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CLASSIFIEDS Page 23 VOLUME 6 | ISSUE 23 | JULY 24, 2013
CLASSIFIEDS
Page 23
VOLUME 6
|
ISSUE 23
|
JULY 24, 2013

SHARING THE ROAD:

VINELAND’S NEW BIKE LANES

{ STORY AND PHOTO BY RYAN DINGER }

NEW BIKE LANES { STORY AND PHOTO BY RYAN DINGER } Hector Mercado, a local citizen,

Hector Mercado, a local citizen, uses the new bike lane on Elmer Street in center city Vineland.

T wo months ago, the City of Vineland took a major step in making roadways safer for bicyclists when designated bike lanes were

added to both Wood Street and Elmer Street in center city. The bike lanes are a product of the Health Department’s partnership with the Vineland YMCA on a project called New Jersey Partnership For Healthy Kids. “With this project, one of the goals we are charged with is improving upon areas where our residents can exercise more with environmental changes,” said Emma Lopez, a Health Educator with the city’s Health Department. With this initiative, the Health Department, along with the YMCA, explored potential for walk- ing and biking areas, with the two new bike lanes being the first result of their planning. Since their construction, there has been some confusion about traffic laws surrounding the bike lanes, as well as questions about their design. Regarding the traffic laws, there are a few things both bicyclists and motorists can do to minimize risk. Firstly, for bicyclists, awareness is key.

Continued on page 21

for bicyclists, awareness is key. Continued on page 21 Long Drive Home Pittsgrove resident Janice Salmon

Long Drive Home

awareness is key. Continued on page 21 Long Drive Home Pittsgrove resident Janice Salmon is finally

Pittsgrove resident Janice Salmon is finally home after a day at her job as a microbiologist in New Brunswick, New Jersey.

Area residents and employees find refuge and fulfillment at both ends of a long commute. { STORY AND

PHOTOS BY STEPHANIE FARRELL }

T hey find compelling reasons to live where they do and work where they do—despite the dis- tance. Tallying up the cost of the long com-

mute, these commuters still find it worth it.

ONE HUNDRED MILES

long commute. Microbiologist Janice Salmon leaves Pittsgrove before the sun rises to beat traffic up to Bristol-Myers Squibb in New Brunswick; it's an hour and a half trip. "I'm Associate Director of Quality Assurance. My team is the last check before a product goes out the door," says Salmon. She's held the posi- tion for nine years, but for the first three years she lived 10 minutes away. "Where I lived before houses were sitting on top of each other, there was no land. We wanted a change, but not to our jobs. We took the drive down here, saw the land and you just get more house for your money. We didn't think the commute would be that much of an issue. The school system is better than where we were. We have deeper friend- ships. It is like a breath of fresh air. As soon as I pull up in my driveway, I am relaxed." The commute has its challenges, though. "I worked and my job is at a desk; I spent three hours in the car a day. In six years I gained 20 pounds." She has taken it all off and then some with Zumba and exercising at lunch in her work's gym. "It takes away some of the stress from the job and the commute."

EACH WAY. Now that is a

Continued on page 7

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stress from the job and the commute." EACH WAY. Now that is a Continued on page
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I Letter to the Editor

Saluting Our Heroes Event Applauded

The St. Padre Pio Parish Players are to be complimented on presenting “Saluting Our Heroes!” at St. Mary’s School Auditorium recently to a packed house that thoroughly enjoyed the exciting evening. Under the professional direction of Grace Hoffner and her dedicated staff, the group presented so many of the Broadway songs that have been remembered through the years. It was so amazing that these regular parish members had such talent that was not discovered until the evening went on. The outstanding musical selec- tions were offered by members of the church who participate in the weekly masses or in the choir, but all of the par- ticipants received standing ovations for their talent and dedication to insuring a magnificent treat. In addition to the entertainment, an entire segment of the program was the

saluting to all of the branches of our serv- ice, with a member of each service repre- sented, who carried a flag or presented the flag in a wheelchair. Each of the vet- erans were so proud to be there and when each patriotic song was sung, there were tears falling from many eyes. Young chil- dren were also part of the program and amazed all in attendance for their presentations. Heartfelt thanks to all of the partici- pants for their countless hours of rehearsals and dedication. They sang and danced like professionals and smiled the entire evening. They loved their director, Grace Hoffner, whose vision and desire to celebrate all that is America, succeeded. Congratulations to Father Peter Saporito, our proud Pastor of Padre Pio Parish, who has such talented members in his parish. God Bless America!

—Gloria Noto, Vineland Cumberland County Clerk

You may e-mail a letter to the editor to letters@grapevinenewspaper.com or mail or fax them to the address/number below. Letters should be 300 words or fewer, and be addressed to the Editor. Longer letters may be edited or rejected. Anonymous letters are not accepted. For verification, letters must include the writer’s name, address and daytime phone. Only names and home towns will be printed. Letters critical of another’s religion, blasphemous, obscene, legally objectionable or commercial in nature will not be published.

The Grapevine 907 N. Main Rd., Ste. 205, Vineland, NJ 08360 PHONE: 856-457-7815 • FAX:

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907 N. Main Rd., Ste. 205, Vineland, NJ 08360 PHONE: 856-457-7815 • FAX: 856-457-7816 EMAIL: letters@grapevinenewspaper.com WEB: www.grapevinenewspaper.com

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MIKE EPIFANIO Editor & Publisher

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I
I

Faces in the News

Park Graduates from Saint Joseph’s University

Dana Marie Parks, daughter of Mary and Daniel Parks of Vineland, recently graduated from The Haub School of Business at Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia, PA, with a Bachelor of Science Degree in Marketing. She was selected for membership in Beta Gamma Sigma, the international honor society for col- legiate schools for business, and achieved the Dean’s List status for all eight semesters there. Parks was a member of the Hawks softball team, and earned A-10 Conference First Team Honors and an A-10 All-Academic Honors. She set the record for single season hits and career stolen bases at SJU, and was recently named The Philadelphia Inquirer’s Academic Area Performer of the year. She has accepted a position with the Philadelphia Phillies.

She has accepted a position with the Philadelphia Phillies. Rehm Graduates from Graduate School at Wharton

Rehm Graduates from Graduate School at Wharton

Capital Bank of New Jersey has announced that Joseph F. Rehm, Senior Vice President and Gloucester County Market Manager, recently graduated from the American Bankers Association’s Stonier Graduate School of Banking. Stonier is held at the University of Pennsylvania and is considered the premier graduate school of banking in the U.S. Along with his degree, Rehm also earned a Leadership Certificate from the Wharton School of Business. David J. Hanrahan, president and CEO com- mented, “I’ve had the pleasure of working with Joe for more than 10 years. He takes great care of his customers, and he’s a big asset to Capital Bank. We congratulate him on this professional achievement.” Rehm has over 16 years of banking experience in Southern New Jersey, primarily in lending. He joined Capital Bank in 2007 while it was still in formation. He heads a lending team that is responsible for developing commercial business in Gloucester County. His community involvement is extensive, including serving as President of the Board of the Gloucester County YMCA and as Vice Chairman of the Gloucester County Chamber of Commerce. Anthony J. Altadonna, Executive Vice President and Chief Lending Officer, noted that “Joe has been an integral part of the management team from the out- set of Capital Bank. He has made significant contributions to our success and the growth of the bank’s loan portfolio. In addition to his lending responsibilities, Joe also serves as Capital Bank’s CRA Officer and Director of Loan Policy.”

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{ 4 } the grapevine | JULY 24, 2013
{ 4 } the grapevine | JULY 24, 2013
I
I

Faces in the News

Johnson, 4, Wins Jersey Shore Fishing Tournament

in the News Johnson, 4, Wins Jersey Shore Fishing Tournament Four-year-old Justin Donald Johnson, who resides

Four-year-old Justin Donald Johnson, who resides in Elmer, N.J., recently was crowned champion of the Jersey Shore's annual John Winfield Sykes Fishing Tournament. He competed against more than 100 other anglers and 30 other children. His Spot Fish weighed in at 13 ounces, the closest to the New Jersey State Record of any fish caught in the tournament. He is by far the youngest person to ever have their name on the Avalon Yacht Club's most prestigious trophy. Justin’s proud parents are Margo and Donald Johnson lll. His grandpar- ents are Diane and David Kolman and the late Karen and Donald Johnson Jr. His great grandparents are Nancy and Donald Johnson Sr.

From left: Fred Sykes, tournament founder; Justin Donald Johnson with his trophy; Alan Shaeffe, Commodore; and Patrick McAleer, Rear Commodore.

Vineland Girl Donates to Locks of Love

Rear Commodore. Vineland Girl Donates to Locks of Love Jaclyn Kell, 15 years old, sophomore at

Jaclyn Kell, 15 years old, sophomore at Vineland High School has recently donated over 12 inches of her hair to Locks Of Love during an event at Frinj Hair Salon in Vineland. This is Kell's fifth time donating her hair since she was six years old. She and the Locks Of Love feel that this is an opportunity to return a sense of self, confidence, and normal- cy to children suffering from hair loss. Anyone interested in more informa- tion on being a donator or contributor you can go to www.locksoflove.org

15-year old Jaclyn Kell has been a regular donor to Locks of Love all her life.

Biegalski Celebrates 40 Years with Newfield Bank

her life. Biegalski Celebrates 40 Years with Newfield Bank Joseph Biegalski, Jr., Executive Vice President, was

Joseph Biegalski, Jr., Executive Vice President, was recently honored at a dinner celebrating his 40th Anniversary with Newfield National Bank. Biegalski has been employed by the Bank since April 1973. He has held positions of Branch Manager, Assistant Cashier, Vice President & Auditor, and Senior Vice President. He currently holds the position of Executive Vice President of Lending. Biegalski started his banking career after graduating from Richard Stockton State College with a degree in Finance and Accounting. He also attended Central Atlantic School of Commercial Lending at Bucknell University and American Institute of Banking. He has served on the American Red Cross of Gloucester County, Gloucester County Board of Social Services and Boy Scouts of America Southern New Jersey Council.

Joseph Biegalski, Jr., left, with John Borelli, Jr., president/CEO of Newfield National Bank.

WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | the grapevine { 5 }

I Obituaries & Memorials

Philamena Pendola, 88, of Vineland, died peacefully on July 13. Born in Newfield, and a 1942 graduate of VHS, she married in 1946. She worked at the Vineland Developmental Center for 30 years. She was civically active. Jacob Teichman, 108, of Vineland, died on July 14. Born in Poland, Jacob came to the U.S. in 1950 with his wife after enduring Nazi occupation. Paralyzed during a late battle, he proved doctors wrong by learning to walk again. In the U.S. he and his wife were tireless workers. Patricia Callari, 88, of Vineland, died peacefully on July 13. Born in Newfield, and a 1942 graduate of VHS, she mar- ried in 1946. She worked at the Vineland Developmental Center for 30 years. She was civically active. Juan Berrios, 74, of Vineland, passed away on July 14. Born in Puerto Rico, he lived in Vineland since 1991. He is survived by his wife, two sons, two daughters, two brothers, two sisters, and three grandchildren. Modesto Francisco, 81, of Vineland, passed away on July 16. Born in Spain, Modesto loved to cook and host friends and family. He was an avid traveler and enjoyed watching the sunset over the beach. Edward Bush, 91, of Mizpah, passed away on July 17. A longtime resident of Mizpah, Edward was a Navy veteran. He is survived by his wife of 58 years, his daughter, his grandsons, and his brother. Rufino Vicente, 77, of Vineland, passed away on July 17. Born in Puerto Rico, Rufino served honorably in the Army until 1963, when he began work as a handyman. He enjoyed family reunions and playing the harmonica. Rosemarie Wheeler, 72, of Vineland, passed away on July 17. Rosemarie worked as a cashier for Penn Fruit- Dales, Shopping Bag and Wawa. She enjoyed crabbing and was an avid Elvis fan. She loved traveling down south.

In Remembrance

FOR RUTH LERA On the one-year anniversary of her passing. You’re in our thoughts and prayers. Missing and loving you always.

passing. You’re in our thoughts and prayers. Missing and loving you always. Love, Ann, Robyn, Tara

Love, Ann, Robyn, Tara and all your family

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Faces in the News

Vineland Couple Welcomes German Teens

Two teenage girls from Schwabisch Hall, Germany, arrived in Vineland on July 17 to visit their friends, Eloise and Bud Sulzman. The girls will be in the United States until July 31. The Sulzman’s friendship with the girls’ fami- lies started in the early 1960s, when Bud was stationed in Schwabisch Hall, the 36th Artillery Headquarters’ Battery. Eloise and Bud then visited Schwabisch Hall in 1998 and went to the house where Bud had lived off-base. It was there that they met Selina Ulrich’s father, Herbert, and her mother, Uschi. At that time, Selina was about 15 months old. The Ulrichs wel- comed the Sulzmans, and a friendship was forged. Since 1998, the two families have communicat- ed through e-mails, cards, letters, by telephone, and recently using Skype. Herbert has assisted Bud in researching his family’s genealogy, helping locate the area where the Sulzman history began in Southern Bavaria (Besingen). In 2008, Selina’s grandmother, Cristel, visited Vineland. Now it is Selina’s turn. Her schoolmate, Laura Krass, has accompanied her on the journey. The Sulzmans plan to have the girls meet with teenagers from Eloise’s church, while also taking them to historical sites in Philadelphia, and to a Phillies game on July 30. Selina has expressed interest in baseball, even presenting a report on the history of the Phillies to one of her classes with the assistance of Eloise and Bud. A weekend trip to the Boston area, where the Sulzmans have family, is also planned.

From left: Eloise Sulzman, Selina Ulrich, Laura Krass, and Bud Sulzman, pose in the Sulzman’s yard. Note the flagpole in background, with the American and German flags.

flagpole in background, with the American and German flags. Miss Vineland 2013 Joins with Project Thanksgiving
flagpole in background, with the American and German flags. Miss Vineland 2013 Joins with Project Thanksgiving

Miss Vineland 2013 Joins with Project Thanksgiving

Olivia Cruz, who was crowned Miss Vineland 2013 earlier this year, has agreed to work on Project Thanksgiving this year. She will be making several guest appearances later in the year along with the official Project Thanksgiving ambassador and mascot, Nigel. Their role will be to help promote the fifth annual turkey collection during these special guest appearances. Vineland has not had a Miss Vineland in quite a while. Cruz is work- ing to restore the community activism aspect of being Miss Vineland. She hopes to be Miss Cumberland County next year.

Olivia Cruz, Miss Vineland 2013, poses with Nigel, and Project Thanksgiving founders Alex Kaganzev, left, and Steve Plevins, right.

Miss Vineland 2013, poses with Nigel, and Project Thanksgiving founders Alex Kaganzev, left, and Steve Plevins,
Miss Vineland 2013, poses with Nigel, and Project Thanksgiving founders Alex Kaganzev, left, and Steve Plevins,

LONG WAY HOME

Continued from cover

To keep herself entertained, Salmon lis- tens to sports radio in her Honda Civic. "I spend $70 a week on gas." She says the early part of the week is okay, but by the end of the week she is spent. "There are other places to work. But I have a very good position and it's secure. I just live with it." Her husband works from home three days a week; three of their kids are in travel soccer. "I think the reason why it works so well is because I have a good husband who is willing to do a lot. He is there for the kids; he keeps things going."

MARK McCASLIN BEATS A 65-MILE PATH in his Honda Civic from Vineland to Trenton where he is the fiscal officer for the Office of Legislative Service. The commute, which is "always an adven- ture," takes over an hour but can take two hours due to weather, accidents or construction. McCaslin moved his family to Vineland after taking the job to be close to his wife's family. They have nine biological kids; last year they adopted two 14-year old girls from China who were aging out of their orphanages. Though they could move now, the pull of friends, church and family are strong. "I didn't want to uproot them. My family's already involved in a network of friends and family that would not be as easily accessible if we moved away." McCaslin's job is a little flexible. He has more time in the morning with the younger kids, and helps with their adopt- ed daughter, Evangeline's physical needs. "Since September she has had three sur- geries and four hospital stays." His later work start means he works late, usually missing dinner. McCaslin maximizes his commute time. "It's a good opportunity, a university on wheels. You can actually be developing new skills as you drive." He listens to podcasts, motivational speakers, and other personal development programs. "I am trying to teach myself Spanish. I wanted to get a better understanding of it before our trip to Costa Rica." He and two sons just returned from a mission trip. But he readily admits he doesn't like to drive. "The point at which I'd pull my hair ou—if I had any left--is when I am stuck in a rainstorm. When it is sunny and it is just an hour and 10 minutes, it is not as big a deal."

NEW JERSEY APIARIST TIM SCHULER says, "I'm not in a stationary work place." A Richland resident, Schuler teaches at Rutgers, has a Trenton office, but his responsibility for our bees takes

Schuler
Schuler

him "from Cape May Point to High

Point." He inspects honeybee colonies for diseases, certifies new colonies, and edu- cates new and veteran beekeepers. "I drive 2,500 miles per month. It is anywhere between one hour to six hours

a day, could be almost seven. It gets very

monotonous. If I don't leave at a certain time of day, I could be stuck in traffic for three to four hours. I may not get home

till 8 at night, but I am not going to leave

a person's property. The beekeepers are

my constituents. They're important to me.

I answer their questions, though it may

mean I'm going to be in major traffic. Traffic is very frustrating. If you have to

go to the bathroom and there is no place to go, that's very uncomfortable." Fatigue

is another issue. "I have pulled off on the side of the road and snoozed for 15 to 20 minutes. It is more fatiguing to drive than to do physical work. I tend to stop and eat

if I get tired, and I eat junk food if I have

not packed." Schuler says that has added to a weight issue. Schuler makes phone calls to family and work while driving. "I also listen to music and books. I am listening to The Boy Who Captured the Wind. It is about Malawi." Schuler traveled with a team to Malawi in March and trained villagers on beekeeping. "People complain about New Jersey, but I've seen some of the coolest things—

bobcats in the road about the Delaware

Water Gap, bears next to my truck in Sussex County. And I've met some really cool people. It's a lifestyle. From that standpoint, it's different every day."

THE ELLISON SCHOOL'S ART TEACHER KARA ROSSI has an unusual commute. She drives 50 minutes from Philadelphia to the Vineland school, leav- ing her city home and husband to educate the preschoolers to 8th graders in art. A Vineland native, Rossi has been living in Philadelphia since 2004. She picked the city because a lot of her college friends lived there and she liked the community. She worked there as a design assistant before heading back to school to be an art teacher. While studying at the Moore College of Art in Philly, she worked part- time for her family's business in Vineland. "I got used to commuting back and forth. Then I could take the train to Hammonton sometimes. I can't do that now because I have to be at work so early, I can't convince anyone to pick me up." Rossi, already well-loved at Ellison, just finished her first year at the school. She finds the job "really great and excit- ing. I find what the children are interest- ed in and can create my own curriculum around their interests. Real learning comes from a genuine interest and an opportunity to explore that interest. Ellison allows for that sort of freedom in teaching." Her reverse commute has advantages in that she can see her family more often while in Vineland, but still be part of the culture she loves in Philly, such as the venues for music. The commute is only hard when she is "worn out and tired. You have to stay alert. But I like waking up early. I get to see the sun rise and plan my day in my head as I'm driving." Despite the long drive home, Rossi says it is worth it. I

Salmon
Salmon
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{ 8 } the grapevine | JULY 24, 2013
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Faces in the News

{ 8 } the grapevine | JULY 24, 2013 I Faces in the News A Piece

A Piece of Vineland’s Past

A vintage piece of Vineland’s history rolled to a stop recently in front of the Vineland Historical and Antiquarian Society museum on South Seventh Street. The recently-restored 1937 Ford truck, painted in Washington blue with red trim, was brought to town for the day by Ted Whitmyer and his family of Folsom. The truck, built in town by Cresci & Son, Inc., has been beautifully restored by Whitmyer’s longtime friend, Wayne Kennedy, of Belhaven, North Carolina. It features an original plate list- ing its serial number as #370, and the back has been painted black with the Standard Coal name in bright yellow let- ters. Kennedy said they spotted the truck on their way back to Folsom after visit- ing the Army Airfield Museum in Millville about four years ago. The Whitmyers plan to bring the vehicle back to the Society’s 2014 anniversary celebration.

From left: Wayne Kennedy, Ted Whitmyer, and Nick DeBello of Vineland, with truck.

Boys & Girls Club Members PrepareCare Package

truck. Boys & Girls Club Members PrepareCare Package The Boys and Girls Club's Y.E.S. (Youth Engaged

The Boys and Girls Club's Y.E.S. (Youth Engaged in Service)Club, coordinated by AmeriCorps Member Ali Austin, put togeth- er a care package for soldiers in Afghanistan with the help of Club youth. Pictured here, U.S. Army Sergeant Edward Martindell, speaks to Club members about the importance of care packages for troops overseas, and answers questions about the Army and careers in the military. Club members are presented with career exploration activities and college prep information through support from United Way and Bank of America.

Bank Donates to Spirit and Truth Ministries

Century Savings Bank recently pre- sented a check in the amount of $1,250 along with several boxes of donated dry and canned goods to Spirit and Truth Ministries of Vineland in support of their efforts to eliminate hunger and improve the lives of area residents. “We at Spirit & Truth Ministries are so appreciative of the partnership of caring we have formed with Century Savings Bank. We are always looking for input from the community, so when Century offered to take part in sponsoring meals for our Soup Kitchens, we were delighted,” stated The Rev John Fordyce, President of the Board for Spirit and Truth Ministries. “They then took part with "hands on" volunteering during lunches and clothes dis- tribution as well as setting up a drive among customers at the bank. The money they have donated and raised will supply a lot of meals in the months to come.” “As a true community bank, we see the increasing opportunity to use our reach to solve challenges that our community faces,” noted Deborah Holman, Vice President of Marketing for Century Savings Bank. “Century Savings Bank is commit- ted to assisting any way we can to help the fight against hunger in our community.”

From left: Ashley Jones; Deborah Springfield, Assistant Vice President of Human Resources; Shakera Rainner; Anne Outland, Branch Manager; Rev John Fordyce, President of Spirit and Truth Ministries; Willie Scott; Jennifer Martinez.

and Truth Ministries; Willie Scott; Jennifer Martinez. Seniors Celebrate Independence On July 4, the Millville
and Truth Ministries; Willie Scott; Jennifer Martinez. Seniors Celebrate Independence On July 4, the Millville

Seniors Celebrate Independence

On July 4, the Millville Senior Center held a Independence Day celebration at Glasstown Midrise, located at 224 S. 2nd St. in Millville. Included in the festivities was a barbecue. Pictured here, from left:

(front row) June Taylor and Marilyn Dusharm; (back row) Tom Stevenson, Phyllis Meyer, Steve Pokrovsky, and Jacky Mader.

Mayor Welcomes Home Family of Veterans

On June 7, Mayor Ruben Bermudez offi- cially welcomed home two veterans, SSGT Edwin J. Pitman, and his daughter, US Army Nurse Corps CPT Diana M. Pitman. SSGT Edwin Pitman served in the US Air Force during the Korean War era from November 1948 to September 1952. Pitman served as an Air Traffic Controller and was declared essential personnel, which required him to remain in the U.S. serving in Sacramento, CA. Captain Diana Pitman served with the 348th Medical Corp Hospital Detachment 3; the 4225th USAH Det. 15FC; and the 7221st Medical Support Unit from November 2001 through March 2010. She served in Guatemala, caring for 14,000 Guatemalans on a ten day mission. She also served in Germany at Wurzburg Army Hospital and then at Landstuhl Regional Army Hospital, caring for wounded Marines and Soldiers during Operation Phantom Fury (Battle of Fallujah II). Diana also served in Arkansas in support of Operation Enduring Freedom; a community based Warrior Transition Unit cover- ing seven states. Her father says he is proud of his daughter and added, “She outranks me, and I have to call her ‘Ma’am.” The Mayor’s Welcome Home Committee would like to honor more veterans that have never been honored by their local community and urges family and friends to submit the names of other veterans they would like to see recognized. Call the Mayor’s office at 856-794-4000, ext. 4011.

From left: US Army Nurse Corps CPT Diana M. Pitman, SSGT Edwin J. Pitman, and Vineland Mayor Ruben Bermudez.

ext. 4011. From left: US Army Nurse Corps CPT Diana M. Pitman, SSGT Edwin J. Pitman,

I Vintage Vineland { VINCE FARINACCIO }

Clara’s Story

The wife of Charles K. Landis is most remembered for causing Vineland’s founder to commit murder.

I f there is one moment for which

Clara Landis, wife of Vineland

founder Charles K. Landis, is most

remembered locally, it would be

when her husband shot Independent newspaper editor Uri Carruth in a disas- trous attempt to defend his wife’s besmirched honor in that publication’s pages. It resulted in the dissolution of their marriage, which evidence reveals was tenuous at best, and the reinvention of the former Clara Meade of Brooklyn, New York. The Carruth murder has become widely known and somewhat legendary in local cir- cles. On the morning of March 19, 1875, Clara showed Landis an article from the March 18 edition of the Independent that reported on “a prominent Vinelander” who “went galloping up and down telling every man he met, confidentially that his wife was crazy” and “tried to get her into a private Insane Asylum; yes, he did, the wretch.” Landis marched over to the Independent office and asked to see Carruth. After nearly 20 minutes, the edi- tor appeared, spotted his visitor and ran into the newspaper’s composing room. Landis followed him, drew a pistol and fired, hitting the editor in the back of the head. Carruth slumped to the floor and lay unconscious while his assailant pro- claimed “I’ve killed him. God forgive me. I had to do it. There lies the man who has caused all the misery in my family.” He was also reported to have said, “Oh, my poor crazy wife.” Carruth lived for seven months, during which time he entertained settlement offerings from Landis that ran as high as $12,000 in money and land. But no agree-

ment was reached and when the editor died on October 24, Landis was immedi- ately arrested and charged with murder. His trial, which began in Bridgeton in January 1876, drew extensive media cov- erage and ended in an acquittal of Vineland’s founder on the grounds of tem- porary insanity. A St. Louis Globe-Democrat article from 1885 reports that Clara “regained her mental equilibrium,” but then “developed unmistakable signs of being a vixen in temperament, which disposition she assiduously cultivated in her language and conduct toward Mr. Landis…”

However, in Clara’s extensive account of her life, published in the Buffalo Courier in 1884, the murder is rendered in only a sentence and implicates Landis as the sole victim of Carruth’s published attacks with no mention of Clara’s mental ailments. It relays matter-of-factly that her husband “… was arrested for shooting a newspaper editor who published slanderous articles concerning him, but he was acquitted.” She also dates the murder five years earli- er than when it occurred. The most startling statement about Landis delivered in Clara’s account is the very next sentence, which contends that “twelve months later he killed a neighbor who had won a lawsuit from him, but was acquitted… after a trial which lasted two years.” She continues by asserting that “at this trial I first learned of my husband’s enormous wealth…Shortly afterward, I left him and went to live with my parents.” The statements are shocking but highly questionable. For one thing, there is no available evidence of a second Landis trial, which would certainly have received con- siderable media attention for its alleged duration and for occurring so soon after the Carruth scandal. Second, if the pre- nuptial agreement she signed and her hus- band’s business ventures and reputation in their years together weren’t enough to indicate his wealth, it is doubtful Clara would have learned about her husband’s fortune at any trial since legal documents uncovered by the Vineland Historical and Antiquarian Society confirm she left Vineland May 22, 1875, eight months before the Carruth murder hearing. She then spent considerable time abroad until 1880. And third, her father’s death on April 16, 1870, would have made it impossible to return home “to live with my parents.” She does not discuss the fact that, at the time of the Carruth scandal, she was pregnant with the couple’s third child and that she gave birth to him in October 1875. Clara maintains that after separating from Landis she had been “so overcome by sorrow that I tried to find forgetful- ness in a foreign land. In July 1876, I took my youngest child and servants and sailed for Europe. I traveled there for three years…” I

Next Week: The Second Marriage

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I News in Brief

Dew Drop In Expands in Glasstown Arts District

Owners Todd and Amanda Fahrer have expanded their three-year-old Dew Drop In into a new location at 114 N. High Street. Formerly, it was located in the Villageon High shopping area in a 200- square-foot cottage. The new space is 1500 square feet and is adjacent to Winfield’s Restaurant, Clay College and The Levoy. Todd Fahrer said “The expansion is a dramatic change to grow our business and clientele. The large store includes hand- crafted and original designs by South Jersey artists, including handmade alpaca items from local farms, handmade jewelry from beads to silver and everything in between, handmade wood crafts and cus- tom items.” There is a large area of the building that houses a gallery. Dew Drop In will also be hosting parties, wine tastings, tea parties, and many other special events every month, all found at www.dew-

dropin1.com.

Business hours of operation are Tuesday to Saturday 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., Sunday 12 to 5 p.m., Closed Monday.

Three County Intersections To Become All-Way Stops

Two intersections in Upper Deerfield Township and one in the city of Vineland will be permanently converted to all-way stops over the next six weeks in an effort to make those crossings safer for area drivers. The intersections include:

—Finley Road (CR 617) and Centerton Road (CR 553/CR611) in Upper Deerfield —Centerton Road (CR 553) and Big Oak Road (CR 658) in Upper Deerfield —Weymouth Road (CR 690) and NW Boulevard (CR 615) in Vineland The Cumberland County Freeholder Board authorized the changes following a road safety study by a team from Rutgers University. The changes will go into effect first at the two Upper Deerfield intersec- tions on July 31, followed in August 22 for the Vineland intersection. For a nine-day period leading up to each change, electronic message boards will be in place announcing the new stops.

Winners Announced in County Older Americans Art Exhibition & Competition

The Cumberland County Office on Aging and Disabled is inviting the public to enjoy more than 70 diverse works of art that comprise the 39th Annual Older Americans Art Exhibit and Competition. The exhibit, now on display until July 31 at the Vineland Public Library, features both professional and non-professional

Library, features both professional and non-professional artists age 60 and over competing in cate- gories that

artists age 60 and over competing in cate- gories that include Oil, Acrylic, Watercolor, Sculpture, Print, Pastel, Drawing, Mixed Media, Photography, Computer Imagery and Craft. A total of 43 artists entered their art- work in the competition in early June. Special recognition for Best of Show went to Floyd Pettengill of Millville for his Acrylic painting, “Katie Around Color” (pi ctured). Specific category first-place awards went to the following artists:

Acrylic, Professional: Floyd Pettengill of Millville – “Katie Around Color” Acrylic, Non-Professional: Carol Bell of Bridgeton – “California Scene” Craft, Professional: Frank Pandolfo of Vineland – “Vase” Craft, Non-Professional: Ray Freas of Vineland – “Segmented Vase” Computer Imagery, Professional: Jay Parks of Vineland – “Motion in Red” Drawing, Professional: Elaine Wallenburg of Greenwich – “Pensive Figure” Drawing, Non-Professional: Dom DeLuke of Shiloh – “First Snow” Mixed Media, Professional: Floyd Pettengill of Millville – “Big Ron & His Little Black Beauty” Oil, Professional: Helen Troia of Vineland – “Floating Rocks” Oil, Non-Professional: Ed Bracco of Vineland – “Trio” Pastel, Non-Professional: Diane Risdon of Millville – “Great Horned Owl” Photography, Professional: Jay Parks of Vineland – “Milkweed Ballet” Photography, Non-Professional: Dee Shiell of Millville – “Cape Flattery” Sculpture, Non-Professional: Jim Hewitt of Vineland – “Curlew” Watercolor, Professional: Judy Scull of Vineland – “Penobscot Bay” Watercolor, Non-Professional: Andrew Chin of Millville – “Coastal Serenity” Professional and non-professional 1st Place Winners in each respective category will be selected to compete in the September/October 2013 New Jersey State Senior Citizen Juried Art Contest and Exhibition held at Meadow Lakes in East Windsor, N.J. Coordinated by the Cumberland County Office of Aging and Disabled, funding was made possible in part by the New Jersey State Council of the Arts, Department of State, and the Cumberland County Board of Chosen Freeholders, through the Cumberland County Cultural and Heritage Commission. I

$ PRIZEWEEK PUZZLE $ This week’s jackpot $450 Jackpot increases by $25 each week if

$ PRIZEWEEK PUZZLE $

This week’s jackpot

$450

Jackpot increases by $25 each week if no winning entry is received!

ACROSS:

DOWN:

1. Political observer

2. Draft dodger is relieved

remarks to woman, “There are _ media references to

your husband nowadays, not

to be out of the _ when his

country becomes involved in military conflict.

at all like in the past.”

4.

During tour of museum,

3.

Pilot claims the jet’s

teen points to photo of _ and

time of arrival can be

adversely affected if aircraft

states, “I really wish I could drive that kind of vehicle.”

changes its _ at a specific

5.

Couple at water’s edge

speed.

are awed by _, particularly

7.

need to look at a clock to

Daughter doesn’t even

regarding the graceful moves in the air.

know it’s mealtime, simply

6.

Parents give permission

from the smell of

for their children to be taken

10.

An instrument whose

for a ride in a helicopter,

8.

Supervisor of child care

pitch is between a soprano and a tenor.

claiming it would be

12.

Often, you’ll find North

center holds meeting to dis-

American families have a favorite brand of

cuss recent series of reckless incidents involving

14. Coach reassures mother

9. If a _ is very small, it

watching son, who’s a novice

could easily go unnoticed.

athlete practicing for school

11.

It wouldn’t do any harm

race, “It’s natural for runners

if you were to _ an old jacket

to be _ occasionally.”

when gardening.

16. Lively conversation

13. To avoid trouble with

starts up when one girl tells

authorities in communist

another _ she’s heard about their mutual ex-boyfriend.

country, cruise ship tourist is cautious about using her cam-

18.

Found on windows on

era in certain

cold mornings.

15.

A type of tree.

20.

Businesswoman worries

17.

Crew member struggles

she’s really going to get

of changing office premises.

to adapt to working in

behind in her work during _

restricted space while labor- ing in

21. At gathering, woman

19. A sphere.

comments sarcastically about chatty hostess, “I’ll bet she’s boring her guests to tears ”

about her

SOLUTION TO LAST WEEK’S PRIZEWEEK PUZZLE

The answers to last week’s puzzle are below. For a detailed explanation of the answers to last week’s puzzle and additional rules, visit www.SouthJerseyFCU.com

puzzle and additional rules, visit www.SouthJerseyFCU.com 1. Solve the puzzle just as you would in any

1. Solve the puzzle just as you would in

any crossword puzzle. Choose from each printed clue the word that best fits the definition. Write the answers in the blank

space provided in each puzzle until all spaces have been filled in.

2. There is no limit to the number of times

you may enter, however no facsimiles or reproductions will be accepted. Only original

newspaper entry forms will be accepted.

3. Anyone is eligible to enter except

employees/directors of South Jersey Federal Credit Union (SJFCU) and the Grapevine and their immediate families.

4. A basic prize of $50.00 will be awarded

to the winner(s) of each weekly Prizeweek Puzzle. In the case of multiple winners, the prize money will be shared. If no correct puzzle entries are received, $25.00 will be added the following week. Winners

agree to permit use of their names and photos by SJFCU and/or the Grapevine.

5. Entries can be mailed to South Jersey

Federal Credit Union, Attn: Prizeweek Puzzle, PO Box 5429, Deptford, NJ 08096, or dropped off 24 hours a day, 7 days a week in the vestibule of SJFCU, 106 W. Landis Avenue, Vineland. Mailed

entries must be received by SJFCU no later than 10 am on the Monday following the Wednesday publication of the Prizeweek Puzzle. Entries dropped off at the SJFCU

Vineland branch must be received no later than 8:30 am on the Monday following the Wednesday publication of the Prizeweek Puzzle. SJFCU assumes no

responsibility for late or lost entries.

6. South Jersey Federal Credit Union

reserves the right to issue additional instructions in connection with the Prizeweek Puzzle. All such instructions are to become part of the official rules.

Visit www.SouthJerseyFCU.com for list of additional rules.

PRIZEWEEK 071313
PRIZEWEEK 071313

THIS LIST INCLUDES,

AMONG OTHERS,

THE CORRECT WORDS FOR THIS PUZZLE.

ALTITUDE

HOLD

SOAP

TREAT

ALTO

HOLE

SOUP

WAR

ATTITUDE

HUBBY

TEAR

WAY

BLOT

MIDDLE

THAT

WEAR

DIVE

MUDDLE

TIMED

WHAT

DOVE

NEW

TIRED

FEW

ORB

TOAST

FIR

PARTS

TOTS

FROST

PORTS

TOYS

GREAT

ROAST

TRAM

HOBBY

SLOT

TRAP

HOW TO ENTER:

Note contest rules at the top of this page.

Readers can deposit their puzzles 24/7 in the drop-slot located in the vestibule of South Jersey Federal Credit Union, 106 West Landis Ave., Vineland, NJ 08360. Note: Use a debit card from any financial institution to gain access to the vestibule drop box after hours. Entries must be deposited by 8:30 am on Monday.

Or, completed puzzles can mailed to:

South Jersey Federal Credit Union Prizeweek Puzzle PO Box 5429 Deptford, NJ 08096-0429

Mailed entries must be received by 10 am on Monday.

| the grapevine { 11 } WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM
| the grapevine { 11 }
WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM

YOUR IMPACT

 

Thank you to our donors and corporate partners for your support of our 2012-13 campaign! Your investment in United Way of Greater Philadelphia and Southern New Jersey in Cumberland County drives measurable, lasting impact that none of us can achieve alone.

Because of you, more children have access to a quality education, from cradle to career. Because of you, more individuals earn a family-sustaining wage. Because of you, more children, adults and seniors have access to the resources they need for good health.

 

Thank you for LIVING UNITED!

 

Join United Way at our Annual Campaign and Awards Celebration as we salute key volunteers and advocates for their extraordinary support of our work.

 

Honoring:

Keith Egan

Lori Cogit

 

2013

Agency Director of the Year

2013

Employee Campaign

 

Tom Merighi, Jr.

 

Chair of the Year

 

2013

LIVE UNITED Award

F&S Produce

Matthew Rudd

 

2013

Superstar Cup

2013

John Nichols

Vineland School District

 

Volunteer of the Year

 

2013

Public Employees

 
 

Charitable Campaign of the Year

 
 

Wednesday, July 31 • 5:30 - 8:30 p.m. Merighi’s Savoy Inn For tickets call 856-205-1800

 

$60 person / $550 for a table of 1o

 
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
www.UnitedForImpact.org

www.UnitedForImpact.org

www.UnitedForImpact.org
{ 12 } the grapevine | JULY 24, 2013
{ 12 } the grapevine | JULY 24, 2013

COMMUNITY CALENDAR

Family Float and Fun Night. YMCA,

1159 E. Landis Ave., Vineland. 6–8 p.m. A chance for families to enjoy aquatic fun in a safe setting. Bring their own favorite inflatable rafts or use the Y’s flotation col- lection. Children under 10 must be accom- panied by an adult. Free to Y facility mem- bers, $8 for program members, and $12 for the community. These prices are based on a family of four; each additional family member costs $2. RSVP by July 25. Space is limited. 856-691-0030, ext. 312.

Vacation Bible Schools

• August 5-9: “God’s Backyard Under

The Stars.” Trinity Episcopal Church, 8th & Wood St., Vineland. 6-8 p.m. Free. Activities for ages 4 to 12. Crafts, games, videos and snacks. To register, call Joanne at 609-289- 7560 or 856-691-1589.

• August 5-9: “Faith Alive.” Lutheran

Church of the Redeemer, 2384 E. Landis Ave., Vineland. 9 a.m.- 3 p.m. Financial Assistance available. For children entering Kindergarten through 5th grade, this camp focus on Bible study, worship, prayer, hospitality and service. Lunch and snacks will be provided.

For more info., or to register, call

805-822-9679.

• August 5-9: “Kingdom Chronicles.”

First Baptist Church, Rosemont and Catawba Aves., Newfield. 6:30 - 8:45 p.m. Free. Activities for chuldren ages 3 through 6th grade, including

Bible lessons, games, crafts, snacks, puppets and songs. For more info. or to register, call 956-697-2217.

• August 5-9: “Everywhere Fun Fair:

Where God’s World Comes Together.” Port Elizabeth United Methodist Church, John Boggs Hall, 152 Port Elizabeth-Cumberland Rd. 6-8 p.m. Explore and experience God’s welcom- ing love with various fun activities. For more info., call 856-825-4386.

HAPPENINGS

THROUGH JULY 28

46th Annual Puerto Rican Pride

Celebration. Landis Park, 600 E. Park Ave., Vineland. 6 p.m. Free. A week of entertainment, activities, rides, a parade, food and more through Saturday beginning at 3 p.m. For a complete schedule of events, call 856-696-1147.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 24

Young Adult Author Program. Millville

Public Library, 210 Buck St., Millville. 6 p.m. Enjoy an interactive program, featur- ing six New Jersey authors. Books will be available for purchase (cash only). For more info., or to register, visit the circula- tion desk or call 856-825-7087, ext. 12.

Stop Smoking and Get Healthy Group

Session. Inspira Scarpa Regional Cancer Pavilion, 1505 W. Sherman Ave., Vineland. 6:30 p.m. All attendees are encouraged to bring a friend or family member with them for support. In addition to learning proven

ways to stop smoking, attendees will receive a free two-week trial membership to Inspira Fitness Connection, including an evaluation by a personal trainer. Space is limited. For more info. or to register, call

856-641-8670.

THURSDAY, JULY 25

GVCC Women’s Professional Group

Meeting. Luna’s Outdoor Grille (Merighi’s Savoy Inn), 4940 E. Landis Ave., East Vineland. Noon. A fun, relaxed outing for female members of the Greater Vineland Chamber of Commerce. The event theme is “Health & Wellness.” Lunch included. RSVP 856-691-7400.

FRIDAY, JULY 26

Crabs and Spaghetti Dinner. North Italy

Club, 8th Street and Virano Ln., Vineland. 6 p.m. An annual tradition, steamed and raw clams will also be available for purchase. Takeouts are available and begin at 5:30 p.m. For more info., call 692-9862.

clams will also be available for purchase. Takeouts are available and begin at 5:30 p.m. For

SATURDAY, JULY 27

Skin Cancer Screening. Inspira Medical

Center Elmer, 501 W. Front St., Elmer. 9 a.m.–noon. Free. Appointments are required to receive a screening. To sched- ule an appointment or for more info., call 856-641-8670. Event sponsored by Inspira Cancer Services and Ingrid P. Warmuth, M.D., P.A. and Ana Newport, M.H.A., P.A.-C.

Downtown Sidewalk Sale. Downtown

Vineland, Landis Ave., Vineland. 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Free. Sponsored by Main Street Vineland, merchants and businesses will have merchandise outside on display for this event. Rain date: 8/3/13. For more info., call 856-691-1180.

Chicken Barbecue. Gouldtown Fire Station Picnic Grove, 1137 Bridgeton-Millville Pike, Gouldtown. 12–6 p.m. $10. Featuring a half chicken platter with potato salad and corn on the cob, live music by The Road House Band, and a Wheels of Thunder Car Show. All proceeds benefit the Fire Department

SUNDAY, JULY 28

Sunset Cruise. The Marina, Fortescue, NJ. Departs at 4:30 p.m. and lasts four hours. $40 for adults, $20 for children ages 5-14. Beverages will be provided. 856-825-0123.

JULY 29 AND 30

AARP Safe Driving Program. Inspira

Medical Center Elmer, 501 Front St., Elmer. 9 a.m.–noon. $12 for AARP members, $14 for non-members. Designed especially for drivers 50 and older, participants must attend both classes. Upon completion, attendees will receive a certificate that entitles them to an insurance discount or deduction of violation points.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 31

United Way Annual Awards Celebration.

Merighi’s Savoy Inn, 4940 E. Landis Ave., Vineland. 5:30 p.m. $60 per person, $550 per table of ten. Local volunteers, donors and community advocates will be applauded for their efforts to build a stronger community as United Way of Greater Philadelphia and Southern New Jersey (UWGPSNJ) in Cumberland County holds its annual awards celebration. For more info., or to purchase tickets, call

856-205-1800.

HIGH SCHOOL REUNIONS

For details about these reunions, e-mail or call the numbers provided.

• The Vineland High School Class of 1983 is holding its 30-year class reunion on

Saturday, July 27, from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. at Merighi’s Savoy Inn, Landis Avenue and Union Road. For more information, contact Debi Quinn Bechtel via email - Dbechtel@vineland.org

• The Vineland High School Class of 1978 is celebrating its 35th year class reunion

on Saturday, Aug. 3, beginning at 7 p.m., at the Greenview Inn at Eastlyn Golf Course, 4049 Italia Avenue. The event will feature dinner, dancing and music. The cost is $65 per person and it will be a casual attire event. If you have never received an invitation or have a change of address, email Doreen (Organski) Riccio at

Dorr18@msn.com.

• The Sacred Heart High School class of 1958 will hold its 55 year reunion at 6 p.m.

on September 1 at the Greenview Inn, 4049 Italia Avenue in East Vineland. The affair

will begin with a cash bar cocktail hour and appetizers followed by dinner and dessert in the banquet room. Music for listening and dancing as well as other fun- filled activities are planned to make the evening an enjoyable one for all. If you have not received an invitation or have had a change of address, please contact Judy Lascarides at 23 Sunset Drive, Millville NJ 08332 or email at jl0930@msn.com.

• Vineland High School class of 1993 is holding its 20th year class reunion on

Saturday, October 12 from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. at The Greenview Inn at Eastyln Golf Course, located 4049 Italia Ave in Vineland. Tickets are $60 per person or $110 per

couple. It includes beer and wine and a buffet dinner. Entertainment will be provided by a DJ. Make checks payable to VHS class of 93. Mail to P.O. Box 206, Vineland, NJ, 08360. For more info., call 856-498-2336.

• Vineland High School Class of 1973 is planning a 40-year reunion for Saturday, November 2, 2013. The reunion will be held at Eastlyn Golf Course, located in

Vineland. There will be a cocktail hour at 6:00 p.m. with a dinner served at 7:00 p.m. Tickets for this event are $65 a person. Make checks payable to VHS Class of 1973 and send them to 1314 Magnolia Rd., Vineland, NJ 08361. Seating is limited, so send payments as soon as possible. RSVP by September 15.

• Buena Regional High School Class of 1978 will hold its 35th class reunion on

November 16th at Merighi’s Savoy Inn. Anyone who has not received a notice from the reunion committee should email mbconvey@hotmail.com as soon as possible.

Natural Solutions To Digestive

Problems. Cooper Wellness Center, 6 LaSalle St., Vineland. 7–8 p.m. Free. This workshop explains how the digestive tract functions and how disease and illness occurs in the GI tract with natural solu- tions to heal. Targeted towards individuals with digestive issues. Limited to 20 people. RSVP 856-691-1313.

THURSDAY, AUGUST 1

Let’s Talk Criminal Justice. Cumberland

County College, 3322 College Dr., Vineland. 3–7 p.m. Free. Still considering college and a career in Criminal Justice? It’s not too late for September. This semi- nar will cover areas of concentration such

as Criminal Justice, Corrections, Homeland Security, and Emergency Management. For more info., call 856-691- 8600 ext. 1277.

SATURDAY, AUGUST 3

American Cancer Society Beef N

Beer. Five Points Inn, 580 E. Landis Ave., Vineland. $25. Presented by Hector Santiago and Romeo Levari as part of their Caritas Project with St. Augustine Prep, 100% of the ticket sales for this event will benefit the American Cancer Society Making Strides Charity. Featuring music by DJ Nicky G, a Chinese Auction and door prizes. For tickets, visit Dynamic Fitness or call 856-297-5438.

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{ 14 } the grapevine | JULY 24, 2013

I Downtown Vineland

{ BY TODD NOON, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, VDID / MAINSTREET VINELAND }

TODD NOON, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, VDID / MAINSTREET VINELAND } Downtown Pride It was surely evident last

Downtown

Pride

It was surely evident last Wednesday when “Jenny On Your Block” came to Landis Avenue.

T he morning of Wednesday, July 17 was one of those magical times—a time when the pride that I and others feel for down-

town Vineland gets an added boost. It was the morning when Fox 29’s “Good Day Philadelphia” visited our downtown and their reporter Jennaphr Frederick received a hearty Vineland welcome for her segment “Jenny On Your Block.” We had the honor of being the first South Jersey city that her segment has visited for the spotlight. For three hours, a festi- val atmosphere came over the 600 block of Landis Avenue that we usually only see for weekend events. To add to the festivities, that day marked the opening of the new Amish Family Restaurant in the upper level of Landis MarketPlace—timing that could not have been better. Exposure on televi- sion throughout the Delaware Valley never hurts and, judging from the crowd in the restaurant, business was off to a great start. Our downtown put its best foot for- ward for this. Everything looked great, the crowd (especially for a weekday morning) was terrific, and lots of things were going on—live entertainment, local eateries offering their food, and lots more. Downtown businesses opened their doors in a festive atmosphere. It all had to come together rather

quickly. We had less than two weeks to create this event but—thanks to teamwork with and the leadership of Dawn Hunter and the Greater Vineland Chamber of Commerce, Mayor Bermudez, Landis MarketPlace, and many others—this dou- ble event came off well and created true downtown Vineland pride. This was one of those moments that you wish you could replicate every week- day. The great times, the hustle and bus- tle—all that is what makes the downtown the soul of a city and gives it a unique personality. *** We have begun to plan our annual “A Taste of Vineland” fundraiser event. Vineland’s finest restaurants and eateries come out for this event and offer their sig- nature dishes. We are planning it this year for Wednesday, October 16, at 6 p.m., at Mori’s, 830 E. Landis Ave. For a single ticket, you get a wide variety of foods from some great eateries—and all to help Main Street Vineland in its good work. More details will follow. *** This is a final reminder about our Downtown Sidewalk Sale, to take place on Saturday, July 27 (rain date: Saturday, August 3) from 10 to 5 p.m. Great bargains will be featured up and down Landis Avenue! 92.1 WVLT will be broadcasting live from the event from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

will be featured up and down Landis Avenue! 92.1 WVLT will be broadcasting live from the

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| the grapevine

{ 15 }

Come on down! *** Also, don’t forget about our Tomato and Wine Festival, to take place on Saturday, August 10 (rain date: Sunday, August 11) from 4 to 8 p.m., on the 600 block of Landis Avenue. Lots of fun will be in store, with great food, live music, fun for the kiddies, and an expanded homemade wine contest. You have until August 2 to enter your wines for the competition and you’ll also want to enter your kiddies in the Little Miss & Mister Cherry Tomato Pageant Parade. Visit our website for registration forms for both or give us a call. I

For more information on Main Street Vineland, visit 603 E. Landis Ave., call 856- 794-8653, visit www.mainstreetvineland.org, or check them out on Facebook.

Vineland, visit 603 E. Landis Ave., call 856- 794-8653, visit www.mainstreetvineland.org, or check them out on
Vineland, visit 603 E. Landis Ave., call 856- 794-8653, visit www.mainstreetvineland.org, or check them out on
Vineland, visit 603 E. Landis Ave., call 856- 794-8653, visit www.mainstreetvineland.org, or check them out on
Vineland, visit 603 E. Landis Ave., call 856- 794-8653, visit www.mainstreetvineland.org, or check them out on
Vineland, visit 603 E. Landis Ave., call 856- 794-8653, visit www.mainstreetvineland.org, or check them out on
Vineland, visit 603 E. Landis Ave., call 856- 794-8653, visit www.mainstreetvineland.org, or check them out on
Vineland, visit 603 E. Landis Ave., call 856- 794-8653, visit www.mainstreetvineland.org, or check them out on
Vineland, visit 603 E. Landis Ave., call 856- 794-8653, visit www.mainstreetvineland.org, or check them out on
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{ 16 } the grapevine | JULY 24, 2013

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In Our Schools

Petway Celebrates 6th Annual Achievement Night

Petway Elementary School cele- brated its Sixth Annual Achievement Night with demonstrations of student work in academics, music, and art, with a portion of the evening also set aside for refreshments and fun, according to school staff. The evening began with Petway's Math 24 members, led by coaches Mrs. Marla Gruber and Mrs. Vicky Kaffenberger, demonstrating their amazing math skills with speed and accuracy. This was followed by a patriotic red, white & blue musical per- formance by Petway's Kindergarten students. Petway's Chorus, under the direction of Mrs. Terry Bordo and Mrs. Jeanette Ganio, sang "Firework." Petway's fifth grade student, Heather Raguckas, sang, "Part of Your World," dressed as Ariel from Petway's spring production of "Little Mermaid Jr." Petway's String Ensemble, direct- ed by Mrs. Vera Bojko, delighted the crowd with their instrumental talents. The per- formances ended with Petway's Drama Club thanking their directors, Mrs. Dana Speziali and Mr. Steven Calakos with a gift as a token of their appreciation for all the hard work, time, and dedication they gave to their recent spring musical. In the Library, Petway's Art LEAP students and Art Teacher Mrs. Lisa Suprun revealed their enormous colorful sunflower mosaic. Students and their families were then encouraged to roam the school's hallways to enjoy the multitude of amazing projects and work samples created by Petway students. Those attending saw writing samples, Math, Social Studies, and Science displays, as well as models of Lenape villages, the solar system, and various com- munities. There were also numerous research reports, timelines, and posters. After roaming the hallways, families were invited outside to celebrate another won- derful school-year coming to an end, and to enjoy some family fun. Students frolicked on various inflatables, played basketball, and danced to the music the DJ played. Families were treated to light refreshments, cotton candy, ice cream and snow cones.

Musical performances by students were just one of the many activities that highlighted the Petway Achievement Night.

activities that highlighted the Petway Achievement Night. Students Help Restore Storm-Ravaged Oyster Beds Seventh

Students Help Restore Storm-Ravaged Oyster Beds

Seventh grade students at Veterans Memorial School are working to help Hurricane Sandy victims of a different sort—oyster beds in the Delaware Bay. According to information provid- ed by the school, oysters need hard substrate for their larvae to settle on and grow. Without these, oyster offspring will not survive. Many of the established oyster reefs were destroyed by Hurricane Sandy this past fall. With the help of Jenny Paterno from Project PORTS, Mrs. Emily Diaz-Chard's and Mrs. Betty Slusarczyk's classes are working hard to restore the oyster reefs by bagging clam shells in nylon net bags. These bags will be trans- ported to a designated spot in the Delaware Bay in time for oyster breeding sea- son. Oysters are a keystone species in the ecology of the bay. They provide food and habitat for other species and are an essential filtering system for the estuary. Project PORTS is an education and community-based oyster restoration pro- gram, which targets elementary and middle school communities in New Jersey's Delaware Bay Shore region. The strategy of Project PORTS is to promote hands-on activities that present basic scientific concepts and emphasize the local signifi- cance of the issues surrounding the oyster resource.

Veterans Memorial students sift through oyster shells.

Veterans Memorial students sift through oyster shells. Food Service Director Ellis Settling In Howard Ellis is

Food Service Director Ellis Settling In

Howard Ellis is settling in as the new Vineland Public Schools director of food services for Sodexo, the dis- trict's food service provider. Ellis, of Marlton, assumed the post on June 1, following the departure of Keith Nocco for a position in another state. Although new to Vineland, Ellis has been working in the food service industry since 1993 and is no stranger to school dis- trict culinary operations. Since 2009, he was area general man- ager for Sodexo in South Jersey, managing four school district accounts that had a total of 110 employees. Vineland's central kitchen, located at the Wallace Middle School, has about the same number of staff. Although Ellis is still learning his way around the Vineland district his mission is straightforward "I'm here to take care of the chil- dren, to ensure they get a nutritious meal for breakfast and for lunch," he said. "Of course the district has other needs—catering, special functions— and I will do everything I can to help the community and help the children that we feed." The district's spacious central kitchen is "not typical of every school district, that's for sure," he said. "This is one of the largest facilities I've seen in a school district, although there are some commissary kitchens being used (for schools)." The scope of the operation does not present a challenge, however, since Ellis says he has worked in "large retail operations" in prior positions. Easing the transition will be few changes in school food menus, with the exception of breakfast. "But our menu is already compati- ble to new (federal) guidelines," he said, "so that's great for us." Prior to his role as Sodexo's area manager, Ellis was general manager for the company's operations in the Winslow Township school district. Among the awards Ellis earned while working for Sodexo are the Spirit of Service Award (2012); Most improved district award and Spirit of Service Award (2009); Rising Star Award (2008) and the Executive Chef Master Class, Commitment to Excellence Award.

of Service Award (2009); Rising Star Award (2008) and the Executive Chef Master Class, Commitment to

Petway Celebrates Patriot Pride Day

Petway Elementary School celebrated its final Patriot Pride Day on June 18. Patriot Pride Days are held once a month in celebration of the school's Pathway to Patriot Pride Character Education initiative. Petway was recognized as a New Jersey School of Character in March 2012 by The New Jersey Alliance for Social, Emotional and Character Development (NJASECD). "During our June Patriot Pride Day celebra- tion we honored Patrick Bryant as an outstand- ing Petway Patriot," said Jennifer Frederico, principal. "Patrick attended Petway as a fifth grader the year the school opened in 2006. He is now a junior at Vineland High School." Dr. Thomas McCann, principal of Vineland Senior High School, attended the assembly and encouraged the younger students to follow in Bryant's footsteps. All Petway students were invited to show 'What Patriot Pride Means to Them.' Students created iMovies, wrote songs, poetry and essays, created posters and board games. Top winners from each grade level were recognized at the Pride Day celebration. The event closed with 5th grade Petway Patriots reciting the Petway Pledge and singing Petway's School Song.

Mrs. Jodi Fiore, Kindergarten Teacher, was honored for donating $100 to the school’s Peer Mediators Program. Student, Gianna Hennessy brought up flowers as a thank you.

Video Call Gives VHS Students a Look at Genetics

thank you. Video Call Gives VHS Students a Look at Genetics Eighty students at Vineland High
thank you. Video Call Gives VHS Students a Look at Genetics Eighty students at Vineland High

Eighty students at Vineland High School North recently participated in an interactive video call with Dr. John Overton, lead geneticist at Yale University, and one of his col- leagues, VHS grad Maria Sotiropoulos, said Mario Olsen, principal. The event was organized by Dave Ragazzi, a science teacher at the school while Anthony Rizzo, a VHS North technician, coordinated the audio and video equipment and connection. Another colleague of Dr. Overton, Alex Lopez, joined the session. All three sci- entists gave the students an in-depth explanation of their educational back- ground, their role in genetic science, and a tour of their lab. The students also had an opportunity to ask each scientist questions on various topics. Sotiropoulos' sister, Crystal, is a grade 9 student at the school. In an email to Ragazzi, Maria Sotiropoulos explained her work at Yale. "I work at The Yale Center for Genome Analysis, at the (Yale) Medical School in the Genetics department. Our facility provides services for RNA expression, DNA genotyping and high-throughput sequencing," she said. "Specifically, I work with Next Generation sequencing technologies to capture and sequence the DNA exome coding regions for the purpose of discovering variants associated with various diseases and disorders. We work with many different studies involving the well known Mendelian projects as well as studies related to Autism, Skin Cancer, Heart Disease as well as hundreds of others." Sotiropoulos said the video chat was intended to "give the class some insight on the importance of DNA sequencing and how we contribute to research discov- eries and real-life situations." Rizzo said the 80 students that participated in the session represented VHS in a respectful manner. "I firmly believe that today's call will have a major impact on many of the science students that participated today especially for those who may have been curious about this field and today should have answered many of their questions." "This event seems to have been a huge success," said Olsen. "This is a great example of learning at its highest level with the infusion of technology. It begins with our teachers having a vision and then requires a lot of hard work by many people to make it happen. Thank you again to all of you for creating this won- derful experience for our students."

Students enjoy a video presentation from Dr. John Overton, a Yale professor, and his two colleagues Maria Sotiropoulos, a VHS grad, and Alex Lopez.

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Ho m e

{ 18 } the grapevine | JULY 24, 2013 Ho m e Garden Keep Outdoor Activities

Garden

Keep Outdoor Activities Pest-Free

July is National Picnic Month and a great time to combine family, friends, and food with outdoor games and sunshine. Whether it’s hosting an impromptu picnic in the backyard or taking sandwiches to the kid’s ballgame, picnics create memories that will last a lifetime. But the recipe for a successful picnic doesn’t end there. It is just as critical to keep your family safe from mosquitoes, ticks, noxious weeds, and other harmful pests that can cause West Nile virus, Lyme disease, severe allergic reactions, and more. “We are committed to raising awareness for pest prevention that can ultimately improve the quality of outdoor activities,” said Karen Reardon, vice president, public affairs, at RISE (Responsible Industry for a Sound Environment) ®. “For example, when people step outdoors during mosqui- to season it should be just as automatic to think about repellents or pest-prevention as it is to apply sunscreen to protect against sunburn.” RISE is sharing the following facts and tips to help keep people safe from hazards while enjoying outdoor activities all sum- mer long.

MAKE YOURSELF MOSQUITO-AWARE

Mosquitos are spreading West Nile virus across the nation at alarming rates. In fact, 2012 was the worst year on record with 286 deaths, according to U.S. health officials. Steps to protect yourself and your family this summer include:

• Cover up with long sleeves and pants,

especially during dawn and dusk hours when mosquitoes are most active.

• Apply insect repellent on exposed

skin—like DEET—to protect family and friends from painful mosquito bites.

• Avoid areas where there is standing

water as that is a mosquito-breeding ground.

PREVENT TICKS FROM TAGGING ALONG Ticks are difficult-to-detect insects that can transmit harmful diseases. Lyme dis- ease is the most commonly reported vector- borne illness in the U.S., most prevalent among children, followed by adults ages 40

to 55, according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Some tips to keep you out of harm’s way include:

• Avoid wooded, damp, dark areas or

brushy fields where ticks live, and use pic-

nic tables instead the ground.

• Inspect and properly remove ticks in

hard-to-see areas such as inside the belly button, under arms, around ears, in hair, and the back of knees as these are places that commonly attract ticks.

RECOGNIZE POISON IVY Approximately 85 percent of the popu- lation will develop an allergic reaction if exposed to poison ivy, oak, or sumac, according to the American Academy of

Dermatology. Helpful hints for dealing with certain outdoor plants include:

• Remember the saying, “leaves of three,

let it be” to help identify the plant.

• Wash pets after they have been playing

in near potentially affected, wooded areas.

NJDA Plant Laboratory Offers Testing

The recent stretch of unusual rainy weather raises the potential of myco- toxin contamination in small grains, and other field or forage feed crops. Grain growers may be affected by price discounts and/or restricted markets. Mycotoxin contamination in animal feed and forage can lead to feed refusal, reduced productivity (reduced production of eggs, milk, and weight gain), reproduction prob- lems (disrupted heat cycles, early embryonic death, abortion) impaired health, and in severe cases, death. The NJ Department of Agriculture’s Plant Laboratory offers concerned growers and producers services to test for mycotoxins:

Aflatoxin, DON/Vomitoxin, Fumonisin, Ochratoxin, T-2 Toxin, and Zearalenone. Sample submission information can be found at: http://www.state.nj.

us/agriculture/divisions/pi/pdf/myco-

toxinsubmissionform.pdf If you have any questions, call 609-406-6939 for more information.

Purple Martin Migration Spectacular

This event, slated for Friday and Saturday, August 2 and 3, is hosted by CU Maurice River, Maurice River Township, the Cumberland County Improvement Authority, The Association of New Jersey Environmental Commissions, and New Jersey Audubon. Purple Martins amass for several evenings before continuing their migra- tion to Brazil. This staging area will build to many thousands of birds con- gregating at the Mauricetown Causeway on the Maurice River. At dusk the birds assemble in large numbers, swirling over the tops of the phragmites before settling in for the night. Make your reservations for an Evening Dessert Cruise aboard the Bodacious. Slowly cruise the Maurice River at sunset with local Purple Martin expert Allen Jackson and representatives from CU Maurice River. Reservations are required, $35 per person; please pay in advance. The trip lasts approximately three hours and takes place rain or shine. Contact Suzanne Olah 856-327-5118 or cureservation@gmail.com to make a reservation. Cruises depart Longreach Marina, 2806 High St., Port Norris at 6:15 p.m. They can accommodate passengers with disabilities or other special needs if alerted well in advance. You can pay online on CU’s website (http://www.cumauriceriver.org) or mail your check to CU Maurice River, PO Box 474, Millville, NJ 08332. Be sure to specify which day you plan to attend. You can also view the Purple Martin phenomenon for FREE from viewing platforms graciously supplied by the Cumberland County Improvement Authority at the Mauricetown Bridge on CR 670 just west of the Route 47 Wawa. Starting at 7 p.m. on Friday and Saturday, see thousands of Purple Martins as they gather for migration. Volunteer naturalists from CU Maurice River will be available to answer questions and enhance your viewing experi- ence. No reservations required for the platform. Bring your binoculars and some bug spray! Rafine’s Italian Ice will be available for beverages and snacks. In addition, rentals will be available from Al and Sam’s Canoe and Kayak Rental (www.alandsams.com) at the Mauricetown Bridge. Reserve at least one week in advance by calling 856-692-8440. Suggested launch time is around 6:45 p.m. Life jackets are required and included with rental, and light sticks and flashlights are highly recommended. Thanks to Maurice River Township for sponsoring the Purple Martin Spectacular! NOTE: The Purple Martins have staged at this site for many years. However, this is a natural phenomenon and there is no guarantee they will always return.

at this site for many years. However, this is a natural phenomenon and there is no

• Clean outdoor tools and wash clothing in hot water to prevent exposure to the plant from spreading. Effective preventative treatments to yards and picnic areas help reduce the occurrence of ticks and poison ivy. Read and follow all label directions when using repellents and outdoor pest control products. For more information on staying safe from harmful pests, visit www.DebugTheMyths.com.

RISE, located in Washington, D.C., is the national association representing the man- ufacturers, formulators, distributors, and other industry leaders involved with pesti- cide and fertilizer products used in vector control, pest control, turf, ornamental, aquatic and terrestrial vegetation, and other non-food/fiber applications. Learn more at www.debugthemyths.com. I

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

COMEDY AT THE LANDIS, FREE OUTDOOR CONCERTS, POTTERY AND PAINTINGS, AND MUSICAL JOURNEYS

{ 20 } the grapevine | JULY 24, 2013

SATURDAY, JULY 27 Pégate a la Risa. Landis Theater, E. Landis Ave., Vineland. 7:30 p.m.

SATURDAY, JULY 27 Pégate a la Risa.

Landis Theater, E. Landis Ave., Vineland. 7:30 p.m. Based on the #1 tel- evision programs of WAPA and WAPA América (Pégate al Mediodía, Risas en Combo, and Sunshine Remix.) Pégate a la Risa is the #1 comedy show in Puerto Rico. The show is a mix of stand-up comedy, sketches and musical parodies. Audience members will have the opportunity to interact with all of the characters including Mongui and Pescuezo, Cascarita, Feliciano, Boris, Viroldo, Guitarreño and, the Puerto Rican master of comedy, Sunshine Logroño. The cast includes Danilo Beauchamp, Francis Rosa, Alfonso Alemán , Alejandro Santiago and Emmanuel Sunshine Logroño. This show includes comedy of an adult nature appropriate for ages 16 and up. Persons under 18 should be accompanied by a parent. Orchestra $20 | Mezzanine $25. www.landistheater.ocm or 691-1121.

JULY 22 THROUGH 29 Nightlife at Bennigan’s. 2196 W.

Landis Ave., Vineland, 205-0010. Karaoke Thursdays with Bob Morgan, 9 p.m.-close, $3 Heinekens, DJ/Dance Party Fridays 9 p.m.-Close, $3 Coronas. All Sports Packages: MLB Extra Innings, NBA League Pass, NHL Center Ice, and NFL Sunday Ticket. $3 12-oz. Coors Light & $5 23-oz. Call for RSVP and details.

Nightlife at Tombstone Saloon and

Grill. 373 Rt. 54, Buena. Mon. line danc- ing 7 p.m. (beginners welcome), Tues. karaoke, trivia, Wed. Bike/Wing Night, Fri. and Sat. Jim Mitchell and the Repeat Offenders, live country music.

Nightlife at Moonlight Bar and Grill.

528 N. Harding Hwy., Vineland, 697- 5500. Mon. karaoke, Wed. Zod, (psychic), Thurs. Tony Mascara 7 p.m., Fri. Line Dancing Party with Pepper Paul 8 p.m., Sat. Together Again, live band 7–10 p.m.

EVERY TUESDAY

Karaoke. The Cosmopolitan. 3513 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland. With KAO Productionz feat. Kerbie A. (9 p.m.–1 a.m.). 765-5977.

Tuesday Night Trivia Contest. Tre

Bellezze, 363 East Wheat Rd., Vineland.

7 p.m. Win $ and other great prizes! 697-

8500.

EVERY WEDNESDAY

Salsa Night. The Cosmopolitan. 3513 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland. Latin-inspired dance party. Free Dance Lesson 9–10 p.m. with DJ Slick Rick. 765-5977.

Country Night/Dancing. Ten22, The

Centerton Country Club & Event Center, 1022 Almond Rd., Pittsgrove. Requests all night) on one of the largest dance floors in region. $5 cover charge.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 24 Free Outdoor Concert: Bob Ferris

Orchestra. Michael Debbi Park, Cedar Ave., Richland. 7 p.m. Hot dogs, desserts, and beverages sold. Seating available or bring lawn chairs. Dance floor (weather permitting).

EVERY THURSDAY

Jazz Duos. Annata Wine Bar, Bellevue Ave., Hammonton, 609-704-9797. Live Jazz featuring area's best jazz duos. 6:30–9:30 p.m. No cover. RSVP recommended.

Jeff Giuliani of Eleven Eleven. Double

Eagle Saloon, 1477 Panther Rd., Vineland. Live acoustic 7–10 p.m.

JULY 24 THROUGH 27

Nightlife at Mori’s. Lou Ferretti's Mori's on Landis, 830 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 690-0300. Thurs.: "Open Mike Night"

with DJ Kerbie 8 p.m

Party 8 p.m. Sat.: Live music 8 p.m.

Fri.: Latino Dance

Nightlife at Ramada. Harry's Pub at

Ramada, W. Landis Ave. and Rt. 55, Vineland, 696-3800. Wed.: Ladies Night, 1/2 price appetizers all night. Happy Hour Mon.-Sat, 4-6 p.m. $1 off alcoholic drinks. Wed.–Sat., live entertainment.

Nightlife at Double Eagle. Double

Eagle Saloon, 1477 Panther Rd., Vineland. Live Music with Jeff Giuliani Monday nights and Rob Lipkin on Friday nights. Deck bar with 16 draft beers, food and drink specials.

Nightlife at Old Oar House. Old Oar

House Irish Pub. 123 N. High St., Millville, 293-1200. Wed.: Karaoke. Fri.: Phil and the Heart Attacks 9 p.m., Sat.: No live music 9 p.m., Sun.: TJ Frye 5–9 p.m.

EVERY FRIDAY

Gene Cortopassi. Merighi's Savoy Inn,

E. Landis Ave. and Union Rd., Vineland,

691-8051. 6 p.m. Dinner music.

Rob Lipkin. Double Eagle Saloon, 1477 Panther Rd., Vineland. Live music, 8 p.m.

EVERY FRIDAY AND SATURDAY Top 40 Dance Party w/ DJ Tony

Morris. The Cosmopolitan. 3513 S. Delsea Dr,, Vineland. All of the most pop- ular mainstream dance music. 765-5977.

JULY 25 AND 26 Many Lands: A Musical Journey.

Levoy Theatre, 126-130 N. High St., Millville. 1 p.m. both days, also 7 p.m Thursday. Off Broad Street Players campers take you on a magical ride through Neverland, Seusville, Oz, Christmas Town and lots of other “fan- tastic”places in this revue. $5 matinees, $10 evening show. 856-327-6400 or www.levoy.net.

FRIDAY, JULY 26

Chip Rishell. Bogart’s Bookstore. 210

N. High St., Millville. Free. Live music.

7–9 p.m.

Adelante. Dodges Market, 55 Chestnut St. (the corner of Main St. and US Rt 40), Elmer, 358-4571. 7–9:30 p.m. J. Jody Janetta on drums, Stephen Testa on bass and Jack "Jez" Jesiolowski on gui- tar. www.dodgesmarket.com

SATURDAY, JULY 27 Jammin’ in July: Frank Comparri.

Bellview Winery, 195 Atlantic St., Landisville. Live music. 4–8 p.m. $10 (includes wine tasting, parking, take- home glass, and music.

Steve Byrnes; Blues, Rags & Hollers.

Bogart’s Bookstore. 210 N. High St., Millville. Free. Ragtime blues guitarist, singer. 7–9 p.m.

Megan Knight, The Truth. NJ

Motorsports Park, The Finish Line Pub, 1000 Dividing Creek Rd., Millville. 6 p.m. Local recording artist Megan Knight and The Truth, a rock band touring with the ARCA Racing Series this summer, are both scheduled to perform.

MONDAY, JULY 29 Free Outdoor Concert: Buddy and the

Blue Flames. Giampetro Park, Enrico Serra Band Shell, E. Landis Ave., Vineland. 7 p.m. In case of rain, the concerts will be held at Memorial School Auditorium, Main Road and Chestnut Avenue. Free.

Free Music Lecture. Vineland Public

Library, 1058 E. Landis Ave., Vineland. 6–7:30 p.m. Explore music from the Far North in this music lecture by Paul M. Somers, sponsored by the Bay-Atlantic

Symphony.

TUESDAY, JULY 30 Free Outdoor Concert: Gene Ianette

Group. Bruno Melini Park, Central Ave., Minotola. 7 p.m. In case of rain, concert will be held at Louise Basile Pavilion.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 31 Free Outdoor Concert: Ten Eddy Drive.

Michael Debbi Park, Cedar Ave., Richland. 7 p.m. Hot dogs, desserts, and beverages sold. Seating available or bring lawn chairs. Dance floor (weather permitting).

THROUGH AUGUST 11 Maurice River School of Painters 4th Annual Art Show. The Riverfront

Renaissance Center for the Arts, Downtown Millville. This exhibit features artworks produced by the instructors and students of the workshop during previous years, as well as works created at this year’s workshop. For more details, call The Barn Studio of Art at 856-825-5028 or www.mauriceriverschool.org.

THROUGH AUGUST 18 Tea Pottery: Handcrafted Pottery for the Avid Tea Drinker. The Gallery of

Fine Craft, Wheaton Arts and Cultural Center, 1100 Village Dr., Millville. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Tuesday–Sunday. This exhibit and sale features handcrafted tea related accessories created by the WheatonArts Potters including Amy Peseller, Resident

by the WheatonArts Potters including Amy Peseller, Resident Assistant Potter, Phyllis Seidner, Associate Potter, Erika

Assistant Potter, Phyllis Seidner, Associate Potter, Erika Pugh, Associate Potter, and WheatonArts Resident Potter Terry Plasket (work pictured), who has been a resident artist since 1979. Show highlights include teapots, teacups, tea mugs, tea bowls and pottery accessories such as small plates, creamer and sugar sets, and honey jars. Free admission. For more, call 1-800-998- 4552 or 856-825-6800.wheatonarts.org.

SUNDAY, AUGUST 4 Bay Atlantic Symphony Summer

Concert. Music Box at Borgata Hotel Casino & Spa in Atlantic City. 5 p.m. All- Mozart concert featuring violinist Kai Gleusteen in fourth concert in the Symphony’s summer classical series. Tickets ($25 and $35) are available for purchase by calling 866-900-4849, online at www.theborgata. com, or in- person by visiting the Borgata Box Office.

BIKE LANES

Continued from cover

According the to the New Jersey Department of Transportation, cyclists are at fault in approximately 75 percent of the accidents that result in a collision between an automobile and a bicycle. Cyclists should constantly be looking ahead, on the lookout for potentially hazardous traffic or problems that could affect their path, such as parked cars, residents pulling out of driveways, motorists opening the door to exit their vehicle, and fallen or low-hang- ing tree branches. Though the law states that only children under 17 need a helmet when riding a bike, it is recommended for every cyclist. Cyclists should also obey traffic laws, including using hand signals to indicate when they’re turning or braking, and stop- ping at traffic lights and stop signs. In the instance of Wood and Elmer streets, which are both one-way streets, cyclists should only ride in the same direction as traffic. All of these rules can help you avoid an accident. In fact, failing to obey these laws can result in a citation from an officer.

FRIDAY, JULY 26 Free Family Fun and Fitness Festival: Biking and Summer

Safety. 600 Block of Landis Ave., Vineland. 6:30–8:30 p.m. Mayor Ruben Bermudez, Vineland City Council, and the Vineland Health Department would like to invite everyone to this event. Enjoy family time on a Friday night. “The theme of the July Festival is Biking and Summer Safety,” said Vineland Health Department Educator Emma Lopez. “We will have members of the Vineland Police Department doing Bike Demonstrations and Challenges, a YMCA Obstacle Course, and a Vineland Firefighter Challenger Course. There will also be Jump Roping, Vineland High Football Demonstrations, Zumba Classes, Moonbounces, and other interactive demonstrations and fun events.” “In addition, we will have health screenings, nutrition information, summer safety for swimming and pets, as well as tips on skin cancer prevention, mosquito, and tick safe- ty,” Lopez said. “Food vendors will be on-hand offering healthy snacks to enjoy. There will also be surprise guests conducting healthy cooking demonstrations throughout the evening, and offering recipes and tasty samples for attendees to try.” For more information about the July Festival, or to participate in the August or September Festival, con- tact Emma Lopez in the Vineland Health Department at 856-794- 4000, ext. 4709.

“Once a bike lane is established in any municipality, law enforcement has the authority to ticket a citizen for breaking the law,” said Lopez. “While the crackdown hasn’t occurred yet here in Vineland, it will be coming.” As a driver, remember that you’re shar- ing the road with bicyclists now. They should be treated the same way you’d treat another driver. For example, before making

a left turn, look behind you and make sure

a cyclist isn’t approaching. If they are, it is your responsibility to yield to them until they pass. Drivers should also look for cyclists before opening their door to exit their vehicle. The solid lines of the bike lanes should be treated like any other solid line on the roadway by not crossing over it. Crossing into the bike lane can be viewed by an officer the same way as driving down the double solid line of a two-way road would be—illegal and a citable offense. “It really does come down to awareness for both parties,” said Lopez. “Everyone needs to be aware of what’s going on around them.” As stated, many citizens have also expressed concerns that the bike lanes were thoughtlessly placed on the left side of the road, making driving lanes too nar- row. Brian Myers, an engineer in the Vineland Engineering Department, says they are ill found. “We did a lot of research for placement of these lanes,” he said. “Legally, on a one- way road, the bike lane can be on the right or the left side. In studies we saw, we found that placing the lanes on the left side of the road reduced incidents greatly. Specifically, the left-handed placement reduces door swing conflicts.” With the bike lane on the left, cyclists need only worry about passengers exiting a car, which happens much more rarely than

a driver exiting. As for the narrowing of the driving lane, Myers indicated that it is an illusion. “Wood and Elmer were operating as a free-for-all before these bike lanes,” he said. “They are meant to be single-lane roads. Legally, we’re allowed a variation in lane width from 10 to 12 feet. The driving lanes on these roads are 11 feet, so they’re wider than what is necessary. It’s more of a driver psychology thing.” Myers said having the bike lane and the parking spots gives the driver a feeling of narrower lanes, but they actually aren’t. In other words, it’s all in your head.

“One of our goals was to give it this per- ception to slow traffic down,” he said. “It’s

a traffic calming measure.” For those who still have concerns regarding the bike lanes, the Vineland Police Department will be giving bike safe- ty demonstrations during this week’s Fourth Friday celebration, which is being held on the 600 block of Landis Avenue this Friday, July 26. I

is being held on the 600 block of Landis Avenue this Friday, July 26. I WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM
WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | the grapevine { 21 }
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{ 22 } the grapevine | JULY 24, 2013 REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS The following transactions
{ 22 } the grapevine | JULY 24, 2013
{ 22 } the grapevine | JULY 24, 2013

REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS

The following transactions of $1,000 or more were filed with Cumberland County in the month of May 2013 (transactions may have occurred in an earlier month). Names listed may, in some cases, be those of buyers’ or sellers’ representatives.

BRIDGETON

50 Grove St., Claus & Reyers Co. to

Renewable Jersey LLC on 5/13/13 for

$80,320

48 York St., Samuel A Delp, Jr. (Exec.) to

Derek Patchell on 5/14/13 for $18,000

54 York St., Cohansey Bridge LLC to

Jose A Arellano on 5/14/13 for $50,000

99

Summit Ave., Sec. of Veterans Affairs

to

Robert V Parenti on 5/15/13 for

$46,150

509 N Laurel St., James P Strang

(Exec.) to Cesar Morales on 5/16/13 for

$43,000

100 E Commerce St., Penn Jersey

Advance Inc. to Bearl LLC on 5/16/13 for

$240,000

COMMERCIAL TWP

7379 William Ave., Carole Bottorf (Exec.)

to Kevin H Nocon on 5/10/13 for

$20,000

DEERFIELD TWP

801 Garton Rd., Lucy Minklei to Ronald

G Bennett on 5/16/13 for $147,500

DOWNE TWP

961 Main St., Edward B Bailey, Jr. to

Dylan Tusing on 5/16/13 for $20,000

550 Ackley Rd., AGR Builders LLC to

Christine Sanderlin on 5/16/13 for

$145,000

FAIRFIELD TWP

55 Shoemaker Ln., Cohansey Bridge LLC

to Jose A Arellano on 5/14/13 for

$50,000

HOPEWELL TWP 8 Gilmore Rd., David G Spoltore to Shane P Davenport on 5/16/13 for

$245,000

159 River Rd., S Mark Scherbekow to

David Gilligan on 5/16/13 for $295,000

LAWRENCE TWP

82 North Ave., Kevin Young-Bey (Adm.)

to Prakash C Sharma on 5/10/13 for

$57,000

MAURICE RIVER TWP

611 Main St., Marilyn Howard to Kelly

Getty to 5/16/13 for $189,500

C Sharma on 5/10/13 for $57,000 MAURICE RIVER TWP 611 Main St., Marilyn Howard to Kelly
CLASSIFIEDS Call 9 a.m - 5 p.m daily, Deadline for paid ads: Friday, 3 p.m.

CLASSIFIEDS

Call 9 a.m - 5 p.m daily, Deadline for paid ads: Friday, 3 p.m. To order your classified, call 856-457-7815 or visit www.grapevinenewspaper.com/classifieds. See box below for additional ordering information.

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Electrical

Contractor

Micro Electric LLC. Residential repair, addi- tions, and services. Bonded and insured. “no job is too small.” NJ LIC #14256. Call 609-501-7777.

Help Wanted

Home Health Aide (Certified) CHHA/Program Aide Vineland, NJ Inspira Health Network seeks Full- Time and Per Diem CHHAs to join our team at Vineland LIFE Center or Vineland LIFE Home. You'll pro- vide care and assis- tance to participants in their homes, as well as in a facility. When in the home, provide and assist partici- pants with skilled and non-skilled activities of daily living, restora- tive and supportive care necessary to the preservation of the home environment. Assist with implemen- tation of activities for participants tailored to the needs and limi- tations of frail elderly. Requirements: High school diploma or GED, current NJ Home Health Aide

certification, valid dri- ver’s license and insurance along with means of transporta- tion. CPR certification (through American Heart Association). Apply online:

www.inspirahealthnet-

work.org, Category

Nursing Support

Services. EOE

The YMCA of Vineland is seeking part-time experi- ence individuals for posi- tions as Member Service Representatives and Member Experience Coordinator. Details can be found on the Y's web- site at www.ccaymca.org.

Seamstress: Bridal and special occasion dresses. Minimum five years expe- rience. Cherry Hill area. Part-time. Call 856-834- 2232 if interested.

For Rent

Share a Nice Big Modern House in a Great Neighborhood. $699/mo. Call 609-

213-0832.

For rent: Upstairs apart- ment. West Vineland, Sunset Avenue. Two bed- room. $1100/mo. Includes heat and electric. Call

856-794-1623.

For Rent: 1) Office/Retail. Over 750 square feet, pris- tine condition. Prime area. 2) Office/Retail. 2350 to

5350 square feet. Landis

Avenue, prime area. For either, call 856-692-6849.

House to share in Vineland:

Near stores, cable TV, shared bathroom and kitchen. $450/mo. Prefer a Christian. References req. Call 856-982-5890

For Sale

Chihuahua Puppies: Sweet, lovable temperament. Shots, wormed, paper- trained. $350. If interested, call 856-696-0969.

Having a party but you don’t need a planner? Buy a complete party basket with everything you need. One dozen guests and up, starting at $50. If interested, call 856-765-9098.

2006 MX-5 Miata Grand

Touring. Copper red, 25,000 miles, power win- dows, door locks, auto- matic transmission and cruise control. $13,000. Call 856-327-0131.

Real Estate

2004 Double Wide Mobile

Home. 28' x 50'. 3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms, Laundry Room, Deck, C/A and Much More. In nice park. Reduced $53,900. Contact Jean Gale at 856-

825-3083

Services

Piano Lessons in my home. Ages 4.5 and up! Music and movement birthday parties. Ages 2 to 4.5. Call 794-8977.

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All o ers require 24-month commitment and credit quali cation. Call 7 days a week 8am - 11pm EST Promo Code: MB0513 *O er subject to change based on premium movie channel availability

Farmland Avail.

2 ½ acres of Farmland in Rosenhayn available for use. Maintenance of grounds required in lieu of rental fee. Call 856-982-0300.

Services

Rain Forest Lawn Cutting. No contract needed. If interested, call 856-327-

3299.

Steelman's Drywall. Drywall installation and repairing nailpops, cracks, water damage, unfinished drywall. Big or small! Call Joe for a free estimate at

609-381-3814.

Turk's Pressure Clean. Powerwashing of vinyl and aluminum siding. Concrete, brick, roof stain removal. Gutter cleanouts. Over 25 years in business. Insured. Call 856-692-7470

Got School Stress? The Homeschool Academy of South Jersey can help. Choose from IN-Class or ON-Line or AT- Home affordable, K- 12th grade programs in Millville. hasjschool.org. 609-

805-2548.

Services

Krystal Clear, LLC Home and Office Cleaners. Exceptional Service, Senior discounts, Spring cleaning spe- cials, Free Estimates. (856) 982-3310

A+ HOME & OFFICE CLEANING: Bonded, owner-operated, 20 years of excellent serv- ice. Free estimates. No corners cut! Call 856-906-5855

Home

Improvement

Pete Construction Specializing in decks, roofs and home remodeling. State licensed and insured. Call for a free esti- mate. 856-507-1456.

Residential Window Cleaning. Owner Operated, for a free estimate call Mike's Cleaning Service @

856-305-1166.

Advanced Cabinetry & Storage Systems. Shop at home—over 30 years expe- rience: kitchens, vanities, closets, garage systems. For all your storage needs— factory direct purchase power. Call (609) 805-6277 for an at-home consulta- tion. Save thousands.

805-6277 for an at-home consulta- tion. Save thousands. The Family Value Combo 2 (5 oz.) Filet
805-6277 for an at-home consulta- tion. Save thousands. The Family Value Combo 2 (5 oz.) Filet
The Family Value Combo 2 (5 oz.) Filet Mignons 2 (5 oz.) Top Sirloins 4
The Family Value Combo
2
(5 oz.) Filet Mignons
2
(5 oz.) Top Sirloins
4
Boneless Chicken Breasts (1 lb. pkg.)
4
(4 oz.) Omaha Steaks Burgers
4
(3 oz.)
Gourmet Jumbo Franks
4
Stuffed Baked Potatoes
48829VSK List $154.00, Now Only
$ 39 99
4 FREE
Omaha Steaks Burgers
Limit of 2 packages & 4 FREE burgers per address.
Standard S&H will be applied. Free Burgers must ship
with orders of $39 or more. Offer expires 11/15/13.
©2013 OCG | 15602 | Omaha Steaks, Inc.
Call Free 1-855-340-7179
www.OmahaSteaks.com/mbfvc70
Inc. Call Free 1-855-340-7179 www.OmahaSteaks.com/mbfvc70 SPECIALIZING IN: SPECI ALIZING IN: Lawn Lawn Maintenance
SPECIALIZING IN: SPECI ALIZING IN: Lawn Lawn Maintenance Maintenance Landscap e Design • Walks, Landscape
SPECIALIZING IN:
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Lawn Lawn Maintenance Maintenance
Landscap e Design • Walks,
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Driveways
Driveways • Retaining Walls
• Retaining Walls
Fire Pits • R estoration of Pavers
Fire Pits • Restoration of Pavers
Call Call 8 856-982-7701 56-982-7701
or or 8 856-498-7571 56-498-7571
lewbowhunter@gmail.com
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LANDSCAPING & PAVERS
See See our o ur work work on on
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Over
10 Years
work work on on Professional Installations Over 10 Years We Buy Used Vehicles! See See LennyCampbell

We Buy

Used Vehicles!

SeeSeeLennyCampbellMerle Graham

We Buy Used Vehicles! See See LennyCampbell Merle Graham 808 N. Pearl St., Bridgeton NJ (856)

808 N. Pearl St., Bridgeton NJ

(856) 451-0095

JON BLACK Fully Insured Vineland, NJ 08360 AtTheTopTree@aol.com Locally Owned & Operated NJ-0995A
JON BLACK
Fully Insured Vineland, NJ 08360
AtTheTopTree@aol.com
Locally Owned & Operated
NJ-0995A
Call 9 a.m - 5 p.m daily, Deadline for paid ads: Friday, 3 p.m. To

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