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7th Grade Mathematics-Quarter 1

Focus Clusters: 7.RP Analyze proportional relationships and use them to solve real-world and mathematical problems. Foundational: 5.NF.5a and b Interpret multiplication as scaling (resizing). 6.RP.1-3 Understand ratio concepts and use ratio reasoning to solve problems. Unit CCSSM Learning Targets SMP emphasized
(KDE and NC Unpacked Standards) (NC Unpacked Standards)

Corresponding SPIs (Not


Addressed by CCSSM)

Corresponding EPAS Standards


Solve routine two-step or threestep arithmetic problems involving concepts such as rate and proportion, tax added, percentage off, and computing with a given average. Solve multistep arithmetic problems that involve planning or converting units of measure (e.g., feet per second to miles per hour). Write expressions, equations, or inequalities with a single variable for common pre-algebra settings (e.g. rate and distance problems and problems that can be solved by using proportions).

I can create a scale drawing using a different scale. I can calculate the missing length in a scale drawing using proportional SMP8 Students formally connect their reasoning. understanding of multiplicative I can calculate the area of a scale comparisons, the joining of measures drawing using proportional reasoning. When given two figures, I can describe in a composed unit, division, and proportional thinking. the relationship between the two. Instructional Notes: Proportional thinking is developed through activities involving comparing and determining the equivalence of ratios and solving proportions in a wide variety of problem-based contexts without recourse to rules or formulas. Instruction should not solely emphasize the use of cross products; rather students should be encouraged to use alternative strategies until they develop a strong sense of proportional reasoning. See Benchmark Understandings for Ratio and Proportion.

7.RP.1 Compute unit rates associated with ratios of fractions, including ratios of lengths, areas and other quantities measured in like or different units. For example, if a person walks 1/2 mile in each 1/4 hour, compute the unit rate as the complex fraction 1/2/1/4 miles per hour, equivalently 2 miles per hour. 7.RP.3 Use proportional relationships to solve multistep ratio and percent problems. Examples: simple interest, tax, markups and markdowns, gratuities and commissions, fees, percent increase and decrease, percent error. 7.G.1 Solve problems involving scale drawings of geometric figures, including computing actual lengths and areas from a scale drawing and reproducing a scale drawing at a different scale.

Using Ratios to Compare and Scale (8 weeks)

I can compute unit rates with fractional values. I can compute unit rates with ratios of length and area. I can compute unit rates in like or different units of measure.

I can apply proportional reasoning to solve real world multistep ratio and percent problems.

SMP1 and 3 Students solve problems involving ratios and rates and discuss how they solved the problems. Students solve real world problems through the application of algebraic and geometric concepts. Students seek to understand the context of a problem and look for efficient ways to represent and solve it. Students construct and critique each others reasoning; especially, when justifying their comparisons of ratios. SMP2 Students represent a wide variety of real world contexts using ratios and proportions. Students contextualize to understand the meaning of the number in terms of the problem and decontextualize to manipulate symbolic representations by applying properties of operations.

SPI 0806.1.3 Calculates rates involving cost per unit to determine the best buy.

7th Grade Mathematics-Quarter 2


Focus Clusters: 7.NS Apply and extend previous understandings of operations with fractions to add, subtract, multiply, and divide rational numbers. 7.EE Use properties of operations to generate equivalent expressions. Foundational: 6.NS Apply and extend previous understandings of numbers to the system of rational numbers. 6.EE Apply and extend previous understandings arithmetic to algebraic expressions. Corresponding Unit CCSSM Learning Targets SMP emphasized
(KDE and NC Unpacked Standards) (NC Unpacked Standards)

SPIs (Not

Addressed by CCSSM)

Corresponding EPAS Standards


Perform one-operation computation with whole numbers and decimals. Solve routine one-step arithmetic problems (using whole numbers, fractions, and decimals) such as single step percent Solve some routine twostep arithmetic problems Work with numerical factors

7.NS.1 Apply and extend previous understandings of addition and subtraction to add and subtract rational numbers; represent addition and subtraction on a horizontal or vertical number line diagram. 7.NS.1a Describe situations in which opposite quantities combine to make 0. For example, a hydrogen atom has 0 charge because its two constituents are oppositely charged. 7.NS.1b Understand p + q as the number located a distance |q| from p, in the positive or negative direction depending on whether q is positive or negative. Show that a number and its opposite have a sum of 0 (are additive inverses). Interpret sums of rational numbers by describing real-world contexts. 7.NS.1c Understand subtraction of rational numbers as adding the additive inverse, p q = p + (q). Show that the distance between two rational numbers on the number line is the absolute value of their difference, and apply this principle in real-world contexts. 7.NS.1d Apply properties of operations as strategies to add and subtract rational numbers.

Number Sense-Expanding the Number Line (4 weeks)

I can show that the distance between two rational numbers on the number line is the absolute value of their difference. I can apply the principle of additive inverse in a real-world context. I can apply order of operations to add and subtract rational numbers. I can describe situations in which opposite quantities combine to make 0. I can show that a number and its opposite have a sum of 0 (are additive inverses). I can interpret sums of rational numbers by describing real-world contexts. I can describe the sum when adding positive and negative numbers as distance on a number line.

SMP2 Students represent a wide variety of real world contexts through the use of real numbers. Students may use concrete materials (such as two color chips) or a semi-concrete number line diagram to represent situations. Students contextualize values in terms of the situation, decontextualize in order represent the situation with symbolic expressions, and manipulate symbolic expressions to solve problems. SMP8 Students use repeated reasoning to discover patterns in integer operations. For example, after repeatedly adding integers using chips or a number line, students develop a set of generalizable rules for operating with integers.

7.NS.2 Apply and extend previous understandings of operations with fractions to add, subtract, multiply, and divide rational numbers. 7.NS.2a Understand that multiplication is extended from fractions to rational numbers by requiring that operations continue to satisfy the properties of operations, particularly the distributive property, leading to products such as (1)(1) = 1 and the rules for multiplying signed numbers. Interpret products of rational numbers by describing realworld contexts. 7.NS.2b Understand that integers can be divided, provided that the divisor is not zero, and every quotient of integers. 7.NS.2c Apply properties of operations as strategies to multiply and divide rational numbers. 7.NS.2d Convert a rational number to a decimal using long division; know that the decimal form of a rational number terminates in 0's or eventually repeats. 7.NS.3 Solve real-world and mathematical problems involving the four operations with rational numbers.

I can multiply rational numbers. I can divide with integers, provided the divisor is not zero. I can interpret quotients of rational numbers by describing real-world contexts. I can apply properties of operations to multiply and divide numbers. I can apply order of operations to multiply and divide numbers. I can convert a rational number to a decimal. I can explain that a rational number in its decimal form ends in 0 or repeats.

I can add rational numbers in real world problems. I can subtract rational numbers in real world problems. I can multiply rational numbers in real world problems. I can divide rational numbers in real world problems.

Instructional Notes:
Integer operations should be developed over time, with special emphasis on conceptual understanding, repeated reasoning, and generalization. Students benefit from spending much time in the concrete and semi-concrete phase before working with just abstract symbolic equations. See Benchmark Understanding for Integers. Emphasize 7.EE Use properties of operations to generate equivalent expressions when using equations to solve problems. Note properties of operations and identities when manipulating equations. 7.NS.2d can be integrated into this unit through the context of the number line. Students learn to convert a rational number to a decimal using long division that the decimal form will terminate or eventually repeat, and understand these numbers can be placed on the number line. This instructional strategy provides a context for discussing all types of numbers within the Number System (fractions, decimals, ratios, integers) location of these numbers on the number line, and the density of the number line. See Benchmark Understandings for Irrational Number. Additionally, it is vital that students interact with positive and negative fractions and decimals generalizing that rules for operating with integers apply to the system of rational numbers.

CCSSM

Learning Targets
(KDE and NC Unpacked Standards)

SMP emphasized
(NC Unpacked Standards)

Corresponding SPIs (Not


Addressed by CCSSM)

Corresponding EPAS Standards


Solve real-world problems using first-degree equations Add and subtract simple algebraic expressions Solve routine first-degree equations Combine like terms (e.g., 2x + 5x) Solve equations in the form x + a = b, where a and b are whole numbers or decimals Work with numerical factors

Applying Number Sense to Generate Expressions and Equations (4 weeks)

7.EE.1 Apply properties of operations as strategies to add, subtract, factor, and expand linear expressions with rational coefficients.

7.EE.2 Understand that rewriting an expression in different forms in a problem context can shed light on the problem and how the quantities in it are related. For example, a + 0.05a = 1.05a means that increase by 5% is the same as multiply by 1.05.

I can apply properties of operations to add and subtract linear expressions with rational coefficients. I can apply properties of operations to factor linear expressions with rational coefficients. I can apply properties of operations to expand linear expressions with rational coefficients. I can rewrite an expression in an equivalent form and explain how the quantities are related.

SMP7 Students begin to recognize expressions as entities that can be manipulated (added, subtracted, multiplied, divided) and operated on. (e.g. 2(x+4)=12 may more be more easily solved by dividing by 2 first rather than distributing.)

Instructional Notes:
After working with operation properties and identities using rational numbers, students now learn to apply these properties to expressions, which may include variables. See Benchmark Understandings for Expressions and Equations.

7th Grade Mathematics-Quarter 3


Focus Clusters: 7.RP Analyze proportional relationships and use them to solve real-world and mathematical problems. 7.EE Use properties of operations to generate equivalent expressions. 7.EE Solve real-life and mathematical problems using numerical and algebraic expressions and equations. Foundational:
5.OA Write and interpret numerical expressions. 5.OA Analyze patterns and relationships. 6.RP Understand ratio concepts and use ratio reasoning to solve problems. 6.EE Apply and extend previous understandings arithmetic to algebraic expressions.

Unit

CCSSM

Learning Targets
(KDE and NC Unpacked Standards)

SMP emphasized
(NC Unpacked Standards)

Corresponding SPIs (Not


Addressed by CCSSM)

Corresponding EPAS Standards


Solve real-world problems using first-degree equations Add and subtract simple algebraic expressions Solve routine first-degree equations Combine like terms (e.g., 2x + 5x) Solve equations in the form x + a = b, where a and b are whole numbers or decimals Work with numerical factors Solve routine two-step or three-step arithmetic

7.EE.3 Solve multi-step real-life and mathematical problems posed with positive and negative rational numbers in any form (whole numbers, fractions, and decimals), using tools strategically. Apply properties of operations to calculate with numbers in any form; convert between forms as appropriate; and assess the reasonableness of answers using mental computation and estimation strategies. For example: If a woman making $25 an hour gets a 10% raise, she will make an additional 1/10 of her salary an hour, or $2.50, for a new salary of $27.50. If you want to place a towel bar 9 3/4 inches long in the center of a door that is 27 1/2 inches wide, you will need to place the bar about 9 inches from each edge; this estimate can be used as a check on the exact computation.

Algebraic Thinking (8 weeks)

I can solve equations in the form px + q = r with speed and accuracy. I can identify the sequence of operations used to solve an equation of the form px + q = r and p(x + q) = r. I can compare the sequence of operations in an algebraic solution to an arithmetic solution.

SMP1 Students solve real world problems through the application of proportional reasoning and algebraic concepts. Students seek to understand the meaning of a problem and look for efficient ways to represent and solve it. SMP4 Students model problem situations with symbols, graphs, tables, and through contexts. Students form expressions, equations,

7. EE.4 Solve word problems leading to equations of the form px + q = r and p(x + q) = r, where p, q, and r are specific rational numbers. 7.EE.4a Solve equations of these forms fluently. Compare an algebraic solution to an arithmetic solution, identifying the sequence of the operations used in each approach. For example, the perimeter of a rectangle is 54 cm. Its length is 6 cm. What is its width? 7.EE.4b Graph the solution set of the inequality and interpret it in the context of the problem. For example: As a salesperson, you are paid $50 per week plus $3 per sale. This week you want your pay to be at least $100. Write an inequality for the number of sales you need to make, and describe the solutions.

I can solve equations in the form px + q = r with speed and accuracy. I can identify the sequence of operations used to solve an equation of the form px + q = r and p(x + q) = r. I can compare the sequence of operations in an algebraic solution to an arithmetic solution. In a real world problem, I can graph and interpret the solution set of an inequality.

or inequalities from real world contexts and connect symbolic and graphical representations. SMP5 Students use equations, tables, and graphs interchangeably in order to solve problems. Students pay special attention to which representation most efficiently assists them in solving problems. SMP6 Mathematically proficient students communicate precisely by engaging in discussion about their reasoning using appropriate mathematical language. The terms students should use with precision are: unit rates, ratios, proportional relationships, proportions, constant of proportionality, and complex fractions.

problems involving concepts such as rate and proportion, tax added, percentage off, and computing with a given average Solve multistep arithmetic problems that involve planning or converting units of measure (e.g., feet per second to miles per hour) Write expressions, equations, or inequalities with a single variable for common pre-algebra settings (e.g. rate and distance problems and problems that can be solved by using proportions).

7.RP.2 Recognize and represent proportional relationships between quantities. 7.RP.2a Decide whether two quantities are in a proportional relationship, e.g., by testing for equivalent ratios in a table or graphing on a coordinate plane and observing whether the graph is a straight line through the origin. 7.RP.2b Identify the constant of proportionality (unit rate) in tables, graphs, equations, diagrams, and verbal descriptions of proportional relationships. 7.RP.2c Represent proportional relationships by equations. For example, if total cost t is proportional to the number n of items purchased at a constant price p, the relationship between the total cost and the number of items can be expressed as t = pn. 7.RP.2d Explain what a point (x, y) on the graph of a proportional relationship means in terms of the situation, with special attention to the points (0, 0) and (1, r) where r is the unit rate. 7.RP.3 Use proportional relationships to solve multistep ratio and percent problems. Examples: simple interest, tax, markups and markdowns, gratuities and commissions, fees, percent increase and decrease, percent error.

I can analyze two ratios to determine if they are proportional by examining a graph and observing whether the graph is a straight line through the origin. I can analyze two ratios to determine if they are proportional by examining a table and identifying whether the line crosses through the point (0, 0).

I can apply proportional reasoning to solve real world multistep ratio and percent problems.

Instructional Notes:
This unit is foundational for future work students do in algebra and much time should be spent emphasizing connections between proportional relationships, equations, tables, and graphs.

Students should NOT be formally introduced to the word slope but instead be able to recognize the constant of proportionality (unit rate) in tables, graphs, equations, diagrams, and verbal descriptions of proportional relationships. Rich contexts are a vital tool for instruction. Students encounter many different contexts and be flexible in creating, interpreting, and manipulating equations, tables, and graphs in order to solve problems. Then, students should be introduced to situations that are not proportional and be able to interpret the meaning of the y-intercept although they do not need to know that term formally. After encountering proportional and non proportional situations, students should generalize that proportional relationships have graphs with lines that go through the origin and tables in which there is a constant ratio in the entries. More reading on Ratio and Proportion. Expressions, Equations, and Algebraic Reasoning Benchmark Understandings.

7th Grade Mathematics- Quarter 4


Focus Clusters:
7.RP Analyze proportional relationships and use them to solve real-world and mathematical problems. 7.EE Use properties of operations to generate equivalent expressions. 7.EE Solve real-life and mathematical problems using numerical and algebraic expressions and equations.

Unit Clusters:
7.G Draw, construct, and describe geometrical figures and describe the relationships between them. Solve real-life and mathematical problems involving angle measure, area, surface area, and volume. 7.SP Use random sampling to draw inferences about a population. Draw informal comparative inferences about two populations. Investigate chance processes and develop, use, and evaluate probability models.

Foundational:
Geometry and Measurement 5.MD Geometric measurement: understand concepts of volume and relate volume to multiplication and to addition. 5.MD.3 Recognize volume as an attribute of solid figures and understands concepts of volume measurement. a. A cube with side length 1 unit, called a unit cube, is said to have one cubic unit of volume, and can be used to measure volume. b. A solid figure which can be packed without gaps or overlaps using n unit cubes is said to have a volume of n cubic units. 5.MD.4 Measure volumes by counting unit cubes, using cubic cm, cubic in., cubic ft., and improvised units. 5.MD.5 Relate volume to the operations of multiplication and addition and solve real world and mathematical problems involving volume. a. Find the volume of a right rectangular prism with whole-number side lengths by packing it with unit cubes, and show that the volume is the same as would be found by multiplying the edge lengths, equivalently by multiplying the height by the area of the base. Represent threefold whole-number procedures as volumes, e.g., to represent the associative property of multiplication. b. Apply the formulas V=l x w x h and V=B x h for rectangular prisms to find volumes of right rectangular prisms with whole-number lengths in the context of solving real world and mathematical problems. c. Recognize volume as additive. Find volumes of solid figures composed of two non-overlapping right rectangular prisms by adding the volumes of the non-overlapping parts, applying this technique to solve real world problems. 6.G Solve real-world and mathematical problems involving area, surface area, and volume. Sampling and Variability, and Measures of Center 6.SP Develop understanding of statistical variability. 6.SP Summarize and describe distributions. (Special Attention to Mean Absolute Deviation)

Unit

CCSSM

Learning Targets
(KDE and NC Unpacked Standards)

SMP emphasized
(NC Unpacked Standards)

Corresponding SPIs (Not


Addressed by CCSSM)

Corresponding EPAS Standards

7.G.2 Draw (freehand, with ruler and protractor, and with technology) geometric shapes with given conditions. Focus on constructing triangles from three measures of angles or sides, noticing when the conditions determine a unique triangle, more than one triangle, or no triangle.

7.G.3 Describe the two-dimensional figures that result from slicing three dimensional figures, as in plane sections of right rectangular prisms and right rectangular pyramids 7.G.4 Know the formulas for the area and circumference of a circle and use them to solve problems; give an informal derivation of the relationship between the circumference and area of a circle.

I can construct triangles from three given angle measures resulting in unique triangles, more than one triangle, or no triangle by drawing free hand, or by using rulers, protractors, or technology. I can construct triangles from three given side measures resulting in unique triangles, more than one triangle, or no triangle by drawing free hand, or by using rulers, protractors, or technology. I can describe the twodimensional figures that result from slicing a 3-D figure. I can apply the formula for area of a circle to solve problems. I can apply the formula for circumference to solve problems. I can find the area of a circle given the circumference. I can find the circumference of a circle given the area. I can describe and justify the relationship between area and circumference of a circle. I can identify and recognize types of angles: supplementary, complementary, vertical, adjacent. I can calculate the complement and supplement of a given angle. I can determine an unknown angle measure by writing and solving equations based upon relationships among angles.

SMP5 During mathematical investigations a variety of tools should be available to students; with students justifying their selection. SMP6 Students attend to precision while accounting for units of measure, calculating measures, and drawing figures.

SPI 0806.4.3 Find measures of the angles formed by parallel lines cut by a transversal.

7.G.5 Use facts about supplementary, complementary, vertical, and adjacent angles in a multi-step problem to write and solve simple equations for an unknown angle in a figure.

Exhibit some knowledge of the angles associated with parallel lines Find the measure of an angle using properties of parallel lines Exhibit knowledge of basic angle properties and special sums of angle measures (e.g., 90, 180, and 360) Use several angle properties to find an unknown angle measure Compute the perimeter of polygons when all side lengths are given Compute the area of rectangles when whole number dimensions are given Compute the area and perimeter of triangles and rectangles in simple problems Use geometric formulas when all necessary information is given Compute the area of triangles and rectangles when one or more additional simple steps are required Compute the area and circumference of circles after identifying necessary information

7.G.6 Solve real-world and mathematical problems involving area, volume and surface area of twoand three-dimensional objects composed of triangles, quadrilaterals, polygons, cubes, and right prisms.

I can find the surface area of cubes and right prisms. I can solve real world and mathematical problems involving area, surface area and volume. I can find volume of cubes and right prisms.

Instructional Notes:
Circles provide an excellent context for ratio and proportional reasoning; 7.RP Analyze proportional relationships and use them to solve real-world and mathematical problems. Students can measure many circles, recording radius, diameter, circumferenceetc. Then examine multiplicative relationships between these values identifying the ratio of circumference to diameter, diameter to radiusetc. Whenever students are determining measures using formulas teachers should emphasize the clusters 7.EE Use properties of operations to generate equivalent expressions. When students are solving geometric problems teachers should emphasize 7.EE Solve real-life and mathematical problems using numerical and algebraic expressions and equations.

Unit Sampling and Variability, and Measures of Center (2 weeks)

CCSSM
7.SP.1 Understand that statistics can be used to gain information about a population by examining a sample of the population; generalizations about a population from a sample are valid only if the sample is representative of that population. Understand that random sampling tends to produce representative samples and support valid inferences.

Learning Targets
(KDE and NC Unpacked Standards)

SMP emphasized
(NC Unpacked Standards)

Corresponding SPIs (Not Addressed by


CCSSM)

Corresponding EPAS Standards

7.SP.2 Use data from a random sample to draw inferences about a population with an unknown characteristic of interest. Generate multiple samples (or simulated samples) of the same size to gauge the variation in estimates or predictions. For example, estimate the mean word length in a book by randomly sampling words from the book; predict the winner of a school election based on randomly sampled survey data. Gauge how far off the estimate or prediction might be.

I can make generalizations when a sample of a population is a valid representative. I can apply statistics from a sample to gain information about a population. I can recognize that random sampling produces representative samples and make inferences from the sampling. I can analyze statistical data to draw inferences from a sample population with an unknown characteristic of interest. I can generate random samples of appropriate size for a population to gauge the variation.

SMP3 Sampling and variability provide an excellent context for constructing and critiquing viable arguments. During this unit students reason inductively about data, making plausible arguments that take into account the context from which the data arose. (CCSSM). Students construct verbal or written explanations incorporating measures of center and variability, graphs, tables, and other data displays (i.e. box plots, dot plots, histograms, etc.). SMP5 Students strategically select measures of center

7.SP.3 Informally assess the degree of visual overlap of two numerical data distributions with similar variabilities, measuring the difference between the centers by expressing it as a multiple of a measure of variability. For example, the mean height of players on the basketball team is 10 cm greater than the mean height of players on the soccer team, about twice the variability (mean absolute deviation) on either team; on a dot plot, the separation between the two distributions of heights is noticeable. 7.SP.4 Use measures of center and measures of variability for numerical data from random samples to draw informal comparative inferences about two populations. For example, decide whether the words in a chapter of a seventh-grade science book are generally longer than the words in a chapter of a fourth-grade science book.

I can compare two distributions on a graph by visually comparing their displays. I can compare the measures of center in data distributions by measuring the difference between the centers by expressing it as a multiple of a measure of variability. I can calculate mean absolute deviation. I can use measures of center and variability from random samples to make informal comparisons of two populations.

and variability and data displays (i.e. box plots and histograms) to draw inferences, make comparisons and formulate predictions. SMP6 Students may decide to represent similar data sets using dot plots with the same scale to visually compare the center and variability of the data. They may choose to use a graphing applet or the calculator to do this.

Instructional Notes:
Sampling can provide an excellent, real-world context for ratio and proportional thinking. Students examine quantities sampled from populations and analyze proportional relationships using them to make generalizations about the population. An example is the task Counting Trees. When students are calculating variability and measures of center teachers should emphasize the clusters 7.EE Use properties of operations to generate equivalent expressions; noting when operational properties, identities, or algebra strategies such as combining like terms are used.

Unit

CCSSM
7.SP.5 Understand that the probability of a chance event is a number between 0 and 1 that expresses the likelihood of the event occurring. Larger numbers indicate greater likelihood. A probability near 0 indicates an unlikely event, a probability around 1/2 indicates an event that is neither unlikely nor likely, and a probability near 1 indicates a likely event.

Learning Targets
(KDE and NC Unpacked Standards)

SMP emphasized
(NC Unpacked Standards)

Corresponding SPIs (Not Addressed by


CCSSM)

Corresponding EPAS Standards


Compute straightforward probabilities for common situations Determine the probability of a simple event Use the relationship between the probability of an event and the probability of

I can express probability as a number between 0 and 1. I recognize a probability of 1/2 as neither likely nor unlikely to occur. I recognize that as a probability moves closer to 1 that it is more likely to occur. I recognize that as a probability moves closer to 0 it is less likely to happen.

Probability (3 weeks)

SMP4 Students use experiments or simulations to generate data sets and create probability models. SMP5 Students might choose to use probability tools strategically when they use physical objects or applets to generate probability data and use

7.SP.6 Approximate the probability of a chance event by collecting data on the chance process that produces it and observing its long-run relative frequency, and predict the approximate relative frequency given the probability. For example, when rolling a number cube 600 times, predict that a 3 or 6 would be rolled roughly 200 times, but probably not exactly 200 times. 7.SP.7 Develop a probability model and use it to find probabilities of events. Compare probabilities from a model to observed frequencies; if the agreement is not good, explain possible sources of the discrepancy. 7.SP.7a Develop a uniform probability model by assigning equal probability to all outcomes, and use the model to determine probabilities of events. For example, if a student is selected at random from a class, find the probability that Jane will be selected and the probability that a girl will be selected. 7.SP.7b Develop a probability model (which may not be uniform) by observing frequencies in data generated from a chance process. For example, find the approximate probability that a spinning penny will land heads up or that a tossed paper cup will land open-end down. Do the outcomes for the spinning penny appear to be equally likely based on the observed frequencies?

I can approximate the probability of an event by collecting data and determining its relative frequency.

graphing calculators or spreadsheets to manage and represent data in different forms.

its complement

I can design a uniform probability model. I can use a uniform probability model to determine the probability of events. I can develop a probability model from experimental data. I can compare an experimental model to a uniform model and explain any differences.

SPI 0806.5.1 Calculate probabilities of events for simple experiments with equally probable outcomes. SPI 0806.5.1 Calculate probabilities of events for simple experiments with equally probable outcomes.

7.SP.8 Find probabilities of compound events using organized lists, tables, tree diagrams, and simulation. 7.SP.8a Understand that, just as with simple events, the probability of a compound event is the fraction of outcomes in the sample space for which the compound event occurs. 7.SP.8b Represent sample spaces for compound events using methods such as organized lists, tables and tree diagrams. For an event described in everyday language (e.g., rolling double sixes), identify the outcomes in the sample space, which compose the event. 7.SP.8c Design and use a simulation to generate frequencies for compound events. For example, use random digits as a simulation tool to approximate the answer to the question: If 40% of donors have type A blood, what is the probability that it will take at least 4 donors to find one with type A blood?

I can find the probability of a compound event using a list, a table, a tree diagram or a simulation. I can interpret probability of compound events as a fractional amount. Given a compound event, I can create a list, table, tree diagram, or simulation to represent the sample space. Given an event, I can identify the outcomes in the sample space. I can design and use simulations to generate frequencies for compound events.

SPI 0806.5.1 Calculate probabilities of events for simple experiments with equally probable outcomes. SPI 0806.5.2 Use a variety of methods to compute probabilities for compound events (e.g., multiplication, organized lists, tree diagrams, area models. SPI 0806.5.2 Use a variety of methods to compute probabilities for compound events (e.g., multiplication, organized lists, tree diagrams, area models. SPI 0806.5.2 Use a variety of methods to compute probabilities for compound events (e.g., multiplication, organized lists, tree diagrams, area models. SPI 0806.5.2 Use a variety of methods to compute probabilities for compound events (e.g., multiplication, organized lists, tree diagrams, area models.

Instructional Notes:
When calculating probabilities, students work with fractions, a ratio that describes a part-whole relationship. Students should recognize fractions as a subset of ratios, because they describe a part-whole relationship, and that ratios can also describe part-part or whole-part relationships. Making this distinction helps students connect and understand the differences and similarities between ratios and fractions. This unit also provides opportunity to emphasize equivalency between fractions, decimals, and percent. Embedding intervention instruction related to the many forms fractions can take and the meaning behind each (fraction, decimal, percent) will help students make connections and deepen their conceptual understanding.