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CHAPTER 1 RESEARCH DESIGN 1.

1 RESEARCH OBJECTIVE To understand the viewers reactions to controversial AXE and WILD STONE MALE Deodorant Advertisement from the age group of 18 to 28. To understand gender wise change in reactions to the controversial advertisements of Axe and Wild Stone Deodorant. To know the reasons for banning the advertisements.

1.2 RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODOLOGY Research Design Exploratory Research -Design in which the major emphasis is on gaining ideas and insights, Sources of Data Collection The study is a cross sectional study. Data was collected at a single point of time. For the purpose of present study a related sample of population were chosen for the sake of convenience. 1) Primary data: It is data which is collected by the researcher directly from the respondents. o Questionnaire: Designing the questionnaire 2) Secondary data: It is the data which is collected by researcher by studying the work of others and is collected through Journals, Articles, and Books and Online Data etc. Method of sampling It refers to the method to be applied and the technique to be used in selecting the sample. Stratified sampling: A stratified sample is a probability sampling technique in which the researcher divides the entire target population into different subgroups, or strata, and then randomly selects the final subjects proportionally from the different strata. Sample size: A sample is a part of the total population .It can be an individual or a group of elements selected from the population. Although it is a subset it is representative of the population. o The Sample size is 200.

CHAPTER 2 2.1 INTRODUCTION: SHOCK ADVERTISEMENT Shock advertising is a type of advertising generally regarded as one that deliberately, rather than inadvertently, startles and offends its audience by violating norms for social values and personal ideals. It is the employment in advertising or public relations of "graphic imagery and blunt slogans to highlight" a public policy issue, goods, or services. Shock advertising is designed principally to break through the advertising clutter to capture attention and create buzz, and also to attract an audience to a certain brand or bring awareness to a certain public service issue, health issue, or cause (e.g., urging drivers to use their seatbelts, promoting STD prevention, bringing awareness of racism and other injustices, or discouraging smoking among teens). This form of advertising is often controversial, disturbing, explicit and crass, and may entail bold and provocative political messages that challenge the publics conventional understanding of the social order. This form of advertising may not only offend but can also frighten as well, using scare tactics and elements of fear to sell a product or deliver a public service message, making a "high impact." In the advertising business, this combination of frightening, gory and/or offensive advertising material is known as "Shocking Advertisement".

THE CONTROVERSIAL FACTOR Controversial advertisements can be shocking and offensive for a variety of reasons, and violation of social, religious, and political norms can occur in many different ways. They can include a disregard for tradition, law or practice (e.g., lewd or tasteless sexual references or obscenity), defiance of the social or moral code (e.g., vulgarity, brutality, nudity, faeces, or profanity) or the display of images or words that are horrifying, terrifying, or repulsive (e.g., gruesome or revolting scenes, or violence). Some advertisements may be considered shocking, controversial or offensive not because of the way that the advertisements communicate their messages but because the products themselves are "unmentionables" not to be openly presented or discussed in the public sphere. THE EFFECT OF CONTROVERSIAL ADVERTISEMENTS Advertisers, psychiatrists, and social scientists have long debated the effectiveness of controversial/ shock advertising. Some scientists argue that shocking ads of course evokes stronger feelings among the consumers. One finding suggests shocking content in an advertisement significantly increases attention, benefits memory, and positively influences behaviour. The same study also shows that consumers are more likely to remember shocking/controversial advertising content over advertising content that is not shocking. Shock advertising could also refer to the usage of emotional appeals such as humor, sex or fear. Humour has for a long time been the most frequently used communication tool within advertising, and according to branch active people it is considered to be the most effective. The effects of these advertising could also be explained by the theory of selective perception. Selective perception is the process by which individual selects, organizes and evaluates stimuli from the external environment to provide meaningful experiences for him- or her. This means that people focus in certain features of their environment to the exclusion of others. The consumer unconsciously chooses which information to notice and this kind of selection is dependent of different perceptual filters which are based on the consumers earlier experiences. One example of this kind of filter is perceptual defence. Perceptual defence is the tendency for people to protect themselves against ideas, objects or situations that are threatening. This means that if a consumer finds a certain kind of advertising content threatening or disturbing, this message will be filtered out.
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2.2 SEX IN ADVERTISING DOES SEX REALLY SELL AND IF SO, WHY? By Paul Suggett, About.com Guide, Simply put, sex in advertising is the use of sexually provocative or erotic imagery (or sounds, suggestions and subliminal messages) that are specifically designed to arouse interest in a particular product, service or brand. Typically, sex refers to beautiful women (and increasingly, handsome men) that are used to lure in a viewer, reader or listener, despite a tenuous a non-existent link to the brand being advertised. THROUGHOUT HISTORY, SEX HAS BEEN USED AS A SELLING TOOL It's been said that as human beings, we have a lizard or reptilian brain that responds to certain primal urges. Food is one. Sex and reproduction is definitely another. This underlying, preprogrammed disposition to respond to sexual imagery is so strong, it has been used for over 100 years in advertising. And the industry, while abusing it more and more, would be foolish to ignore the draw of sexual and erotic messaging. Back in 1885, W. Duke and Sons, a manufacturer of facial soap, included trading cards in the soap's packaging that included erotic images of the day's most popular female stars. The link between soap and sex is slim at best, but it worked. And ever since, brands have purposely linked themselves to suggestive (or downright blatant) sexual imagery in the search for new customers. In particular, alcohol, fashion, perfume and car advertisements have created strong links with sex. DOES SEX ACTUALLY SELL? Yes, sex sells. It's a fact. Popular mens magazines like Maxim and FHM have experimented often with their covers. Overwhelmingly, when a sexy, semi-naked woman appears on the cover, it outperforms an image of a male star, even if that star is someone men want to read about. When ads are more sexually provocative, men in particular are irresistibly drawn to them. It's simple genetics. Men respond to sexual images. And if your ad creates a sexual situation, it will get the desired response.
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SEX ALSO TURNS OFF CUSTOMERS There's a fine line, and all too often these days brands are stepping way over the line. Consumers are human, they will respond, but they're also smart, well-educated people who will soon realize that they're being manipulated. People may buy your product one or two times due to the erotic interplay, but if the product isn't any good, you won't hold onto the customers for long. Not only that, they'll feel cheated, talked down to, or outright patronized. And that will take a much greater effort on the part of the advertiser to regain that trust.

THE FUTURE OF SEX IN ADVERTISING

Sex is here to stay, and it's getting more blatant with every passing year. The rise of the internet over the last 20 years has produced a direct line for much stronger, graphic sexual material to enter consumers' homes. And they're responding to it. Pornography, while not used in advertising in its traditional sense, is a multi-billion dollar business. As the rules around sex and consumers become more relaxed, you can guarantee that sex will become a bigger part of our advertising landscape.

THE BOTTOM LINE - USE SEXUAL IDEAS ONLY IF IT'S APPROPRIATE If you are advertising a male deodorant like Axe (Lynx in the UK) or lingerie like Victoria's Secret, you'd be a fool to overlook such a strong selling mechanism. But if you're trying to sell a lawn mower or a new sofa with nudity and sex, you're doing your product a serious disservice. Yes, you'll get attention. But it's the wrong kind of attention, and won't lead to a bigger and better brand. Sex, used sparingly and judicially, is a strong selling tool. But abuse it, and you will ultimately lose out. A study conducted by Paul Suggett for About.com guide, regarding the relevance of Sex in Advertising and different aspect that effect the effectiveness of this advertising tool. The source for this content is given in reference point 4.

2.3 AXE DEODORANTS Axe or Lynx (in the United Kingdom, the Republic of Ireland, Australia, and New Zealand) is a brand of male grooming products consisting of body sprays, deodorants, antiperspirants, shower gels and hair products. Axe is owned by the BritishDutch company Unilever, which is the thirdlargest consumer good company in the world, and markets their Axe/Lynx grooming products towards a youth male demographic. Although Axe's lead product is the fragranced aerosol deodorant body spray, other grooming products are available. Within underarm care the following are available: deodorant aerosol body spray, deodorant stick, deodorant roll-on, anti-perspirant aerosol spray (called Axe Dry), and anti-perspirant stick (also called Axe Dry).

PR CONTROVERSIES Adverse publicity has been generated by the product's advertisements for encouraging sexual promiscuity and sexism. The Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood claimed that Bartle Bogle Hegarty's work on Axe "epitomizes the sexist and degrading marketing that can undermine girls' healthy development." On January 12, 2008 12 year old Daniel Hurley from Derbyshire, England died in a hospital five days after collapsing at his home. The medical coroner ruled that he had suffered from cardiac arrhythmia and died from heart failure as a result of spraying large amounts of Lynx (Axe) in a confined space. Videos on social networking sites depicted teens lighting themselves on fire. The trend resulted in multiple injuries. In response to the possible safety concerns, the company created two ads, one against the use of Axe as an inhalant, and the other warning of its flammability.

ADVERTISING: AXE ad campaigns have always been the talk of the town. A good product also requires a good promotion strategy. Word of Mouth Marketing, It has always projected its products as cool, fashionable and stylish. Axe has the right storytelling element and the video reinforces the brands provocative and contrarian personality. Getting the girl has never been easier, thanks to the AXE EFFECT. Publicity of Axe has sponsored a wide range of other events like youth festivals, music shows. AXE organizes upbeat events for its new product launches and it follows this strategy worldwide.

PROMOTION OF AXE EFFECT Through a series of ads in print, outdoors and television, viewers are being encouraged to call this very same number. One of the campaigns launched showed girls swooning over Axe men and giving them their telephone numbers. Both films end with the girls giving the boys the number 09987333333. Targeted at the young urban male, the cool and youthful brand is positioned as one that helps guys get ahead in the mating game. CALL MECampaigns as part of promotion. This campaign was implemented in two phases. In the first phase a small teaser site with the name of www.clickmore.com was launched. Their main objective was to start a social phenomenon called Clicking. The axe undertook the click campaign in 2006 to promote its new fragrance CLICK. It was a pan-global campaign which was mainly targeted at young males.

AXE CLICK CAMPAIGN This campaign again highlights the importance of internet as a medium of communication especially if the target audience is young. This campaign was mainly used to capture the attention of the young internet users who visited the Yahoo webpage. It was 24 hour online campaign in which a dark man was placed in the centre of the www.yahoo.co.in homepage on 14th November. Axe launched another campaign in November 2008 to promote its new variant Axe Dark Temptation in India. It was undertaken in association with Yahoo.

CHOCOLATE MONTH OF THE YEAR- NOV08 Experience in its each and every in use of Sensory: Seduction: New Extra Strong Axe MASSAGE STRATEGY The massage strategy of axe is of two types: experience ad, Axe conveys the after use: massage that after It focuses on the using this Deodorant, the girls benefit of usage of the will attract towards all product by the boys and men who customer at Past and will use AXE.

CREATIVE STRATEGY That is, it is showing the Transformational effect of using the product. The massage source of this deodorant is not any celebrity but the common girls who are the desire of any common boy or men. The creative strategy of axe is transformational because, it indicates that after using the Deodorant a boy or men will get the power to seduce and attract the girls.

2.4 WILDSTONE DEODORANT WILD STONE is a quintessentially male brand, providing personal care products for young Indian males. Rough and rugged, it does away with the controlled norms of social interaction, taking contact between men and women to an elemental, instinctual level. WILD STONE bases its products on the changing needs of Indias youth. WILD STONE answers the need for fragrance on the go, with its Deodorants and Perfumes. The strong fragrances are ideally suited for Indian weather conditions. Soaps and shaving products complete a mans personal care ritual. With a wide range of fine fragrances, WILD STONE offers an international experience to its users. WILD STONE has grown rapidly over the last 5 years, as one of the leading male deodorant brand in the country. The success of the brand is reflected in the fact that it features among the top 3 deodorant brands in several states, both in terms of market share and top of mind awareness. Walking hand in hand with the evolving consumers tastes and preferences, WILD STONE deodorant was launched in a completely new packaging in September 2011. The new packaging is much appreciated and has been received well by the consumers The brand was started in the year 2005, targeting the middle class working people. Their products are targeted at the urban-masculine male who loves living life on the edge. Wild Stone markets itself as the masculine and mysterious brand in the Indian market. The brand is targeted at male aged 22-28. All its campaigns revolve around this central theme of seduction where girls make the first move. The feeling of being seduced gives a big boost of self confidence to a man. Along with these, the brand also ensures that customers are constantly engaged with new fragrances and campaigns. The company started the brand with a tagline Wild by nature. They moved on to the Barely Legal tagline which was more subtle and had sexual Undertones. Now the brand has again a new Tagline It happens. The new tagline gives a message that Wild Stone man doesn't have to "Try Too Hard. Brand anchor is Dangerous Liaisons and the brand destination is to become The iconic Indian Male Fantasy brand that owns the space of Indian sensuality.
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Wild Stone has grown rapidly over the last two years, to emerge as the number three brand in the fastest growing FMCG category today. It is the top brand in several states, has achieved universal awareness. With a clearly differentiated position, and strong growth across categories, Wild Stone is set for success. Wild Stone has become one amongst the top three brands in the Indian deodorant market within few years of its launch. Wild Stone deodorant has a national market share of 7.4%.

WILD STONE took another leap in year 2011 by going live on digital, a medium any brand can ignore at its own peril today. WILD STONE, in its endeavour to communicate and engage with the consumers, established its presence across social media platforms like YouTube, Facebook and twitter. The success of these brand platforms is reflected in the fact that the WILD STONE brand channel on YouTube (www.youtube.com/wildstoneofficial) got more than 3 lakh views and WILD STONE Facebook page (www.facebook.com/wildstoneofficial) has more than 60,000 fans, all this within 2 months of the launch With a clearly differentiated position, and strong growth across categories, WILD STONE is set for success! Living life on the edge can be intensely pleasurable. Wild Stone is for the man who enjoys unshackled pleasure Wild stone has strong fragrances with high affinity amongst users, 50% repeat purchase Rate of trials has doubled in critical cities like Mumbai and Delhi, leading to growth for the brand
Source: to www.futurebrands.co.in

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LATEST ADVERTISEMENT CAMPAIGN WEARING WILD STONE RED MAKES THINGS HAPPEN FOR MEN Deodorant brand, Wild Stone India has launched a commercial for its latest variant- Wild Stone Red. The TVC created by Soho Squarei went on air on 15 February. The pan India campaign is dubbed in regional languages and will air across national and regional channels for the next two months.
Image Source: www.campaignindia.in

The film opens with Dia Mirza dressed in a white robe and with her hair semi wet she walks towards the window. She gets a strong whiff of perfume and when she opens her eyes she sees a young man in the house opposite to hers. They exchange glances. Instead of drawing the curtain she opens the window and looks at him. In the next shot, she is shown dressed in a red sari, seated by the dressing table and doing her makeup. While doing so, she quickly checks if he is looking at her. When dressed, she again walks to the window, looks at him seductively and then leaves. The TVC then shows the man wearing the Wild stone deodorant and the voice over announces presenting Wild Stone Red. The TVC ends with the man looking on and wondering where she has gone. After this, the doorbell of his house rings. He pauses for a bit to contemplate who that might be and then grins. The voice over says, It happens. Aanchal Jain, head - brand partnerships, Future brands, said, "Wild Stone has always delighted its consumers with world class fragrances. This time we took two years to create the perfect new deodorant, Wild Stone Red. It is one of the most fashionable fragrances of 2013 internationally. Wild Stone Red is launched in a 'twist and press' unique can. The can is already met with an exhilarating response from the Deodorant users in India, who are demanding the can to be launched for all Wild Stone deos. The ad has been shot by Shoojit Sircar (of Vicky Donor and the lyrics for the ad film have been composed by Swanand Kirkere while the music has been composed by Shantanu Moitra. The campaign will have a digital run through Facebook and YouTube. Along with outdoor hoardings there will be activation exercises at malls, theatres and stores.
CreditsClient: Wild Stone Creative agency: Soho Square

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CHAPTER 3 LITERATURE REVIEW 1) OBSCENE DEODORANT ADS AXED FROM INDIAN TV

Rebecca Hawkes | 05-07-2011 says three controversial deodorant advertisements have been banned from broadcast in India with immediate effect following a ruling from the Advertising Standards Council of India (ASCI). The television ads for Axe body spray, and Cool talc and deodorant by Set Wet Zatak were found to be both obscene and indecent by Indias advertising watchdog, according to Indiantelevision.com. The advertisements, which have been the subject of many viewer and government complaints, showed women overcome by desire when faced with men wearing the various scents being showcased. The 21 strong Consumer Complaints Council part of ASCI decreed the ads should be taken off screen following their meeting, given there was no possibility of modifying the scenes deemed as offensive. In one ad, a woman dentist is shown unbuttoning her shirt while treating a scantily clad male patient wearing Zatak deodorant. Other shows a tailors son applying the apparently potent talc prior to taking a woman customers measurements with lascivious intent. The third offender is based around an excited female security guard over zealously frisking a man wearing Axe deodorant. Allan Collaco, general secretary, ASCI said: There is very little to modify in these ads. Hence, they have been asked to go off-air immediately. In May, the Ministry of Information and Broadcasting asked ASCI to ensure that the adverts are either modified or taken off air, because they offended good taste and decency. The Ministry said that these and some other deodorant adverts portray women as lustily hankering after men under the influence of such deodorants and that the depiction and portrayal of women in these ads is overtly sexual.

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2) INDIA BANS OVERTLY SEXUAL DEODORANT ADVERTISEMENTS The wild Stone deodorant advert shows a woman in a sari who bumps into a young man after being distracted by his body spray By Dean Nelson, New Delhi (27 May 2011) says that the Indian government's Information issued a and Ministry of

Broadcasting warning

statement

television channels not to broadcast the television commercials following a rash of ads featuring voracious women and "libidinous" men. Plot lines for deodorant ads aimed at young men have become increasingly racy in recent months, posing a challenge to India's traditionally chaste culture. One ad in particular, for Wild Stone deodorant, has pushed Indian sensibilities to their limits. It shows a young, pretty woman in a sari, carrying food at a family gathering, who bumps into a young man after being distracted by his body spray. In the next shot they are seen naked in bed, where they appear to have sex before the women leaves with her sari dishevelled and hair tousled. Similar ads for Axe, Addiction and other deodorants "brim with messages aimed at tickling the libidinous male instincts and portrayal of women as lustily hankering after men under the influence of such deodorants," the ministry statement said. In a letter to the Advertising Standards Council of India, the ministry said "these ads appear indecent, vulgar and suggestive they appear to denigrate women and thus violate the cable laws." It warned the ads must be modified or withdrawn immediately from broadcast.

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3) AXE DEODORANT AD ANGELS ARE FALLING BANNED WHEN ANGELS


A FLOCK OF BEAUTIFUL

FALL FROM THE SKY IN

PURSUIT OF A SCENT SO AMBROSIAL THAT

EARTH
IN

HAS ITS

OVERTAKEN ONE

HEAVEN

DIVINITY,

HUMOURLESS PURITAN DECIDES IT IS HIS SACRED DUTY TO DEFEND THE HONOUR PREACHES HIS NARROW-MINDED DOGMA TO THE OF RELIGION, AND

ADVERTISING STANDARDS AUTHORITY.

SHOULD

ONE MANS HISSY FIT DENY THE MASSES OF REFRESHINGLY ENTERTAINING

ADVERTISING?

The Advertising Standards Authority has ordered Unilever to withdraw an Ad for AXE deodorant. The Ad depicted sultry-looking angels falling from the sky, seemingly drawn irresistibly to a man who had used AXE deodorant. A voice over stated New Axe deodorant. Even angels will fall. A complaint was received from an offended member of the public who stated that, according to the Bible, angels are Gods messengers and the suggestion that angels would fall for a man wearing this deodorant is incompatible with his beliefs as a Christian. The ASA has a Code of Advertising Practice to which Ads must adhere. One of the general principles of the ASA Code is that Ads should not offend against good taste or decency or be offensive to public or societal values and sensitivities. In considering whether an Ad is offensive, the ASA will generally give consideration to various factors including the context, medium, likely and audience and prevailing standards. Fair enough. But whose moral standard or sense of decency will apply? The enquiry gets especially tricky when the rather sticky topic of religion is involved. This is not the first time that the ASA has received a complaint against an Ad which has had a religious theme or has used religious symbolism. Probably the most well-known of these was the Virgin Mobile Ad in 2006 which depicted a man suffering a heart attack due to his costly monthly cell phone bill and ascending to heaven. The depiction of heaven in the Ad included scantily-dressed female angels carrying beer and washing sports cars. Despite the fact that a
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large number of complaints was received by the ASA in respect of the Virgin Mobile Ad, the ASA was guided by the principle that the test is whether the hypothetical reasonable person would find the commercial offensive and that this fictional reasonable person is neither hypercritical nor over-sensitive. It held that the images of heaven were of a secular, nondenominational heaven and ruled that the hypothetical reasonable person would immediately recognise the humour and exaggeration and understand that this was not a realistic depiction of a particular religion or its concept of heaven. The ASA Directorate, in the Virgin Mobile ruling, commented that, while the commercial had clearly alienated a particular part of the Christian audience, there was no basis to find that the Christian sector, as a whole, had been offended. The ASA (sensibly, I think) found that the Ad did not contravene the ASA Code. Other advertisers have not been so lucky. Both Mavericks, which used an image of a woman in prayer holding a set of rosary beads and the pay-off line believe to promote a strip club and GHD Hair, which had used an image of a woman with rosary beads in her hands and the pay-off line May my luscious locks wrap everyone on earth around my little finger and Thy will be done, were ordered to withdraw their Ads. In the case of the Even angels will fall Ad for AXE deodorant, the ASA Directorate took a surprisingly literal approach and found that the commercial communicates that saintly creatures would give up their heavenly status and fall from grace for a man, a concept which Christians would be likely to find offensive. It further held that the Ad differed from the Virgin Mobile Ad in that this commercial takes place in the real world and not in the fantasy of the hero character. The ASA Directorate seemed to have been particularly perturbed by the fact that the fallen angels were not simply shown coming to earth but rather crashing to earth. Of course, these were the very aspects which, in my view, indicated both humour and exaggeration on the part of the advertiser and were clear indications that the Ad should not be taken too seriously. The ASA generally takes a realistic approach to advertising, recognising that Ads make use of parody, humour and exaggeration to get their message across. It is surprising that it came to this rather harsh decision on the basis of a single complaint from a possibly sensitive viewer. A quick search on YouTube reveals a multitude of banned AXE television Ads worldwide and it remains to be seen whether Unilever will go to the trouble of appealing the ASAs decision. Either way, it seems unlikely that this is the last clever (yet controversial) Ad we will see for this product.
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4) "CHOCOLATE MAN" AD TOO SEXY FOR INDIAN AUDIENCE A

deodorant advert that showed an apparently irresistible chocolate man being gnawed on by scantily clad women has been banned in India. An advertising executive in the country explains why it was so offensive. The Indian blogosphere is having a tantrum over the decision to withdraw a commercial for Axe Dark Temptation deodorants for men, which are flavoured with a hint of chocolate. Created by Argentinean advertisers and aired on Indian television, the ad shows crowds of attractive young women nibbling and licking at a young man wearing the deodorant. Although parts of the clip had already been censored to appease the regional audience, the Advertising Standards Council of India (ASCI) received so many complaints about the ad that they decided to remove it. It follows a collection of commercials flaunting, amongst other things, sexy underwear and flavoured condoms, which have been taken off air or censored for being "indecent, vulgar and repulsive". In the video you see a young man in the bathroom and after he uses the product he turns into a chocolate man. The intention of this ad is to say women wont be able to resist men after they use this product just like how they cant resist chocolate. The intended audience is young males who want to get girls. Maybe ones that are currently hitting puberty The ad is sexed up a little bit but uses a great deal of humor also.
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The ladies in the video are all mesmerized as the guy walks past and there is some slow Barry White type music playing in the background, which also adds to being a bit cheeky.

The chocolate man himself looks very cartoonish doesnt look tasteless at all. If he was a topless with a 6 pack then the ad could have been more questionable You see the man walk past the two ladies ripping off his nose to sprinkle their ice cream cones and you see his hand in the present he gives to a patent in hospital In India they tried banning the ad Culture might be a factor to why the ad was considered controversial as public displays of affection such as holding hand, kissing is forbidden In saying that its funny as if you ever go to countries where the culture is like that the local men/males in the country are the ones who stare, wink and shout out cheap pick up line comments as you walk past the street so its bizarre how they find it offensive just because a different gender is behaving in that manner.

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5) I&B MINISTRYS AXE ON DEODORANT ADS

With recent orders by Information and Broadcasting ministry to certain brands to take their commercials off air has come as an alarm to TV and Ad industry. Ministry has notified ASCI (ADVERTISING STANDARDS COUNCIL OF INDIA) for seven ads which are considered visually obscene and seems to hamper the Indian culture. But the irony is that even ASCI get a chance to watch these films once they are on air. Though the Ads have a creative angle we cant deny the raunchy feel which somewhere spoils the mind of audience specially youngsters. Even the bigwigs of Advertising fraternity like Prahlad kakkar and Bharat Bala are supporting the ministrys steps. They think that certain brands are going way ahead and making commercia l which is inappropriate on moral grounds specially the one where a married gal drops her Manglasutra. Manoj Shroff who heads Equinox films which boasts of making some of the most successful commercials in Indian Advertising history like Hamara Bajaj and HappyDent says If they are obscene they must be taken off especially since TV is an open medium and children cannot be controlled from watching it. What and how much is obscene is however always debatable. Most of the people use deodorant to fight the bad odour and not to seduce a gal, with a least expectation that gals around will chase or jump on them. But thats what a commercial of Axe shows which even resulted into Unilever paying millions of dollar to a guy who sued the brand in court for false depiction and promise. He claimed that he used the deodorant for seven years but not even a single gal came closer to him. Though time has changed and the content has evolved many folds in last few years but showing women as the object of desire seems unethical and unfit especially in Indian culture. Its not about moral policing but we need to understand that what works in west might not go well with Indian audience. ASCI need to be more careful in near future and upgrade its guidelines when it comes to commercial targeting Indian Audience.

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ASCI ORDERS TO REMOVE 3 DEODORANT ADS AXE EFFECT ZATAK AXE DEODORANT SET WET DEODORANT FROM AIR TV (22 JULY 2011)

ASCI orders to remove 3 Deodorant Ads Axe Effect, Zatak Axe Deodorant, and Set Wet Deodorant from air TV. Advertising Standards Council of India (ASCI) has asked Hindustan Unilever and Paras Pharma to pull their objectionable deodorant commercials off air. The complaints upheld against three deodorant Advertisements include: 1) The Hindustan Unilever Ltds The Axe Effect Ad - The Hindustan Unilever Ltds The Axe Effect Ad - depicting a female security staff checking a man at an airport with a metal detector on his chest and arms. She is shown in a spell of lust and clinging to his body in a display of sexual passion overpowering her with the voice-over, The Axe Effect. 2) Paras Pharmaceuticals Zatak Axe Deodorant - shows a boy going to a lady dentist after using the Deodorant. As he sprays the deodorant, the lady dentist is shown closing her eyes and moaning suggestively. When the boy says that he has toothache, the lady dentist is shown unbuttoning his shirt. She asks him to breathe and demonstrates it by sensuously thrusting her bust forward. In doing so, her white coat is off and her inner garment is clearly showing off her cleavage. 3) Paras Pharmaceuticals Set Wet Deodorant Ad - shows a man using the Deodorant and a female clinging to him in a passionate display of desire. An onlooker also tries the deodorant and soon a female is shown coming behind him taking off her garment and clinging to him lustfully. The CONSUMER COMPLAINTS COUNCIL of ASCI that is CCC in a meeting which was recently held concluded that these Ads display overtly sexual desire and are also demeaning to women. Keeping in view the generally prevailing standards of decency and propriety is likely to cause grave and widespread offence. Since these Ads contravened Chapter II of the ASCI Code, the complaints against these three Ads have been upheld. During the meeting, CCC also noted Paras Pharmaceuticals assurance that the Zatak Axe TVC would be appropriately modified. Once a complaint is upheld, the advertiser has to pull off the commercial within 48 hrs and then he/she has the option of either modifying it or Completely withdrawing it.

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THE CCC DURING THE SAME MEETING DID NOT UPHELD COMPLAINTS AGAINST 3 DEODORANT ADVERTISEMENTS 1. McNROE Consumers Products P. Ltds Wild Stone Deodorant - showing a woman who is blindfolded gradually removing her blindfold to cast a sensuous look at a man and then again putting it on. Thereafter, she is shown sensuously groping for the man. The woman is then shown removing her sari off in a seductive gesture, as the man is shown spraying the deodorant on his body. 2. Mankind Pharmas Addiction Deodorants - showing a man spraying the Deodorant and sending an ensemble of dancing women. One female is shown clinging to the man with a song in the background can you handle all my addiction? 3. Hindustan Unilevers New Axe Googly - depicting behaviour of boys and girls in a pub

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CHAPTER 4 DATA ANALYSIS DEMOGRAPHICS Chart 1

Chart 2

AGE
18 to 21 22 to 25 26 to 28

GENDER
Male Female

24%

22%

37% 63%
54%

Chart 5

OCCUPATION
Self Employed (Doctors, Lawyers, Etc) Entrepreneurs Student Public Service Private/ MNC 14% 39%

21%

10%

16%

Chart 6

EDUCATIONAL QUALIFICATION
Higher Secondary Studies (12th) Graduate 12% 33% 55% Post Graduate

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Chart 7

Awareness of Deodorant Advertisements


96%

4% Yes No

96% people are Aware and Remember Deodorant Advertisements.

Chart 8

Deodorant Brand Recall


94% 75% 57% 48% 34% 29% 19% 61%

Axe

Addiction Wildstone Garnier

Reebok

Nike

Park Avenue

Set wet zatak

Axe Deodorant is the most famous deodorant brand amongst people as 94% people could recall it, Wild Stone has second highest brand recall with 75%, followed by Set Wet Zatak with 61% brand recall.

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Chart 9

Keywords Associated with Deodorant Advertisement


71% 54% 38% 29% 57% 52% 38% 32% 18% 13% 31% 33% 25% 48%

53%

34%

Keywords Respondents could associate with Deodorant Advertisements and India

Chart 10

Major Keywords describing Deodorant Advertisement


71% 54% 57% 53% 52%

48%

Provocative

Sensual

Misleading

Irrelevant Inappropriate Entertaining Content

Provocative, Misleading and Inappropriate content are the most repeated word with 71%, 57% and 52% respectively.
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Chart 11

Recognition of the given Wild Stone Deodorant Advertisement


90%

10% Yes No

90% Respondents said that they recognize the given Deodorant Advertisement.

Chart 12

Identification of brand- Wild Stone Deodorant Advertisement


96%

3% Axe WlidStone

1% Set Wet Zatak

0% Reebok

0% Nike

1% Others

Out of the 90 % Respondents who said that they recognize the advertisement 96% could correctly identify the Brand of the Deodorant whose Advertisement was shown to them, which was WILD STONE DEODORANT.

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Chart 13

Keywords describing the given Wild Stone Deodorant Advertising


77% 73% 40% 23% 27%

76%
66% 34% 58% 39% 30% 4%

The graph shows the keyword/ Adjectives respondents could think of when they saw Wild Stone advertisement. Majority was the respondents think that the advertisement is provocative, vulgar, and controversial and represent women in questionable manner.

Chart 14

Recognition of the given Axe Deodorant Advertisement


96%

4% Yes No

96% respondents said they recognize the Axe Deodorant advertisement.

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Chart 15

Identification of Brand- Axe Deodorant Advertisement


96%

2% Axe WildStone

1% Set Wet Zatak

1% Reebok

1% Nike

0% Others

Out of the 96% Respondent who said they recognize the advertisement, 96% could identify the Deodorant brand correctly, which is AXE Deodorant.

Chart 16

Keywords describing the given Axe Deodorant Advertisement


61% 41% 32% 31% 33% 28% 18% 57% 41% 23% 37%

The chart shows the keywords/adjectives respondents could relate to the Axe deodorant advertisement. Majority of them think that the advertisement is provocative and indecent.

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Chart 17

Respondents who think these Advertisements are controversial


88%

12%

Yes

No

A majority i.e. 88% of respondents think that the advertisement shown was controversial. Chart 18

Reasons for Advertisements not being controversial


Creative Innovative Appealing Pleasing

15% 25%

24%

36%

Out of the 12% respondents who feel that these advertisements are not controversial, a majority of them i.e. 36% feel that the reason is innovativeness of the advertisement, 24% feel that advertisements are Appealing to the audience and rest 15% feel that the reason is that these advertisement are Pleasing to them.

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Chart 19 Awareness about the given Adverisements being Banned in India


75%

25%

Yes

No

Only 75% of the respondents were aware about the ban on these advertisements by government.

Chart 20

Government's decision of Banning these advertisement is right


61%

10% 3% Strongly Disagree Disagree

13%

13%

Neither Agree nor Disagree

Agree

Strongly Agree

A majority i.e. 61% of respondents think that Governments decision of banning these advertisements was right.

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Chart 21

Reasons for banning the above Advertisements in India


Others Obscene/ Vulgar Offensive Against Indian Culture Incorrect Representation of Product Depicts Men in questionable Manner Depicts Women in Questionable Manner Provocative 50% 24% 74% 46% 21% 77% 37% 70%

The chart shows various reasons for banning the Deodorant Advertisements.

Chart 22

Major Reasons for Ban

Obscene/ Vulgar

Provocative

Against Indian Culture

Depicts Women in Questionable Manner

Major reasons according to respondents are presented in the pie chart above.

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Chart 23

Controversial Advertisements help in Brand Recall


69%

31%

Yes

No

69% Respondents feel that controversial advertisements help them remembering the brand of deodorant.

Chart 24

Controversial Advertisements are meant for Indian Audiences


76%

24%

Yes

No

Only 24% of the respondents feel that Indian Audience can watch these controversial Male Deodorant advertisements.

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Chart 25 Deodorant Advertisements like the ones mentioned NEGATIVELY effect purchasing behaviour
48%

32% 20%

Yes

No

Not Sure

20% respondents feel that controversial advertisements negatively affect these purchasing behaviour i.e. these types of advertisements discourages them to buy the brand.

Chart 26

Deodorant Advertisements like the ones mentioned above POSITIVELY effect purchasing behaviour
38% 33% 29%

Yes

No

Not Sure

38% respondents feel that Male deodorant controversial advertisements positively affect these purchasing behaviour i.e. these types of advertisements encourages them to buy the brand.

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CHATER 5 INFERENCE
CROSS TABULATION

BRAND RECALL

IMPACT ON BUYING BEHAVIOUR

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WILD STONE AND AXE DEODORANT ADVERTISEMENTS

Zatak

Zatak

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CHAPTER 6 SUGGESTION 1. The deodorant brands should understand that the Indian consumers are not open to accept the provoking advertising strategy they adopt to promote the brand. 2. Companies should understand the market and according design advertising strategy, as lot of resources go in designing an advertisement and the banned advertisement is waste of these resources. 3. These advertisements have higher recall of brand and which is a motivator for the brands to create such advertisement but to the extent a brand goes for recall and recognition is very important. 4. These controversial advertisement are exposed a mass audience and not only the target customers therefore its very important that brands be more sensitive towards the content of such advertisements. 5. According to experts such provoking advertisements and sexism sells the brand and thats why they adopt such ways of advertising but considering Indian Market and profile of Indian consumers acceptance of such advertisements will take a very long time.

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CHAPTER 7 CONCLUSION

1. Majority of people are aware of men deodorant advertisements, out of which females are more sensitive towards controversial men deodorant advertisements. 2. The two advertisements shown in the questionnaire were recognized by 96% of respondents and they correctly identified the brand. This clearly shows the impact of these banned advertisements on viewers. 3. 77% of the respondents found the advertisements obscene, vulgar, provocative, misleading, and said that these advertisements contain inappropriate content. 4. 61% respondents agree, and 13% strongly agree with governments decision of bannin g controversial, provoking men deodorant advertisement. 5. 70 to 77% respondents find the following reasons for the ban on controversial men deodorant advertisement: a. Obscene/ vulgar b. Depicts women in questionable manner c. Against Indian culture 6. 69% says that these controversial men deodorant advertisement is the reason for brand recall also 38% respondents feels that these advertisements positively influence their choice of male deodorant brands.

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CHAPTER 8 LIMITATION

The research is one time study. Respondents may not have given correct data. The respondents may have been biased. The sample size is very small, and may not represent the population as whole. Data Analysis is based on the data complied through questionnaire survey and not from the researchers point of view.

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CHAPTER 9

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 1. http://digitaljournal.com/article/307354 2. http://www.rediff.com/getahead/slide-show/slide-show-1-glamour-top-9-bannedcommercials-of-2011/20111227.htm 3. Obscene deodorant ads axed from Indian TV | Rapid TV

News http://www.rapidtvnews.com/index.php/2011070513344/obscene-deodorantads-axed-from-indian-tv.html#ixzz2ReS2u1Ej 4. http://advertising.about.com/od/advertisingprojects/a/Sex-In-Advertising.htm 5. http://www.futurebrands.co.in/partnership.php 6. http://www.campaignindia.in/Video/334120,wearing-wild-stone-red-makes-thingshappen-for-men.aspx 7. http://adloo.blogspot.in/2010/03/most-controversial-indian.html 8. www.golegal.co.za/practicing-law/axe-deodorant-advertisement-banned 9. www.experiencefestival.com/axe_deodorant_-_controversial_advertisem. 10. www.telegraphindia com 11. post jagran com Entertainment News 12. asiancorrespondent.com/55919/india-bans-racy-deodorant-ad erts

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ANNEXURE QUESTIONNAIRE
AGE 18 to 21 22 to 25 26 to 28 GENDER Male Female OCCUPATION Self Employed (Doctors, Lawyers, Etc) Entrepreneurs Student Public Service Private/ MNC EDUCATIONAL QUALIFICATION Higher Secondary Studies (12th) Graduate Post Graduate ARE YOU AWARE OF ANY DEODORANT ADVERTISEMENTS? Yes No WHICH DEODORANT BRAND DO YOU RECALL? Axe Addiction Wild stone Garnier Nike Killer Park Avenue Others

Reebok DESCRIBE ONE OF THE DEODORANT ADVERTISEMENT THAT YOU CAN RECALL USING THE FOLLOWING KEYWORDS. Provocative Sensual Shocking Unethical Irrelevant Embarrassing Hyped Creative Enticing Pleasing Tempting Appealing Misleading Inappropriate Content Exciting Others ___________________________

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ARE YOU AWARE OF THE DEODORANT ADVERTISEMENT GIVEN ABOVE? Yes No IF YES, PLEASE IDENTIFY THE BRAND. Axe Wild Stone Killer Reebok Nike Others ____________________ IN YOUR OPINION WHICH OF THE KEYWORDS DESCRIBE THE GIVEN ADVERTISEMENT APPROPRIATELY. Provocative Stereotyping Objectifying Women Indecent Vulgar Unethical Sexual Offensive Disturbing Controversial Pleasing Others ______________________________

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ARE YOU AWARE OF THE DEODORANT ADVERTISEMENT GIVEN IN THE ABOVE? Yes No IF YES, PLEASE IDENTIFY THE BRAND. Axe Wild Stone Killer Reebok Nike Others __________________ IN YOUR OPINION WHICH OF THE FOLLOWING KEYWORDS DESCRIBE THE GIVEN ADVERTISEMENT APPROPRIATELY. Provocative Stereotyping Indecent Vulgar Unethical Sexual Offensive Disturbing Controversial Pleasing Others ______________________-

DO YOU THINK THESE ADVERTISEMENTS ARE CONTROVERSIAL? Yes No IF NO, WHAT IS IN YOUR OPINION IS THE REASON FOR IT? Creative Innovative Appealing Pleasing Others __________________

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ARE YOU AWARE THAT THESE ADVERTISEMENTS ARE BANNED IN INDIA? Yes No IS GOVERNMENT'S DECISION OF BANNING THESE ADVERTISEMENT RIGHT? Strongly Disagree Disagree Neither Agree nor Disagree Agree Strongly Agree IN YOUR OPINION WHAT ARE THE REASONS FOR BANNING THE ABOVE ADVERTISEMENTS IN INDIA? Provocative Depicts Women in Questionable Manner Depicts Men in questionable Manner Incorrect Representation of Product Against Indian Culture Offensive Obscene/ Vulgar Others _______________________ DO YOU THINK THESE CONTROVERSIAL ADVERTISEMENTS ARE NOT MEANT FOR INDIAN AUDIENCES? Yes No DO THESE CONTROVERSIAL ADVERTISEMENTS HELP YOU REMEMBER THE BRAND? Yes No DO DEODORANT ADVERTISEMENTS LIKE THE ONES MENTIONED ABOVE NEGATIVELY AFFECT YOUR CHOICE WHILE PURCHASING A DEODORANT? Yes No Not Sure DO DEODORANT ADVERTISEMENTS LIKE THE ONES MENTIONED ABOVE POSITIVELY AFFECT YOUR CHOICE WHILE PURCHASING A DEODORANT? Yes No Not Sure

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