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2012 WNA GENERAL EXCELLENCE WINNER
141st year, No. 30
Thursday, July 25, 2013
Keeping you current since 1872
$1.25
INDEX
Editorial .....................1D
Police/Court ...............5B
TV listings ...............5-6C
Community .............3-5D
Letters ........................2D
Classieds .............9-10B
Harold M. Grabow, 76, Fontana
Charles E. Hines, 50, Fontana
Richard H. Hoagland, 87, Williams Bay
Mary Jane McKittrick, 81, Lake Geneva
See page 3D for death notices
OBITUARIES 3-4D
COMING ATTRACTIONS
Parade of Homes in July, August
The Lakeland Builders Associations
24th annual Parade of Homes is slated
for July 27 and 28 and Aug. 3 and 4. It
will include homes in Randall, Elkhorn,
Lake Geneva and Fontana. Visit www.
lakelandba.com.
Library hosting book sale
The Friends of the Lake Geneva
Public Library will hold their annual
book sale on Saturday and Sunday,
Aug. 10 and 11 at the east end of Li-
brary Park, Lake Geneva.
The Dream Team
Athletes of all abilities
play on baseball diamond
Page 1C
Fireghter training
Up close
and inside
a controlled
burn Page
9A
Five want to be
Linn Supervisor
Page 4A
JOY KOWALD/REGIONAL NEWS
CONSTRUCTION CONTINUES AT Eastview Elementary School, the new gym is done, the old gym is a library and the build-
ing should be ready for the inux of fourth-and fth-grade students that will come in September.
Court of Appeals rules preliminary hearing legal in OBrien case
Abuse case heads back to county
By Robert Ireland
RIreland@lakegenevanews.net
A Bloomeld couple accused of abusing
their adopted children have failed to have
the state Court of Appeals overturn sev-
eral decisions made by a local judge.
Kathleen M. OBrien, 50, has been
charged with four felony and seven misde-
meanor charges of child abuse. Martin P.
OBrien, 50, has been charged with seven
felony and ve misdemeanor charges of
child abuse.
The OBrien case has received interna-
tional media attention.
The couple is accused
of abusing their six
adopted children, four
of whom are from the
former Soviet Union.
The OBriens pleaded not
guilty Sept. 19, 2012.
According to the
criminal complaint,
Kathleen allegedly used
pepper spray on one of
the adopted children and
stabbed another in the hand with a knife.
Martin is accussed of
hitting one of the chil-
dren in the face, chok-
ing a child and striking
one of the children in the
genitals with his knee.
The pair, according to
the criminal complaint,
also allegedly forced the
children to stand on a
porch naked and locked
them in a room for days.
The criminal pro-
ceedings in Walworth County against
the OBriens have been on hold while the
Court of Appeals reviewed the case. As of
press time, a new hearing date hasnt been
scheduled.
Court of appeals decision
The OBriens objected to the use of
hearsay evidence during their preliminary
hearing. During a preliminary hearing,
a judge must determine whether there is
enough probable cause for the case to pro-
ceed. The judge also rules in the light most
favorable to the state.
During the OBriens preliminary hear-
ing, only one witness, Bloomeld Investi-
gator Lori Domino, testied.
PLEASE SEE OBRIENS PAGE 3A
Martin OBrien Kathleen OBrien
PLEASE SEE CIRCUS PAGE 3A
PLEASE SEE EASTVIEW PAGE 3A
Circus
returns to
Lake Lawn
Delavans history is deeply rooted in the circus.
From the elephant, giraffe and lion exhibit in down-
towns Tower Park, to the rumors heard at the cafes of ele-
phant bones being buried at the bottom of Delavan lake,
everywhere one turns the communitys tradition of the
circus is on full display.
For one day, that tradition will come alive and the
circus will return to Delavan.
On Sunday, July 28, the Carson & Barnes Circus is
coming to Lake Lawn Resort and will perform two shows,
one at 2 p.m. and the other at 5 p.m.
The Carson & Barnes Circus will delight audiences on
the resorts historic grounds with acts including elephants,
camels, clowns, acrobats, aerialists, horses, jugglers, ying
trapeze artists, a petting zoo, plus a variety of other per-
formances, according to a press release from Lake Lawn
Resort.
To bring the big top back to Delavan, Lake Lawn Resort
partnered with the Delavan Historical Society. The perfor-
mance will be on the grounds of the Lake Lawn Airport,
which once housed Mabies Circus and Menagerie.
The historical signicance of Mabies Circus and
Menagerie is something we want to celebrate with our
guests and the Delavan community, said David Sekeres,
Lake Lawn General Manager. We hope that bringing the
circus back and reliving all the big top traditions will be a
magnet for area guests.
In 1847 Edmund and Jeremiah Mabie established the
circus headquarters on what is now Lake Lawn.
Mabie Circus and Menagerie ended in 1867 when Jer-
emiah Mabie died.
SUBMITTED
THE CARSON & BARNES CIRCUS is coming to Lake Lawn
Resort in Delavan this Sunday.
New gym built, old gym
transformed at East View
By Kelly Meyerhofer
Special to the Regional News
People describe Wisconsin weather as almost winter,
winter, still winter, and construction. From the looks of
Eastview Elementary School, its clear to Wisconsinites
that construction season, er, summer is certainly under
way.
A stroll through Eastview school with principal Drew
Hablesma revealed what has been completed in just over
a month. While the construction started on the rst day
of summer vacation, the new gym expansion began in
March.
But Eastview is not getting just an athletic addition to
the north end.
The old gym has been transformed into a library com-
plete with four large windows. The staff lounge, special
education room and new computer lab have been con-
structed. The ceiling and ooring have been ripped out
and the new gym received fresh paint on July 10.
All of the renovations are to accommodate the grade
readjustment between Eastview and Central Denison next
school year. Both schools currently house K4 through fth
grade. Come September, fourth- and fth-graders will
spend their days at Eastview while the younger students
will be taught at Central-Denison.
We were ahead of schedule. The rain set us back a
bit in June so we had to get the moisture out so the wood
oors wouldnt buckle, Hablesma said. But were still on
schedule.
2A The Regional News July 25, 2013
LYONS
By Chris Schultz
cschultz@lakegenevanews.net
LYONS It took nearly an hour and a
half for the bus to travel from south Chi-
cago to Rustic Falls Camp, a little oasis of
grass, trees, and peace and quiet near Lake
Geneva.
And it would take about that long to get
back.
In between the trips
out of and back into the
city, about 55 Chicago-
area youngsters would
get about four hours of
peace, quiet, lunch and
simple fun during a hot
summer Saturday, July
13.
Temperatures were
in the 80s, and with the
humidity it felt hotter.
But the heat and heavy
air didnt seem to slow
the youngsters down at all, as they shot bas-
kets, kicked soccer balls and just plain ran
around to check out the grounds around a
renovated 150-year-old stone farm house.
Bug spray, however, was in great
demand.
The camp is just ve miles east of Lake
Geneva, on Cranberry Road in the town of
Lyons. It was created by Eric Lentz and his
wife, Deanna Hallagan, of Skokie, Ill.
The 55 youngsters, from some of the
meanest streets in Chicago, were on a trip
sponsored by Marillac House, a social ser-
vice agency run by the Daughters of Charity
in Chicago.
They are in a program called Hope
Junior for kids ages 6 to 18, said Hallagan,
who has been a social worker at Marillac for
23 years.
Marillac House, on Chicagos south
side, provides recreation and a secure place
to meet and socialize for up to 400 kids a
day, ve days a week.
The goal of the visit was simply to get
the youngsters out of the city, said Hal-
lagan. Over the July 4 weekend, 72 people
were shot and killed in separate incidents
throughout Chicago. Many of those shoot-
ings happened in the neighborhoods where
these youngsters live, she said.
Kids went hiking in the woods sur-
rounding Rustic Falls and then, just before
lunch, took turns on a slip and slide.
Its good to be at Rustic Falls, said
Jadari Ames, 11. You dont got to worry
about guns and shooting. You got peace of
mind.
Lentz said he watches the kids atti-
tudes and actions change as they go from
the streets of south Chicago into the woods
around Rustic Falls.
These kids tend to have a hard
demeanor, even the little ones, Lentz said.
Then we bring them out here and theyre
11-year-olds again.
He said the program will bring young-
sters up in groups of eight to 10 to stay over-
night on weekends.
The camp is supported through the
nonprot Frank Lentz Foundation, named
after Erics late father, who was a child psy-
chologist in the Naperville School District.
The center of the camp is the two-story
eldstone farmhouse, which has been reno-
vated and restored with mostly volunteer
effort to sleep up to eight.
Surrounding the ve-acre Rustic Falls
Camp is 87 acres of the old Drumlin farm
now owned by the Seno Woodland Educa-
tion Center. Seno and Rustic Falls have a
mutual use agreement. Guests of Rustic
Falls can hike the Seno grounds, and guests
of Seno can use the facilities at Rustic
Falls.
Lentz said Rustic Falls has two to three
groups visit every month. The Frank Lentz
Foundation has established connections
with several social and medical service
agencies in Illinois and Wisconsin.
Rustic Falls Nature Camp is a custom-
ized camp experience for small groups.
The goal of the camp is to create unique
outdoor experiences for at-risk youth,
cancer survivors and physically and men-
tally challenged children and adults. Each
camp is tailored to the special needs of each
group.
More information about Rustic Falls is
available at www.rusticfallsnaturecamp.
org.
From the inner city to rural Rustic Falls
CHRIS SCHULTZ/REGIONAL NEWS
ON THE PATH for a little adventure, these youngsters enjoy a ower bordered walkway
through the grounds around Rustic Falls Camp in the town of Lyons during a July 13 eld
trip. These youngsters are from Marillac House, a Chicago social service agency. Eric Lentz,
who co-owns the camp with his social worker wife, Deanna Hallagan, said kids from the
inner city have a hard demeanor. Then we bring them out here and theyre 11-year-olds
again, he said.
Lentz
CORRECTIONS
We make every effort to be accurate. If you feel weve
made an error, please contact us at jhalverson@
lakegenevanews.net. Include your name and phone
number in case we need to get back to you.
Visit us online at
www.lakegenevanews.net
Date of Genoa Citys meeting
In last weeks Regional News the wrong date was listed
for the Genoa City Village Board meeting. The meeting
occurred on July 11.
WHATS HAPPENING
Safe Sitter program coming to Mercy Hospital
Safe Sitter, a nationally recognized program led by certi-
ed instructors, will be hosted by Mercy Walworth Hospital
and Medical Center, Highways 50 and 67, on Wednesday,
Aug. 14. Registration is required.
The course teaches 11- to 13-year-olds how to be effec-
tive babysitters by keeping young children and infants safe
and secure while their parents are away. In the process,
Safe Sitter graduates become more condent, responsible
and compassionate teens and adults.
Topics presented during the class include rst aid, child
behavior, rescue breathing, injury prevention and manage-
ment, safety of the sitter, preventing problem behavior and
babysitting as a business.
The class will be held in the lower level conference room.
Cost is $45 and space is limited to 10 students.
Students are asked to provide their own snack and
lunch.
For more information or to register, call the Mercy
HealthLine at (888) 39-MERCY.
The Knot to feature Lake Geneva in 2014
The Knot Chicago, a bridal magazine, will feature a spe-
cial section highlighting Lake Geneva weddings and the
local experts who help make them happen in the spring/
summer and fall/winter 2014 issues.
The Knot Chicago Magazine is the number 1-ranked
local bridal magazine in all of Chicagoland-based Barnes
& Noble stores. Some restrictions apply.
Ask stylist for details.
Expires 8/15/13
Some restrictions apply.
Not valid with other offers.
Expires 8/15/13
Some restrictions apply.
Not valid with other offers.
Expires 8/15/13
Visit Andie at CommunityBankCBD.com/Andie!
866-848-2265
Lake Geneva Delavan Clinton Sharon
CBDs Mobile Bill Pay Saves the Day!
LAKE GENEVA NEWS
July 25, 2013 The Regional News 3A
By Chris Schultz
cschultz@lakegenevanews.net
The police-school liaison ofcer posi-
tion will continue at Badger High School
next year, but when staff or students go to
the liaison ofcers station in the school
theyll be greeted by a new face.
Ofcer Kara Richardson will be patrol-
ling the halls at Badger and answering calls
to other schools starting the 2013-14 school
year.
Richardson, a six-year veteran of the
Lake Geneva Police Department, is taking
over for Ofcer Ralph Braden who retired
earlier this month.
Police Chief Michael Rasmussen said
Richardson was one of two candidates who
vied for the position. The two candidates
were interviewed by both the Badger High
School Board and by ofcers in the depart-
ment and Richardson came out on top, he
said.
The liaison position is funded half by the
police department and half by the school,
Rasmussen said.
I always wanted to work with juve-
niles, Richardson said. I think its impor-
tant to have a positive rst encounter with
a child. Its important that children know
that the police are there to help them.
There are differences in how police of-
cers are received in the different schools.
Walk into an elementary school, and
everyone loves you, she said.
In middle school, the kids might still
respect police ofcers, but theyre more
standofsh.
At the high school level, the uniform
earns you nothing. The liaison ofcer earns
his or her respect, Richardson said.
The school teaches academics, Rich-
ardson said. The school liaison teaches
life lessons. Because once they leave those
walls (of the high school) things are a little
harsher.
In accepting the position, Richardson
had to make a commitment of four to six
years. She said she hopes she goes the full
six years.
Richardson said she shadowed Braden
for six weeks starting in April, as he
patrolled the high school and interacted
with the students.
After two weeks, I was smitten, she
said.
Richardson said shes already orga-
nizing her paperwork for her move to the
liaison ofcers station in the high school,
scheduled for early September.
Once the department had two liaison
ofcers, one in the K-8 grades and the other
in the high school
But shrinking revenues limits the dis-
trict and police department to just one liai-
son ofcer, the one at the high school. Rich-
ardson said she will be called to the other
schools if a situation arises, but her main
ofce will be at Badger.
While gangs are no longer as serious
a problem as they were when Braden rst
started the liaison program, they are still a
problem.
But the job always seems to bring up
something new every day, Richardson said.
There are issues with truancy and dis-
orderly students, she said.
Some make bad decisions and use
drugs before they come to school, she
said. It doesnt happen often, but it does
happen.
She said the liaison is kept constantly
busy.
You usually dont get a lot of down
time and quiet time, she said. That means
paperwork must be done piecemeal, with
the ofcer leaving paperwork to deal with
student issues, and then returning to the
paperwork to complete it later.
Multitasking is a must, she said.
Richardson had nothing but praise for
the program Braden has left behind.
Ive been set up fabulously, she said.
She said the safety plans for the Lake
Geneva high school and elementary schools
are ahead of their time.
She said her job will be to maintain the
program and tweak it as needed.
Richardson is a 1999 graduate of Racine
Park High School. She attended the Univer-
sity of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, where she
took courses in accounting. It may seem
a stretch, going from bean counter to cop,
but Richardson said her accounting classes
were intended to get her into the FBI.
Actually, taking the accounting courses
at UWM was aimed at a law enforcement
career.
However, her father later told her that if
she entered the FBI as an accountant, she
would spend her days in an ofce shufing
papers.
Then I realized I dont want to sit
behind a desk all day, Richardson said.
She went to Gateway Technical College in
Racine and earned her certication as a
police ofcer.
Law enforcement runs in her family.
Her father is a retired Racine County
Sheriffs deputy. Her late grandfather was a
sergeant in the Racine Police Department.
Richardson said that when she was
attending police academy at Gateway, one
of the instructors, who was a Lake Geneva
police ofcer, suggested she apply at Lake
Geneva as a reserve ofcer.
Once she graduated from the academy,
Richardson said, she applied at the Racine
Police Department, but she also applied at
Lake Geneva.
And she hoped to get the Lake Geneva
position.
I didnt want to stay in Racine, Rich-
ardson said. I wanted to be in a more rural
area.
She said that when Lake Geneva offered
her a fulltime police position, she jumped
at the chance.
Richardsons parents are Ronald and
Christiana Eckert of Racine.
She is married to Brad Richardson, who
is chief information ofcer for Platinum
Systems, a computer networking company
in Kenosha. The Richardsons live in Linn
and have an 8-year-old son.
Richardson to step in as school liaison
Its important that
children know that
the police are there
to help them, Kara
Richardson, the new
Badger Liason ofcer.
For now, Hablesma
identies the next two
weeks as very important.
The new carpeting and
ceiling will be installed. In
mid-August, Eastview will
get new furniture.
The heavily-talked
about new gym will mirror
Star Center Schools gym
and will seat 350 people,
said Hablesma.
The addition will com-
plement the new intramu-
ral sports program. East-
view students will have the
opportunity to participate
in basketball, track, cross-
country and volleyball.
Its not just Hablesma
who is excited for the
coming school years new
offerings.
Central Denison prin-
cipal Betsy Schroeder
said the transition will be
an improvement for both
schools and provide greater
opportunities for collabo-
ration and instructional
improvement.
Eastview
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1A
Carson and Barnes is a traveling circus
with shows scheduled every day during the
next three weeks in Wisconsin and Iowa.
The day of the circus, a crew of more
than 100 will park 26 semi-trailers to begin
the transformation of airport to a circus.
The public is invited to watch the setup
starting at 9:30 a.m. Visitors will also be
welcomed to the grounds with a free pet-
ting zoo, and camel and elephant rides will
be available.
Tickets are available in advance at Lake
Lawn and other locations in Delavan for
$12 for adults and $6 for children between
the ages of 2 and 11.
Tickets are available the day of the
circus for $16 for adults and $10 for chil-
dren between the ages of 2 and 11. Children
under 2 can attend the show for free. Tick-
ets are valid for either showtime.
Premium box upgraded seating can be
purchased the day of the event. Free park-
ing is available in the adjacent lot to the air-
port.
Circus/Visitors can watch setup
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1A
Domino had watched interviews the
children had with a forensic interviewer
at the Walworth County Child Advocacy
Center
The ofcer had no personal knowl-
edge of any of the alleged offenses, and
simply testied about hearsay statements
in the complaint, the appeal led by the
OBriens attorneys stated. The investiga-
tor admitted that the complaint contained
signicant factual gaps and the incidents
described were only summaries, not ver-
batim accounts.
The defense attorneys representing the
OBriens are Pamela Moorshead of Glen-
dale and Kathleen Stilling of Brookeld.
The Court of Appeals disagreed with the
defense attorneys.
We note that the United States
Supreme Court long ago upheld the issu-
ance of a grand jury indictment when all
of the evidence before the grand jury was
hearsay, the appeal states. As the court
there observed, a rule permitting defen-
dants to challenge indictments on the
grounds that they are not supported by
adequate or competent evidence would
transform the grand jury proceeding into
a kind of preliminary trial to determine
the competency and adequacy of the evi-
dence.
Before the preliminary hearing, the
OBriens moved to preclude hearsay evi-
dence during the hearing, which Judge
John Race denied.
The state also moved to quash a sub-
poena that was issued to one of the victims
in the case.
Race ruled in favor of the state.
During the preliminary hearing, the
OBriens attempted to call one of the vic-
tims, who is now an adult but was a child
during the alleged abuse.
However, during the hearing, Assistant
District Attorney Diane Donohoo argued
that he shouldnt have to testify because
the previous witness, Domino, already had
established probable cause.
OBriens/Only one witness, an investigator, testified at preliminary hearing
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1A
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they took beautiful photos and video which became a great commercial
highlighting my business' strong points. I would highly recommend every
business in the Lakes Area makes a commercial with ReelLifeTV."
Nick Vorpagel (Sales Manager)
Lake Geneva Country Meats
Lake Geneva Country Meats
5907 Hwy. 50 Lake Geneva, WI
262.248.3339
www.lakegenevacountrymeats.com
4A The Regional News July 25, 2013
GENEVA LINN TOWNSHIPS / BLOOMFIELD
Published every Thursday
by the Lake Geneva Printing and Publishing Co.
315 Broad Street, Lake Geneva, WI 53147
Mailing address: Post Office Box 937, Lake Geneva, WI 53147
Phone: 262-248-4444 Fax: 262-248-4476
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wherein the error occurred.
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CITY OF LAKE GENEVA
PARKING LOT RESURFACING
PROJECT NO. TST-13-03
NOTICE TO BIDDERS
OFFICIAL NOTICE TO BIDDERS
Sealed proposals will be accepted by the City of Lake Geneva in the City Clerk's office at
626 Geneva Street, Lake Geneva, until Thursday, August 1, 2013 at 10:00 A.M. for milling
and resurfacing, including restriping, three (3) downtown parking lots in the Lake Geneva,
WI.
GENERAL:
Proposals must be sealed and submitted on the attached proposal form and returned clear-
ly marked with date and time of opening. No undated, unsigned, or faxed proposals will be
considered.
Bid documents are available by calling the office of the Director of Public Works &
Utilities, 262-248-2311, for pick-up at the Lake Geneva Utility Commission, 361 West Main
Street, Lake Geneva, WI. Copies of bidding documents are available for viewing at the
Commission's main offices or at the City Clerk's office, 626 Geneva Street, Lake Geneva, WI.
Bidders shall complete the enclosed insurance questionnaire with proposal. Requirements
are; Contractor shall furnish evidence of Workers Compensation, public liability and proper-
ty damage insurance. Limits of insurance shall be as follows: Minimum amounts of
$1,000,000 bodily injury and $1,000,000 property damage including both injury and proper-
ty damage caused by vehicles and machinery.
Successful bidder shall properly hold the City of Lake Geneva harmless from all damages
occurring in any way by his acts or negligence, or that of his employees, agents or workers.
A current Certificate of Insurance will be required of the successful vendor.
LEGAL PROVISIONS: Letting of the work described herein is subject to the provisions
of Sections 62.15, 66.0901, and 66.0903 of the Wisconsin State Statutes and all applicable
local, state and federal requirements pertaining to public works projects.
PREVAILING WAGE RATES: The project is subject to the Wisconsin State Statutes
which requires all Contractors and Subcontractors to comply with the prevailing wage rates,
hours of labor and hourly basic pay rates in all trades contemplated as determined by the
Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development for a single trade project with a total of
$48,000 or more or a multiple-trade project total cost of $100,000 or more.
If the bid exceeds these amounts, the Contractor would then be required to compensate his
workers per the order.
If a Special Order of the Department of Workforce Development is required, it shall be
obtained by the City and included in the final contract documents. The Contractor would then
be obligated to compensate his workers per the order.
BID SECURITY: No Bid shall be received unless accompanied by a Certified Check, Bid
Bond, Cashier's Check or Money Order equal to at least 5% of the total Bid, payable to the
City of Lake Geneva as a guarantee that if his Bid is accepted, the Contractor will execute and
file the Contract and the Insurance Certificates that are required by the Contract Documents
within the time limit set by the City.
CONTRACT SECURITY: This is expected to be a multiple trade project. If the award
is greater than $100,000, the successful Bidder will be required to furnish a satisfactory
Performance Bond & Payment Bond each in an amount equal to the Contract Price within ten
(10) days after the award of the contract. If the successful Bidder fails, for any reason, to exe-
cute and file such contract and performance/payment bond, the amount of the Check or Bid
Bond shall be forfeited to the City of Lake Geneva as liquidated damages. However, if the
successful bidder's contract amount is less than $100,000, the requirements for per-
formance and payment bonds shall be waived.
BID REJECTION / ACCEPTANCE: The City of Lake Geneva reserves the right to
accept the lowest responsible bid. The acceptance or rejection of any bid submitted is final
and binding on all bidders without recourse by rejected bidders against the City. No Bid shall
be withdrawn for a period of sixty (60) days after the opening of the Bids without the consent
of the City.
Published by authority of the City of Lake Geneva.
BY ORDER OF :JAMES CONNORS, MAYOR
MICHAEL HAWES, CITY CLERK
PREPARED BY: DANIEL S. WINKLER, P.E.
DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS & UTILITIES
CITY OF LAKE GENEVA &
LAKE GENEVA UTILITY COMMISSION
361 W. MAIN STREET
LAKE GENEVA, WI 53147 (T) (262) 248-2311
Five want to be next Linn supervisor
By Steve Targo
steve@lakegenevanews.net
LINN Five people applied to ll the vacant town
supervisor spot, and four of them should be familiar to
those who follow local politics.
On July 17, Town Chairman Jim
Weiss said Allan Polyock, N146 Bissel
Road; Tom Jacobs, N2008 S. Lake Shore
Drive; Bonnie Cornue, W4828 Lakeville
Road; Roy White, N1978 Birches Drive;
and John Larkin, W3675 Hartshorne
Lane, submitted letters of interest for
the supervisors spot formerly held by
Jeanne Allis.
Hopefully, by the end of the month,
well be able to conduct interviews,
Weiss said.
He said he hopes a new supervisor
will be appointed by the time of the regular board meeting
in August.
Of the ve candidates, Jacobs has the most years of
experience. A former longtime town supervisor, his last
stint on the board began in September 2010.
This was after the minor board shakeup following then
town chairman Dave Bollwegs resigna-
tion.
The board had appointed Weiss
who at that time was a supervisor
to ll the chairmans spot. Jacobs was
appointed to ll Weiss supervisor spot.
In December 2010, Jacobs had led a
noncandidacy statement.
Polyock has logged in experience as
a town of Linn chairman and Walworth
County supervisor.
He has sought to return to the town
board several times.
Most recently, Polyock ran against
Allis in the spring 2012 election, but
lost.
Cornue is also a familiar name in
town. She is a longtime Reek School
Board member, having served several
years as its president. Also, she serves
on the towns public parks committee.
White, a member of the towns pro-
tective services committee, also was a
candidate in this springs race for the
supervisors position formerly held by
Terry Woods. White lost to Craig DeYoung.
On Monday, Linn Town Clerk-Treasurer Sue Polyock
said Larkin has not held an elected or appointed position
in town government before.
However, of the ve, Larkin is the only resident of the
north shore region of Linn.
Wheres Allis?
Allis, the sole north shore representative on the Linn
Town Board, resigned in May.
It is with great sadness I am announcing my request to
resign from the town of Linn board as I unfortunately will
no longer be a Linn resident and meet residency require-
ments to be on the board, Allis said in a May 17 email to
town ofcials. My family and I, however, are not moving
far, as we will be residents of Fontana.
Allis was rst elected town supervisor in 2008, suc-
cessfully challenging Christine Jones. She was re-elected
in an uncontested race in 2010, then won her bid for re-
election in 2012.
Previously, she had been vocal about the north shores
desire to improve response times from emergency person-
nel.
Polyock
White
Allis
PLEASE SEE LINN PAGE 5A
50 project progresses without many complaints
By Steve Targo
steve@lakegenevanews.net
GENEVA Ed Brzinski, the administrator at Woods
School, said he was nervous about the Highway 50 proj-
ect.
Theres a difcult trafc situation at pickup time for
us, he said, adding there are quite a few cars at the start
and end of each school day.
Woods School is at the corner of Highway 50 and Snake
Road. Its likely the reason why theres a lot of trafc in that
intersection.
Add to that the concerns over workers tearing up
chunks of road and the Department of Transportation
temporarily reducing the four-lane highway to two lanes,
its understandable that Brzinski would be nervous.
But he had nothing but good news to report last
month.
Weve been fortunate and I think the increased
patience, people driving slower, has certainly helped, Brz-
inski said.
He said he has received no complaints and experienced
no major headaches from the project.
I think being involved with the DOT early on and talk-
ing to them, theyve taken into consideration the needs of
this intersection very well, Brzinski said.
He said the DOT has been communicating with
Woods.
Attempts to obtain comments from Jacob Rosbeck and
Michael Pyrick DOT personnel attached to the project
were unsuccessful by press time.
But its clear the project is progressing.
Recently, the lanes of trafc during the project have
switched from the eastbound to westbound lanes of High-
way 50.
This was announced in statements posted on the web-
sites for the towns of Linn and Geneva, the two communi-
ties in which this four-mile stretch of highway is located.
The DOT is milling and resurfacing the roadway,
adding left turn lanes for median openings and left- and
right-turn lanes at the intersections.
On April 23, DOT project manager Gary Metzer told
the Regional News that drainage culverts and storm sewers
are being replaced as the project progresses.
Metzer also said the project also calls for rebuilding a
1,000-foot stretch of road near Geneva Ridge Resort.
The sight distance will be improved so that when
youre driving along, the road doesnt disappear, he said.
Although Metzer said there should be minimal dis-
ruption, there have been a few trafc accidents.
POLICE REPORTS
PLEASE SEE HIGHWAY PAGE 5A
Weve been fortunate and I
think the increased patience,
people driving slower, has
certainly helped.
Ed Brzinski, administrator,
Woods School
Bloomeld
Bloomeld police
recently reported the fol-
lowing incidents. In most
cases, police did not report
names, ages, or addresses
for anyone involved in these
incidents.
n Several people were
cited after police received
an underage drinking party
call June 16 at 2:35 a.m. at a
Bloomeld Road residence.
One man was cited for
possession of marijuana
and contributing to the
delinquency of a child. Six-
teen people between the
ages of 16 and 19 were cited
for underage drinking.
n Three people received
multiple citations after a
trafc stop June 19 at 2:25
a.m. on Highway 50 at
Eastside Road.
A girl driving the vehi-
cle stopped by police was
cited for possession of drug
paraphernalia, underage
drinking-possession/con-
sumption, curfew violation
and disorderly conduct
with a motor vehicle. A
male subject was cited for
possession of drug para-
phernalia. A girl riding in
the vehicle was cited for
underage drinking and
curfew violation.
n Two people were
arrested June 23 at 2:01
a.m. after a trafc stop on
Highway 12 near Pell Lake
Drive. Police cited a male
motorist for operating
while intoxicated, prohib-
ited alcohol content and
drinking open intoxicants
in a motor vehicle. Police
also arrested a male pas-
senger on a warrant out of
Illinois.
n A male motorist
received three citations and
was picked up on a warrant
after a trafc stop June 9
at 11:57 p.m. at a Lincoln
Drive residence. He was
cited for operating while
intoxicated, operating left
of center, failure to obey
trafc ofcer signal/order
and picked up on a proba-
tion hold.
n Issued citations to a
motorist for possession of
marijuana, driving without
insurance, defective regis-
tration lamps and a defec-
tive passenger side tail light
during a trafc stop July 10
at 11:37 p.m. on Highway H
at Daisy Drive.
n Three male subjects
received citations after a
trafc stop July 4 at 12:58
a.m. on North Lake Shore
Drive near Fitch Lane.
One was cited for oper-
ating an unregistered vehi-
cle and for being a minor
transporting intoxicants
in a vehicle. Another was
cited for open intoxicants
in a vehicle. The third male
subject was cited for under-
age drinking-possession/
consumption.
n A motorist was cited
for third-offense operating
while intoxicated, resisting
arrest and speeding July 14
at 3:32 p.m. on Nippersink
Road near Tombeau Road.
n Police cited a motor-
ist operating while intoxi-
cated, operating left of
center and driving without
insurance July 11 at 2:49
a.m. on Thistle Drive at
Juneau Road.
n A male motorist
received two citations after
a two-vehicle accident June
10 at 3:10 p.m. on Twin
Lakes Road at Highway U.
The motorist was
cited for failure to yield to
the right-of-way from a
stop sign and violation of
instructional permit.
SEE POLICE PAGE 5A
GENEVA LINN TOWNSHIPS / GENOA CITY BLOOMFIELD
July 25, 2013 The Regional News 5A
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Highway/School, town officials have little to report as far as complaints
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 4A
JOHN HALVERSON/
REGIONAL NEWS
IN JUNE, the Highway
50 work was done in the
westbound lane and trafc
was reduced to the east-
bound lanes. Recently, that
changed. Now, highway
trafc travels over the west-
bound lanes, so workers
can mill and resurface the
eastbound lanes.
On June 13, Geneva
Town Clerk-Treasurer Deb
Kirch and Highway Super-
intendent Randy Parker
said they also received a
couple minor complaints,
but both were addressed.
One of the complaints
was that Dummer Drive
was cut open to install a
culvert, but not enough
sand was placed to ll the
gap.
As the start of the next
school year approaches,
Brzinski said he still
remains concerned about
safety.
According to state-
ments on town websites,
the project is expected to
be nished mid-October.
He said they will include
project information in the
welcome back letter that
is sent to parents.
One of the things weve
been trying to do is have
parents avoid making left
turns and have parents use
Snake Road, Brzinski said.
Its a bit of a longer drive,
but its a pretty drive.
Geneva Lake separates the north shore region from the
south shore, which is where emergency personnel are sta-
tioned. In September 2012, Allis said there was confusion
over whether the north shore region was covered.
This was the issue that prompted me to run, she said
previously.
In her May 17 email, Allis mentioned the issue again,
as well as others.
I will continue to keep an interest in the things that we
supported together over the years, (such as) better cover-
age of services for all of Linn residents while supporting
more open space to keep (the town) the friendly and green
community that has made us a unique and close-knit com-
munity. Allis was chairperson of the Harbor Commission
and Public Parks Committee in Linn. She also was co-chair
of the towns Plan Commission.
He pulled his vehicle away from the stop sign, head-
ing east on Twin Lakes, and pulled out in front of a vehicle
driven north on Highway U by a female motorist. Her vehi-
cle struck his, and she suffered back pain from the crash.
She was taken to receive medical treatment.
n The male driver of a Ford Focus was cited for inat-
tentive driving after a two-vehicle accident July 1 at 5:33
p.m. near the intersection of Highway H and Lake Geneva
Highway.
According to police, the Focus driver was traveling
south on Highway H when he looked down at his speed-
ometer and looked up when it was too late. He struck a
gray Honda which was being driven by someone who had
stopped on Highway H while waiting to turn onto Lake
Geneva Highway.
n A male motorist was cited for driving too fast for con-
ditions after a two-vehicle accident June 28 at 5:41 p.m. on
Highway H near Litcheld Road. He was driving a 2007
Toyota southeast on Highway H when he struck a silver
2002 Chevrolet vehicle that was stopped while its female
driver was attempted to turn into a driveway. The Chevro-
let sustained moderate rear-end damage. The Toyota sus-
tained severe front-end damage.
n Police reported a three-vehicle accident June 22 at
5 p.m. at the Nippersink Pro Shop, N1055 Tombeau Road.
Someone driving a red Dodge Intrepid backed into two
other vehicles. Further information was not reported.
n Two appliances were stolen after someone broke into
an unoccupied, for-sale residence between June 5 and 18
on Highway H. According to police, a refrigerator worth
$849 and a stove worth $499 were stolen. There were no
signs of forced entry, but the front door was unlocked when
a real estate agent arrived to show the residence.
n Police are investigating the theft of $174.39 worth of
groceries reported stolen June 17 at 8 a.m. from Lakeside
Woodland home, W913 Washington Ave.
n Police are investigating a complaint reported July 2
at 7:15 p.m. that someone stole $500 from another person
at a Powers Lake Road residence.
n Someone reported suspicious activity July 14 at 11:15
p.m. in the area of Hemlock and Walnut roads. A young
person apparently was seen attempting to enter someones
vehicle. The suspect ed the scene on foot, running north
on Hemlock Road, and did not enter the vehicle.
n Someone damaged a vehicle the evening of June
17 while it was parked at a Florence Road residence. The
damage was done to the front drivers side wheel well.
n Someone took a wallet that contained $20 and a pack
of cigarettes from a vehicle parked at a Cedar Road resi-
dence before July 15 at 9:20 a.m.
n Two scaffolding planks were reported stolen some
time between the evening of July 8 and the morning of July
9 from Huml Storage, N1989 Schaitel Road.
n Someone took a vinyl sign between July 2 and 3 from
property on Highway U near Pell Lake Drive.
Genoa City
n A 19-year-old Lake Geneva man was arrested after
injuring himself in a bike accident June 26 at 1:30 a.m. on
Hunters Ridge Drive at Highland Avenue.
Ismael Escobedo Jr., 1163 S. Wells St., Apt. 4, was
arrested for possession of drug paraphernalia. He ran into
a re hydrant and suffered minor leg injuries.
n Police arrested a 29-year-old Genoa City man after a
domestic abuse call July 4 at 11:18 p.m. in an apartment at
766 Main St.
The man was arrested for resisting/obstructing an of-
cer, disorderly conduct and a warrant.
n Kassandra C. Cussen, 24, Chicago, was cited for inat-
tentive driving and operating while intoxicated June 28 at
12:42 a.m. on Highway 12.
n Two people were cited for theft after an incident July
4 at 6:52 p.m. at a reworks stand at the corner of Ster-
ling Parkway and Walworth Street. Police cited Connor R.
Freise, 19, and Jeremy P. Sachs, 18, both of Crystal Lake,
Ill.
They were arrested for stealing a cell phone that was
inside a vehicle parked near the reworks stand.
n An iPad and its charging cord were reported stolen
June 29 at 1:20 p.m. from a Freeman Street residence.
Police believe the incident occurred between 6:15 and
9:30 a.m. that day, and the front door of the residence was
unlocked.
n Someone broke bow ties off several vehicles parked
in the lot at K&M Auto Sales and Service, 326 Freeman St.,
prior to July 3 at 10:20 a.m. Police believe someone also
used a screwdriver to damage the paint on these vehicles.
n Police are investigating a theft complaint reported
June 27 at 9:50 a.m. at the village hall, 715 Walworth St.
Further information was not reported.
n Someone vandalized a truck prior to July 5 at 7:05
p.m. parked on Wisconsin Street.
Police/Reports from Bloomfield, Genoa City
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 4A
WHATS HAPPENING?
Linn/Supervisor
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 4A
Boat races July 27
GENEVA The Lake Como Cardboard Boat Races will
be Saturday, July 27, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.
As in the past, the event will take place on Lake Como,
near Freddies West End, W4118 Lake Shore Drive.
Facebook.com/LakeGenevaRegionalNews
News You Can Share
6A The Regional News July 25, 2013
GENOA CITY/ BLOOMFIELD/ LAKE GENEVA
Petitioners attorney plans to meet with DAs ofce
By Robert Ireland
RIreland@lakegenevanews.net
GENOA CITY The attorney represent-
ing citizens who circulated a petition
demanding direct legislation plans to meet
with a member of the District Attorneys
Ofce regarding the village boards recent
action to make that effort useless.
On July 11, the village board approved
an ordinance that requires a referendum
election for projects costing more than $2
million. The petition demanded that proj-
ects that cost more than $500,000 be put
to referendum.
Attorney Steven Wassel of Wassel,
Harvey & Schuk LLP, Delavan, is repre-
senting the group that circulated the peti-
tion. On July 18, he said that he wouldnt
be willing to discuss his plans publicly
because of the legal strategy involved.
I advised the village attorney that I
will be meeting with the District Attorneys
Ofce on the matter, Wassel said. I plan
on doing that quickly.
On July 11, Village Attorney Linda Gray
said a petition requiring referendum for
capital improvement projects isnt legal if it
conicts with an existing ordinance.
The petition didnt conict with an
existing ordinance until, on July 11, the
board approved an ordinance requiring
referendums for projects that cost more
than $2 million. The petition was turned
over to the village earlier that afternoon.
Gray didnt return a phone call seeking
comment on Wassels plan to meet with the
District Attorneys Ofce.
A direct legislation petition needs 15
percent of the number of people who voted
in the last gubernatorial election to sign it.
The village clerk has 15 days to certify the
petition. Because the petition wasnt yet
certied, it wasnt valid.
Village President reacts
Village President Bill Antti said the vil-
lage acted with the advice of its attorney,
and he doesnt believe that anything illegal
or improper occurred during the meeting.
We went through with the advice of
our counsel, Antti said. I dont think there
was anything illegal about it. I think what
they were trying to do would have been ter-
rible for the village.
Residents circulated the petition
because of concerns about property taxes
in the village, and because the village cre-
ated subcommittee to study the village
hall.
The subcommittee is looking at either
repairing the existing building, construct-
ing a new village hall or modifying an
existing building to become the new vil-
lage hall. Neither the village board or the
subcommittee has made any ofcial rec-
ommendation.
Antti said the way the petition was
worded, the village would need to receive
referendum approval before obtaining
quotes from engineers and other profes-
sionals. This, he said, would make putting
projects to referendum difcult because
the village typically has to spend money on
engineers to obtain quotes for projects.
He said the village board would have to
guess at costs on the ballot, and hope that
the project doesnt exceed estimates.
It would have been terrible, Antti
said. We couldnt x any roads if they cost
over $500,000 or even if they came close
we couldnt take a chance or we would be
breaking an ordinance.
The petition was circulated by Heidi
Crow. Crow is the daughter of former Vil-
lage President Chuck Schuren, who also
assisted in circulating the petition.
Antti said Schuren was the village pres-
ident when the Tax Increment District was
created, which Antti said is major reason
the villages taxes are as high as they are
now.
It is kind of ironic that he is worried
about taxes now, but not then, Antti said.
I think he probably had good intentions
when he did that, it just didnt work out as
well as he thought.
The TID is scheduled to close this year,
which is expected to lower taxes in the vil-
lage. The timing of the village hall project
has been aligned with the TID closure.
If changes to the village hall are
approved at the same time as the TID
closure, overall village taxes should still
decrease.
I dont like paying high taxes any more
than anyone else, Antti said.
I dont think there
was anything illegal
about it. I think what
they were trying to do
would have been ter-
rible for the village,
Village President Bill
Antti said.
Woman charged in Bloomeld stabbing
A 41-year-old Bloomeld woman is accused of stabbing
her live-in boyfriend in the shoulder with a kitchen knife on
June 23 after the two had been arguing.
Michelle C. Meinen, N1217 W. Lake Shore Dr., faces felony
charges of rst-degree reckless injury and battery, both as
domestic abuse incidents.
If convicted, Meinen faces up to 31 years imprisonment
and $110,000 in nes.
Jonathan P. Giese, 39, was rst transported to Lakeland
Medical Center for treatment, but was own by Flight For Life
to Froedert Hospital, Wauwatosa, after his lung collapsed as
a result of the stabbing, according to the criminal complaint.
After the incident, the Bloomeld Police Department
issued a press release stating police would refer criminal
charges against both Meinen and Giese.
The Bloomeld police referred charges to prosecutors
against Giese for misdemeanor battery and disorderly con-
duct and felony strangulation and suffo-
cation.
As of Tuesday, the Walworth County
District Attorneys ofce hasnt led
charges against Giese.
Meinen is free from custody on a sig-
nature bond.
According to the criminal complaint:
At 9:45 p.m. police responded to the
home after receiving a report of a stab-
bing. The ofcer met Giese in the drive-
way, and Gieses shirt was soaked in
blood. He told police that he had been
stabbed.
The ofcer lifted up Gieses shirt and saw a stab wound
that was about two inches long. Inside of the home, police
spoke to Meinen, who said she used a kitchen knife to stab
Giese.
Meinen told police she had washed the knife, but she
didnt remember which knife she used. Police reported that
Meinen smelled of alcohol and that her eyes were bloodshot
and glassy.
A witness told police that Giese had called him on the
phone. While on the phone with Giese, the witness heard
Giese and Meinen arguing.
The witness also heard Meinen threaten to stab Giese and
Giese reply go ahead and stab me. He then heard Giese say
Augh, as if he was in pain, before he hung up the phone.
Between ve to 10 minutes later, the witness received a call
from Meinen, who said the police were outside and that she
was probably going to jail.
On June 25, Investigator Lori Domino interviewed
Meinen. Meinen said that she and Giese had been arguing.
Meinen said that Giese picked up a pan of out water off of the
stove and threw it across the room.
Meinen said she thought she nicked Giese with the knife.
Meinen
LGRN les open records request
GENOA CITY The Lake Geneva Regional News has led an open records request
for any communications that village ofcials received or sent regarding the village hall
project, direct legislation or the citizens petition for direct legislation.
The open records request was sent to the six village trustees, Village President Bill
Antti and the Village Clerk-Treasurer Claudia Jurewicz.
The request that was sent out July 18 is for all letters and electronic communica-
tions (emails) sent or received by you, (the record custodian), regarding the village hall
project, direct legislation and the citizens petition, the request states. The request is
for any correspondence that occurred between Jan. 1, and July 18.
Former alderwoman concerned about beach refunds
Reserve ofcers get raise
Only two items created discussion at the Lake Geneva
City Council meeting Tuesday night.
One was approval of wages for reserve police of-
cers. These are police ofcers who are used in the summer
to walk or ride bicycles in the downtown and beach areas.
Their raises amounted to 6.5 percent going from $15.36
per hour to $16.36. They hadnt received a pay increase
since 2011. Comparable positions from other communities
were used to support the increase.
There was also a question raised during the public com-
ment period by former city councilwoman Mary Jo Fesen-
maier. She was concerned about an item in the monthly
expenses of $14,081 for beach refunds. She wondered if
proper bookkeeping procedures had been followed.
City Administrator Dennis Jordan explained that
refunds are for people who put bills into the beach kiosks
that are larger than the amount they owned.
For instance, if they put in a $20 bill for a $7 beach
pass, theyre owed $13. The kiosks dont make change,
so users receive a receipt saying how much theyre owed.
They redeem that receipt for the balance when they enter
the beach. All receipts are kept as are a calculation of how
many people enter the beach area, Jordan said.
Former city council person Terry ONeill echoed Fes-
enmaiers concerns about the beach issue during his turn
during the open comment period.
He also repeated previous concerns relating to the
Peller property. Peller Investments Inc. and Lake Geneva
recently settled a special assessment case involving the
Edwards Boulevard extension. In March 2012, Walworth
County Judge James Carlson ruled that the city has
improperly assessed the Peller property.
ONeill indicated that no one was ever held responsible
for such problems.
I dont expect any action on this nor do I expect it to
be reported in the newspaper, he said.
Facebook.com/LakeGenevaRegionalNews
News You Can Share
VON BERGENS COUNTRY MARKET
The Place Where You Can See It Growing
~ HOMEGROWN VEGETABLES
Celebrating Our 34th Year!
Our Own Sweet Corn is In!!
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8:30 a.m.-6:00 p.m.
2 1/4 miles east of Hebron
Quality Fruit Also Available
Call For All
Your Freezing &
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GREEN BEANS FOR
CANNING OR FREEZING
TOWN OF LINN FIRE / EMS
43rd ANNUAL
PIG & CORN ROAST
SUNDAY, AUGUST 11th
DONATION
$12 Advance $15 Gate $8 Children
Plenty of Parking Available
Linn Township Residents ~ Firefighters will be
going door-to-door on Saturdays & Sundays
Selling tickets.
Proceeds from this event will help in the purchase of a AED
for Reek School and benefit the Burn Camp for Kids.
Stop by to See The Walworth
County Smokehouse
Just off South Lakeshore Dr. on Hillside &
Willow Road at Firemans Park.
~ Serving from Noon until Sold out or
Until 5:00 p.m.
Tickets are available from any Linn Fire/EMS
member, Zenda Town Hall and all
participating businesses.
KIDS
ACTIVITIES
T-SHIRT
RAFFLES
CRAFT
FAIR
MUSIC
GENOA CITY DAYS
AUGUST 2nd, 3rd, 4th
Hosted by the Genoa City Lions Club
KIDS GAMES INFLATABLES BINGO LIVE MUSIC MUD BOGS
FOOD & DRINK 20THANNUALHARLEY-DAVIDSON RAFFLE
31st Annual
Free
Admission
For More Information Go To: www.genoacitylions.org
At Veterans Park Fellows Rd. & Hwy. H
in Genoa City, Wisconsin
FUNdraiser of the Year
FOLLOW
YOUR
DREAM
Free
Parking
FRIDAY, AUGUST 2
ND
5:00 p.m. Genoa City Days Begins
Pig Roast Hosted by First Congregational Church
Ruthie the Singing DJ Hits of Yesteryear
6:00 p.m. BINGO with $$ Prizes at the North Shelter
8:00 p.m. The Fairlanes Band with Walworth County Idol winner,
Alyssa Montes de Oca
SATURDAY, AUGUST 3
RD
8:00 a.m. Lions Club Blood Drive Call Lee Swenson at
(262) 279-3316 for an appointment
12:00 p.m. Genoa City Days Parade
1:00 p.m. Ruthie the Singing DJ Hits of Yesteryear
Lakeland Animal Shelter Barnyard Babies & Storytime
(On the 1/2 hour)
KIDDIE TRACTOR PULL(Kids under 100 lbs.) Hosted by
the S. E. Wisconsin Antique Power &Collectibles Society
2:00 p.m. Frankie Miglio Vegas Stylist
5:00 p.m. BINGO with $$ Prizes at the North Shelter
7:00 p.m. Rock Central
8:00 p.m. THE CHASINGAMY BAND
SUNDAY, AUGUST 4
TH
9:00 a.m. Ecumenical Service First Congregational Church
9:30 a.m. 3rd Annual Pauline Parker Memorial MUD BOGS
Registration at the Park
11:00 a.m. Peter Guerin One Entertainer, Many Shows
1:00 p.m. 3rdAnnual PaulineParkerMemorial MUDBOGSEvent Begins
BINGO with $$ Prizes at the North Shelter
2:00 p.m. The Fairlanes Band
Nippersink Resort Alumni Reunion
7:00 p.m. 20TH ANNUAL HARLEY-DAVIDSON RAFFLE
*SCHEDULE SUBJECT TO CHANGE*
TOWN OF LINN
July 25, 2013 The Regional News 7A
Discover Wisconsin visits Black Point
By Jade Bolack
JBolack@lakegenevanews.net
TOWN OF LINN Nearly everything
inside the Black Point estate is original.
The furniture, the pictures and the exterior
paint colors.
The historical site has a new director,
though, with backing from the state.
David A. Desimone was selected ear-
lier this year to direct operations on the
grounds. In January, the state Histori-
cal Society assumed responsibility for the
estate.
Hes now overseeing tours and making
sure all the artifacts within the house are
cataloged and cared for.
Desimone will also be showcasing the
estate on an episode of Discover Wiscon-
sin, a public broadcasting radio and televi-
sion show touring Wiscon-
sins landmarks.
A lm crew from Dis-
cover Wisconsin was at the
estate July 15.
Mariah Haberman, a host
on the show, said the episode
wont air until next June.
Black Point is one of the
four featured historical sites
the show is doing in the next
season, she said. It takes
almost that whole year for us
to process the video and produce it.
Black Point was chosen, she said,
because of its uniqueness.
We wanted sites that were really dif-
ferent and unique, Haberman said. This
episode will be part of our 27th season,
and well be touring more than 50 destina-
tions, our biggest year ever.
Black Point history
The house was built in 1888 by a beer
magnate, Conrad Seipp. Originally, the
house was just a summer cottage. Seipp
moved much of the familys furniture from
their Chicago residence while building a
new home there.
That furniture is still at Black Point.
The family kept it and added to it.
The property passed into the owner-
ship of the state of Wisconsin in 2006,
when William Petersen, a Chicago attorney
and descendant of Conrad Seipp, signed
the property over to the state.
Public tours of the property began in
June 2007.
Until January of this year, a board of
directors oversaw the operations. This
year, the Wisconsin Historical Society took
over.
Big plans
Desimone said he wants to create more
tour options for the estate.
Plans are in the works to augment
the base tour (the existing boat ride and
grounds tour) with specialty tours like an
architectural tour or a garden tour, he
said. Id also like to create packages with
other historical sites around the lake.
Currently, the tour is
only available by taking a
boat ride from Lake Geneva
and climbing 120 stairs. The
boat ride cuts vehicle trafc
around the estate, but it also
limits the number of visitors
to the site.
Desimone said he thinks
the backing of the state his-
torical society is already
helping increase boat trafc
to the estate.
Theres a higher level of support for
public relations and curators, he said.
The weight of the state historical society
is a pretty good benet for Black Point.
The site has already seen increased
numbers this season.
June 2013 had double the attendance
from the previous June, Desimone said.
The state has seen some publicity in the
New York Times and other media outlets.
Theres also a picture of it on the current
issue of At the Lake magazine.
Desimone said the estate is on-track to
beat previous July records as well.
He likes the way the boat ride trans-
fers people into the tour. The ride allows
people to relax, to really visualize what it
was like when the family lived here, to go
back in time, he said.
JADE BOLACK/REGIONAL NEWS
MARIAH HABERMAN, co-host of Discover Wisconsin, lms part of the shows feature on
Black Point before boarding the Geneva Cruise Lines Yacht Geneva.
Do the guests sit on the original furniture?
According to a docent at
the estate, not all of the fur-
niture on the houses deck is
original.
When William O.
Petersen, the great-grand-
son of the original builder,
decided to donate the house
and grounds to the state, he
asked the state to keep the
wicker furniture on the deck
for tour guests.
At rst, the state refused,
saying the chairs needed to
be preserved.
Petersen bought some
new chairs in the same
style.
He spray painted all the chairs the same color and asked state ofcials to tell
him the difference. Ofcials were unable to tell the difference.
Petersen got his wish.
The green chairs are still on the deck, welcoming tour guests to the home.
JADE BOLACK/REGIONAL NEWS
NOT ALL THE WICKER CHAIRS Black Point guests
sit in are originals, but some are. Former owner Bill
Petersen painted originals and newer chairs the same
color, so no one could tell them apart.
This episode will
be part of our 27th
season, and well be
touring more than
50 destinations, our
biggest year ever,
Mariah Haberman,
co-host of Discover
Wisconsin, said.
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8A The Regional News July 25, 2013
LAKE GENEVA NEWS
By Chris Schultz
cschultz@lakegenevanews.net
The private-public partnership program started in Lake
Geneva earlier this year is intended to expand to other com-
munities in Walworth County, said Lake Geneva Fire Capt.
John Peters, who is also head of the citys emergency manage-
ment.
And it appears its starting to attract attention.
The goal of the public private partnership is to increase
communications between businesses and emergency ser-
vices, including police, re and ambulance medical services.
During the June 19 meeting, businesses from Elkhorn
and Delavan were present, as was a police ofcer from Elk-
horn.
Elkhorn Police Chief Joel Christensen said, however, that
the ofcer was there primarily to learn more about the Nixle
program, which the Lake Geneva Police Department is using
to post public safety updates on residents mobiles and com-
puters.
Obviously, we would like to do more, Peters said in a
recent interview. The bigger picture has always been to make
it countywide.
Peters said growth of the program to outside Lake Geneva
was the goal from the beginning when he rst met with Ben
Schliesman from the state emergency management and Wal-
worth County Sheriffs Lt. John Ennis to set up the program.
Im always about partnering, because thats how we win,
he said.
Peters said hes based the Lake Geneva program on one
that Kenosha County has since created.
The group now has a steering committee made up local
business people.
Tammy Carstensen, manager of Harbor Shores, chairs
the partnerships steering committee.
She said she appreciates the increased communication
between emergency services and businesses.
Hopefully, we will all be a step ahead, Carstensen said.
I hope we will all be better informed. We need to be pre-
pared.
At the public/private partnerships meeting last month
at the Riviera, preparedness was a major issue, especially to
deal with extreme circumstances.
Mitch Ross, Milwaukee police ofcer and a liaison with
Milwaukees federal Intelligence Fusion Center, presented
information about remaining safe from workplace violence,
in particular, active shooters and bomb threats.
Active shooters are rare here and terrorism, domestic and
otherwise, almost unheard of, said Ross.
That doesnt mean local businesses and residents shouldnt
be aware that these things may happen, he added.
Active shooters range in age from 11 to senior citizen, said
Ross. Their motivations are many and varied, personal, psy-
chological, nancial, political and even religious.
And there is no way to predict who will be an active
shooter until the person starts shooting, he said.
The three basic rules for an active shooter are:
n Evacuate the building.
Have an escape route and plan in mind and leave your
belongings behind.
n Hide. If you cant evacuate, hide in an area out of the
shooters view. Block entry to your hiding place. Lock the
doors if possible.
n Fight, but only if you cant hide or run away.
This is a last resort and only if your life is in danger.
Ross said that if those threatened by an active shooter need
to ght, make every attempt to incapacitate the shooter. Act
with extreme aggression and assault the shooter by throwing
things or using heavy objects as bludgeons, he said. There is
no such thing as ghting fair.
Also at the meeting were Milwaukee bomb squad mem-
bers ofcers Dan Thompson and Mick Chemlick.
While bombings are infrequent in Walworth County,
bomb threats are made occasionally.
Thompson said if the bomb threat is called in, keep the
person on the line get as long as possible to get as much infor-
mation as possible. Determine whether the caller is male or
female. Notice whether the person speaks with an accent.
Listen whether background noise can be heard.
If the threat is emailed, keep the email.
Keep an eye out for suspicious packages and letters.
Tell-tale signs are stains on the package from something
leaking inside, misspelled names on the address, too much
postage, sounds coming from inside the package, no return
address and no postmark.
If you identify a suspicious package:
n Do not touch or attempt to open the suspicious pack-
age or letter. Do not cover the package. Bomb squad members
want to see what theyre dealing with.
n Dont try to open the item for a peek.
n If the item is suspected to be a bomb, do not use a cell
phone or two-way radio near it. Call police on a land line.
n If the item is believed to contain poison or a contami-
nant, keep it away from windows, doors, fans or vents.
n If evacuation of the building is in order, make sure
everyone uses an exit as far away from the package as pos-
sible.
Lake Geneva Police Lt. Ed Gritzner said police will work
with businesses to set up emergency plans to deal with active
shooter situations and suspicious packages and mail.
The term fusion center may make some think of the
movie Back to the Future, or some other science ction ref-
erence.
But after 911, the newly-created Department of Homeland
Security determined that law enforcement agencies from local
to federal were not communicating in any meaningful way.
The centers are communications exchanges, said Mitch
Ross, Milwaukee police ofcer and a member of Milwaukees
federal Intelligence Fusion Center.
A total of 78 fusion centers were created around the U.S.
to allow law enforcement agencies to communicate on a
national scale.
Each state has at least one center, Ross said.
One of the keys to preventing crime are suspicious activi-
ties reports, or SARs, he said About 80 percent of the crimes
prevented are stopped by people who contact their local
police to report something that seems odd, out of place, or
downright suspicious.
Ross said authorities are urging people who see something
suspicious to say something, even if it isnt a 911 situation.
It may take a while, but authorities can use that informa-
tion to keep crimes from happening or solve old crimes, he
said.
Ross said Wisconsin is home to two fusion centers. one
in Madison and one in Milwaukee.
Municipal, state and federal emergency services agencies
can now share information about dangerous situation, suspi-
cious individuals and locally unsolved crimes, Ross said.
Those who see suspicious activity, but not necessarily ille-
gal, should call, toll free, (877) 949-2824.
For more information, or to le an online report, go to
www.wiwatch.org.
Will public, private parternship go countywide?
Fusion centers gather information
on suspicious activities
Wisconsin home to two terrorist attacks
Anyone who thinks acts of terror or manmade
disaster cant happen here, keep in mind that before
the Murrah building bombing of 1995 and the
World Trade Center attack of Sept. 11, 2001, the
Badger state was home to two of the worst act of
domestic terrorism.
In terms of how not to handle a suspicious pack-
age believed to be a bomb, what happened to the
Milwaukee Police Department on Nov. 24, 1917,
should stand as an object lesson.
A social worker found a large, suspicious pack-
age next to an evangelical church in the citys Third
Ward.
The woman dragged the package into the church
basement and called the church janitor.
The janitor took the package to Milwaukees
central police station.
The desk sergeant was showing it to the shift
commander just before a scheduled inspection
when the black powder bomb exploded, killing
nine police ofcers and a civilian.
No one claimed credit. Historians years later
would trace the bomb to a group of anarchists who
were angered by sermons preached by the pastor of
the church where the bomb was found.
For 85 years, it was the single most fatal event in
national law enforcement history.
It would only be surpassed 85 years later by the
Sept. 11, 2001 World Trade Center terrorist attacks
when 72 law enforcement ofcers representing
eight different agencies were killed.
At 3:42 a.m. on Aug. 24, 1970, a bomb inside a
1960 Ford van detonated, devastating Sterling Hall
on the University of Wisconsin campus, damaging
about ve square blocks killing one and injuring
three others.
During the Vietnam War, a part of Sterling Hall
at the University of Wisconsin was occupied by
the Army Mathematics Research Center (AMRC), a
Pentagon-funded think tank.
The stolen Econoline van was lled with about
2,000 pounds of ammonium nitrate and fuel oil.
Pieces of the van were found on top of an eight-
story building three blocks away.
Killed was Richard Fassnacht, who was not a part
of the AMRC. He was a postdoctorate researcher
working on superconductivity in the physics depart-
ment, which was also housed in Sterling. He left a
wife, son and twin daughters.
The three injured men were Paul Quin, also a
physics researcher; David Schuster, a South African
graduate student; and Norbert Sutler, a UW secu-
rity ofcer. Schuster was the most seriously injured,
having been buried in the rubble of Sterling Hall for
three hours before being rescued.
Also destroyed were irreplaceable records of a
quarter century of research and experiments done
on the nature of atomic nuclei.
Despite the damage, the bomb missed the
AMRC, which lost only a days worth of work.
Total damage to the university came to $2.1 mil-
lion (1970 dollars).
Of the bombers, Karleton Armstrong, Dwight
Armstrong and David Fine were all tracked down
and arrested within six years of the bombing and
were sentenced to federal prison terms. All have
since been released. The fourth bomber, Leo Burt,
has never been caught.
Nearly a quarter century later a massive bomb,
similar but more powerful than the Sterling Hall
bomb, destroyed the Alfred P. Murrah federal build-
ing in downtown Oklahoma City.
That bomb was so powerful it claimed 168 lives
and injured more than 680, damaged 324 build-
ings and destroyed 86 vehicles within a 16-block
radius.
Damage was estimated at $652 million (1990s
dollars).
White supremacist Timothy McVeigh, who was
also an Army veteran, was arrested, convicted and
executed for the crime.
Stressing the importance of offering nutritious meals to
children during the summer months, the Lake Geneva Joint
One School District announces the sponsorship of the Summer
Food Service Program.
The Summer Food Service Program (SFSP), which is funded
by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and is admin-
istered by the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction,
provides nutritious meals to children during the summer, when
free and reduced-price school meals are typically unavailable.
Free meals will be made available to children 18 years of age
and under. Persons over 18 years of age who are determined
by a state or local public educational agency to be mentally
or physically disabled and who also participate in a public or
private non-prot school program during the regular school
year may receive free meals as well.
The following locations will be serving the free meals from
August 5 through August 23:
Star Center Elementary School
W1380 Lake Geneva Hwy, Lake Geneva, WI
Eastview Elementary School
535 Sage Street, Lake Geneva, WI
Central-Denison Elementary School
900 Wisconsin Street, Lake Geneva, WI
Breakfast will be served from 9:00 a.m. to 9:30 a.m.
Meals are provided to eligible children regardless of race,
color, national origin, age, gender or disability, and there will
be no discrimination in the course of meal service.
This program lls a void created when school lunches are
not available, said Ms. Donna Ecklund, School Food Service
Coordinator. Helping parents meet the nutritional needs of
their children is the strength of the program.
To le a complaint of discrimination, write the USDA, Director, Ofce of Civil Rights
(Ofce of Adjudication), 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington , D.C.
20250-9410 or call toll free (866) 632-9992 (Voice). TDD users can contact USDA
through local relay or the Federal Relay at (800) 877-8339 (TDD) or (866) 377-
8642 (relay voice users). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer.
For More Information, Please Call (262) 348-1000 ext.1015

LAKE GENEVA SCHOOLS


SUMMER BREAKFAST FEEDING PROGRAM
Tuesday, July 30
Seatings at 5, 6 & 7 p.m.
$10 adults $5 children 10 & under
tips & drinks extra
Tickets available from Side by Side members, Simple, or at the door.
FUNDRAISER
525 Broad St.
Lake Geneva, Wis.
simple
COMUNICADO DE PRENSA - EL PROGRAMA
DE SERVICIO DE COMIDA PARA EL VERANO.
(Para patrocinadores que no son campos y que establecieron el programa de
elegibilidad por rea geogrca.)
Insistimos la importancia de ofrecer comidas nutritivas a
nios durante los meses de verano, Donna Ecklund, anuncia
la patrocino del Programa de Servicio de Comida de Verano.
El Programa de Servicio de Verano (SFSP), que fue fondeado por
el Departamento de Agrucultura de los EEUU (USDA) y es admin-
istrado por el Departamento de Instruccin Pblico de Wisconsin,
provee comidas nutritivas a los nios durante el verano, cuando
tpicamente las comidas gratis o reducidas no estn disponsibles.
Comida gratis va estar disponsible para todos los nios de 18 aos
o menos. Personas mas de 18 aos que estn determinados por el
estado o agencia pblica de educacin en ser incapacitado mental
o sicamente y que tambin participa en un programa escolar
privado o pblico sin nimo de lucro durante y ao escolar regular-
mente puede recibir comida gratis tambin.
Las localizaciones siguientes van a servir comidas gratis
este verano. Desde el 5 de agosto hasta el 23 de agosto,
2013, de las 9:00 de la maana hasta las 9:30 de la
maana en las escuelas de:
Star Center Elementary School
W1380 Lake Geneva Hwy, Lake Geneva, WI
Eastview Elementary School
535 Sage Street, Lake Geneva, WI
Central-Denison Elementary School
900 Wisconsin Street, Lake Geneva, WI
La comida se provee a nios elegible a pese a raza, color, origen
nacional, edad, sexo o incapacidad, y no va ver discriminacin
en el curso del servicio de comida.
Este programa llena el vacio creado cuando almuerzos esco-
lares no estn disponsibles, dice Donna Ecklund. Ayudando
a padres lograr las necesidades nutritivas para sus nios es una
fuerza de esta programa.
Para presentar una denuncia de discriminacin, escriba USDA Director, Ofce of
Civil Rights (Ofce of Adjudication), 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington
, D.C. 20250-9410 or llame gratis a (866) 632-9992 (Voz). Los que usan TDD
pueden contactar USDA con un rel o el Rel Federal a (800) 877-8339 (TDD) o
(866) 377-8642 (voz de rel). El USDA es un empleador que cree en la igualdad de
oportunidades y sus empleados.
Para Ms Informacin, Llame Al (262) 348-1000 ext.1015

Most people run out of a re.


We run in.
LAKE GENEVA NEWS
July 25, 2013 The Regional News 9A
Story and photos by John Halverson
jhalverson@lakegenevanews.net
LINN The flames were real. The heat was real
up to 400 degrees.
The terrain was the inside of a burning house. Its
treacherous, especially when youre looking through a
gas mask.
The suit youre wearing isnt the kind you wear with
a tie. Its heavy. Everything included, the firefighters are
probably carrying about 300 pounds.
Youd better be able to take orders, too.
You get dressed up in something that resembles a
space suit, feel the heat, risk the terrain and the fire, to
get yelled at.
GET EM IN THERE! GET EM IN THERE!, Grant
Winger Jr. yells.
Winger is the assistant fire chief of the volunteer
fire department for the Town of Linn.As the operations
officer for a controlled burn Saturday, he was the one
barking orders to about 35 firefighters from Linn, Lake
Geneva, Whitewater, Hebron, Fontana and Sharon.
This is just a practice.
A fire drill, but with real fire. Its one fire depart-
ments relish because its difficult to get through the
bureaucracy and paperwork that allows people to donate
their homes to be burned down.
It was practice, but everyone acted like it was real.
For a lot of the firefighters, this is the first real fire
theyve experienced.
They went in in waves, four or five in each one.
They huddle at the door of the house, poised like
paratroopers about to jump from a plane.
When they go theres no exact blueprint. Sure, theyve
been trained. Sure, they know the theory. But they dont
know exactly what theyll face. Nor can you be sure how
youll react if something unexpected happens.
Onlookers were everywhere. On the porches of nearby
homes, on the shoulders of parents. Everyone seemed to
have a camera. Everyone was kept out of harms way.
I was lucky enough to get a closer view. From inside
the burning house.
Safety still came first. Winger was at my side along
with two other aspiring firefighters, one his daughter.
Winger strung a hose inside just in case the flames
got too close for comfort.
Get down, he told us, explaining the heat comes in
layers, the hottest is near the ceiling.
He yelled: Fire it up!
Theres a fire in the hole, someone yelled.
Fire in the hole, Winger repeated into his radio.
Thats when Winger bellowed his orders.
GET EM IN!
A stairway door in front of us filled with flames. The
firemen burst through the front door, hoses in tow, and
headed toward it.
You could hear a flurry of activity in the floor above
us. The smoke cut into our throats and eyes.
After a few minutes, were told an upstairs room
might be becoming less stable and Winger orders us
out.
Back in the fresh air, I was sweating, coughing from
the little smoke Id inhaled. Grants mother, Georgie, a
member of the Auxiliary, offered me water.
In front of the house, the firefighters we saw go in
came out. Theyd seen the worst of it.
They knelt down in a circle, seemingly exhausted,
heads down like they were praying. When they took their
masks off, you could see they were sweating profusely.
Eventually, everyones had their turn going in. Learn-
ing what there was to learn.
The house continues to burn as hoses from the fire
trucks go into action. Hoses wrap like snakes from all
directions, surrounding the house. There are trucks in
front of the house and from on high a spray of water
floats down from a ladder truck.
They spray the roof of a nearby home, too, and the
fire trucks nearest the blaze. Let it burn, but take pre-
cautions.
Eventually, the house crumbles, in stages, like a
house of cards.
Obviously, fire can be a tragedy, but it cant help but
quicken the pulse.
Rhonda Baumann is studying to be a firefighter at
Gateway.
I always wanted to do this, she said.
This was her first real fire. She called the experience
absolutely fabulous.
Every fire is different, says Wingers 71-year-old
father, Grant Sr., whos a pump operator. He was wiping
sweat from his bald head as we talked.
But, he added. It doesnt matter how many times,
youve done it, you get in and the adrenaline flows.
You never know how much you know until it hap-
pens, explained another fire fighter, Ray Boro. Then
the training takes over.
Just as Im leaving I run into Augie Wojcik and the
day came full circle.
He was in charge of setting the fire in the first
place.
Like Winger, it seems firefighting runs in the
family.
Wojciks grandfather and father were both firemen.
He has a photo of himself with his father, both posing
in the boots of a fireman.
Now Wojcik has a similar photo of his 7-year-old
son. And after this practice burn, Wojcik headed to the
hospital. Another son was born the night before.
Wojcik plans to pose him as a fireman, too.
A firefighters shoes cant be filled by everyone, but
those who do fill them take pride in it.
Well leave Linn firefighter Mike Schaid, volunteer
fireman with the last word.
Most people run out of a fire, he said. We run in.
Even if its just practice.
FIRE IN THE HOLE!
Entering a burning house a dangerous way to spend a Saturday
A FAMILY PORTRAIT. When the days practice is done all the reghters pose for a group photo.
SMOKE AND FLAMES are the reghters constant companion even when they practice.
10A The Regional News July 25, 2013
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Lake Geneva REGIONAL NEWS
Thursday, July 25, 2013
DOT makes decision on Highway 14
By Jade Bolack
JBolack@lakegenevanews.net
WALWORTH The decision has been
made. The DOT has announced its decision
on the path Highway 14 will take through
the village.
The antique store will be gone, along
with two houses on the east side of the
southern half of Main Street.
School district safety concerns remain
unresolved.
Though the nal plans are made, con-
struction isnt set to begin until 2020.
According to a map created by the DOT,
instead of trafc driving around the square,
highway trafc will ow in north and south
on the west side of the square, where the
current southbound trafc ows.
Walworth School Board President Kelly
Freeman said she still isnt happy with the
DOTs decision.
It lacks such common sense to me
that you move a federal highway closer to a
school, she said at the July 18 board meet-
ing. I just cant imagine.
Freeman said the map was released by
the DOT at a special meeting July
10.
We met at the Fontana Village
Hall, she said. The village board
was represented by the president
... the chamber was there. Our
Walworth task force was well rep-
resented.
The DOT expected school
board members to be happy with
the decision, Freeman said.
There was also an aside
that the school would be happy
because they were moving the
highway 15 feet farther away (from
the school), she said. Instead
of 38 feet, its going to be 53 feet
(away).
Other schools in the county
face similar situations.
Part of (the DOTs) rational is
that Highway 14 is within 49 feet
of the Darien school, Freeman
said. Well, they didnt move the
highway. They built that school
around the highway. Its not the same thing
at all.
Bypass still not an option
I think its fair to say that
(everyone) wanted the bypass,
Freeman said. Everybody is in
agreement with this. The state
said thats not going to happen.
Proposed bypass routes take
semitrailer trafc away from the
village to the west.
They would be using county
trunk K which has already been
upgraded for truck use, Freeman
said. There are already trucks out
there using it.
Another concern is the busi-
nesses affected by the rerouted
highway.
You can see by the illustration
that one of the problems is in front
of the gas stations over there,
Freeman said. Its a dead end.
Whats going to happen to those
businesses? That was a good ques-
tion that wasnt answered (by the
DOT). Emergency vehicles may
have more trouble moving through the
downtown, too.
Vehicles are going to have to go around
the park (to the west), Freeman said. The
DOT couldnt believe that our police cars
and such go down the wrong way, against
trafc. Well, yes, it happens all the time.
Villages view
Village President David Rasmussen
said he is glad the DOT decided on the
shape of the highway through the village.
The problem is trying to work on the
details when the main concept hasnt been
decided, he said during a phone interview
July 22. There are still a lot of undecided
things about the plan for this, but the main
thing is decided. The shape of the highway
through the village will be that as straight
as possible line.
Rasmussen said he wants to talk with
the DOT engineers.
The Heyer family talks about the
importance of the park that carries
their familys name. Page 2B.
JADE BOLACK/REGIONAL NEWS
SHARON HOSTED the Prairie Cycle Series on July 17. The event was planned as a way to promote the village.
Sharon hosts rst major
cycling event, hopes for more
By Jade Bolack
JBolack@lakegenevanews.net
SHARON After more than a year of planning, Sha-
rons cycling race spun smoothly July 17.
Hosted by the village and coordinated by Prairie Cycle
Series, the village was home to an all-day cycling event.
Starting in the early morning, cyclists rode through
the village and out onto country roads, making loops for
hours.
In the evening, racers started the criterion, a small
loop right in the village.
It was fabulous, Village President Diana Dykstra
said. It was an amazing event. The community really
came together.
Though the trailer that would typically host regis-
tration tables at the race site broke down on the way to
Sharon, the United Methodist Church offered its basement
for registration and as a cooling space.
They made a donation to the church for that, Dykstra
said. It was just a really great thing to be involved with. It
was very exciting.
Shes elded questions about the village since the
event.
We had somebody asking questions about some of
the shops downtown, Dykstra said. We had this idea
of bringing people downtown, and that slowly started to
happen during the race.
To coordinate the whole race, the
village created a steering committee,
which organized vendors to sell on site,
found volunteers and sponsors.
Volunteer race marshals were sta-
tioned throughout the course ensuring
cyclists werent hurt and trafc wasnt
disrupted.
Someone asked me what this actu-
ally does for the village, Dykstra said.
With something like this, you arent
going to see a tangible benet to the
village. Youre going to see a long-term
benet, maybe further development and trafc. Thats
what is going to benet our community.
Dykstra called the race and cycling events an invest-
ment in the community.
When people complain, I refer them back to the
Fourth of July. What does that bring to the village? she
said. When we talk about the money we pay for reworks,
were spending about $8,000. That brings people to the
park, not to our downtown shops. This event costs us about
$3,000, and it brought people into our businesses.
Next years race planning will start soon.
I think this race brings a great deal of publicity and
validity to us being a cycling destination, Dykstra said.
That was our goal: to have people feel, say and believe that
we are the friendliest bicycling community.
Dykstra
PLEASE SEE HIGHWAY 14 PAGE 2B
Freeman
Rasmussen
By Chris Schultz
cschultz@lakegenevanews.net
Monday was a time of change for the Williams Bay
School District.
There was the scheduled, annual budget change
approved for the coming school year by the districts regu-
lar annual meeting.
And there were the changes brought about by circum-
stance.
In a special meeting at 7 p.m., the school board approved
hiring William White as principal of the districts junior-
senior high school and director of district curriculum.
Since 2010, White had been principal and superinten-
dent of the K-8 Brighton School District near Kansasville.
Whites contract runs from Aug. 1 to June 30 and he will be
paid $96,500 a year.
Earlier this month, the district hired Wayne Anderson,
former Mount Horeb School District superintendent, for
$118,000 a year.
At 8 p.m., the board called the districts annual meet-
ing to order to approve a preliminary budget and a pro-
jected property tax rate.
School budget
gets green light
New superintendent, principal hired
PLEASE SEE BUDGET PAGE 3B
Village wants to become a destination for cyclists
Attempted
drug deal led
to shooting
By Jade Bolack
JBolack@lakegenevanews.net
WALWORTH Less than two weeks after Gabriel
Contreras, Walworth, was killed during a drug deal in Mil-
waukee, a 19-year-old Milwaukee man will face homicide
charges for his death.
According to a report from the Milwaukee Journal
Sentinel, Matthew Ray Taylor is charged with rst-degree
reckless homicide and rst-degree reckless injury.
This charge means that the accused did not intend to
cause the victims death, but he did show reckless disregard
for life. The maximum penalty for the homicide charge is
imprisonment for up to 60 years.
The maximum penalty for a rst-degree reckless injury
is 25 years in prison and a $100,000 ne.
Milwaukee police say Contreras and his brother-in-law
were in Milwaukee to buy drugs on the night of July 10.
Contreras brother-in-laws name was not released.
PLEASE SEE SHOOTING PAGE 2B
2B The Regional News July 25, 2013
GENEVA LAKE WEST
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Heyer family worries over park changes
By Jade Bolack
JBolack@lakegenevanews.net
WALWORTH Its kind of what small
towns are all about.
Shirley Heyer, the daughter-in-law of
the parks namesake, isnt too happy about
potential changes to the highway cutting
into her familys park.
Heyer Park sits in the middle of the vil-
lage of Walworth and in the middle of her
familys heart.
It amazes me how many people stop at
that park now, she said. We wont have as
many stopping if they cut up the park (with
the highway). Theyve been talking about
changing the highways for a long time. I
dont know if theyre ever going to.
Jack Heyer, Shirleys husband and son of
Edwin Heyer, said it would ruin the town
if the park was changed too much.
As far as the highway going through
it, that would destroy it, he said. I think
thats terrible. We dont have many parks
anymore.
Edwin Heyer, whose hardware store sat
on the north side of the square, was hon-
ored to have his name attached to the park.
Jack said he was about 50, or 33 years ago,
when the name changed.
I think it was very nice they named
it after my father, Jack said. We had the
hardware store in the square, and he took
care of that park. He just kind of made it his
duty to make sure the park looked nice.
Supplies from the hardware store went
to making sure the park stayed nice.
My dad would always fertilize the park,
Jack said. Hed take bags from the store,
and hed tell me that he had found broken
bags so he put (the fertilizer) in the park. We
knew he didnt nd a broken bag. He just
wanted to make sure the park looked good.
That was his thing.
Jack said Edwin could be found at the
park digging up dandelions or talking to
tourists.
He talked to anyone who would stop,
and theyd carry on for a while in the park,
Jack said.
Shirley said Edwin would share the story
of the park to anyone who would listen.
Hed give them the history of every-
thing, she said. He enjoyed it. He lived in
an apartment above the store, so he didnt
have a lawn of his own. He just took over the
park. He did everything. He complained to
the village if he didnt like what they were
doing.
The family joked that Edwin thought he
owned the park.
Before they named it after him, it was
just called the village park, Jack said. They
didnt really have a name for it. There are a
lot of things that have changed since then,
in and out of the park.
Jack no longer works at the hardware
store, now located on Highway 67 on the
east end of the village.
I gave up working about 10 years ago,
he said.
He gave up seeing the park as often as he
used to, as well.
When the hardware store was there,
we always faced the park, Jack said. We
could see it all year round. We saw the color
changes and everything. In the fall, wed see
these birds y south for the winter. Theyd
always stop in Walworth and ll the trees
in that park.
Jack said the birds got drunk off some-
thing they ate and would stumble around in
the park grass.
They would actually be wobbling
around on the ground, he said. This would
happen once a year. I dont even know what
kind of bird it was. We were just used to
seeing it because it happened every fall.
He doesnt know if the birds still visit
Heyer Park, but he and his wife do, though
the family doesnt live on the square any-
more.
We only live a block from it, Shirley
said. We still go there.
Mary Heyer, Jack and Shirleys daugh-
ter, declined to comment on her familys
history regarding the park. Mary, Walworth
School Board Clerk, said she didnt want
decisions about the park to affect decisions
she makes on the school board.
JOHN HALVERSON/REGIONAL NEWS
HEYER PARKS fountain has been a xture for decades.
When their design
people go in, they design the
road the way theyd want it
to be, as though its a brand
new road, he said. They
just design it based on their
perfect design standards.
Well, they dont always
work.
Many parking spaces
around the square will be
eliminated, based on the
current DOT plan.
Theyre just eliminat-
ing those parking spots that
we have room for, Rasmus-
sen said. They arent really
thinking about our village,
just the perfect model.
Trafc ow on the north
and east sides of the square
isnt ofcially determined
yet.
The map shows angle
parking facing east and
south owing trafc, as
though the DOT wants to
reverse the current ow of
trafc around the square.
People who come
down Main Street have no
way out, Rasmussen said.
They can only make a right
turn at (Kenosha Street).
Youre going to push every-
one through the alley.
Rasmussen said that by
eliminating most left turns,
the DOT causes unintended
consequences.
Theyre banning left
turns, he said. You cant do
that. How do people get out?
People will be trapped.
As for the space where
the antique mall currently
stands, Rasmussen has no
denitive plans.
The state will own that
land, he said. I assume it
will be some parking and
some green space. Wed like
to keep the visibility as open
as possible.
The dead end created on
the section of Main Street
south of Highway 67 isnt
nalized either.
The Geneva Lake West
Chamber raised some con-
cerns about those gas sta-
tions, saying how are people
going to get in there, Ras-
mussen said. Well, the
trafc situation is worse for
them now. When youre in
those gas stations and the
trafc is backed up (south)
to the library, you cant turn
left or right.
The lower volume of
trafc on the dead end street
will allow for easier turns in
either direction onto High-
way 14, Rasmussen said.
Other school news
A rst draft of the 2013-
14 budget was submitted to
the school board.
Karie Bourke, admin-
istrative assistant, said the
district could delay buying
health insurance for its part-
time employees because of a
change in the implementa-
tion time line of the Afford-
able Care Act.
She said this change
reduces the stress on the
districts budget.
Tax payers may see a
tax levy decrease because of
increased state aid, as well.
The school board met
in closed session prior to
the open meeting to discuss
parent complaints that were
submitted earlier this year
and negotiations with the
Walworth teachers union.
Highway 14/They really arent thinking of the village
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1B
Kenosha St
M
a
i
n

S
t
.
M
a
i
n

S
t
.
M
a
d
i
s
o
n

S
t
.
Beloit Rd.
F
r
e
e
m
o
n
t

S
t
.
ES
90 ft.
53 ft.
unplanned area
current road
Key
ES Elementary School
DOT approved road plan
new park space
SARAH SCHAUF
/REGIONAL NEWS
Originally, the two men bought morphine pills. Because
there is a limited demand for morphine pills in Walworth
County, Contreras tried to sell the morphine and buy Pero-
cet. Percocet is a prescription pain reliever.
Contreras and his brother-in-law met Taylor who
reportedly asked what they wanted to buy.
The three men couldnt come to a deal they were all
comfortable with, and Contreras and Taylor both reached
for their guns. Taylor shot both Contreras and his brother-
in-law in the early morning of July 11.
Contreras body was found near the intersection of 15th
Street and W. Keefe Avenue, one block to the northwest of
the shooting. His brother-in-law was shot in the pelvis, but
he survived the shooting.
Police responded to the scene, and a nearby resident
told police a man with a gunshot wound was inside her
home.
Taylor was found with a gunshot wound in his leg.
Shooting/Suspect shot
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1B
POLICE REPORT
Fontana
Two friends were cited
for disorderly conduct for
ghting outside Chucks in
Fontana July 14.
Police were called to the
scene at 1:35 a.m. for medi-
cal assistance. According
to the police report, Conor
Lucas, 25, Chicago, showed
police his cut-up hand.
Lucas said his friend, Sean
Cleary, 22, Madison, had
tried to punch him.
Lucas returned the
punch with a beer bottle
in his hand. Lucas said he
forgot he had the bottle in
his hand when he punched
Cleary.
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JULY26-28
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GENEVA LAKE WEST
July 25, 2013 The Regional News 3B
By Chris Schultz
cschultz@lakegenevanews.net
Experience was a key factor in the Williams Bay School
Boards search for an interim superintendent.
The board may have found it in Wayne R. Anderson, 58.
Anderson served 17 years as superintendent at the Mount
Horeb School District.
Anderson signed a one-year contract with the Williams
Bay district. But, if he and the board get along, I may stay
longer, he said.
The K-12 Mount Horeb district, with 2,350 students, has
seven buildings, which includes ve schools, an administra-
tive building and a bus garage.
The district includes the villages of Mount Horeb and Blue
Mounds and all or part of eight other towns.
While Mount Horeb superintendent, Anderson oversaw
four major building referendums. Under his leadership, dis-
trict voters approved all four referendums, which paid for a
new school, school expansions and upgrades.
All four passed on the rst try, he said.
That kind of experience would be helpful to the Williams
Bay School Board, should it decide to proceed with a referen-
dum to pay for a new elementary school building.
Although Anderson talked with a reporter on July 17, and
he will be at the July 22 annual school district meeting, he
doesnt ofcially start as Williams Bay superintendent until
Aug. 1. Anderson said he grew up in Milltown in northwest
Wisconsin, about 40 miles from Hudson and 60 miles from
Minneapolis-St. Paul.
Anderson said he planned on becoming a minister. He
attended the University of Wisconsin-River Falls from 1973 to
1977 and earned undergraduate degrees in English and his-
tory.
He said he planned to attend seminary after graduation.
I loved preaching and teaching, he said.
But while working as a pastoral intern at a local church,
he found himself attending night meetings and dealing with
church politics.
Anderson said he began to realize he didnt want to deal
with that.
He then took teaching jobs, starting in Blair, Wis., where
he met his wife Susan. They married in 1979.
He returned to UW-River Falls and earned a masters
degree in history in 1981. Anderson then taught in Cassville
in the southwest side of the state for two years, before moving
on to Barneveld. He earned his masters degree in education
administration at the University of Wisconsin in 1985.
Anderson was administrative assistant in Sheboygan for
three years and then moved to Reedsburg in 1988, where he
spent eight years as assistant principal at the high school for
ve years and then as elementary principal for three years. He
also spent his last year in Reedsburg as assistant superinten-
dent in charge of business.
In 1996, he was hired as superintendent of the Mount
Horeb School District. When his fourth Mount Horeb build-
ing referendum was approved two years ago, Anderson said
he planned to stay on until the work on those projects was
completed, and then he would retire.
When I had put in to retire, I thought I was ready to
retire, Anderson said. And I was wrong.
He said he was attracted to Williams Bay which was look-
ing for a person with experience.
Im a strong proponent in having access, he said. Ill
meet with people where and when they feel comfortable.
He said that approach was very benecial during his 17-
year tenure in Mount Horeb.
We may not agree, but Ill listen with an open mind,
Anderson said.
Anderson said he also loves to write, and he will try to
write a regular blog at the school website.
When you work together, you solve a lot of problems, he
said.
He said he taught school nance at the University of Wis-
consin.
Under the states school funding system, there is no way
to know what a school districts revenue stream will be more
than two years in advance, Anderson said.
Weve seen in the past two years how school funding can
change drastically, he said.
Having worked as an administrator in mid-sized districts
with more than 1,000 students, Anderson said hes looking
forward to working in a smaller district
Whats nice, after a while, Ill get to know of the kids and
their parents, he said.
He said he taught in two districts smaller than Williams
Bay, Cassville and Barneveld.
The advantage in a small district is you get to know
everybody, he said.
The Andersons will rent a condo in Geneva National start-
ing in September to be close to the school district. They have
two children.
Daughter Kristin, a vision therapist for CESA II, is mar-
ried to Peter Grendes, business manager for the Deereld
School District.
The Grendes have two young children, Sam and Gordie.
The Andersons son, Erik, is manager of a company called
Do All, which does landscaping, snow removal and building
renovation.
He and his wife, Regina, live in Burnsville, Minn.
Interim superintendent brings experience
About 35 people attended the meeting. White and
Anderson introduced themselves.
Electors at the meeting approved a proposed budget of
$7.68 million on a 29-1 secret ballot.
The districts 2013-14 tax levy is $6.93 million, no
increase over 2012-13 tax levy.
They also approved a proposed tax rate of $6.80 per
$1,000 of equalized valuation, which is the same as last
year. Unless a property owners assessed valuation has
increased over the past year, the owner of a home assessed
at $250,000 will pay $1,700 in school property taxes, the
same as last year.
The difference between expenditures and tax levy will
be made up by other revenues, including state aid (about
$62,000), federal aids (about $140,000), local fees and
payments (about $58,000) payments for open enrollment
students (about $750,000) and a portion of the districts
fund balance.
On voice votes:
n District residents also approved a transportation for
elementary school students who live a mile from school
and for junior and senior high school students live more
than a mile and a half from school.
n School board salaries were approved: $2,700 for the
board clerk; $2,500 for the president and $2,200 for the
other three board members.
White, a Kentucky native, said he was glad to be a part
of the Williams Bay staff. He said hes worked at admin-
istrative levels in the Brookeld, Waukesha and Brighton
school districts.
Anderson said he was ecstatic about being hired as
interim superintendent.
Between meetings, Dianna Woss, school board presi-
dent, said Andersons experience in administration at
Mount Horeb was a major reason the board hired him.
Anderson also has nancial expertise, which the dis-
trict wants to tap into, Woss said.
Everyone I talked to at Mount Horeb said hes honest,
hes ethical and hes outgoing, Woss said. And hes scally
responsible.
On the districts scal end, the preliminary budget
shows revenues of about $7.56 million, meaning expenses
will exceed revenues by $119,023. The district will dip into
its $1.16 million fund balance to cover the difference.
District revenues for 2013-14 increased by about 7 per-
cent over last year, but expenses increased by nearly 14
percent, according to district gures.
The district will levy $559,000 as part of the states
Energy Efciency Exemption. The levy will pay for main-
tenance at the junior-senior high school building, which
will increase energy efciency with the intention of saving
the district in operating costs.
The preliminary budget tax levy is based on the 2012
fall equalized valuation. When the school board certies
the levy in November, the levy will be based on the 2013
fall equalized valuation.
When I had put in to retire, I
thought I was ready to retire,
Wayne Anderson, the interim
superintendent for Williams Bay,
said. And I was wrong.
Budget/Approved 29-1
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1B
CHRIS SCHULTZ/REGIONAL NEWS
A LOT OF CHICKENS were lined up on the roaster for this years Williams Bay Fire Department Chicken Roast on Saturday
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roaster handles 480 chicken halves at a time. The department
had 1,600 chickens on hand. The potatoes were prepared
at nearby Conference Point. The $10 dinner included a half
chicken, coleslaw, whole baked potato, lemonade and a
piece of cake.
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4B The Regional News July 25, 2013
COUNTY REPORT
County extends option to buy parkland
By Robert Ireland
RIreland@lakegenevanews.net
ELKHORN The county extended an option to pur-
chase parkland in Lyons Township on July 9, and the
county administrator will likely include buying the prop-
erty in next years budget.
The county board approved a six-
month option to purchase the land in
February, which was set to expire in
August.
The county is considering buying
195 acres at the intersection of Sheridan
Springs and Short roads to turn it into a
park. The White River meanders through
the property, and there is about 9,200
feet of frontage on the land
The county hopes to receive a Stew-
ardship Grant from the DNR to pay for
half of the $1.91 million purchase price.
Two obstacles have stopped the board
from buying the land in 2013.
We have no indication yet from the
Department of Natural Resources as to
the Stewardship Grant, County Admin-
istrator David Bretl said. We are short of
the vote to acquire the property even if we
had the grant. It was an unbudgeted item
and would require a two-thirds vote.
To buy the land in 2013, eight of the
11 county board supervisors would need
to approve it. Only seven supervisors have shown support
for buying the land.
Supervisors Richard Brandl, Ken Monroe, Carl Rede-
nius and Rick Stacey voted against extending the option to
purchase, and all four voted against the option to purchase
the land in February.
Bretl is the rst to develop the county budget, but it
will be ultimately up to the supervisors to approve it. For
the park to be approved during the budgeting process, a
simple majority of supervisors would need to vote in favor
of it.
Supervisor Daniel Kilkenny said there was no addi-
tional cost to extending the option to purchase, and
extending the option doesnt require the board to buy the
land in the future.
We have already paid the option price, there is no
additional consideration, Kilkenny said. Personally I
dont see a reason why you would want to limit the countys
options.
Opposition
The supervisors who oppose buying the park usually
have one major concern.
To me its the price tag, for the land that is there we are
way overspending, Brandl said. Its not that we are anti-
park, it is the price tag.
Monroe said he was concerned about the price tag, but
he also had too many unanswered questions to approve
extending the option to purchase.
He said it isnt clear what the county plans are for the
home and barn that are located on the property. He also
said he isnt sure if the county needs to build a bridge to
cross the White River to access different parts of the prop-
erty.
He also wants to know whether the county has the cor-
rect equipment to maintain the existing trails on the land,
or if it will need to buy additional equipment.
The supervisors who oppose the park will have another
opportunity to voice their concerns if it appears in the 2014
budget.
Im disappointed that it will be included in the budget
next year, Brandl said. I guess thats democracy, you win
some you lose some.
Neither Brandl nor Monroe would commit to opposing
any budget with money set to purchase the parkland.
For me personally, it is probably a good possibility,
Brandl said. It all depends on how the budget comes out,
but I will say it is a possibility on my part.
Monroe said it will depend on whether the county
receives the matching Stewardship Grant, and what other
items are in the budget.
Im not going to rule anything out until I see what hap-
pens with the Stewardship Grant and there will be some
more studies done, Monroe said. Just hopefully they get
the Stewardship Grant, I hope it goes through, Monroe
said.
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By Chris Schultz
cschultz@lakegenevanews.net
ELKHORN The boys, both Beach and Oak Ridge,
will perform for free at the grandstand, and rabbit races
will give the pig races a run for their money at the 164th
annual Walworth County Fair.
This year, the fair will run from Aug. 28 through Sept.
2. The theme is: Start your engines and race to the fair.
The media were introduced to this years fair on July 18,
appropriately enough, at the Elkhorn Garage. There, Sue
Pruessing, fair media director, and Ed Sokolowski, presi-
dent of the Walworth County Fair Board, kicked off public-
ity for the 2013 fair. The Elkhorn Garage is owned by Gary
and Sue Wallem. Gary Wallem keeps part of his antique car
collection there.
Admission at the fair gate will be $9 for adults (13 and
older) and $3 for children from 6 to 12. Ages 5 and younger
are free. Season passes are $30 for adults, $10 for children
(ages 5 and younger still free), parking is $5 a day; season
parking is $20.
Wednesday through Friday (Aug. 28-30) are senior citi-
zen days. Anyone 62 or older will pay $4 admission.
Grandstand shows are free, and among this years
musical grandstand entertainment are: The Oak Ridge
Boys Aug. 7:30 p.m.; The Beach Boys, Sept. 1, 7:30 p.m.;
Kenny Loggins, Aug. 31, 7:30 p.m.; and Jerrod Niemann,
Aug. 29, 7:30 p.m.
Other grandstand entertainment (also free) will be
Badger State Tractor/Truck Pulls 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Aug. 28;
Round Up Tractor Pulls, starting 11 a.m. Aug. 29; Demoli-
tion Derby Sept. 2 at 1, 3 and 6:30 p.m.
Harness racing will be Aug. 30, 31 and Sept. 2 starting
noon.
The Fair is looking for Walworth County Grandparents
of the year. Children ages 5 to 12 are invited to write a letter
about their grandparents and then draw a picture of the
favorite thing you do together.
Find contest applications online at www.walworth-
countyfair.com. Please send completed entries to PO Box
286 Elkhorn, 53121.
For more information, call the fair ofce at (262) 723-
3228. Submissions will be accepted right up to the rst day
of the fair, said Sue Pruessing, fair public relations director.
Walworths outstanding senior citizens this year are Eileen
Guthrie of Elkhorn, Neill R. Flood of Delavan and Karla
and Brent Tildahl of Fontana.
A total of seven contestants will be vying for Fairest of
the Fair. This years contestants are:
n Emily Watson, 21, of Elkhorn, daughter of Nathan
and Diane Watson.
n Kayla Decker, 19, of Sharon, daughter of William and
Lisa Decker.
n Brandy Sheppard, 19, of Genoa City, daughter of Vic-
toria Tibbitts.
n Jillian Cline, 19, of Lake Geneva, daughter of Fred
Cline and Heidi Hall.
n Emily Cerny, 22, of Sharon, daughter of Susie and
Mike Cerny.
n Megan Rasmussen, 19, of Lake Geneva, daughter of
Mike and Penny Rasmussen.
n Shelby Peteler, 20, of Lake Geneva, daughter of Mark
and Gail Peteler.
Honored family centennial farms this year are:
n The Sunny Brook Farm, Knuteson Family Farm,
owned by Ken and Virginia Knuteson, Whitewater. In the
family since 1885.
n The Steffen Family Morningside Farm, town of Lyons.
In the family since 1899.
n The Walter and Mary York Family Farm, town of
Linn. In the family since 1904.
n The Merry Water Farm, town of Linn. In the family
since 1852.
n The Palmer Family Farm, town of Linn. In the family
since 1880.
And just for fun, Kunes Country Auto is again sponsor-
ing an Antique Classic Car and Tractor Parade and Show.
Registration is between 8 and 9:15 a.m. Aug. 31. The parade
on the race track starts 9:30 a.m.
164th Walworth County Fair revving up
Brandl
Monroe
To see video footage taken in February at the
proposed park visit www.lakegenevanews.net
and click on this story.
LOCAL NOTE
BFHS class of 1968 45-year reunion
Activities have been planned for the 45-year reunion
of the class of 1968 of Big Foot High School in Walworth on
Friday and Saturday, Aug. 2 and 3.
The rst event begins at 6 p.m., Friday, Aug. 2, with a
tour of the high school, beginning at the main entrance.
Following that, people will gather at 7 p.m. for socializing
at Pinos Last Call Pizza Pub and Grill at 545 Kenosha St.,
Walworth Invitations have been extended to the classes
of 1965, 1966, 1967, 1969, 1970 and 1971 to join the class of
1968 for the evening.
Tours of the grade schools many of the classmates
attended Fontana, Reek, Sharon and Walworth begin
at 11 a.m., Saturday, Aug. 3. Attendees are welcome to have
lunch afterward at the Corn and Brat Festival in downtown
Walworth. The dinner Saturday evening is in the Geneva
Club room of Lake Lawn Resort in Delavan and begins
with a social period at 6 p.m. At 6:30 p.m. a group photo
of classmates will be taken and the meal will be served at
7 p.m. A program will follow. The reunion activities were
organized by a committee consisting of Wendy Church,
Mary Dangereld, Bonnie Millar, Fred Noer, Viki Pster,
Richard Rasmussen and Tom Stelling.
For more information, contact Noer at (262) 728-4392
or frednoer@charter.net, or Rasmussen at (262) 275-5482
or rd@ras-law.org.
The Walworth County Alliance for Children
is proud to announce the opening of The Tree House
Home of the Childrens Hospital of Wisconsin, Walworth County Child Advocacy Center.
Please join us for the open house celebration and ribbon-cutting ceremony.
Wednesday, July 31
5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
Ribbon-Cutting Ceremony 6:00 p.m. Statue Unveiling 6:15 p.m.
at
The Tree House W4063 Hwy. NN Elkhorn, WI
The Tree House is located on Hwy. NN across from the Walworth County Sheriffs Department
For more information, please email the Walworth County Alliance for Children at wcacwisconsin@gmail.com
WALWORTH COUNTY COURT
July 25, 2013 The Regional News 5B
Man gets ve years prison for 10th OWI
Robert Ireland
RIreland@lakegenevanews.net
ELKHORN A 49-year-old man will
spend ve years in prison after he was
arrested in Darien for his 10th drunken
driving offense.
Leonard LaPuma of Chicago, was
arrested March 23 shortly after he was
released from prison for his ninth-drunken
driving offense.
According to records on the Depart-
ment of Corrections website, LaPuma was
incarcerated until Jan. 10.
As part of his sentence for the 10th
offense, LaPuma will also serve ve years
of extended supervision, complete 70 hours
of community service and pay a $1,200
ne. His latest prison sentence wont begin
until he completes his revocation on the
ninth-offense.
On Feb. 5, 2009, for his ninth offense,
LaPuma was given a 10-year sentence, ve
years of initial incarceration and
ve years of extended supervision.
He also was ned $6,300. A con-
dition of his extended release was
that he not consume alcohol.
LaPuma was arrested on
March 23 at 3:14 a.m., and the of-
cer reported that LaPuma smelled
of alcohol, his speech was slurred
and his balance was poor, accord-
ing to the criminal complaint.
A portable Breathalyzer test
came back with a blood-alcohol
level of 0.12. The legal limit for a rst-
offense drunken driver is 0.08, and it is
0.02 for repeat offenders.
LaPuma has nine previous convictions,
which include offenses that occurred on
Feb. 11, 1991; June 27, 1991; Feb. 14, 1993;
Nov. 13, 1994; March 24, 1998; July 26,
1998; Nov. 3, 2001; Sept. 3, 2006; and Nov.
26, 2008.
When Judge James Carlson sentenced
LaPuma on his ninth-drunken
driving offense he ruled that
LaPuma wouldnt be eligible for
the earned release program until
he completed 3 1/2 years of his
sentence.
In a letter written from prison,
LaPuma asked Carlson to modify
his sentence and nd him eligible
for the earned release program
before he serves 3 1/2 years.
Im asking for the opportunity
to participate in the ERP program
with the hopes to learn new life skills that
will help me not repeat my past mistakes,
LaPuma wrote to Carlson. The Earned
Release Program is a substance-abuse pro-
gram. Carlson denied the motion.
Eventually, LaPuma enrolled in the
program and successfully completed it.
The DOCs website states the program
provides statutorily eligible inmates an
incentive to actively participate in an inten-
sive alcohol and drug treatment program
designed to reduce the incidence of future
criminal behaviors.
In 2008, LaPuma was arrested after he
rear-ended a vehicle on State Highway 50.
The other vehicle was reportedly stopped
in front of Mulligans Sports Pub & Grill
and was waiting to turn into the parking
lot.
LaPuma rear ended the vehicle and
then ed the scene. He told a town of Dela-
van police ofcer that he left because his
license was revoked and he didnt think the
accident was that bad.
An attempt to locate was placed on the
vehicle and LaPuma was stopped by the
Williams Bay Police Department. Before
stopping the vehicle, the ofcer saw the
driver slam on the vehicles brakes to avoid
an accident. When the ofcer made contact
with LaPuma, he could smell alcohol on
him. During eld sobriety tests, LaPuma
struggled to keep his balance.
LaPuma
COURT REPORTS
Men arrested at Geneva Towers
Two men face criminal charges after
police allegedly found a large amount of
candy that contained marijuana and two
rearms at the Geneva Towers in down-
town Lake Geneva.
David A. Wood, 46,
Denver, faces a felony
charge of possession of
marijuana with intent
to deliver, in or near
a park. If convicted of
that charge, Wood faces
up to 15 years impris-
onment and $25,000 in
nes.
He also faces a
misdemeanor charge
of possession of mari-
juana.
James P. Kelly, 42,
880 S. Lakeshore Dr.,
Lake Geneva, faces
felony charges of pos-
session of marijuana
with intent to deliver,
in or near a park and
possession of a rearm
contrary to an injunc-
tion.
If convicted of both
counts, Kelly faces up to 25 years impris-
onment and $50,000 in nes. He also
faces a misdemeanor charge of posses-
sion of marijuana. Kelly was scheduled to
appear in court Jan. 12, but didnt, accord-
ing to online court records. A warrant has
been led for his arrest.
The charges against Kelly were led,
but a criminal complaint hasnt been
issued. Woods attorney led a motion
to dismiss the criminal complaint and is
scheduled for a hearing July 23. Wood is
free from custody after posting a $5,000
cash bond.
According to the criminal complaint
led against Wood:
On June 28, police were dispatched
to the Geneva Towers after receiving a
report that one of the units smelled like
marijuana. No one answered the door at
the unit.
The ofcer went outside and saw Kelly,
who the ofcer recognized from prior
police contacts. The ofcer approached
Kelly, who smelled of marijuana.
Kelly told the ofcer he had smoked
marijuana inside of the Geneva Towers.
Kelly was carrying a backpack, which
was searched. Inside of the bag, police
found a digital scale, marijuana and a
handgun with a fully-loaded magazine.
After arresting Kelly, ofcers executed
a search warrant on the Geneva Towers
apartment that smelled like marijuana.
Wood was inside of the unit. Inside of
Woods pants pocket, police found mari-
juana. Inside of the unit police located the
following items:
n A paper bag containing 30 Evolab
glass containers of 1,000 mg THC oil
weighing 6.06 ounces. THC oil is taken
from marijuana, and is used to prepare
food or candies that contains THC, the
active ingredient in marijuana.
n Two additional individual Evolab
glass containers of 1,000 mg THC oil.
n A paper bag containing 32 indi-
vidually wrapped 10 percent THC Cheeba
Chew candies weighing 12.45 ounces.
n A paper bag containing 35 100 mg
THC Blue Kuda chocolates weighing 20.2
ounces. The Cheeba Chews and Blue Kuda
tested positive for THC.
The two items are prepared to contain
marijuana. A backpack that was labeled
James Kelly was found inside of a utility
room in the unit.
Inside of that backpack police found, a
scale, marijuana and two 9mm handguns.
The unit is located 1,000 feet from Flat
Iron Park.
Man faces burglary charge
A 21-year-old Twin Lakes man is
accused of helping in the burglary of a
Bloomeld home in September 2011.
Dylan J. Gutierrez is scheduled for
a July 11 arraignment. If convicted, he
faces up to 12 1/2 years imprisonment and
$25,000 in nes.
According to the criminal complaint:
On March 22, 2012, a detective from
the Twin Lakes police department gave
Bloomeld police a list of suspects in bur-
glaries. Gutierrez was on that list and was
questioned by police on March 25, 2012.
Gutierrez said that he, Nathan Kivi and
Jason Olrich broke into a home in the
town of Bloomeld.
Lake Geneva man allegedly gave
out Xanax in jail
A 22-year-old Lake Geneva man is
accused of handing out Xanax at the Wal-
worth County Jail on the Fourth of July.
Gerrick R. Richey, 229 Pearson Dr.,
has been charged with delivering a sched-
ule IV drug. If convicted, he faces up to six
years imprisonment and $10,000 in nes.
According to the criminal complaint:
On July 5 several inmates at the Wal-
worth County jail tested positive for
Xanax. One of the inmates told a Wal-
worth County Sheriffs deputy that Ger-
rick gave him the Xanax the day before.
He said no payment happened for the
Xanax, and that Richey was handing out
the pills because its the Fourth of July.
Services directory
Garbage & Rubbish Removal
Commercial-Industrial-Residential
608-752-8210
Serving Walworth County
WASTE MANAGEMENT
of
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GARBAGE REMOVAL
SEAL COATING
LANDSCAPING
CLEANING
LAWNCARE
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K&L FASHIONS, INC.
SEWING ALTERATIONS
252 Center St. Lake Geneva
262-248-1840
Kris Nish
Laura OHalleran
Mon., Tues., Thurs., Fri. 10-5
Wed. 10-3, Sat. 10-2
After Hrs. Appts. Available
& CUSTOM CLOTHIER
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Call your
LAKE GENEVA REGIONAL NEWS
ad representative today.
262.248.4444
New Construction Carpet Cleaning Winter Watch Program
Windows & Gutters Power Washing Snow Removal
Stephanie Nicewarner
homecleaning@sbcglobal.net
www.home-cleaning-service.webs.com
LAWNCARE
Spring Clean-Up Weed and Feed
Power Raking Core Aeration
Seeding Sod Mowing
Pruning Property Maintenance
GRADUATE HORTICULTURIST & TURFGRASS MGMT.
Specialty Lawncare Co.
262.248.4829
B.L.G. SERVICE
262-249-1455
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BRUSH & TREE CUTTING
Topsoil Manure Traffic Bond Sand Gravel Stone
MATERIAL DELIVERY-BOBCAT WORK
Aftermath Paving, Inc.
Residential and Commercial Seal Coating
www.aftermathpaving.com
Paving Repair and Replacements
Overlays Striping
Patching Infrared Patching
New and Existing Construction
LAKE GENEVA ~ 262.812.9150
CONSTRUCTION
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Providing Quality Service and Craftsmanship for over 20 years
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OUR SERVICES
MULCH COMPOST TOPSOIL SOD TRIMMING TREES MOVING
TREES PLANTING TREES & FLOWERS MOWING & EDGING
PATIOS (BRICK & STONE) RETAINING WALLS SNOW REMOVAL
WOOD FENCES TIMBER WALLS CLEANUPS
Kelly
Wood
6B The Regional News July 25, 2013
NOTES FROM AROUND THE COMMUNITY
June 30
1:29 a.m.: While on routine patrol in
the 600 block of W. Main Street an ofcer
saw a man hop a fence into a business. Upon
contact with a business representative, the
ofcer learned the man was told to leave
and not to come back. Ofcers cited Joseph
Arthur Pierce, 27, Lake Geneva, for tres-
passing.
4:04 p.m.: An ofcer was dispatched
to the 900 block of Veterans Parkway for a
battery complaint. Zelon A. Urias, 27, Dela-
van, was cited for battery.
July 1
12:12 p.m.: An ofcer went to the area
of Center and W. Main streets for a report
of a hit and run complaint. Mary E. Oster-
meier, 62, Zenda was cited for unsafe back-
ing of vehicle.
July 2
12:15 a.m.: Ofcers went to the 1600
block of Lake Shore Drive for a report of
suspicious activity. Boe Bojan Miljkovic, 21,
Morton Grove, Ill., was cited for obstructing
ofcers.
10:02 p.m.: Ofcers were dispatched to
the 800 block of W. Main Street for a report
of a theft by an employee. Ofcers referred
charges to juvenile intake on a 17-year-old
Lake Geneva boy for retail theft.
July 3
1:25 p.m.: An ofcer went to the 300
block of Havenwood Drive for a damage to
property complaint.
Catherine S. Alejandre, 48, Twin Lakes,
was cited for criminal damage to private
property.
July 5
1:06 p.m.: An ofcer went to the 800
block of Geneva Street for a retail theft com-
plaint. Betty J. Rowe, 65, Rockford, Ill., was
cited for retail theft.
July 6
3:13 p.m.: An ofcer responded to a
complaint of an intoxicated subject in the
900 block of George Street. Keith R. Harper,
55, Lake Geneva, was cited for disorderly
conduct.
July 7
12:45 a.m.: While on foot patrol, of-
cers saw a man urinating in the 100 block
of Broad Street. Dario D. Newell, 45, Lake
Geneva, was cited for disorderly conduct -
public urination.
1:05 a.m.: While on routine patrol, an
ofcer saw a man drinking from an open
alcoholic beverage in the 100 block of Broad
Street. Kyle N. Radtke, 22, Darien, was cited
for open alcoholic beverage in public.
1:09 a.m.: While on foot patrol, an of-
cer observed two men urinating in the 100
block of Broad Street. Jason A. Melahn, 38,
Lake Geneva and Mart T. Stephan, 44, Lake
Geneva, were cited for disorderly conduct -
public urination.
July 8
4:15 p.m.: An ofcer responded to the
200 block of Havenwood Drive for two dis-
orderly subjects. Christina M. Nelson, 44,
Waukesha, was cited for disorderly conduct,
involved in a ght. Crystal D. Schmidt, 51,
Zenda, was cited for disorderly conduct,
involved in a ght and criminal damage to
property.
11:54 p.m.: Ofcers responded to the
700 block of W. Main Street for an under-
age subject that kept attempting to enter
a tavern. Justin Roland Bender, 19, Lake
Geneva, was cited for underage possession/
consumption of alcohol and ID card viola-
tions.
July 9
10:15 p.m.: Ofcers responded to
the 900 block of Badger Lane for a report
of a disturbance. Jesse R. Derke, 32, Lake
Geneva, was cited for disorderly conduct.
July 11
1:35 p.m.: Ofcers responded to the
600 block of North Edwards Boulevard for
a report of a shoplifter who had stolen sev-
eral items in the past. Ofcers arrested Car-
olina Lechuga, 28, Milwaukee, into custody.
Charges have been referred to the Walworth
County District Attorneys Ofce for two
counts of felony bail jumping, misdemeanor
bail jumping, felony retail theft, resisting an
ofcer and disorderly conduct.
Ofcers also took Joseph L. Ott, 25,
into custody. Charges have been referred
to the Walworth County District Attorneys
Ofce against him for disorderly conduct
and resisting an ofcer. Lechuga also had
valid warrants from Ozaukee County Sher-
iffs Department, Waukesha County Sher-
iffs Department and Milwaukee County
Sheriffs Department. Both subjects were
conned in Walworth County jail on those
charges.
8:06 p.m.: An ofcer conducted a traf-
c stop on E. Main Street at N. Edwards Bou-
levard. Orlando Ruacho, 22, Lake Geneva,
was cited for operating after suspension, as
a third offense.
July 12
7:38 p.m.: Ofcers responded to the
Riviera Beach for a report of underage sub-
jects drinking and smoking. Jon Michael
Schmitt, 20, Johnsburg, Ill., and Christo-
pher David Cook Jr., 19, Richmond, Ill., were
cited for underage possession/consumption
of alcohol.
July 13
12:26 a.m.: An ofcer stopped a vehicle
on Wrigley Drive at Broad Street. William
S. Breuder, 44, Chicago, was cited for oper-
ating a motor vehicle while intoxicated and
failure to obey sign/signal.
12:50 a.m.: An ofcer stopped a vehicle
on E. Main Street at West Drive. Kathleen
B. McKenzie, 59, Lake Geneva, was cited for
operating a motor vehicle while intoxicated
and operating left of center.
9:39 p.m.: While on foot patrol near
the Riviera Beach, ofcers saw people on the
beach with alcohol next to them. Josh Alan
Young, 22, Winslow, Ill., was cited for open
intoxicants. Peyton Nicole Munch, 19, Loves
Park, Ill., and Amanda Kristine Prine, 19,
Rockford, Ill., were cited for underage pos-
session/consumption of alcohol
11:15 p.m.: While on foot patrol, an of-
cer saw a woman urinating in the 700 block
of W. Main Street. The ofcer cited Anita V.
Paljetak, 35, Willowbrook, Ill, for disorderly
conduct - public urination and released.
July 14
12:27 a.m.: While on foot patrol, of-
cers saw two boys out past curfew.
A 17-year-old Lake Geneva boy was cited
for curfew and possession of drug parapher-
nalia.
A 16-year-old Lake Geneva boy was also
cited for curfew violation.
LAKE GENEVA POLICE REPORTS
MADISON Rep. Amy Loudenbeck,
R-Clinton, and Rep. Debra Kolste, D-
Janesville, are co-authors of a bill designed
to expand services at free medical clinics,
such as Open Arms Clinic in Elkhorn and
HealthNet of Rock County.
Kolste volunteered for many years at
HealthNet.
The law will expand the number of
health care professionals who can offer
their services without risk of liability,
Loudenbeck said in a July 19 telephone
interview.
It would let these clinics offer a wider
range of services, Loudenbeck said.
The Loudenbeck-Kolste bill would
expand the list of those considered agents
of the state while volunteering in qualied
free clinics, she said. The state can pro-
vide legal representation for those on the
list and may pay damages for judgments
stemming from volunteer work at free
clinics.
This bill came
about after we talked
to ofcials from clinics
that offer health care to
the uninsured, Louden-
beck said. We learned
that some health care
professionals cant offer
their services for rea-
sons of liability.
For example, the
gap in the law prevented
advanced nurse practi-
tioners with prescription authority from
volunteering at free clinics and being able
to write prescriptions, Loudenbeck said.
Put up for co-sponsorship in May
and June, Loudenbeck said the bill was
expected to have as many as 30 co-signers
before it was to be formally presented to
the state Assembly.
Assembly Majority Leader Robin Vos
will assign the bill to committee.
New law would expand
free clinic services
Loudenbeck
The Friends of the Lake Geneva Public
Library will hold the 21st Annual Book Sale
on Saturday, Aug. 10, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., and
Sunday, Aug. 11, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., at the east
end of Library Park in Lake Geneva.
Mass media paperback books will be sold
for 50 cents. Hardcover and trade paperback
books, DVDs, videos and CDs will be avail-
able for $1. Rare editions or signed copies
of books are in a separate category and are
priced according to their value. Funds raised
from the sale make special projects possible,
including youth and adult programming,
online book clubs, new books, audio books
and DVDs for the library collection.
Gently used book donations are welcome
for the sale. Donations of textbooks, maga-
zines, encyclopedias and Readers Digest
condensed books will not be accepted.
The Friends Book Sale is the major
annual fundraiser sponsored by the group. It
is managed solely by volunteers who devote
their time to receive, sort and sell books for
this anticipated tradition that draws book
lovers and collectors from local areas as well
as from out of state.
In addition to the book sale, historic
LIFE Magazines will also be available for
purchase as a part of the ongoing sale. The
sale of LIFE provides an opportunity to give
a contribution to the library as well as pur-
chasing a gift for friends and family to com-
memorate birthdays, anniversaries or other
special events or occasions. The librarys col-
lection of more than 700 magazines covers
the years 1936 through 1972 and 1978-2000
but is not comprehensive and represents
only what the library has stored. The stan-
dard price for each issue is $10 and select
magazines are sold for higher prices based
on their assessed values.
The Friends welcome new members
throughout the year with annual dues of $10
for individuals, $15 for families and $25 for
patrons. Dues for lifetime membership are
also popular and are offered with a one-time
gift of $100. Members are invited to a Mem-
bers only Preview Night to purchase books
before the annual sale opens to the general
public. Enrollment applications are available
at the librarys circulation desk.
For more information, call the library at
(262) 249-5299 or visit the website at www.
lakegeneva.lib.wi.us.
LG library hosting book sale
WHATS HAPPENING
Summer Elk Players performing
July 26
The Summer Elk Players, a summer
school theatre program of Elkhorn Area
School District, will present their summer
musical, Harmony High, during two per-
formances, Friday, July 26, and Saturday,
July 27, at 7 p.m.
When three new siblings transfer into
their new school, they quickly discover a
learning curve, because at Harmony High
everything, from gym class to detention, is
set to song. In the end the students discover
learning is better when music is involved,
and everyone gets along, because life is a
beautiful song.
For more than 10 years the Summer Elk
Players have brought family-friendly musi-
cals to life in the James A. Wahner audito-
rium at Elkhorn Area High School. Middle
school students act, sing, build sets, and
are involved in every aspect of the theatri-
cal experience. Volunteer alumni students
head up the lighting, props, sound board
and assist the directors backstage.
The performance is free of charge, while
donations are always gladly accepted.
For more information, contact Edwin
Scherzer, director, at (262) 745-3290 or
scherzem@gmail.com.
Church hosting pork chop dinner
The Delavan United Methodist Church,
213 S. 2nd St., will host a Grilled Pork Chop
Dinner Saturday, July 27, from 4 to 7 p.m.
The menu includes grilled pork chops,
corn, homemade au gratin potatoes, rolls,
applesauce, brownies and beverage. Carry-
out service is available.
Advance tickets cost $10, children 2 to 6,
$5, and under 2, free. At the door the cost is
one dollar more.
The building is handicap accessible and
air conditioned.
For advance tickets or to order pickups
ahead, call (262) 728-3644.
Cycle Club hosting event July 27
The White River Cycle Club will host a
promotion as part of the Festival of Summer
in Elkhorn. Rides will be available Satur-
day, July 27, in 10, 30, 68 and 100 mile dis-
tances.
The rides will start at Sunset Park in
Elkhorn, rain or shine. Registration is from
6:30 to 10 a.m. The longest rides go out by 8
a.m.; the 30-mile ride by 9 a.m.; and the last
ride by 10 a.m.
Registration is $30 for adults and $20
for those age 16 and under, each including a
free ticket to the Rotarys Corn and Brat Fes-
tival on Courthouse Square, serving from 11
a.m. to 4 p.m. There is a family ticket avail-
able for $10, not including meal tickets.
For more information, visit the White
River Cycle Club website, www.whiteriver-
cycleclub.com.
Service League seeks bridge players
The Delavan Service League invites
bridge players to compete once each month
in a bridge marathon. Players do not have to
be members of the league to participate. The
deadline to join is Aug. 30.
Games are played once each month from
October through May. A small cash prize is
awarded to the winners.
Entrants who already have playing part-
ners are encouraged to join as a team. All
games take place in participants homes or
other locations acceptable to players.
The cost to join is $15 per person for
the entire season. All proceeds except prize
money are given to local charities by the
Delavan Service League. To sign up or get
more information, call Phyllis Cook at (262)
740-0201.
Wuttke wins prizes at State Fair
Thirty-four entries in various catego-
ries of photography subjects earned Sharon
Wuttke, Bray Road, LaFayette Township,
formerly of Lake Geneva, 10 awards in the
2013 Wisconsin State Fair. They will be on
exhibit throughout the run of the fair.
The competition is open to the public
and information is available online in early
May. Entry forms had to be submitted by
June 12, subjects submitted by July 12 and
judging was done July 17.
Wuttkes four rst prizes were in the cat-
egories of military, songbird and winter and
the most interesting, to her, was forks. She
thought table forks might not be interesting,
so her entry included a bale of hay, three
pitch forks and a person holding two forks.
Her other winners were two third-place and
two fourth-place prizes.
The photography show drew entries
from about 500 photographers who submit-
ted 2,500 entries. After the initial rst prizes
are awarded, they are judged by a panel for
the grand prize. The rst round had 24 rst-
place winning entries and Wuttke had two
of hers in consideration. The nal round of
nine prints found one of those two still in
competition. Although she didnt take the
grand prize, when the Judges Choice was
being selected, one judge commented that
Wuttkes entry in the military category was
his second choice.
Wuttke uses a Canon 60 35mm digital
camera. All of her 8-by-10-inch entries were
in color and most were taken in her back-
yard. She has been doing photography off
and on for about 25 years, but has become
more involved with photos within the last
ve or six years. This is the third year she
has been competing at the state and county
fairs. In some years the categories at the
state fair coincide with categories at the
Walworth County Fair. When that happens
she has entries in both fairs.
Church hosting bible school
The First United Methodist Church,
518 Booth St., Genoa City, will host Vaca-
tion Bible School Monday through Friday,
July 29 through Aug. 2, from 9 to 11:30 a.m.
each day. Children age four through those
who have nished sixth grade are welcome.
There is no registration fee required.
The theme for the week is and each day
will include Bible stories, music, prayers,
crafts, activities, games and snacks.
For more information, contact the
church at (262) 279-6448.
Wonderful worms coming to
Genoa City library
The Welty Environmental Center of
Beloit will present Wonderful Worms at
5:30 p.m., the Genoa City Public Library,
126 Freeman St., Monday, July 29, at the
American Legion Hall, next to the library.
The program begins with an interac-
tive story about life in the soil and nishes
with a song about how worms help make the
food people eat. It introduces children to
worms, helps them learn about the simple
but important creatures and gets them com-
fortable with an unhuggable animal. The
children will experience what animals need
to live in the soil with games and actual arti-
facts from nature.
Other topics will include compost piles,
moving like a worm, learning worm anat-
omy and creating a beaded worm of their
own.
SCHOOL MATTERS
July 25, 2013 The Regional News 7B
PUBLIC NOTICES
PUBLIC
NOTICES
STATE OF WISCONSIN,
CIRCUIT COURT,
WALWORTH COUNTY
Order Setting Deadline
for Filing a Claim
(Formal Administration)
Case No. 2013PR121
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF
JOHN F. DREWS
A petition for formal administration
was filed.
THE COURT FINDS:
1. The decedent, with date of birth
January 7, 1947 and date of death May 25,
2013, was domiciled in Walworth County,
State of Wisconsin, with a mailing address
of 506 Main Street, P.O. Box 304, Genoa
City, WI 53128.
2. All interested persons waived
notice.
THE COURT FINDS:
1. The deadline for filing a claim
against the decedents estate is October 11,
2013.
2. A claim must be filed at the
Walworth County Probate, P.O. Box 1001,
1800 County Rd. NN, Elkhorn, Wisconsin,
Room 2085.
BY THE COURT:
Dela Race
Circuit Court Commissioner
July 5, 2013
Nicholas A. Egert
McCormack & Egert, S.C.
835 Geneva Parkway North, Suite 1
Lake Geneva, WI 53147
(262) 248-6600
Bar No. 1056736
July 11, 18 & 25, 2013
WNAXLP
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT
WALWORTH COUNTY
Notice and Order for
Name Change Hearing
Case No. 13CV00620
In the matter of the name change of: BRI-
ANNA MARIE COOK
NOTICE IS GIVEN:
A petition was filed asking to change
the name of the persons listed below from:
Brianna Marie Cook to
Breanna Marie Rullman.
Birth Certificate: Brianna Marie Cook
IT IS ORDERED:
This petition will be heard in the
Circuit Court of Walworth County, State of
Wisconsin before the Hon. Judge Phillip A.
Koss, at the Walworth Co,. Judicial Center,
1800 County Road NN, Elkhorn, WI on
August 12, 2013 at 11:30 a.m.
IT IS FURTHER ORDERED:
Notice of this hearing shall be given
by publication as a class 3 notice for three
(3) weeks in a row prior to the date of the
hearing in the Lake Geneva Regional News,
a newspaper published in Walworth County,
State of Wisconsin.
If you require reasonable accommo-
dations due to a disability to participate in
the court process, please call 262-741-7012
at least ten (10) working days prior to the
scheduled court date. Please note that the
court does not provide transportation.
BY THE COURT:
James L. Carlson
Circuit Court Judge
July 2, 2012
July 18, 25, August 1, 2013
WNAXLP
PUBLIC
NOTICES
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT
WALWORTH COUNTY
Order Setting Deadline
for Filing a Claim
(Formal Administration)
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF
CHARLOTTE W. SALUS
Apetition for formal administration was filed.
THE COURT FINDS:
1. The decedent, with date of birth
August 17, 1930 and date of death July 4,
2013, was domiciled in Walworth County,
State of Wisconsin, with a mailing address
of N3130 Tamarack Road, Lake Geneva, WI
53147.
2. All interested persons waived
notice.
THE COURT ORDERS:
1. The deadline for filing a claim
against the decedents estate is October 18,
2013.
2. A claim must be filed at the
Walworth County Probate, P.O. Box 1001,
1800 County Rd. NN, Elkhorn, Wisconsin,
Room 2085.
BY THE COURT:
Dela Race
July 12, 2013
Nicholas A. Egert
835 Geneva Parkway North, Suite 1
Lake Geneva, WI 53147
262-248-6600
Bar Number; 1056736
July 18, 25, August 1, 2013
WNAXLP
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT
WALWORTH COUNTY
Notice to Creditors
(Informal Administration)
Case No. 13PR119
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF
ENID J. WESTFALL
A/K/A ENID JANETTE WESTFALL
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE:
1. An application for informal adminis-
tration was filed.
2. The decedent, with date of birth
April 6, 1918 and date of death June 18,
2013, was domiciled in Walworth County,
State of Wisconsin, with a mailing address
of 703 S. Lakeshore Dr., Lake Geneva, WI
53147.
3. All interested persons waived
notice.
4. The deadline for filing a claim
against the decedents state is October 10,
2013.
5. A claim may be filed at the
Walworth County Probate, P.O. Box 1001,
1800 County Rd. NN, Elkhorn, Wisconsin,
Room 2085.
Wendy A. Esch,
Deputy Probate Registrar
July 3, 2013
Attorney Richard W. Torhorst
500 Commercial Court, PO Box 1300
Lake Geneva, WI 53147
262-248-3333
Bar Number: 1015127
July 11, 18, 25, 2013
WNAXLP
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT
WALWORTH COUNTY
Notice to Creditors
(Informal Administration)
Case No. 13PR114
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF
JOHN SCHLIMMER
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE:
1. An application for informal adminis-
tration was filed.
2. The decedent, with date of birth
September 7, 1931 and date of death June
6, 2013, was domiciled in Walworth County,
State of Wisconsin, with a mailing address
of 5693 Alvin Howe Road, Lyons, WI 53148.
3. All interested persons waived
notice.
4. The deadline for filing a claim
against the decedents state is October 2,
2013.
5. A claim may be filed at the
Walworth County Probate, P.O. Box 1001,
1800 County Rd. NN, Elkhorn, Wisconsin,
Room 2085.
Wendy A. Esch,
Deputy Probate Registrar
June 25, 2013
Stephen M. Clubb
Rizzo 7 Diersen, SWC
3505 30th Ave.
Kenosha, WI 53144
262-652-5050
Bar Number: 1055103
July 11, 18, 25, 2013
WNAXLP
contact Sue at
262-248-4444
sue@lakegenevanews.net
MUST BE PLACED
BY 12 P.M. MONDAY
TO APPEAR IN THE
UPCOMING ISSUE
LEGAL NOTICES
to place a listing or
for more information
The 84th Wisconsin FFA Convention was held at the
Alliant Energy Center in Madison from June 10 to 13. The
event attracted more than 3,000 members, advisers, par-
ents, alumni and sponsors to celebrate the years success
and support for students involved in agricultural educa-
tion.
The Lake Geneva Badger FFA Chapter members par-
ticipated in many events held throughout the convention.
They assisted in a service project called FFA Rally to Fight
Hunger where they assisted with 300 FFA members from
20 different schools to package more than 70,000 meals
to help feed children and adults that are ghting hunger.
The Badger chapter also contributed a cash donation to the
project to assist in purchasing supplies for the program. It
promotes the Living to Serve portion of the organizations
motto as they continue to promote the importance of active
citizenship, community service and leadership through
agriculture education. The Badger FFA advisors are Larry
Plapp and Candice Olson.
Badgers chapter was also recognized for several accom-
plishments during the convention:
National Chapter Award Gold Ranking Overall The
chapter will proceed to competition at the national level
this fall against the other top ranked chapters. Only the top
10 percent of the states FFA Chapters received this recogni-
tion, based upon the FFA Chapters Program of Activities in
student development, community development and chapter
development.
Ninth-place chapter, out of 255 chapters, in the area of
chapter development.
Tenth-place chapter in the area of community develop-
ment.
Sixth-place chapter for Food For America Program, to
recognize chapters for their agriculture literacy program-
ming for elementary students.
Blue rated second-place FFA website, an award area
designed to recognize chapters that promote their chapters
through their own website. FFA student members create,
prepare and maintain the website with FFA advisors acting
as consultants.
Second place for chapter membership recruitment
award, recognizing the accomplishments of the chapter
ofcers in their effort to recruit new members and agricul-
tural education students.
The Badger FFA veterinary science team won state
and was recognized on stage. They will proceed to national
competition this fall.
Also, several individual FFA members received awards
during the convention.
Taylor Kundert received the Three Star Leader Award
based upon her active participation in all activities of the
FFA chapter.
Haylee Lininger was recognized as the rst place top
individual in the Floriculture Career Development Event
State Contest. The event tests the diversity of the FFA mem-
bers knowledge of the oriculture industry.
Kundert and Dakota Siegler received their Wisconsin
FFA Degrees, the highest degree a state association can
bestow upon its members. To be considered for this honor
the FFA member must meet the following minimum quali-
cations: have productively earned and invested $1000 or
worked 1,500 hours; been an FFA member for at least two
years and had 360 hours of agriculture classroom instruc-
tion, given two agricultural related speeches, been involved
in at least ve FFA activities above the local level and par-
ticipated in two community activities.
Dakota Siegler was recognized for having rst place gold
prociency in the area of Agricultural Service and will pro-
ceed to competition at the national level for his entrepre-
neurial agriculture experience. He was also recognized as
runner-up in Star in agribusiness nalist competition and
fourth place GOLD in the forage crops prociency area.
Shanna Mercier was recognized for having rst place
gold prociency in the area of diversied horticulture and
will proceed to competition at the national level for her job
placement agriculture experience at Pesches Greenhouse.
Marc Hughes was recognized for having second place
gold prociency in the area of fruit production for his job
placement at his familys orchard Harvest Time.
Anna Niles and Taylor Kundert were recognized for
having sixth-place gold prociency in the area of agricul-
ture education for elementary education lessons.
Ashley Turville was recognized for having eleventh-
place gold prociency in the area of small animal care and
production for her job placement at the Dog Spot.
Katrina Hanrahan was recognized for having tenth-
place gold prociency in the area of small animal care and
production for her job placement at Lake Geneva Animal
Hospital.
Nick Merry was chosen to participate in the Wisconsin
FFA State Band and was nominated to apply to National
FFA Band. He will be playing at the Wisconsin State Fair
with the Wisconsin State Band in August.
Students enrolled in agricultural education in Wiscon-
sin schools and who are members of the FFA have a fan-
tastic opportunity for leadership and career development,
Wisconsin FFA Executive Director Cheryl Zimmerman
said. The Wisconsin FFA Convention is our opportunity
to recognize the importance of the education of our society
about agriculture and the achievement of young people who
are the future leaders of the agriculture industry.
The Wisconsin Association of FFA is a leading student
organization due to the efforts of more than 19,000 stu-
dents across the state.
With a focus on premier leadership, personal growth,
and career success, students FFA activities complement
agricultural classroom instruction by giving them an
opportunity to apply their skills and knowledge while gain-
ing real-world experience.
Local students attend state FFA Convention
The following local students received degrees from the
UW-Whitewater during the spring graduation ceremonies
on Saturday, May 18.
Jeffrey Allis, Fontana, graduated with a bachelors of
business administration degree in information technology.
Elkhorn students included Mallory Amann, bachelors
of business administration degree in economics; Emily
Beckett, magna cum laude, with a bachelors of business
administration degree in operations and supply chain
management; Joshua Benavides, bachelors of science in
education degree in physics; Richard Connell, bachelors of
business administration degree in general business; Justin
Deubel, masters of professional accountancy degree in
accounting; Shane Dorgan, bachelors of science degree in
geography; Caitlyn Findreng, bachelors degree in history;
Michael Finster, bachelors of science degree in sociology;
Stephen Flitcroft, bachelors of business administration
degree in general business; Sean Harris, bachelors degree
in English; Emily Johnson, summa cum laude, with a bach-
elors of science degree in biology; Shane Kayser, bachelors
of science in education degree in physical education; Dawn
Koutsky, bachelors of science degree in liberal studies; Ari-
elle Mason, bachelors of science in education degree in ele-
mentary education; Jessica Meinen, bachelors of science
in education degree in early childhood education; Andrea
Michetti, bachelors of business administration degree in
information technology; Andrew Norton, bachelors of sci-
ence degree in geography; Eric Ostermeier, bachelors of
business administration degree in general business; Gerald
Siarnicki, bachelors degree in media arts and game devel-
opment; Kyria Smith, magna cum laude, with a bachelors
of business administration degree in marketing; Samantha
Soto, bachelors of business administration degree in gen-
eral management; Thomas Walbrandt, bachelors degree in
history; and Nicholas Walton, cum laude, with a bachelors
of business administration degree in information technol-
ogy infrastructure.
From Walworth, Michael Bentley, bachelors of science
degree in integrated science business; Timothy Feather-
stone, masters of science degree in counseling;
Sarah Gruetzmacher, bachelors degree in commu-
nication; and Eva Peterson, masters of science degree in
safety.
Students from Lake Geneva were Amber Boltz, masters
of professional accountancy degree in accounting; Holly
Camalieri, bachelors degree in social work; Anthony Fer-
rini, masters degree in business administration; Daniel
Flitcroft, bachelors of business administration degree in
marketing;
Benjamin Grzenia, bachelors degree in art; Shanell
Haines, associate of arts degree in general studies; Nadine
Harris, bachelors degree in speech; Jason Liebovich, bach-
elors degree in history; Benjamin Morgan, bachelors of sci-
ence degree in occupational safety; Isaac Olson, bachelors
of business administration degree in information technol-
ogy infrastructure; Melinda Pedersen, masters of science
degree in counseling; Pilar Rios, masters of science degree
in counseling.
From Genoa City, Cerina Colon, bachelors degree in
music; Scott Haines, bachelors of science in education
degree in physical education; Bart Leasure, bachelors of
science in education degree in physical education; Jenni-
fer Musilek, magna cum laude, with a bachelors degree in
art; Katey Pasqualini, magna cum laude, with a bachelors
of business administration degree in accounting; Whitney
Schutte, bachelors of ne arts degree in art; and Kimberly
White, bachelors degree in social work.
Williams Bay students were Spencer Lynch, bachelors
degree in psychology; and Allison Vlach, masters degree in
business administration.
Students who graduate cum laude had a grade point
average of 3.4 to 3.59. Magna cum laude students had a
great point average of 3.6 to 3.84. Summa cum laude stu-
dents had a grade point average of 3.85 and above.
UW-Whitewater names local graduates
SCHOOL NOTES
Winona releases names of area graduates
Area graduates from Winona State University, Winona,
Minn., have been announced.
Lake Geneva students and their degrees are Elizabeth
Heinlein, Bachelor of Science, cum laude, nursing; and
Amy Schlehlein, Bachelor of Science, exercise and reha-
biilitave science.
From Genoa City, Melissa Monroe earned a Bachelor of
Science in athletic training.
Ashlyn Anderson, Elkhorn, received a Bachelor of Sci-
ence, cum laude, in elementary education.
The spring semester deans list at Winona State Univer-
sity, Winona, Minn., has also been announced. Area stu-
dents are included on the list. To earn the honor, students
must be undergraduate, enrolled full time with at least 12
credit hours, and achieve a grade point average of at least
3.5.
Genoa City students are Kenneth Eterno and Melissa
Monroe. Students from Lake Geneva are Elizabeth Hein-
lein, Christopher Hovden, Hollynd Schmidt and Mary Pat
Volpi. Elkhorn students are Lauren Davey and Antony
Krusenbaum.
Cone graduates from Loomis Chaffee School
Erika Cone, Elkhorn, was among the 176 graduates
from the Loomis Chaffee School class of 2013.
Located in Windsor, Conn., the school is a co-educa-
tional boarding and day school of 650 students from 30
states and 31 countries, chartered in 1874.
Iowa State University releases deans list
More than 6,250 Iowa State University undergraduates
were recognized for outstanding academic achievement by
being named to the 2013 spring semester deans list.
Among them was Preston Gardner, Lake Geneva.
Students named to the list must have earned a grade
point average of at least 3.50 on a 4.00 scale while carrying
a minimum of 12 credit hours of graded course work.
UW-La Crosse releases deans list
The deans list at the UW-La Crosse for the spring semes-
ter of the 2012-13 academic year has been announced.
Qualication is limited to students who have attained
outstanding academic achievement.
To be eligible, students must have earned not less than
a 3.5 semester grade point average and have carried a mini-
mum of 12 semester credits
Included in the list are Corina Colon, Genoa City; and
Lindsay Meyerhofer and Lauren Trautner, both of Lake
Geneva.
UW-Stevens Point honors local students
The UW-Stevens Point honored 2,645 undergraduate
students for attaining high grade point averages during the
spring semester of the 2012-13 academic year.
High honor citations go to those with grade point aver-
ages from 3.75 to 3.89 and honor recognition is accorded to
those with grade point averages from 3.50 to 3.74.
Students who received honors include Ashlie Jones,
Lake Geneva.
Andrea Schneider, Lake Geneva, received high honors.
Wagar named to deans list at Aurora
Nathan Wagar, Walworth, was named to the deans list
at Aurora University for the spring 2013 semester, receiv-
ing high honors.
The high honors list recognizes students who attain a
4.0 grade point average while completing at least 12 credit
hours during the semester.
8B The Regional News July 25, 2013
PUBLIC NOTICES
WALWORTH
SCHOOL BOARD
Knorr received four requests for the use of
the district facilities by the Walworth 4-H
Club for two separate use of district facili-
ties, Spirit of the Lakes Chorus, and
Immanuel United Church of Christ. Motion
by Dr. Schmitz to approve the requests, as
presented. Second by Mrs. Heyer. Motion
carried 4-0.
c. Donations- Mrs. Knorr received
a Paint Grant donation from the True Value
Foundation for our school district and a sec-
ond donation from one of Ms. Kris Koltess
parent for $100.00 to be used for a field trip
and for any classroom supplies. Motion by
Dr. Schmitz, with gratitude, to accept the
donations. Second by Mr. Hildebrandt.
Motion carried 3-0. Mrs. Heyer abstained.
d. First Reading: Board Policies
533.1, 345.42, and 453 + 453 Rules-
Updated copies of these policies were e-
mailed to the board members.
e. 2013-2014 Dousman Bus
Contract- Motion by Mrs. Heyer to approve
the 2013-2014 Dousman Bus Contract, as
presented, with a 2% increase. Second by
Dr. Schmitz. Motion carried 4-0.
f. 2013-2014 Designation of
Newspaper- Motion by Dr. Schmitz to
approve the Lake Geneva Regional News
as the Walworth Jt. District #1s designated
newspaper. Second by Mrs. Heyer. Motion
carried 4-0.
g. 2013-2014 School Fees- Mrs.
Knorr recommended the school fees, break-
fast fees, and lunch fees be increased.
Motion by Mr. Hildebrandt to approve an
increase in the school fees, breakfast fees,
and lunch fees, as presented. Second by
Mrs. Heyer. Motion carried 4-0.
h. 2013-2014 Food Bids, Milk
Bids, and Bread Bids- Mrs. Knorr presented
recommendations of Food Service Bid with
Dean Foods for milk, Alpha Baking for
bread, and Fox River for food service.
Motion by Dr. Schmitz to approve the bids,
as presented. Second by Mr. Hildebrandt.
Motion carried 4-0.
i. 2013-2014 Support Staff
Raises- Motion by Mr. Hildebrandt to
approve a 2% increase for the 2013-2014
Support Staff raises. Second by Dr.
Schmitz. Motion carried 4-0.
The next meeting will be held on
Thursday, July 18, 2013 at 6:00 P.M.
Motion by Mr. Hildebrandt to adjourn
the meeting. Second by Mrs. Heyer.
Motion carried 4-0. The meeting was
adjourned at 7:55 P.M.
Minutes Prepared For: Mary Heyer, Clerk
By: Barbara Dade,
Executive Secretary
July 25, 2013
WNAXLP
WALWORTH
SCHOOL BOARD
bers. Mr. Jacob Ries was absent from the
regular board meeting.
1. Pledge of Allegiance- The
meeting opened with the Pledge of
Allegiance along with a moment of silence
for Dr. Irwin Bruhn, a school board member
of the Walworth Jt. District #1 for 25 years.
2. Communication from the
Public- There was no communication from
the public at this time.
3. Approval of Minutes, Monthly
Invoices, and Financial Statements-
Consent motion by Dr. Schmitz to approve
the open session minutes from the meeting
held on May 20, 2013, the special closed
meeting minutes from June 12, 2013, and
June 20, 2013, and the special meeting
minutes from May 23, 2013, and May 31,
2013. Second by Mr. Hildebrandt. Motion
carried 4-0. Consent motion by Mr.
Hildebrandt to approve the June invoices
including general fund checks #51226-
#51320 totaling $153,579.39, payroll checks
#23580-#23588 totaling $1,976.78, direct
deposit checks #900010355-#900010688
totaling $381,891.97, and online payments
#668-#680 totaling $232,138.18. Second
by Dr. Schmitz. Motion carried 3-0. Mrs.
Heyer abstained.
4. Reports-
a. 2013-2014 Maintenance Items-
Buildings and Grounds Report- Mr. Wolski,
Buildings and Grounds Coordinator, report-
ed on the 2013-2014 maintenance items in
prioritized order.
b. Board Policy Committee
Update- Mrs. Heyer reviewed the board
policies worked on at the last Board Policy
Committee meeting. Board Policy #870
was tabled until the next board meeting.
c. 2013-2014 Master Schedule
with New Lunch Schedule- Mrs. Knorr and
Mrs. Larson distributed/reviewed the new
2013-2014 Master Schedule along with the
new lunch schedule.
d. Presidents Update- Mrs.
Freeman reported a letter was sent out to all
of the 17 public complainants which com-
pletes the cycle.
e. Business Office Report- Ms.
Bourke and Mrs. Knorr reviewed/distributed
the part-time Mandatory Health Insurance
Law Options Chart in detail.
f. Principals Report- Ms. Larson
reviewed/discussed/distributed: 1) the
Principals Report which was emailed to the
board members; and 2) a chart of the Qtr. 4
Absences.
g. Administrators Report- Mrs.
Knorr reviewed/distributed: 1) information
regarding the DPI Educator Effectiveness
Pilot Project-Year 2; 2) updated information
regarding the summer meals program; 3)
information regarding a DPI letter for
Special Education Self-Assessment; 4) the
2013-2014 English and Language Arts
Proposal for new textbooks, and 5) the hir-
ing of Mrs. Katie Cronin, Kitchen Assistant.
5. Old Business
a. Second Reading: Board
Policies 421- Updated copies were e-mailed
to the board members. Motion by Mrs.
Heyer to approved the board policy, as pre-
sented. Second by Dr. Schmitz. Motion
carried 4-0.
6. New Business
a. Resignation- Motion by Mrs.
Heyer to accept the resignation, with deep
regret, of Mrs. Amy Pulokas, ELO
(Gifted/Talented) Coordinator, as presented.
Second by Mr. Hildebrandt. Motion carried
4-0.
b. Use of District Facilities- Mrs.
LAKE GENEVA
PUBLIC NOTICES
65 Cu. Yds. Excavation Below Sub
grade (EBS)
130 Ton Granular Backfill for Excava
tion Below Subgrade
Various Pavement Marking on STH 50
and Other Locations
Traffic Control
Lawn Restoration
Erosion Control
This project is partially funded with
Wisconsin Department of Transportation
Local Road Improvement (LRIP) funds.
All Bidders shall comply with the Contractor
Qualification Ordinance of the City of Lake
Geneva requiring pre qualification of
Bidders prior to submitting bids or to act as
a Contractor or Subcontractor who act as a
general contractor on any public improve-
ment project. Application for Qualification
forms may be obtained from the Lake
Geneva Utility Commission at the office of
the Director of Public Works, 361 Main
Street, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin 53147, or
at Crispell-Snyder, Inc., A GAI Company,
700 Geneva Parkway, Lake Geneva,
Wisconsin 53147.
TIME AND PLACE OF BID OPENING:
Sealed Bids will be received until 10:00
a.m., Local Time, on the 1st day of August,
2013, in the office of the City Clerk, 626
Geneva Street, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin
53147. After the official Bid closing time, the
Bids will be publicly opened and read aloud.
BIDDING DOCUMENTS: The Bidding
Documents are on file for inspection at the
office of the City Clerk, 626 Geneva Street,
Lake Geneva, Wisconsin 53147, and the
offices of Crispell-Snyder, Inc., A GAI
Company, 700 Geneva Parkway, Lake
Geneva, Wisconsin 53147. All submitted
Bidding Documents, including addendums,
shall be official copies obtained directly from
Crispell-Snyder, Inc., A GAI Company. Bids
prepared on downloaded (internet) docu-
ments, which cannot be verified as being
obtained directly from Crispell-Snyder, Inc.,
A GAI Company, will not be accepted.
Copies may be obtained by applying to
Crispell-Snyder, Inc., A GAI Company, P.O.
Box 550, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin 53147.
A $30.00 refundable payment for each set of
Bidding Documents is required. A separate
$10.00 non-refundable handling charge for
each Document set that is not picked up, is
also required.
Copies of the Bidding Documents may be
secured in person at the Crispell-Snyder, A
GAI Company, office in Lake Geneva,
Wisconsin, eliminating the handling charge.
The refundable deposit will be returned to
the apparent low Bidder and all other plan
holders who return the Documents to
Crispell-Snyder, A GAI Company, in usable
condition within 10 business days after the
opening of Bids. These are the only condi-
tions under which the deposit will be
returned.
LEGAL PROVISIONS: The Contract letting
shall be subject to the provisions of
Sections 62.15, 66.0901, and 66.0903 of
the Wisconsin Statutes.
WAGE RATES: Contractors shall be
required to pay not less than the prevailing
wage rates on the Project as established by
the State of Wisconsin, Department of
Workforce Development. Copies of these
wage rates are on file in the office of the City
Clerk and incorporated into the Contract
Documents.
BID SECURITY: Bid Security in the amount
of not less than 5% nor more than 10% of
the Bid shall accompany each Bid in accor-
dance with the Instructions to Bidders.
Acceptable Bid Security shall be Bid Bond,
Certified Check, Cashier s Check, or
Money Order.
CONTRACT SECURITY: The Bidder to
whom a Contract is awarded shall furnish a
Performance Bond and a Payment Bond
each in an amount equal to the Contract
Price.
BID REJECTION/ACCEPTANCE: Owner
reserves the right to reject any and all Bids,
waive informalities in bidding or to accept
the Bid or Bids, which best serve the inter-
ests of Owner.
Published by authority of the City of Lake
Geneva
By:
James Connors, Mayor
Michael Hawes, Clerk
CRISPELL-SNYDER, INC.
Professional Consultants |
A GAI Company
July 18, 25, 2013
WNAXLP
WALWORTH
SCHOOL BOARD
WALWORTH JT. DISTRICT #1
WALWORTH, WISCONSIN 53184
REGULAR BOARD OF
EDUCATION MEETING
MONDAY, JUNE 24, 2013
MINUTES
The meeting was called to order by
Mrs. Kelly Freeman, President, at 5:30 P.M.
Members in attendance included: Mr.
Richard Hildebrandt, Mrs. Mary Heyer, and
Dr. Valerie Schmitz. Also in attendance was
Mrs. Pamela Knorr, District Administrator.
Motion by Mrs. Heyer to adjourn to closed
session pursuant to S19.85 (1)(c) consider-
ation of employment, promotion, compensa-
tion or performance evaluation data of any
public employee which the governmental
body has jurisdiction or exercises responsi-
bility. Re: Support Staff Salaries for 2013-
2014. Second by Dr. Schmitz. Roll call vote
4-0. The meeting was adjourned into closed
session at 5:31 P.M. Mrs. Freeman recon-
vened the meeting back into open session
at 6:04 P.M. Also in attendance were Ms.
Pamela Larson, Principal; Ms. Karie
Bourke, Business Administrative Assistant;
Ms. Jade Bolack and Mr. John Halverson,
media representatives; and three staff mem-
TOWN OF
BLOOMFIELD
Southeast corner of Certified Survey Map
No. 3904, recorded in Volume 24, Page 6 of
Walworth County Certified Survey Maps;
thence N 011840 W 290.00 feet to a
found iron rod marking the Northeast corner
of said Certified Survey Map No. 3904;
thence N 884120 E 245.23 feet; thence S
012121 E 462.33 feet to the point of
beginning, and containing 76,327 square
feet or 1.752 acre(s) of land, more or less,
from A1 Farmland Preservation District to
A5 Agricultural Rural Residential District
zoning and division of the above-referenced
lands from tax key parcel number
MB26000002, Twin Lakes Road.
Copies of the Certified Survey Map
and all applications pertaining to this matter
are available for inspection at the Town
Clerks office, Bloomfield Town Hall during
normal business hours. All interest parties
are invited to attend and provide comment.
Notice is hereby
given this 24th day of July 2013.
/s/ Cynthia L. Howard, Town
Clerk
July 25 & August 1, 2013
WNAXLP
GENOA CITY
PUBLIC NOTICES
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ON
VILLAGE OF GENOA CITY,
WISCONSIN
VARIANCEBOARD OF APPEALS
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a
Public Hearing will be held on Monday,
August 5th, 2013 at 7:00 p.m. at Village
Hall, 715 Walworth St. Genoa City
Wisconsin due to insufficient lot area and
setback due to small lot and previous place-
ment of house. Requirements have been
submitted to the Village of Genoa City
Board of Appeals by Jerad and Holly Smith
on the following property:
609 Park Street
TFR200002A
THE NORTH 50 OF LOT 1, BLOCK 2
OF FREEMANS 2ND ADDITION TO THE
VILLAGE OF GENOA CITY, WALWORTH
COUNTY, WISCONSIN
This hearing is to give residents,
property owners, and interested parties an
opportunity to express their opinions on the
above-mentioned variance
Dated this 25th day of July, 2013.
Claudia Jurewicz
Clerk/Treasurer
Village of Genoa City
July 25, 2013
WNAXLP
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ON
VILLAGE OF GENOA CITY,
WISCONSIN
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a
Public Hearing will be held on Thursday,
Aug. 8th, 2013 at 6:30 p.m. at Village Hall,
715 Walworth St. before the Planning
Commission of the Village of Genoa City,
Wisconsin on Conditional Use Permit
Application under 310-53 filed by Charles
Schuren, Builder (DIEMODE TOOL, owner)
proposed use of structure of site in detail for
66 x 38 x 15 storage/warehouse addition to
existing building and may be permitted as a
conditional use on the following described
property:
150 Elizabeth Lane; THBP00015
Zoning: M-1; Industrial District
All interested parties in the above
matter are invited to attend. The Village
Planning Commission will be in session on
Thursday, Aug 8th, 2013, at 6:30 p.m. at the
Village Hall, 715 Walworth Street, Genoa
City, Wisconsin to consider any objections
that may have been filed and to hear all per-
sons desiring to be heard.
Dated this 25th day of July, 2013.
Bill Antti, Chairperson,
Village Planning Commission
July 25, 2013
WNAXLP
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
VILLAGE OF
GENOA CITY, WISCONSIN
AMENDMENT TO THE
MUNICIPAL CODE OF THE
VILLAGE OF GENOA CITY
REGARDING ORDINANCE 114-8 IMPACT
FEES FOR
LAND DEVELOPMENT
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a
Public Hearing will be held on Thursday,
August 8th, 2013 at 7:00 PM at Village Hall,
715 Walworth Street before the Planning
Commission of the Village of Genoa City,
Wisconsin to solicit comments on proposed
Amendment to Ordinance 114-8 Impact fees
for land development for Water, Park, Law
Enforcement Fire & Rescue and Library of
the Village of Genoa City, Walworth and
Kenosha Counties.
A copy of the proposed ordinance
may be obtained at the office of the clerk.
All interested persons desiring to be
heard in the above matter are invited to
attend.
Dated this 25th day of July, 2013.
William Antti, Chairperson,
Village Planning Commission
July 25, 2013
WNAXLP
LAKE GENEVA
PUBLIC NOTICES
OFFICIAL NOTICE TO BIDDERS
2013 STREET IMPROVEMENT
PROGRAM
CITY OF LAKE GENEVA
WALWORTH COUNTY, WISCONSIN
OWNER: The City of Lake Geneva
hereby gives notice that sealed Bids will be
received for the construction of the 2013
Street Improvement Program.
The Project consists of one prime
Contract and is identified as follows:
Project No. W130141.04:
24,235 Sq. Yds. Asphaltic Pavement
Milling
935 Ton Remove and Replace Base
Aggregate
5,313 Ton Asphaltic Concrete Pave
ment, Type E-0.3
3 Each Adjust Manhole Covers
218 Lin. Ft. Remove and Replace
Curb and Gutter
1 Lump Sum Common Excavation
PUBLIC
NOTICES
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT
WALWORTH COUNTY
Notice to Creditors
(Informal Administration)
Case No. 13PR116
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF
EUNICE O. BRINCHMAN
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE:
1. An application for informal adminis-
tration was filed.
2. The decedent, with date of birth
June 2, 1919 and date of death May 29,
2013, was domiciled in Walworth County,
State of Wisconsin, with a mailing address
of 133 N. Potawatomi Rd., (Box 603)
Williams Bay, WI 53191
3. All interested persons waived
notice.
4. The deadline for filing a claim
against the decedents estate is October 4,
2013.
5. A claim may be filed at the
Walworth County Probate, P.O. Box 1001,
1800 County Rd. NN, Elkhorn, Wisconsin,
Room 2085.
Wendy A. Esch,
Deputy Probate Registrar
June 28, 2013
Bonnie Gene Olberg
2525 Countryside Dr.
Delavan, WI 53115
July 11, 18, 25, 2013
WNAXLP
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT
WALWORTH COUNTY
AMENDED SUMMONS
Money Judgment: 30301
Case No. 13CV519
Our File: 1697514
CITIBANK, N.A.
701 E 60TH ST NORTH
SIOUX FALLS, SD, 57117
Plaintiff,
vs.
BRAD A NICHOLS
W3823 PARKER DR
LAKE GENEVA WI 53147-4108
Defendant(s).
THE STATE OF WISCONSIN, To each per-
son named above as Defendant:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
the Plaintiff named above has filed a lawsuit
or other legal action against you. The com-
plaint, which is also served upon you, states
the nature and basis of the legal action.
Within 40 days after 07/31/2013 you
must respond with a written answer, as that
term is used in chapter 802 of the Wisconsin
Statutes, to the complaint. The court may
reject or disregard an answer that does not
follow the requirements of the statutes. The
answer must be sent or delivered to the
court whose address is 1800 COUNTY
HWY NN, ELKHORN, WI 53121 and to
RAUSCH, STURM, ISRAEL, ENERSON &
HORNIK, LLC, Plaintiffs attorney, whose
address is shown below. You may have an
attorney help or represent you.
If you do not provide a proper answer
to the complaint or provide a written
demand for said complaint within the 40 day
period, the court may grant judgment
against you for the award of money or other
legal action requested in the complaint, and
you may lose your right to object to anything
that is or may be incorrect in the complaint.
A judgment may be enforced as provided by
law. A judgment awarding money may
become a lien against any real estate you
own now or in the future and may also be
enforced by garnishment or seizure of prop-
erty.
Dated: July 2, 2013.
/s/ Ryan M. Peterson
RAUSCH, STURM, ISRAEL,
ENERSON & HORNIK LLC
ATTORNEYS IN THE PRACTICE
OF DEBT COLLECTION
250 N. Sunny Slope Rd., Suite 300
Brookfield WI 53005
Toll Free: (877) 667-8010
Attorney for the Plaintiff
July 18, 25, & August 1, 2013
WNAXLP
TOWN OF
BLOOMFIELD
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
Town of Bloomfield, Walworth County
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
Town of Bloomfield Planning & Zoning
Commission will be conducting a Public
Hearing to be held on the 14th day of
August, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. at Bloomfield
Town Hall, N1100 Town Hall Road,
Bloomfield, WI to consider rezoning the fol-
lowing land:
A part of the Southeast of the
Northeast of Section 26, Town 1 North,
Range 18 East, Bloomfield Township,
Walworth County, Wisconsin, described as
follows: Commence at the East corner of
said Section 26; thence S 884120 W
861.94 feet along the South line of the
Northeast of said Section 26 to the point
of beginning; thence continue S 884120
W 30.00 feet to the Southeast corner of
Certified Survey Map No. 336, recorded in
Volume 2, Page 113 of Walworth County
Certified Survey Maps; thence N 012552
W 172.46 feet to a found iron pipe marking
the Northeast corner of said Certified
Survey Map; thence S 883922 W 215.23
feet to a found iron rod marking the
Southeast corner of Certified Survey Map
No. 3904, recorded in Volume 24, Page 6 of
Walworth County Certified Survey Maps;
thence N 011840 W 290.00 feet to a
found iron rod marking the Northeast corner
of said Certified Survey Map No. 3904;
thence N 884120 E 245.23 feet; thence S
012121 E 462.33 feet to the point of
beginning, and containing 76,327 square
feet or 1.752 acre(s) of land, more or less,
from A1 Farmland Preservation District to
A5 Agricultural Rural Residential District
zoning and division of the above-referenced
lands from tax key parcel number
MB26000002, Twin Lakes Road.
Immediately following the Public
Hearing, the Town of Bloomfield Town
Board will be having a Special Meeting for
the purpose of considering approval of
rezoning the following land:
A part of the Southeast of the
Northeast of Section 26, Town 1 North,
Range 18 East, Bloomfield Township,
Walworth County, Wisconsin, described as
follows: Commence at the East corner of
said Section 26; thence S 884120 W
861.94 feet along the South line of the
Northeast of said Section 26 to the point
of beginning; thence continue S 884120
W 30.00 feet to the Southeast corner of
Certified Survey Map No. 336, recorded in
Volume 2, Page 113 of Walworth County
Certified Survey Maps; thence N 012552
W 172.46 feet to a found iron pipe marking
the Northeast corner of said Certified
Survey Map; thence S 883922 W 215.23
feet to a found iron rod marking the
PUBLIC
NOTICES
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT
WALWORTH COUNTY
AMENDED SUMMONS
Case No. 13CV000401
CAPITAL ONE BANK USA NA
140 E SHORE DR 12017-0380
GLEN ALLEN VA 23059
Plaintiff,
vs.
ANGELE PETROS
Defendant.
THE STATE OF WISCONSIN
TO: ANGELE PETROS
1618 MILLER RD
PO BOX 505
LAKE GENEVA WI 53147-9998
You are hereby notified that the
Plaintiff named above has filed a lawsuit or
other legal action against you. The
Complaint, which is also served on you,
states the nature and basis of the legal
action.
Within Forty (40) days after July 11,
2013, you must respond with a written
answer, as that term is used in Chapter 802
of the Wisconsin Statutes, to the Complaint.
The court may reject or disregard an answer
that does not follow the requirements of the
statutes. The answer must be sent or deliv-
ered to the court, whose address is: CLERK
OF CIRCUIT COURT, WALWORTH COUN-
TY, 1800 COUNTY RD NN, ELKHORN WI
53121 and the Kohn Law Firm, Plaintiffs
attorneys, whose address is 735 N. Water
St., Suite 1300, Milwaukee, WI 53202. You
may have an attorney help or represent you.
If no Complaint accompanies this
Summons you must respond within the said
40 day period with a written demand for a
copy of the Complaint by mailing or deliver-
ing said written demand to the court and to
the Plaintiffs attorneys at their respective
addresses listed above.
If you do not provide a proper answer to the
Complaint or provide a written demand for
said complaint within the 40 day period, the
court may grant judgment against you for
the award of money or other legal action
requested in the Complaint, and you may
lose your right to object to anything that is or
may be incorrect in the Complaint. A judg-
ment may be enforced as provided by law.
A judgment awarding money may become a
lien against any real estate you own now or
in the future, and may be enforced by gar-
nishment or seizure of property.
Dated at Milwaukee, Wisconsin June
13 2013.
KOHN LAW FIRM S.C.
/s/ Joseph R. Johnson
State Bar No. 1053052
Attorney for Plaintiff
Our File # 753377
July 11, 18, & 25, 2013
WNAXLP
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT
WALWORTH COUNTY
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
Case No. 12CV00077
WALWORTH STATE BANK,
Plaintiff,
v.
BENCHMARK LAND & DEVELOPMENT,
LLC a/k/a BENCHMARK LAND AND
DEVELOPMENT LLC, a Wisconsin limited
liability company,
WILLIAM McCARRON a/k/a
WILLIAM E. McCARRON
a/k/a WILLIAM EDWARD McCARRON,
JEAN J. McCARRON, and
THE COTTAGES OF LAKE GENEVA HILLS
CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION,
Defendants.
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a
judgment of foreclosure entered on
December 20, 2012 in the amount of
$360,036.51, the Sheriff will sell the
described premises at public auction as fol-
lows:
TIME: August 15, 2013 at 10:00 a.m.
TERMS: Pursuant to said judgment,
10% of the successful bid must be paid to
the sheriff at the sale in cash or certified
funds, payable to the Clerk of Courts (per-
sonal checks cannot and will not be accept-
ed). The balance of the successful bid must
be paid to the Clerk of Courts in cash,
cashiers check or certified funds no later
than ten days after the courts confirmation
of the sale or else the 10% down payment is
forfeited to the plaintiff. The property is sold
as is and subject to all liens and encum-
brances. Purchaser to pay all transfer and
recording fees and costs of any title evi-
dence.
PLACE: In the lobby of the Walworth
County Law Enforcement Center, 1770 Co.
Hwy. NN, Elkhorn, Wisconsin.
LEGAL DESCRIPTION: PARCEL 1: Units
5, 6, 7, 9, 10 and 13, together with said
units undivided appurtenant interest in the
common elements (and the exclusive use of
the limited common elements appurtenant
to said unit) all in The Cottages of Lake
Geneva Hills Condominium, a condominium
declared and existing under and by virtue of
the Condominium Ownership Act of the
State of Wisconsin and recorded by a
Declaration as such condominium in the
Office of the Register of Deeds for Walworth
County, Wisconsin, on June 6, 2006, as
Document No. 678653, and amended by
First Amendment to the Declaration of
Condominium The Cottages of Lake
Geneva Hills recorded June 1, 2007 as
Document No. 709825, said condominium
being located in the City of Lake Geneva,
County of Walworth, State of Wisconsin on
the real estate described in said Declaration
and incorporated herein by this reference
thereto.
Tax Key Nos. ZCOT 00005, ZCOT
00006, ZCOT 00007, ZCOT 00009, ZCOT
00010 and ZCOT 00013
PROPERTY ADDRESS: Platt Avenue, Lake
Geneva, WI 53147
DATED: July 11, 2013
Attorney Edward F. Thompson
State Bar No. 1013187
CLAIR LAW OFFICES, S.C.
617 E. Walworth Ave.
P.O. Box 445
Delavan, WI 53115-0445
Phone: (262) 728-9196
Clair Law Offices, S.C. is attempting
to collect a debt on our clients behalf and
any information obtained will be used for
that purpose. If you have previously
received a discharge in a Chapter 7 bank-
ruptcy case, this communication should not
be construed as an attempt to hold you per-
sonally liable for the debt.
July 18, 25, Aug. 1, 2013
WNAXLP
11 A.M. FRIDAY
contact Sue at
262-248-4444
sue@lakegenevanews.net
CLASSIFIED
AD DEADLINE
contact Sue at
262-248-4444
sue@lakegenevanews.net
MUST BE PLACED
BY 12 P.M. MONDAY
TO APPEAR IN THE
UPCOMING ISSUE
LEGAL NOTICES
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HELP WANTED
SHORT-ORDER COOK
Champs Sports Bar
747 Main Street Lake Geneva, WI
Apply in person or call 262.248.6008
ALSO INTERVIEWING FOR WAITSTAFF
HELP WANTED
Adult interested in learning fudge making.
This position can lead to a permanent part
time position. Will train the right individual.
KILWINS OF LAKE GENEVA
772 W. Main St. Lake Geneva, WI
Please Call: 248-4400 & ask for
Lynn or Amanda
TRAINING!!
TRAINING!!
TRAINING!!
The #1 Real Estate organization in Wisconsin is searching for the right
candidates to partner with the most rewarding and exciting business oppor-
tunity today.
SHOREWEST REALTORS is now interviewing for our next training
class. Contact John Tisdall at jtisdall@shorewest.com or call
(262) 248-1020 today to learn more or to attend one of our career seminars.
July 25, 2013 The Regional News 9B
Residential
Rentals
84
Residential
Rentals
84
G& S PROPERTIES Office 694-3077
Call Today to Schedule an Appointment!
7919 60th Ave. #103
1004202
24 Hr. Maintenance, easy access to the interstate, plus great local shopping
RENTALS STARTING AT
$
640 per month
2 Bedroom/2 bath
all appliances, full size washer/
dryer, private patio, balcony,
private entry, attached garage
2 Bedroom/1 bath
all appliances, on site laundry,
private patio, balcony,
secured entry, garages available
Quiet
Residential Living
MMW Mapartments
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Kenoshas best in apartment living!
1 Beds from $560
2 Beds from $670
552-8365
Residential
For Sale
98
ALLENWOOD CONDO. Upper, Interior Location,
2 BR, Family Room, all appliances, attached
garage, 1426 sq. ft. 262.497.8769.
FOR SALE: GARAGE AND LOT in Lake Geneva
on West Barry Street. 262-248-4771
Resort-Vacation
Property
108
LAKE GENEVA TOWNHOME at Grand Geneva
Resort & Spa. 2 BD 1.5 BA $199,000 Enjoy
the amenities of the resort. 847-502-4567
Manufactured
Home Sale/Rent
112
PARK CITY, IL Senior Community. Marlette.
1344 sq. ft. Excellent condition. 2 BR & 2 full
baths. Large covered deck & carport. New
Central Air. $45,000. 847-204-0117.
Motorcycles 114
HARLEY DAVIDSON 2006 SOFTTAIL. $9900
OBO. 5,000 miles; Custom paint. Lots of
chrome. Ph. 262-620-1393.
HONDA SHADOW 1100 CC 1997 $2,800 -
Low miles, excellent condition, 3 bags, new
tires, custom exhaust. Ph. 847-271-0798
Antiques, Classic
Cars & Parts
119
CADILLAC 1992 CONVERTIBLE $7,995 One
of a kind! 44,000 miles. Ph. 262-694-3962
or 262-818-2001.
Automobiles 120
04 MERCURY MARQUIS 62k, new tires, bat-
tery, leather. Remote start. Grandma kept.
$5,900. 262-215-6634
CHEVROLET IMPALA 2002 $2,700 OBO - Good
runner, strictly highway miles, high mileage,
good runner. Ph. 847-525-7204.
FORD 2001 TAURUS $3800 Flex fuel, 2nd
owner. 120k miles. New transmission.
Clean carfax. Great shape. 262-657-0507.
PORSCHE 911 SC 1978 $17,500 OBOTarga
top, great condition! Rebuilt motor, runs/
sounds great, must sell! 262-818-1623
Vans & SUVs 121
CHEVROLET Venture LT 2000 Van. Loaded,
silver/gray, good condition. $2,500. 262-949-
2584
FORD EXPLORER 1997 $1995 - New rotors,
brakes and radiator, tune up, 126,000 mi.,
Ph. 262-705-5163
MERCURY MOUNTAINEER 1999 $1800 -
Leather, air, sunroof, V-8, runs good.
Ph. 239-850-3114
Residential
Rentals
84
10 NAZ MOTEL
Effeciency apartment, Free HBO & WI-FI,
Kitchenettes, Low Weekly & Daily Rates
847-746-1400
1004 HARBOR MOTEL
Efficiency Apt. Clean with Cable TV, internet,
phone, refrigerator & microwave,
Kitchenette, sleeping room. Daily/weekly
rates.
847-872-5400
1128 ABODE MOTEL
Sleeping rooms, Kitchenettes,
Free wi-fi, Cable TV. Low Daily/Weekly Rates
847-872-3476
17th AVE., 4428 2 BR lower. Heat, water &
appliances included. Laundry in basement.
Off-street parking. $750 mo. Housing o.k., no
pets. 262-757-5439/414-943-5439
27TH AVE., 7210 Clean, quiet 2 BR UPPER.
Appliances, deck, parking. $700 mo. includes
heat and water. References required Ph.
262-945-0127.
44TH PL., 1920 LOWER 3BR APT., 2 car
garage, laundry, basement storage, appli-
ances. $925/mo. + utilities. 262-945-9240
60TH ST., 1615
FREE MICROWAVE
FREE HEAT & HOT WATER!
COMPLETELY REMODELED.
T1 BR, $629
2 BR, $689. Elevator, underground
parking, locked lobby, close to shopping
& bus line. No smoking building.
Ask for Everett, 262-617-1104
BRISTOL 19737 - 84th Place. 2 BR, 2 BA
UPPER condo style unit, Attached 1 car
garage. private laundry Pets OK. $930+sec.
Char @ 209-481-0000.
BRISTOL19727 84TH PL. 2 BR, 1 BA LOWER.
Garage. Laundry. Basement storage. Private
entrance Pets o.k. $780+sec. 209-481-0000.
LAKE GENEVAKitchenettes and sleeping
rooms. Affordable. 262-248-4988.
ROOM FOR RENT Plaza Inn, 5711 7th AVE.
Extended stay rooms for rent. 1 week, $90 or
$100 + 2 weeks advanced payment. Call 262-
653-0463 or 262-652-7322
SHARON, WI Modern 1 and 2 BD apts.
Country living in Historic Sharon. 20 minutes
from Lake Geneva, 15 from Delavan. 10 from
Walworth. Located on Hwy 67. 262-736-
2300
WALWORTH, 115 Maple, 3 BD, 1 bath house,
no pets, no smoking, $850 per month, securi-
ty deposit required, call (262) 275-2127
between 8 am and 5 pm.
ZION EAST SIDE VALUES1BR units on 2nd
floor, staring at $575 per month plus gas,
electric, & security deposit. No pets. Ph. 847-
903-7563
ZION TOWNHOUSE Nicely updated 3BR,
end unit, 1.5BA, full heated basement w/
washer/dryer hookups. Living room has nice
view of huge front yard, private driveway,
Tenant pays all utilities. Close to shopping
restaurants, transportation.224-419-5552
Business/
Commercial Rentals
88
LAKE GENEVA Commercial condo #208 located
at 700 Veterans Parkway. 1480 sq. ft. Terms
negotiable. Contact 608-289-3583
Miscellaneous 50
PRINT Thomas Kinkade.
Framed print titled Hometown Chapel.
The edition has been limited to 4950 artist
proofs on canvas, hand signed and
numbered. The print has been appraised
at $2100 by local art shop.
Asking price of $1500.
Call 262-658-3857 for more information.
TRUCK (REMOTE) Traxas Stampede RC
truck with 2 batteries and 2 chargers. 1
charger is a Dynamite Vision Peak 2. $250.
OBO. Ph. 262-694-4398.
WANTED TO BUY BUYING Gold & Silver -
coins - paper money - pocket & wrist watches
- knifes - swords & military items & more!
262-497-6688 Joe
Recreation,
Exercise & Sports
52
1991 BASS TRACKER BASS BUGGY 18 FT
PONTOON BOAT
WITH 25 HP JOHNSON MOTOR
(SEVERAL NEW FEATURES ADDED)
Motor gone thru, new water pump & carb, runs
excellent ** added power trim to the motor
** brand new long shaft trolling motor w/foot
control ** New Hummingbird #561 depth
finder & fish finder ** New 2012 Phoenix
bunk trailer, will adjust to accommodate a 20
ft pontoon boat ** new canopy top and boot
** one new 12 gal. plastic gas tank ** just
rebuilt two front fishing seats ** live well **
brand new outside cover & motor cover **
GREAT FAMILY OR FISHING BOAT
** MUST SEE TO APPRECIATE **
$6500.00 CALL (815) 708-2008
CUSTOM BOAT COVERS/seat upholstering,
motor & drive repair/replacements. Stereo
installations, buffing, waxing, indoor boat stor-
age w/free winterizing & wash. Since 1963
AmericanMarineDelavan.Com
262-728-3453
Pets, Supplies
& Services
62
DOG Beautiful Golden Retriever male
pup born June 3 from AKC registered
parents. Pup has 1st shots, vet exam,
dew claws removed, dewormed.
$600.00. 262-308-4303.
PET CREMATION SERVICES
Pets are family too! Cremation
services for your pets. Kenosha
Funeral Services & Crematory.
Ph. 262-652-1943 - 8226 Sheridan Rd.
Residential
Rentals
84
1 & 2 BRs STARTING AT $675
www.professionalrealty.biz
262-942-8399 Pet Friendly
1 & 2 BEDROOMS
2524 - 18TH STREET
$670 - $750 HEAT INCLUDED!
262-551-7255
CALL FOR SUMMER SPECIAL
Tree-Lined Community Near Bike Trail
1000 sq. ft., Balconies, Garages
SHOWN BY APPOINTMENT
1805 BIRCH RD Kenosha, WI 53140
www.petrettiapartments.com
1 BEDROOM from $560
2 BEDROOM from $670
GAS FOR HEATING, COOKING
AND HOT WATER INCLUDED
262-552-8365
WOOD CREEK APARTMENTS
Mon.-Fri. 9-6; Sat. 10-4. Sunday by Appt.
http://www.edwardrose.com/woodcreek
Help Wanted 20
TEACHER
We are a unique academically focused
preschool in Kenosha, Wisconsin. Our
professional team is looking to add an
organized, detail-oriented leader with a fun
and friendly demeanor. If you have strong
communication skills, are creative, and can
multi-task consider this part-time position.
Competitive pay. Requirements include
elementary school teaching credentials
and/or early childhood degree or certificate
and a positive attitude.
Please send your resume with qualifications
to: Box 134, 5800 7th Avenue
Kenosha, WI 53140
Job Site ID#1008064
TEMPORARY HELP
Ukes Harley-Davidson is looking for
temporary help during this summers
110th Anniversary party! Need to fill hours
from Aug 26th - Sept 1st. Please send
resume to brenda@ukeshd.com
or stop in and fill out application.
5995 120th Ave., Kenosha, WI 53144
Job Site ID#1008120
Information
Services
23
HAVE YOU DEVELOPED DIABETES FROM LIPI-
TOR? If you used Lipitor between December
1996 and the present time and were diag-
nosed with diabetes while taking Lipitor, you
may be entitled to compensation. Call Charles
H. Johnson toll-free 1-800-535-5727
Service
Directory
26
FENCING Alex Fence. We beat any price.
Top quality work. 25% off any written estimate.
We do repairs. Free estimates. Call Alex, 262-
344-6736
FLOORING INSTALLATION Baumbach Flooring
installs your carpet, vinyl and tile. 262-245-
6168
PAINTING BY PATRICK Interior/exterior,
quality & commitment! Insured & bonded.
262-960-5750 www.paintingbypatrick.com
(look for a valuable coupon).
ROOFING J&R Roofing. All types of roofing
and exterior work done. Low prices and Senior
discounts. Free estimates. Ph. 262-455-
5937.
Rummage,
Estate, Moving
49
KENOSHA - ESTATE SALE! See ad in July 26th
Kenosha News. See estatesales.net for pics.
#8055
W. ALPINE SPRINGS DR., 313 VERNON
HILLS Garage Sale July 26, 27, 28, 8am -
5p, off Rte. 60 behind Walgreens. Clothing for
all sizes & occasions, household, some fur-
nishings.;
#8813
WAUKEGANCountr y Lane Subdivision
Community Garage Sale, July 26 & 27, 9am-
4pm, 3282 Victoria Ln. Waukegan, IL 60087,
Dir.: Delany & Yorkhouse, W to Country Ln.,
Sponsored by Brenda Lawler REMAX SHOW-
CASE, 847-596-6109
Miscellaneous 50
HOUSEHOLD / APPLIANCES Whirlpool
Dr yer, electric, stackable,almost new.
$80.00. Sears snow thrower. $25.00. Day
bed, beautiful, white wood. Barely used.
Includes custom cushions and bedding.
$500.00 Ph. 262-697-1469
LANDSCAPING EQUIPMENTwalk behind
Snapper lawn mower, 12 horse Kawasaki
engine $850; Husqkarna auto walk lawn
mower, $165; 5 horse, yard machine rototiller
$185, or best offer. Call 847-623-7167
between 7am and 8pm.
LOSE WEIGHT-
ALL NATURAL
Enjoy summer..feel
good...look good!
Call-262-786-6603
MATTRESSES Full $65. Queen $75. King
$95. Like new, extra thick. 6224 22nd Ave.
Drop-off avail. 262-496-6750.
Help Wanted 20
DRIVERS Needed for upcoming school year
to transport special needs children. Sign on
bonus. Call (847) 244-8700 M-F 9am-2pm.
JANITORBarton of Zion, a senior living facili-
ty, is seeking a responsible & experienced per-
son to fill a full-time janitorial position. We are
seeking an individual who has patience & is
respectful & dependable. If interested please
stop in & fill out an application for employ-
ment or fax resume to 847-731-6430. Barton
of Zion, 3500 Sheridan Rd. Zion, IL Ph. 847-
872-1500
JOURNALIST
(Part-Time)
We are seeking a part-time journalist
able to produce news and feature
stories and shoot pictures. The ideal
candidate will aggressively pursue
breaking and spot news, while juggling
other assignments.
If interested in this position, please
submit a cover letter & resume to
Human Resources
5800 - 7th Avenue
Kenosha, WI 53140
or apply within:
Equal Opportunity Employer
Job Site ID#1007649
MAINTENANCE MACHINIST / MECHANIC
Powerbrace Corporation, the premier manufac-
turer of heavy-duty door securement products
for the truck-trailer and container industries,
has an opportunity for a Maintenance
Machinist/Mechanic. In this key role, you
will be responsible for all plant maintenance
operations including machine repair and
maintenance and building and grounds.
The qualified candidate should possess a
minimum of 5 years experience in all areas
of industrial maintenance including: pneu-
matic, hydraulic and piping systems, 480v
electrical, PLCs, welding and fabrication (mig
and stick), hydraulic presses, and automated
assembly equipment. Candidate should be
able to read and follow blue prints and
schematics, understand production needs,
PMs and set-ups. Candidate must also
have strong oral and written communications
skills and strong computer literacy.
Compensation will be based upon experience
and is coupled with a comprehensive bene-
fits package. Interested applicants are
encouraged to forward their resume and
salary requirements to:
Powerbrace Corporation
Attn: Human Resources
7640 60th Avenue
Kenosha, WI 53142
Fax: 262-694-8680
E-mail: Jobs@minerent.com
EOE M/F/D/V
Job Site ID#1008345
MECHANIC
Fleet shop looking for Truck / Trailer
Mechanic with Heavy-duly experience.
WE OFFER:
Competitive Wages
Health and Vision
Insurance
Quarterly Bonus
Program
Paid holidays and
vacations
Uniforms
401 k Program
Apply 8 am 4:30 pm at
BIRCHWOOD
"TRANSPORT. INC.
3111 152nd Avenue
Kenosha. WI 53144
Equal Opportunity Employer
Job Site ID#1008737
MECHANIC FOR SMALL ENGINE REPAIR
Must have drivers license & own tools, 30-40
hours per week. Ph. 224-440-1453
RESTAURANT MANAGER
Local restaurant hiring for manager.
Call for details: 262-945-7339.
Job Site ID#1008519
RN ($26 PER HR.) or LPN ($20 PER HR.)-
needed for DHS case on Zion. Disabled 22
year old male client. Call (847) 445-4633 for
additional information or e-mail resume to
jnbronx@aol.com
SAFETY AND SECURITY PART TIME
Apply online at
www.zbths.org job opportunities
Criminal Background Check REQUIRED. EOE
Job Site ID#1008646
SERVERS Experienced, Part time.
Able to obtain bartenders license.
Ask for Beverly or Pam.
Ph. 262-654-3932.
Job Site ID#1008184
Classified
SPECIALS
2
AS A KENOSHA NEWS
SUBSCRIBER YOU HAVE ACCESS
TO ALL ONLINE CONTENT AT
KENOSHANEWS.COM FOR FREE!
Call the Kenosha News Today!
Customer Care Center
262-657-1500 and well be glad
to help you get registered.
Ask about our Members Program
for a few cents more
you can receive your paper
plus local retail offers and more!!
Help Wanted 20
AUTO BODY TECHNICIAN -- Experienced.
Must have own tools.
Apply in person
AMERICAN COLLISION
1325 Washington Rd., Kenosha
#1008272
CDL-A OVER THE ROAD
COMPANY DRIVERS and
OWNER - OPERATORS
WANTED
OTR COMPANY DRIVERS
If you have: Good Driving Record
and Good Work History
We have:
Competitive Wages
Great Benefits Package
Late model tractors
Bonus Program and 401K
OWNER- OPERATORS:
If you have
a 2007or newer tractor
Good Driving Record
Good Work History
Good PSP report
We have: A GREAT pay package,
Weekly home time
On site Fuel and
STEADY YEAR ROUND WORK!
If either of these positions sounds like a
match for you... Call Scott at
866-424-5644 Ext 1457 or visit and apply at
www.birchwoodtransport.com
or apply in person at
BIRCHWOOD TRANSPORT, INC.
3111 152nd Avenue
Kenosha, WI 53144
EOE
Job Site ID#1008735
Class A CDL Drivers What are you waitin for??
Our drivers are treated better than family, are
home most weekends and receive benefits,
bonuses and vacation.
Call 877-261-2101 to apply!!
Cleaning
MAID
POSITION
THE ALMOST
PERFECT JOB
* No Nights or Weekends
* Transportation Provided
* Excellent Pay
* Drivers License Req
* Must be 21
El Trabajo Casi Perfecto
* No Noches o Fin de Semanas
* Transportacion Includio * Paga
Exceiente * Se Necesita Licensia de
Manajar * Debe de Tener 21 anos
1421 Old Deerfield Rd.
Highland Park, IL 60035
847-681-1800
DENTAL ASSISTANT
We are seeking a full time dental assistant
for our Kenosha dental practice. We are
looking for someone who is personable, self-
motivated, efficient, well organized and has a
great attitude. This applicant must have
experience in all aspects of dental assisting.
Benefits to commensurate with dental experi-
ence. Please call: 262-654-0268 and ask
for Patti.
Job Site ID#1008215
DRIVERS (SCHOOL BUS)
Olson Transportation is hiring drivers for
routes in Deerfield, Lake Bluff and Lake
Forest. $13.85 to start. Prior driving
experience may qualify for higher pay. Must
be 21 years of age or older. All candidates
must pass a drug test and background
check. Must pass a pre-employment
physical. Health benefits available.
Paid training. Apply in person:
1134 N. Route 41, Gurnee, IL 60031
Ph. 847-336-0720.
Job Site ID#1006412
10B The Regional News July 25, 2013
BENOY MOTORS IN WOODSTOCK
**Pri ces excl ude tax, ti tl e, l i c. & doc fee. Incl udes al l manufacturer rebates & i ncenti ves. Photos are for i l l ustrati on purposes onl y and may not represent actual vehi cl es. Jeep & Chrysl er are regi stered trademarks of Chrysl er LLC.
No pri or sal es. Expi res 3 days after publ i cati on. See deal er for more detai l s. ^On sel ect model s, see deal er for compl ete detai l s.
E-ma||:|nfo@benoymotors.comorwww.benoymotor.com
1790S.EastwoodDr.(CornerofRt.14&47|
(815)
338-5100
Hours:
Mon:7:30am-8pm
Tues:7:30am-8pm
Wed:7:30am-6pm
Thurs:7:30am-8pm
Fr| : 7: 30am-6pm
Sat:8:00am-4pm
Hours:
Mon:7:30am-8pmTues:7:30am-8pm
Wed:7:30am-6pmThurs:7:30am-8pm
Fr| : 7: 30am-6pmSat:8:00am-4pm
(815)
338-5100
OrE-ma||:|nfo@benoymotors.com
1790S.EastwoodDr.(CornerofRt.14&47|
WWW.BENOYMOTOR.COM
*Pri ces excl ude tax, ti tl e, l i c. & doc fee. No pri or sal es. Expi res 3 days after publ i cati on. See deal er for more detai l s.
FAMILY OWNED AND
OPERATED FOR OVER
60 YEARS!
BENOY MOTORS IN WOODSTOCK
QUALITY PRE-OWNED VEHICLES TO FIT YOUR BUDGET
0
%
x 72
^
MONTHS
APR
SALE
PRICE:
$
21,774
**
MSRP-$25,520
Rebate-$500
BonusCash-$500
TradeAss|s-$1,000
BenoyD|s.-$1,746
3.6L V6 Eng|ne
8 Speed Auto Trans
S|rr|us Rad|o
A|r Cond|t|on|ng
Spray In Bed L|ner
C|ass
Tra||erH|tch
NEW2013RAM
1500 REG CAB
Stk.#R13-41
SALE
PRICE:
$
30,110
**
MSRP-$32,120
Rebate-$500
BenoyD|s.-$1,510
3.6L V6 Eng|ne
5 Speed Auto Trans
Power Dr|ver Seatbe|t
S|de Curta|n
A|rbags
17" A|um|num
Whee|s
Key|ess Enter
N-Go
NEW2013JEEP
GRAND CHEROKEE
LAREDO 4X4
Stk.#J13-91
NOW
ONLY: $
17,731
**
A|r Cond|t|on|ng
Power W|ndow & Locks
17" A|um|num Whee|
2.0L I4 DOHC
Eng|ne
6 Speed Auto Trans
Key|ess Entry
NEW2013
DODGE DART
SXT 4DR
Stk.#D13-14
MSRP-$19,890
Rebate-$1,250
BonusRebate-$500
BenoyD|s.-$409
SALE
PRICE: $
18,242
**
MSRP-$22,685
Rebate-$3,000
BonusRebate-$1,000
BenoyD|s.-$443
A|r Cond|t|on|ng
17" A|um|num Whee|s
T||t/Te|escope Steer|ng
3.6L V6 Eng|ne
6 Speed Auto
Power W|ndow
& Locks
NEW2013DODGE
AVENGER
SE 4DR
Stk.#D13-11
'11 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE OVERLAND 4X4 ....................................... $34,900*
'10 DODGE NITRO DETONATOR 4DR 4X4 .............................................. $20,900*
'03 DODGE RAM 2500 QUAD CAB DIESEL ............................................. $16,900*
06FORDMUSTANGPONY2DR ............................................................ $12,900*
'08 SATURN VUE XR.............................................................................. $12,500*
'07 PONTIAC G6 GT CONVERTIBLE ....................................................... $11,500*
'06 NISSAN MURANO SL AWD............................................................... $11,500*
07HONDAACCORDSE4DR................................................................ $9,995*
'02 CHEVY TAHOE LT Z71 4X4 .............................................................. $8,995*
'07 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER.................................................................. $7,995*
'06 CHEVY IMPALA LT 4DR.................................................................... $7,995*
'04 DODGE DURANGO LTD 4X4 ............................................................. $7,495*
'04 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT 2WD ............................................................. $7,495*
'02 ACURA RL 3.5 4DR ......................................................................... $7,495*
'99 GMC 1500 EXT CAB PICKUP............................................................ $4,995*
'97 FORD F-150 EXT CAB 4X4 ............................................................... $4,595*
'98 DODGE DAKOTA CLUB CAB ............................................................ $3,995*
'02 HYUNDAI SANTA FE 4X4.................................................................. $3,995*
'03 MAZDA MPV VAN ............................................................................ $3,995*
'01 CHRYSLER 300M 4DR...................................................................... $3,495*
'01 CHEVY BLAZER 4DR 4X4 ................................................................. $3,495*
'01 TOYOTA CAMRY LE 4DR.................................................................. $3,495*
03DODGESTRATUSRT4DR................................................................ $2,995*
'98 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 4X4.......................................................... $2,995*
'99 CHEVY VENTURE VAN ..................................................................... $2,995*
'01 SATURN SL2 4DR ............................................................................ $2,495*
'95 FORD CONTOUR GL 4DR................................................................. $2,495*
'95 JEEP CHEROKEE 4DR 4X4............................................................... $2,495*
'93 PLYMOUTH GRAND VOYAGER ......................................................... $1,500*
'97 CHEVY S10 EXT CAB ...................................................................... $1,200*
Sports
C
Serving Badger, Big Foot & Williams Bay High Schools
Lake Geneva REGIONAL NEWS
Thursday, July 25, 2013
Senior circuit
Genoa City begins its second
season Wednesday.
2C
MIKE RAMCZYK/REGIONAL NEWS
MARK STINEBRINK sits in his ofce Monday afternoon and displays the Milwaukee Brewers ticket with his picture.
Stinebrink featured
on Brewers ticket
Living out a big league fantasy
By Mike Ramczyk
sports@lakegenevanews.net
Mark Stinebrink has loved the Milwaukee Brew-
ers for decades.
The 60-year-old, who is the general manager at
Stinebrinks Piggly Wiggly, has played in two Brew-
ers fantasy camps and has had season tickets to
Miller Park since 1998. Heck, he has even played
poker with Brewer greats Jim Gantner, Jerry Augus-
tine and Gorman Thomas.
But on Sunday, Stinebrink got to live out a Brew-
ers fantasy that may have been his best experience
yet.
Back in February, Stinebrink was selected as
part of the Brewers Fantastic 40 promotion to have
his face on the Brewers season tickets for the July
21 game against the Miami Marlins. Stinebrink
and about 130 other family, friends and colleagues
enjoyed a mega-tailgate with two mobile homes and
three canopies.
It was a neat prize for me to win, Stinebrink
said Monday sitting in his ofce at Lake Genevas
Piggly Wiggly. We chose Sunday so my daughters
could come up from Illinois. They live south of the
border, but theyre still Cheeseheads.
Season-ticket holders were automatically eligible
for the 40-day promotion, which gave away a new
prize each day. People were able to sign up for it as
well.
JADE BOLACK/REGIONAL NEWS
GET DOWN! A member of the Dream Team hustles to third base July 15 at Veterans Park.
Baseball eld of dreams
By Jade Bolack
JBolack@lakegenevanews.net
LAKE GENEVA It was just like any other
summer league baseball game.
There were coaches telling kids to hustle and
focus on the ball, teammates cheering and over
protective moms.
For a couple of hours, all kids were equal on the
diamond.
Ten years ago, John Swanson helped create
the Dream Team summer league for athletes of all
abilities.
In the first season, there were only 10 players.
This season, there are 72.
Mainly from Lakeland School, the players com-
pete against other YMCA summer league teams.
Swanson said he first created the league because
he realized there wasnt a place for them.
Have you ever been out here (to Veterans Park)
during the games? he said. The kids are yelling
and having a great time. I wanted that for the kids
at Lakeland.
Along with Swanson, a group of volunteer
coaches staff the league.
Jeff Sonn, a coach and parent, has been with
the league since the beginning.
Kian (my son) was in the original group, Sonn
said.
JADE BOLACK/REGIONAL NEWS
A DREAM TEAM player heeds advice from a team volunteer.
Genoa City juniors end
up two games from state
Postseason
run comes to
crashing halt
By Mike Ramczyk
sports@lakegenevanews.net
BURLINGTON The Genoa City Junior Legion
baseball team may have simply ran out of gas Monday
night.
After playing four games in five days, the Red Legs
needed to beat Burlington Post 79 Monday night at
Beaumont Field to advance to Tuesdays regional cham-
pionship against Janesville.
Genoa City grinded out a 5-4 victory against Water-
ford earlier Monday and faced Burlington a mere 30
minutes later. The well-rested Post 79 ended the game
early, jumping out to a 9-2 lead after two innings and
cruising to a 10-4 victory.
The loss ended Genoa Citys season at 17-8 overall.
The Red Legs put together an impressive string of victo-
ries in the regional tournament over Racine, Burlington
and Waterford, but Burlington Post 79 proved to be too
much late Monday night.
Genoa City starting pitcher Alex Morland allowed
seven earned runs in only 1 2/3 innings before John
Laskowski relieved him.
The Red Legs may have fared better if they started
Laskowski, who only surrendered one earned run in the
final 5 1/3 innings.
Down 10-2 in the fourth, Clint Ugolinis RBI single
cut the lead to 10-3, and Genoa City tacked on another
run in the fifth thanks to a wild pitch. But Sibley, Bur-
lingtons starting pitcher, was too strong. He scattered
five hits and gave up four earned runs in the complete
game victory.
Morland had two hits and an RBI to lead Genoa
City.
Genoa City 5, Waterford 4
The Red Legs avenged a loss earlier in the tourna-
ment to Waterford with a solid effort Monday night.
Waterford was never able to get over the hump and
overcome its troubles against Genoa City on Monday,
as Waterford fell 5-4 at Beaumont Field, 650 Milwau-
kee Avenue, Burlington, WI after falling behind by three
runs in the fifth inning.
Down 5-2, Waterford scored two runs in the fifth
inning to cut it to a one-run game.
However, Isaac Ziervogel shut Waterford down in
the final three innings, allowing only one hit and strik-
ing out two.
Colton Tisch had two extra-base hits for Genoa City.
He doubled in the first and third innings.
Genoa City banged out 12 hits, led by three from
Nick Van Kampen. Ugolini and Laskowski each added
two hits.
PLEASE SEE STINEBRINK PAGE 3C
PLEASE SEE DREAM TEAM PAGE 3C
PLEASE SEE GENOA CITY PAGE 3C
2C The Regional News July 25, 2013
SPORTS
Team nishes season 12-14, but could be a tournament sleeper
Genoa City opens playoffs this week
By Mike Ramczyk
sports@lakegenevanews.net
GENOA CITY The real season begins
this week.
All the Genoa City Senior Legion base-
ball team has to do is win three games in
this weeks double-elimination, ve-team
regional and it will nd itself in the Amer-
ican Legion state tournament.
The Red Legs nished the regular
season 12-14 thanks to a 10-7 victory over
Waterford Saturday.
In a nine-inning contest to prepare
for regionals (all regional games are nine
innings), Colton Andresen started and
pitched ve strong innings. Travis Stahu-
lak hurled the nal four innings, allowing
only one run.
Genoa City jumped out to a 3-0 lead in
the rst only to see that lead vanish. The
Red Legs trailed, 6-4, after ve innings. In
the sixth, the Red Legs scored four runs on
a one-out triple by Colin Barry. That was
followed by consecutive hits from James
Alexander, Corey Crowder, Stahulak and a
two-run RBI hit by Jonah Zeinert.
Genoa City smashed 17 hits against
Waterford, as everyone got at least one hit.
The leading hitters for the Red Legs were
Barry and Crowder with three hits apiece
followed by two hits each from Andresen
and Van Kampen.
Alexander and Zeinert contributed
three and two RBIs, respectively.
We hit the ball well this afternoon and
even our outs were hit hard, said Genoa
City coach Gary Cukla. Our good base-
running forced Waterford into miscues on
some plays, and we were aggressive in the
way we played.
The Red Legs open regionals against
Beloit Wednesday night at 8 p.m. at Car-
thage College in Kenosha. The tourna-
ment will be played into the weekend and
all games are at Carthage. Genoa City split
with Beloit this season.
The winner will play the Kenosha-
Waterford winner. Janesville has a rst-
round bye in the ve-team tournament.
Genoa City players Corey Crowder and
Brendan Huber will be away on vacation,
but the team still boasts a solid pitching
rotation of Eric Nevoso, Andresen, Stahu-
lak and Bryce Davis.
The competition is pretty even, said
assistant coach Curt Andresen. It will be
interesting. We will need to execute with
men on base.
To win the regionals we are going
have to hit the ball and force errors by
our opponents, Cukla said. This tourna-
ment will be won by the team that makes
the least mistakes both on offense and
defense. The team that gets hot with their
bats will be tough to beat. That sounds
simple, but it is very hard to accomplish.
You also need to be lucky once in awhile.
Beloit 3, Genoa City 2
On July 17, Nevoso was strong on the
mound for the Red Legs, but a late run by
Beloit proved to be the difference.
Genoa City jumped out to a 1-0 lead
in the rst inning thanks to two Beloit
errors. It stayed that way until the bottom
of the fourth when Beloit came up with
two runs. They took a 2-1 lead with a
safety squeeze.
The Red Legs came back to tie it up in
the fth on a lead-off double by Brendan
Huber, who later scored on a wild pitch.
Then, Corey Crowder and Alexander were
both stranded to end the rally when Bryce
Davis ew out to left for the nal out.
In the bottom of the sixth, Beloit went
up, 3-2, when its runner at third scored on
a wild pitch.
Zeinert reached on an error to start
the seventh. Then, Huber walked and both
runners advanced on a sacrice bunt.
With the winning run at second with only
one out, Nevoso failed to lay down a safety
squeeze before striking out.
With two outs, Andresen struck out
looking.
Despite a strong pitching performance
from Nevoso, the Red Legs only mustered
two hits.
We had our chances but failed to
execute some important plays on offense,
Cukla said. If you are not hitting, you
have to nd other ways to win and that is
executing those little things like bunting.
MIKE RAMCZYK/REGIONAL NEWS
ERIC NEVOSO has owned Beloit this season. He may get the start Wednesday.
Local swimmer
heading to nationals
Kaarin Quaerna, a 16-year-old swim-
mer for Geneva Y Swim Team and a junior
at Badger High School, has qualied for the
2013 YMCA National Long Course Swim-
ming Championships, held July 29 through
Aug. 2 at Georgia Tech University.
Quaerna qualied in the 50-, 100-, and
200-meter freestyles.
She broke the pool record July 13 at the
Buehler YMCA in Palatine, Ill., in the 100-
yard freestyle. Quaerna swam it in 54.32
seconds, a personal best.
The YMCA staff and volunteers and the
YMCA swim team parents would like to
wish Quaerna the best of luck at Y Nation-
als.
Club kids qualify for state
The Lake Geneva Swim Club will be
heavily represented at the upcoming state
meet, which is Aug. 1 through 4 in Brown
Deer.
State qualiers for the 13 and over
age group include Coriann Dorgay, Molly
Dover, Carly OBrien, Katelyn OBrien,
Kady Ruemmele and Terrin Seaver.
State qualiers for the 12 and under
division are Emma Coltman, Kathleen
Fitzgerald, Phoenix Horn, Paige Murphy,
Lauren OBrien, Mark Pasikhov, Willy
Pinnow and Ashley Stahmer.
SPORTS SHORTS
RICK BENAVIDES/SPECIAL TO THE REGIONAL NEWS
THE LAKE GENEVA GENERALS dropped to 0-2 Saturday night at Williams Bay High School
with a 44-29 loss to the national champion Racine Raiders. Here, Generals receiver Quentin
Hardy, 5, hauls in a pass. The Generals had more yards, rst downs and time of possession,
but Racine jumped out to a 21-0 lead early in the second quarter and held on. Generals quar-
terback Sir G Albritton threw three touchdown passes in the second half to rally the Generals
from a 28-7 halftime decit. Albritton passed for 274 yards and four touchdowns and rushed
for 144 yards. Lake Geneva travels to Muskego Saturday to take on the Hitmen at 7 p.m.
Generals lose at home
SENIOR LEAGUE SOFTBALL PLAYOFFS
Stinebrinks Piggly Wiggly 13, Kokodynski
Ortho 10
PFI Screenprint 5, Central Vending 2
Championship Game:
PFI Screenprint 9, Stinebrinks Piggly Wiggly 5
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL PLAYOFFS
Autoworks Plus 9, Kokodynski Ortho 8
Peck & Weis 11, Next Door Pub 1
Casting Solutions 11, Autoworks Plus 5
Peck & Weis 10, Lake Geneva Chiropractic 8
Championship Game:
Peck & Weis 11, Casting Solutions 9
COLT LEAGUE BASEBALL PLAYOFFS
Culvers 13, Dairy Queen 10
Edward Jones 8, Baker House 6
Championship Game:
Culvers 18, Edward Jones 11
TRAVEL TEAMS BASEBALL
U12 Lake Geneva Chiropractic placed
second in Cactus League tourney
U12 Lake Geneva Blue nished 1-1
in Cactus League tourney
U14 Lake Geneva Blue nished 1-1
in Cactus League tourney
TRAVEL TEAM SOFTBALL
U14 Lake Geneva placed third
in Quad County tourney
MENS LEAGUE FRIDAY NIGHT SOFTBALL
Fat Cats 15, Nameless 12
Mt. Zion 11, Team Nurnburg 8
Mama Ciminos 16, Peck & Weis 6
Peck & Weis 18, Fat Cats 13
Stinebrinks 16, Mecum Auction 5
Rumours 16, Advocare 12
Stahulak Concrete 12, Vaughn Hammers 8
Stahulak Concrete 15, Mama Ciminos 5
STANDINGS AS OF JULY 19
Stahulak Concrete 9 0
Mama Ciminos 8 2
Vaughn Hammers 7 3
Advocare 7 3
Rumours 7 3
Team Nurnburg 5 5
Fat Cats 5 5
Mt. Zion 4 6
Stinebrinks 3 7
Peck & Weis 3 7
Nameless 1 9
Mecum Auction 0 9
ADULT COED KICKBALL
One Kick Wonders def. Kickin Old School
99 Problems def. Lakeland Community
Church
STANDINGS AS OF JULY 17
One Kick Wonders 3 0 1
99 Problems 2 1
Lakeland Community Church 2 2
Kickin It Old School 0 3 1
SPORTS
July 25, 2013 The Regional News 3C
After being selected in
February, Stinebrink went
to Miller Park for a photo
shoot where he wore the
light green Brewers jersey
with his nickname, Stiney,
on the back.
I started calling differ-
ent companies and asked
if I could use their season
tickets if they werent using
them, Stinebrink said.
I wanted all of my seven
grandkids and the rest of
my family to come to the
game. I reached out to any-
body and everybody.
A quirky and fun-loving
character, Stiney has
dressed up as the Piggly
Wiggly pig and even worn a
dress for work golf outings
before and is never afraid to
let loose.
He said several people
even approached him and
asked how he got his face
on the ticket. At one point
during the game, Stine-
brinks friend stood and
yelled to everyone around
that his buddy was on the
ticket. That got a round of
applause.
Stinebrink and his wife
sat in the front row of sec-
tion 121, an arms length
from the eld. The rest
of the crew was scattered
throughout the stadium.
Everyone wore yellow T-
shirts with Stinebrinks face
on it and an upside-down
Brewers logo, which looked
like a pig for Piggly Wiggly.
Stinebrink particularly
enjoyed seeing the visit-
ing dugout with his seven
grandchildren. Several of
the kids got to go down
Bernie Brewers slide,
an icon that the Brewers
mascot zips down when the
Brewers hit a home run.
I forgot to sign myself
up for the slide, Stinebrink
joked. Why didnt I do
that?
During the game, Stine-
brinks name was recog-
nized on the JumboTron
for 21 years of supporting
the Big Brothers, Big Sisters
organization.
A fantastic nish
The Stinebrink crew
entered the parking lot
around 10 a.m., and the
massive tailgate included
brats, hot dogs and bag
toss.
My wife did way too
much work, Stinebrink
said. She even cleaned up
after the game. She deserves
all the credit.
But Stinebrink was get-
ting plenty of credit for
being on the ticket through-
out the game. It was that
praise that came back to
bite him during the games
most exciting moment.
It was the bottom of the
13th inning, and the Brew-
ers were coming to bat in a
0-0 game. The marathon
was a pitchers duel, and
little-used minor leaguer
Caleb Gindl was the rst
Brewer to bat in the inning.
This seemed like the
perfect time for Stinebrink
to leave his seat and use the
restroom. He had been wait-
ing since the second inning
for the right time, and he
thought he wouldnt miss
anything because Gindl
hadnt even hit a major-
league home run yet.
So Stinebrink rushed up
the stairs of his section only
to be stopped by a fellow
fan. The fan asked how
Stinebrink got his picture
on the ticket.
The nice guy that he is,
Stinebrink explained the
story quickly and proceeded
to sprint to the restroom.
Gindl did the unbelieve-
able. He cracked a game-
winning home run, and
Stinebrink heard the call
over the radio but was too
late to see it in person as
he was just exiting the rest-
room.
I was trying to get out
of my conversation with
that guy as fast as I could
and ran to the bathroom,
Stinebrink said. When
Gindl hit the homer, I was
like, Youve got to be kid-
ding me.
Despite the bathroom
blunder, it was an experi-
ence Stinebrink will cherish
forever.
It was a great tailgate,
and Im just happy every-
thing went well, Stine-
brink said. It was nice to
have family and friends
together.
Zach Ditzenburger got it done on
the rubber on the way to a win. He
allowed two earned runs over four
innings and scattered six hits.
Genoa City 4, Burlington 3
The Red Legs needed some late-
inning magic July 20 against the
Trashers, and they were given a gift.
With two outs in the bottom of the
seventh and the scored tied, 3-3, Van
Kampen scored on a wild pitch to win
the game. Van Kampen reached on an
error and was sacriced to second on
a bunt by Riley Gentile.
Genoa Citys Logan Siegler boosted
his batting average thanks to a perfect
2-for-2 day at the plate.
Morland got the win on the mound.
He allowed one run over three innings,
struck out four, walked one and gave
up four hits.
Burlington tied the game in the
seventh on an RBI single.
Genoa City 15, Racine 2
Genoa City took down Racine
for the second time in a week July
18 thanks to eight runs in the third
inning.
Ugolini racked up two RBIs on
three hits for Genoa City. He tripled
in the third inning and singled in the
rst and fth innings.
Van Kampen allowed two runs
over four innings for the victory. He
struck out eight, walked four and sur-
rendered ve hits.
Genoa City added ve more runs
in the top of the fourth. Laskowski
singled, plating Morland and Ugolini
to kick things off.
That was followed by Grayson
Grimsleys double, which scored
Tisch.
Genoa City tacked on another two
runs in the fth.
Ugolini led the way with three hits,
and Laskowski and Grimsley each
added two.
Van Kampen, Gentile, Morland,
Tisch and Phil Kutch each tallied a hit
for Genoa City.
Waterford 7, Genoa City 6
Genoa City opened the regional
tournament July 17 with a near come-
back.
Gentile had a busy day at the plate,
collecting two extra-base hits. He sin-
gled in the rst inning and doubled in
the third and fth innings.
Waterford led, 5-0, in the rst, and
7-3 through three innings.
After pushing across three runs in
the top of the third, Genoa City faced
just a 5-3 decit.
An error, an RBI double by Gen-
tile, and an RBI single by Laskowski
gave Genoa City life.
After pushing across three runs in
the top of the fth, Genoa City faced
just a 7-6 decit.
A walk by Ditzenburger and a two-
run single by Siegler triggered Genoa
Citys comeback.
However, Ziervogel struck out to
end the inning.
The kids really love it. They have a pep rally in the
spring at the school, gearing up for it.
Sonn pitched during the dream team games on July
15.
The league lasts about ve weeks in the summer, he
said. We spend a few weeks practicing. Then we play a
few games against the other YMCA league teams. It gives
other kids a chance to play with these kids (on the Dream
Team). They really love it, too. They get into it like any
other game.
A group of 48 high school and middle school students
volunteer with the league.
They put in 1,000 volunteer hours, Swanson said.
Thats a lot of work.
Sonns 11-year-old daughter, Odessa, helps on the
diamond, too.
These games have been going on since I was born,
she said. Ive been here and started helping when I
could.
She ran the bases with Courtney Jaeger, who said she
was too focused on the game to talk to a reporter.
Jaeger is on the same team as Odessas brother,
Kian.
I just met with Courtney and started helping out,
Odessa said.
Both Sonns wife, Tracy, and his other son, Julian,
help out with the teams, too.
Its a family thing for us, Sonn said. Its an amazing
thing. We look forward to it all year.
SUBMITTED
THE STINEBRINK CREW all together in front of Miller Park Sunday.
Stinebrink/Tailgate included 130 people, Stinebrink missed the big play
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1C
SUBMITTED
STINEBRINK even signed a few autographs Sunday.
Genoa City/Team exacted revenge on Waterford
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1C
Dream Team
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1C
JADE BOLACK/REGIONAL NEWS
THIS DREAM TEAM player shared her joy after a big play.
MIKE RAMCZYK/REGIONAL NEWS
GENOA CITY PITCHER ALEX MORLAND got the victory against Burlington on
Saturday.
4C The Regional News July 25, 2013
The Lake Geneva Regional News welcomes its read-
ers to submit photos of charitable events, personal
milestones and school activities for publication. We
also accept unique photos of wildlife and nature.
Photos must have a minimum 200 resolution. The
photos must be in focus and have a natural color
distribution. The Regional News may alter the color
on photos and crop them. We use editorial discre-
tion when reviewing pictures. The people in the pic-
tures must be identied. Submitted pictures may
also appear online at www.facebook.com/LakeG-
enevaRegionalNews.
Please email photos to managing editor Robert Ire-
land at rireland@lakegenevanews.net. Readers can
also bring pictures to the Regional News Ofce, 315
Broad St. Lake Geneva, between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.
Monday through Friday.
SUBMITTED BY PETE SCHOEN
BRAD PAISLEY performed last Saturday night at the sold-out
Country Thunder festival in Twin Lakes. This photo was sub-
mitted by Pete Schoen of Genoa City. To see a video from
Country Thunder visit www.reellifetv.net.
SUBMITTED
SEN. NEAL KEDZIE volunteered for the Wisconsin Dental Associations Mission of Mercy held at Badger High School in
Lake Geneva. The two-day event in June provided a variety of services to more than 2,000 patients, with more than 1,200
volunteers and 228 WDA dentists.
SUBMITTED
THE LAKE GENEVA SCHOOL OF COOKING celebrated
their fth anniversary benetting The Time Is Now To Help
charity organization Tuesday, July 2, and helped raise more
than $14,000. Chef John Bogan presented the check to Sal
Dimicelli, founder of the organization.
SUBMITTED
THE LAKE GENEVA ROTARY CLUB recently presented a
$2,500 check to Side by Side, an organization involved in
support of local families in time of need. Pictured are (from
left), Jim Daily, president Lake Geneva Rotary, Charlene
Hinckley, Side by Side board member, and Fred Anderson,
Rotary treasurer.
SUBMITTED
THE RIVER CHURCH, Delavan, and mission agency Love As Jesus, sent a mission group to New Orleans the rst week in
July where they conducted Bible school each day and participated in other activities. Members of the group, from Delavan
and Lake Geneva, included Chris Slawson, Wes Slawson, Cheryl Bradley, Cole Bechman, Debby Reeb, John Mayer, Kierra
Krause, Morgan Walker, Myra Burns, Nichole Champeny and Sam Gerkin.
A new generation of online TV for the Lake Geneva area
Catch all the sneak previews
of where to dine, shop, stay & play
Currently playing on ReelLifeTV.net
PhilipSassano
of Underground Lake Geneva
is going
to the
WATCH FOR THE VIDEO!
ON
WWW.REELLIFETV.NET
Circus
July 25, 2013 The Regional News 5C
REGIONAL NEWS
Thursday, July 25th, 2013
through Wednesday, July 31st, 2013
TV
L i s t i n g 8
6C The Regional News July 25, 2013
EVENTS
& TRAVEL
CHANNEL
DINING
CHANNEL
Maple Fest Lake Geneva
Cruise LIne
Chocolate
Fest
Fontana
Lobster Boil
Tune in
for more
Tune in
for more
Tune in
for more
Walworth
County Fair
Country
Thunder
Venetian
Festival
Dog n Suds Fitzgeralds Genoa
Junction
Yogeeze Frozen
Yogurt
Olive Black Martini and
Wine Lounge
SHOPPING
CHANNEL
Aldens Kennels Best Bargains Inc Paper Dolls Paper Dolls J. Roberts
Menswear
Tune in
for more
Black Point Estate Geneva Lake
Conservancy
East Troy
Electric
Railroad
Big Foot Beach
State Park
Bloomfield
Preserve
Hunt Club
LODGING
CHANNEL
Mill Creek Hotel Grand Geneva Resort
GOLF &
ADVENTURE
CHANNEL
Grand Geneva Resort Twin Lakes Country Club
PLAY-PER-
VIEW
CHANNEL
Also playing:
An Events & Travel Channel Exclusive Series
UNDERGROUND LAKE GENEVA
with host Philip Sassano
Current Episodes:
Winterfest 2013
The Baker House
AMSOIL Snocross Championship
Currently playing on
This week we completed
our distribution of the Fox
Charities $25,000 Matching
Grant funds. Your generous
donations matched by the Fox
Charities $25,000 Matching
Grant has provided $50,000
in poverty assistance to those
in desperate need.
Gracious gratitude to Fox
Charities and all of the donors
from those you provided com-
passionate care for, removing
their pains of poverty. Every
penny of this matching grant was used to provide utility
assistance, shelter, automobile assistance, food, toiletries and
household necessities.

This is how all of us helped:
Rent/Shelter = $29,356.59
Thanks to the Fox Charities Matching Grant and your
generosity, we prevented homelessness for over 40 of our
fellow creations.
This week alone we prevented homelessness for six fami-
lies and provided emergency housing for two families living
in cars. We paid overdue rent for senior citizens and the work-
ing poor to prevent eviction.
Your donations, matched by Fox Charities, provided the
funds necessary to move these already homeless struggling
families from cars to motel rooms, and prevent the anguish
of eviction for seniors and children.

Utilities = $10,125
Phone $300 + Gas $3,800 + Electricity $6,025
Thanks to the Fox Charities Matching Grant and your
generosity, we paid for gas and electric utilities for senior
citizens, the handicapped and for those whose utilities were
about to be disconnected. We paid the cell phone bill for a
senior citizen living all alone.
Many people were suffering with poor health, disabilities
and medical bills. This has caused them to choose between
their health care, food and paying their utilities. God Bless all
of you for providing these much needed utilities.
Food = $3,792.22
Thanks to the Fox Charities Matching Grant and your
generosity, many fellow creations will not go hungry. Many
children do not receive their school provided breakfast and
lunch during the summer months.
This causes an already stretched food budget to be
stretched even further. As many of you see with your own
grocery bills, food prices continue to rise. As gas prices rise,
so do our food costs.
We provided emergency food assistance with gift cards
and emergency volunteer food deliveries. Some of these
fellow creations had very little food to eat. Many had only
been able to purchase a cheap bag of chips or fast food to ght
off the ever present hunger. Your donations helped to ll the
pantries, refrigerators and nourish the bodies for many of our
poverty stricken neighbors. God Bless all of you for removing
hunger.
Transportation = $4,979.12
Thanks to your generous donations, matched by Fox
Charities, we were able to repair three cars for single moth-
ers.
We also assisted with gas vouchers for many struggling
to pay the high cost of gas for their cars. The working poor,
single mothers and senior citizens are being hit hard by the
expense of transportation for work and medical visits. It is an
expense that has taken an ever larger part of the budget for
most fellow Americans.
Household necessities = $461
Thanks to the Fox Charities Matching Grant and your
generosity, we provided household necessities for many.
These items include: blankets, sheets, towels, cleaning sup-
plies, pots and pans, dishes, etc.
For the homeless we sheltered that have often lost all they
own, these items are most appreciated. For those that strug-
gle with budget restraints, and often go without these daily
necessities, these items were gratefully received.
Resorter Editor/
Special Projects Coordinator
Jessica Franzene
Featuring Letters to the Editor, Obituaries and Community Matters
Thursday, July 25, 2013
Community & Commentary
D Lake Geneva REGIONAL NEWS
CONTACT
Newsroom
(262) 248-8096
jhalverson@lakegenevanews.net
Advertising
(262) 248-4444
ads@lakegenevanews.net
Fax (262) 248-4476
General Manager/Editor
John Halverson
BUSINESS STAFF
Office Manager
Sue Hinske
Customer Service/Office
Glenda Hill
Jacki Larisch
EDITORIAL STAFF
Managing Editor/New Media
Rob Ireland
Sports Editor
Mike Ramczyk
Reporters
Jade Bolack
Chris Schultz
Steve Targo
ADVERTISING STAFF
Advertising Representatives
Duane Hove
Mike Coolidge
Phil Bonyata
ReelLifeTV/Videographer
Joy Kowald
Graphic Arts Director/
Advertising Sales
Michael Reinsissel
Asst. Graphic Arts Director
Sarah Schauf
PLEASE SEE TIME IS NOW PAGE 5D
PRODUCTION STAFF
The Lake Geneva Regional News Serving the area for more than 140 years Published every Thursday by the Lake Geneva Printing and Publishing Co.
Breaking down where grant money went
RUMOR OF THE WEEK
JOHN HALVERSON/REGIONAL NEWS
LAKE 961 FM DID NOT BURN, is not closing nor is it moving.
But those are the rumors going around based on construction
occuring next door to the station. Keefe owns the building
and they are giving it a beautiful facelift in preparation for
potential tenants, Nancy Douglass, station general manager,
wrote in an email. Weve been asked all kinds of questions
about it. All we know is that we are here to stay, and we are
excited about having new neighbors in the future.
Village board needs civics lesson
At the very least, it was a
fast one.
Some might even call it
sleazy.
No matter how you char-
acterize it, Genoa Citys vil-
lage board hijacked the politi-
cal process last week.
A petition was submitted
to the village to require that
capital projects costing more
than $500,000 go to a refer-
endum for approval.
Hours after that petition was turned in,
the board effectively scuttled the petitioners
goal by passing an ordinance.
That ordinance states that a referendum
can only be held for projects exceeding $2
million. Since a referendum cant override
an already established ordinance, the peti-
tion for a $500,000 limit became moot.
That strategy by the board was appar-
ently legal because even though the peti-
tion was turned in before the ordinance was
passed, it hadnt been certied, so it wasnt
ofcial.
At the root of the petition is concern that
the village may spend money on a new vil-
lage hall. The petitioners are against that
idea.
The board members say
nothing is carved in stone,
that a committee is studying
the issue, and that the peti-
tioners are misguided by mis-
information.
Maybe so. But whose fault
is that?
If the issue was so big that
it festered, board members
should have been going door-
to-door to make their case
and explain the facts.
True, citizens who dont seek out the
facts are culpable to a degree, but the ulti-
mate responsibility for getting out informa-
tion falls on the board especially on an issue
this big.
There should have been enough time for
thoughtful consideration, dissemination of
information and community input. There
still is, but the referendum and the ram-rod-
ding of the ordinance has created drama and
expended energy that could have been used
for conversation instead of controversy.
In other words, it should never have
gotten this far.
The boards biggest mistake, though, was
its refusal to allow public input during dis-
cussion of the ordinance itself. They allowed
comment during the public comment por-
tion of the agenda, but not when the ordi-
nance came up for a vote.
Board members say they were elected
and shouldnt be micromanaged. But
weighing in on a decision on how to spend
$500,000 in a village the size of Genoa City
is hardly day-to-day micromanagement.
Besides, being elected doesnt give one
dictatorial rights, and it isnt the only mech-
anism of a representative democracy.
Referendums and petitions are another
tool of elected government. Theyre part of
the balance of power that the board mem-
bers dont seem to accept.
What is the board afraid of?
If they think theyre right then they
should have summoned a crowd of their
supporters to argue
against those on the
other side. Thats how
these things work.
Sadly, this has
many of the markings
of the city council debates in Lake Geneva a
few years ago.
Maybe Genoa City needs a history
lesson.
The current Genoa City village president
is a leader in the effort against the referen-
dum while the referendum has the strong
support of a former village president.
In Lake Geneva, it was a similar situa-
tion.
The former mayor, or at least his sup-
porters, had issues with the mayor in ofce
at the time.
In that case, the reigning mayor made a
big mistake in by overstepping his bounds
and strong-arming the opposition just as the
village board has now.
The Lake Geneva mayors tactics back-
red.
The debate disintegrated to the point
where it made national news, embarrassed
the city and created bad blood that may
never be resolved.
In a democratic society, right ought to rule
the day, not might.
The winners today
may turn out to be
the losers of tomor-
row if they dont look
for common ground.
Someone needs to be grown up enough
in Genoa City to see whats happening and
to step in to be a conciliator.
Halverson is editor and general man-
ager of the Regional News.
No matter how you characterize it,
Genoa Citys village board hijacked
the political process last week.
What do you
think of Rolling
Stones cover?
The Rolling Stone cover that features Boston Mara-
thon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev has generated
outrage in Boston and beyond. On the Regional News
Facebook page, we asked our readers for their opinions
on the issue.
n Chris Coughlin: Freedom of press! Never thought
the day would come when Boston of all cities
would be bullied by martial law, fear, and sur-
render their rights as citizens. For shame.
n Ray Michalowski: The press likes drama...the
press is bullcrap, as is rolling stone.
n Greg Blizard: Dont buy it. Dollars speak loud.
n Stacey Cygan: We have pulled it off the shelves
and quarantined it at Walgreens!
n Daniel Maus: Sad. Giving these terrorists the
attention they sought.
n John McCrory: So that loser is on the cover
and On the Bus With WILLIE NELSON is in
small print? What the hell is wrong with Rolling
Stone?
n Sam Asani: Disgraceful and un-American.
If you have your own thoughts, email John Halver-
son at jhalverson@lakegenevanews.net. Please include
your name.
2D The Regional News July 25, 2013
COMMUNITY & COMMENTARY
Time ies
FROM THE FILES
July 29, 1993
Local Boy Scout Troop 112 members
Ian Mueller, Ted Peters, Dan Nelson, Matt
Pagliari and Joe Volp attended the national
jamboree at Fort A.P. Hill in Virginia.
Area residents who graduated from
UW-La Crosse included Charles Roth Jr.,
Fontana, Susan Orr, Genoa City, Julie
Johnson, Lyons Township, and Patricia
Martino and Spencer Weber, Williams
Bay.
Lake Geneva Moonlight Madness par-
ticipants included Winona Knits, the Ben
Franklin Store, Julias and the Country
Cobbler.
July 31, 2003
The Lake Geneva Area Joint 1 School
District hired two assistant principals for
the 2003-04 school year. They are Donna
Jaeger for the Lake Geneva Middle School
and Roger Gahart for Central-Denison
Elementary School.
Area students Chris Evans, Jessica
Cates, Shane Westphal and Catherine
Quinn were among those who received
scholarships from the Geneva Lake Asso-
ciation Environmental Education Inc.
program.
New members of the Geneva Lake
Womens Association are Debbie Costabilo
and Mary Goddard.
HISTORY
To the Editor:
I would like to extend my heartfelt
thanks and appreciation to the indi-
vidual near Fair Oaks Road and the
amazing Town of Linn Police Depart-
ment for recovering my wallet (totally
intact) and for everyones efforts to
contact and locate me.
My husband and I were visiting a
friend on Fair Oaks Road on June 24.
We were in a hurry to leave in order
to visit with other friends in Illinois
before our return ight to Massachu-
setts. It wasnt until the morning of
the 25th that I realized I didnt have
my wallet. Panic set in!
The short version is that I had
inadvertently left my wallet on top of
our rental car. (Stupidly is probably a
more appropriate term, but Im being
kind to myself.) Fortunately, it fell off
on Fair Oaks Road, and a kind and
honest soul brought it immediately to
the Linn Police Department. It took
several phone calls and a lot of extra
driving around on the parts of many
people, but all was well in the end.
Thank you so much to all involved
for a wonderful ending and for
enabling me to retrieve my wallet.
Getting through TSA at OHare Air-
port for my return ight would have
otherwise been challenging without a
hard copy of my photo ID. God bless
and thank you again.
Beverly Harper
Belmont, Mass.
LETTER
Thankful for help
ISSUE OF THE WEEK
SUBMITTED BY WALTER LEE FLEMING
AND THE ANSWER IS ... last week we asked readers if they knew the identity
of the members of the 1932 Lake Geneva High School basketball team. Loyal
reader Carolyn Wareld has at least part of the answer. The coach on the left
side of this picture is Walter Jonas, she wrote in an email. I may be wrong but,
the standing fella on the right appears to be a teacher/coach named Mr. Heiling.
I recognize Ollie Fleming as he was the father of one of my long time friends and
worked at the Wisconsin Southern Gas Company for years.
Letters to the Editor must be signed by the writer,
include a phone number and address in order to
be considered for publication in the Lake Geneva
Regional News. No names will be withheld.
Letters emailed to the Regional News must contain
a telephone number and address so the writer can be
reached. They should be sent to jhalverson@lakegene-
vannews.net.
The Regional News reserves the right to edit let-
ters. Letters that are libelous, vulgar or profane will not
be published. Poetry also will not be published. All
decisions regarding this letters policy are at the discre-
tion of the editor. The deadline for submitting a letter
for any given week is 5 p.m. Friday.
LETTERS POLICY
Another view of the July 4 riots
EDITORS NOTE: I was general man-
ager of The Week when the following
story ran in 1992. Back then we had an
editor named Sandy Halpin who believed
in giving novice writers a chance. She
sure hit paydirt when she had Jennifer
Schaefer of Lake Geneva do the following
story on the Lake Geneva riots of July 4,
1967. At the time she was a senior at the
University of Wisconsin-Madison. She is
the daughter of Trish Schaefer of Lake
Geneva. The story was edited to update
and for space for space purposes.
John Halverson, editor
They smashed store windows. They
jeered and spat at police ofcers. They
uprooted telephones booths. They killed
Andy Gump. They even caused Rex the
police dog a concussion. They were the
youthful rioters who turned Lake Geneva
into their own chaotic playground on the
Fourth of July weekend in 1967.
It was sheer terror, said Audrey Mil-
liette, who owned Eleven Gables Inn on
The Lake. I was out of my wits.
And understandably so, since Mil-
liettes bed and breakfast house was tar-
geted by the vandalizing youths in the
riot.
Things were happening all around
the building, Milliette said. Kids were
pounding on the doors, scaling the fences
and somebody even put a brick through
my dining room window.
Indeed, Lake Geneva was virtually
torn apart in that Independence Day
weekend rampage.
Most dramatically, the citys landmark
life-sized statue of comic strip character
Andy Gump was smashed to pieces on
Saturday night. Originally in 1927 Andy
Gump had perched on the lakefront estate
of his creator, Sidney Smith, before being
transported to Flat Iron Park in 1944.
This particular act of violence was
perhaps the most senseless of all the
destruction in the city over the long pre-
Independence Day weekend, stated the
July 6 issue of the Lake Geneva Regional
News. And it seems the impact of the stat-
ues desecration was even understood by
the vandals themselves, since messages
were scratched into automobiles announc-
ing simply the death: of Andy Gump.
While the 600 members of the Wis-
consin National Guard were obvious help
to the local police, one Lake Geneva resi-
dent, who chose not to be identied, did
not appreciate their presence.
This man, who was home from college
at the time, described being held at gun-
point by a National Guardsman. The Lake
Geneva man said that when he pulled
his car into a parking space, a National
Guardsman stepped out of the shadows
pointing his gun at my head and ordering
me to move.
Even after the resident explained that
his girlfriends father owned the property,
the guardsman kept his gun pointed at the
drivers head. I think the National Guard
added to the tension, added the local
man.
Despite the looting and vandalizing,
most Lake Geneva residents remember
the crowd as relatively harmless. They
werent a mean, nasty, pugnacious type
of crowd, said townsperson Tom McMa-
nus. They were just trying to raise a little
hell.
According to Lake Geneva Alderman
Shelly Shepstone, who was a police ofcer
at the time, there was little physical vio-
lence. It was mostly just words and push-
ing and shoving, he said.
But the riot was not very happy for one
of the newest members of the police force,
Rex the dog, who was hit by a hurled re-
cracker. According to newspaper reports,
injuries to both rioters and police ofcers
consisted of mostly cuts and bruises. For-
tunately, Rex recovered.
According to Shepstone, the police
force handled the situation with patience
and reserve to avoid further agitating riot-
ers. It probably could have gotten really
bad if we had started swinging clubs and
tear-gassing people, he said.
And although the police ofcers
became edgy and irritated after many
hours on the scene, Shepstone said he
saw no police ofcers get carried away
with their authority. He said, I never saw
anyone get out of hand and work anyone
over with a nightstick or anything.
Milliette, however, did. In fact she
watched as one of her young frater-
nity guests had the whole side of his
face crushed in by a recently deputized
bouncer from a local bar.
Lake Geneva mayor at the time, Emil
Johnejack, nally ordered the city sealed
off from incoming trafc, made busi-
nesses close early and enforced a strict
curfew, the disorderly youngsters quickly
left town.
Then, after rampaging through Wil-
liams Bay and Delavan, the caravan of
youngsters ran into a roadblock near Dela-
van. And even those cars that managed to
turn around were met by trailing National
Guard units.
After being rounded up in a nearby
eld, the rioters were interviewed, charged
and arrested.
While some parents treated their chil-
drens behavior as simply a mistake, other-
swere furious. One man was seen pushing
his long-haired son into a womens rest-
room yelling, Dont come out until your
hair is the length its supposed to be!
Most Lake Genevans attribute the
uprising to the media. And this viewpoint
is certainly justiable, for the national
news media did play a substantial role in
the riots.
For not only did major Chicago and
Milwaukee newspapers print ongoing sto-
ries, but CBS News covered the action on
both Monday and Tuesday evenings.
One person even saw television crews
encouraging people to cause trouble. After
setting up their cameras and equipment,
the broadcasters would tell kids to go
ahead and riot now. And the kids wanted
to show off for the camera, he said.
Johnejack was even more specic in
his accusations. According to him, the
popular 1960s dance the Twist was to
blame for the rioting.
He condemned the dance as disgust-
ing and revolting at a city council meet-
ing following the riots.
Many Lake Geneva citizens believe the
1967 riot was a premeditated rather than a
spontaneous action. Although there is no
concrete proof for this belief, Shepstone
said, Who knows? There may have been
some people who were paid to come up
here as instigators.
Shepstone described todays youth as
more civic minded and concerned about
peoples rights and private properties
than the generation of rebellious young-
sters that tore apart Lake Geneva.
I dont know why they didnt do what
they normally come up here for, he said,
which is to drink, pick up girls and just
have a good time. I dont know why they
didnt just stick to that.
Editors note: The July 4th saga con-
tinues next week, with two commentar-
ies that take a whole different view of the
situation.
Beware
hucksters
Sad to say,
we are a nation
of hucksters.
Selling seems
to take prece-
dence over peo-
ples privacy
and common
courtesy. Now
adver t i s er s
see robots
as splendid
opportunity. But robo calls are offensive, to
say nothing about interrupting routines.
A few minutes ago I took a call beginning,
Is this Teresa? If this is Teresa ... Hanging
up I wondered where this was going. Or was
it a charity?
If businesses can make your phone ring
anytime they want, and force messages on
you, and no one is on the other end except
automated digital machinery, Big Brother
surely has arrived. It is scary to think where
such things could lead.
Several times in recent months a youthful,
energetic male voice declared, Dont hang up!
Congratulations! I didnt feel congratulatory,
but I did hang up. What was he selling?
By habit I hang up instantly. My daugh-
ter says why dont I look at the 800 number
on caller ID and not answer. But the ringing
continues, and besides Ive taken to collecting
these automated infringements on my private
life.
Think about it. Digital machinery does all
the work. The sponsor doesnt have to talk to
anybody The only human directly involved is
me and my privacy.
Ive been on no-call lists, but they dont
seem to be the answer. If you can use the phone
to make anyone elses ring, it is a stretch to call
it credible selling, to say nothing of invading
private space. What really bothers me is the
Big Brother dimensions of this.
On one occasion I was expecting a
follow-up call about a friends death. When
I answered, the greeting went, If you are a
senior citizen ... It was a little more harass-
ment in an already stressful situation.
Congratulations! You have pre-qualied
for... Five words was all I needed. American
hucksters in action.
There is a sad dimension to all this. Some-
times the come-ons are from charities. Or I
think they are charities.
Do you or someone you love smoke? I
wasnt curious (or tolerant) enough to nd out
where that one was going either.
Considering how often I am otherwise
interrupted in the course of a day, these added
unsolicited intrusions take on serious propor-
tions.
Hello! This is a very important message.
If it were, wouldnt you think a real person
would be delivering it?
Hawking, peddling, showmanship, call it
what you will common courtesy is not part
of the process.
Oh, oh, theres the phone: This is Lisa
calling about your credit card account.
Johnson was a long-time English teacher
at Badger High School.
COMMUNITY & COMMENTARY
July 25, 2013 The Regional News 3D
OBITUARIES DEATH NOTICES
Harold Hal Martin Grabow,
76, died Wednesday, July 17, 2013, at Lake-
land Medical Center in Elkhorn. Visitation
from 10 to 11 a.m., Monday, July 22, at St.
Benedict Catholic Church, Fontana. Funeral
services at 11 a.m. at the church, with the Rev.
Norberto Sandoval ofciating. Burial will be
private at a later date.
Richard R. Gravenstein, 56,
Lake Como, died Thursday, July 18, 2013, at
his residence. Memorial service at a later date
at the Steinke Funeral Home, Lake Geneva.
Charles Edward Hines, 50,
Fontana and Lake Geneva, died Sunday, July
21, 2013, at his home after losing his life to
cancer. Mass of Christian burial at 11 a.m.,
Thursday, July 25, at St. Benedict Catholic
Church in Fontana. Visitation from 9:30 a.m.
until time of service Thursday at the church.
Private burial of his ashes at Cobblestone
Cemetery. In lieu of other expressions of
sympathy, memorials may be made to Lucas
Hines or Lakeland Animal Shelter. The Toyn-
ton Walworth Funeral Home assisted the
family with arrangements.
Richard Hulbert Hoagland,
87, Williams Bay, died July 16, 2013, at Golden
Years Health Care Center in Walworth after a
prolonged illness. His wife and family were by
his side. Mass of Christian burial Friday, July
19, at 11 a.m., at St. Benedict Catholic Church,
Fontana, preceded by visitation at the church
at 10 a.m. In lieu of owers, friends may make
donations to Aurora Visiting Nursing Asso-
ciation of Wisconsin. The Toynton Funeral
Home, Walworth, assisted the family with
arrangements.
Norbert J. Jeka, 81, Milton, for-
merly of Trevor and Salem, died Wednesday,
July 17, 2013, at Milton Senior Living. Mass of
Christian burial at 11 a.m., Tuesday, July 23,
at St. Williams Catholic Church in Chicago.
Interment in St. Adalbert Cemetery in Niles,
Ill. Visitation at the church from 10 a.m.
until time of Mass. The Haase-Lockwood
and Associates Funeral Home of Twin Lakes
handled the arrangements. For online guest-
book, go to haaselockwoodfhs.com.
Mary Jane McKittrick, 81, died
Friday, July 19, 2013, at Geneva Lake Manor.
Services Wednesday, July 24, at 2 p.m. in the
chapel of the Derrick Funeral Home in Lake
Geneva, with the Rev. Keith Aurand ofciat-
ing. Visitation will be from noon to the time
of services. Burial Thursday, July 25, at 2:30
p.m., in Bear Creek Cemetery in LaFarge.
Gerald J. Melson, 73, Pell Lake,
died Thursday morning, July 18, 2013, at
the Aurora Memorial Hospital of Burling-
ton. Memorial gathering from noon until
2 p.m., Sunday, July 21, at the Haase-
Lockwood and Associates Funeral Home
and Crematory of Genoa City and from 3
to 5 p.m. at the Melson residence at W944
Primrose Dr., Pell Lake. For online guest-
book, visit haaselockwoodfhs.com.
Paul Thomas Mysker, 32,
Kenosha, formerly of Twin Lakes, died
Friday, July 19, 2013, at his home. Funeral
services at 11 a.m., Friday, July 26, at
the Haase-Lockwood and Associates
Funeral Home in Twin Lakes. Interment
in St. Johns Cemetery. Visitation will 3
to 8 p.m. Thursday at the funeral home.
Memorial remembrances may be made to
the Mysker Family. For online guestbook,
go to haaselockwoodfhs.com.
Libby Ann Pearson, 63, Twin
Lakes, died Saturday evening, July 20,
2013, at the Mercy Walworth Hospital
and Medical Center in Geneva Township.
Funeral services at 11 a.m., Thursday,
July 25, at Messiah Lutheran Church,
Twin Lakes. Visitation from 3 to 8 p.m.
Wednesday at the Haase-Lockwood and
Associates Funeral Home in Twin Lakes
and from 10 a.m. until time of services at
the church on Thursday. Memorials may
be made to Messiah Lutheran Church,
P.O. Box 808, Twin Lakes, WI, 53181. For
online guestbook go to haaselockwood-
fhs.com.
Harold H. Prentice Sr., 66,
Richmond, Ill., died Friday morning, July
19, 2013, at Geneva Lake Manor in Lake
Geneva. Funeral services at 10 a.m., Tues-
day, July 23, at Grace Lutheran Church in
Richmond. Interment in Memory Gar-
dens Cemetery in Arlington Heights, Ill.
Visitation will be from 4 to 8 p.m. Monday
at the Haase-Lockwood and Associates
Funeral Home in Genoa City. For online
guestbook, visit haaselockwoodfhs.com.
Richard Hulbert Hoagland
March 7, 1926 - July 16, 2013
Richard Hulbert Hoagland, 87, Williams Bay, died peacefully on July 16, at Golden Years
Health Care Center in Walworth after a prolonged illness. His wife of almost 58 years, Janet,
and his family were by his side.
Dick was born March 7, 1926, in Grand Island, Neb. After moving with his family to Sioux
City, Iowa, he graduated from Sioux City Central High School and enlisted in the Navy in
1943. He graduated from the University of South Dakota and began his career in cash and
futures trading in the grain business. He was employed by Ralston Purina Co. in St. Louis,
Mo., and then was manager of their Chicago Board of Trade ofce, Checkerboard Grain. He
retired from Ralston after 25 years and moved from their Northbrook home to Lake Geneva
to enjoy his family, boating and golf.
He will be remembered for his great warmth and sense of humor which brought fun and
good times to his family and friends throughout his life.
He is survived by his wife, Janet; his children, Rick (Eileen) Hoagland, Lake Geneva,
Judy (Mark) Reichold, Schaumburg, Ill., John (Donna) Hoagland, Orland Park, Ill., and Tom
(Susan) Hoagland, West Bend; nine grandchildren, Brandon, Sean, Colin, Holly, Katie, Sarah,
and Luke Hoagland, Jennifer and Eric Reichold; four great-grandchildren, Evie, Culhane,
Finley, and Jaxon.
Dick was preceded in death by his parents, Raymond and Carita Hoagland; and a sister,
Virginia.
Mass of Christian burial Friday, July 19, at 11 a.m., at St. Benedict Catholic Church, Fon-
tana, preceded by visitation at the church at 10 a.m. In lieu of owers, friends may make dona-
tions to Aurora Visiting Nursing Association of Wisconsin. The Toynton Funeral Home, Wal-
worth, assisted the family with arrangements.
Harold Hal Martin Grabow
Sept. 23, 1936 - July 17, 2013
Harold Hal Martin Grabow, 76, died Wednesday, July 17, 2013, at Lakeland Medical
Center in Elkhorn.
Hal was born Sept. 23, 1936, to Harold C. and Muriel E. Martin Grabow in Chicago, the
older of two children. He graduated from Hirsch High School, Chicago, and attended Knox
College for two years in Galesburg, Ill.
He served in the U.S. Navy for two years and retired from the Navy Seabee Reserves after
34 years of dedicated service with the rank of Equipment Operator First Class. He met his
beautiful bride, Betty Joanne Hartzel, through Parents without Partners in 1975 and they
married in 1977 in Fontana.
He wore many hats over the years including part-time police ofcer for Fontana and Wel-
fare Fraud Investigator for Walworth County, which he retired from in 1996 after 20 years
of devotion to the duty and his professional achievement as an investigator. This included a
statewide Special Recognition Award from the Wisconsin Council on Welfare Fraud on behalf
of the Wisconsin Assembly with the concurrence of Sen. Tim Weeden.
Hal is survived by his wife, Betty; son, Kirby (Colleen) Grabow; stepdaughters, Roberta
(Troy) Nelson, Laurie Kimball and Patti (Kirk) Vanacker; stepson, Thomas Zinnecker; a grand-
child, Alecsander Campbell, Riley Grabow; stepgrandchildren, Rick, Kyle, Jordan Hines, Josh
Zinnecker, Brittney and Quinn Kimball, Rhiannon Olcott, Kayla Vanacker, Daniel and Megan
Fitzpatrick; several stepgreat-grandchildren; and a sister, Judy (Frank) Renaldi.
He was preceded in death by his parents; and sons, Kris and Kirk Grabow.
Visitation from 10 to 11 a.m., Monday, July 22, at St. Benedict Catholic Church, Fontana.
Funeral services at 11 a.m.
at the church, with the Rev.
Norberto Sandoval ofciat-
ing. Burial will be private at
a later date.
More Obituaries
on page D4
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4D The Regional News July 25, 2013
COMMUNITY & COMMENTARY
OBITUARIES
Charles Edward
Hines
Oct. 5, 1962 - July 21, 2013
Charles Edward Hines, 50, Fontana and Lake Geneva,
died Sunday, July 21, 2013, at his home after losing his
life to cancer.
Charlie was born to Earl and Nancy Edwards Hines
in Evergreen Park, Ill., Oct. 5, 1962. He grew up in Palos
Park, Ill., and graduated from Carl Sandburg High School
in 1981. He was a mason all his life, working for many
contractors and most recently his own company for 20
years. He moved to Fontana in 1989. He loved the lake,
shing, boating and snowmobiling. He married Heidi Jo
Zupan on Sept. 26, 1998, on the Lady of the Lake.
He is survived by his loving wife, Heidi; his son,
Lucas Hines; parents, Earl and Nancy Hines; brothers,
Tom (Rose), John (Pam) and Jim (Barbie); sister, Jane
(George) Kopp; mother-in-law, Ruthmary Zupan Wester-
meier; sisters-in-law, Ruthie (Robert) McIlhenny, Kim
(Doug) Hurt, Amy (Scott) Munier and Carol (Scott) Levin;
nephews, Michael, Tom and Jimmy Hines, Seth Munier
and Keefe Knutson; nieces, Sally Kay (Jen Watts) Hines,
Lizzie (Justin McMath) Hines, Reagen Hines and Thea
(Frankie) Munier; his beloved dogs, Ranger and Star; and
many wonderful aunts and uncles.
He was preceded in death by fathers-in-law, Frank
Zupan and Larry Westermeier; a niece, Whitney Knut-
son; and brother-in-law, Wes Knutson.
Mass of Christian burial at 11 a.m., Thursday, July
25, at St. Benedict Catholic Church in Fontana. Visita-
tion from 9:30 a.m. until time of service Thursday at the
church. Private burial of his ashes at Cobblestone Ceme-
tery. In lieu of other expressions of sympathy, memorials
may be made to Lucas Hines or Lakeland Animal Shelter.
The Toynton Walworth Funeral Home assisted the family
with arrangements.
Mary Jane
McKittrick
March 28, 1932 - July 19, 2013
Mary Jane McKittrick, 81, died Friday, July 19, 2013, at
Geneva Lake Manor.
Mary Jane Wemmer was born March 28, 1932, to the
late Curtis and Jessie Thomas Wemmer in LaFarge. She
graduated from LaFarge High School in 1951. She married
Kilbourne McKittrick in Woodstock, Ill., on June 6, 1953.
She was a past member of the Travel Club of Pell Lake
and the Red Hat Society. She loved to play cards, loved
bingo and loved to go shing and shopping.
Mary is survived by her husband of 60 years, Kilbourne
McKittrick; three children, Steve McKittrick, Beloit, Sally
(Darwin) Kavanaugh, Elkhorn, and Perry (Leslie) McK-
ittrick, Lake Geneva; three grandchildren, Jim (Shelby)
Pody, Elkhorn, Scott (Susie) Pody, Lake Geneva,and Matt
(Amy) Pody; Ft. Meyers, Fla.; and two great-grandchil-
dren, Brian and Jake Pody.
She was preceded in death by her parents; two broth-
ers; and two sisters.
Services Wednesday, July 24, at 2 p.m. in the chapel of
the Derrick Funeral Home in Lake Geneva, with the Rev.
Keith Aurand ofciating. Visitation will be from noon to
the time of services. Burial Thursday, July 25, at 2:30 p.m.,
in Bear Creek Cemetery in LaFarge. To sign the online
guest registry, visit www.derrickfuneralhome.com.
Although almost every
cook has scores of recipes
calling for chicken, most
are always on the lookout for a new recipe or two. None of
these recipes are difcult to prepare, but any one of them
may become a family favorite.
Charcoal Broiled Lemon Chicken uses young fryers
that are split and will cook in about an hour on the grill or
half an hour in the broiler of the stove. Garlic salad dress-
ing mix, lemon juice and butter are the remaining ingredi-
ents. Serve them with a large green salad, sliced tomatoes
and a great desert for a simple feast.
When the day is cool enough for a meal from the oven,
Parmesan Baked Chicken would be a good choice. Ital-
ian salad dressing marinates the cut up chicken, then it
is shaken in a bag containing bread crumbs, Parmesan
cheese, parsley and paprika. The chicken bakes about an
hour. Select a fresh vegetable or two, whatever may be
ready in the garden, and a delicious meal can be prom-
ised.
Sweet and Spicy Chicken calls for salsa, peach pre-
serves, taco seasoning and boneless, skinless chicken
breasts. The cut up chicken is tossed with the taco season-
ing and browned in oil. The salsa and preserves are stirred
in and everything cooks in less than 30 minutes. It can be
served over rice or rolled into our tortillas. Sweet corn
and fresh fruit could nish the menu.
A main dish choice, Ginger Chicken on Spinach Salad
is as attractive as it is tasty. Raw chicken is marinated
with fresh ginger, soy sauce and rice vinegar, then cooked
in the broiler. A salad of spinach, avocado, red onion and
cherry tomatoes is prepared, the chicken is cut into strips
and added to the greens, then balsmic vinaigrette dressing
goes over all. Serve it with jasmine rice and crusty rolls.
CHARCOAL BROILED LEMON CHICKEN
1 cup margarine
1 cup lemon juice
2 envelopes garlic salad dressing mix
2 broiler-fryer chickens, split
Melt butter in saucepan. Blend lemon juice with dress-
ing mix and stir into butter. Cool, cover and refrigerate.
Place chicken on prepared grill, about 6 inches from
grey coals. Grill, turning every 15 minutes until cooked,
about an hour. Heat sauce until warm, brush on chicken
and grill 30 minutes longer, turning every three or four
minutes.
To oven broil, brush chicken with warm sauce, place
skin side down on broiler pan. Broil seven to eight inches
from heat for 15 minutes; turn chicken, brush with sauce
and broil 15 minutes, until browned.
SWEET AND SPICY CHICKEN
1 pound boneless, skinless chicken breasts
3 tablespoons taco seasoning
1 to 2 tablespoons cooking oil
1 11-ounce jar chunky salsa
1/2 cup peach preserves
Hot cooked rice or our tortillas
Cut chicken breasts into 1/2-inch cubes; place in large
resealable plastic bag. Add taco seasoning and toss to coat
all sides of chicken.
In skillet, brown chicken in oil; do not crowd. Add
salsa and preserves to skillet; stir to combine. Bring to
boil; reduce heat. cover and simmer three minutes, until
meat juices run clear. Serve over rice or roll into warm
our tortillas. Makes four servings.
PARMESAN BAKED CHICKEN
1/4 cup Italian salad dressing
3 broiler-fryer chickens, about 1 1/2 pound each, cut up
1 slightly beaten egg
1/2 cup grated parmesan cheese
1/2 cup ne dry bread crumbs
2 tablespoons snipped fresh parsley
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
1/8 teaspoon paprika
Pour salad dressing into a 9-by-13-by-2-inch baking
dish; add chicken, turning to coat all sides. Cover and
refrigerate four hours, occasionally spooning dressing
over chicken pieces.
When ready to cook, preheat oven to 350 degrees.
Drain chicken, reserving dressing. Combine egg and
water in bowl. Combine remaining ingredients in large
plastic bag. Dip each piece of chicken into egg mixture;
shake a few pieces at a time in crumb mixture to coat.
Return to baking pan;sprinkle remaining crumbs
over chicken. Bake at 350 degrees for 45 to 50 minutes,
until tender. Makes four servings.
GINGER CHICKEN ON SPINACH SALAD
3 tablespoons light soy sauce
1 tablespoon rice vinegar
1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger
1 pound skinless, boneless thin chicken breast or cutlets
2 6-ounce bags baby spinach, washed
1/2 cup nely sliced red onion
1/2 cup sliced avocado
1 cup cherry tomatoes
1/3 cup balsamic vinaigrette
Combine soy sauce, vinegar and ginger in large ziptop
bag. Add chicken, turn to coat.
Line broiler pan with foil; heat broiler.
Remove chicken from marinade; place on broiler pan
rack. Discard marinade. Broil chicken two minute per
side or until cooked through. Remove to cutting board;
allow to stand ve minutes; slice crosswise in strips.
Combine remaining ingredients to make salad.
Arrange on individual plates. Divide chicken strips on top
of salads. Add dressing and serve. Serves four.
SUBMITTED
MARTY AND DAVE ALTWIES are celebrating their 50th
wedding Anniversary with friends and family in Lake Geneva
which they now call home. They met in West Lafayette, Ind.,
while attending Purdue University. Dave graduated with an
electrical engineering degree and Marty with a degree in
education. The couple married on June 15, 1963, in West
Lafayette. They have three children and ve grandchildren
who reside in California, New York and Wisconsin. Daves
position in senior management took the family to Ohio,
Pennsylvania, Michigan, Canada, Hong Kong, Taiwan and
North Carolina before settling in Sarasota, Fla. A year ago the
couple relocated to Lake Geneva to be near family, where
they are enjoying the seasons and the friendly community.
ANNIVERSARY WEDDING
PHOTO BY JOY KOWALD
SARAH HAMRICK-IRELAND AND ROBERT IRELAND were
married on June 15 at Horticultural Hall in Lake Geneva.
Hamrick-Ireland is a sales associate at The Bootery in Lake
Geneva. Ireland is the managing editor of the Lake Geneva
Regional News. Hamrick-Ireland is the daughter of Neil and
Linda Hamrick, Mercer. Ireland is the son of Donna McNichols,
Genoa City. The newlyweds live in Lake Geneva.
COMMUNITY NOTES
Golf Outing
The Lakeland Animal Shelter will
host the annual Turtle Open Golf
Outing Thursday, Aug. 1, at Hawks
View Golf Course, Lake Geneva. The
outing helps support the more than
2.500 animals cared for annually at
the shelter.
Sponsorships are available for
businesses to support the cause.
Items are being accepted for a silent
auction and raffles. Individual golf-
ers pay $125 for the round of golf,
including cart, a welcome bag, lunch
buffet, golf and hole opportunites
and a fish fry buffet dinner. Guests
are welcome to enjoy the dinner for
$35 each.
The scramble format registration
begins at 10:30 a.m., with lunch from
11 to 11:45 a.m. The shotgun start is
at noon. Cocktails at a cash bar will
be available from 5 to 6 p.m., with
dinner at 6 p.m, followed by awards,
the auction and raffle.
Harvestpoint Camp Meeting
The Harvestpoint Camp meeting
will be Sunday through Thursday, July
28 through Aug. 1, at 10 a.m. and 6:30
p.m., with prayer at 1 p.m., at Harvest-
point Church, 209 S. 4th St., Delavan.
Leading the prayer, preaching, praise
and worship will be the Rev. Jeff and
Cindy Weber, the Rev. Catharine Creek,
the Rev. Phillip Slaughter and the Rev.
Gary and Shelli Sisk. The public is wel-
come at all services. For more informa-
tion, see www.harvestpointwi.org.
Celebrating something?
Share your news with the community!
Submit your announcements to the Regional News at 315 Broad
St., Lake Geneva. Or email information to Glenda at ghill@
lakegenevanews.net. Call 262) 248-4444 with questions.
COMMUNITY & COMMENTARY
July 25, 2013 The Regional News 5D
PCOMING ATTRACTIONS
U
AUG. 10 & 11
The Friends of the Lake Geneva Public Li-
brary will hold their twenty-rst Annual Book
Sale on Saturday, Aug. 10, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and
Sunday, Aug. 11, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the east
end of Library Park in Lake Geneva. Mass me-
dia paperback books will be sold for fty cents
and hardcover and trade paperback books for
one dollar. DVDs,
videos, and CDs will
also be available for
one dollar.
Rare editions
or signed copies
of books are in a
separate category
and are priced ac-
cording to their val-
ue. Funds raised from the sale make special
projects possible, including youth and adult
programming, on-line book clubs, and new
books, audio books, and DVDs for the Library
collection.
Gently used book donations are welcome
for the sale. Donations of textbooks, maga-
zines, encyclopedias,
and Readers Digest
condensed books
will not be accepted.
For more infor-
mation, call (262)
249-5299 or visit
www.lakegeneva.lib.
wi.us.
JULY 27 & 28,
AUG. 3 & 4
The Lakeland Builders
Associations 24th an-
nual Parade of Homes is
the largest open house in
the area and will include
10 homes. Tickets are
$10 and children aged 12
and younger are free. The
homes are in Randall,
Elkhorn, Lake Geneva
and Fontana. For addi-
tional information, visit
www.lakelandba.com.
Ongoing
Visit ReelLifeTV.net for more video specials on
upcoming events and year-round activities
in the Geneva Lake area.
The Lake Geneva Farmers Market is held
on Thursdays from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Horticul-
tural Hall, 330 Broad St. Vendors line the side-
walk and also ll the hall, offering fresh produce,
garden plants, arts and crafts and more.
Black Point Mansion is now open for tours.
Visitors depart from the Riviera Docks in down-
town Lake Geneva aboard one of the Lake Geneva
Cruise Lines unique boats. The visit to the 1880s
lakeshore mansion includes a steep stairway of
more than 100 steps, so participants need to be
able to manage them. The grounds and household
at Black Point have been painstakingly preserved
to give participants the opportunity to go back in
time to a real summer cottage on Geneva Lake.
Visit lakegenevacruiseline.com for additional
information, and go to ReelLifeTV.net to view a
video episode on Black Point.
Toiletries = $1,286.07
Toiletries are highly
appreciated items. Toilet
paper, tooth brushes, tooth
paste, shampoo, soap, dia-
pers, feminine hygiene prod-
ucts, etc.
The fellow creations
struggling to pay their rent
and utilities will give up toi-
letries and food in order to
prevent homelessness. The
homeless have no money for
these often expensive items.
Your donations provided
personal hygiene and self-
condence for many turning
to The Time Is Now to Help
for assistance.
Grand total = $50,000
As you can see every
penny you donated, along
with the Fox Charities match-
ing funds, went to assist the
poverty stricken. We feel so
blessed to be supported by
you and Fox Charities.
Together, we will con-
tinue to replace the fear, pain
and suffering of poverty, with
compassion, healing, Caring
and Sharing with our hearts
to change lives. Thank you
for helping us achieve good
works for those in desperate
need.
Health and happiness,
God bless everyone,
W.C./Sal
New mailing address
Make checks payable to:
The Time Is Now to Help
P.O. Box 1
Lake Geneva, WI 53147
The Time Is Now to Help
is a federally recognized
501(c)3 charitable organiza-
tion licensed in the states of
Wisconsin and Illinois. You
will receive a tax deductible,
itemized thank you receipt
showing how your donation
provided assistance for the
poverty stricken.
Thanks
Fox Charities, Lake
Geneva School of Cooking,
Chef John Bogan, Pentair
Foundation, The Sum-
mertime Foundation, Dick
and Jean Honeyager, Keith
Gibson and Family, Jim and
Ardith Drescher, Nestor and
Bien Alabarca, Dr. Gerald
Theune, Bill and Susan Bos-
worth, Suzanne Sampson,
Gerald and Anita Heinz,
Wayne Reuter, William
and Carol Dick, David and
Mary Riesland, Caleb and
Bridget Christen, Martin
Business Group, Brady Cor-
poration and the 3rd Annual
Brady Walk for the Com-
munity, Mary Kroll, Hedwig
Spaight, Joanne Batzler,
Donald and Mildred Carl,
Rebekah Fox, George and
Lauretta Clettenberg, Caro-
lyn May Essel, Chris and
Kelly Welch, Milton and
Carol Ann Ancevic, William
and Sylvia Daletski, Mariusz
and Magdalena Tobijasin-
ska, Marvin and Audrey
Hersko, Anthony and Mary
Hauet, Randall and Mar-
garet Smith, Jack Mallory,
Barbara Kufalk, W.C. Family
Resource Center/Food
Pantry volunteers, and all
the God loving volunteers of
all our caring food pantries,
all of you who support The
Time Is Now to Help dona-
tion boxes, and the busi-
nesses that allow our dona-
tion boxes.
Anyone who would like
a Time Is Now donation box
in your business, please call
(262) 249-7000.
Honoraries
The Kurland Cousins in
honor of the 75th Birthday
of Geri Hinton.
Memorials
Thomas and Bridget
Posta in memory of Ralph
Graber. Arlene and Kerry
Clausen in memory of their
ne neighbor Bob May.
Side by Side event
Side by Side will have a
fundraiser dinner at Simple
Restaurant, Tuesday, July
30. Seatings are at 5, 6 and
7 p.m. $10 adults, $5 chil-
dren under age 8. Tickets
are available at member
churches or at Simple Res-
taurant, 525 Broad St., Lake
Geneva.
Need cars
Please donate a used car
to help our fellow Americans
get to work and other daily
necessities.
Please visit
www.timeisnowtohelp.org.
Time Is Now/
Where grant money went
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1D
Lakes Area Limelight
Anchal Sud
Gastroenterologist Mercy Walworth Hospital
Mercy Health System has added board-certified gastroenter-
ologist Anchal Sud (Sood), MD, to its staff at Mercy Walworth
Hospital and Medical Center, Geneva Township. Her special
interests include liver disease, inflammatory bowel disease and
holistic care. She is certified by the American Board of Internal
Medicine and is accepting new patients.
Peter Metzger
Pastor First Evangelical Lutheran Church
First Evangelical Lutheran Church (WELS), 1101 Logan St., Lake
Geneva, welcomed its new pastor at a special service of ordination and
installation on Sunday, July 21. Peter Metzger, the new pastor, is a May
2013 graduate of Wisconsin Lutheran Seminary, Mequon. The ofci-
ating pastor at the special service was the Rev. Paul Metzger, Peters
father, and pastor of St. John Lutheran Church in Gladwin, Mich.
As part of his seminary training, Metzger was a summer student assis-
tant to a pastor in Syracuse, N.Y. He also spent a vicar year of internship
at the WELS church in Kokomo, Ind., under the Rev. Adam Mueller.
Metzger replaces the Rev. Mark Kaesmeyer, who recently accepted a
call to serve at Cross of Christ Lutheran Church in Coon Rapids, Minn.
The Lake Geneva Regional
News encourages area
businesses to submit notable
employees for the Limelight.
Please email press release and
a high resolution photo of the
individual to managing editor
Robert Ireland at rireland@
lakegenevanews.net.
Information can also be
submitted in person at the
Regional News Office, 315
Broad St. Lake Geneva,
between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.
Monday through Friday. Call
262-248-4444 with questions.
SUBMITTING TO
LIMELIGHT
BOOK SALE
The Friends of Aram
Public Library, Delavan,
are preparing for the
annual summer book sale,
with all proceeds benet-
ing the library.
A members pre-sale is
scheduled for Friday, Aug.
9, from noon to 4 p.m., and
the sale opens to the public
on Saturday, Aug.10, from
8 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Donations are currently
being accepted and may
be brought to the library
at 404 E. Walworth Ave.
in Delavan during regular
library hours. Member-
ships can be purchased
for $5 at the door for the
Friday sale.
For information call,
(262) 728-3111.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Office Pickup - 1 Year $45
Walworth County Delivery - 1 year $45, 2 years $72, 3 years $105
Wisconsin Delivery - 1 year $45, 2 years $83, 3 years $121
Illinois Delivery - 1 year $58, 2 years $106, 3 years $164
Mixed States Delivery - $65 year, 2 years $120, 3 Years $185
Name:
Address:
City: State: Zip:
Telephone:
SEND COUPON & CHECK TO: Lake Geneva Regional News, P.O. Box 937,
Lake Geneva, WI 53147, e-mail sue@lakegenevanews.net or call with
credit card (262) 248-4444 Monday-Friday 8 a.m.- 5 p.m.
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"We LOVE, LOVE LOVE our commercial!
ReelLifeTV exceeded our expectations!"
Tammie Carstensen (General Manager)
& Shelley Strohm (Director of Sales & Marketing)
Harbor Shores on Lake Geneva
300 Wrigley Dr.
Lake Geneva, WI 53147
262.248.9181
harborshoreslg.com
Rummage Sale
Sat., July 27th
8 a.m.-2 p.m.
1031 Bonnie Brae Lane
Lake Geneva, WI
Misc. household items
golf balls, electronics
china, shelving, etc.
6D The Regional News July 25, 2013
OUR ADOPTION PROGRAM
Located 3 miles south of Elkhorn on Highway 67 OPEN MON.-FRI. 12 PM-6 PM SAT. 11 AM-4 PM CLOSED SUNDAYS & HOLIDAYS
LAKELAND ANIMAL SHELTER
DOGS: from $106.50 to $156.50 and include spay or neuter,
distemper and bordetella vaccinations, heartworm test, fecal
exam and worming, flea/earmite check and treatment as need-
ed, and microchip (including registration).
CATS: from $81.50 to $126.50 and include spay or neuter, dis-
temper and bordetella vaccinations, Feline Leukemia and FIV
test, fecal exam and worming, flea/earmite check and treatment
as needed, and microchip (including registration).
OTHER ANIMALS: Adoption fees vary.
Buddy system, senior citizen, and member discounts are also
available.
CALL 723-1000 or visit our website
www.lakelandanimalshelter.org
HYDE
Phone: 262-248-8177
612 Wells Street Suite C
Lake Geneva, WI 53147
www.LakeGenevaChiropractic.com
LAKE GENEVA
CHIROPRACTIC
Dr. Jeffrey Buntrock
Dr. David Bergman
ZACHARY
LOCAL
INTERNET ACCESS
PITA
with
Prompt, Professional Service
(262) 248-2103
Serving the Lakes Area
SARAH
HARDWARE SALES & SUPPORT
249-9100
http:www.genevaonline.com
705 Madison St. Lake Geneva
WANDA
CRAGEN
LESSONS AVAILABLE
AKC Canine Good Citizen Evaluator
Therapy Dogs International Evaluator
Nancy Doherty
Certified Dog Trainer
262-275-0517
CHLOE
EVERGREEN SEPTIC
SERVICE
Emergency - Same Day Service
Ron Sarna
Owner
WILLIS
T.V. & APPLIANCE, INC.
17 S. Washington, Elkhorn, WI
(262) 723-3477
ANGIE
DUBBER
800 Wells (Behind Dairy Queen)
Lake Geneva
248-3970
FALCON
Dr. Mona M. Hodkiewicz
Dr. Scot A. Hodkiewicz
248-4790
801 Townline Road, Lake Geneva
www.lakegenevaanimalhospital.com
LAKE GENEVA
ANIMAL HOSPITAL
BROOKLYN BOB
In Memory
of Toby,
Bandit and
Hobo
Sponsored by Grace Meyerhofer
(262) 248-4711
888-400-4711
Mobile Direct:
(262) 949-3555
800-443-9152
262-275-2185
www.rauland.net
Compliments of
Finn, Holly
and Annie
CHEWY
262. 903. 0631
www.reliablehomewatch.net
From Castles to Condos
Property Management Firm
315 Broad Street Lake Geneva, WI 53147
262-248-4444
www.lakegenevanews.net
LAKE GENEVA REGIONAL NEWS & RESORTER
DEWEY
32 W. Geneva St.
Williams Bay
(262) 325-2364
AURORA
IVY
Chinawest
Jewelers
262.248.0304
803 Main Street
Lake Geneva, WI
Williams Bay
Care Center
262-245-6400
ALICE
2506 Crest Drive
Hwy. 120 North
Lake Geneva, WI 53147
(262) 763-4333
Located 3 miles south of Elkhorn on Highway 67 OPEN MON.-FRI. 12 PM-5 PM SAT. 11 AM-4 PM CLOSED SUNDAYS & HOLIDAYS
TINKS HUTCH NOCARI
214 Broad St.
Lake Geneva, WI
(262) 248-6988
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