
ROSARIES (300) $3 each.
570- 829- 2411 RECORDS
(400) LP', 78's, 45's, from the
50's, 60's 70's and 80's. $1
each. 570-829-2411
SUI T CASES, on wheel s,
American Tourister and At-
lantis. (2) black and (1) blue.
25/26". Excellent condition.
Call after 1:00 p.m. $10 Each.
570-822-1227
SWEEPER, Dirt Devil Electric
Sweeper. Turbo tool cruiser.
Self propelled, 12 AMPS. Ex-
cellent Condition. $45. Call
after 1 p.m. 570-822-1227
SWI TCH, Li onel , 027. $5.
CROSSOVER, 027, $5. TREE
ASST., 1 package, 21 pieces.
$5. FAST RACK, (3) straight,
$2 each. RR STATION 027,
$2. 570-504-6778
VCR TAPES, 45 total. $15 for
all. UMBRELLA STROLLER,
$4. SCREEN, Fine, Aluminum,
48" wide. 15' roll. $10. TIER
LIGHT, Malibu, like new. Was
$75, asking $50. 570-779-9791
Musical Instruments
CLARINET, in case, $80.
570-735-1589
GUITARS, (1) electric, 6 string,
(1) electric 4 string. $80 each.
Pools & Spas
POOL FILTER, Hayward, auto
chlorine feeder and 3/4 HP.
motor. $275 for all.
570-639-1323
Stereos /Accessories
SATELLITE RADIO, XM, (1)
Delphi SA 1001 Boombox with
remote. (1) AC Adapter (also
battery operated) (1) Delphi
Receiver. In Box. $100. Leave
a message, 570-693-1454
Televisions /Accessories
TELEVI SI ON, Fl at scr een,
HDTV, Vi zi o. $100
570-301-8703
Tools
SKIL SAW, Craftsman, 7.5",
new in the original box. $25.
Call after 1 p.m. 570-822-1227
Toys & Games
MEGA BLOCKS, (2) boxes.
$20. LINCOLN LOGS, (7)
bags. $20. 570-504-6778
QUAD, BARBI E, Power
Wheel s. Good condi t i on,
purple and pink in color. Three
batteries, 1 AC charger for bat-
teries. $80. Will text pictures.
570-760-5291
RIDE ON TRACTOR, Ford,
cart train driven. 23 years old,
$175. TRAIN, HO Army, set of
4. $18. 570-735-1589
Want To Buy
ANTIQUES
One item or entire contents of
homes.
Cash Paid
570-814-3371
570-328-4420
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F U N N I E S THURSDAY, JULY 11, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
SALLY FORTH
CLASSIC PEANUTS
STONE SOUP
BLONDIE
BEETLE BAILEY
THATABABY
FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE
GET FUZZY
CLOSE TO HOME
ARGYLE SWEATER
B.C.
PICKLES
PARDON MY PLANET
MARMADUKE HERMAN
DRABBLE
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TUNDRA