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universe.byu.edu
September 25 October 1, 2012
Brigham Young University
Provo, Utah
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Stop, look and listen for signs of stress
B Y A U B R E Y S T E E N H O E K
As Megan Chipman focused on sub-
mitting her mission papers, she walked
from the Tanner Building to the library.
Her thoughts were, If I go on a mis-
sion, should I put my papers in now?
Should I wait to put my papers in to see
if I can get an internship this summer?
Should I switch my schedule this semes-
ter so I can t in an internship so I can
leave in summer?
Her mind was involved in her inter-
nal discussion for the earlier part of the
day. She said it was hard to focus on any-
thing; she was stressed about making
the right choice and she couldnt seem
to get her mind off of it.
According to experts in the eld,
the onset of stress most commonly
comes from transition periods in life.
College students are in a period of
constant change, explaining the high
levels of stress. Stressful events cause
negative thought patterns that make
events worse than they are. The body
recognizes stress before we do, and it
shows physically and cognitively.
The larger view
Stress in college years is a continu-
ally rising trend in the United States
due to the changing environment, work,
school, relationships and other major
life decisions.
According to a Cooperative Institu-
tional Research Program survey, more
than 200,000 freshmen students rated
their mental health, and only 59.1 per-
cent of students reported their mental
health as above average. This is the
lowest score in the 25 years the survey
has been running.
Many college students make their
stress worse by not taking care of them-
selves physically. Experts say not get-
ting enough sleep, eating junk food,
not exercising and overbooking are all
ways students increase stress.
Findings from the 2009 College Senior
Survey said that 33.1 percent of graduat-
ing seniors said they frequently felt
overwhelmed by all they had to do.
Daniel Huestis, a BYU student,
See STRESS on Page 3
The sacrifices and demands
of a BYU nursing student
Students in the
nursing program
are required to go
above and beyond
B Y M A D I L Y N C O L E
At 4:45 a.m., Sadee Hansen hears the
buzzing of her alarm clock. As much as
she wants to pull the covers over her
face, she has to get up or shell miss her
bus for her 7 a.m. shift at the Primary
Childrens Medical Center in Salt Lake
City. Hansen is a nursing student in
her fourth semester at BYU, and time
is something she does not have a lot of.
What started as a childhood interest
developed into her soon-to-be career.
Hansen, 21, from Riverton, Salt Lake
County, grew up in the medical eld, as
her father was a surgeon. Her love for
the nursing eld developed after she
went to Haiti with her mother. It was
then she learned that nursing could
open the door for her to help and serve
people in all sorts of places.
The undergraduate nursing pro-
gram at BYU is a three-year program
after admittance. Each semester has
a different focus and from the second
semester until graduation students get
hands-on experience in hospital set-
tings with real patients.
Along with taking classes, nursing
students are expected to complete six to
12 hours of hands-on work in the hos-
pital per week. However, students are
not guaranteed a spot in Provo hospitals
and often have to commute.
Data from the 20102011 school year
report that 368 students were in the
undergraduate nursing program. The
average GPA of these students was a
3.79. The College of Nursing has a 100
percent pass rate on the American
See NURSE on Page 3
Photo illustration by Brad Davis and Chris Bunker
College students have a long to-do list that causes stress in their daily lives. The 2009 College Senior Survey found that 33.1 percent of graduating seniors are overwhelmed.
Photo by Madilyn Cole
Sadee Hansen, a BYU nursing student, practices drawing blood.
Experts say not getting
enough sleep, eating
junk food, not exercising
and overbooking are
all ways students
increase stress.
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UNIVERSE ONLINE
Continue reading these stories and more at universe.byu.edu.
BYU students react to
protests in Middle East
Following last weeks attack, protests broke
out throughout the Middle East and Northern
Africa. Protesters targeted U.S. embassies in
Cairo and Sana, Yemen, as well as many other
countries throughout the region.
Thousands of miles away from the unrest,
BYU students said the attacks disheartened
them .
Story continued at http://unvr.se/P6vfCQ
Nursing students go global
Before students in the nursing program walk
across the stage and the bright lights to receive
their hard-earned diplomas, they will all have
had exposure to areas of the world that are not
as bright and happy, where their tools and skills
were appreciated and needed to help save lives.
The global health and human diversity course
required for all nursing students, provides stu-
dents an opportunity to learn more about the
world around them, and helps them to understand
the impact culture has on health.
Story continued at http://unvr.se/PQOtvJ
New study shows people have
more time when they give it away
A new study has shown that when people
donate their time to others they nd more time
in their schedules and live longer than those
who do not serve.
Cassie Mogilner, assistant professor of mar-
keting at the Wharton School at the University
of Pennsylvania, told The Harvard Business
Review about the benets serving can have on
someones well-being.
Story continued at unvr.se/ShvQkb
President Packer presides over
Brigham City Temple dedication
President Boyd K. Packer, president of the
Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, presided over
the cornerstone ceremony for the Brigham
City Temple and dedicated the temple in three
sessions.
These temple dedication sessions were broad-
cast to LDS stake centers all across Utah to
members of the Church holding special temple
recommends for the occasion.
Story continued at unvr.se/QQtz0I
AP Photo/Mohammad Hannon
10,000 people poured into a boulevard of Benghazi, demanding that militias disband.
Mechanical engineering
is a splash
Skipping rocks and shooting rubber balls out
of air compressed cannons, BYUs Splash Lab
is nothing short of interesting when it comes to
their projects and research.
The Splash Lab is not your average lab on
campus. Everything from rock skipping to ping
pong balls bouncing in puddles are studied,
along with many other natural phenomena that
deal with water and other liquids.
Story continued at http://unvr.se/P6sQrU
Photo by Sarah Hill
The Brigham City Utah temple was dedicated
Sunday and marks the LDS churchs 139th temple.
Photo by Jamison Metzger
The Y-Serve logo is prominent in the WILK.
Caffeine update police and council weigh in
B y C R Y S T A L M Y L E R
In a recent demonstration on
campus, students handed out
soda in an effort to raise aware-
ness of a petition to request
caffeine on campus. Police
informed the students that
without proper authorization,
they were not allowed to hold the
event on campus. The students
complied and moved to a site off
of BYU property.
Lt. Arnold Lemmon of the Uni-
versity Police commented on the
situation, stating that the reason
police responded to the situation
was students were promoting
products on campus.
We did not view it as a pro-
test, Lemmon said. In order to
promote or sell any product, you
need approval from the dean of
student life. I dont know if (the
drinks) were caffeinated or not.
That was not the issue.
The issue was students had
not gone through the proper
channels to hold an event on
campus.
One option for students
wanting to voice their concerns
is to meet with a representa-
tive of the Student Advisory
Council, a subsidiary of the
BYUSA. According to Christina
Westover, the vice president of
SAC, the council consists of 40
students who meet with admin-
istrators one or two times a
week.
The council acts as a bridge
between students and the admin-
istration, Westover said.
Adrian Klemme, assistant
director of student leadership
and adviser of SAC, said that
SAC hopes students are aware
of their resources and represen-
tation on campus.
It is very important to us
that students know they have a
connection to administration,
Klemme said.
Klemme also briey discussed
the caffeine issue from the coun-
cils viewpoint. The goal of the
council is to raise awareness of
an issue with the administration
and that awareness has been
achieved through other means.
What I can say is that people
who are aware of the issue are
working on the issue, Klemme
said.
At the beginning of the semes-
ter, a student representative pro-
posed looking into the caffeine
issue as a research project and
brought it up to the administra-
tion. When the event on cam-
pus occurred, the representative
backed away from the issue.
He (the representative) didnt
want to be associated with that
type of approach, Klemme said.
Overall, Klemme said the inci-
dent was not the best approach to
the situation.
The approach taken by stu-
dents in general could have
been carried out a little more elo-
quently, Klemme said. There
were a lot of things that were red
ags, and it wasnt just the caf-
feine issue.
Klemme stressed the impor-
tance for students to use their
resources on campus.
Our message is that it
is always best to work with
the administration, Klemme
said.
Legislative committee discusses
human-form targets
B y J O R D A N L E E
While there is no law regard-
ing the practice of human-
form targets, it has become an
unwritten rule adopted by the
public ranges.
Robin Cahoon, Utah Divi-
sion of Wildlife Resources leg-
islative liaison, reported to the
Utah legislature Wednesday
giving a report on the safety of
hunting with a firearm while
also appealing for human-form
targets at public ranges not be
made law.
The state of Utah instituted
hunter education in 1957,
Cahoon said. During that year
there were 126 hunting-related
accidents. Of those accidents,
22 were fatal. This sort of acci-
dent rate was not tolerable. The
primary objective of the pro-
gram is to help people learn
essential skills needed to hunt
safely and ethically.
Comparing 1957 to recent
years provided an insight into
hunting that is rarely known.
Utahs Hunter Education
Program works, Cahoon said.
Over the last 16 years (since
1996) Utah has averaged six
hunting incidents per year.
During that time, we have had
only seven hunting-related
fatalities.
The International Hunter
Education Association teaches
that you should never point
your firearm at something you
do not intend to shoot. There-
fore shooting at human shaped
targets would be counterpro-
ductive, Cahoon said.
Although targets shaped
as humans are not available,
Cahoon noted that the targets
used in Utahs Hunter Educa-
tion Program include a bulls-
eye, squirrel and a rabbit.
Senator Lyle Hi l lyard
(R- Cache, Rich) offered his
thoughts on the subject by
recounting an experience of
one of his constituents. He told
of a man who is a professional
trainer of how to handle weap-
ons and upon arriving at the
Logan public shooting range,
was informed that they did
not allow human targets to be
used. A round target with a
bulls-eye was the most com-
mon target used at the facility.
Its one thing to shoot at
targets, but its another when
its self-defense and youve got
somebody coming at you, Hill-
yard said. I understand the
reason that you may not want
to teach people to shoot peo-
ple but the aspect of having a
training with a gun and getting
the equipment maybe ought to
be changed so you have some of
that more experience.
Hillyard said he realized not
all who attend shooting ranges
would feel comfortable shoot-
ing at a human shaped target
saying he (doesnt) want to
force people but give them a
choice.
Presidi ng Chai r, Sen.
Mark B. Madsen (R- Tooele),
told those gathered that the
department has the privilege
of operating (the ranges) but
they are the citizens range.
Madsen believed that by not
allowing human-form targets
they may have restricted
use because of an overstep of
authority.
Because there is no admin-
istrative rule on prohibiting
human-form targets it was
Madsens belief that a meeting
would need to be held to deter-
mine a statute that could allow
for more clarity.
There needed to be input
from the tax-payers that own
the range, Madsen said. The
peoples interests need to be
ref lected in the policies and
since they are the publics
shooting ranges they need to
make sure their interests are
paramount.
CORRECTION
A photo from last weeks
print edition incorrectly cred-
ited a photo. The photo con-
tributor was Margie Torres.
2 The Universe, September 25 October 1, 2012
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StreSS
Good stress vs.
toxic stress
Continued from Page 1
explained that everyone has
stressful events and people; men,
especially, are good at hiding it.
Its not socially acceptable
to show certain levels of stress,
and when stress turns into dis-
tress people still dont let on
anything is wrong, said Hues-
tis. Showing we are facing dis-
tress is a sign of weakness, and
no one wants to feel like they
arent up to the task like every-
one else appears to be.
Reasons
Experts say the constant com-
petition faced in college is the
cause of much stress, on top of
holding a job to pay for school,
extracurricular activities, dat-
ing and keeping in touch with
family.
According to Barbara Mor-
rell, the director of the Stress
Management and Biofeedback
Lab, the top three reasons stu-
dents at BYU come to the Stress
Management and Biofeedback
Lab are school, relationships
and fnances.
Time management and too
many things crammed into one
day often create an increase in
stress.
Sometimes when I have a lot
of things going on and I worry
that I cant get it all done, I
spend more time stressing that
I cant get it all done than I do
knocking things off my list,
said BYU student Lindsey
Hanna.
Morrell explained many stu-
dents get caught in thinking
traps such as comparing, think-
ing negatively and responding
to shoulds instead of personal
priorities.
Experts say college is often a
stressful time because students
arent living a healthy lifestyle.
Taylor Farnsworth, a student
at BYU, said one day he had a
plane fight from Salt Lake to
New York for a track meet, and
during the plane fight he had to
fnish an eight-page paper.
It would be so much easier if
we could focus on one thing at a
time, said Farnsworth.
Impacts
Diane Peterson, a marriage
and family therapist, said, Our
bodies often show us that we are
in stress before our minds rec-
ognize it.
Headaches, high blood pres-
sure, diarrhea, higher sustain-
ability to catch colds and the fu
are all physical signs of stress
said Peterson. Our emotions
also give away our stress lev-
els, including irritability, mood
swings, lack of motivation and
being overwhelmed or easily
angered.
Studies have shown that
when stress is heightened it
impairs ability to think on a
higher level, as taught by the
Career and Academic Center
on the topic of stress manage-
ment. This means students who
are too stressed before tests, at
work or at school are not per-
forming at their best because
their cognitive abilities are
lowered.
Peterson said there are two
types of stress: good and bad
(toxic).
An example of good stress is if
a student is worried about a test
and the worry makes him or her
study to prepare. However, toxic
stress would exist if a boss made
an employee look bad at work,
causing the employee to worry
constantly about the security of
his or her job.
Toxic stress is when
fears and imaginings are
repeatedly disproportionate to
actual risks, Peterson said.
It is also when the amount
of stress makes it diffcult to
cope.
When this becomes a
common pattern of thought,
an anxiety disorder is often
present, Peterson explained.
A combination of therapy and
medication make it easily
treatable.
Talking problems out with
a loved one, deep breathing,
writing in a journal, listening
to music, yoga, meditation and
playing sports are all ways to
relieve stress.
Megan Chipman, undecided
on what to do about her mission
papers, chose to talk it out with
a friend.
The two conversed about both
of their options and were able
to relieve their stress together.
Chipman now has her mission
call.
It is still stressful, Chip-
man said, but now its the good,
exciting stress.
NurSe
Learning work
ethic for the future
Continued From Page 1
Nurses Credentialing Center
examinations to be a family
nurse practitioner and a 96 per-
cent pass rate on the National
Council Licensure Exami-
nation for registered nurses
exam.
Because of these numbers,
the program is highly compet-
itive, and many students dont
make the cut when it comes to
admittance into the major.
Hansen said everyone told
me good luck when they found
out she was applying to the
program.
She explained that, as with
any competitive program, the
prerequisites and other parts
of the application process were
not easy. Part of the process is
completing a volunteer log that
represents all service and vol-
unteer-oriented activities from
the past fve years. She also
explained that students are
told they need a car, and if they
do not have a car, they need to
have their own transportation
lined up because of the exces-
sive traveling involved with
completing clinical rounds.
Lauren Wallace, 21, in her
second semester of the pro-
gram, said the competitive
nature of the program sepa-
rates the people who really
want to be there and are pas-
sionate about being nurses.
Wallace describes her
classes as being stressful
because what shes learning
really matters.
I knew going into it that the
program was very demand-
ing, Wallace said, but she
noted that because she wants
to be a better nurse, she is will-
ing to work hard.
Like Wallace, Hansen feels
a lot of pressure because she
knows the seriousness of what
shes learning.
If you mess up, youre
affecting someones life, Han-
sen said.
Despite the stress and high
pressure she faces, she feels
nursing has helped her to be
more compassionate.
She said its an adjustment
getting used to working with
people who are always at their
worst.
When she goes in for her
shift at the hospital, she said,
I forget about whats going
on in my life and focus on the
patient.
Melissa Williams, 21, in her
ffth semester, is one of the few
nursing students who works
and goes to school. Because of
her hectic schedule during the
week, she attends classes and
completes clinicals during
the week, and she works long
hours on the weekends.
You have no time for your-
self, she said.
Williams said its easier for
her to work on the weekends
because during the week you
cant really prepare for what
theyre going to tell you to do
or where you need to be.
She has needed to be fexible
and make nursing her prior-
ity throughout the course of
her undergraduate studies.
She said the most diffcult part
about being a nursing student
is the demand on her time and
its effect on other aspects of
her life.
However, Williams, Hansen
and Wallace feel that they are
putting in the time now for
a payoff later. All three stu-
dents, feel they will be better
prepared to work after gradu-
ation because of the hard work
and the time they put in.
vfr
DevotionalJeff Wilks,
School of Accountancy,
11:05-11:50 a.m., Marriott Center
DisneyCollegeProgramLive
Presentation
2 & 4 p.m., 3222 WSC
StudentFitnessCenter
OpenHouse9 a.m.-4 p.m.,
Smith Fieldhouse Room 293
KennedyCenterAmbassador
LectureAmbassador to the US
for Germany, 12 p.m.,
238 Herald R. Clark Building
GuestRecitalJulie Heinen,
7:30 p.m., Madsen Recital Hall
GuestRecital
Dmitry Rachmanov,
7:30 p.m., Madsen Recital Hall
BYUGraduateSchoolFair
10 a.m.-2 p.m., WSC Ballroom
DistinguishedLecturein
InternationalAffairsJohn
J. Harme, 7:30 p.m., Hinckley
Center Assembly Hall
UVUSymposiumonADHD
9 a.m.-4 p.m., UVU
ParentsWeekend
Sept. 28-30, all day,
BYU Campus
Register online
parents.byu.edu
DollhouseFestivalBoutique
Raise awareness and money
for child abuse victims, Friday
10 a.m.-9 p.m., Saturday 10
a.m.-5 p.m., Provo City Library
L.TomPerrySpecial
CollectionsOpenHouse
4:30-7 p.m., HBLL Special
Collections Classroom
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THeUnIVeRSeCALenDAR SePteMBeR 25 OCtOBeR 1
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Frontier Airlines shuts down flights out of Provo
B y J J K N e C H t e L
Frontier Airlines announced
on Sept. 14 that it would stop
all fights coming out of Provo
Airport starting in 2013.
Starting on June 21 of last
year, Frontier had successfully
been flying a small, 99-seat
Embraer 190 jet aircraft out of
Provo for quick trips to Denver.
However, due to recently fall-
ing profts across the country,
Frontier Airlines had to make
some cutbacks. These small
Provo fights to Denver were
on their list of things to go in
this coming year. This was
unexpected, as Frontier Airlines
had announced earlier this year
that it was planning on bringing
in an airbus for its Provo feet
in January.
Provo City Mayor John Curtis
expressed in a press release that
this was an unfortunate change
for Provo.
While disappointing, this
is just a temporary setback,
Curtis said. The Provo fights
were often full, proving that
there is a demand for the service.
And they were overall proft-
able when you factor in the trips
beyond Denver.
Curtis was not the only one
that is disappointed by the ser-
vice cancellation. Marissa
Wimmer and her husband,
both students at BYU, have fown
out of Provo before and were dis-
mayed to hear that Frontier Air-
lines would no longer be offering
services out of Provo Airport.
I am sad that they are not fy-
ing out of Provo anymore, Wim-
mer said. It was super nice to
just get off the plane and have
our luggage brought over to us
and then be home in 10 minutes.
I think if they had given it more
time it would have been proft-
able for the airport in the long
run as more people heard about
it.
Not only did it seem proftable
to those that few out of Provo,
but as the Wimmers found out,
these fights were perfect for
BYU students who wanted to
quickly get out of Provo and
avoid Salt Lake City traffc.
We are both disap-
pointed because we were excited
about being able to fy out of
Provo at a future date, Wim-
mer said. It will defnitely take
longer to get out to the SLC air-
port when we have to travel and it
could possibly cost more because
it is a larger airport.
Although Frontier Airlines
has decided to pull their fights
from Provo Airport, the city
of Provo is still determined to
search for other ways the resi-
dents can take advantage of this
airport. Were continuing to
look at other airlines to provide
service as well, Curtis said.
Photo by Jamison Metzger
Frontier Airlines will discontinue its fights out of the Provo Airport starting in 2013 because of falling profts.
the Universe, September 25 October 1, 2012 3
Use your Meal Plan at
lunch from 12-2:30 on
Tuesday, September 25th
at the Cannon Commons
for the Hawaiian Luau
Meal.
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dining.byu.edu/commons
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Lunch
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New speed limits on I-15 will be permanent
SALT LAKE CITY The drive
to Vegas just got faster, for good.
In a unanimous motion, a
legislative committee voted
in support of permanency and
expansion of the 80 mph test
zones between Nephi and Cedar
City.
The Utah Transportation
Interim Committee heard from
Carlos Braceras, deputy director
and chief engineer of Utah
Department of Transportation,
and Rep. Jim Dunnigan,
R-Taylorsville, on Wednesday
Sept. 19, to discuss the results
of the test sections. Dunnigan
sponsored HB406 in 2008 to
create the 80 mph test sections.
The four test sections on
I-15 included Scipio to Mills
Junction, a stretch of road just
south of Fillmore, Cove Fort (
near the junction with I-70) to
Beaver, and another stretch just
north of Cedar City.
Before Dunnigan sponsored
the bill, Sen. Scott K. Jenkins,
R-District 20, had tried to pass
it. I was the original Senate
sponsor that couldnt get it
through and then the house did.
This is a great bill.
When the bill was initially
presented, the committee was
concerned the new speed limit
would encourage drivers to
travel much faster. After a three
year study, Utah Department
of Transportation (UDOT)
reported even though traffc did
travel faster, average speed only
increased from 83 to 85 mph.
There was a 20 percent
reduction in drivers exceeding
the speed limit, Braceras told
lawmakers. Therefore, there
was better compliance with the
speed limits posted.
Of the first two segments
studied, Braceras reported an
11 percent decrease in crashes
in the frst and a 20 percent
decrease in the second. Two
other segments of I-15 are
currently being studied, and
results will be available in the
summer of 2014.
Committee members discussed
testing I-80 from Salt Lake to
Wendover, although Braceras
expressed concern because of
higher fatalities. Dunnigan said
there is a possibility of expanding
tests to northern Utah.
Dunnigan requested the
approval for additional 80 mph
testing in geographically similar
sections on I-15 that UDOT had
previously ruled out because of
prior speed related crashes.
I think that UDOT and
perhaps traffic enforcement
have some concern because
(these areas) have a little bit
higher history of accidents, but
still as far as geometric design
of roadway they would qualify.
Theyre just nice, straight
sections where you have nothing
to do except try to get through as
quickly as possible, he said.
Dunnigan also said UDOT and
the legislature should accelerate
the determing process for state-
wide speed limits.
I appreciate the science
and carefulness of UDOT in
taking years to determine that
these (speed limits) should be
made permanent, Dunnigan
said. But accidents have
not increased, and we probably
ought to have a mechanism to
redesignate it as a permanent
speed limit rather than as a test.
Photo courtesy BYU archives
The old home of Cougar football only seated about 5,000 people and was located
where the Tanner Building now stands. Continual success and winning seasons led to
the Lavell Edwards Stadium of today.
B y M E r E d i T h L o n g
BYU football isnt what it used to
be. The Cougar football program has
grown and developed over the past 80
years to winning a national champion-
ship and having some of the nicest facili-
ties in the country. Originally, the team
played games in front of a much smaller
crowd where the Richards Building now
stands.
Although students use the never-
ending stairs near the Tanner Building
nearly every day, that was not their orig-
inal purpose. The stairs used to be the
stands of the old hillside stadium, which
was home to the BYU football team in the
1930s.
The permanent stands at the old
stadium seated 5,000 people, with tem-
porary bleachers on the west side accom-
modating up to 12,000 people. This is
stiny in comparison to the capacity of
LaVell Edwards Stadium, 65,000 people.
The old stadium was frst used in 1928,
when BYU football Coach Ott Romney
led the Cougars to their frst victory
against the College of Idaho Coyotes.
From its humble beginnings, its
pretty awesome what BYU football
has become, Mel Olsen, offensive line
coach for BYU football, said. Its kind
of unheard of to go from a place like
that old stadium to winning a national
championship.
The LaVell Edwards Stadium, the cur-
rent home to the Cougars, has not been
the only innovation to the BYU football
program overs the years. Since 1964,
BYU has added the indoor practice facil-
ity as well as the Student Athlete Build-
ing, which is equipped with academic
advisement for the athletes, a physical
therapy center, the football gallery and
many other services.
Olsen recalled that before and during
Edwards coaching of the BYU Cougars,
the team had to use the west annex of the
Smith Fieldhouse for practice whenever
it rained or snowed because the indoor
practice facility was not built yet.
The area was so small that the
offense would practice for an hour and
a half, followed by defense, Olsen said.
After LaVells run, BYU football con-
tinued to progress to become the team it is
now. The team is now equipped with Nike
uniforms and state-of-the-art facilities.
I think that BYUs football facilities
are among the nicest in the country,
wide receiver Cody Hoffman said. Not
too many stadiums still have natural
grass felds it takes a lot of work to care
for a grass feld.
According to Roy Peterman, director
of grounds, all the immaculate details
of the feld grass and landscaping out-
side the stadium are cared for by BYU
Grounds.
Whether its accompanying thou-
sands of fans on a Saturday night or pro-
viding an excellent environment for the
football team, the LaVell Edwards Sta-
dium is home of BYU football and the
result of a rich history.
The improvements and successes
of the football team (are) largely due
to new facilities, skilled coaching and
commitment to and pride in the team,
Olsen said. It was all pretty exciting to
watch unfold.
The humble history of the Cougars stadiums
B Y J o E L g r i f f i n A n d
d A n i E L L A S U B i E T A
4 The Universe, September 25 october 1, 2012
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The Universe, September 25 October 1, 2012 5
NEXT: UNI VERSI TY DEVOTI ONAL
This devotional will also be broadcast in the JSB Auditorium.
TODAY
UNIVERSITY DEVOTIONAL
Tuesday, Sept. 25, 11:05 a.m.,
Marriott Center
T. Jeffrey Wilks joined the BYU
faculty in 2000 after completing
his masters and PhD at Cornell
University. From 2006 to 2008
Professor Wilks took a leave of
absence from BYU to fulfll an
appointment as an academic fel-
low at the Financial Accounting
Standards Board in Norwalk,
Connecticut. This regulatory body
is responsible for setting the rules
and guidelines that U.S. compa-
nies must follow when reporting
their fnancial results. While there
Professor Wilks helped in the
development of a new international
standard on the topic of revenue
recognition, a standard that will
ultimately affect over 100 countries.
Professor Wilks currently
teaches a case-based masters level
course that requires students to
apply both U.S. and International
Financial Reporting Standards to
a variety of complex business trans-
actions. Students rate this course
among the most diffcult courses
in the Marriott School, but also
among the most valuable courses.
The Marriott School awarded
Professor Wilks the Teaching
Excellence Award in 2011.
Professor Wilks served as a
missionary in the Ecuador Quito
Mission. Since then he has served
in many other callings, includ-
ing Scoutmaster, early-morning
seminary instructor, and executive
secretary. Currently he is serving
as the bishop of his ward in Orem,
Utah. He and his wife, Melinda,
are the parents of fve children.
T. Jeffrey Wilks
Professor of Accounting, Marriott School of Management
Ray Huntington
Professor of Ancient
Scripture
Selected speeches available at http://speeches.byu.edu
October 2, 11:05 a.m.
Marriott Center
PLAN NOW TO ATTEND.
BYU construction management program has much to offer
Its not all just
yellow, hard
hats and muddy
wading boots
B y M e r e d i T h L O n g
For students struggling to fg-
ure out a practical career path
with an excellent job market
after graduation, the BYU con-
struction management program
may be the answer. Although
hard, yellow hats and muddy
wading boots may often be asso-
ciated with this profession, stu-
dents and professors alike say it
has much more to offer.
One of the great things about
the program is that it has a high
number of job offers to gradu-
ates which is a major concern
for most students, said Josh
Adams, marketing specialist for
BYU Construction Management
Program.
An article on CNNMoney
ranks construction manage-
ment positions as number 23 out
of 100 Best Jobs in America,
and describe the responsibili-
ties of the career as managing
and controlling construction
execution, planning, productiv-
ity and safety. Other aspects of
construction management are
keeping current on govern-
ment regulations concerning
construction as well as budget
and cost.
Aside from a stable job mar-
ket, another plus is the depend-
able pay, which according to
the Bureau of Labor Statistics
averages between $80,000 and
$90,000. Trevor Hatch, a senior
majoring in construction
management said he found the
major not because of a desire
for a high paying salary, but
through his passion for creating.
I declared business man-
agement as my major origi-
nally but then realized that I
enjoyed building things, so I
considered engineering and
eventually decided on CM (con-
struction management) because
it is a good mixture of both,
Hatch said.
Jay Christofferson, a profes-
sor in the construction man-
agement program said some
might not consider construc-
tion management because they
are not educated about the
major. It includes many types
of construction like residential
and commercial, job oppor-
tunities both nationally and
internationally and allows for
creativity.
Some people dont know what
(construction management) is,
Christofferson said. If you were
to defne it, its the building of
one-of-a-kind structures in an
uncontrolled environment.
The construction manage-
ment program at BYU leads
construction management edu-
cation around the world, and has
consistently placed in the top
three for regional and national
competitions. For more infor-
mation, visit their website at
cm.byu.edu.
Couples and Facebook accounts: To combine or not to combine?
B y J i n B a T e M a n
With the ability to virtually
friend anyone in the world on
the social networking site, Face-
book has produced some chal-
lenges for married couples. The
New York Times and The Wash-
ington Times, writing articles
titled, A double standard, and,
Facing temptations on Face-
book, provide just a couple
examples of the possible dangers
Facebook has introduced.
Cherly Wetzstein, journalist
for the Washington Times, said,
Befriending old flames can
snuff a marriage, but logging
off is extreme.
Wetzsteins article focuses on
a New Jersey pastors comment
to his congregation, urging mar-
ried couples to stop using Face-
book, which Reverand Cedric
Miller described as too many
peoples portal to infdelity.
Although there have been
reports of ruined marriages
due to social networks, it is
obvious that with 66 percent of
adults using social networking
sites, deleting accounts may be
an extreme solution. That leads
to the possibility of combining
Facebook accounts.
Despite any dangers that
may arise from having separate
Facebook accounts, Ashley and
Douglas Kelly, a married couple
attending BYU, do not see the
need to combine their accounts.
That would be a reason if you
dont trust each other, said Ash-
ley Kelly, junior theater educa-
tion major from Fresno, Calif.
Her husband, Douglas Kelly,
senior information systems
major from Provo, also feels
that combining accounts is not
necessary.
Once we started dating, Face-
book disappeared, he said.
The Kellys have separate
accounts, do not share pass-
words and agree that they will
likely never combine accounts.
Another married couple also
did not combine accounts; how-
ever, they do share passwords.
I feel like its almost more of
a hassle to share an account,
said Annie Call, junior
elementary education major
from Springville.
Her husband, Joseph Call, a
sophomore from Star Valley,
Wyo., majoring in information
technology, feels the same way.
We both know each others
passwords although we dont
get onto each others (accounts),
said Joseph Call.
Annie and Joseph both agree
that it would be more conve-
nient to have separate accounts
because when someone wants
to talk to one of them it would
be diffcult to tell who is online
with a shared account.
For example, it would be
hard to plan a surprise party,
Joseph said.
Facebook may not be a con-
cern in the lives of these mar-
ried couples; the question of
whether or not to combine was a
simple one for them. Since Face-
book does not have the option to
merge two accounts, it becomes
more complicated for those who
choose to do so. However, for
them, it might be an important
way of keeping their relation-
ship close.
Photo by Jamison Metzger
a BYU married couple tries to decide if combining Facebook accounts is a good idea.
Photo courtsey BYU Construction Management department
Construction management is ranked 23rd in Cnn Moneys Best Jobs
in america.
Attorneys bring love of the Constitution to Utah schools
B y M I A G A B R I E L
Daniel Woods stands at the
front of the class with a mic
attached to his tie, holding up his
pocket-sized United States Con-
stitution and reading aloud, We
the people of the United States,
in order to form a more perfect
Union .
Constitution Day was cel-
ebrated in Utah schools on
Sept. 17 with presentations given
by members of the Utah State Bar
Civics Education Committee.
Shauna Griffen, who has
taught at Maple Mountain
High School for the past three
years, received an email this
summer from the Utah Bar
Association asking if mem-
bers of the association would
be able to visit her classroom
on Constitution Day.
Students need to see how
laws and politics affect them,
Griffen said. They have been
taught some basics about the
Constitution, but teaching it
to them with more depth helps
them see why it is important to
them and the role that they have
as citizens to understand and
support the Constitution.
The Utah Bar Association
sent lawyers to elementary
schools, to boys and girls clubs,
to middle schools and high
schools throughout the state of
Utah. Daniel Woods, a civil liti-
gation lawyer for the Stratton
Law Group in Orem, is a mem-
ber of the Utah State Bar Civics
Education Committee. His love
of the Constitution is so much a
part of him that he volunteered
to share what he loves and what
he knows with the students of
Maple Mountain High School in
Spanish Fork.
We are a government of the
people, for the people, by the peo-
ple, Woods said. And because
of that, every single person
should have a basic understand-
ing of what the Constitution says
and what it means.
Woods said his goal for the
high school students was to give
them a basic understanding of
the constitution, instill a sense
of pride and a spirit of patrio-
tism. He split the class in half for
a mock trial, as if they were in
the court of appeals. One side of
the room was the appellee (pros-
ecution), and the other was the
appellant (defense), with ve
students acting as judges at the
front of the room. The students
received a list of terms, the case
they were working on and a
pocket copy of the Constitution.
Garrett Griffin, a 15-year-
old student at Maple Mountain,
acted as an attorney for the
appellant, discussing strategy
with his team and arguing his
case in front of the judges.
It was fun to see how the
Constitution works, Grif-
n said. Its what America is
all about. The more we know
about it, the more we can gov-
ern ourselves.
Woods stressed the impor-
tance of every citizen reading
the Constitution to know what
authority our leaders have and
what authority they do not have.
He stated that the separation of
powers was laid down for a rea-
son and taught the students of
the need to acknowledge the
importance of the role of law and
of keeping the three branches of
government within their consti-
tutional authority.
I feel its important to re-
educate people about what the
Constitution says and what it
does and to help them recognize
when a law is unconstitutional,
Woods said. I want to help peo-
ple feel empowered. That this
really is a government of the peo-
ple. That the people collectively
are sovereign and that its only
as good as we are.
Associated Press
This undated handout photo, provided by George Washingtons Mount Vernon Estate & Gardens, shows
George Washingtons annotated copy of the Constitution and Bill of Rights.

We are a government
of the people, for the
people, by the people.
Because of that,
every single person
should have a basic
understanding of what
the Constiution says
and what it means.
Daniel Woods
Civil litigation lawyer
6 The Universe, September 25 October 1, 2012
September 24 28
Monday
Tuesday
Lunch with a Llama
10:00 AM-2:00 PM
RB Quad
Wednesday
Rooftop Tours
11:00AM 1:00 PM
SWKT
Thursday
Morningside w/
Matthew O. Richardson
11:00 AM11:45 AM
3228 WILK
Friday
Hot Dog BBQ
11:30 AM
Eyring Science Quad
Ice Cream Kick-Off
12:00 noon2:00 PM
Brigham Square/MCKB
Te Store With More
byubookstore.com
(801) 422-2400
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e
w
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k
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september 24th-28th 2012
sale hours & location
Te BYU Bookstore is owned and operated by Brigham Young University
monday
tues-thurs
friday
10 am - 6 pm
8 am - 6 pm
8 am - 3 pm
sale is located
outside the n.w.
corner of the
byu bookstore
Prof. Gary Booth
Dr. Booth has taught at BYU since 1972.
His courses include biology, plant and
wildlife sciences and Book of Mormon.
1
How do you sum up 40
years of teaching at
the same school?
I would describe it as a jour-
ney of discovery. When I came
here I didnt have a single test
tube in my lab. I gave up a mil-
lion-dollar research lab at the
University of Illinois, a big-time
job where I had everything I
ever dreamed of. But I felt like I
wanted to come where there was
more opportunity to teach. So,
the discovery part was putting
together a toxicology research
lab and getting myself involved
with undergraduates. Between
those two, it was like a journey
I was on.
2
Would it have been
different at the
University of Illinois?
BYU had more of an oppor-
tunity to teach undergraduates
than I had at the University of
Illinois. Illinois was about 90 per-
cent research, 10 percent teach-
ing. Here, its 70 percent teaching
and 30 percent research. So, BYU
essentially had the balance that
I was after. I wanted students to
be around me. Frankly, while I
was on my post-doctorate at Illi-
nois, I found out students were
your bread and butter . Thats
where you get your work done.
3
Do you make it a
goal to incorporate
humor into class?
Its a soft yes. Yes, because I
think learning can be fun, and
if its fun its going to bring a
smile to your face for a couple
of reasons. 1 Theyre going to
nd out they dont know as much
as they thought they did, and 2
they might feel how good it is
to feel something new suddenly
distill on them. And thats what
brings a smile to their faces.
Occasionally, yes, I go dressed
up as Yoda or Obi-Wan Kenobi
and I do my thing and its great,
but its all about learning. If you
can teach principles by blow-
ing up balloons, thats active
learning.
4
How do you incorporate
the gospel into
science lectures?
I feel that in the beauty and
the balance of the creation
everything is connected. If the
kids see that connection, theyre
studying the patterns of the Cre-
ator and some of the things that
the Creator has used to put these
organisms into place. Students
often ask, How can you teach
organic evolution here? I thought
that was a godless concept. And
its just an explanation that biol-
ogists have to explain the diver-
sity of life. Once they understand
that, they understand (evolu-
tion) doesnt detract from their
testimonies.
5
Have you had any
highlight experiences
as a teacher here?
My students presented me
with this $300 laser, its a Jedi
laser. That was a moment they
were trying to say thank you. I
remember walking in to class
with my colleague Paul Cox, we
team-taught a course. All the
students were standing on their
chairs clapping and chanting,
Oh captain, my captain. I looked
over at my colleague and he was
crying. I said, Paul, why are you
crying? Theyre clapping. And
he said, No, no. You dont get it.
Dont you know what thats from?
Ever see Dead Poet Society?
Taylor Street
More I-15 lane
restrictions
take effect
around Orem
B y C O D Y E D D I N G T O N
The seemingly unending
construction on I-15 will have
more exit closures.
UDOT construction crews
have already reduced south-
bound I-15 in Orem to three
lanes from the Lindon 200
South exit to University Park-
way on Sunday night, and this
section will remain reduced
the next couple weeks.
This lane restriction is due
to continued concrete paving
and is scheduled to last up to
two weeks.
This possible two-week
delay is a similar time frame
for another part of Orems I-15
section.
Motorists should also be
aware that the Orem 1600
North interchange was to
remain closed through late
September. How speedy con-
struction led to an early fin-
ish, and the interchange has
reopened. UDOT recommends
Orem 800 North and Pleasant
Grove Boulevard as alternate
routes.
On a positive note, UDOT is
planning on utilizing the night
hours to do a majority of the
work. This should minimize
the traffic during the daytime
and rush hours where volume
is high.
By performing this work
during overnight hours,
we are able to significantly
reduce traffic delays in the
long term, said I-15 CORE
spokesperson Leigh Dethman
in a recent press release.
Drivers are advised to use
State Street and Geneva Road
as alternative routes until con-
struction is complete.
Many Utah drivers who use
I-15 daily say they cant ever
recall not having some kind
of major construction project
on this highway.
I understand why, but I still
hate it, said Matt Francis, an
employee at KSL News in Salt
Lake and a daily I-15 com-
muter. A road that receives
the amount of consistent traf-
fic f low as ours needs a lot of
TLC to keep it in good shape.
Dont get me wrong, I hope
there is a day soon when it is
done and stays that way for a
while.
A UDOT press release says
in order to minimize the
delays, drivers are encour-
aged to use TravelWise, plan
ahead and use suggested
detours. Stay informed about
these and other I-15 CORE con-
struction activities by signing
up for weekly email updates at
udot.utah.gov/i15core, follow-
ing the project on facebook.
com/i15core and twitter.com/
i15core and receiving text
updates by texting i15core to
53535.
FIVE QS
FIVE QUESTIONS FOR

By performing this
work during overnight
hours, we are able to
signiantly reduce
trafc delays in
the long term.
Leigh Dethman
I-15 CORE spokesperson
The Universe, September 25 October 1, 2012 7
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Chinese orphans gain a
second chance at life
B y V A L E R I A C H A O
Not only does China account
for over 20 percent of the entire
worlds population, but there are
nearly one million orphans in
China born into poverty-stricken
homes that lack a caring, nurtur-
ing and loving mother.
Half the Sky, created in 1997, is
a nonprot organization focused
on helping orphans in China
gain a second chance in life. The
organization wants to provide
the basic necessities every child
should have, which also included
the nurturing care of a woman.
Most people do not realize that
the majority of Chinas popula-
tion live in mild to severe pov-
erty, according to most western
standards. Because of insuf-
cient funds, many of the orphans
have diseases, deformities and
handicaps that go untreated.
The organizations goal
is to raise money to support
the programs that it has set
up in coordination with the
Chinese government, said BYU
alumnus Jeremy Pendleton,
founder of Utah United for
Half the Sky. Half the Sky has
multiple programs that range
from building and renovating
orphanages, to training
otherwise unemployed women to
work in the orphanages caring
for and teaching the children.
Even if a child hasnt been
adopted by the time they reach
college age, Half the Sky will help
fund their college education.
Pendleton developed a love
for the Chinese people and cul-
ture during his LDS mission in
Taiwan. With the help of some
mission friends, he got involved
with Half the Sky during his
senior year at BYU as a way to
forget about himself and help
others.
We realized that all we ever
talked about was our majors, our
classes, our internships, our job
search, our relationships, our
engagements, our whatevers,
Pendleton said. We felt like we
had lost that spirit of service we
felt on our missions and wanted
to do something to give back. We
decided to team up with Half the
Sky to assist a cause we were pas-
sionate about.
Utah United for Half the Sky
is a satellite branch of Half the
Sky. The mission of the satellite
branch is to raise money through
fundraisers and send it to the U.S.
headquarters located in Berke-
ley, Calif. All proceeds earned
go directly to the orphans.
We have had one fundraiser
event so far a 5K/10K (run)
back in April 2012, said Kristy
Yoo, acting president of Utah
United for Half the Sky. Run-
ners ran along the Provo River
starting in the Paul Ream Wil-
derness Park. We raised more
than $3,000 from this one event.
It was an amazing experience
how everything came together,
how many people showed up.
Yoo said she has learned many
lessons from being involved in
Utah United for Half the Sky.
Minoring in nonprot manage-
ment, she loves applying what
she learned in textbooks to real-
life situations.
As someone who has been
given much, I long to share my
means and resources for the
betterment of others in need,
Yoo said. I do rmly believe
that we should all be anxiously
engaged in a good cause. What-
ever that good cause may be to
you, immerse yourself in it. To
me, this organization is a way to
share my passion, to serve and to
be edied in charity.
Students can help Utah United
for Half the Sky by attending the
fundraising events. Yoo said
that they are planning another
5K/10K marathon in April 2013.
Students can nd and like Utah
United for Half the Sky on Face-
book as well. The Facebook page
will have upcoming events and
fundraising outcomes informa-
tion. Last year, records showed
that Utah United raised $4,600
for Half the Sky.
Senior Jessica Lew, a physi-
ology and developmental biol-
ogy major and member of Utah
United, said anyones donation
would benet the orphans and
even change someones life.
The small contribution of just
one person can supply the funds
necessary to save an infant by
(funding needed) surgery, said
Lew. They can also provide the
necessary resources and educa-
tion for the orphans to give them
an opportunity to live a good life.
Students can read the success
stories and see the happiness
that these children have because
of their donations.
Cleaning the oceans from Utah
B y T Y L E R V A N H A Z E L E N
Volunteers will help clean up
areas around Provo Canyons
Bridal Veil Falls and the Jordan
River Parkway as part of Ocean
Conservancys International
Coastal Cleanup.
The Living Planet Aquarium
in Sandy has teamed up again
with Ocean Conservancy to get
landlocked Utah involved in
cleaning the oceans.
The aquarium is proud to
be participating in the Interna-
tional Coastal Cleanup again
this year. It creates a unique
opportunity for landlocked
Utahns to make a difference
in the welfare of our oceans,
said Melissa Bowers, volunteer
and internship coordinator at
The Living Planet Aquarium,
in a news release.
Though Utah is 650 miles from
the nearest coastline, Austin
Prince, an intern at The Living
Planet Aquarium, said that much
of the oceans trash is carried there
from inland streams and rivers.
Organizers have planned
two more cleanups in addition
to those already completed this
month. On Sept. 22 volunteers
met at Jordan River Parkway
Trail, and on Sept. 29 they will
meet at Bridal Veil Falls Trail,
both at 8 a.m.
There is a lot we can do here
to help, Prince said. It makes
the parks and places look better
and helps the environment.
If 20 volunteers show up it will
take only two hours to clean up
these areas, Prince said.
At the end of the cleanup, all
the trash will be weighed and the
statistics sent to Ocean Conser-
vancy for a nal total. Last year,
Utahns found 5,000 pounds of
trash, and organizers hope to
surpass that this year.
In addition to the coastal
cleanup, The Living Planet
Aquarium tries to schedule a
cleanup for each county each
month. They can be reached at
volunteer@livingplanet.com
and TLPA.ecoteer@gmail.com.
Volunteer opportunities are also
available on The Living Planets
website at thelivingplanet.com.
This year marks the 27th
year of Ocean Conservancys
International Coastal Cleanup.
Each year, hundreds of coun-
tries clean up millions of miles
of coastline in the movement for
Trash Free Seas.
The 2011 campaign gathered
almost 600,000 volunteers and
picked up 9 million pounds of
trash worldwide. Over the past
26 years, more than 153 mil-
lion pounds of trash have been
removed from 153 countries,
according to an Ocean Conser-
vancy news release.
Last year, volunteers found
enough food packaging to get
takeout for breakfast, lunch and
dinner every day for the next 858
years, David Pittenger, direc-
tor of the Ocean Conservancys
Trash Free Seas program, said
in a news release.
Along with the food items,
enough clothing was found to
outt every audience member of
the London 2012 Olympic opening
ceremony, enough light bulbs to
replace every light on the Eiffel
Tower and almost $46,000 worth
of recyclable beverage cans.
Trash jeopardizes the health
of our ocean, our economy and
people. Sometimes there are
uncontrollable events like
the Japan tsunami that add
to the larger problem of marine
debris. Thats why its important
to tackle whats preventable,
Pittenger said.
Police Beat
THEFT
Sept. 17 Five victims reported cash stolen from their wallets
during a birthday party at their apartment. Their wallets were
left unattended in their bedrooms. The police are still working to
determine how much cash was taken as well as other potentially
stolen articles.
Sept. 17 A $400 bicycle was reported stolen from the Joseph
Fielding Smith Building. The victim said it was taken five days ear-
lier between 8 and 9:30 a.m.
Sept. 17 A student reported his bicycle stolen but was uncertain
of the location it was last seen. He claimed it was either stolen
from a bike rack at the Wilkinson Student Center or May Hall. The
bike was valued at $150.
Sept. 18 A laptop valued at $1,000 was reported stolen at the
Richards Building five days after the incident supposedly oc-
cured. There are no suspects at this time.
Sept. 18 A bike with an estimated value of $105 was reported sto-
len from the Joseph F. Smith Building. The theft occured between
11:15 and 11:30 a.m.
VANDALISM
Sept. 15 Four males were found pouring a corrosive liquid on the
cougar statue and surrounding grass on the southwest corner of
the LaVell Edwards Stadium. The incident occured at 2 a.m., and
the vandals were arresed, issued a misdemeanor and citations
and then released. The cougar was protected by shrink wrap, and
officers are waiting to see if surrounding sprinklers diluted the
damages made by the liquid.
THREATS
Sept. 14 A father made threatening calls to the BYU accounting
office after he was upset with his daughters campus financial
account. An officer contacted him, and the man apologized. The
case is currently under investigation.
Archives of Police Beat are available at universe.byu.edu
Photo courtesy Half the Sky
The nonprot organization Half the Sky strives to give children the
basic necessities of life that they may not be exposed to.
8 The Universe, September 25 October 1, 2012
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Eric J. Sorensen, D.D.S.
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Obtaining funding: What every entrepreneur should know
B y M E G A N N O A C K
Every business starts with
an idea, a plan and a chunk
of change, but number three
can be a barrier for aspiring
entrepreneurs.
Speakers advised entrepre-
neurs on how to obtain startup
funding in a lecture Sept. 12
at UVU. The lecture, How to
Raise Money in Utah, was put
on by the Wayne Brown Insti-
tute, a nonprofit organization
that helps entrepreneurs cre-
ate solid business plans.
Entrepreneurs are known
for the immense amount of
passion, sweat, blood and tears
they put forth. But when it
comes down to it, starting any
business also requires money.
And how do entrepreneurs get
a handle on funds? One simple
word investors.
But investors arent quick
to drop thousands of dol-
lars unless it is likely they
will get a return. The return
happens when a business
theyve funded begins mak-
ing a profit and pays back the
investor.
According to Kent Thomas,
founder of Advanced CFO Solu-
tions, of every 10 entrepreneurs
funded, only seven actually
pay back their investors. Sure
a 3/10 loss doesnt sound that
bad, but when its referring to
thousands of dollars, a lot more
than single digits goes down
the drain.
When entrepreneurs under-
stand this, they will under-
stand why investors are
skeptical.
James Oakes, a communica-
tions studies major from San
Diego, Calif., believes it can be a
little intimidating talking with
investors. But after taking entre-
preneurship classes, he believes
it is not impossible to obtain
funding.
I think the most important
thing is being able to articu-
late your message and purpose
and share the vision that you
have in a way that theyll want
to support you, Oakes said.
Investors agree.
How you are perceived
by an investor is everything.
Ninety percent of all entrepre-
neurs are first timers, so they
probably havent dealt with
an investor, said Brad Ber-
toch, president and CEO of the
Wayne Brown Institute. They
(investors) want to know if you
really understand that there is
a way to create businesses.
Heres a review of what
investors look for based
on Berotchs and Thomass
addresses:
1. The number- one item
investors look at is the poten-
tial companys management
team. A team needs well-
skilled, dedicated individuals
who can bring positive results.
2. If you dont have a lot of
startup revenue, investors
need to know you have custom-
ers who will buy your product.
This means the product needs
to be something someone will
actually use.
3. Understand and identify
your market. Present a clear,
organized strategy on how to
reach it.
4. Investors need to know
their money will be used
wisely. Wearing an Armani
suit and driving a Mercedes is
a red f lag for investors. They
want to see entrepreneurs who
can manage their own money
before they write them a check.
5. Dont make an investor the
foundation of your business.
Investors want in and out in a
reasonable time frame. Use their
money to start your business.
Then pay them back and move
on. Dont keep them tied to you.
6. Be honest with investors.
Explain to them why your busi-
ness may or may not succeed,
and dont overestimate your
money-making abilities. Noth-
ing turns off investors more
than telling them you plan on
making $7 million in the rst
year.
As entrepreneurs, we tend
to be very optimistic, and we
tend not to really look in detail
at all of the what ifs that
might happen in business,
Thomas said. Help us (inves-
tors) get over that; present to
us real information.
State senator shares insights into recent audit
B y R O B B I E J E N K I N S
Sitting in a luxurious,
wood-paneled and sunlit sec-
ond-f loor office, Sen. John Val-
entine, R-Orem, leaned back in
his chair to discuss the most
recent audit of the Department
of Alcoholic Beverage Control
(DABC).
They had a culture of invin-
cibility, Valentine said. They
thought they were invincible,
and whenever an agency has that
attitude, there are problems.
This was the view of things
at 30,000 feet as Valentine
described it, meaning when one
looked at the big picture.
The most recent audit,
released on Tuesday, Sept.
11, revealed not just this big
picture, but detailed a lot
of smaller pictures: numer-
ous problems in inventory,
finances and ethical judg-
ments on nearly every level.
However, these problems are
not new. Legislators, includ-
ing Senator Valentine, have
been aware of many of these
problems for several years and
have been trying to eliminate
them.
In 2011, Valentine sponsored
Senate Bill 314, a bill which
increased licensing and renewal
fees, created several new license
types and enacted online train-
ing guidelines for alcohol
servers. It allowed for alcohol
licenses to be dealt on the open
market beginning July 1, 2012,
as well as reformed the process
of selection for such positions as
the commission chairman and
department director.
Senate Bill 314 was designed
to put in a system of checks and
balances whereby no one person
has all the authority, Valentine
said.
He further explained that
some of the reforms effected by
the bill changed the structure of
the chain of command. Each per-
son in a position of authority is
responsible and accountable to
report to others. Consequently,
both independent commissions
and internal commissions can
act as watchdogs for each other.
As a result of stricter regula-
tions, the former licensing and
compliance director resigned
earlier this year in March,
admitting in his letter of resig-
nation he had received gifts from
a licensee.
Ostensibly, the addition of
stricter regulations will damage
the alcohol sales in Utah. How-
ever, Valentine believes that the
regulations will have a neutral
effect on the states sales. The
purpose of the bill, he afrmed,
was to ultimately change the
culture within the DABC to one
of honesty, especially given the
egregious problems uncovered
in recent audits.
As the most recent audit
proves, even a year and a half
after the bill was enacted, there
are many problems yet to be cor-
rected. The DABC is addressing
those problems though. In the
audit, Salvador D. Petilos, the
interim director for the DABC,
outlined his departments
responses and measures to the
auditor generals suggested
changes.
When considering the sale
of alcohol in Utah, Valentine
explained, the state weighs
the social cost, or risk to pub-
lic safety, with its hospital-
ity of alcohol. Risks to public
safety include additional
crime, problems within fami-
lies, under-age drinking and
DUIs, and although Utah ranks
among the states with the low-
est number of these problems,
legislators like Valentine are
still striving to improve those
statistics.
Photo by Megan Noack
Investors visiting UVU discuss what they expect of entrepreneurs.
The Universe, September 25 October 1, 2012 9
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Listening to the Jewish shopkeeper go on and
on about his dislike of the Palestinians in Jeru-
salem, I wondered why this man had so much
hatred in his heart. What kind of personal ex-
perience had led this man to have such strong
opposing views against the people that live just
miles from his home? The confict has existed
for centuries. Since before the time of Christ,
the Jews and the Palestinians have been fght-
ing.
As I got to know and visit with both the Pal-
estinian and the Jewish people living in this
crowded historical land, I learned to love both
sides. I saw beautiful scenes of devout Jews
dancing in the Sabbath and praising their Lord,
and kind Palestinian women working in a run-
down hospital amongst premature babies.
So why, when there is so much good to be
found on both sides, do they hate each other so
much? There is no simple answer to this ques-
tion. Graduate students and professors alike
spend years studying and discuss-
ing this topic, but I believe there
is a base answer to this question:
they have been taught since birth
to hate each other.
The recent events in Libya and
across Europe have the world talk-
ing about hate crimes. As Ameri-
cans, we watch the news and it
makes us sad to see the events go-
ing on around the world. But then
we turn off the TV, or fnishing
reading the article, and we think
it doesnt apply to us. But it does.
We were all raised with certain
prejudices regardless of where we
were born. As I was thinking about this topic,
I started to examine what cultural ideas some
of us have been raised with in the Mormon cul-
ture. Lets take the issue that has been raised
recently about caffeine on campus. There is a
wide range of opinions about whether caffeine
is OK to drink in the Mormon culture. Some
children are raised in families that think it is a
sin to drink caffeine, and some families think
it is perfectly fne. Now while I am not saying
that caffeine is the best thing for you to drink,
as proven by the recent press release by the
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, we
as a Church do not have an offcial stance on
this issue. The problem with this issue comes
in Mormon culture when those that have been
raised to believe that drinking caffeine is wrong
judge others for making the choice to drink it.
Another issue that is a hot topic in the states
right now is gay rights. Whether many people
recognize the source of their feelings or not, it is
obvious that people have strong feelings for and
against this topic. Some people are raised to ab-
hor even the idea of homosexuality so much that
they inherently hate the person struggling with
the issue. While I am not condoning the practice
of homosexuality, and we are clearly taught in
the Church that marriage is ordained of God
and between a man and a woman, problems
come when we cannot separate in our minds the
sin from the person.
The Savior taught that we are not to judge but
to love others.
As I stated before, although these examples
may or may not be a prejudice that we are per-
sonally struggling with, they are examples of
common prejudices that people struggle with in
our culture.
It is up to us to distinguish be-
tween what we truly believe and
what we have just been taught to
believe. Part of the issue that re-
sides in the Middle East between
the Palestinians and the Jews is
that sometimes they dont even un-
derstand why they hate each other.
It was something they have been
taught to believe for centuries.
As we are taught in the scrip-
tures, sometimes traditions passed
down from the fathers can be righ-
teous and good and we should fol-
low in their footsteps. However,
we need to decide for ourselves
whether those traditions are righteous, and
then choose how to become the best we can be.
The basis of prejudice comes when people
dont understand one another. We should stick
by our morals and what we believe to be right,
but also attempt to refrain from judging others
and distinguish between what we truly believe
and what we have just been taught to believe.
Viewpoint
Prejudice: The act of not understanding one another

Stephanie Lacy is the opinion editor at The
Universe. This viewpoint represents her
opinions and not necessarily those of BYU, its
administration or The Church of Jesus Christ
of Latter-day Saints.
STEPHANIE
LACY
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Submit your political cartoons to The Universe and you could be featured on our
Issues & Ideas page. Send original, black and white cartoons to universe.ideas@gmail.com.
Artists will not receive compensation for their work. Please contact The Universe for more information.
My husband has one arm. Yep, just one. Its
not everyday you see a guy with one arm, an
empty sleeve dangling, walking around. People
stare at us when we go out. Theres pointing and
whispering whenever we are in public. It both-
ered me, but it didnt faze my husband.
As we sat at our table in the back of Pizza Pie
Cafe, his gaze was fxed on the television as the
Monday night football game ensued. The man
next to us had his gaze set directly on the one-
armed guy eating pizza. I couldnt take it any-
more and decided that we were done going out
until people quit staring.
Well then we will never be able to go out in
public again, he said. Im fne with people
looking at me like Im this strange person.
Hopefully if they stare long enough, they will
see something special instead of different.
He was right. Having one arm is different,
but it is also something special, just like be-
ing a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter-day Saints. The world looks
at us because we live our lives dif-
ferently than most.
Now I dont want this to come
off as an article about how we
should embrace our uniqueness,
even though we should. My point
is that we need to make sure that
the perception the world has of us
is correct. We are already viewed
as a peculiar people, but why
cant we be viewed as hard-work-
ing, devout members of a Chris-
tian faith?
Recently our religion has been
highlighted extensively. There is
a Broadway play making fun of it,
a presidential candidate constantly asked about
it and a whole bunch of members who can stand
up for it. Im not talking about starting fghts in
chat rooms. Im saying we need to be doing our
part to help those around us understand that we
are not secretive or exclusive and we have the
technology to share that with others.
The media gets it wrong all the time. I recent-
ly watched a story on CNN where they brought
in a Mormon expert to talk about Mitt Rom-
neys involvement in the Church. The so-called
expert started to list various callings Romney
has held in the Church, which included state
president and head bishop. I knew the expert
meant to say stake president and bishop, but
others who are not familiar with the Church
would not. I know those are small mistakes, but
when we let little mistakes slide, people develop
a misconstrued perception of who we really are.
A few days after I saw the interview on CNN,
I overheard two students talking about how dis-
gusted they were with media outlets and their
lack of understanding about the LDS faith. In-
stead of complaining, do something.
We have social media and the Internet readily
available for us to use. Information spreads like
wildfre as long as it is information worth know-
ing. We have been encouraged by Church lead-
ers to use social media as a way to spread the
Gospel, but it can also be a way for people to be
informed and educated on a factual basis. Post
things on Facebook, create a profle on Mormon.
org, write a letter to a news station when they
make mistakes or blog about it. The media print
falsities. We are the ones who can change that.
It may seem like this isnt our responsibility.
After all, we are young and maybe not as experi-
enced as the leaders of the Church,.
However last time I checked, they
do ot have personal twitter accounts
or Facebook profles. A lot of us do.
We publish pictures on Instagram
about what we ate this morning
for breakfast, but how often do we
tweet about the fallacies the media
publish about our religion?
Misconceptions will exist as long
as they remain unchallenged. We
can be the solution. Between updat-
ing your Facebook statuses, fnd the
time to post a Mormon Message.
There will always be some who
will stare and think we are weird,
but it wont do us any good to stay
inside until it stops. We just have to hope that
people will stare long enough that they will see
something special.
Viewpoint
Defning Mormonism for the media

Carlie Ellett is a campus editor at The
Universe. This viewpoint represents her
opinions and not necessarily those of BYU,
its administration or The Church of Jesus
Christ of Latter-day Saints.
CARLIE
ELLETT
[TweetingCougars ]
@sethrhall
Just saw a proposal in
the cougareat...#barf
#byu #setforsuccess
@desirable813
Sister missionaries just con-
tacted and asked ME to come
on splits with THEM on #byu
campus. They lack exchanges?
#confused#missionarywork
@istheBrette
Newtons 3rd law explained by my
professor: if you punch someone in
the face, that person will face you in
the fst #science #byu
@ABC4Emerson
Watching NFL Films Pres-
ents on the NFL Network and
theyre about to do a feature on
Brett Keisels beard. #BYU
@ticoster93
I dont get why everyone has tests.
I have till October before I have to
go to the testing center. #BYU
@SpencerIrvine
After hearing my roommate
keep saying bro nonstop
Im offcially never saying it
again #ruinedword #BYU
@GoCougars13
#BYU better step it up and win
the next 3 games. #utahstate and
#oregonstate will be tough games
@lindsey5brooke
Free food on campus? My day
has been made. #freefood #BYU
@lizzy_dent
Does anyone else see people
riding unicyles to thier next
class or is that just #BYU?
[FacebookReactions ]
Leavingwithadiploma
butnoring
Rose Mauss
Found a link to this article on
another about fellow members
marrying too quickly and without
much thought. My husband and I
always found it hilarious to know
he had an impression to leave
LDSBC and come back to Georgia
where he met me after my having
just had an impression to leave my
study abroad stint and come back
to Georgia. The main thing is that
he was prompted to leave a Church
school to fnd his wife.
BYUtovisittoughestplaceto
winincollegefootball
Stan Turner
I agree, Bronco Stadium can be
really loud, as your experts Jordan
and Taylor stated. But, how would
Jordan and Taylor compare it to
other famous stadiums theyve
been to, like Autzen Stadium,
or Michigans stadium, or the
between the hedges in Sanford
Stadium in Georgia? You know-
stadiums that hold 2-3 times what
Bronco Stadium holds?
Peacethroughpingpong
David J Lowe
Nice article Valeria! I totally agree
that ping pong is a way to relax.
Think how many people spend
extraordinary amounts of time in
front of computers or books. Ping
pong is the ultimate game that
stimulates your mind.
Leaveyourcommentsatuniverse.byu.edu.
10 The Universe, September 25 October 1, 2012
Sports
universe.byu.edu/sports
September 25 October 1, 2012
Page 11

& RecReati on
Student Fitness Center Open
House 9 a.m. 4 p.m., 283 Smith
Fieldhouse
Workout routines, free
green smoothie sample
Womens Soccer vs. UVU
7 p.m., South Field
Womens Volleyball vs. San
Francisco 6:30 p.m. PDT, San
Francisco War Memorial Gym
Football vs. Hawaii
6 p.m., LaVell Edwards Stadium
Mens Hockey vs. U of U
8 p.m., University of Utah
USA Hockey Clinic
5 7 p.m., Peaks Ice Arena
Mens Swimming
Blue vs. White 9 a.m.,
Richards Building Pool
Womens Swimming
Blue vs. White
9 a.m., Richards Building pool
Womens Softball vs.
Southern Idaho
4 p.m., Gail Miller Field
Womens Softball vs. Weber
State 6:15 p.m., Gail Miller Field
Race to the Altar 5K
8:30 a.m., The race begins at
Wilson Diamonds in Provo
Mens Soccer vs. UVU
7 p.m., South Field
Free unvr.se/R4HMWw $5 unvr.se/OAFBis unvr.se/S2ThO3 unvr.se/Ny4Noj unvr.se/Sy9MCk Free unvr.se/SC2VHT Free unvr.se/RiBYOV
Free unvr.se/RiBYOV $5 unvr.se/RiBYOV $5 unvr.se/RiBYOV $24 unvr.se/Qzwk6C
Free unvr.se/LOIf1t
SpORtS CAlendAR SEPTEMBER 25 OCTOBER 1
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International competitor
BYU rubgy player
makes national team
B y J O R D A N L E E
For any sports person, competing at the highest
level is the dream. For one BYU rugby player, that
dream became a reality.
After helping the South African rugby team to
its second national title in four years and an unde-
feated season, geography major Shaun Davies was
added to the national USA Eagles rugby squad for
their June Internationals a tournament where
the U.S. national team plays against other nations
such as Italy, Canada and Georgia.
To play for your country is the highest honor in
world rugby.
As a kid you always dream of playing interna-
tional rugby, and I was fnally able to realize that
dream this summer, Davies said.
Playing for the national team is comparable to
playing for the U.S. soccer or basketball team. Once
youre in, your spot is not guaranteed; its a week-in,
week-out assessment of how youve been playing.
Davies was able to obtain his frst cap as an inter-
national player by getting game time against a very
capable Georgia team who went down to the Eagles,
3620.
To be in a team with so much experience many of
the Eagles play professionally overseas while still
attending college is a feat not many have achieved.
It was such a great learning experience, and
it was really good to see the level I would like to
compete at one day and the player I aspire to be,
Davies said.
Being in a national team is sometimes cutthroat;
players can be in the team one day and then gone
the next.
It means I have to really be on top of my game
week-in and week-out simply because the best play-
ers are chosen every week, Davies said. There is
always someone nipping at your heels.
Davies is also in another minority at BYU. First,
he is South African, and second, he is a not a mem-
ber of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day
Saints. He was able to qualify for the national team
by being in the U.S. for over three years.
Being in this environment has defnitely been a
plus, Davies said. There are a lot less distractions
than other universities face, and that allows me to
concentrate on my rugby and schooling. If it wasnt
for the rugby team, I wouldnt have been able to get
used to such a culture shock because the guys are
just really willing to help out.
Davies success should not come as a surprise.
As a member of the Cougars rugby team, Davies
achieved many milestones in the sport, such as
being a four-time All-American and the high-
est point scorer in the team for the last fve years
running.
Coming from South Africa, I didnt realize so many
doors would be opened (for) my future, Davies said.
See RUgBY on Page 13
Photo by Chris Bunker
Shaun Davies helps BYU win the rugby national championship, beating Arkansas State at Rio Tinto Stadium in Sandy.
100th marathon for
BYU alumnus
B y R Y A N G R AY
In 1991, a poster changed the life BYU
alumnus Jonathan Crampton.
I was in a dorm room in Heritage
Halls when I saw this poster of a student
fnishing the St. George Marathon,
Crampton said. I looked at it, and I said
to myself, Thats what I want to do.
It wasnt easy, but Crampton accom-
plished his goal and fnished the race.
I fnished the race in three hours
and 53 minutes, and I was white as a
ghost coming over the line. Kori, my
wife, looked at me and said, You look
absolutely horrible. So I decided I would
never run another marathon.
But Crampton was hooked. A year
later he was pursing a graduate degree
in Texas when he saw another sign for
a marathon.
I hadnt thought too much about
marathon running after my frst race
until I saw this sign in downtown Dallas
that said, Dallas White Rock Marathon
in December. It was three weeks away.
With little time to train, Crampton fn-
ished the race with a new determination:
If he was going to run marathons, he
See MARATHON on Page 13
Tough defense and struggling offense
leave 2-2 record for BYU football
B y S H A W N F I E L D I N G
A top-10 defense and a senior quar-
terback cant keep BYUs football team
from a 2-2 record to start the 2012
season.
For a school that is traditionally
known for its offense, BYUs defense
has taken center stage and become
one of the top defenses in the nation.
After four games, the Cougar defense
is ranked No. 7 in the nation in total
defense, allowing only 246 yards and
12.5 points per game. Since Head
Coach Bronco Mendenhall took over
the defensive responsibilities in 2010,
BYUs run defense has been especially
good, allowing an average of 91.5 yards
rushing per game. The only team
defending the run better during that
time span is the defending National
Champion, the Alabama Crimson
Tide.
Kyle Van Noy has been one of the
most dominant linebackers in the
nation through four games. Van Noy
has 4.5 sacks and 7.5 tackles for a loss.
Van Noy has also been named line-
backer of the week once already. Eze-
kial Ansah and Brandon Ogletree
have also been stand-out performers
for the defense, with big plays and
See FOOTBALL on Page 13
Photo by Chris Bunker
Jonathan Crampton shows off the 100
that he wore at his 100th marathon.
Spikeball makes its debut on BYU campus
B y C A S E Y R H O T O N
Frisbee now has some compe-
tition as the game of choice on
BYUs campus as spikeball, a
new sport, makes its debut.
BYU students Kace Redder
and John Preston have big plans
for spikeball. Redder, Preston
and other spikeball enthusiasts
are trying to create a spikeball
club and eventually promote it
to be an intramural sport.
Really our goal is to not
only make a club but make it an
intramural sport, Redder said.
So we have to prove a demand
for the sport and so were out
trying to endorse it.
Redder explains that Spike-
ball is a fourplayer game
where teams of two bounce a
palmsize ball against a net
six inches off the ground to
the opposing team. Similar to
volleyball, points are earned
when the opposing team can-
not return the ball. The rst to
21 points wins.
Its kind of a mix between
foursquare and volleyball, Red-
der said. Teams are partners of
two, and you get up to three hits
between the team, and you try
to hit it off the net to where the
opponent cant return it.
Redder discovered spikeball
when he was cleaning out his
parents garage.
I just found this set
unopened in my garage, and we
opened it up and asked my par-
ents what it was, Redder said.
John and I started playing it
over the summer with every-
one in Idaho, and we felt like it
would be a good opportunity to
make a club here at BYU.
Preston, the partner in advo-
cating spikeball, explains how
their plans are bigger than just
a club.
Eventually we would like to
see it as an intramural sport,
said Preston. Thats the big
picture, but right now were
just trying to get enough people
to make it a club, and hopefully
it will catch on and become
big enough in the next year or
so that BYU will consider it
an intramural sport.
The club advocates set
up games between the Kim-
ball Tower and Joseph Smith
Building and play between
classes. They invite anyone to
join who is interested. They also
have a Facebook page where
they post information about
the potential club and when
they play.
The spikeball advocates on
campus think it has a lot of
potential to become popular
because of the fun nature of the
game.
Its way fun, really simple,
and its a different sport that
is really easy to play, Chad
Unsicker, a spikeball lover, said.
[Tweeting Cougars tackle sports]
@Robbie Bullough
It took Clemson and Florida State
4 minutes and 6 seconds to out-
score BYU and Boise State.
@whitneyfredette
Loving how well Dennis
Pitta has been doing!!
@itschappy
Soooo... #BYU fans. Do you buy into
the start Tayson for the next year
theory? If Riley is hurt for a couple
more weeks, do thoughts change?
@KevinOnCFB
Its now Monday morning and I still
think #BYU should have gone for two.
@CollegeGameDay
Backed up on their own 1 yard
line, the #BYU defense stuffs
Boise 4 straight times. THAT is a
goalline stand #BYUvsBOISE.
@DUsportsdesk
Happy brithday to the
@byusoccer_w coach, Jennifer
Rockwood! Good luck tonight
against the #Aggies. #GoCougars!
@JAgroseclose
BYU volleyball is so raw.
@Bri_Holt05
BYU volleyball = amazing.
@kennethbaldwin
@dailyuniverse I want to bury the
whole football season in my backyard.
@annaface
@dusportsdesk #BYUs men soc-
cer team lit up #SUU like a Roman
Candle on Saturday 16-0 #domination.
Join the conversation by tweet-
ing @dusportsdesk.
Two female BYU cross country runners develop obsession for disco skating
A look at two BYU
cross country
runners and
their secret
skating love
B y I A N R AY
Background music is play-
ing the classic disco song from
Earth, Wind and Fires Boo-
gie Wonderland. Disco ball
and lights, vibrant colors on
the wall and oors and the 80s
theme decorate the skating rink
where Kaisa Rosenberg and Jen-
nica Redd go almost every Satur-
day with their friends at Classic
Skating and Fun Center on disco
night.
Disco skating here is a hid-
den gem from non-Utahns. But
for two BYU cross country run-
ners, it is where they ne-tune
their hobby.
For Rosenberg, a sophomore
from Springville majoring in
secondary education, disco skat-
ing is the hobby that shes been
doing since high school, thanks
to some friends who introduced
it to her as the thing to do.
Rosenberg started rolling
around in rollerblades when she
was little and moved to Spring-
ville. After moving to Spring-
ville, Rosenburgs neighbor
friend introduced her to disco
skating. She
also remem-
bered her sib-
lings pulling
her i nside
their neigh-
borhood cul-
de-sac behind
a bike,to teach
her how to
balance, gain
speed and
watch from her siblings on how
to roller skate.
During the cross country sea-
son, Rosenberg disco skates and
looks forward to the moments
when she has free time during
the season to go skate. Her usual
routine when she goes disco
skating is to skate and then
afterwards go to Yogurtland for
some frozen yogurt.
Some newspapers offer cou-
pons for classic skating in their
newspaper advertisement for $2.
Thats a dollar an hour for
the best time
of your life,
Rosenberg said
in excitement.
When she
was younger,
Jennica Redd,
a sophomore
from Orem
majoring in
exercise and
wellness, loved
rollerblading so much that when
she met Rosenberg on the BYU
cross country team, they began
to go disco skating together.
Redd and Rosenberg became
good friends the year they both
got roller skates for Christmas.
One Christmas (in 2011), we
both got roller skates for each
other so that we could go disco
skating whenever we wanted,
Redd said.
Some of the reasons Redd
loves disco skating is its fun
nature, the chances to meet new
people and the different experi-
ence she gets from hanging out
with friends at disco skating.
As athletic as they are, Redd
and Rosenberg like to perform
one of their tricks on the rink:
one person spins and does a
dance move while the other per-
son pushes the one performing
the trick from behind, like push-
ing a wheeled bulletin board
across a oor as it glides.
On the weekends or free time
outside of disco skating, Redd
and Rosenberg go down the
Provo Canyon trails with their
rollerblades to get more practice
time. But when it comes to the
indoor fun they are all about
disco skating. Their claim to
fame was getting their cross
country teammates to go disco
skating once because the team
knew of the pairs obsession.
Although, Redd and Rosen-
berg attended rival high
schools, that did not stop them
from creating a bond all
because of their love for disco
skating.
Redd said that disco skating
is a great way to have exercise
while having fun.
Rosenberg agrees but has
other reasons why. I love to
meet new people every week
and seeing the regulars at disco
skating along with the music
being played because I can
dance to it, she said.
Located at 250 South State in
Orem, Classic Skating and Fun
Center offers discounts of $1
off when you dress up in your
funky disco attire and an addi-
tional $1 off when you show your
college I.D. on Saturdays disco
night. For discount coupons
from Classic Skating, look in
The Universe.
Photos by Chris Bunker
BYU students can be seen around campus playing spikeball, a mix
between foursquare and volleyball.

Thats a dollar an
hour for the best time of
your life.
Kaisa Rosenberg
BYU Cross Country Runner
12 The Universe, September 25 October 1, 2012
Be a GEAR UP tutor
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Marathon
BYU alumnus
completes 100th
marathon
Continued from Page 11
was going to need to train properly.
From then on, he began run-
ning about one marathon a year
until he reached his 50th race at
age 45. On Saturday, he fnished
his 100th race at the Top of Utah
Marathon in Logan in three
hours and 43 minutes.
There are about 600 runners
nationwide who have completed
100 marathons, and only about
15 living in Utah, according to
Crampton, now a 51-year-old
husband and father with three
daughters.
During the Top of Utah Mar-
athon, he was able to have the
number 100, symbolizing how
far he has come. Not only has he
passed the 100-marathon thresh-
old, but he was able to do it faster
than the frst time.
I feel fantastic, Crampton
said after fnishing the race.
It was fun to have my family,
friends I have met over the years,
and other pacers there for this
great experience.
Crampton began running
as a 16-year-old investigating
The Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter-day Saints in his home
country of England. Someone
in his branch simply told him
he looked like a runner.
I competed in the Newcastle
athletics meet,
where I won
four of five
events that the
branch presi-
dent entered
me in. Once I
realized I had
some talent, I
began train-
ing, Crampton
said.
Cr a mpt on
was baptized
two years later
at age 18. He
served a mis-
sion in Brus-
sels, Belgium, and decided to
study physical therapy at BYU,
where he saw the sign for the St.
George Marathon.
Although he is far away from
his hometown in England,
Crampton receives a lot of sup-
port from his family. They have
seen many of his meets here in
the United States.
The frst time we really knew
he was going for 100 marathons
was when he ran his 60th, said
Cramptons older sister, Julie
Lazonby. That meet was the
frst time we had ever seen him
run a marathon race.
Cramptons 87-year-old father,
Philip, also came to see his son
compete.
I feel very proud, Philip
said. Its quite a goal to com-
plete what he
set out to do
many years
ago, and after
pushing him-
self, he made
it.
C r a m p -
ton counts
his father as
the inspira-
tion behind
the 100-mara-
thon goal. He
wanted to be
able to com-
plete 100 mara-
thons while his
father was still alive. During
the race, his father, sister and
brother-in-law sat on the side-
lines cheering him on. Philip,
who is still in great health, hopes
to see future races.
If he runs 150 marathons I
will try and stay here on earth to
see them, Philip jokingly said.
Crampton will only have a
few weeks to celebrate as he pre-
pares himself for the St. George
Marathon on Oct. 6 and the New
York Marathon on Nov. 4.
rugby
Shaun Davies goes
from national
champion to
national team
Continued from Page 11
After the success of the June
Internationals, Davies, along
with BYU rugby captain Ryan
Roundy, was added to the USA
Sevens Development Team. Sev-
ens rugby is a form of the game
with seven-minute halves and
seven players per team, making
the game very fast and high scor-
ing. This form of rugby has been
added to the Olympics in Rio
2016, and the development team
is a squad of players expected to
be available to compete there.
Playing alongside Shaun
is always a great experience,
Roundy said. He always seems
to make us all look good on the
feld.
Playing in the next Rugby
World Cup is also another goal
that Davies hopes to tick off his
list.
The Rugby World Cup is the
third most watched sporting
event worldwide, behind the
Summer Olympics and the Soc-
cer World Cup, he said. Playing
in front of a worldwide audience
of billions would be amazing.
Davies skill and leadership
qualities have helped the BYU
rugby team become the most
winningest team at BYU and the
only one to win two Division One
national titles.
Shaun has the ability to
change a game, especially when
its tight, BYU rugby Coach
David Smyth said. All the little
extras he does off the feld really
add to his dynamic and show the
other players what is necessary
to play at the top.
Davies plans on marrying his
girlfriend, then fnding out what
the future holds.
Im just going to get my
degree and then concentrate
on rugby, he said. Hopefully
more opportunities come for
me to play in the national team
and then we will go from there.
Obviously family comes frst,
though, so once we are married
and settled here in Utah, then we
will see.
Although he may be graduat-
ing shortly, Davies is adamant
his time here at BYU will always
be close to his heart.
It has been such an honor to
play here at BYU, and no mat-
ter where rugby takes me I will
always bleed blue, he said.

Crampton counts his
father as the inspiration
behind the 100-marathon
goal. He wanted to be
able to complete 100
marathons while his
father was still alive.
Photo by Chris Bunker
Jonathan Crampton poses with his 87-year-old father prior to his 100th marathon.
Football
Defense ranks
No. 7 but offense
struggles
Continued from Page 11
solid performance from the two
of them.
After defeating Washington
State and Weber State at home,
BYUs offense struggled on
the road. In both games, the
offense failed to move the ball
with consistency through
three quarters, before find-
ing life in the fourth quarter.
Amid turnovers and penalties,
BYUs offense has struggled to
fnd rhythm and had trouble
protecting the quarterback.
Numerous penalties have
stopped drives short, or forced
BYU into poor feld position.
Another contributing factor
to recent offensive struggles
may be senior quarterback
Riley Nelsons back injury.
Against Weber State, Nelson
took several hard hits to the
back and has not been as effec-
tive since. Nelsons injury has
opened the door for fans to get
a glimpse at freshman quarter-
back Taysom Hill. After losing
to Utah, offensive coordina-
tor Brandon Doman promoted
Hill to second string quarter-
back because his style of play
mirrors Nelsons. After Nel-
sons four turnovers against
Boise State, Hill entered the
game and led BYU on its only
scoring drive of the game.
Even with BYUs offense
struggling to fnd the endzone,
the Cougars should be encour-
aged by the teams resiliency.
In both losses, the team had
fourth-quarter surges that put
BYU in a position to win. BYUs
defense has been unrelenting,
keeping them in every game.
If not for a missed feld goal
against Utah and a failed two-
point conversion against Boise
State, BYU could be 4-0.
BYUs schedule doesnt
get any easier. After playing
Hawaii this week, BYU plays
a string of games against an
in-state rival and two Top 25
teams. Utah State and Oregon
State come to Provo to face
the Cougars. The Aggies beat
the Utes in Logan and were a
missed feld goal away from
beating Wisconsin on the road.
No. 18 Oregon State entered the
Top 25 after beating No.13 Wis-
consin and No. 19 UCLA.
The Cougars then play No. 10
Notre Dame and Georgia Tech
on the road. Notre Dame is 4-0
with wins against Michigan
and Michigan State. Georgia
Tech has a 2-2 record after los-
ing twice in overtime. However,
the teams offense averages 42
points a game. Both teams will
test BYUs defense.
BYU looks add a win to their
record Friday against Hawaii
at 6 p.m. at LaVell Edwards
Stadium. The Warriors are
coached by former BYU offen-
sive coordinator Norm Chow.
Photo by Chris Bunker
BYU quarterback Taysom Hill runs for a touchdown against the
Boise State defense during Thursdays game at Bronco Stadium.
The Universe, September 25 October 1, 2012 13
dining.byu.edu/legendsgrille
23633JG2
Find us
on Facebook
Come eat Before
the game
at
BYU Vs. HAwaii
FRI, SEPt. 28th
6:00 pm
Monday- Friday: 7:30 am - 8:00 pm
Saturday: 11:00 am - 8:00 pm
$10LargE
Hawaiian Pizza
14 The Universe, September 25 October 1, 2012
Mens soccer finds success in double header
B y n i c O l e H i l l S T e a d
The mens soccer team came
out undefeated after this week-
ends match-ups with the Uni-
versity of Utah and Southern
Utah University.
My favorite part was beat-
ing University of Utah and
getting some revenge after
football, sophomore defender
Sterling Hancock said.
In Fridays match, the Cou-
gars overthrew the Utes with
a fnal score of 4-0. They were
able to score within the frst
fve minutes of the game and
continue in confdence from
there.
The weekend then progressed
into a large win for the Cougars
on Saturday night when they
beat the Thunderbirds 16-0.
The Cougars were pleased
with their accomplishments
this weekend and left the feld
both nights with smiles.
Were scoring goals, Han-
cock said. And not just any
goals, exciting goals. I think
we were able to have fun.
The Cougars scored a total
of 20 goals in just two games,
leaving players with mainly
positive things to say.
We fnished really well,
senior defender Douglas Clark
said. We scored goals, which
is important to win.
Coming off two wins, the
men are happy but still ready
to get back to work.
Something we could work
on would be moving the ball
quicker, Hancock said,
instead of just dribbling,
working on actually moving
quick.
Clark said the team needs
to work on discipline when it
gets ahead, but with these two
shut-outs there isnt much to
criticize.
Assistant Coach Chad Sack-
ett said the fall season is used
primarily to get to know and
understand the new prospec-
tive players. These last two
games have allowed teammates
to get to know one another and
the attitudes seem positive.
Its exciting being able to
play with the new guys, Han-
cock said. Theyre good play-
ers. Now I feel like were getting
some chemistry, so its good.
BYU takes on Utah Valley
University next Saturday at
7 p.m. on BYUs South Field.
GOING ON
A MISSION?
Come in for a FREE
pre-mission exam
and get 10% OFF
any needed service!
ninth
east
dental
ninth
Short walk from campus
Across from BYU Creamery
and next to Subway
1234 N 900 E Provo
NinthEastDental.com
801
-
921
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4332
Photos by Whitnie Soelberg
The cougars shut out both Utah and Southern Utah University over the weekend.
Junior midfelder Toni niccoli netted two goals against Southern
Utah University on Saturday.
Junior midfelder Toni niccoli looks to shoot the ball in Fridays 4-0
victory over Utah.
Life, etc.
universe.byu.edu/life
September 25 October 1, 2012
Page 15

Two years
of catch-up
How recently returned missionaries
assimilate back into the world
of popular culture
B y J E S S I E A L L E N
When missionaries steps off the
plane, they are greeted by more than
just the loving arms of their families.
They step into a world they have been
unfamiliar with for two years the
world of media and popular culture.
This is an adjustment that all recently
returned missionaries of The Church of
Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints have
to make.
Before his mission, Cecil Rice
described media as an important aspect
in his life. Music, movies and sports
were always an outlet for entertain-
ment, and they certainly kept him busy.
I lived through the media, espe-
cially during March Madness, Rice
said. I watched SportsCenter all the
time to check the scores. If I couldnt
watch TV, I turned to the Internet or
my friends texted me. From season to
season, actually, no matter the sport, I
was like that.
When he opened his call, his obses-
sion had to end, at least temporarily.
Rice was called to serve in the Texas
Dallas Mission, Spanish speaking.
He had to say goodbye to family and
friends, as well as to a social network
of connections, entertainment and triv-
ial information. The doors to the Mis-
sionary Training Center represented a
passage into a new way of life: one with-
out the luxuries of media and popular
culture.
I was shocked when I entered the
MTC, Rice said. Just because I knew
I couldnt access it, didnt mean that the
interest had suddenly dissolved. It was
still there, and I had to go cold turkey.
Gradually, Rice became accustomed
to his missionary life, but thats not to
say it didnt lack hardships. Serving in
Texas, Rice explained that sports are
everything there. Rice not only served
during the World Cup, a vital commod-
ity in the Spanish-speaking commu-
nity, but he also served when the Dallas
Cowboys hosted Superbowl XLV. Rice
described the phenomenon as being like
a child taunted with candy.
Rice said the adjustment was grad-
ual when he came home. During his
mission he had gotten used to the sep-
aration from media and the sphere of
popular culture. The rst thing he did
when he got home was not update his
Facebook status, but spend time with
his family. The maturing process mis-
sionaries undergo included a new atti-
tude toward media and popular culture.
The shock combined with the lack of
perceived necessity inhibited him, but
it did not prevent him from getting back
into the swing of things. The longer he
was home, the easier the adjustment and
transition period became for him.
I still loved playing sports, Rice
said. But I had become accustomed
to not watching them, so I just didnt. I
felt disgusted with myself and felt there
were other more important things I
could be spending my time doing.
When he was comfortable watching
sports again, though it was not up to the
level as before his mission, the other
See CATCH-UP on Page 17
Photo illustration by Chris Bunker
A recently returned missionary for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints faces the daunting feat of reconnecting
into the world of popular culture.
Y marks
the spot
The Great Provo-
Orem Treasure Hunt
begins this week
B y C A M I D AY L E Y
Over the next few weeks, a treasure
hunt will take place in the Provo-Orem
area and the prize is $5,000.
Duncan Lillico, aspiring app pro-
ducer and self-appointed treasure mas-
ter, has taken $5,000 from his pocket
and put it up as prize money for the rst
ever Great Provo-Orem Treasure Hunt.
Ofcial clues will be distributed to par-
ticipants starting Sept. 28, just after the
BYU football team takes on Hawaii at
LaVell Edwards Stadium.
The thought of nding treasure is
so romantic, Lillico said, expressing
his hopes that the fantasy notion of the
whole thing appeals to many.
Lillico got the idea for his treasure
hunt from a similar event he and his
wife participated in 15 years ago in
Canada. The new treasure master
hopes the event will be memorable and
protable. Lillicos treasure hunt is a
See TREASURE on Page 17
v f r
Taste of Home Cooking
School culinary specialist
Kristi Larson, 5 p.m.,
Dee Events Center
American Piano
Quartet 7:30 p.m., Harris
Fine Arts Center
Humor U Dutch TV Show
Taping 8 p.m., 321 MSRB
McCoards Mystery
Corn Maze 4-10 p.m.,
McCoards Garden Center
A Second Birth The world
premiere of a new play by
Ariel Mitchell, 7:30 p.m., Sept.
25-28, Margetts Theatre
BYU International Cinema
Le Quattro Volte, 5:30 p.m.,
The Blue Eyes of Yonta,
7:30 p.m., 250 SWKT
BYU Jazz Showcase 7:30 p.m.,
de Jong Concert Hall
Creative Gathering Class:
Halloween Tree 11 a.m.-
6 p.m., Tropical Room,
Thanksgiving Point
Farmers Market
Thursdays thru Oct. 25,
LaVell Edwards Stadium,
south parking lot
Acoustic Showcase
BLOODFUNK, Lexi Lyon, Mary
Jackson, Michael Whittle,
all day, Muse Music Caf
Sundance Scenic Lift Full
Moon Ride
8:30-11 p.m., Sundance
BYU Instrumental Showcase
7:30 p.m., de Jong Concert Hall
Auditions Turn of the
Screw, Martyrs Crossing,
and 3 Short Haunted Plays,
6-9 p.m., Echo Theatre
$12/$14/$40 unvr.se/O9fShf unvr.se/OGXLgI Free unvr.se/SVdBrD $8 unvr.se/R0rkKp $8 unvr.se/PTgK5w Free unvr.se/QmMwdL
unvr.se/OGXLgI $50 unvr.se/PHZLSQ unvr.se/OAFBis unvr.se/OH0iau $15 unvr.se/PAGNyW unvr.se/OGXLgI Free unvr.se/PAJYH9
THE UNIVERSE CALENDAR SEPTEMBER 25 OCTOBER 1
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Coard's Mystery
MAZE M
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Coard's Mystery
MAZE
"Hours of Outdoor Fun"
Illustration by David Bowman
BYU students rush
to get new iPhone
B y C A S E Y B R I G G S
After months of anticipation, the
iPhone 5 was nally released Friday
morning.
Customers ooded both Apple and
other cellular retail stores; some even
waited outside the stores overnight.
We had people camped out, said a
local Verizon store manager. We sold
out in about an hour, all the stores had
people lined up. We also saw quite a
few 4Ss go out because the price
dropped. There were denitely a lot
of younger, college-aged customers.
BYU students were among those
customers. Andrew Wilson, a junior
studying pre-communications, waited
early Friday morning at the Apple
store in the Gateway Mall.
See APPLE on Page 17
Photo by Lacey Montierth
BYU students were among those who went to Salt Lakes Apple Store at The
Gateway to purchase the new iPhone 5.
Getting around without gas
Even simple
tasks seem
daunting when
youre on foot
B y K r i s t e n W i l l d e n
Going on a date, buying gro-
ceries or picking up a relative
from the airport can seem ordi-
nary and simple. But without
a car, these activities become
more complicated.
Whether or not the weather
is sunny or snowy, students
without cars have to walk
everywhere. Those students
find creative ways to live, work
and enjoy their lives.
Jason Redford, a senior
graphic design major from
Rancho Cucamonga, Calif., did
not own a car for his first year
of marriage.
Mainly, we just didnt have
the money to get one, Redford
said. We are very indepen-
dent, so we couldnt ask for
any money from our parents
and had to support ourselves.
We also didnt want to buy a
car and worry about monthly
payments.
He and his wife went on
many creative dates.
When we were dating, we
cooked together, did stuff on
campus, walked around places
and raced boats at the park,
he said. When we got married,
we spent a lot of time going to
Center Street. We went out to
look at the antique shop there.
We frequently go out for a walk
at the park, go out to run, Red-
box a movie and get frozen
yogurt.
Redford said he still walks
frequently and does not use the
car often.
I think the car makes our
life a lot easier, and our life has
been more supplemented with
a car, he said. We treat it as
a tool, not a lifestyle. We try to
fill up the gas once a month.
Christin Watkins, a sopho-
more family consumer sci-
ence and education major from
Malad City, Idaho, gets rides
with her friends to go places.
I get rides with friends to
the grocery store, or when I
cant find a ride, I just walk
there, Watkins said. I usu-
ally do stuff with other people
so I can carpool to other places.
If I cant carpool, I usually
dont go. I hate asking people
for a ride if they are not going
anywhere that I want to go, but
I dont feel bad asking if they
are going to the same place as
I do anyway.
Since Watkins doesnt have
a car, she looked for a job on
campus.
Its been nice to work
on campus, Watkins said.
Classes are so close, so I can
go back and forth all the time.
David Castellanos, a junior
from Atlantic City, N.J., major-
ing in biology, said he would
love to have a car but cannot
afford one.
Its bad enough to pay for
tuition and rent and on top of
that, if I have a car payment,
that would be a huge hassle.
Despite the lack of trans-
portation, he still takes girls
on dates.
I had some trouble about it
previously, so I make sure to
have a car to borrow, Castel-
lanos said. Honestly, its hard
to ask a girl out without a car;
I just feel dependent. I have to
ask my friends in order to go
on a date. If my friends cant
let me borrow their car, I cant
go anywhere.
Testing Center rituals: Hope for the best, prepare for the worst
B y K r i s t e n W i l l d e n
Before taking a test, its
imperative that each student
has a pencil and a bubblesheet;
however, for many students,
the standard preparation is not
enough.
To avoid anxiety, some stu-
dents have come up with their
own necessary rituals to help
them focus before a test.
Justin Livingstone, a junior
fnance major from Glendale,
Ariz., said he needs his lucky
pen, pencil and eraser to take
tests. Livingstone said no mat-
ter what the score is, he jumps
up and does a heel click when he
looks at his score.
When I do really well, I do a
double heel click, he said. Peo-
ple assume that I got a really
good score if I do a heel click,
even though I do a double when I
get a good score. I think that it is
funny, so I just do it.
As a tradition, Brillante
Self, a senior from Severn, Md.,
majoring in Spanish transla-
tion, said she always looks for
the picture of Christ and sits on
the row where she can see Him
while she takes a test.
One time, the row was full, I
couldnt sit there and felt uncom-
fortable, she said.
Another necessary part of her
routine is a snack.
I always get the Snoopy
gummies from the vending
machine, she said. Those get
me through my tests. Some-
times, I tell myself that I dont
need to waste my money on the
gummies, but I prefer to have it.
Norman Roberts, director of
the Career and Academic Suc-
cess Center at the Wilkinson Stu-
dent Center, said some rituals
may be non-harmful or benign,
but others could be compul-
sions which could lead to more
serious issues.
Some of these rituals
may seem humorous, but
if they interfere with stu-
dents lives, then they may
need to be addressed and stu-
dents may want to work with
professionals, he said. If com-
pulsions, they may carry over
in students work or other parts
of their lives, which can create
signifcant problems.
The Career and Academic
Success Center provides
information to help students
be more successful students
through its free workshop
and handouts, including test
preparation and textbook
comprehension.
Dallas Beck, a senior econom-
ics major from Council Bluffs,
Iowa, said he used to go to the
music room to take a test.
I tried there a couple of times,
and it was alright, but then I
noticed a lot of music that they
would play are in a minor key,
which made me feel depressed,
he said. That is the last thing I
want to feel when I take a test, so
I stopped doing it.
Even though Beck stopped
going to the music room, he has
never stopped his other tradi-
tion, eating a Texano burrito at
Rancheritos.
Its a way to treat myself,
thinking I deserve it after hav-
ing studied so much, he said.
One time at the end of fall
semester, I was running late to
go to the airport. Even though
I was running out of time, I
couldnt break my tradition, so
I still went and made it to my
fight.
Zombies
are coming
to Provo
B y C a s e y r h o t o n
The Walking Dead, a popu-
lar TV show, has created quite a
stir in the zombie world. Ryan
Freeman and Jordan Gluch put
their brains together in hopes to
create a stir with their own zom-
bie fantasy the running dead.
Freeman and Gluch will infect
Provo with the zombie virus on
Nov. 3 with the Provo Canyon
Escape 5K race.
The Provo Canyon Escape is
a 5K zombie-apocalypse-themed
race for anyone wanting to test
themselves against the zombies.
For a race fee, registrants are
considered survivors who have
to run from the starting line to
the evacuation point without
being captured by having their
fag pulled by the zombies.
The survivors will have a
head start, then the zombies
will be released when we cant
hold them back anymore, said
Jordan Gluch, co-director of the
race.
Zombies will chase and cap-
ture the survivors by pulling
their flags. Only those who
make it across the fnish line
still wearing their fag will get
the survivor T-shirt.
There is nothing to fear, as the
zombies are volunteers. How-
ever, they will be dressed up
with fake blood and makeup for
a frightening appearance, said
Freeman, co-director of the race.
It should get your adrenaline
rushing, being chased by people
with fake blood and makeup,
Freeman said.
There is also no need for the
slow runners to fear; the zombies
are not necessarily going after
the slow people.
The zombies will only be
allowed to take a certain number
of fags, so the people who are a
bit slower, dont worry you still
have a chance, Freeman said.
There will be at least one safe
zone where participants can get
a drink of water and rest if they
have to without the zombies pull-
ing their fags.
Race strategy may come into
play as the survivors choose
when, or whether or not, to take
a break, hoping to avoid the
zombies.
Zombie enthusiast and co-
director Jordan Gluch writes sto-
ries on the Provo Canyon Escape
blog with stories building up to
the day of the race, or the con-
tamination. Many of the stories
are fctitious adaptations of real
events that help the story come
alive.
We love the public participa-
tion, said Gluch. We love input
and want people to get really
into it. Thats really the reason
behind the back story, so that
everyone can get excited about
it and make it real for just that
day.
The recent popularity of
zombie entertainment is
the inspiration behind this
race, particularly the movie
Zombieland.
In the movie, the frst rule
to survive a zombie apocalypse
is good cardio, so were kind of
playing off that, Freeman said.
Its all about the cardio.
Both of the race directors
would classify themselves as
zombie people and are put-
ting on the race for the commu-
nity to have fun and get out and
exercise.
Some people do races for
charity, some do it for money; we
wanted to organize a race that
would be fun, particularly to col-
lege-age students and other people
around the state, Freeman said.
Becca Jackson, an exercise
and wellness major and avid
runner, says the race sounds
creepy but fun.
It seems exhilarating. It
would be more of a competition
if you are running for your life,
Jackson said.
For those preparing for the
apocalypse, a co-director gives
some valuable advice.
If you can run from them,
youll survive, Freeman said.
The zombies are coming on
Nov. 3. For more information
about the apocalypse, visit pro-
vocanyonescape.com.
Photo illustration by sarah hill
students fll the testing center with snacks in hand. From snacks to superstitions, most students have a
ritual when they go to take a test.
Photo by sarah hill
Going to the grocery store can be a daunting task for students without cars. Bumming rides or borrow-
ing friends cars are several options these students rely on.
16 the Universe, september 25 october 1, 2012
Modest clothing that you
dont have to layer!
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The Universe, September 25 October 1, 2012 17
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for the Hawaiian Luau!
September 25:
Lunch 12-2:30 pm. Invite a friend!
With the Dining Dollars meal plan, plan holders
receive a Dining Dollar allotment at the beginning
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CatCh-up
Reconnecting
with pop culture
is a struggle
for returned
missionaries
Continued from Page 15
facets of popular culture and
social media began to again
take their place in his life.
It was weird feeling out of
the loop, Rice said. It was
depressing because I didnt
know anything. For instance,
in music there was suddenly
this new thing called dub-step,
which had never existed before.
People called me an old man
because I was still rockin out
to my old stuff.
Transitioning from a zero
to 60 mph world of media is
not something unique to Rice.
Sophomores Preston Alder and
Brandon Richards recently
underwent similar assimilat-
ing experiences.
The biggest change I saw
was in technology, Alder said.
I was amazed at everything
you could do with a phone. I
didnt touch a dollar bill for
weeks after I got home because
everything was on credit.
Alder served in South Africa
and Richards served in Para-
guay. Coming home for these
young men was an out of this
world experience, cultur-
ally speaking. Once they had
thought the adjustment to living
in underdeveloped countries
would be tough, but coming
home and adapting to the tumul-
tuous world of Bieber-fever,
emailed receipts and superhero
frenzy was comparably harder.
Maybe when Im home for a
little longer it will be easier,
Richards said. But my view of
the world has changed. I feel for-
eign in my own country.
For them, its all about fnd-
ing a balance. Before they
left, popular culture and the
media served as escape outlets,
and weighed so much in their
social lives. Now, they want
to continue incorporating the
standards and lifestyles they
established while out in the
feld, but they also dont want to
be left behind.
I had to force myself to take
the initiative back into media,
Richards said. The desire was
there, but the necessity isnt. Its
all about prioritizing.
treasure
The Great Provo-
Orem Treasure Hunt
begins this week
Continued from Page 15
clever marketing campaign
for an app he plans to launch
next year for college textbooks.
As aspiring treasure chasers
search for Lillicos booty, theyre
also building a relationship with
the entrepreneur. Though he
hopes to build a good rapport
with potential customers, he
promises the treasure hunt will
be a challenge.
Its not going to be easy, Lil-
lico said.
Be advised no cash is actu-
ally hidden or buried. Partici-
pants must decipher and follow
the series of clues that will lead
them to a voucher that will allow
them to claim their prize. The
search is projected to last about
45 days. Clues will be emailed
and tweeted to those who sign
up. Treasure hunters who sign
up before Sept. 28 will receive
pre-clues, giving them an advan-
tage over others in the hunt for
the prize.
The hunt will be packed with
activities and smaller prizes
along the way to keep hunters
motivated. The hunt is designed
to be done in groups, making it
ideal for family night activities,
date ideas and college groups.
In fact, Lillico has promised to
give a special clue exclusively to
BYU students. If you email him
to sign up and use the code word
gocougars he will respond
with a clue not given to the rest
of the treasure hunters.
Jessica Ross, a senior study-
ing public health, said shes got
big plans if she wins the prize.
If I found it, Id probably
be lame though and put it in
the bank or invest it in 5,000
cheeseburgers.
While fun in nature, the
treasure hunt will also be a
humanitarian effort. There
will be service events along
the way, including food drives
and hygiene product donations.
Hunters who participate in these
events will receive extra clues to
fnd the prize. These donation
times will conveniently be just
before the holiday season.
Nate Kuhlman, a senior BYU
student studying Russian, has a
group prepared to start the trea-
sure hunt.
Even if I dont end up fnding
any treasure, I think the GPOTH
will be a great big game for my
friends and me where we can get
out around town and just have
fun together as we look for some
treasure, Kuhlman said.
Aspiring treasure hunters can
sign up by emailing to dl@pro-
votreasurehunt.com, following
their twitter @ProvoTreasure,
or by visiting Lillicos website
provotreasurehunt.com.
apple
Students line up
for latest iPhone 5
Continued from Page 15
I have a couple of friends that
work at the Apple store, so they
convinced me to do it, Wilson
said. I thought Id be crazy to
ever do that, but it was actually
kind of fun. Plus, I got a bunch
of awesome swag from other
companies; even some awesome
headphones, and Apple catered
hot chocolate, coffee and dough-
nuts for the people waiting for
the store to open.
To Wilson, the wait was worth
it.
It feels great in my hand, the
larger screen doesnt make it feel
too big for my hand or pocket,
he said. I was surprised and
impressed with how solid it feels
yet how light it is. I think its a
beautiful phone overall.
Apple began pre-orders on
Sept. 14 and completely sold out
within an hour. Jeff Hammond, a
senior studying geospatial intel-
ligence, was one of those few
people who was able to order the
phone.
I have been using an older
phone and decided it was time
to upgrade to a smart phone,
and the coming out of the new
iPhone was the perfect timing
to do it, Hammond said. I am
excited to be able to schedule my
days on it and use Siri.
Tyler Richards, a senior
studying business management,
bought the iPhone 5 because of
its new upgrades. One of the
biggest changes with the new
iPhone is the upgrade to a 4G
LTE network.
I love that it has that extra
space compared to the 4 or the
4S, said Richards. Also, Siri
is new to me. The 4G is new to
me, and I really need that speed.
I have a startup company, and I
constantly need to be connected
to the web. Especially on my
iPhone. That surfng speed is
huge to me.
Photo by Lacey Montierth
Students and other customers line up outside the Gateway Apple store to purchase the latest iPhone.
Students discuss their definition of beauty
B y L A U r e n M O r A n
With teased hair, freshly
curled eyelashes and a new coat
of lip-gloss, Spencer Hastings,
one of several characters on
the ABC Family show Pretty
Little Liars, leaves her stun-
ning home with makeup caked
on and an outft appropriate for
the Oscars in the season fnale.
For many, this is the vision of
beauty, but for BYU students
it is a misrepresentation of the
words true meaning.
The media constantly bom-
bards students with images
of attractive men and women;
however, at BYU, dress and
grooming is held to a standard
that equips students with a
healthy mentality towards the
appearances of others.
Brittni Ray, a 21-year-old
sophomore from Kirkland,
Wash., believes beauty is about
the goodness of others, rather
than their physical appearance.
I think people are beautiful
from the inside, Ray said. I
used to judge people a lot and
then I began to look at them
as sons and daughters of God.
When you look at people that
way, you see that we are all cre-
ations of our Heavenly Father.
Ray continued discussing
how being a member of The
Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter-day Saints has helped
change her perception of
beauty.
God never makes ugly
things, she said. We are all
beautiful.
In regard to natural beauty,
Austin Morrell, a 19-year-
old sophomore from Anchor-
age, Ala., majoring in biology,
stated he thinks people are
most attractive hanging out in
their pajamas. Also, Morrell
said he has an appreciation
for the unique. To Morrell, the
truly beautiful are the truly dif-
ferent. Variety is his personal
defnition of the word.
Variety kind of not ftting
a mold and having something
unique or special about you,
Morrell said.
He discussed how his
affliation with the Latter-day
Saint church has contributed to
his perception of beauty. Mor-
rell thinks people should be
proud of their differences.
While natural beauty is
highly regarded among some
students, others believe
makeup and hair spray has its
place.
Tiffany Owens, an 18-year-
old freshman from Orem,
thinks as long as its not too
crazy, people should have fun
with their looks.
I think makeup should
be used to bring out natural
beauty, Owens said. Its fne if
they can tell you have makeup,
but you shouldnt look like a
plastic doll.
Similar to Ray and Morrell,
Owens knows her beliefs as a
Latter-day Saint have affected
her views on beauty. When
asked to defne beauty, Owens
stated it was goodness and hap-
piness, in addition to the physi-
cal appearance.
Id say we focus more on
modesty and goodness, rather
than being sexy, Owens said.
Photo by Whitnie Soulberg
Although physical beauty is important, some people say their inner beauty is more important.
18 The Universe, September 25 October 1, 2012
McBride Briar Patch thrives as cool weather brings good business
B y K E N N E T H B A L D W I N
Between rows and rows of
green sit several red juicy mor-
sels, glistening in the gentle
September sunlight, sweetening
as the cool evening air comes
over McBride Briar Patch.
McBrides raspberry and
blackberry patch at 1849 S. 2100
W. in Mapleton has only a few
weeks left in its raspberry har-
vest. The pick-your-own rasp-
berry patch opens every year
in mid-August and offers cus-
tomers all the raspberries they
can pick in the McBrides large
property for only three dollars
a pound.
There are several pick-it-
yourself farms in the local
farmers community, but the
McBrides are seeing a lot of
trafc.
News travels just kind of
by word of mouth, said Joyce
McBride, one of the farm own-
ers. I think weve been letting
people come pick for about seven
years. Its gotten crazy these
past couple of years.
The McBrides also have a
Facebook page with nearly 500
subscribers. The briar patch
seems to be a favorite local
secret.
We have some people come
out just for therapy, Joyce said.
Some of their customers make
it a point to come back weekly to
escape the chaos of everyday life
in the city. With their expanse of
raspberry plants, its not hard to
spend well over an hour or two
walking up and down the rows
looking for berries. The sounds
of the freeway are just faint
enough to forget about.
The briar patch also is a pop-
ular date destination. In fact
when a couple comes, Wayne
McBride, Joyces husband,
encourages the men to pick
some owers for their compan-
ion from their garden in front,
free of charge.
I thought that McBrides was
a perfect date location, Paul
Fiske, a senior at BYU said. It
was just far enough to be adven-
turous but close enough for a
spur of the moment idea.
Wayne McBride is more
than happy to have couples and
young people visiting.
We try to make it nice for
people, said Wayne. Theres a
place for them to sit, wash their
hands and their buckets. We
even have a lavatory.
Wayne is particularly proud
of his crop and is ready to teach
all newcomers how to nd and
pick the best berries on the
property. He even encourages
his customers to taste as they go
so they can identify which, out
of the several breeds of raspber-
ries on his property, they prefer.
Theyre a cool weather
berry, Wayne said. The
cooler it gets, the faster they
bloom and the more sugar they
get into them. As the nights get
cooler the berries get better and
better.
The recent cooler weather
has given their berry crop an
impressive yield. It doesnt
take customers long to collect
several pounds of crop.
Labor Day we had the most
number people weve ever had,
Wayne said. The picking was
the best weve ever seen. There
were people in every row com-
ing back with beautiful berries.
This has been an exceptional
year.
Photo by Kenneth Baldwin
McBride Briar Patch has a few weeks left in its raspberry harvest
this year.
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Balancing act: A student, employee and parent
B y K R I S T E N W I L L D E N
On its own, school can be
quite a task to manage, but
dirty dishes, changing dia-
pers and long hours at work
on top of it can make student
life nearly impossible.
According to Y Facts, in
2011, 25 percent of BYU stu-
dents were married. Despite
juggling class schedules with
homework and other daily to-
dos, those students still find a
way to manage their schedule
to provide for their families.
Austin Hanks, a senior from
St. George, has been married for
two years and has a 6-month-old
son. As a business management
student, Hanks has a rigorous
study load and said he takes
managing things one day at a
time.
I dont do anything spe-
cial, Hanks said. I just kind
of do it. I need to plan out what
I have to do for school. School
is what makes me most over-
whelmed, especially when I
have to do everything all at
once. I am fine when I am in
classes, but having to do the
hard work outside of classes is
overwhelming.
He said he tries to get home-
work done as soon as possible
so he can spend time with his
family.
This is my choice and
responsibility, Hanks said.
I have chosen to get married
and have children, so with that
choice, I have the responsibility
to do all these things. I wont be
able to provide for my family if
I dont nish school. I want my
wife to stay at home, so I need to
take care of my family.
Dr. Tom Golightly, the asso-
ciate clinical director at BYU
Counseling and Psychological
Services, said many couples
juggle many roles such as course
loads, workloads, nancial bur-
dens and parental roles.
Couples can work on
communicating to each other,
Golightly said. They need to be
deliberate about agreeing upon
the vision of their relationship
to progress in the relationship
and maintain the levels of care
and concerns of one another.
Making the relationship a pri-
ority is essential. Couples have
to make their relationship a
priority in order to nurture it
and be purposeful in doing fun
things together. Not just talking
about it as a priority, but spend-
ing time together is important.
BYU offers various counsel-
ing to those married students.
Counseling and Psychological
Services in the Wilkinson Stu-
dent Center helps all full-time
BYU students. The Compre-
hensive Clinic at the John Tay-
lor Building takes both BYU
students and people among
the community. The School of
Family Life and the Depart-
ment of Religion also provide
classes to help marriage and
family relationships.
Emily Conrad, a freshman
health care administration
major from Springville, has a
2-year-old son, works 60 hours
a week, takes 10 credits at UVU
and plans on transferring to
BYU next semester.
I feel overwhelmed every-
day, but I know that it will pay
off in the end, Conrad said. I
grew up in a really good life. I
dont want my son to lose out of
his opportunities just because
I was pregnant in a young age.
With no time during the
week, she spends time with her
son on the weekend.
I get off work at 6:30 p.m.,
so I have time with him for two
to three hours everyday, she
said. During the weekend, we
try to have more time together.
He loves to go shopping, watch
football and go to the park, so
we normally do what he likes
to do.
Lee Jensen, a senior from
Cedar Hills, a masters student
in accounting, tries to maintain
a balance between work, school
and family.
Its not always easy, Jen-
sen said. Effectively man-
aging your time is essential.
I have to make sure to set
aside time for the things that
are most important like fam-
ily, work, school and church.
My wife is amazing, I rely on
her for taking care of a lot of
things.
He said his main motivation
is his family.
Things dont always go
as planned, so I have to be
f lexible, he said. I try to
make it home before my
18-month- old daughter goes
to bed, but sometimes, some-
thing will come up at work
that keeps me there longer
than expected. I just have to
remember that the whole rea-
son I work and go to school is
for my family. They are what
brings me happiness.
Photo by Whitnie Soelberg
Austin Hanks is one of many students who balances diaper duty and schoolwork.
Facts on
marriages
at BYU
SINGLE
Number of students:
24, 623
Percent of students:
75 %
MARRIED
Number of students:
8,357
Percent of students:
25 %
TOTAL
32,980 students on
campus
BYU daytime student marital
statuses according to Y Facts.
Available at yfacts.byu.edu
The Universe, September 25 October 1, 2012 19
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Secrets to successful date-night outfits
When it comes
to dating,
BYU students
take different
approaches to
apparel choices
B y L a U r e n M O r a n
Attending a religious univer-
sity where marriage is deemed
a high priority, several students
take their dating life seriously
especially the frst date.
Some students believe what
they wear can make or break the
potential relationship. BYU stu-
dents have varying opinions on
how to handle their date-night
apparel choices.
Daniel Ellis, a 24-year-old
from Portland, Ore., majoring
in mechanical engineering,
discussed how he handles his
personal fashion. Ellis believes
frst date fashion choices should
not be taken seriously, rather
with a sense of humor.
I wear overalls or a large
vest, Ellis said. Its a fltering
mechanism. If they like me while
wearing heinous clothes, I
know theyre cool.
Ellis continued discuss-
ing how some girls love his
unruly style, while others
do not see the humor in a
man showing up at their
door with a full-blown mus-
tache and jean jacket.
In comparison to Ellis
opinion, Blake Thain, a
24-year-old from Bounti-
ful, majoring in account-
ing, dresses to impress,
rather than feeling out his
dates personality with unat-
tractive clothes.
I wear a nice pair of jeans
and button up, but it depends on
the date, Thain said. I like my
date to feel comfortable.
Deborah Tan, an information
systems major from Singapore,
discussed her likes and dislikes
on frst dates. Tan enjoys know-
ing what the night holds, so she
chooses the appropriate outft.
Its always awkward when
you go on a date and your outft
is too nice or too casual, Tan
said.
In addition to wearing the
right thing, Tan stated she has
certain preferences in what her
dates wear.
Boys should refrain from
wearing sneakers on a first
date, Tan said. I know some
girls who wont go on a sec-
ond date because of their shoe
choice.
Fashion choices tend to vary
between sexes. Ryan Knecht, a
freshman from Mission Viejo,
Calif., said freshmen women
dress like they are attending
a fashion show. For the men,
Knecht believes they are laid-
back about what they wear.
I have noticed a lot of cargo
shorts and running shoes among
the freshmen, Knecht said. It
kind of weirds me out.
Knecht believes dating should
not be about what you wear,
rather what you have to offer in
a relationship.
For right now, I am going to
keep wearing my aloha Friday
shirts from Goodwill, Knecht
said.
Photos by Whitnie Soelberg
a BYU student models what he
feels is the best dating look.
20 The Universe, September 25 October 1, 2012
NightNight, Loud Harp, Alex Bateman and Soft Science to play at Velour on Friday
B y J e S S i e A l l e n
Something big is about to hit
the Provo music scene. One band
is reuniting and one band is just
getting started. Together, these
bands will put on a show that is
out of the ordinary.
On Friday Sept. 28, Provos
Velour Live Music Gallery will
host Alex Bateman, NightNight,
Loud Harp and Soft Science.
This show will be the culmina-
tion of a coming-home show, a
revival show and a last chance
effort at a Kickstarter campaign.
Loud Harp has never played a
show in Utah, but is well known
elsewhere. They just came home
from a successful summer tour
and according to local musician
Mason Porter, their debut in
Provo is highly anticipated.
NightNight is band comprised
of local heros in the Provo music
scene. The band features Scott
Shepard,who also sings for New
Nervous and Book On Tape
Worm.
Were all working on dif-
ferent projects, Shepard said.
But its fun to get together for
this side project, especially for
this show. We want to support
Soft Science. The album theyre
working on sounds incredible.
The other members of Night-
Night include McKay Stevens,
singer for The Vibrant Sound
and co-founder of Northplatte
Records with Joshua James,
and Nate Pyfer who toured with
Joshua James and produced
The Moth & The Flames album
and is producing Soft Sciences
record. NightNight has a big
local following and hasnt played
a show in nearly two years, but
is expecting to release an album
in October.
Shepard said playing at the
Velour rejuvenates the band.
There is such a good com-
munity in Provo, Shepard said.
We look for and foster friend-
ships when we do play. The vibes
we get are good, and it pumps us
up for more projects. We feed off
the success everybody of there
and that helps make it a great
show.
Soft Science working
on its frst album. They use elec-
tronic beats to create sounds
decorated with melancholic
melodies. The thunderous,
powerful beats are evocative of
the mystique surrounding the
mood of the band. The organic
and naturalistic sounds are pro-
duced electronically and build
on each other to create an aes-
thetic unlike any other.
Electronic music is some-
thing thats never been incred-
ibly popular in Provo, Jason
Gibby, the bands primary beat
maker, said. We just think its
fun to make music thats fresh
and if people like it, all the
better.
The band consists of Mason
Porter (vocals), Scott Haslam
(guitar), Jason Gibby (synthe-
sizer, samplers) and Jared Price
(base, synthesizer).
We rely on the interaction
of technology and traditional
instruments to create an inno-
vative musical experience,
Haslam said. One of our goals
is to push musical boundaries.
We are exploring new ways to
be creative both with audio and
visuals. In an artistic, non-tradi-
tional way, we want our shows to
be as exciting as rock shows, but
with a totally different sound.
The bands album Basic Com-
plex, is in the fnal stages of
production. The show on Friday
will serve as the fnal promo-
tional push for the Kickstarter
campaign the band launched to
raise funds to fnish the record.
Soft Science is offering inter-
active incentives to Kickstarter
campaign supporters. Those
who pledge $10 are pre-ordering
their copy of the album, those
who pledge $25 will have the
privilege of attending a pre-
listening pizza party with the
band, and those who pledge $50+
will get to come into the studio
and record sounds with the band
that will be used in live shows
and possibly future albums.
Producing this album has
been a slow process, Porter
said. We realized it was in our
best interest to put our all into
recording. Weve already spent
a lot of money for studio time
and stuff, now were asking our
fans to help get us the rest of the
way.
Attendees will be able to pur-
chase merchandise to support
the band.
Were striving to create the
chance for fans to connect to
something new and fresh in the
music scene, Price said.
Reckless endangeRment:
How outsized ambition, gReed, and coRRuption
led to economic aRmageddon
A presentAtion by
assistant business editoR
and columnist,
gRetcHen moRgenson
wednesday, octobeR 3, 2012
NOON 1 P.M.
KENNEDY CENTER CONFERENCE ROOM (238 HCRB)
Brigham Young University
brought to you by the
David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies
incollege
GRETCHEN MORGENSON
is assistant business and fnancial editor and a columnist at the new york times. she has
covered the world fnancial markets for the times since joining the paper in May 1998 and won
the pulitzer prize in 2002 for her trenchant and incisive coverage of Wall street. she is also the
winner of several awards in the feld of fnancial journalism.
previous to her career at the times, Ms. Morgenson was assistant managing editor and an
investigative business writer and editor at Forbes magazine. outside of her journalistic career,
she was a stockbroker for three years with Dean Witter reynolds in new york.
Ms. Morgenson is the co-author of reckless endangerment: How outsized Ambition, Greed,
and Corruption Led to economic Armageddon, with Joshua rosner. published in 2011, it
became a national best seller. she is also the author of Forbes Great Minds of business, and
co-author of the Womans Guide to the stock Market.
1
2
-
1
6
3
2
Reckless endangeRment:
How outsized ambition, gReed, and coRRuption
led to economic aRmageddon
A presentAtion by
assistant business editoR
and columnist,
gRetcHen moRgenson
wednesday, octobeR 3, 2012
NOON 1 P.M.
KENNEDY CENTER CONFERENCE ROOM (238 HCRB)
Brigham Young University
brought to you by the
David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies
incollege
GRETCHEN MORGENSON
is assistant business and fnancial editor and a columnist at the new york times. she has
covered the world fnancial markets for the times since joining the paper in May 1998 and won
the pulitzer prize in 2002 for her trenchant and incisive coverage of Wall street. she is also the
winner of several awards in the feld of fnancial journalism.
previous to her career at the times, Ms. Morgenson was assistant managing editor and an
investigative business writer and editor at Forbes magazine. outside of her journalistic career,
she was a stockbroker for three years with Dean Witter reynolds in new york.
Ms. Morgenson is the co-author of reckless endangerment: How outsized Ambition, Greed,
and Corruption Led to economic Armageddon, with Joshua rosner. published in 2011, it
became a national best seller. she is also the author of Forbes Great Minds of business, and
co-author of the Womans Guide to the stock Market.
1
2
-
1
6
3
2
Reckless endangeRment:
How outsized ambition, gReed, and coRRuption
led to economic aRmageddon
A presentAtion by
assistant business editoR
and columnist,
gRetcHen moRgenson
wednesday, octobeR 3, 2012
NOON 1 P.M.
KENNEDY CENTER CONFERENCE ROOM (238 HCRB)
Brigham Young University
brought to you by the
David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies
incollege
GRETCHEN MORGENSON
is assistant business and fnancial editor and a columnist at the new york times. she has
covered the world fnancial markets for the times since joining the paper in May 1998 and won
the pulitzer prize in 2002 for her trenchant and incisive coverage of Wall street. she is also the
winner of several awards in the feld of fnancial journalism.
previous to her career at the times, Ms. Morgenson was assistant managing editor and an
investigative business writer and editor at Forbes magazine. outside of her journalistic career,
she was a stockbroker for three years with Dean Witter reynolds in new york.
Ms. Morgenson is the co-author of reckless endangerment: How outsized Ambition, Greed,
and Corruption Led to economic Armageddon, with Joshua rosner. published in 2011, it
became a national best seller. she is also the author of Forbes Great Minds of business, and
co-author of the Womans Guide to the stock Market.
1
2
-
1
6
3
2
Reckless endangeRment:
How outsized ambition, gReed, and coRRuption
led to economic aRmageddon
A presentAtion by
assistant business editoR
and columnist,
gRetcHen moRgenson
wednesday, octobeR 3, 2012
NOON 1 P.M.
KENNEDY CENTER CONFERENCE ROOM (238 HCRB)
Brigham Young University
brought to you by the
David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies
incollege
GRETCHEN MORGENSON
is assistant business and fnancial editor and a columnist at the new york times. she has
covered the world fnancial markets for the times since joining the paper in May 1998 and won
the pulitzer prize in 2002 for her trenchant and incisive coverage of Wall street. she is also the
winner of several awards in the feld of fnancial journalism.
previous to her career at the times, Ms. Morgenson was assistant managing editor and an
investigative business writer and editor at Forbes magazine. outside of her journalistic career,
she was a stockbroker for three years with Dean Witter reynolds in new york.
Ms. Morgenson is the co-author of reckless endangerment: How outsized Ambition, Greed,
and Corruption Led to economic Armageddon, with Joshua rosner. published in 2011, it
became a national best seller. she is also the author of Forbes Great Minds of business, and
co-author of the Womans Guide to the stock Market.
1
2
-
1
6
3
2
Reckless endangeRment:
How outsized ambition, gReed, and coRRuption
led to economic aRmageddon
A presentAtion by
assistant business editoR
and columnist,
gRetcHen moRgenson
wednesday, octobeR 3, 2012
NOON 1 P.M.
KENNEDY CENTER CONFERENCE ROOM (238 HCRB)
Brigham Young University
brought to you by the
David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies
incollege
GRETCHEN MORGENSON
is assistant business and fnancial editor and a columnist at the new york times. she has
covered the world fnancial markets for the times since joining the paper in May 1998 and won
the pulitzer prize in 2002 for her trenchant and incisive coverage of Wall street. she is also the
winner of several awards in the feld of fnancial journalism.
previous to her career at the times, Ms. Morgenson was assistant managing editor and an
investigative business writer and editor at Forbes magazine. outside of her journalistic career,
she was a stockbroker for three years with Dean Witter reynolds in new york.
Ms. Morgenson is the co-author of reckless endangerment: How outsized Ambition, Greed,
and Corruption Led to economic Armageddon, with Joshua rosner. published in 2011, it
became a national best seller. she is also the author of Forbes Great Minds of business, and
co-author of the Womans Guide to the stock Market.
1
2
-
1
6
3
2
Reckless endangeRment:
How outsized ambition, gReed, and coRRuption
led to economic aRmageddon
A presentAtion by
assistant business editoR
and columnist,
gRetcHen moRgenson
wednesday, octobeR 3, 2012
NOON 1 P.M.
KENNEDY CENTER CONFERENCE ROOM (238 HCRB)
Brigham Young University
brought to you by the
David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies
incollege
GRETCHEN MORGENSON
is assistant business and fnancial editor and a columnist at the new york times. she has
covered the world fnancial markets for the times since joining the paper in May 1998 and won
the pulitzer prize in 2002 for her trenchant and incisive coverage of Wall street. she is also the
winner of several awards in the feld of fnancial journalism.
previous to her career at the times, Ms. Morgenson was assistant managing editor and an
investigative business writer and editor at Forbes magazine. outside of her journalistic career,
she was a stockbroker for three years with Dean Witter reynolds in new york.
Ms. Morgenson is the co-author of reckless endangerment: How outsized Ambition, Greed,
and Corruption Led to economic Armageddon, with Joshua rosner. published in 2011, it
became a national best seller. she is also the author of Forbes Great Minds of business, and
co-author of the Womans Guide to the stock Market.
1
2
-
1
6
3
2
Reckless endangeRment:
How outsized ambition, gReed, and coRRuption
led to economic aRmageddon
A presentAtion by
assistant business editoR
and columnist,
gRetcHen moRgenson
wednesday, octobeR 3, 2012
NOON 1 P.M.
KENNEDY CENTER CONFERENCE ROOM (238 HCRB)
Brigham Young University
brought to you by the
David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies
incollege
GRETCHEN MORGENSON
is assistant business and fnancial editor and a columnist at the new york times. she has
covered the world fnancial markets for the times since joining the paper in May 1998 and won
the pulitzer prize in 2002 for her trenchant and incisive coverage of Wall street. she is also the
winner of several awards in the feld of fnancial journalism.
previous to her career at the times, Ms. Morgenson was assistant managing editor and an
investigative business writer and editor at Forbes magazine. outside of her journalistic career,
she was a stockbroker for three years with Dean Witter reynolds in new york.
Ms. Morgenson is the co-author of reckless endangerment: How outsized Ambition, Greed,
and Corruption Led to economic Armageddon, with Joshua rosner. published in 2011, it
became a national best seller. she is also the author of Forbes Great Minds of business, and
co-author of the Womans Guide to the stock Market.
1
2
-
1
6
3
2
Reckless endangeRment:
How outsized ambition, gReed, and coRRuption
led to economic aRmageddon
A presentAtion by
assistant business editoR
and columnist,
gRetcHen moRgenson
wednesday, octobeR 3, 2012
NOON 1 P.M.
KENNEDY CENTER CONFERENCE ROOM (238 HCRB)
Brigham Young University
brought to you by the
David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies
incollege
GRETCHEN MORGENSON
is assistant business and fnancial editor and a columnist at the new york times. she has
covered the world fnancial markets for the times since joining the paper in May 1998 and won
the pulitzer prize in 2002 for her trenchant and incisive coverage of Wall street. she is also the
winner of several awards in the feld of fnancial journalism.
previous to her career at the times, Ms. Morgenson was assistant managing editor and an
investigative business writer and editor at Forbes magazine. outside of her journalistic career,
she was a stockbroker for three years with Dean Witter reynolds in new york.
Ms. Morgenson is the co-author of reckless endangerment: How outsized Ambition, Greed,
and Corruption Led to economic Armageddon, with Joshua rosner. published in 2011, it
became a national best seller. she is also the author of Forbes Great Minds of business, and
co-author of the Womans Guide to the stock Market.
1
2
-
1
6
3
2
Reckless endangeRment:
How outsized ambition, gReed, and coRRuption
led to economic aRmageddon
A presentAtion by
assistant business editoR
and columnist,
gRetcHen moRgenson
wednesday, octobeR 3, 2012
NOON 1 P.M.
KENNEDY CENTER CONFERENCE ROOM (238 HCRB)
Brigham Young University
brought to you by the
David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies
incollege
GRETCHEN MORGENSON
is assistant business and fnancial editor and a columnist at the new york times. she has
covered the world fnancial markets for the times since joining the paper in May 1998 and won
the pulitzer prize in 2002 for her trenchant and incisive coverage of Wall street. she is also the
winner of several awards in the feld of fnancial journalism.
previous to her career at the times, Ms. Morgenson was assistant managing editor and an
investigative business writer and editor at Forbes magazine. outside of her journalistic career,
she was a stockbroker for three years with Dean Witter reynolds in new york.
Ms. Morgenson is the co-author of reckless endangerment: How outsized Ambition, Greed,
and Corruption Led to economic Armageddon, with Joshua rosner. published in 2011, it
became a national best seller. she is also the author of Forbes Great Minds of business, and
co-author of the Womans Guide to the stock Market.
1
2
-
1
6
3
2
Reckless endangeRment:
How outsized ambition, gReed, and coRRuption
led to economic aRmageddon
A presentAtion by
assistant business editoR
and columnist,
gRetcHen moRgenson
wednesday, octobeR 3, 2012
NOON 1 P.M.
KENNEDY CENTER CONFERENCE ROOM (238 HCRB)
Brigham Young University
brought to you by the
David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies
incollege
GRETCHEN MORGENSON
is assistant business and fnancial editor and a columnist at the new york times. she has
covered the world fnancial markets for the times since joining the paper in May 1998 and won
the pulitzer prize in 2002 for her trenchant and incisive coverage of Wall street. she is also the
winner of several awards in the feld of fnancial journalism.
previous to her career at the times, Ms. Morgenson was assistant managing editor and an
investigative business writer and editor at Forbes magazine. outside of her journalistic career,
she was a stockbroker for three years with Dean Witter reynolds in new york.
Ms. Morgenson is the co-author of reckless endangerment: How outsized Ambition, Greed,
and Corruption Led to economic Armageddon, with Joshua rosner. published in 2011, it
became a national best seller. she is also the author of Forbes Great Minds of business, and
co-author of the Womans Guide to the stock Market.
1
2
-1
6
3
2
Reckless endangeRment:
How outsized ambition, gReed, and coRRuption
led to economic aRmageddon
A presentAtion by
assistant business editoR
and columnist,
gRetcHen moRgenson
wednesday, octobeR 3, 2012
NOON 1 P.M.
KENNEDY CENTER CONFERENCE ROOM (238 HCRB)
Brigham Young University
brought to you by the
David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies
incollege
GRETCHEN MORGENSON
is assistant business and fnancial editor and a columnist at the new york times. she has
covered the world fnancial markets for the times since joining the paper in May 1998 and won
the pulitzer prize in 2002 for her trenchant and incisive coverage of Wall street. she is also the
winner of several awards in the feld of fnancial journalism.
previous to her career at the times, Ms. Morgenson was assistant managing editor and an
investigative business writer and editor at Forbes magazine. outside of her journalistic career,
she was a stockbroker for three years with Dean Witter reynolds in new york.
Ms. Morgenson is the co-author of reckless endangerment: How outsized Ambition, Greed,
and Corruption Led to economic Armageddon, with Joshua rosner. published in 2011, it
became a national best seller. she is also the author of Forbes Great Minds of business, and
co-author of the Womans Guide to the stock Market.
1
2
-1
6
3
2
choose from 6
one-year business
masters degrees
boost your job search
Graduate School Fair
Thursday, September 27
10 a.m. 2 p.m.
WSC Ballroom, BYU
wpcarey.asu.edu/graduate
Two women discover beauty is more than just skin-deep
B y S A r A P h e l P S
Being diagnosed with a auto-
immune disease can change
ones life, and often for the
worse. However, through the
development of a new website,
two women let a diagnosis turn
their life around for the better.
As a makeup artist for 30
years, Laurie Vukich said she
had occasionally heard about
some dangers of makeup prod-
ucts. However, this realization
became real when her daughter
Tiffany Correa, also a makeup
artist, was diagnosed with rheu-
matoid arthritis. Upon the diag-
nosis, both women took action.
For us as makeup artists
we said, lets just start off with
what we care about most and
look and research into what
could be harmful to the body,
Correa said. There were lots
of stories online about people
who had cured themselves by
eating healthy and not putting
chemicals on their body, so we
got empowered and went from
there.
Correa and Vukich said they
wanted to share what they were
learning, and from it devel-
oped Natures Knockout, a
website designed to help people
transition into a chemical-free,
healthy lifestyle.
We just feel like (Tiffanys)
body was on toxic overload,
Vukich said. Weve seen a lot of
people that have interacted with
us through our website and have
made changes to replace toxins
with healthy options.
Correa said that since her
efforts to avoid toxic products
and eat clean she has even
noticed a difference in her
arthritis symptoms.
My arthritis symptoms
didnt completely go away, Cor-
rea said, but its night and day
difference. I lost a lot of weight
on it actually, and I wasnt even
trying to. Thats where we real-
ized that beauty is more than
just face or skin deep, it goes
much deeper.
Shannon Golladay, who does
public relations for Natures
Knockout, also had a life-chang-
ing moment when she realized
she needed to be healthier.
I was always athletic, Golla-
day said. I was a dancer and ran
marathons, and then I got preg-
nant and gained 60 pounds. I
didnt know how to lose weight
because I never had to.
Because of the healthy life-
style she learned from Natures
Knockout, Golladay was able to
lose weight by focusing more on
a clean diet with lean meats and
organic produce.
Both Vukich and Correa said
although healthy eating and
natural products are important,
beauty is also attributable to pos-
itive thinking, and this is one of
their main messages.
We really feel like its empow-
ering to make positive replace-
ments with the products we use,
the food we eat and the thoughts
we think, Vurich said. We
really have come to believe that
the way we are eating is a beauty-
food diet. It really does make you
more beautiful in many ways.
To learn more about Natures
Knockout and natural products,
visit www.naturesknockout.com.
Photo by Whitnie larson
Soft Science member Mason Porter practices his vocals.
Photo by Whitnie larson
Mother and daughter laurie Vukich and Tiffany Correa created their
website to help people transition to a healthy lifestyle.
BYU grads qualify as Utah Book Award finalists
B y L i n d s e y W i L L i a m s
One night as she was
getting ready for bed, Jessica
Day George had a moment of
inspiration as the first line of
her new book suddenly popped
into her head. She found a piece
of paper and wrote down the
potential first line.
Emily Wing Smiths book did
not come to her in one night,
rather it was a 10-year idea that
recently came to life.
George and Smith, both
BYU graduates, qualified as
finalists in the 2011 Utah Book
Award. The winners will be
announced on Oct. 5.
Smith qualified with her
young adult novel, Back When
You Were Easier to Love. The
book is about a girl named Joy,
who moved to a small town in
Utah during her senior year
of high school. The only thing
that feels comfortable in her
new town is her boyfriend.
After her boyfriend dumps
her, leaving without telling
her where he was going, Joys
journey of trying to find him
and get him back begins.
The book drew
on Smiths personal
experiences. Smith moved
to Centerville before her
junior year of high school
and experienced a bit of culture
shock because of the higher
concentration of Latter- day
Saints. Smith estimated 97
percent of her student body was
enrolled in seminary.
Everyone had the same
beliefs but I found the culture
to be kind of cheesy, Smith
said. I felt like a lot of this
stuff doesnt have to do with
what I believe as a member of
the Church. Can I still be a good
person and not be interested
in going to Super Saturday
and other, kind of odd, Utah
events?
Smith said these experiences
paralleled those faced by the
character Joy.
Joy struggled with her
religion and the culture with
it versus her faith, which
was something that was very
important to me, Smith said.
Mari lou Sorensen, a
columnist for the Deseret
News, reviewed Smiths book.
I think shes got a real eye
for what teenagers go through
today, where religious and
moral values are being tested
to the limit, Sorensen said. I
was proud of her. I interviewed
her for that column and said
that I thought it would be
worthwhile for her to talk to
young women in the Church
because so many of them are
being pulled to attractive men
who are not worthy of them and
in (the books) case, the young
man is not (worthy of Joy).
George qualified with her
childrens book, Tuesdays at
the Castle. The book is about
Princess Celie who lives in a
castle that is alive.
The castle chooses who
the king will be; the castle
adds new rooms; the castle
can suck people out a chimney
and shoot them out into the
haystack behind the castle,
George said. The castle loves
the princess so much that
when people attack the castle it
works with her to try and fight
them off.
One of Georges challenges
while writing the book was
making it for a childrens
audience.
This book is for younger
readers than I usually write
for and so I had a hard time
deciding how much peril
would be too much peril or not
enough, George said. How
much danger could Princess
Celie be in before it could be
too scary?
Despite the chal lenges,
George said she is thrilled to
be a finalist in the Utah Book
Awards.
I am excited and honestly I
want to win, she said. I have
been nominated almost every
year since I got published but
Ive never won.
Allison Madsen, the youth
services librarian at the South
Jordan Library, said she loves
Georges book.
By the end of the first
paragraph I knew that I needed
to get this book in the kids
hands, Madsen said. Its
really important that kids
want to read the books and
that theyre exciting by the
beginning.
Rachel Birch, an avid
reader and mother of two, read
the book with her 6-year-old
daughter.
It is a delightful book for
princesses of any age, Birch
said. The main character
is spunky and fun. She has
a special relationship with
her siblings and with the
castle that everyone wants
to have with their family.
Photos courtesy emily Wing smith
emily Wing smith is a ByU graduate and the auther of Back When
you Were easier to Love, a novel inspired by her high school experi-
ence in Utah. Her story tells of a young woman named Joy who has
just expereinced a breakup.
Photos courtesy Jessica day George
ByU graduate Jessica day George is the author of Tuesdays at the
Castle, a novel that had been a dream of hers for ten years before it
became a reality. it is a tale about a young girl and her adventures in
an enchanted castle.
Feeling blueTheres
an app for that
B y C a s e y r H o T o n
New technology has allowed
smartphone apps to track calo-
ries, translate languages and
even take professional look-
ing photos. Now, a new app can
also test for mental health con-
ditions, assisting in both treat-
ment and reducing costs.
WhatsMyM3 is the app that
screens for signs of depression,
anxiety, bipolar disorder and
post-traumatic stress disorder.
Through a series of questions,
the app assess the users mental
condition. The results come as
an overall score and four sub
scores, one for each conditions.
Gerald Hurowitz, MD
Chief Medical Officer for
WhatsMyM3, explains that the
number given from the test is
important in assessing ones
mental condition. Just as high
cholesterol numbers indicate
a higher risk for heart attack
and stroke, M3 scores can indi-
cate risk for developing various
mental conditions.
The number is a starting
point to assess any mood or
anxiety disorder, said Hurow-
itz. It is not a black and white
answer to if you have the disor-
der or not the responses need to
be put into context. It is up to
the clinician to humanize the
results instead of being diag-
nosed by robots.
It prompts to help organize
symptoms, Byer said.
Henry Acosta, patient and
advocate of M3, says that
prompting him to fx the prob-
lem is just what M3 did.
I was trying my best to keep
it all together, Acosta said. I
hadnt been in the psychiatric
hospital since I was 16 years
old. A few months ago I liter-
ally felt like (returning to the
hospital) may have been an
option but I didnt want to ruin
everything that was going on,
I couldnt afford it. I thought
this will pass, this will pass,
just deal with it.
He said he took the M3 test
and his thoughts that he may
have depression were con-
frmed. He scored high in areas
of depression and suicide risk.
That propelled me to pick
up the phone and get back into
treatment, said Acosta. Since
then it really helped change the
course of my life.
As a device of early detec-
tion, this can be benefcial for
those not mentally afficted, Dr.
Hurowitz said. He also says this
can be very helpful for students.
Sometimes college peo-
ple think it romantic to be
depressed or angry and
sometimes those feelings
are appropriate, the medi-
cal professional said. Some-
times young adults lose sight of
the fact that emotions can have
an impact on actions.
When negative feelings
overtake the person and begin
interfering with functions the
body gets worn down and can
worsen conditions. Because
the app tracks scores, people
can assess their mental state
over time, and visit a clinician
if necessary, Hurowitz said.
Dr. Hurowitz and others also
believe this could also reduce
health care costs. According
to the news release, mood dis-
orders that are not treated cost
more than $70 billion each year.
Photo by Casey rhoton
Whatsmym3 is an app that
detects and tracks mental
health.
The Universe, september 25 october 1, 2012 21
Puzzles
[&Comics]
Sudoku
Solutions available at universe.byu.edu/sudoku
3 6 1 7 2 4 8 9 5
9 2 4 5 8 6 3 1 7
5 8 7 9 1 3 2 4 6
8 7 3 6 9 5 4 2 1
1 9 2 8 4 7 5 6 3
6 4 5 1 3 2 7 8 9
4 3 6 2 5 1 9 7 8
7 5 9 4 6 8 1 3 2
2 1 8 3 7 9 6 5 4
Puzzle 1: Easy
6 1 3 2 8 4 7 9 5
7 4 5 3 6 9 2 8 1
9 8 2 5 7 1 6 3 4
5 2 4 9 3 6 8 1 7
8 3 7 1 2 5 9 4 6
1 9 6 7 4 8 3 5 2
2 5 1 6 9 3 4 7 8
4 6 9 8 1 7 5 2 3
3 7 8 4 5 2 1 6 9
Puzzle 6: Very Hard
1 6 9 3 8 2 5 7 4
2 3 5 4 7 9 1 8 6
4 7 8 5 6 1 9 2 3
3 8 1 6 4 5 7 9 2
6 5 2 7 9 8 3 4 1
9 4 7 1 2 3 6 5 8
5 2 6 9 3 4 8 1 7
8 9 3 2 1 7 4 6 5
7 1 4 8 5 6 2 3 9
Puzzle 5: Hard
4 7 6 1 8 9 2 5 3
8 9 1 5 2 3 4 6 7
2 3 5 4 7 6 8 9 1
9 4 7 2 6 5 1 3 8
6 8 2 3 1 7 9 4 5
1 5 3 8 9 4 6 7 2
5 1 9 6 3 8 7 2 4
7 2 4 9 5 1 3 8 6
3 6 8 7 4 2 5 1 9
Puzzle 4: Medium/Hard
5 3 9 6 2 8 7 4 1
2 4 8 7 9 1 6 5 3
6 7 1 3 4 5 8 9 2
7 5 3 4 8 9 2 1 6
8 9 6 2 1 3 5 7 4
1 2 4 5 6 7 3 8 9
3 1 2 8 5 4 9 6 7
4 6 5 9 7 2 1 3 8
9 8 7 1 3 6 4 2 5
Puzzle 3: Medium
3 6 9 4 8 1 5 7 2
7 8 1 5 9 2 3 4 6
2 4 5 3 6 7 9 8 1
1 2 3 9 7 5 4 6 8
5 9 6 1 4 8 7 2 3
4 7 8 2 3 6 1 5 9
6 3 2 7 5 9 8 1 4
8 5 4 6 1 3 2 9 7
9 1 7 8 2 4 6 3 5
Puzzle 2: Moderate
8 The Daily Universe, Tuesday, April 24, 2012
Puzzles
[ & Comics ]
Sudoku
Continued from Page 7
Dr. Syed Nabi, a doctor at the
Sleep Institute of Utah in Ogden,
treats individuals who have or
may have a sleep disorder.
You have to figure out where
[the symptoms] are coming
from, Nabi said. Its like a head-
ache.
Similar to a headache, the
symptoms could come from a
number of different stressors in
the persons life.
Dr. Nabi meets with his pa-
tients and asks them questions
about their symptoms. If he sus-
pects an issue with the patients
sleep, he will order a sleep study.
This study evaluates the person
while he or she is sleeping and
measures brain activity.
Jared Facer, a senior major-
ing in international studies at
BYU-Hawaii, has the most severe
form of sleep insomnia. Facer, of
San Clemente Calif., served as a
missionary in Colorado Springs,
Colo., where he received his diag-
nosis. According to doctors, his
insomnia was triggered by high
elevation. After staying awake
for seven days, he was honorably
released from his mission. Five
years later, doctors are still un-
able to help him sleep.
I sleep maybe six hours a
week, he said. My body func-
tions on about two hours of sleep
[a night]. Ive been on every type
of medication, but nothing will
work.
Since the time most people
spend sleeping is time Facer can
use to his advantage, he said he
tries to be productive.
I work a lot, he said. I do a
lot of pondering and scripture
reading. Isaiah is not as boring
as people told me it was.
Sara Michael, a junior major-
ing in public relations, also be-
lieves she has a sleep disorder,
though she has not been diag-
nosed.
A lot of times when Im sleep-
ing, I wake up and think my
dream is still happening, she
said. My dreams are really
crazy.
At times, she dreams a family
member is in danger or someone
dangerous is in her room. She
wakes up and acts how she would
if the event was happening, at
times creating a comical situation.
Michael said her vivid dreams
can affect her sleep because she
still thinks about them, even af-
ter she is awake and knows it was
a dream.
Sometimes [when I am dream-
ing] I want to stop the dream, but
I cant, she said.
To fall back asleep, she listens
to music or lies in bed quietly.
Michael believes her active
dreams could be caused by stress
because they often occur when
she is in a new environment or
with new people.
While these two students have
rather severe cases of sleep dis-
orders, many Americans have
problems sleeping, including
BYU students. Those experienc-
ing symptoms can receive help
on campus from Biofeedback
Services in the Wilkinson Stu-
dent Center.
Barbara Morrell is a clinical
professor at the Counseling and
Career Center and coordinator
of Stress Management and Bio-
feedback Services.
We use biofeedback to help
people become aware of stress in
the body and where theyre hold-
ing the stress and tension and
then to learn to relax it, she said.
While Biofeedback Services
does not treat diagnosed medical
conditions, it is designed to help
relieve stress and tension, often
alleviating common sleep disor-
der symptoms.
One of the ways that stress
impacts sleep is that our brain
waves are different speeds, de-
pending on what were doing,
Morrell said. Our brains are
fast for thinking and doing and
very slow for sleeping. If we are
stressed and our mind is racing,
it is very tough for our minds to
slow down enough to sleep.
Biofeedback Services focuses
on relaxation training. Anyone
seeking help with relaxation
techniques can either schedule
an appointment with Biofeed-
back Services or visit the web-
site, caps.byu.edu/biofeedback-
and-stress-management, where
downloadable relaxation re-
cordings are available as well
as information on ways to sleep
better.
sleep
Lack of sleep
can be harmful
B y S A r A h S h e p h e r D
What started as an idea for a
simple Christmas gift, turned
into something Harry Potter
fans around the world could
enjoy year round.
In 2008, with Christmas just
around the corner, Sara Anst-
ed, a BYU graduate, was strug-
gling to think of a present for
her sisters. Knowing their love
for Harry Potter, Ansted went
online to find affordable, au-
thentic looking wands, but was
disappointed to find the wands
cost more than $70.
Ansted decided to try her
hand at whittling and made her
own Harry Potter wands.
I got some wooden dowels
from the BYU Bookstore and
said to myself, Ok lets see what
happens, she said.
Two years after Ansted made
her first wands she decided to
sell them online. She made
a store on Etsy.com and was
pleasantly surprised to see
people all over the world want-
ed to buy her wands. The wands
cost up to $18 and have been
purchased by people in Brazil,
Spain, England, Australia, Po-
land, Canada and Italy.
Stacy Julin, Ansteds co-
worker in the circulation de-
partment at the Provo City Li-
brary, purchased The wands as
birthday presents for her three
sons. She was impressed by the
workmanship and price.
Each wand is unique and re-
ally authentic looking, Julin
said. Ive seen other wands for
sale at craft sales and farmers
markets, but they are priced
much higher, and I like Saras
Wands better. My kids just de-
scribe them as awesome.
Ansteds wands can be found
online by visiting Etsy.com
and searching Embershad-
eDragon.
B y J e f f f i n l e y
Students with Provo in their
rearview mirror are missing out
during spring term.
The well-kept secret of spring
term is full of warm weather ac-
tivities, like river rafting and re-
cord-setting water balloon fghts,
that would be simply miserable in
the middle of December.
The worlds largest water bal-
loon fght in Summer 2010 was
hosted by BYUSA, BYUs student
service association, with almost
4,000 students and more than
120,000 water balloons.
While campus activities are
scaled down during spring term,
there is still plenty to do. Clubs
and other student groups, such as
the popular Laugh Out Loud com-
edy troupe, also hold activities. Be
sure to check the events calendar
on The Universe website for up-
dates and more information.
For those seeking a spiritual
boost, devotionals and forums
also continue during spring term.
Students who have purchased
an All Sport Pass and want to
watch a good sporting event can
enjoy baseball and softball games,
as well as tennis matches and
track and feld competitions.
Steven Leyland, a pre-business
major, said campus is less crowd-
ed during spring term, which is a
potential beneft.
Campus is more freed up, Ley-
land said. There isnt all the foot
traffc where you cant get to class
on time because youre bumping
into people.
In a poll done by The Universe,
71 percent of students who partici-
pated said they do not take classes
during spring or summer terms.
Milanne Carpenter, a nursing
major, said even though classes
are hard, studying for fnals is
easier because the course takes
place over a shorter period.
Although it was intense, a lot of
the teachers are pretty laid back,
Carpenter said. And I like that I
only have to remember material
from two months ago instead of
four months ago.
Another beneft of being on cam-
pus during the summer months
is the weather. With warm spring
temperatures, many students en-
joy being outside to throw a fris-
bee around or just to take a break
between classes.
When youre coming out of
classes you can go sit on a bench
and it isnt cold, Leyland said.
David Bracero, a geography
major, summed up his favorite
things about spring term in one
sentence.
Smaller class sizes, not as
many credits, better parking and
good weather, Bracero said.
B y K r i S T A r o y
There is a tarp tucked under the
bed, with a sleeping bag stacked on
top, seeming anxious and ready to
go.
Their owner, Kim Stevens, a se-
nior from Colorado Springs study-
ing mechanical engineering, puts
them to good use. Last summer she
set a goal to never spend Friday
night in her bed.
I was thinking of things I want-
ed to do that summer and realized
there was no reason I shouldnt be
camping every Friday night, she
said.
Stevens camping streak lasted
from the start of summer into
the Fridays of fall, and she even
camped during winter semester.
In January, my roommates and
I went to Goblin Valley thinking
we would get warm weather, but
it got down to three degrees Fahr-
enheit, Stevens said. We didnt
sleep much, but it was still fun.
Scott Jackson, a junior from Ev-
erett, Wash. studying mechanical
engineering, found inspiration in
Stevens weekend hobby.
Our group just went out and did
something no one else was doing,
and it didnt need to be planned,
he said.
Stevens agrees and said this
hobby teaches her to live off the
bare necessities.
I bring a tarp, sleeping bag,
sometimes a hammock and run-
ning shoes, Stevens said. Theres
nothing better than rolling out of
a sleeping bag and running in the
Saturday air when everyone else
in Provo is still sleeping in their
beds.
Stevens and her outdoorsy atti-
tude will keep her out of her bed
again every Friday night this sum-
mer.
Life is too short to spend it
sleeping in your bed, she said.
Camping keeps
Friday nights fun
Spring is in the air
Handmade wands
make unique gifts
photo by Chris Bunker
Tulips blooming all across ByU campus are colorful signs of spring.
photo by Krista roy
Kim Stevens, Krista roy, Mackenzie Gregerson and Jenny Stevens hunker
down in sleeping bags during a friday night camping trip.
photo by Sarah Shepherd
Sara Anstead whittles harry potter-inspired wands to sell on etsy.
5 1 2 6 4 8 3 7 9
9 7 4 3 1 2 6 8 5
3 8 6 7 5 9 1 2 4
6 5 8 4 3 1 7 9 2
7 9 1 5 2 6 8 4 3
2 4 3 8 9 7 5 6 1
1 3 7 9 6 4 2 5 8
4 6 5 2 8 3 9 1 7
8 2 9 1 7 5 4 3 6
Puzzle 1: Easy
5 8 3 4 9 6 1 2 7
4 6 1 8 7 2 3 9 5
9 2 7 1 3 5 8 4 6
7 1 6 5 2 8 9 3 4
3 4 9 6 1 7 2 5 8
8 5 2 9 4 3 6 7 1
2 7 8 3 5 1 4 6 9
6 3 4 7 8 9 5 1 2
1 9 5 2 6 4 7 8 3
Puzzle 6: Very Hard
7 2 8 5 3 1 6 9 4
3 9 1 4 7 6 8 5 2
4 5 6 8 9 2 3 1 7
5 7 2 9 6 3 4 8 1
8 6 4 1 2 5 7 3 9
9 1 3 7 4 8 2 6 5
1 3 5 2 8 4 9 7 6
6 4 7 3 5 9 1 2 8
2 8 9 6 1 7 5 4 3
Puzzle 5: Hard
1 5 7 3 2 4 8 6 9
8 3 4 7 9 6 1 2 5
6 9 2 5 8 1 3 4 7
2 7 1 4 3 8 9 5 6
3 4 6 1 5 9 7 8 2
5 8 9 2 6 7 4 1 3
9 1 5 6 4 3 2 7 8
4 6 3 8 7 2 5 9 1
7 2 8 9 1 5 6 3 4
Puzzle 4: Medium/Hard
6 1 8 9 7 3 5 2 4
4 7 9 2 5 1 6 8 3
3 5 2 4 8 6 7 9 1
1 9 4 7 6 5 8 3 2
5 2 3 1 4 8 9 6 7
7 8 6 3 2 9 4 1 5
2 6 1 5 9 4 3 7 8
8 4 7 6 3 2 1 5 9
9 3 5 8 1 7 2 4 6
Puzzle 3: Medium
6 3 1 7 9 2 4 8 5
2 7 8 3 4 5 6 1 9
4 5 9 6 8 1 7 2 3
7 6 5 1 2 3 9 4 8
8 9 2 5 6 4 1 3 7
1 4 3 8 7 9 2 5 6
3 8 4 9 1 7 5 6 2
5 1 7 2 3 6 8 9 4
9 2 6 4 5 8 3 7 1
Puzzle 2: Moderate
Sudoku
Solutions available at universe.byu.edu/sudoku
10
22 The Universe, September 25 October 1, 2012
Cougar Questions
Do you think you have a weird email address? Compare yours to these.
cheetachik@
My mom created this email for
me because I was obsessed with
cheetahs because I love to run.
Cheetahs always run faster than
everyone.
Tasha Wilson
Sophomore
dbmcconk@
My older sister set it up for me,
so my password was theman for 10
years.
Daniel McConkie
Junior
madsterbball@
My dad gave me the nickname
because my name is Madi and I love
playing basketball.
Madi Webber
Sophomore
scsweetheart11@
SC stands for South Carolina
because I used to live there, and
sweetheart is just to put it there.
Eleven is because my birthday is
May 11.
Angela Brown
Freshman
The weekly five: Must-see television shows
this season according to BYU students
From geeks and
zombies to families
and elementary
school teachers,
this season
promises it all
B y J a c O B R O B e R T S
Autumn brings with it cool morn-
ings, beautiful color, festive holi-
days and, best of all, new seasons of
the best TV shows.
Here is a list of fve shows that stu-
dents say must be watched this fall:
1. The Big Bang Theory
Whether one considers himself a
nerd or merely takes a fancy to
watching what nerdy people do in
life, this is the perfect show.
I like the show because its
really funny and I can relate to the
geek humor, because Im a geek
myself, Marissa Luke, a recent
BYU graduate from Spokane, Wash.,
said.
Lukes favorite
character is by far
the lovable Shel-
don. She loves his
awkward social
abilities and how
he gets on every-
one elses nerves.
Catch Sheldon,
Leonard and the
rest of the gang on
Sept. 27.
2. The Walking
Dead
What could make October better
than the season-three premier of
this gut-spilling, blood-squirting,
head-exploding zombie extrava-
ganza? What will happen next for
Rick Grimes now that the survivors
are beginning to doubt his leader-
ship? Who will become infected
next? The post-apocalyptic story
continues Oct. 14.
3. Modern Family
Another crowd-pleaser for this
season is Modern Family.
I like the inter-
action between all
the characters,
and the show is
very cleverly writ-
ten, Ashley Chip-
man, an English
major from Tustin,
Calif., said.
Modern Fam-
ily is a show all
about the societal
shifts in the def-
nition of todays
Amer i c an f am-
ily. Its portrayal of this diversifed
family has earned the show many
awards, including an Emmy for
Outstanding Comedy Series. The
Pritchett family returns Sept. 26.
4. New Girl
Next up is last years starting
series New Girl. The show stars
Zooey Deschanel as an elemen-
tary school teacher (who occasion-
ally bursts into song) who moves
into an apartment with three
bachelors.
New Girl shows great potential
to capture a large audience as its
pilot episode drew in over 10 million
viewers the most for a Fox pilot
since The Bernie Mac Show in
2001. Season two continues Sept. 25.
5. Community
The fnal show that promises
some good laughs this season is
Community, picking up again on
Oct. 19.
The shows comedic portrayal of
the strange and interesting charac-
ters enrolled in a community college
has earned the show dozens of nomi-
nations, including four 2011 Satellite
Awards and an Emmy for Best Com-
edy Series.
I love the situations they
get themselves into, Joy Patterson,
an elementary education major from
Las Vegas, said.
Its hilarious.

Ilike the show


because its really funny
and I can relate to the
geek humor, because Im
a geek myself.
Marissa Luke
BYU Graduate
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Valid Tu Th. See store for details. Sales tax and shop supplies not included.
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1515 S State Street, Orem 801 802-8555
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P
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l
e
s

P
i
c
k
l
e
s

G
a
r
f
e
l
d

G
a
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f
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l
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D
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l
b
e
r
t

F
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a
n
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&

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a
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&

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Z
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a
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ACROSS
1 and ___
goes
5 Pre-dyed hair
color, often
9 Hip again
14 Help desk
offering
15 Connecticut Ivy
16 This, that and
the ___
17 John Gottis
nickname, with
the
19 Cautious
20 Father of the
Symphony
21 What a military
operative may
provide
23 1995 N.F.L.
expansion team,
for short
24 First human in
space
27 Google image-
organizing app
30 Like an excited
puppys tail, old-
style
31 Oklahoma town
32 Folk song
played at Jewish
weddings
38 Life Saver-
shaped
41 Come out on top
42 Approvals
43 Giant who was
the Super Bowl
XLVI M.V.P.
46 Thos. Jefferson
founded it
47 Nuclear reactor
part
48 Sluggish
51 Flat item to cook
food on
55 Black shade
56 Vive ___!
57 More puzzling
61 Regular
63 Densely
populated area
or what 17-,
24-, 32-, 43- and
51-Across each
have?
65 Sculptors
subject
66 Place to drop a
line from
67 Skin woe
68 Oktoberfest
container
69 Memento from
Zorro
70 Food items
catapulted with
a spoon, maybe
DOWN
1 Dark Lord of the
___ (Star Wars
title)
2 Eminently
draftable
3 Not certain at all
4 Was I right, or
was I right?!
5 Ob-___
6 Lines going out
in all directions
7 Run ___ now

8 Dirt disher
9 Bed with wheels
10 Juillet season
11 Caught you, at
long last!
12 Showed again
13 Large African
antelope
18 Arduous task
22 Richard of Love
Me Tender
25 Bowl noise
26 Huge fad
27 Spread on
crackers
28 Worshiped one
29 Many an
illustration in
The Economist
33 Plant bristle
34 Roman septet
35 Curry who
formerly
co-hosted
Today
36 Italian writer
Primo
37 What ___ state
of affairs!
39 No problem
here
40 Bell tower
instrument
44 Spanish baby
45 Pontiac model
discontinued in
74
49 ___ about
(around)
50 Station aide
51 Make drunk
52 Movie set aides
53 Title character in
a Sega game
54 Skin woe
55 Extends (out)
58 Yahtzee
equipment
59 Italian hot spot
60 Some deli
loaves
62 ___ see it
64 Do something
wrong
Puzzle by Ian Livengood
For answers, call 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 a minute; or, with a credit
card, 1-800-814-5554.
Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday
crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS.
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Online subscriptions: Todays puzzle and more than 2,000 past
puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year).
Share tips: nytimes.com/wordplay.
Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords.
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16
17 18 19
20 21 22 23
24 25 26
27 28 29 30
31 32 33 34 35 36 37
38 39 40 41 42
43 44 45 46
47 48 49 50
51 52 53 54
55 56 57 58 59 60
61 62 63 64
65 66 67
68 69 70
S C A T D E B I T P H E W
P E E R I N U R E H O R A
A L I I O C E A N L I N E R
S L O P N O N E L E C T
M O U L I N R O U G E S T Y
E P E E P E S O
T H E T A C O L N I C E
S O L I D F O U N D A T I O N
A T O M A P E R H I N O
E A S E W A G E
T S P C O C O A P O W D E R
A T O L L V I A H I Y A
M A K E U P T E S T O N I T
E V E N E A R T H L E N T
R E D S G U T S Y E D G Y
The New York Times Syndication Sales Corporation
620 Eighth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018
For Information Call: 1-800-972-3550
For Tuesday, September 18, 2012
Edited by Will Shortz No. 0814
ACROSS
1 Letters in front of
an e-mail address
4 *Brother of
Moses
9 *Von Richthofen,
e.g.
14 Sender of much
e-mail
15 Campfire treat
16 Like some rial
spenders
17 Country musics
___ Young Band
18 Its just not done
19 Arc lamp gas
20 Victoria Falls river
22 Many a PX
patron
24 Hydrocarbon
suffix
25 *Element in
the cleanser
20 Mule Team
26 More haggard
28 Second man to
walk on the moon
30 ___ Bandito
31 Subatomic
particles
32 Cassandra, e.g.
33 Place for many
an office
37 Org. that bargains
with G.M.
38 Manx litter
41 Kilmer of film
42 Areas in dog
pounds
44 Director Joel or
Ethan
45 Founding
member of NATO
47 Several Russian
czars
49 Will it play in
___?
50 Potpourri
fragrance
53 *Bklyn., Queens
and others
54 Toothpaste box
letters
55 The Mayor of
Simpleton band,
1989
56 Coat
electrolytically
59 Dish alternative
61 Spokes
63 1970s-80s
Pakistani leader
64 Bagel choice
65 Find ___ and fill
it
66 Ambulance org.
67 *Sonny and Chaz
68 *Adheres
69 1/14 of a fortnight
DOWN
1 Joan with a guitar
2 Pepsi, e.g.
3 Dismount
4 Star
5 Fighting female of
myth
6 With 46-Down,
cohort of Little
John
7 Conquistadors
goal
8 Baylor basketball
uniform color
9 Block from
rebounding, in
basketball
10 ___ Zion Church
11 Charged
12 ___ occasion
13 San Fran gridder
21 Partner of bred
23 Terrier type
27 Japanese drama
28 Russia/China
border river
29 Pig-roasting
occasion
30 Honors with style
32 Creature prized
for its claws
34 Too large
35 Hawaiian isle
36 Lanchester of film
39 Quitters cry
40 Athletes no-nos
43 ___ card
46 See 6-Down
48 Alluring ladies
49 Paid (up)
50 Ebenezers
partner in A
Christmas Carol
51 Hersey bell town
52 Polio vaccine
pioneer
53 When doubled, a
spa city
57 Coors alcopop
brand
58 Dont get so
excited!
60 Head of
Parliament?
62 Ill take that as
___
Puzzle by Peter A. Collins
For answers, call 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 a minute; or, with a credit
card, 1-800-814-5554.
Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday
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nytimes.com/mobilexword for more information.
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ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16
17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24
25 26 27
28 29 30
31 32 33 34 35 36
37 38 39 40 41
42 43 44 45 46
47 48 49
50 51 52 53
54 55 56 57 58
59 60 61 62 63
64 65 66
67 68 69
G A P S D A H L S C E N E
O D I N E B A Y T O N E R
R H E A B E N D A V I A N
D O C I M A D D I C T E D T O
O C E L O T M A H E R
N E H I I N G M A R
S E N S E E X E C I A G O
T W I T T E R S O R R Y I M
A E R O T O G A A L O N E
B R O O C H Q U A Y
D R E A M R O A S T S
N O T F O L L O W I N G Y O U
I L I A C I D E S O R A L
M I N S K C E L T R U S K
H O S T S E L L A A P T S
The New York Times Syndication Sales Corporation
620 Eighth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018
For Information Call: 1-800-972-3550
For Wednesday, September 12, 2012
Edited by Will Shortz No. 0808
When this puzzle is done, the answers to the six
starred clues will form a word ladder, starting with
4-Across, whose record of 33-/42-Across was
broken by 68-Across.
ACROSS
1 Swiss ___
6 Derive (from)
10 Multimillion-
selling band
from Australia
14 Sacr-___
(Paris landmark)
15 Syringe
16 Actress ___
Flynn Boyle
17 Aetna
competitor
18 Blood-sharing?
19 Bloodhounds
lead
20 Prison guard
system?
23 Level of
achievement
25 These days
26 Healthful
cooking option
27 Lets see that
again in ___
29 D.O.J. heads
30 Hipster Capitol
Hill worker after
collapsing?
35 Sighs over, say
37 might ___
quietus make:
Hamlet
38 Taylor on The
Andy Griffith
Show
39 Bill at the Star
Wars cantina?
44 E-mail suffix
once required to
join Facebook
45 Make grand
statements
46 Klemperer
of Hogans
Heroes
48 Company that
introduced coin-
slide washers in
laundromats
51 Gives a thumbs-
down
52 Restyle a bit of
a D.C. hockey
players hair?
55 Not just a talker
56 Taylor of Say
Anything
57 Click or clack
60 Heraldic band
61 Thats cool,
man
62 Unbeatable
63 Singer with the
1986 #1 album
Promise
64 Its not meant to
be used on nails
65 Quick to flip
DOWN
1 New Deal work
program, for
short
2 ___ polloi
3 Cyclades setting
4 Totals
5 Speaker of the
line Listen to
them the
children of the
night
6 Outline
7 Preschooler
8 More awesome
than awesome
9 Late-night talk
show feature
10 Much work
ahead
11 Core members
12 Mouth watering?
13 Nickelodeon title
girl
21 Asias ___ Sea
22 Kind of
recognition
23 Chicken pox
result, often
24 Go back before
proceeding
27 Skyline feature
28 In the cellar
31 All ___
32 Like a policy
allowing
unfettered air
traffic
33 Ream
34 Prefix with
-pathy
36 Unpunished
40 Quod ___
faciendum
41 Twist-tie
alternative
42 Not reporting,
maybe
43 You can be
sure
47 Alter, as a
program
48 Windows
forerunner
49 Now, in
Nicaragua
50 Investors info
51 Two-finger
salute
53 Gofer
54 Swan Lake
move
58 Didnt sell
59 Englands Isle of
___
Puzzle by Ethan Cooper
For answers, call 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 a minute; or, with a credit
card, 1-800-814-5554.
Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday
crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS.
AT&T users: Text NYTX to 386 to download puzzles, or visit
nytimes.com/mobilexword for more information.
Online subscriptions: Todays puzzle and more than 2,000 past
puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year).
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Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords.
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16
17 18 19
20 21 22
23 24 25
26 27 28
29 30 31 32 33 34
35 36 37 38
39 40 41 42 43 44
45 46 47
48 49 50 51
52 53 54
55 56 57 58 59
60 61 62
63 64 65
B I B I S G T S A P P L E
E B O N H I H O L E B O N
H M O S E L E M E A S Y A
E P H E D R A M M C C
S C O T I A B E D S H E E T
T S O S T A I R S T R O U
S O O T S B R O N X
T O W N S Q U A R E S
U P E N N U N D U E
R I T A A T E O U T A F T
B U S T I E R S L A S T L Y
I N C A P A L O M A R
I D O N T C A R T A F R O
A N W A R E P E E K E E N
L A S S O S U P S S E S E
The New York Times Syndication Sales Corporation
620 Eighth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018
For Information Call: 1-800-972-3550
For Thursday, September 20, 2012
Edited by Will Shortz No. 0816
ACROSS
1 Western
highlight
9 24 actress
Cuthbert
15 Protest
pompously
16 See 10-Down
17 Its in the
neighborhood
18 Piece that bites
19 Unerringly, after
to
20 Just curious,
thats all
22 Some colts
24 Peoples
Sexiest Man
Alive after
Swayze
25 Belts in which
stars are seen?
28 Rust bucket
30 Bosox great
31 Comcast Center
athlete, briefly
32 Top sports
figure?
36 Do-Re-Mi
singer
37 Massage
message?
39 Romeos
offering
40 Bad thing to
bust in
41 Sent some
cybernotes
42 One of a pair in
Popeye
43 Many a summer
baby
44 According to
45 Start to go?
47 Pale-green
moths
51 Army outfits
54 Show part
55 Fastskin maker
57 Cry before
answering
59 Used harpoons,
say
60 Bit of ingenuity
61 Provider of
punch at
brunch?
62 Rock
DOWN
1 Cut through
2 Cant decline
3 Coffee ___?
4 Set right
5 Belly
6 Land with a
sultan
7 Kate who was
the 2012 Sports
Illustrated
swimsuit cover
model
8 Instant-book
title of 1981 or
2011
9 Imitation
10 16-Across
agreement
11 See 53-Down
12 Turkey
13 Laugh half
14 Half-and-half
half
21 Pass
23 Is an Internet
explorer
26 Stars in which a
belt is seen
27 One in a black
suit
29 Exit line
31 Cry before No
backsies!
32 Land to land on
33 Hit ___ run
34 Exemplar of
focus
35 Peter with the
1986 #1 hit
Glory of Love
36 Roadside sign
38 Big inits. in
comedy
42 Place of
worship
45 Screens
46 Sticky styling
stuff
48 Abstain from
49 Strange
50 Caterpillar
bristles
52 Slangy move
53 With 11-Down,
bash
55 Initials in a
personal ad
56 Golden ratio
symbol
58 Sporty autos
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The Universe, September 25 October 1, 2012 23
24 The Universe, September 25 October 1, 2012
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