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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Tuesday July 30, 2013 Vol XII, Edition 297
CHILD PROSTITUTION
NATION PAGE 5
INTIMACY AFTER
HEART ATTACK?
HEALTH PAGE 17
AUTHORITIES RESCUE 105 YOUNG PEOPLE, ARREST150 ALLEGED
PIMPS IN THREE-DAY SWEEP
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The Peninsula Health Care District is a
landlord, real estate developer and commu-
nity health resource but it does not seem to
prioritize which one is most important,
according to a report released by the San
Mateo County Civil Grand Jury yesterday.
It is also sitting on nearly $61 million in
reserves that the civil grand jury said could
be spent on taking care of the immediate
health care needs of the 230,000 residents it
serves now in the north and central part of
the county, according to the report.
The $61 million, however, is being
stashed away for when its 50-year lease
expires with Mills-Peninsula Health
Services to operate the Mills-Peninsula
Medical Center in Burlingame. Sutter
Health built the state-of-the-art hospital for
$620 million and, when the lease expires in
2057, the hospital will be transferred back
to the district upon payment of its book
value or the lease can be extended another
25 years. The district owned the old hospi-
tal until it was deemed seismically unsafe,
which prompted the board to ink a deal with
Sutter to build the new facility.
Board Chair Dr. Dan Ullyot agreed with
the reports ndings mostly and said that
perhaps the districts most important role
in the community will be as a real estate
developer in the future when it builds a new
health-focused campus adjacent to the new
hospital.
The campus is planned to provide senior
housing, a skilled-nursing facility, an
Health district role questioned
Civil grand jury calls on Peninsula Health Care District to prioritize its functions
Lawmakers
delve into AP
invalidations
Speier, Mullin and Hill all calling for
answers from the College Board on
Mills High Schools unscored tests
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Legislators are beginning to dig into
the case of 641 invalidated Advanced
Placement tests taken at Mills High
School this past May.
U.S. Rep. Jackie Speier, D-San Mateo,
led a conference call with Mills High
School students and parents, representa-
tives from the tests distributors College
Board, test security providers Educational Testing Service
and the San Mateo Union High School District last night to
discuss the tests that were not scored due to concerns about
seating irregularities.
Trevor Packer, senior vice president of Advanced
Deadly six-alarm fire
draws more lawsuits
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Ten days after Jorge and Juanita Chavez led a lawsuit for
negligence following a deadly re in Redwood City, 11
more former residents of the Hallmark House Apartments
have also sued Newport Beach-based KDF Hallmark, accord-
ing to complaints led in San Mateo County Superior Court
Friday.
All the plaintiffs so far are being represented by attorney
Ara Jabagchourian with Cotchett, Pitre & McCarthy who
told the Daily Journal yesterday that more plaintiffs will
ANGELA SWARTZ/DAILY JOURNAL
Construction on the main road leading up to Hoover Elementary School in Burlingame has been halted under a preliminary
injunction.
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Opening arguments were heard in a
lawsuit by the Alliance for
Responsible Neighborhood Planning
against the Burlingame Elementary
School District yesterday over trafc
and parking concerns surrounding the
reopening of Hoover Elementary
School.
At the San Mateo County Superior
Court in Redwood City, Kevin Haroff,
representing the alliance, argued that
the approval of the project was invalid
since there wasnt a sufficient
Environmental Impact Report done.
He stated that neighbors worry reopen-
ing the school may cause major trafc
and parking issues under the current
plan.
He said the district failed to address
trafc impacts in its December 2012
mitigated negative declaration study
and review. He also said the district
committed a California Environmental
Quality Act violation by dismissing
community concerns about traffic.
Haroff cited an October 2012 letter
from the town of Hillsborough stating
their concerns about the rebuilding
being ignored.
A full EIR is necessary, Haroff
said. There are more suitable alterna-
tives to avoid impacts in the first
place. They would be in a better posi-
tion to provide for the needs of the stu-
dents without negative impacts.
Growing enrollment in the
Burlingame Elementary School
District resulted in the purchase of the
previously-closed Hoover Elementary
School on Summit Road in 2010.
Since then, the district has been work-
ing on plans to renovate the building
to meet current standards. The plan is
Hoover Elementary lawsuit comes to trial
Judge will make decision on case in about 60 days
See FIRE, Page 16
See MILLS, Page 20
See HOOVER, Page 20
See HEALTH, Page 16
Jackie Speier
GIANTS VISIT
WHITE HOUSE
SPORTS PAGE 11
Arnett says the Bluth
family may return to Netix
BEVERLY HILLS Will Arnett
hopes the mixed reviews of season 4 of
Arrested Development will mellow
out over time.
Speaking Monday at the annual
Television Critics Association summer
press tour, Arnett said hes incredibly
proud of the shows recent new
episodes and the cast is in discussions
with Netix to do more.
I think we had to go dark (in tone) ...
audiences are so savvy now and you
have to do something thats different
and make it interesting, the 43-year-
old actor said.
The 15-episode fourth season of
Arrested Development, the award-
winning show about the dysfunctional
Bluth family, was posted to Netix Inc.
in May. Each episode focused on a dif-
ferent character showing his or her
point of view of an event that was later
explained. There was much fanfare over
the shows return but not all fans were
impressed with the format and story
lines.
Arnett says working with Jason
Bateman, who was often the straight
man of Arrested Development,
taught him how to play it straight and
reactionary in his upcoming CBS com-
edy, The Millers, co-starring Beau
Bridges, Margo Martindale and Jayma
Mays.
Jason has unbelievable timing,
said Arnett. Hes
personally one of
the funniest people
Ive ever known.
Ive learned so much
from him. As crazy
as Gob (Bluth) was
doing something, it
only worked (play-
ing off Bateman).
... It was a tango,
and Jason was the woman and I was the
man, he joked.
On The Millers, Arnett is a newly
divorced guy whose parents, played by
Martindale and Bridges, are caught up
in a bitter separation.
The sitcom is shot in a multicamera
format and taped in front of a live audi-
ence.
Arnett says hes excited to have the
opportunity to work in a different for-
mat, as most of his TV experience has
been from a single-camera perspective.
It seemed like something that is like
doing a play, it is like an event. ... I
really wanted to do something fun and
different from what Ive been doing the
last few years, he says.
His NBC comedy Up All Night
ended on a strange note after it took a
hiatus in its second season late last
year to switch from a single- to a multi-
camera format. Creator Emily Spivey
and co-star Christina Applegate quit
shortly thereafter.
Arnett says he was more open to the
idea of the shows change of format.
It was something that I was open to
and that sort of took on a life or death
of its own, but I really welcome the
opportunity.
Two-headed turtle at
Texas zoo gets Facebook page
SAN ANTONIO Atwo-headed turtle
born last month at the San Antonio
Zoo has become so popular that she has
her own Facebook page.
Zoo ofcials say the Texas cooter,
named Thelma and Louise for the female
duo in the 1991 Oscar-winning movie,
has been doing well.
Spokeswoman Debbie Rios-
Vanskike says the turtle eats and
swims, and added that the two heads
named Louise Left and Thelma Right
get along.
Evan Rachel Wood
gives birth to baby boy
NEWYORK Evan Rachel Wood is
a mom.
Her representative said Monday that
she gave birth to a baby boy. The 25-
year-old actress married British actor
Jamie Bell last year.
The rep adds that parents and baby
are all doing well. No more details
were provided.
Woods credits include The
Wrestler, Thirteen and HBOs True
Blood. She earned Golden Globe and
Emmy nominations for her supporting
role in Mildred Pierce.
FOR THE RECORD 2 Tuesday July 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
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Actor Tom Green is
42.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1863
American automaker Henry Ford was
born in Dearborn Township, Mich.
You cant build a reputation
on what you are going to do.
Henry Ford, American auto manufacturer (1863-1947)
Former California
governor Arnold
Schwarzenegger is
66.
Actress Jaime
Pressly is 36.
Birthdays
REUTERS
A tortoise makes its way through mud in Kfar Kila village near the Lebanese-Israeli border.
Tuesday: Mostly cloudy in the morning
then becoming sunny. Patchy fog in the
morning. Highs in the lower 60s. South
winds 10 to 20 mph.
Tuesday night: Partly cloudy.
Local Weather Forecast
The article, Remembering Korea: San Bruno resident,
vet and former POWreects on Korean War armistice in the
July 27 edition of the Daily Journal had incorrect informa-
tion. Ted Pallas actually was discharged in August, not
April, of 1953. In his quote, I say a person who enlists
loves war, while a person who is drafted hates war, he was
speaking specically to his captors.
Correction
I n 1729, Baltimore, Md. was founded.
I n 1864, during the Civil War, Union forces tried to take
Petersburg, Va., by exploding a gunpowder-lled mine under
Confederate defense lines; the attack failed.
I n 1918, poet Joyce Kilmer, a sergeant in the 165th U.S.
Infantry Regiment, was killed during the Second Battle of the
Marne in World War I. (Kilmer is perhaps best remembered
for his poem Trees.)
I n 1932, the Summer Olympic Games opened in Los
Angeles.
I n 1945, the Portland class heavy cruiser USS Indianapolis
was torpedoed by a Japanese submarine during World War II;
only 316 out of some 1,200 men survived.
I n 1953, the Small Business Administration was founded.
In 1956, President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed a measure
making In God We Trust the national motto, replacing E
Pluribus Unum (Out of many, one).
In 1963, the Soviet Union announced it had granted polit-
ical asylum to Harold Kim Philby, the third man of a
British spy ring.
In 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed into law the
Medicare bill, which went into effect the following year.
I n 1975, former Teamsters union president Jimmy Hoffa
disappeared in suburban Detroit; although presumed dead, his
remains have never been found.
In 1980, Israels Knesset passed a law reafrming all of
Jerusalem as the capital of the Jewish state.
I n 1990, British Conservative Party lawmaker Ian Gow was
killed in a bombing claimed by the Irish Republican Army.
Ten years ago: President George W. Bush took personal
responsibility for the rst time for using discredited intelli-
gence in his State of the Union address, but predicted he
would be vindicated for going to war against Iraq.
In other news ...
(Answers tomorrow)
BOSSY CLOTH KNIGHT FINITE
Yesterdays
Jumbles:
Answer: After having the flu for a week, she was
SICK OF IT
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
KLISY
YEHAV
DISGIN
LAFNEL
2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
J
u
m
b
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p
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m
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in
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a
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Print answer here:
Actor Richard Johnson is 86. Actor Edd (correct) Kookie
Byrnes is 80. Major League Baseball Commissioner Bud Selig
is 79. Blues musician Buddy Guy is 77. Movie director Peter
Bogdanovich is 74. Feminist activist Eleanor Smeal is 74.
Former U.S. Rep. Patricia Schroeder, D-Colo., is 73. Singer
Paul Anka is 72. Jazz musician David Sanborn is 68.Actor
William Atherton is 66. Actor Jean Reno is 65. Blues singer-
musician Otis Taylor is 65. Actor Frank Stallone is 63. Actor
Ken Olin is 59. Actress Delta Burke is 57. Law professor Anita
Hill is 57. Singer-songwriter Kate Bush is 55.
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Lucky Star,No.
2,in rst place;Gorgeous George,No.8,in second
place; and Lucky Charms, No. 12, in third place.
The race time was clocked at 1:49.01.
5 2 1
4 22 23 27 38 42
Mega number
July 26 Mega Millions
9 23 40 53 58 6
Powerball
July 27 Powerball
3 20 23 25 39
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
2 3 2 8
Daily Four
6 4 3
Daily three evening
18 20 30 40 42 15
Mega number
July 27 Super Lotto Plus
Will Arnett
3
Tuesday July 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
SAN MATEO
Suspi ci ous ci rcumstances. Two girls
knocked on someones door and asked for a
ride home after saying a man was following
them on the 1400 block of Aberdeen Drive
before 9:51 p.m. on Wednesday, July 24.
Brandishing a weapon. A man threat-
ened someone with a gun after a road rage
incident at the intersection of Tilia Street
and Borel Avenue before 8:44 p.m.
Wednesday, July 24.
Theft. Apower washer was taken from the
truck after locks were cut on the 100 block
of North Ellsworh Avenue before 7:22 a.m.
Wednesday, July 24.
Vandalism. Five men were using marker
pens to tag walls and parking meters on the
100 block of South Ellsworth Avenue before
8:41 p.m. on Monday, July 22.
Theft. An ring was stolen on the 500 block
of Bucknell Drive before 12:39 p.m. on
Monday, July 15.
Theft. A license plate was stolen on the
900 block of South Delaware Street before
11:47 a.m. on Monday, July 15.
Theft. A man stole perscriptions from a
CVS/pharmacy on the rst block of Bovet
Road before 8:44 p.m. Saturday, July 13.
Theft. A backpack with a computer and
other electronics was stolen on the 100
block of De Anza Boulevard before 10:24
a.m. Saturday July 13.
Theft. Awomans iPhone was stolen out of
her pocket while she was shopping at the
Hillsdale Shopping Center before 7:11 p.m.
Wednesday, July 10.
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO
Disturbance. A man refused to leave a
Safeway after he was caught stealing on
numerous occasions on El Camino Real
before 10:30 p.m. Wednesday, July 24.
Arre s t. A person was arrested for an out-
standing warrant after ve juveniles were
caught smoking marijuana on Third Lane
before 10:18 p.m. Wednesday, July 24.
Disturbance. Two intoxicated people were
ghting on Villa Court before 8:51 p.m.
Wednesday, July 24.
Mal i ci ous mi schi ef. Two juveniles were
seen on the roof of a school on Spruce
Avenue before 6:39 p.m. Wednesday, July
24.
Theft. Two guitars were stolen after a music
store business owners email was hacked
into on Utah Avenue before 9:35 a.m.
Wednesday, July 24.
Hazard. The driver of a minivan attempted
to enter Highway 101 via the exit ramp and
caused trafc issues on Grand Avenue before
11:14 p.m. Tuesday, July 23.
UNINCORPORATED
SAN MATEO COUNTY
Petty theft. Two batteries worth $359
were taken from an excavator on the 13000
block of Skyline Boulevard before 4 p.m.
Thursday, July 18.
Disturbance. Someone reported receiving
a disturbing message on her voice mail from
an unknown caller on the 500 block of
Terrace Avenue before 9:26 p.m. Monday,
July 8.
Police reports
Parking blues
A person reported they believed some-
one painted a curb blue to create an
unauthorized handicap parking space on
the 500 block of Rollins Road in
Burlingame before 10:51 a.m. Tuesday,
July 23.
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Notre Dame de Namur University
announced yesterday that Paul Ewald, Ph.D.
will be its new provost, starting at the
Belmont school on Sept. 1.
Ewald has served as dean of Regis College
at Regis University in Denver, Colo. since
2002.
He was formerly associate to the chancel-
lor at Antioch University and held faculty
appointments at Westmar College, the
University of Wisconsin-Whitewater and
the University of New England.
He completed a post-doctoral fellowship
in gerontology in the Alaskan interior, a
Fulbright Scholars award in Hungary and a
Fulbright-Hayes team project in Brazil.
Ewald has a B.A. from Creighton
University, an M.S.Ed. from Eastern
Illinois University and a
Ph.D. in educational psy-
chology from the
University of Florida.
I was attracted to
NDNU for many reasons
including its small size,
its rich Catholic heritage
and the heritage of the
Sisters of Notre Dame de
Namur, Ewald said in a
press release. At a time when all the talk
about higher education seems to center on
job preparation, I appreciate NDNUs insis-
tence on maintaining a strong focus on the
liberal arts as well as professionally-orient-
ed learning.
Ewald succeeds Diana Demetrulias, Ph.D.
who announced her retirement earlier this
year.
BART talks continue; union leader
pessimistic about reaching deal
BARTmanagement met with union leaders
again Monday to try to reach an agreement
before the union employees contract
expires at midnight Sunday, a management
spokesman said.
Transit district spokesman Rick Rice said
management met with leaders of Service
Employees International Union Local
1021, which represents 1,430 mechanics,
custodians and clerical workers, yesterday
morning and with leaders of Amalgamated
Transit Union Local 1555, which represents
945 station agents, train operators and cler-
ical workers, yesterday afternoon.
The talks were facilitated by two state
mediators who sometimes meet with the
parties separately and other times meet with
all of them together in the same room.
SEIU Local 1021 executive director Pete
Castelli said negotiations have been ongo-
ing but have been proceeding more slowly
than they should because BARTs lead nego-
tiator, Thomas Hock, has been on vacation
for the past 10 days.
Castelli said that means the parties have
only been able to talk about small supple-
mental issues during that time instead of the
bigger sticking points, which he said are
wages, benets and worker safety.
But Rice said Hocks vacation was
approved by the state mediator back on July
7 and that the parties have still been able to
talk about important matters in his absence.
There have been more meetings than
originally scheduled and theres still plenty
of time to reach an agreement, Rice said.
Hock will be back at the bargaining table
today, and the mediators schedule includes
talks every day until the contract expires on
Sunday night, he said.
Notre Dame gets new provost
Paul Ewald takes over for Diana Demetrulias
Paul Ewald
Around the Bay
4
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LOCAL/STATE/NATION
Sheriffs Office investigating string
of auto burglaries around Half Moon Bay
The San Mateo County Sheriffs Ofce is investigating a
series of car and residential burglaries that took place in and
around Half Moon Bay on Saturday.
Several vehicles along state Highway 1 and in downtown
Half Moon Bay were burglarized between mid-afternoon and
early evening, according to the Sheriffs Ofce.
At least one residential burglary was believed to be con-
nected to the crime spree.
Alate 1990s two-door black Honda with black rims was
seen in the area of two of the crimes, sheriffs ofcials said.
Anyone with information about the case is asked to call
the San Mateo County Sheriffs Ofce at 363-4800.
Fire displaces family
Ahome on Elston Drive in San Bruno caught re Sunday
at about 7:20 p.m., displacing four people, two who suf-
fered minor injuries.
The re went to two alarms briey before re crews were
able to contain it, an ofcial with the city told the Daily
Journal.
The house is not currently habitable, the ofcial said.
Malibu Grand Prix to close
Malibu Grand Prix Family Entertainment Center in
Redwood City is closing Aug. 18 after 35 years of opera-
tion, its general manager announced yesterday.
The center, which offers miniature Indy car racing, minia-
ture golf, turbo go-karts, bumper boats, batting cages and
arcade, opened in 1979.
It has been one a month-to-month lease since earlier this
year, said sales manager Michael Craig, adding he was hop-
ing it would last to the end of the year. The 14-acre proper-
ty is leased from Granite Rock Construction.
Even with the reduced rent, we just werent making
money, Craig said. Its getting tougher and tougher to
make a buck in this business.
Malibu is owned and operated by Palace Entertainment.
Foreign airlines urged to use GPS at SFO
Federal aviation ofcials have advised all foreign airlines
to use a GPS system instead of visual reckoning and cock-
pit instruments when landing at San Francisco
International Airport in the wake of the deadly Asiana
Airlines crash.
The Federal Aviation Administration issued the recom-
mendation on Sunday involving main runways at the air-
port, saying in a statement that it took the action after
noticing an increase in aborted landings by some foreign
carriers ying visual approaches into the airport.
Pilots on Asiana Airlines Flight 214 had been cleared to
make a visual approach when the plane crash-landed on July
6. Three people died, and 180 others were injured among the
307 aboard the ight that came in too low and too slow,
slamming its landing gear into a seawall well before the
actual runway.
Seconds before the accident, the pilots called for a go-
around, meaning they wanted to abort the landing and circle
for another approach. The FAA said such maneuvers are
routine, standardized procedures that can occur once a day
or more at busy airports for various reasons.
Local briefs
By Pete Yost
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON Declaring child
prostitution a persistent threat in
America, the FBI said Monday that
authorities had rescued 105 young peo-
ple and arrested 150 alleged pimps in a
three-day sweep in 76 cities.
The agency said it had been monitor-
ing Backpage.com and other websites
as a prominent online marketplace for
sex for sale. Backpage.com said that it
was very, very pleased by the raids
and that if the website were shut down
to the advertisements, the ads would be
pushed to sites that wouldnt cooperate
with law enforcement.
The young people in the roundup,
almost all of them girls, ranged in age
from 13 to 17.
The largest numbers of children res-
cued in the weekend initiative,
Operation Cross Country, were in the
San Francisco Bay and Detroit areas,
along with Milwaukee, Denver and New
Orleans. The operation was conducted
under the FBIs decade-long Innocence
Lost National Initiative. The latest res-
cues and arrests were the largest such
enforcement action to date.
Child prostitution remains a per-
sistent threat to children across the
country, Ron Hosko, assistant direc-
tor of the bureaus criminal investiga-
tive division, told a news conference.
Were trying to put this spotlight on
pimps and those who would exploit.
FBI spokeswoman Julianne Sohn
said federal and local authorities res-
cued 12 children who were being vic-
timized as prostitutes and arrested 17
alleged pimps in the Bay Area. Under
normal protocol, Sohn said, district
attorneys and federal prosecutors will
confer on what charges might be led
and whether the suspects should be
charged in state or federal court.
The Bay Area sweep, carried out
between Wednesday and Sunday,
included arrests on the street and at
hotels, Sohn said.
Law enforcement agencies from
Alameda, Contra Costa and Sonoma
counties participated, as well as police
from 13 cities.
Those cities were Concord, Daly
City, Hayward, Oakland, Petaluma,
Richmond, Rohnert Park, San
Francisco, San Jose, San Mateo, Santa
Clara, Santa Rosa and South San
Francisco, according to the FBI.
Bay City News contributed to this
report .
Child prostitution: Raids
rescue 105 young people
REUTERS
Law enforcement ofcers make an arrest in this still image taken from video in
New Jersey, provided by the FBI.
By Laura Olson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO A coalition of
business, housing and local govern-
ment leaders is warning California leg-
islative leaders that a plan to rewrite
the states landmark environmental
law could lead to more lawsuits and
make it harder to approve responsible
projects the opposite of what law-
makers seeking the overhaul hope to
achieve.
The group outlined its concerns to
Senate President Pro Tem Darrell
Steinberg, D-Sacramento, in a letter
obtained by the Associated Press. The
group includes powerful organizations
such as the California Chamber of
Commerce, the Southern California
Association of Governments, and the
California Association of Realtors.
The coalition is among many envi-
ronmental, business and labor groups
that have been privately working with
the Democratic Senate leader to reform
the four-decade-old California
Environmental Quality Act. Critics
say the law, which was intended to pro-
tect the states air and water, has been
abused to block projects and gain cost-
ly concessions from developers.
Steinbergs legislation, SB731,
aims to cut the number of lawsuits and
the resulting delays in construction
that can drag on for years when oppo-
nents object to a project.
It would create statewide standards
for noise and trafc issues, allowing
projects that meet those standards to
be protected from lawsuits based on
those issues. A projects aesthetics
also could not be used as grounds for
suing under the environmental law.
In the letter sent to Steinberg on
Thursday, the CEQA Working Group
wrote that the measure as drafted would
create new requirements that will lead
to meritless lawsuits against projects
that otherwise comply with stringent
state and local environmental laws.
California groups worry over environmental law reform
6
Tuesday July 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
By Paul Larson
MILLBRAE
Have you ever
attended a funeral
or memorial service
and felt ill-at-ease,
uncomfortable or
awkward when
talking to the family
of the deceased? Have you ever stumbled
through your words and condolences
because you just didnt know what to say or
how to say it? Have you even decided to not
approach the family for fear of saying the
wrong thing or making a fool of yourself? If
so you are not alone. Many people in this
situation want to provide some kind of
comfort to the immediate family, but just
dont have the verbal tools to do so in an
assuring manner.
Learning Funeral Etiquette can be
useful. Using the right words at the right
time is an appropriate way to show that you
care, and in situations like this can be of
great help when provided correctly.
Standard condolences such as I am sorry
for your loss have become routine and
generic. A personalized phrase can be
welcomed such as John touched many
lives or I will miss John. DO NOT ask
the cause of death, offer advice or make
comments that would diminish the
importance of the loss such as Oh, youre
young and can marry again.
Other ways to demonstrate your support
include: 1. Listening. The family may feel
the need to express their anxiety, and giving
them that opportunity can be therapeutic; 2.
An embrace. This can show that you care
without the need for words; 3. Offering your
services. This shows the family that you are
willing to give extra time for them: Please
let me know if there is anything I can do to
help (be prepared to act if needed).
Even if you dont feel confident in
approaching the family there are other ways
to show that you care: 1. Attending the
funeral and signing the Memorial Book will
show the family that you took the time to be
there in support; 2. Dressing appropriately
for the funeral will demonstrate your efforts
to prepare for this special occasion (dark
colors are no longer a requisite for funerals,
but dressing in a coat, tie, dress or other
attire that youd wear to any special event
are considered a way of showing you care);
3. In certain cases friends are invited to
stand up and offer BRIEF personal feelings.
Prior to the funeral write a few key notes
and reflections which will help you organize
your thoughts. Even if there is no
opportunity to speak before a group you
may have a chance to offer your thoughts to
the family following the ceremony; 4. A
personalized card or note will help you
arrange your words better and can be kept
by the family. If you dont have their
mailing address you can send your envelope
to the funeral home and they will forward it
to the next of kin; 5. Providing flowers is a
long time tradition, or making a charitable
donation in the deceaseds memory will give
the family a strong sense of your regards; 6.
If appropriate a brief phone call can show
your immediate concern, but generally this
should be avoided to give the family the
privacy they may need.
If you ever wish to discuss cremation,
funeral matters or want to make pre-
planning arrangements please feel free to
call me and my staff at the CHAPEL OF
THE HIGHLANDS in Millbrae at (650)
588-5116 and we will be happy to guide you
in a fair and helpful manner. For more info
you may also visit us on the internet at:
www.chapelofthehighlands.com.
Funeral Etiquette Advice:
Show Up, Be Brief, Listen
advertisement
James (Lee) Han, a local
activist, has pulled nomination
papers for a seat on the Redwood
Ci ty Counci l. Councilmen Jeff
Gee and John Seybert and former
councilwoman Diane Howard
have qualied for the ballot. Pl anni ng Commi ssi oner
Ernie Schmidt and business owner Corrin Rankin
have also pulled nomination papers.
Walter (Walt) George Englert Jr.
Walter (Walt) George Englert Jr., born Nov. 23, 1927, died
peacefully July 26, 2013 at his home at the age of 85.
Born in Seattle, Wash., the son of
Walter George Englert Sr. and Adele
Louise Englert. Walt graduated from
Seattle Preparatory School in Seattle and
St. Marys College in Moraga. He married
Isobel Anne OHearne Aug. 18, 1951 at
Corpus Christi Church in Piedmont. Walt
and Isobel moved to San Carlos in 1958.
Walt is survived by his wife of 61 years
Isobel, his sister Patricia, his seven chil-
dren Walter (Mary), James, Catherine
(Robert), Barbara, Patricia, John (Jamie) and Paul (Maresa),
14 grandchildren Francesca (Aaron), Molly, Daniel, Patrick,
Stephen, Hailey, Heidi, Nicholas, Cameron, Noah, Brody,
Lilah, Samuel and Luke, and one great-grandchild Charlotte.
Avigil service will be held 6 p.m.-8 p.m. Wednesday, July
31 with 7 p.m. rosary at Crippen & Flynn Carlmont Chapel
in Belmont. Afuneral mass will be held at St. Charles Church
in San Carlos 10 a.m. Thursday, Aug. 1 and Walt will be laid
to rest at the Gate of Heaven Catholic Cemetery in Los Altos.
Sign the guestbook at www.crippenynn.com.
Joan Flanders Sexton
Joan Flanders Sexton, born Dec. 3, 1938, died July 27,
2013.
She was born in San Francisco and grew up in San Bruno.
She retired from the accounting depart-
ment of Peninsula Hospital and worked
closely with Good Shepherd Parish in
Pacifica, Mission Delores and at St.
Robert Parish in San Bruno. Joanies
vocation in life was helping others,
including cooking at Caf St. Vincent.
She was the wife of the late Ken Sexton
for 27 years. Survived by her sister
Virginia and brothers Robert, Louis and
Raymond, 15 cousins, ve nieces and
nine nephews and hundreds of loving friends.
Visitations on Tuesday, July 30, 2013 after 4 p.m. until 8
p.m. at the Chapel of the Highlands, El Camino Real at 194
Millwood Drive in Millbrae, with a 7 p.m. vigil service. A
funeral mass will follow 10:30 a.m. Wednesday at Saint
Roberts Catholic Church in San Bruno. Committal at Holy
Cross Catholic Cemetery in Colma.
Instead of owers, please contribute to your favorite chari-
t y, or St. Anthony Foundation, 150 Golden Gate Ave., San
Francisco CA 94102, Caf St. Vincent, 344 Grand Ave.,
South San Francisco, CA9408, Second Harvest Food Bank,
1051 Bing St., San Carlos CA94070.
Obituaries
S
an Mateo County
Superintendent of Schools
Anne Campbel l announced
two teachers were selected to receive
2014 County Teacher of the Year
honors.
Di ane M.
Quiery Sexton, a
transitional kinder-
garten (TK) teacher at
Nesbi t School i n
the Bel mont -
Redwood Shore s
E l e m e n t a r y
School Di st ri ct
has been named as
the 2014 San
Mateo County
Teacher of t he
Year f or
E l e m e n t a r y
Sc hool. Quiery
Sexton is a veteran
teacher with 39 years
of teaching experi-
ence, all in the
Belmont-Redwood
Shores School
District.
G. Amanda Kemp is the 2014 San
Mateo County Teacher of Year for
Middle and High School. Kemp
teaches seventh grade English language
arts and social studies at McNair
Middle School in the Ravenswood
City Elementary School Di stri ct.
Ms. Kemp graduated from CSU
Northridge and will complete a gradu-
ate degree in Education
Administration in the fall. She is in
her 16th year as an educator and during
that time has held a variety of teaching
and administrative positions. Over the
past two years she has developed the
AVID (Advancement Via Individual
Determination) program at McNair
Middle School.
***
In June, the Adobe Foundation
announce the winners of its second
annual Adobe Youth Voi ces Aspire
Awards, the only online competition
inviting youth around the world to cre-
atively express their vision for change
in their communities. Among the win-
ners is Andrew Elias, who attends
Everest Public High School i n
Redwood City.
Winners and afl i-
ated schools/organi-
zations for each stan-
dard category receive
software, hardware, a
trip to attend the
2 0 1 3 AYV
Summit in San Jose
and a charitable
donation to a cause
of their choice. The
U N I C E F
Chal l enge rst- and second-place win-
ners receive $40,000 and $30,000
grants, respectively, dedicated to imple-
menting the winning project proposals.
Class notes is a column dedicated to school
news. It is compiled by education reporter
Angela Swartz. You can contact her at (650)
344-5200, ext. 105 or at angela@smdailyjour-
nal.com.
In March and April, the Rotary Club of Menlo Park passed out 131 dictionaries to
third graders at local Menlo Park schools as part of a Rotary project to encourage
literacy and education.Thirteen Rotarians from the Menlo Park club helped hand
out the dictionaries to the classrooms.Rotary Club dues help pay for the dictionaries
so that the children can have them at no cost. The Menlo Park Rotary Club is
planning on distributing dictionaries to every third grader in Menlo Park schools
during the 201314 school year.
Diane
Quiery Sexton
G. Kemp
Andrew Elias
NATION 7
Tuesday July 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Hillary Clinton to
get documentary treatment
BEVERLY HILLS Hillary Rodham
Clintons life is getting the documentary
treatment.
CNN Films said
Monday that it plans a
feature-length lm on the
former rst lady and secre-
tary of state to premiere
next year. It will look at
Clintons professional
and personal lives.
The film from Oscar-
winning director and pro-
ducer Charles Ferguson
will have a theatrical run before airing on
CNN.
Last weekend, NBC announced the four-
hour miniseries Hillary starring Diane
Lane. No air date was announced, but it is
timed to precede the 2016 presidential elec-
tion.
Clinton hasnt said whether shell make
another run for the Democratic nomination
for president.
NBC says the miniseries will track
Clintons life and career from 1998 to the
present.
Obama, Clinton meet
for lunch, sparking 2016 buzz
WASHINGTON When is a lunch more
than just a midday meal? When the two diners
are President Barack Obama and Hillary
Rodham Clinton, and inquiring minds want
to know who, if anyone, the president will
endorse in 2016.
Asummertime meal shared by Obama and
his rival-turned-ally threw the political spec-
ulation machine into overdrive Monday,
highlighting how closely both are being
watched for signs of their intentions in the
next presidential race.
For Clinton, its a question of whether the
former rst lady will take the plunge, launch-
ing another campaign eight years after she
lost to Obama in a hard-fought primary.
By Alan Fram
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON The Senate over-
whelmingly confirmed James Comey on
Monday to become FBI director, elevating
the one-time Justice Department official
who defied efforts by President George W.
Bushs White House to renew a program
that allowed warrantless eavesdropping.
Comey was approved 93-1 after one of
the Senates leading conservatives abrupt-
ly ended delaying tactics that had blocked a
vote on the nomination.
Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., mentioned as a
possible 2016 GOP presidential candidate,
had been thwarting the vote over his con-
cerns about the FBIs domestic use of
drones. Minutes before a showdown vote
that seemed likely to force an end to his
delays, Paul announced he would allow a
vote on Comey, saying hed received a let-
ter from the FBI that answered his ques-
tions about drones.
That letter said the FBI has seldom used
drones and cited Supreme Court rulings that
the agency said suggested that court war-
rants are not needed for aerial surveillance.
Paul was the only no vote.
President Barack Obama nominated
Comey, 52, in June. He will succeed Robert
Mueller, who is stepping down in
September after 12 years heading the
agency.
In the face of ever-changing threats, he
has repeatedly demonstrated his commit-
ment to defending Americas security and
ideals alike, Obama said in a written state-
ment about Comey.
Comey was the Justice Departments No.
2 official from 2003 to 2005 under Bush.
He gained attention during a brief stint as
acting attorney general in 2004, when he
and Attorney General John Ashcroft, who
was ill, rejected an effort by White House
Chief of Staff Andrew Card and White
House counsel Alberto Gonzales to have
Justice renew a program that allowed
eavesdropping without court warrants of
domestic phone calls and emails.
With the Obama administration under
fire following recent revelations about the
National Security Agencys collection of
records of domestic telephone calls and
online communications, that 2004
episode and Comeys credentials of serv-
ing under a Republican president helped
make him an attractive candidate for the
top FBI job.
James Comey proved that his reputation
for unwavering integrity and professional-
ism is well-deserved, Senate Judiciary
Committee Chairman Patrick Leahy, D-
Vt., said during Mondays brief debate.
Leahy expressed concerns about
Comeys approval in 2005 of a legal memo
that he said authorized the use of torture,
including waterboarding, in which water is
poured onto a suspects face to make them
feel like theyre drowning. But Leahy cited
Comeys answers at a committee hearing
this month, when Comey said the FBI
would not allow abusive treatment of pris-
oners.
Comey was praised by the Judiciary
Committees top Republican, Iowa Sen.
Charles Grassley, who called him a fine
choice.
Senate approves Comey as new FBI director
Around the nation
Hillary Clinton
REUTERS
FBI director nominee James Comey laughs while testifying before the Senate Judiciary
Committee on Capitol Hill.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON A U.S. official said
Monday that the National Security
Agency did not monitor phone conversa-
tions between a New Zealand journalist
and his Afghan sources, following claims
by the journalist that his reporting was
monitored by the U.S. intelligence pro-
grams revealed by NSA leaker Edward
Snowden on behalf of New Zealands mil-
itary.
Officials in the intelligence community
and experts said if any surveillance was
done, it was more likely that his phone
calls were caught up by standard military
intelligence monitoring of enemy com-
munications in war zones.
Experts: Unlikely U.S. helped
New Zealand spy on reporter
NATION 8
Tuesday July 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ELITE Volleyball Club
Reach your potential with our girls volleyball program
*Check our web site for more information
Register:
www.elitevolleyballclub.net
brian@elitevolleyballclub.net
888-616-6349
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Center (PJCC)
School Volleyball
TRYOUT CAMP
August 5 8
4:30 6:30 p.m.
$100 includes TShirt
if registered on or before 7/31
CITY OF FOSTER CITY
NOTICE OF PLANNING COMMISSION SPECIAL MEETING
FOR A GILEAD SCIENCES NEW LABORATORY BUILDING (NB355)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Foster City Planning Commission will hold a Public Hearing
at 7:00 pm on Tuesday, August 6, 2013 to (1) review an Initial Study and (2) discuss the proposed
Use Permit for a new 6 story, 124 tall, 191,235 sq. ft,. lab building and a new 3 story, 72 tall,
23,914 sq. ft. pilot laboratory to replace an existing 54,828 sq. ft. offce building located at 355
Lakeside Drive for the Gilead Sciences Corporate Campus in Vintage Park Neighborhood VP
APN: 094-904-340 UP-13-001
PROJECT LOCATION
The project is located in Neighborhood VP (APN: 094-904-340). The project site is bounded by
Lakeside Drive and the Gilead campus on the south, 333 Lakeside Drive (offce building) on the
west, Vintage Park Drive/357 Lakeside Drive on the east and Vintage Lake on the north.
CEQA COMPLIANCE
Pursuant to and in accordance with Section 15162 of the California Government Code of Regulations/
Guidelines for the California Environmental Quality Act, the Initial Study prepared for the project has
concluded that no substantial changes have occurred and no additional signifcant impacts have
been identifed beyond those already identifed in the EIR and therefore the potential environmental
impacts of the new laboratory buildings were adequately analyzed in the Gilead Sciences Corporate
Campus Environmental Impact Report (SCH#2008122064).
DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY
The Plans for the proposed Use Permit are available for review Monday through Friday, between the
hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., at the City of Foster City Community Development Department,
610 Foster City Boulevard, Foster City, California 94404. The Public Hearing will be televised
on FCTV, Channel 27. Information regarding the project and Public Hearing Staff Report will be
available on the Citys website at www.fostercity.org.
If you have questions about the Planning Commission Public Hearing, or general questions
about this project, please contact Kohar Kojayan, Senior Planner at (650) 286-3225 or kkojayan@
fostercity.org.
By David Dishneau
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
FORT MEADE, Md. Pfc.
Bradley Manning will learn
Tuesday afternoon whether he will
be convicted of aiding the enemy
punishable by life in prison
without parole for sending more
than 700,000 government docu-
ments to the anti-secrecy website
WikiLeaks, a military judge said
Monday.
Col. Denise Lind said on the
third day of deliberations that she
will announce her verdict at 1 p.m
Tuesday in Mannings court-mar-
tial.
The charge of aiding the enemy
is the most serious of 21 counts
Manning is contesting. He also is
charged with eight federal
Espionage Act violations, ve fed-
eral theft counts, and two federal
Computer Fraud and Abuse Act vio-
lations, each punishable by up to
10 years; and ve military counts
of violating a lawful general regu-
lation, punishable by up to two
years each.
Lind has tentatively scheduled a
sentencing hearing beginning
Wednesday. The sentencing phase
could run for several weeks; each
side has more than 20 potential
witnesses. Manning is being tried
by a judge alone, which was his
choice. The trial began June 3.
The 25-year-old native of
Crescent, Okla., has admitted to
sending more than 470,000 Iraq
and Afghanistan battlefield
reports, 250,000 State
Department diplomatic cables, and
other material including several
battlefield video clips to
WikiLeaks while working as an
intelligence analyst in Iraq in
early 2010. WikiLeaks published
most of the material online.
The video included footage of a
2007 U.S. Apache helicopter
attack in Baghdad that killed at
least nine men, including a Reuters
news photographer and his driver.
Manning claims he sent the
material to expose war crimes and
deceitful diplomacy. In closing
arguments last week, defense attor-
ney David Coombs portrayed
Manning as a naive whistleblower
who never intended the material to
be seen by the enemy. Manning
claims he selected material that
wouldnt harm troops or national
security.
Verdict reached in WikiLeaks court-martial
REUTERS
Private First Class Bradley Manning, 25, is charged with providing the
WikiLeaks anti-secrecy website more than 700,000 classied les,combat
videos and diplomatic cables while serving as a junior intelligence analyst
in Iraq in 2009 and 2010.
OPINION 9
Tuesday July 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Letters to the editor
Riverside Press-Enterprise
H
igh-tech gadgetry does not neces-
sarily bring careful public policy.
The Legislature needs to do far
more thoughtful analysis before pushing
ahead with a digital license plate program.
At the least, legislators should answer
questions about the plates potential uses,
costs and state goals before going any fur-
ther.
SB 806, by Sen. Ben Hueso, D-San
Diego, would authorize a pilot program to
test digital license plates in California.
The three-year program would allow the
DMV to issue up to 160,000 of the elec-
tronic plates to willing participants, out of
about 32 million registered vehicles in
California. The digital plates would look
like a standard license plate, but annual
registration would take place wirelessly,
without the need for the state to mail driv-
ers a yearly sticker to attach to the plate.
The digital plates manufacturer would
cover the cost of the devices for the pilot
study.
The bill seeks potential savings from a
more modern approach to registering vehi-
cles than the metal license plate. Awireless
electronic plate would allow the DMV t o
save a reported $20 million annually on
postage to mail renewal stickers and paper
registration cards to California drivers. The
legislative analysis, however, makes no
mention of the potential costs of a wide-
spread adoption of electronic plates
including the central question of whether
those expenses would outweigh any sav-
ings.
The Legislature should look for more ef-
cient ways to run state operations, certain-
l y. But that search needs to include a more
thoughtful approach than just eyeing
prospective savings without assessing off-
setting costs. SB 806 also raises a host of
policy questions about privacy, nances
and state intentions that the legislation
does not address, but which need clear
answers before California embarks on test-
ing new technology.
As privacy groups, such as the nonprot
Electronic Frontier Foundation, noted, the
high-tech plates offer more than just easy
registration renewals. The devices also
provide a way to for government to track
drivers movements. The plates electronic
capability, which lets the plates display
messages and serve as tolling mechanisms,
also could create a record of vehicles loca-
tions and travel without drivers knowl-
edge.
So would the state compile and store such
data? Who would have access to the data, or
be able to use the tracking function? Now,
law enforcement cannot put tracking
devices on vehicles without a warrant. But
what happens when the license plate itself
is a tracking device? What controls would
be in place to protect Californians priva-
cy? Disregarding such fundamental ques-
tions is not the way to build support for a
new program.
Tree column
Editor,
No offense to Sue Lempert, but what exact-
ly was the point of her column (In the mid-
dle of big trees in the July 22 edition of the
Daily Journal)?
And what is the point of San Mateo hav-
ing a Heritage Tree Ordinance if the people
who govern the city of San Mateo and head
its departments fail to make informed deci-
sions regarding our healthy heritage trees?
Furthermore, allowing them to be cut down
and then failing to follow through in the
aftermath of their poor decisions by ignor-
ing the requirement to plant replacement
trees?
All I can say is, good luck to the people of
North Central trying to hold on to the few
good trees they have left in their neighbor-
hood. Maybe some of us could support them
in saving their trees and we could eventually
call the area North Central Park.
Joann Ames
San Mateo
The Ryan Braun of San
Mateo County government
Editor,
As reported by the San Mateo County
Civil Grand Jury, the Board of Supervisors
systematically excluded some or all of its
extra property tax revenue to create the
impression of a decit despite having a
multi-million dollar surplus.
When has it been fair and accurate to not
report all your revenue in presenting the
countys nancial picture to the public at
large? Never.
The egregious nature of the county of-
cials actions are beyond reprehensible and
they should be embarrassed personally and
professionally and resign immediately. To
mislead the public on such an important mat-
ter as the countys nances is criminal and
their actions should be investigated by the
state Attorney Generals ofce. Who could
ever believe anything these individuals say
or distribute? Im sure this is not the rst
time they have decided what to share with
the public at large.
They are the Ryan Braun of San Mateo
County government. I am calling on all San
Mateo County residents to demand accounta-
bility from all our county government of-
cials.
Jim Lawrence
Foster City
Welcome to the USGBA
Editor,
Prince Williams new child with Kate
Middleton was the subject of great media
attention in this country, but people need to
be aware of who they are in this country.
The scene of a man dressed in clothing
from the 1600s blowing a horn outside of a
London hospital to announce the childs
birth is not part of our heritage here in the
United States. It must be understood that this
country fought two bloody wars against the
British for this countrys very existence.
Also left out of that rst war, The
Revolutionary War, was the role of our
French rivals. We must remember the revolu-
tion was won with plenty of French military
advice; it was no coincidence that Lafayette
was there at Yorktown to prevent the British
from resupplying.
Presently, we see many Americans cling-
ing to England as a way to establish an iden-
tity in the world, since we are all basically
immigrants in this country. On their behalf,
the British cling to America to instill the
sense of power they once had in the world.
All of this while most British politicians
staunchly resist any form of integration with
the EU like monetary union, which has gone
on now for 11 years. It is quite possible that
in years to come if the same attitudes persist
regarding the need for identity in America
and the need for power in Britain, we could
see the emergence of the United States of
Great Britain and America.
Patrick Field
Palo Alto
Unequally yoked
Editor,
I see a signicant similarity in two major
recent news events. A16-year-old Chinese
girl and a 17-year-old African-American boy
were killed at the hands of persons mandated
to protect and defend.
But the similarity ends there. I am wonder-
ing why. What drove emotion like a rocket
in the sky in the wake of one case and barely
sent up a are in the other? Both were inno-
cent young lives. Both were snuffed out way
too young by someone elses mistake. Dont
need to answer now, but it wouldnt hurt each
of us to roll the question around in our minds
while we pray for these fellow human beings
and rethink the value of human life.
Our answers which will come quietly,
not on poster board will bear witness to
what Abraham Lincoln once said: All the
great battles are fought not on the battle-
ground, but at the border of good and evil,
which runs straight through every human
heart.
Maggie Ranahan
San Bruno
Electronic license plates need far more vetting
Other voices
Kum-BAY-ah
by the Bay
By Stanford M. Horn
K
um-BAY-ah by the Bay: Thats
when tides, marshes, sh and
birds all get along comfortably
with a safe new ecologically-sensitive run-
way at SFO. That would be the most posi-
tive legacy of the fatal Asiana crash.
But rst some hand-holding will have to
occur between environmentalists, busi-
ness, the airport commission, city halls,
the tourism industry and frustrated travel-
ers. They all surely must now recognize the
life-saving, economy-enhancing value of a
modern runway system recongured for
safety, no delays and the welfare of the Bay
and its creatures.
The crash neednt have happened. The
cancellations of more than 500 ights
neednt have happened. The delay of
700,000 San Francisco and Peninsula visi-
tors and residents many of whom would
call themselves environmentalists need-
nt have happened. Tens of thousands of
tired travelers mired in teeming terminals
for days neednt have happened. The delay
of some 7 million arriving passengers
annually for the past decade neednt have
happened. Heres why they did.
By 2002, SFO had completed more than
95 percent of the most exhaustive multi-
year study of the Bay ever conducted to see
what environmental effect a recongured
system of safe, on-time runways would
have. The seeds of this months crash were
planted that year in the ofces of then-
supervisor Aaron Peskin, who single-hand-
edly held up the nal two or three percent
appropriation to complete the study. As
then-mayor Willie Brown accurately proph-
esied in the June 25, 2002, Chronicle: To
have one supervisor step in to kill the
(runway safety/reconguration) project and
risk the lives and economy of this city is
just awful.
So now the inevitable and clearly fore-
seeable consequences of Peskins folly
have occurred. Where should we go from
here? First, the Board of Supervisors
should set aside Peskins action and pro-
ceed with the nal steps allowing the com-
pletion of the environmental study.
Second, the airport commission should
reopen its runway safety and recongura-
tion project. If the anticipated improve-
ments had been made, the Asiana plane
would probably have landed uneventfully
on a cutting-edge-safe runway with func-
tioning glidescope and localizer beams;
our feathered and nned friends would have
had their well-being guaranteed and would
be living, swimming and ying happily;
and the Bay and its restored marshes would
be healthier than ever.
Safe, recongured runways would not
touch 99 percent of the Bay. Runways sup-
ported by pylons similar to those on the
San Mateo or new Bay bridges would have
virtually no contact with the bay. And
because there would be several thousand
feet between parallel runways, allowing
dual landings at all times, SFOs delay
problems would be solved and it would take
its place among the worlds best.
If such improvements are not made, its
certain that in some future earthquake or
ood or re disaster San Francisco would
not be reachable by many public safety,
medical, military and emergency services
personnel because of an outdated decades-
old runway conguration.
Maybe it would help of we stopped call-
ing the improvement a runway, which con-
notes decades of acrimony. Lets call it a
marine yover or a habitat preservation-
way. Those are things that everyone can
hold hands about.
Stanford M. Horn writes on transportation
and development issues.
Guest
perspective
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BUSINESS 10
Tuesday July 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 15,521.97 -36.86 10-Yr Bond 2.585 +0.024
Nasdaq3,599.14 -14.02 Oil (per barrel) 107.00
S&P 500 1,685.33 -6.32 Gold 1,324.30
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Monday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Saks Inc., up 64 cents to $15.95
The luxury retailer is being purchased by the parent of Lord & Taylor for
about $2.4 billion.
Omnicom Group Inc., down 36 cents to $64.75
Hits an all-time high of $70.50 before retreating.It is one half of a merger
of equals, the other half being Publicis Groupe SA, which together will
form a $35 billion advertising behemoth.
Suntech Power Holdings Co. Ltd., up 3 cents to $1.44
Rallied with other Chinese solar companies after the European Union
and China settled a prolonged dispute that had roiled the industry.
Michael Baker Corp., up $10.79 to $40.39
The Pittsburgh engineering company said it has agreed to be acquired
by Integrated Mission Solutions LLC in a $400 million deal.
Perrigo Co., down $9.06 to $125.17
The U.S. pharmaceutical company will pay $8.6 billion to acquire Irish
drugmaker Elan and it will move its tax residence to Ireland.
Nasdaq
Chelsea Therapeutics International Ltd., down 25 cents to $2.82.
The comapany announced another delay in the review of its drug
Northera, saying there are technical problems with its application to
federal regulators.
Activision Blizzard Inc., up 81 cents to $8.27
The stock extended its gains after the announcement Friday that Vivendi
SA would sell most of its majority stake,giving the video game company
its independence.
Big movers
By Steve Rothwell
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK Three days before the
end of the month, a blistering rally in
stocks appears to be fading.
The stock market edged lower
Monday as investors waited for a
series of big economic reports due out
this week. Astring of big-name merg-
er deals wasnt enough to push index-
es higher.
On Wednesday the government will
report its rst estimate of U.S. eco-
nomic growth for the second quarter,
and on Friday it will publish its
monthly jobs survey.
Both reports will give investors a
better idea about the strength of the
economy and whats next for the
Federal Reserves stimulus program.
Investors will hear from the Fed on
Wednesday after the central bank
winds up a two-day policy meeting.
The Feds stimulus has been a major
factor supporting a four-year rally in
stocks.
The Standard & Poors 500 index
dropped 6.32 points, or 0.4 percent,
to 1,685.33.
Seven of the 10 sectors in the index
fell. The declines were led by energy
companies and banks.
The benchmark index is still up 4.9
percent in July, and the S&P 500 is on
track to have its best month since
January. The index jumped this
month, climbing to an all-time high
July 22, after Fed Chairman Ben
Bernanke assured investors that the
Fed wouldnt cut its stimulus before
the economy was ready. The central
bank is buying $85 billion a month to
help keep interest rates low and
encourage borrowing and hiring.
Stocks may struggle to add to their
gains, given that expectations for the
economy remain modest, said Scott
Wren, a senior equity strategist at
Wells Fargo Advisors.
The U.S. economy is forecast to
have grown just 0.5 percent in the sec-
ond quarter, according to data provider
FactSet. That would be slower than the
1.8 percent annual rate the economy
expanded at in the rst three months
of the year.
I dont think youre going to see
the market sustain much higher levels
than this, said Wren. All this data is
going to show that we are slowly
improving, but its a slow process and
theres not much to get excited about.
A trio of corporate deals caught
investors attention Monday but failed
to ignite the broader market.
Saks jumped after Canadian retailer
Hudsons Bay, the parent company of
Lord & Taylor, agreed to buy the luxu-
ry store operator for $2.4 billion, or
$16 a share. Saks rose 64 cents, or 4.2
percent, to $15.95.
Interpublic Group, a big advertising
company, gained after Omnicom
Group, another big advertiser, agreed
to combine with Frances Publicis
Groupe to create the worlds largest
advertising company. Interpublic rose
74 cents, or 4.7 percent, to $16.61.
The stock closed higher even after
Interpublic CEO Michael Roth said
that he saw no need for a major merger
to keep the company moving forward.
Omnicom jumped in early trading,
climbing as high as $70.50, but ended
the day down 45 cents, or 0.6 percent,
at $64.75.
Perrigo also featured in the mergers
and acquisitions news. The drugmaker
agreed to buy Irelands Elan for $8.6
billion. Perrigo fell $9.06, or 6.7 per-
cent, to $125.17.
The deals should be positive for the
stock market in the long run, and
should be followed by more merger
activity, said Dan Veru, chief invest-
ment officer at Palisade Capital
Management. Companies are sitting
on record cash balances and borrow-
ing costs, though rising, are still
close to record lows.
Companies are struggling to grow
organically, said Veru. So, how do
they grow? They grow by buying
other businesses.
Stock rally appears to be fading
By Christopher S. Rugaber
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON The number of
Americans who signed contracts to buy
homes dipped in June from a six-year high
in May, a sign that sales could stabilize
over the next few months.
The National Association of Realtors said
Monday that its seasonally adjusted index
for pending home sales ticked down 0.4 per-
cent to 110.9 in June. The May reading was
revised lower by a percentage point to
111.3, but it was still the highest since
December 2006.
The slight decline suggests higher mort-
gage rates may be starting to slow sales.
Still, signed contracts are 10.9 percent
higher than they were a year ago. There is
generally a one- to two-month lag between
a signed contract and a completed sale.
Economists were relieved after seeing
only a modest decline. They said that shows
higher mortgage rates are having only a
small impact on the home sales market.
All told ... pending home sales held up
fantastically well, Dan Greenhaus, chief
global strategist at BTIG, an institutional
brokerage, said in a note to clients.
The average rate on a 30-year xed mort-
gage has jumped a full percentage point
since early May and reached a two-year high
of 4.51 percent in late June.
Rates surged after Chairman Ben
Bernanke said the Federal Reserve could
slow its bond-buying program later this
year if the economy continues to improve.
The Feds bond purchases have kept long-
term interest rates low, encouraging more
borrowing and spending.
In recent weeks, Bernanke and other
Fed members have stressed that any
change in the bond-buying program will
depend on the economys health, not a
set calendar date.
Since those comments, interest rates have
declined. The average on the 30-year mort-
gage was 4.31 percent last week.
Even with higher mortgage rates, signed
contracts increased in the West last month.
They were unchanged in the Northeast and
fell in the South and Midwest.
Home sales and prices have climbed since
early last year, buoyed by solid hiring and
historically low mortgage rates. Housing
has been an important driver of economic
growth this year as other parts of the econ-
omy have languished, such as manufactur-
ing and business investment.
Sales of previously occupied homes
slipped last month, after a big rise in May
to the highest level in 3 1/2 years.
But new-home sales jumped in June to the
fastest pace in ve years, boosting con-
dence that the housing recovery is strength-
ening.
Pending U.S.home sales slip fromsix-year high
By Linda A. Johnson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
TRENTON, N.J. Drugmaker Pzer Inc.
has agreed to provide hundreds of millions
of doses of its lucrative vaccine against
pneumonia and meningitis at a fraction of
the usual price for young children in poor
countries.
The deal to provide 260 million shots of
its Prevnar 13 vaccine for a few dollars each
is Pzers third agreement under an innova-
tive program through which pharmaceutical
companies, governments, health groups
and charities collaborate to bring poor
countries a long-term supply of affordable
vaccines against deadly diseases.
Prevnar 13, called Prevenar outside the
U.S., protects against 13 strains of pneu-
mococcal disease. The bacterial disease can
cause painful ear infections common in
young children and serious infections that
can kill or leave survivors deaf, paralyzed or
with permanent learning or speech disabili-
ties. Those diseases include pneumonia,
bloodstream infections and meningitis, an
infection of tissue around the brain and
spinal cord.
Pneumococcal disease kills more than
1.6 million people annually, half under age
5 and nearly all of them in poor countries,
according to the World Health
Organization.
One Prevnar dose costs nearly $130 in the
U.S. unaffordable in much of Africa, Asia
and Latin America. In fact, most new
Western vaccines dont reach poor countries
for 10 to 15 years.
To change that, four years ago several
countries and the Bill & Melinda Gates
Foundation together donated $1.5 billion to
develop a tactic that could provide the need-
ed vaccines. An additional $1.3 billion was
pledged by a public-private partnership
called GAVI, formerly the Global Alliance
for Vaccines and Immunization, whose
members include UNICEF, WHO and the
World Bank.
The money was used to start a pilot pro-
gram that would guarantee steady, high-vol-
ume demand for vaccine makers who agree
to sell their vaccines for $3.50 each or less
to poor countries. Experts picked pneumo-
coccal vaccines as the rst project.
Pfizer sells key vaccine cheaply to poor countries
By Josh Funk
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OMAHA, Neb. Billionaire Warren
Buffett is auctioning off an all-you-can-eat
tour of the Sees Candy factory in California
to benet an education nonprot there.
Bidding had already reached $35,000 by
Monday afternoon, but it remains to be seen
whether the nal price of this auction will
rival the annual auction of lunch with
Buffett which routinely tops $1 million.
The online auction that runs through Aug.
13 will benet Communities In Schools of
Los Angeles. It is being offered on the char-
itybuzz.com website.
Buffett says hell teach the auction winner
the proper way to eat a bonbon during the
half-day tour. Buffetts Berkshire Hathaway
conglomerate has owned Sees Candy since
1972, and he spends hours munching on
Sees treats while answering questions at
Berkshires annual meetings.
Buffett did not immediately respond to
questions about this new auction Monday.
For more than a decade, the only time
Buffett auctioned off a chance to meet with
him was the lunch auction that helps fund
the Glide Foundations efforts to help the
poor and homeless in San Francisco.
Warren Buffett auctions off personal tour of Sees Candy
Hudsons Bay buying
Saks for about $2.4 billion
NEWYORK Dont let the global econ-
omy fool you: Luxury is hardly dead.
Saks Inc. agreed to sell itself to Hudsons
Bay Co., the Canadian parent of upscale
retailer Lord & Taylor, for about $2.4 bil-
lion in a deal that will bring luxury to more
North American locales.
The acquisition combines three depart-
ment-store brands Hudsons Bay, Lord &
Taylor and Saks Fifth Avenue and creates
a North American upscale retailing behe-
moth with 320 stores in some of the
biggest and most populous cities in the
U.S. and Canada.
Lord & Taylor and Hudsons Bay,
Canadians biggest department store
chain, both cater to well-heeled shoppers
who can afford $98 Free People blouses and
$250 Coach handbags. Saks customers, on
the other hand, are more affluent and can
shell out $800 for Christian Louboutin
heels or a couple of thousand dollars for
Gucci handbags.
During a conference call with investors
on Monday, Hudsons Bay Co. Chairman
and CEO Richard Baker said the goal is to
bring Saks luxury brand into Canada. The
company plans to open up seven Saks
Fifth Avenue stores and 25 Off Fifth outlet
stores to Canada, while creating a Saks
website targeted to Canadians. The parent
company also plans to renovate Saks
stores and to make the brand more luxuri-
ous.
Intuitive Surgical
boosts buyback to about $1.5B
SUNNYVALE Robotic surgery device
maker Intuitive Surgical Inc. is increasing
its current share buyback by $779 million
to approximately $1.5 billion and is enter-
ing an accelerated repurchase program with
Goldman Sachs.
President and CEO Dr. Gary Guthart said
in a statement on Monday that the increase
to its repurchase program and the accelerat-
ed buyback shows Intuitive Surgicals con-
fidence in its da Vinci surgical system. The
da Vinci system lets surgeons perform
operations through a few small incisions,
according to the companys website.
The Sunnyvale, Calif. company had
about $721 million remaining from prior
repurchase programs.
Business briefs
W
hen the Belmont-
Redwood Shores 10-
11 all-star team saw
its season end with a loss to
Pacica American in the District
52 championship game, BRS
coach Tom McGuire said to keep
an eye on the BRS 11-12 all-star
team.
Apparently, McGuire knew what
he was talking about. The
Belmont-Redwood Shores 11-12
all-stars
became the
rst District
52 team ever
to advance to
the Little
League
Western
Regional
tournament
in San
Bernardino
following a
dominant
weekend in
the Division 2 tournament
Roseville.
Ravenswood Little League of
East Palo Alto was the rst San
Mateo County team to advance to
the Western Regional tournament,
making the championship game
in 1967, but it was part of
District 11 at that time. It has
since moved to District 52.
Winning the Western Regional
would send Belmont-Redwood
Shores to the Little League World
Series in Williamsport, Pa.
Whenever you get this far, its
got to be a bit of a surprise, said
Belmont-Redwood Shores coach
Rudy Lopez. I dont think any-
one goes into this expecting to
get this far.
I expected us to do well in dis-
trict. I thought we could compete
in section and thought we had a
good chance to win. In division, I
thought wed compete. Now were
just on house money. Were just
going down there and competing.
Im condent in the group of
boys we have going down there.
BRS will leave Wednesday
morning for San Bernardino and
will be one of six teams compet-
ing in the Western Regional.
Other states represented are:
Arizona, Hawaii, Nevada,
Southern California and Utah.
BRS opens play at 4 p.m. Friday
against Arizona. After a day off, it
plays Hawaii at 9 a.m. Sunday.
<< As slug their way to another win, page 12
Cribbs is all about the contact, page 12
Tuesday, July 30, 2013
ITS GOING TO HAPPEN: MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER LOOKS TO EXPAND PAST 20 TEAMS >> PAGE 13
New Earthquakes stadium delayed
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
For the San Jose Earthquakes,
the team responsible for the Did
you feel that? marketing slogan a
couple seasons ago, the motto has
now hit a lot closer to home.
The San Jose Earthquakes
announced that due to unforeseen
conditions at the stadium site, the
team is pushing back the opening
date of their new stadium to the
second half of the 2014 season.
With the change in opening date,
the team will play eight games at
Buck Shaw Stadium, one game at
Stanford Stadium and nine games
at the new stadium next season.
According to team ofcials, dur-
ing the demolition phase, the con-
struction team uncovered numer-
ous concrete vaults deep in the
ground, used munitions from the
FMC factory, steel beams and hun-
dreds of concrete pilings. Due to
the high water table at the site, the
excavated vaults also had to be
drained of water, causing more
delays during the grading process.
To drain one of the holes, over
600 tons of rock had to be used.
Photos on the teams Facebook
page showed the degree of the con-
stuction sites problem. The new
stadium site is located on Coleman
Avenue in San Jose next to the
citys airport.
Due to the extraordinary condi-
tions at the stadium site the open-
ing date has been pushed back,
said Earthquakes president Dave
Kaval via team statement. Our
ownership group and organization
is committed to building a world-
class venue for our fans and to cre-
ating the true epicenter of soccer
in the Bay Area. We feel that a sec-
ond-half opening ensures that we
accomplish that goal, while giv-
ing our team a strong home sched-
ule for the best situation competi-
tively.
Season ticket packages for the
still-unnamed stadium will now
See QUAKES, Page 13
See BOXING Page 14
See LOUNGE, Page 14
Owning The Fox
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A sudden burst of celebration
filled the Fox Theatre stage in
Redwood City on Friday night.
There was no actual boxing
going on just the ringside
announcer going through his
promo right before he announced
the co-main event of the evening.
But the roar was loud and it
turned the heads of all on stage
directly towards the back entrance,
in the direction of the dressing
rooms, where San Franciscos
Ricardo Pinell had made his way to
greet his biggest supporters.
And appropriately enough, they
hoisted him in the air and the 27-
year-old began his Friday night
celebration in royal style.
Pinells jubilation was well-
deserved, especially given the way
the B Street Boxing product went
about disposing of his opponent
the 14-pound over-the-weight-
limit Stanley Harvey of Norfolk,
Virginia. After pacing and stalking
Harvey for two rounds taking
advantage of his superior tness
Pinell struck a startling left
hand at the 1:26 mark of the third
round.
His knockout win was sand-
wiched in between two other
impressive San Mateo County vic-
tories that Friday night all of
which came with particular story
lines that made the wins that much
sweeter.
In Pinell, his fourth knockout
victory and fifth overall almost
surely sends his career up a rung
a concept not lost on the ghter
with more than 30 amateur ghts
under his belt.
I want to get a six-rounder in,
Great ride
for BRSLL
SPORTS FILE
Ricardo Pinell, Bruno Escalante and Juan Hernandez all earned knock out wins in front of a hometown crowd.
Giants make 2nd visit to White House
By Stacy Andersen
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON President
Barack Obama says the San
Francisco Giants are making a
habit of dropping in at the
White House.
Obama welcomed the 2012
World Series champions Monday
at a South Lawn ceremony honor-
ing their victory and their commu-
nity service work. The Giants
swept the World
Series in
October, defeat-
ing the Detroit
Tigers 4-3 in
the final game
after nearly
being knocked
out earlier in
the playoffs.
The president
says their second title in three sea-
sons was because of stellar pitch-
ing, defense and timely hitting.
But Obama didnt predict that n-
ish. On the campaign trail last
year, he anticipated a World Series
between the White Sox and the
Washington Nationals.
The crowd of well-wishers
included Giants Hall of Famer
Willie Mays, House Democratic
Leader Nancy Pelosi and San
Francisco Mayor Ed Lee.
NOTES: Giants assistant GM
Bobby Evans says the club will
recall 1B Brett Pill and OF Roger
Kieschnick on Tuesday, when the
team opens a series at
Philadelphia. To clear roster room,
INF Tony Abreu was placed on the
15-day disabled list and OF
Kensuke Tanaka was optioned to
Triple-AFresno.
Barack Obama
SPORTS 12
Tuesday July 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Choice. Advancement. Excitement.
FULFILLED
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need to pursue your interests and grow
your skills.
Current opportunities available in the
Peninsula area (Daly City, San Mateo, Palo
Alto and Mountain View).
To apply, visit www.walgreens.jobs
By Josh Dubow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO When
California opens its rst fall camp
under new coach Sonny Dykes, the top
priority will be identifying the start-
ing quarterback.
The Golden Bears
came out of spring
ball with junior
Austin Hinder, red-
shirt freshman Zach
Kline and freshman
Jared Goff in the
mix to take over the
offense when prac-
tice starts Aug. 5.
None of the three
quarterbacks has ever played a game in
college, leaving the Bears untested at
the most important position heading
into Dykes rst season. That places
added priority on identifying the
starter as soon as possible to get him
ready for a tough opening stretch of
the schedule that begins at home
against Northwestern on Aug. 31.
Im hoping it will happen quickly,
Dykes said Monday. Well see how it
plays out. I dont know if it will be a
guy thats a lot better than the other
two guys from day one. I dont know if
it will be two guys separating them-
selves from a third guy. I dont know if
theres not going to be much separa-
tion. I just dont know. There has to be
a level of exibility with this and how
youre going to treat it.
Improving the quarterback play is
one of the top priorities for Dykes,
who takes over a team from Jeff
Tedford that went 3-9 last season and
has had inconsistent quarterback play
in the eight seasons since Aaron
Rodgers left school.
All three of this years quarterbacks
came to Cal as heralded high school
passers and there was little separation
after spring practice.
They have different attributes with
Hinder being the most mobile and
experienced with three years in the
program, Kline having the strongest
arm and Goff being the most accurate
and familiar with Dykes spread sys-
tem.
Theres different strengths and
weaknesses, Dykes said. The big
thing we have to do is see which one
we think can lead us to win.
Dykes has no problems starting a
true freshman like Goff, having done it
with 17-year-old Nick Isham at
Louisiana Tech in 2010.
Doing that this year could be slight-
ly more problematic given the difcult
early schedule. After hosting
Northwestern, the Bears have a home
game two weeks later against an Ohio
State team that went undefeated last
year and also have road games against
Pac-12 division favorites Oregon and
UCLAin the rst half of the season.
The silver lining in all of this is
our weaknesses will be exposed and
well be able to address them early
because were going to play good
football teams, he said. If you play
three patsies nonconference then you
dont really know what you have to get
xed. Well know probably two or
three series into that Northwestern
game here is what we have to get xed
and heres how were going to do it.
On the injury front, Dykes expects
his team to be almost completely
healthy when practice starts with the
exception of offensive tackle Bill
Tyndall, who is recovering from a bro-
ken ankle in spring ball. Tyndall is
expected back for the opener.
Big-play running back Brendan
Bigelow is healthy after missing
spring practice recovering from knee
surgery and cornerback Stefan
McClure is back after missing all of
2012 recovering from a knee injury.
Cal opens fall camp with QB questions
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND Yoenis Cespedes homered and hit a two-
run triple, Josh Reddick added a two-run double and had
three RBIs, and the Oakland Athletics beat the Toronto
Blue Jays 9-4 on Monday night.
Jed Lowrie singled home a run and Josh Reddick hit a sac-
rice y in Oaklands four-run rst inning. Cespedes led off
the eighth with his 16th home run, snapping a career-high
25-game homerless streak for the Home Run Derby cham-
pion.
Edwin Encarnacion hit a two-run homer, while Adam Lind
and Brett Lawrie each hit solo shots against A.J. Grifn
(10-7), who retired the rst 13 batters of the game before
Linds one-out drive in the fth.
Lawrie homered leading off the sixth, and Encarnacion
connected for his 29th of the year four batters later.
The shaggy-haired Grifn, who went 7-1 last year as a
rookie, gave up four runs and four hits, struck out ve and
walked two in seven innings to win for the fth time in his
last six decisions. He was through four perfect innings on
42 pitches.
The AL West-leading As (63-43) won their fourth
straight and seventh in nine to move a season-best 20
games over .500, tied for best record in the AL with Tampa
Bay. They have some momentum after taking three of four
from the division rival Los Angeles Angels at the
Coliseum, where Oakland has won 24 of its last 30 home
games.
Toronto, last in the AL East, had its six-game road win-
ning streak against the AL West end.
As manager Bob Melvin shufed his batting order with
Eric Sogard in the No. 2 hole and Josh Donaldson drop-
ping down to sixth as he tries to get back on track.
Oakland takes down Jays
Sonny Dykes
By Michael Wagaman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NAPA Theres no arguing that
Josh Cribbs will go down as one of the
top special teams players in NFL his-
tory. He already shares the record for
career kickoff return touchdowns and
has done pretty well as a punt returner
over the years.
One of the Oakland Raiders most
significant offseason acquisitions,
Cribbs can still get down the eld with
the best of them. He was fourth in the
league in kickoff return average in
2012 and was sixth in punt returns.
Cribbs might also be one of the
only return men in the league who dou-
bles on coverage units and thats
something Oakland coach Dennis
Allen fully intends to exploit.
Thats perfectly ne with the 30-
year-old Cribbs, who relishes making
tackles on special teams as much as he
does getting into the end zone.
Its a combination the Raiders
couldnt pass up when they inked the
Cribbs to a one-year contract worth
slightly more than the veterans mini-
mum.
Hes excellent in all phases of spe-
cial teams, not just as a return man,
Allen said. I think thats what makes
a guy like him so valuable.
Cribbs has proven his value ever
since entering the league as an undraft-
ed free agent in 2005.
He has scored on at least one return
in all but two of his eight seasons and
has 11 touchdowns on returns for his
career. Eight have come on kickoffs,
tying Seattles Leon Washington for
most in NFL history.
Cribbs has another nine touchdowns
on offense, including seven as a wide
receiver.
The Raiders just want him to focus
on special teams. Anything beyond
that would be a plus.
Oakland signed Cribbs even though
he had offseason surgery to repair the
meniscus in his left knee. Cribbs
missed the Raiders minicamp in June
as a result.
The injury led some teams to shy
away from pursuing the return special-
ist. Jets general manager John Idzik,
whose team brought Cribbs in for a
physical in the offseason, told
reporters he didnt think Cribbs knee
had fully healed yet.
Those comments irked Cribbs, who
noted the Raiders play in New York on
Dec. 8.
Im going to keep (my thoughts) to
myself, Cribbs said. Its all fun and
games, but when the lights are put on,
Ill remember what he said.
Cribbs gets most animated, howev-
er, when talking about tackling. Not
getting tackled, but laying a hit on an
opposing player.
Cribbs relishes tackling as much as returns
As 9, Blue Jays 4
SPORTS 13
Tuesday July 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Absolutely. When you prepay, your funds are kept in an
account you can access from anywhere at your time of
need. The funds are protected and availability is
assured.We gladly honor arrangements made at other
funeral homes.
Please contact us if we can be of
assistance to you.
by
Special:
4 Speakers
consist of 18 games, with 17 reg-
ular season games and one bonus
game.
We encountered incredibly
difficult [and] unforeseen condi-
tions at the stadium site, said
Devcon Construction vice presi-
dent Peter Copriviza via press
release. With foundations over
10-feet deep, drilled piers, unex-
pected underground chambers,
complicated with a relatively
high water table, we have been
presented with a series of chal-
lenges during both the demoli-
tion and grading process.
We would like to commend our
construction partners for all their
efforts despite facing numerous
complex conditions at the site,
Kaval said. They have navigated
through some difficult situations
and kept us on track for a 2014
opening.
The Earthquakes are coming off
a 2-1 victory over the Portland
Timber last Saturday.
Earthquakes defender Victor
Bernardez scored his first goal of
2013 in the win. Bernardez con-
verted a penalty kick in the 55th
minute for his third goal in two
years with San Jose. He also
donned the captains armband for
a second-straight game.
They return to Buck Shaw stadi-
um this Saturday to take on
Chivas USA.
Continued from page 11
QUAKES
SJEARTHQUAKES FACEBOOK
The San Jose Earthquakesnew stadium encountered major issues with the
foundation including unexpected underground chambers.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
KANSAS CITY, Mo.
Expansion is coming to Major
League Soccer. The only questions
facing the leagues board are how
many teams, where to locate them
and when to bring them into the
fold.
Commissioner Don Garber told
the Associated Press in a wide-
ranging interview Monday that
the leagues owners plan to dis-
cuss expansion in great detail
during a meeting Wednesday.
The MLS will play Italian club
AS Roma in its annual All-Star
game that night.
At the moment, the league is
focused on adding a second team in
New York. But with David
Beckham holding an ownership
option and several cities express-
ing interest in a franchise, the
league could shoot past the 20-
team mark within the next few
years.
The league is going to expand.
Its not an if, but a when, and
its a how many, Garber said.
Theres lots of interest among
many, many different markets, so
well get pretty focused on estab-
lishing something rmer in the
next few months.
There was a time when an owner-
ship group could spend less than
$10 million on a franchise, but
those days are over. Surging atten-
dance, modest but consistent tele-
vision growth and even the recent
success of the U.S. national team
have made the MLS a hot property.
It cost English club Manchester
City and its partner, the New York
Yankees, an expansion fee of
$100 million to launch New York
City FC, which will begin play in
2015.
Other cities that have expressed
interest in a team, or have lower-
tier franchises who want to join
MLS, include Atlanta,
Sacramento, Orlando and the Twin
Cities.
Meanwhile, Beckham has been
linked to businessman Marcelo
Claure, who owns Bolivian team
Club Bolivar. The two appear
interested in Miami, where
Claures wireless company
Brightstar Corp. is based, and
Beckham has said he plans to
reveal his MLS intentions in the
next few months.
The overall growth of the sport
has been so dramatic over the last
number of years by almost any
measure, Garber said. Whether
its the league or the national team
or the womens game, all the
developments are sort of proving
the fact that were a soccer
nation.
MLS expansion isnt a
question of if, but when
Pinell said immediately after his win. And
just keep on progressing from there. I prob-
ably have like four or ve years under my
belt and at this advanced age ... and Ive
been grinding at this pro level, ghting
month to month. All I can do is take it as it
comes and put it in Gods hands. Thats the
key to staying patient.
I really think Ricardo has the tools to
compete at the highest level, said Eddie
Croft, Pinells trainer out of B Street Gym
in San Mateo. Now, a lot has to happen
between now and then, but denitely a six-
rounder is the next step.
Both Croft and Pinell agreed the key is
patience at 27, the San Francisco native
is ghting an uphill battle to gain promi-
nence as he ages and he faces younger ght-
ers. But just like he showed against Harvey,
Pinell has the mental fortitude to see his
promising boxing career through.
Thats the kind of style that I ght,
Pinell said. My trainer tells me to stay
focused and composed. I knew I had the
advantage (in the ght) ... but you cant go
for the kill too early. You have to wait until
its open and then go for it.
I know its all sacrice, he said. The
bigger picture: Thats what keeps me ght-
ing. Thats what keeps me focused. My faith
is in him (God) and I know everything will
be OK.
Faith was also on the mind of Redwood
Citys Juan Hernandez, who made a tri-
umphant return to the ring with a knockout
of Payton Boyea.
Hernandez missed the better part of the
year battling hand and elbow injuries. And
there was no question those were on his
mind coming into the ght given that at 27-
years-old, the injuries had robbed a year
from his career.
But Hernandez showed the power hes
known for and took Boyea down with a hard
left-right combination.
I felt strong, Hernandez said. I felt
condent. And, Lord willing, I think we can
go far. I want to keep giving it my all and do
what do I love. Im going to give the best of
me to take my career somewhere.
That somewhere, for the time being, is
the 165-pound weight class.
I feel like its the best opportunity for
me, Hernandez said. Im just happy to be
back in the sport that I love. I do it with all
my heart.
It was all love for Bruno Escalante as
Friday night came to a close.
After pouncing on Manuel Galaviz of
Mexico in the rst round and ending the
Mexicans night before the second round
belt sounded, Escalante freshened up and
was greeted by his supporters at Milagros
restaurant in Redwood City. There, The
Aloha Kid, received the celebrity treatment.
Its the kind of acknowledgment and status
that the ever- humble Escalante wasnt
always used to. But as he grows in the sport
locally and garners national attention (with
the likes of CSN in attendance on Friday),
its something that Escalante is learning to
embrace and use in the ring.
Thats always been the thing with
Bruno, said Brian Schwartz, his trainer at
Undisputed Boxing in San Carlos. Hes
always had the skill, hes always had the
talent, but he was lacking the condence.
Youre really starting to see that now. And
hes taking off.
SPORTS 14
Tuesday July 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Peninsula Television
Serving San Mateo County since 1999
Newest Programs:
Watch PenTV: Comcast 26 Astound 27 AT&T U-verse 99
Streaming Online at www.pentv.tv
Peninsula Television is a registered 501c3 organization.
Expedition New England
Join Scott Tucker as he explores
the diverse wildlife of New England.
MON-FRI @4:30 PM
San Mateo County History Stories
Part of 1 on 1
Mike Casey delves into whats in
the roots of the cities that build us.
EVERYDAY @7 AM, Noon & 7 PM
BRS will take on Utah at 11:45 a.m.
Monday, Aug. 5 and cap pool play with a
showdown at 8 p.m. Wednesday against
Southern California.
The top four teams then advance to a sin-
gle-elimination, four-team tournament
bracket, with the winner going to
Williamsport.
Ive told them to just have fun, to play
baseball, Lopez said. The kids are very
low key. Theyre not excitable. They keep
their emotions in check. But honestly, I
dont know if they know whats in store for
them. I dont know if they realize theyll
be playing in front of thousands of peo-
ple.
BRS denitely has the horses to compete
on the big stage and the players are accus-
tomed to winning. Since the all-star season
started, BRS has compiled a record of 13-1,
having outscored the competition 141-32,
averaging just over 10 runs per game.
The scary thing is, Lopez believes his
offense hasnt hit its full stride.
Some of our hotter hitters in the early
rounds have cooled a little bit. We didnt
put the ball in play as much as we like.
Some of the kids have gotten hotter, which
I what Ive been waiting for, Lopez said.
We havent had all ve of our big hitters
hot at once, which is what we need going
forward.
Belmont-Redwood Shores only loss so
far this summer was a 2-0 defeat by Santa
Cruz the team it beat twice over the
weekend to win the Division 2 tournament.
[My team] understood the (Santa Cruz)
pitcher was one of the best pitchers in the
country, Lopez said. After the game, I
told them to trust me. I had a plan. One
loss wasnt going to dishearten them.
Obviously we lost on Wednesday, but I
had set up my pitching so we would have
our three main guys going (the rest of the
tournament).
BRS executed the plan to a T. In
Fridays elimination game, Brad
Shimabuku pitched a three hitter, striking
out six in a 12-1, ve-inning win.
Saturday, in the rst game of the champi-
onship series, Nicolas Lopez pitched a no-
hitter in a rematch with Santa Cruz, a 2-0
BRS win. And then the coup de grce
Sunday was Sean Lee adding to his bur-
geoning legend, striking out 17 in a 9-0
win over Santa Cruz that clinched the
Northern California championship.
Ive been waiting for Nicolas. When
hes on, hes pretty dominant. Saturdays
game gave me some hope he is regaining
his form, Lopez said. Its a great feeling
as a coach (having three strong pitchers).
Its a luxury.
Now, BRS will take on the best the rest
of the Western United States has to offer.
I dont think Ive slept very well
(recently), but its fun being on the eld
with your son (Nicolas) and his friends,
boys youve seen mature from the time
they were 8 years old. Its been more
enjoyable than nerve-wracking.
Weve faced everyones aces and weve
acquitted ourselves pretty well. I think
[well] be prepared and wont be shocked.
***
While Belmont-Redwood Shores will be
heading to the Western Regionals, it wont
be cheap and it wont be free. Lopez said
parents and families are still on the hook
for travel, lodging and food expenses.
Its not just a monetary expense but a
time commitment, Lopez said. Our league
is trying to help us and hopefully do a lit-
tle fundraising. Im sure the league will be
able to pitch in a little bit.
If you would like to help the Belmont-
Redwood Shores team and families defray
some of the costs, go to www.belmontlit-
tleleague.org and click the donate but-
t on.
Nathan Mollat can be reached by email:
nathan@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: 344-
5200 ext. 117. He can also be followed on Twitter
@CheckkThissOutt.
Continued from page 11
LOUNGE
Continued from page 11
BOXING
By David Crary and Lisa Leff
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK Russian vodka and the
Winter Olympics in Sochi. For now, those
are the prime targets as gays in the United
States and elsewhere propose boycotts and
other tactics to convey their outrage over
Russias intensifying campaign against
gay-rights activism.
At many gay bars across North America,
owners have joined a campaign to stop sell-
ing Russian vodka notably the popular
brand Stolichnaya. Activists also are press-
ing the International Olympic Committee
and NBC, which holds U.S. broadcasting
rights for Sochi, to be more aggressive in
criticizing new Russian laws.
So far, there have been only scattered
calls for a full-edged boycott of the Sochi
Games, but there is active discussion of how
to convey gay-rights messages once the
competition begins including gestures
by individual athletes and perhaps a gay-
pride parade.
The chief ashpoint is a law signed by
President Vladimir Putin last month that
bans the propaganda of nontraditional
sexual relations and imposes hefty nes
for providing information about the gay
community to minors or holding gay pride
rallies. Foreign citizens arrested under the
law can be jailed for 15 days and then
deported.
There also is concern about a long-run-
ning problem of violence against gays in
Russia, as well as a new law restricting
adoptions of Russian children by people in
countries allowing same-sex marriage.
Russian anti-gay laws impact Olympics, vodka sales
SPORTS 15
Tuesday July 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
S.A.M S A M
1940 Lesl i e St. , San Mateo, CA 94403
Sam
Tsang
Grand Opening!
92
101
Hillsdale
Shopping
Center
Hillsdale
Caltrain
Station
We are Here!
S El Camino Real
West
East
South North by
Special:
4 Speakers
East Division
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 61 45 .575
Washington 52 54 .491 9
Philadelphia 49 56 .467 11 1/2
New York 47 56 .456 12 1/2
Miami 40 64 .385 20
Central Division
W L Pct GB
St. Louis 62 41 .602
Pittsburgh 62 42 .596 1/2
Cincinnati 59 48 .551 5
Chicago 48 56 .462 14 1/2
Milwaukee 44 61 .419 19
West Division
W L Pct GB
Los Angeles 56 48 .538
Arizona 54 51 .514 2 1/2
Colorado 51 56 .477 6 1/2
San Diego 49 58 .458 8 1/2
San Francisco 46 58 .442 10
Mondays Games
Pittsburgh 9, St. Louis 2
Atlanta 9, Colorado 8, 10 innings
N.Y. Mets 6, Miami 5
Milwaukee 5, Chicago Cubs 0
San Diego 2, Cincinnati 1
Tuesdays Games
Milwaukee (Gallardo 8-9) at Chicago Cubs
(Villanueva 2-7), 11:20 a.m., 1st game
St. Louis (Lynn 12-5) at Pittsburgh (A.J.Burnett 4-
7), 1:05 p.m., 1st game
San Francisco (Zito 4-7) at Philadelphia (Lannan
2-4), 4:05 p.m.
Washington (Strasburg 5-8) at Detroit
(Ani.Sanchez 8-7), 4:08 p.m.
Arizona (Kennedy 3-7) at Tampa Bay
(Ro.Hernandez 5-11), 4:10 p.m.
Colorado (Nicasio 6-4) at Atlanta (A.Wood 0-2),
4:10 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Z.Wheeler 4-1) at Miami (Eovaldi 2-1),
4:10 p.m.
St. Louis (Lyons 2-3) at Pittsburgh (Undecided),
4:35 p.m., 2nd game
Milwaukee (Thornburg 1-0) at Chicago Cubs
(Arrieta 0-0), 5:05 p.m., 2nd game
Cincinnati (Latos 10-3) at San Diego (Volquez 8-
8), 7:10 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Pettitte 7-8) at L.A. Dodgers
(Greinke 8-3), 7:10 p.m.
East Division
W L Pct GB
Tampa Bay 63 43 .594
Boston 63 44 .589 1/2
Baltimore 58 48 .547 5
New York 55 50 .524 7 1/2
Toronto 48 57 .457 14 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 59 45 .567
Cleveland 57 48 .543 2 1/2
Kansas City 51 51 .500 7
Minnesota 45 57 .441 13
Chicago 40 63 .388 18 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Oakland 63 43 .594
Texas 57 49 .538 6
Seattle 50 55 .476 12 1/2
Los Angeles 48 56 .462 14
Houston 35 69 .337 27
MondaysGames
Tampa Bay 2, Boston 1
Cleveland 3, Chicago White Sox 2
Texas 4, L.A. Angels 3
Oakland 9,Toronto 4
TuesdaysGames
ChicagoWhiteSox(Peavy8-4) at Cleveland(Kazmir
6-4), 4:05 p.m.
Houston (B.Norris 6-9) at Baltimore (W.Chen 5-3),
7:05 p.m.
Washington(Strasburg5-8) at Detroit (Ani.Sanchez
8-7), 4:08 p.m.
Arizona (Kennedy 3-7) at Tampa Bay (Ro.Hernan-
dez 5-11), 4:10 p.m.
Seattle (J.Saunders 9-9) at Boston (Workman 0-1),
4:10 p.m.
L.A.Angels (C.Wilson 11-6) at Texas (D.Holland 8-6),
5:05 p.m.
Kansas City (E.Santana 6-6) at Minnesota (Pelfrey
4-8), 5:10 p.m.
Toronto (Buehrle 6-7) at Oakland (Straily 6-4), 7:05
p.m.
N.Y.Yankees (Pettitte 7-8) at L.A.Dodgers (Greinke
8-3), 7:10 p.m.
WednesdaysGames
Washington at Detroit, 10:08 a.m.
Toronto at Oakland, 12:35 p.m.
AMERICAN LEAGUE NATIONAL LEAGUE
EASTERNCONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Kansas City10 6 6 36 31 21
New York 10 7 5 35 33 27
Montreal 10 5 5 35 32 29
Philadelphia 9 6 7 34 33 30
New England 8 7 6 30 27 19
Houston 8 6 6 30 23 20
Chicago 7 9 4 25 25 30
Columbus 6 10 5 23 24 27
Toronto FC 3 10 8 17 19 29
D.C. 2 15 4 10 10 35
WESTERNCONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Real Salt Lake 11 7 4 37 36 24
Portland 8 3 10 34 31 20
Colorado 9 7 7 34 28 24
Los Angeles 10 9 3 33 32 27
Vancouver 9 7 5 32 33 29
FC Dallas 8 5 8 32 27 27
San Jose 7 9 6 27 23 33
Seattle 7 7 4 25 22 21
Chivas USA 4 11 5 17 18 35
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie.

Saturdays Games
Toronto FC 2, Columbus 1
Colorado 2, Los Angeles 0
New York 4, Real Salt Lake 3
Philadelphia 1, Vancouver 0
New England 2, D.C. United 1
Montreal 1, Sporting Kansas City 0
Houston 1, Chicago 1, tie
San Jose 2, Portland 1
Sundays Games
Chivas USA at Seattle FC, late
Wednesday, July 31
Roma at MLS All-Stars, 6 p.m.
Saturday, Aug. 3
Chicago at Philadelphia, 4:30 p.m.
Montreal at D.C. United, 4:30 p.m.
New York at Sporting Kansas City, 5 p.m.
Real Salt Lake at Colorado, 6 p.m.
BASEBALL
Major League Baseball
MLB Suspended Toronto minor league OF
Brian Van Kirk (New Hampshire-EL) 50 games
after a second violation for a drug of abuse.
American League
DETROIT TIGERS Sent LHP Darin Downs
to Toledo for a rehab assignment.
HOUSTON ASTROS Traded RHP Jose Veras
to Detroit for OF Danry Vasquez and a player
to be named. Agreed to terms with RHP
Justin Hess on a minor league contract.
Recalled RHP Chia-Jen Lo from Corpus Christi
(Texas). Selected the contract of RHP Josh
Zeid from Oklahoma City (PCL).
LOS ANGELES ANGELS Traded LHP Scott
Downs to Atlanta for RHP Cory Rasmus.
Assigned RHP Billy Buckner outright to Salt
Lake (PCL). Recalled LHP Nick Maronde from
Arkansas (Texas).
MINNESOTATWINS Reinstated C Joe
Mauer from the restricted list. Optioned C
Drew Butera to Rochester (IL).
NEWYORK YANKEES Optioned 3B David
Adams to Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). Agreed
to terms with 3B Brady Steiger on a minor
league contract.
OAKLAND RAIDERS Signed LB Omar
Gaither.
SEATTLE MARINERS Activated OF Michael
Morse from the 15-day DL. Designated OF
Jason Bay for assignment.
TAMPA BAY RAYS Acquired RHP Jesse
Crain from the Chicago White Sox for players
to be named or cash. Transferred RHP
Brandon Gomes to the 60-day DL.
National League
CHICAGO CUBS Sent RHP Scott Baker to
Daytona (FSL) for a rehab assignment.
COLORADO ROCKIES Recalled INF Charlie
Culberson from Colorado Springs (PCL).
Optioned INF Jordan Pacheco to Colorado
Springs.
PITTSBURGH PIRATES Placed C Michael
McKenry on the 15-day DL, retroactive to July
28. Recalled OF Alex Presley from Indianapolis
(IL).
SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS Designated RHP
Yusmeiro Petit for assignment.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
DALLAS MAVERICKS Signed G Shane
Larkin.
HOUSTON ROCKETS Signed C Marcus
Camby.
LOS ANGELES LAKERS Named Kurt
Rambis and Johnny Davis assistant coaches.
PHILADELPHIA 76ERS Named Chris Heck
chief revenue ofcer.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
BALTIMORE RAVENS Signed FB Vonta
Leach to a two-year contract.
CINCINNATI BENGALS Activated TE/LS
Bryce Davis, OT Andre Smith comes from the
active/non-football illness list and WR
Brandon Tate from the active/pup list.
HOUSTON TEXANS Activated S Orhian
Johnson from the active/non-football injury
list.
TENNESSEE TITANS Agreed to terms on a
contract with G Chance Warmack.
MLS GLANCE
TRANSACTIONS
@Rays
10:40a.m.
CSN-BAY
8/4
@Rays
4:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
8/3
Brewers
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
8/5
@Phillies
4:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/31
@Phillies
4:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/30
@Phillies
4:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
8/1
@Rays
4:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
8/2
vs.BlueJays
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/29
at Reds
4:10p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/6
vs.BlueJays
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/30
vs. BlueJays
12:35p.m.
7/31
Rangers
1:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/4
Rangers
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/2
Rangers
1:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/3
vs. Chivas
8p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/3
@Montreal
5p.m.
8/7
@ Vancouver
4:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/10
vs.K.C.
8p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/18
@Dallas
6p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/24
16
Tuesday July 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/WORLD
assisted living/memory care facility
and community center.
In the long term, the health-focused
facility will be big for the district and
Burlingame, Ullyot said.
The districts top priority, however,
is the hospital, he said.
We have to make sure Sutter pro-
vides the core services for acute care
that residents need, he said.
Sutter rents the 21 acres of land from
the district for about $1.5 million a
year.
The districts annual revenue is about
$7.4 million, with $4.6 million of it
coming directly from property taxes.
Two years ago, the district put about
$3.9 million of its revenue into
reserve. This past scal year, the con-
tribution to its reserve was down to
about $1.8 million as the district spent
about $2 million on special projects
including the Healthy Schools
Initiative and Lesley Affordable
Assisted Living.
The civil grand jury recommends that
the district, however, retain experts to
determine the reasonable amount that it
should allocate to reserves annually
and adjust its allocation of revenue to
enhance support of current programs
and grants, according to the report.
The district annually spends more
than $2 million in taxpayer money to
support community health and current-
ly partners with ve school districts to
help fund nurses, physical education
instructors and a school-based health
clinic.
The district also funds a full-time
psychiatric resident physician in the
countys Behavioral Health Program
for $500,000 a year. It spends another
$125,000 a year providing dental serv-
ices of frail seniors, adults with special
needs and residents living on a low
income, according to the report.
The district has been the subject of
multiple civil grand jury reports over
the years and once made a recommenda-
tion that it merge with the Sequoia
Healthcare District, which also col-
lects property taxes to provide similar
services mostly in the southern part of
the county.
To learn more about the district go to
www.peninsulahealthcaredistrict.org.
Continued from page 1
HEALTH
likely emerge.
KDF Hallmark ofcials have also been
hard to nd, Jabagchourian said.
It is a nely diced subsidiary and they
havent been served yet, he said about the
multiple lawsuits.
The six-alarm blaze July 7 at the 72-unit
complex on Woodside Road left nearly 100
people homeless and one man dead.
Fire investigators have stated the re was
likely an accident that started in a third-
oor unit where the deceased, 48-year-old
Darin Michael Demello-Pine, was cooking
at about 1:45 a.m.
The complex did not have sprinklers and
has been ruled uninhabitable by re of-
cials.
New complaints were led by former resi-
dents Tacoe Ahuna, Philip Deluca, Larry
Love, Valarie Martinez, Denise Mostek-
White, Barbara Spann, Jacqueline Smith,
Amy Sacramento, Brenda Rolen, George
Regino and Atory Ward Jr.
The blaze was the fault of KDF Hallmarks
failure to properly inspect, maintain and
safeguard the property from a foreseeable
unit re, according to the rst complaint
led by the Chavez family.
The complex did not have a sprinkler sys-
tem and KDF Hallmark, by not installing
one after it purchased the property for $8
million in 2003, is liable for damages,
according to the complaints.
In Delucas complaint, he alleges the re
was localized and should have been put out
quickly with a sprinkler system, limiting
the damage to the one unit.
He also alleges in the complaint that he
has lost most of his lifes possessions.
About half of the former tenants in
t he bui l di ng r ecei ve some t ype of
assi st ance from t he count y, i ncl udi ng
housi ng vouchers.
Many have physical or mental disabili-
ties and were more susceptible to danger,
Jabagchourian said.
Ofcials with KDF Hallmark have not
responded to requests for comment by the
Daily Journal.
KDF has been involved in the construc-
tion, acquisition and rehabilitation of more
than 5,300 affordable rental units in 44
properties throughout California, according
to the companys website.
KDF Hallmark did return deposits quickly
to residents and also reimbursed them for
July rent, a Redwood City police ofcial
previously told the Daily Journal.
Continued from page 1
FIRE
By Dan Perry
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
JERUSALEM The contours of Israeli-
Palestinian peace are clear, experts say: If
only the sides summon up the will, the
inevitable outcome is two states roughly
along the pre-1967 borders, with Jerusalem
as a shared capital and a nessing of the
Palestinian refugee issue.
The notion of a virtually preordained
eventual result has been around for decades.
And Secretary of State John Kerry believes
in it enough to have spent much of his time
in ofce trying to coax the sides back to the
table.
But with peace talks nally set to begin
anew this week, it is striking how few in the
region itself expect a deal: The previous
rounds have led many to conclude that when
it comes to details, the Palestinians mini-
mal demands simply exceed what Israel is
willing to deliver.
Some say that the
Palestinians are driving
what Israelis view as a
hard bargain because they
have already lost some
three-quarters of histori-
cal Palestine under the
pre-1967 borders.
But there is another fac-
tor: In the long run, con-
trary to standard dis-
course, the Palestinians may not be the
weaker party at all. While they suffer in
various ways from the Israeli occupation of
the West Bank and east Jerusalem, it is the
Israelis who may actually need a partition of
the Holy Land more.
Thats because Israel proper, within its
recognized pre-1967 borders, has some 6
million Jews and almost 2 million Arab cit-
izens. The West Bank, Gaza and east
Jerusalem have almost 4 million
Palestinians among them. If Israel does not
pull back, say withdrawal advocates, near-
parity in historic Palestine is already the
case, and an Arab majority may follow that
cannot forever be denied full democratic
rights. It is a deep dilemma that animates
many a dinnertime debate: For decades
Israelis were told they may have to make
painful sacrices in exchange for peace.
Now the narrative is shifting: They may
have to do it regardless, for demographic
salvation alone.
This understanding may be dampening
Palestinian urgency to strike a deal.
Several times in recent years they did not
accept offers Israel considered far-reaching.
In the most recent, former Israeli Prime
Minister Ehud Olmert says he offered
Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas a
state in Gaza and 95 percent of the West
Bank, and a share of Jerusalem.
Palestinians say they could not agree on
details and that Olmert was a lame duck who
could not deliver. In any case it is hard to
imagine Olmerts successor, the more hawk-
ish Benjamin Netanyahu, going further or
even coming as close.
What will Israel do if a peace deal remains
elusive?
Some people are talking about accepting
that Israel, combined with the West Bank
and maybe Gaza, will simply be a bi-nation-
al state, even if this means Jews will even-
tually be dominated by Arabs. Even some
nationalists seem to accept this and consid-
er it preferable to giving up the land.
Some propose that neighboring Jordan
allow West Bank Palestinians to vote in its
own parliamentary elections as a way of
giving Palestinians in Israeli-controlled
areas a version of democratic rights.
Others hope for a partial settlement that
will give the Palestinians a state in most of
the territory but less than they want and
in exchange Israel would not demand end-
of-conict, with remaining issues left for
later.
Analysis: Mideast peace deal seems far off
John Kerry
HEALTH 17
Tuesday July 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Lindsey Tanner
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHICAGO Many heart specialists
are hardly Dr. Ruth sex is not some-
thing they relish bringing up with
patients. But new guidance says they
should, early and often, to let sur-
vivors know intimacy is often possi-
ble after a heart attack.
Discussions should involve every-
thing from when and how to resume
sex, to what position might be best for
some conditions or not advised for
others, according to a consensus state-
ment released Monday by the
American Heart Association and the
European Society of Cardiology.
Its billed as the rst scientic state-
ment with detailed guidance on resum-
ing sex after a heart attack, stroke or
other cardiac condition and is based on
a review of medical literature.
Sexual health is an important part
of the overall health of the individ-
ual, even for the oldest patients, said
Elaine Steinke, a researcher and pro-
fessor of nursing at Wichita State
University in Kansas. Steinke was the
lead author of the statement published
in the heart associations Circulation
journal and the European Heart
Journal.
Co-author Tiny Jaarsma, a professor
and heart failure researcher at Swedens
Linkoping University, said in an email
that doctors and nurses rarely discuss
sex spontaneously, but often wait
until the patient brings up questions
around sex. Health care providers often
are afraid to upset patients or might
feel embarrassed themselves.
Fears and anxieties about resuming
sex are often numerous: Will it cause
another heart attack? Can I use Viagra?
What if my debrillator goes off dur-
ing sex? And many are too shy to ask,
so heart doctors, nurses and other
health care workers should take the
lead and initiate the discussion with
men and women patients of all ages
and their partners, according to the
statement.
Many heart patients can safely
resume sexual intercourse after first
checking with their doctors, and the
answers to many questions depend on
each patients overall health, the guid-
ance says. Patients with mild, stable
chest pain face a low risk for a sex-
triggered heart problem, whereas
patients with advanced heart failure
should postpone sex until their condi-
tion is stabilized.
General precautions listed in the
statement include:
Before resuming sex, make sure
you can engage in moderate physical
activity, such as walking briskly up
two ights of stairs, without chest
pain, breathlessness or other symp-
toms.
If moderate activity is too strenu-
ous, avoid intercourse but not intima-
cy: hugging and kissing may be OK.
Have sex in a comfortable, famil-
iar place and avoid things that could
add stress to the experience, including
extramarital affairs.
Tell your doctor about any symp-
toms during sex, including chest pain,
dizziness or insomnia afterward.
Some positions may not be safe.
Heart bypass surgery patients should
avoid being on top in the missionary
position, and Steinke said having sex
in a more upright position may be
easier for some heart failure patients,
whose symptoms may include short-
ness of breath.
Sex after heart attack? Docs urged to give advice
Many heart patients can safely resume sexual intercourse
after rst checking with their doctors, and the answers to
many questions depend on each patients overall health.
18
Tuesday July 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Marilynn Marchione
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
For the rst time, government advis-
ers are recommending screening for
lung cancer, saying certain current and
former heavy smokers should get annu-
al scans to cut their chances of dying of
the disease.
If it becomes nal as expected, the
advice by the U.S. Preventive Services
Task Force would clear the way for
insurers to cover CT scans, a type of X-
ray, for those at greatest risk.
That would be people ages 55 through
79 who smoked a pack of cigarettes a
day for 30 years or the equivalent, such
as two packs a day for 15 years.
Whether screening would help younger
or lighter smokers isnt known, so
scans are not advised for them. They
also arent for people who quit at least
15 years ago, or people too sick or frail
to undergo cancer treatment.
The evidence shows we can prevent a
substantial number of lung cancer
deaths by screening about 20,000
of the 160,000 that occur each year in
the United States, said Dr. Michael
LeFevre, a task force leader and family
physician at the University of
Missouri.
Public comments will be taken until
Aug. 26, then the panel will give its
nal advice. Reports on screening were
published Monday in Annals of Internal
Medicine.
The recommendation is a big deal for
many reasons. The task force, an inde-
pendent group of doctors appointed by
the government, in recent years has
urged less frequent screening for breast
and cervical cancers, and no screening
for prostate cancer, saying PSA blood
tests do men more harm than good.
There are no good ways to screen for
ovarian cancer or other less common
types.
But lung cancer is the top cancer
killer worldwide. Nearly 90 percent of
people who get it die from it, usually
because its found too late for treatment
to succeed. About 85 percent of lung
cancers in the U.S. are attributable to
smoking, and about 37 percent of U.S.
adults are current or former smokers.
The task force estimates that 10 million
Americans would t the smoking and
age criteria for screening.
The American Cancer Society used to
recommend screening with ordinary
chest X-rays but withdrew that advice in
1980 after studies showed they werent
saving lives. Since then, CTscans have
come into wider use, and the society and
other groups have endorsed their limit-
ed use for screening certain heavy
smokers.
The scans cost $100 to as much as
$400 and are not usually covered by
Medicare or private insurers now. But
under the new health care law, cancer
screenings recommended by the task
force are to be covered with no copays.
Its generally going to be covered
by all health plans if the advice gets
nal task force approval, said Susan
Pisano of the industry trade group
Americas Health Insurance Plans. She
said her group may develop a response
during the public comment period but
has had high regard for the task force
in the past because they rely so heavi-
ly on the evidence in crafting their rec-
ommendations.
The task force considered lung cancer
screening in 2004 but said there was
too little evidence to weigh risks and
benefits. Since then, a major study
found that screening the age group cov-
ered in the task forces recommendation
could cut the chances of dying from
lung cancer by up to 20 percent and
from any cause by nearly 7 percent.
Panel backs lung cancer screening for some smokers
The American Cancer Society used to recommend screening with ordinary chest
X-rays but withdrew that advice in 1980 after studies showed they werent saving
lives. Since then, CT scans have come into wider use, and the society and other
groups have endorsed their limited use for screening certain heavy smokers.
An influential group of government advisers has
endorsed lung cancer screening for the rst time but
not for everybody.The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force
is proposing annual CT scans, a type of X-ray, for certain
current and former smokers.
To be considered for screening,
the task force says people should:
Be ages 55 through 79.
Have smoked a pack of cigarettes a day for 30 years or
the equivalent, such as two packs a day for 15 years.
People who should not be screened include:
Those younger than 55 or older than 79.
Those who smoked less or less often than those
described above.
Those who quit smoking 15 or more years ago.
Those too sick or frail to withstand treatment for lung
cancer.
Lung cancer screening only
for some smokers, ages
DATEBOOK 20
Tuesday July 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
TUESDAY, JULY 30
Pets in Need Fundraiser and
Adoption Event. Zoom Room
Belmont, 1412 El Camino Real,
Belmont. $10 per dog. All proceeds
and 10 percent of Zoom Rooms retail
sales benefit this rescue. For more
information and to RSVP go to
www.zoomroom.me/pets.
Employment Roundtable. 10 a.m. to
noon. 1044 Middlefield Road,
Redwood City. Free. For more
information email
rkutler@redwoodcity.org.
Spirit of the Rain Forest. 2 p.m. San
Mateo Public Library, Oak Room, 55
W. Third Ave., San Mateo. Meet live
animals from the rainforest and learn
how they live. Presented by Wildlife
Associates. Free. For more information
call 522-7838.
Wealth and Power: Chinas Long
March to the 21 Century. 7 p.m.
Cubberley Community Theatre, 4000
Middlefield Road, Palo Alto. Prices
vary. For more information call (800)
847-7730 or visit
https://www.commonwealthclub.org
/events/2013-07-30/orville-schell-
and-john-delury-rise-china.
WEDNESDAY, JULY 31
Easy to Grow Natives for California
Gardens. Downtown Library, 1044
Middleeld Road, Redwood City. Free.
For more information email
rkutler@redwoodcity.org.
San Mateo Professional Alliance
Weekly Networking Lunch. Noon to
1 p.m. Speido Ristorante, 223 E. Fourth
Ave., San Mateo. $17. For more
information call 430-6500 or go to
sanmateoprofessionalalliance.com.
Music in the Park Zydeco
Flames. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Stafford Park,
corner of King Street and Hopkins
Avenue, Redwood City. Free.
Menlo Park Summer Concert
Series: Jessica Johnson. 6:30 p.m. to
8 p.m. Fremont Park, Santa Cruz and
University avenues, Menlo Park. Free.
For more information go to
www.menlopark.org.
Bicycle Safety 101. 7 p.m.
Burlingame Public Library, 408
Primrose Road, Burlingame. A 90-
minute workshop by a certified
League of American Bicyclists
instructor. Free. For more information
call 558-7411.
Lara Price (Club Fox Blues Jam). 7
p.m. Club Fox, 2009 Broadway,
Redwood City. $5. For more
information call (877) 435-9849 or go
to www.clubfoxrwc.com.
THURSDAY, AUG. 1
Movies for School Age Children:
Cloudy with a Chance of
Meatballs. 3:30 p.m. San Mateo
Public Library-Oak Room, 55 W. Third
Ave., San Mateo. Free. For more
information call 533-7838.
Peninsula Recruitment Mixer. 4 p.m
for Ice Breaker, 4:30 p.m. for
Networking Mixer. Silicon Valley
Community Foundation, 1300 S. El
Camino Real, San Mateo. Network
with dozens of local recruiters. $7 if
paid and registered by July 30, $10 at
the door. For more information call
483-1704.
Peninsula Recruitment Mixer. 4 p.m.
to 7 p.m. Silicon Valley Community
Foundation, 1300 S. El Camino Real,
San Mateo. $10 includes refreshments
and appetizers. For more information
call 574-1766.
Multi-Chamber Business Expo. 4
p.m. to 7 p.m. South San Francisco
Conference Center, 225 S. Airport
Blvd., South San Francisco. Free. For
more information call 588-0181.
Hot Harvest Nights Childrens
Entertainment. 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Downtown Park Stage, 700 Block of
Laurel Street. Free. For more
information call 593-1068.
Central Park Music Series: Bud E.
Luv Orchestra. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Central Park, 50 E. Fifth Ave., San
Mateo. Free. For more information go
to www.cityofsanmateo.org.
Beckys New Car. 8 p.m. Dragon
Productions Theatre, 2120 Broadway,
Redwood City. The show will run
through Aug. 4 and is rated PG-13 for
the occasional use of profanity. $30
for general admission, $25 for seniors
and $15 for students. For more
information go to
www.dragonproductions.net.
Movies on the Square: OZ: The
Great and Powerful. 8:45 p.m.
Courthouse Square, 2200 Broadway,
Redwood City. Free. For more
information call 780-7311 or go to
www.redwoodcity.org/events/movies
.html.
FRIDAY, AUG. 2
The Great Big Garden Bonanza at
Filoli. 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Filoli, 86
Caada Road, Woodside. Free
admission for members, $15 for
adults, $12 for seniors, $5 for students
and free for children age 4 and under.
For more information go to
www.loli.org.
Free First Fridays. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
The San Mateo County History
Museum, 2200 Broadway, Redwood
City. All day admission is free to all. At
11 a.m. preschool children are invited
to learn about agriculture. At 2 p.m.
docents will lead tours of the museum
for adults. For more information call
299-0104.
Free Wine or Beer Tastings. 4 p.m.
to 6 p.m. Half Moon Bay Library, 620
Correas St., Half Moon Bay. Samples
of beer or wine in the wine
department with live music. Free. For
more information go to
www.newleafhalfmoonbay.eventbrite
.com.
Figures and Faces opening
reception. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Pacic
Art League of Palo Alto, 227 Forest
Ave., Palo Alto. Refreshments will be
served. The exhibitions will be open
through Aug. 29. Free. For more
information call 321-3891.
Huge 2 Story Rummage Sale. 5:30
p.m. to 8:30 p.m. 751 Alameda de las
Pulgas, Belmont. Prices vary. For more
information email
mickicartr@aol.com.
Brisbane Concerts in the Park:
Cocktail Monkeys in the Park. 5:45
p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Brisbane Community
Park Gazebo, 11 Old County Road,
Brisbane. Free. For more information
call (415) 657-4320 or go to
ci.brisbane.ca.us.
Summer Concert: Livewire. 6 p.m. to
8 pm. Burton Park, 1070 Cedar St., San
Carlos. Free. For more information go
to www.cityofsancarlos.org.
Foster CitySummer Concert Series:
High-N-Tight. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Leo
Ryan Park, Foster City. Free. For more
information call 286-3380.
Music on the Square: The
Mashtones. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Courthouse Square, 2200 Broadway,
Redwood City. Free. For more
information go to
redwoodcity.org/events.
South San Francisco Open Mic. 7
p.m. to 11 p.m. 116 El Campo Drive,
South San Francisco. Free. For more
information call 451-2450.
Legally Blonde the Musical. 7:30
p.m. Mountain View Center for the
Performing Arts, 500 Castro St.,
Mountain View. Tickets are available
at pytnet.org and may also be ordered
through the Mountain View Center
ticket office. $20 for adults, $16 for
seniors and children under 12, $7 per
person for groups of 10 or more. For
more information and for tickets call
903-6000.
Coastal Rep Presents HAIR. 8 p.m.
Coastal Repertory Theatre, 1167 Main
St., Half Moon Bay. $27. For more
information call 569-3266 or go to
www.coastalrep.com.
Beckys New Car. 8 p.m. Dragon
Productions Theatre, 2120 Broadway,
Redwood City. The show will run
through Aug. 4 and is rated PG-13 for
the occasional use of profanity. $30
for general admission, $25 for seniors
and $15 for students. For more
information go to
www.dragonproductions.net.
SATURDAY, AUG. 3
San Mateo Walking Tour. Meet at
Second Avenue and El Camino Real
at the parking facility, San Mateo. Dr.
Al Acena will conduct a tour of San
Mateos historic downtown.
Walk with a Doc. Leo J. Ryan
Memorial Park, Hillsdale Blvd., Foster
City. A free program of the San Mateo
County Medical Associations
Community Service Foundation that
encourages healthy physical activity
for county residents of all ages.
Walkers enjoy one-hour walks with
physician volunteers and can ask
questions about general health topics
along the way. Next walk on Aug. 17 at
Red Morton Park. Free.To sign up visit
www.smcma.org.
Flea market. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.
American Legion, 130 South Blvd., San
Mateo. Free admission. For more
information go to
www.americanlegionpost82sm.org.
The Great Big Garden Bonanza at
Filoli. 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Filoli, 86
Caada Road, Woodside. Free
admission for members, $15 for
adults, $12 for seniors, $5 for students
and free for children age 4 and under.
For more information go to
www.loli.org.
Discover Your Inner Dumpling Chef!
11 a.m. Menlo Park Library Downstairs
Meeting Room, 800 Alma St., Menlo
Park. Author and teacher Andrea
Nguyen shows how to make
dumplings successfully at home. This
will be an interactive program with
Q&A and tasting. Free. For more
information call 330-2512.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
Placement and College Readiness at
College Board, revealed that nine
schools had their scores thrown out
this year because of seating irregulari-
ties and that the Mills investigation
stemmed from a complaint issued by a
student on May 13. He added that 61
schools had scores canceled because of
procedure violations.
Packer said on the call that ofcials
from Mills High School signed a docu-
ment that stated the correct seating
charts were in place prior to the exam-
inations.
The extent of the irregularities [at
Mills] were so large that statistical
analysis is not an option, Packer
said. The school did not provide us
with seating charts and it would be
highly suspect if they presented them
now. There were significant delays
from Mills for requests of the charts
and most information was not provid-
ed by them.
Packer said the fact that the students
were seated close enough to see each
others test with the lift of an eyelid
gave students unfair advantages.
However, Speier took issue with the
emphasis placed on seating.
The seating irregularities issue is
on page 46 of your manual, Speier
said on the call. If its a critical ele-
ment in the test taking situation, you
need to make it much more upfront.
Packer responded that having correct
seating arrangements are an element
on test administrators training.
Most schools would have a difcult
time meeting the requirement because
of spatial needs, Mills High School
Principal Paul Belzer said on the call.
Other local legislators have
expressed concern about the invalida-
tions.
State Sen. Jerry Hill, D-San Mateo,
said he doesnt believe the students
should be punished.
Its incredible they can act in the
manner they did, Hill said. If they
havent been able to determine cheat-
ing, theres no harm done. If they have
the ability to do [an] algorithm to
determine cheating, they should use
it.
Hill sees an issue if the only measure
of credibility in test taking is by the
angle of the desks and believes there is
something wrong with the procedure.
He is open to the possibly of more
oversight of ETS and said he knows
this is an important issue to the com-
munity.
Assemblyman Kevin Mullin, D-
South San Francisco, wrote a letter to
David Coleman, College Board presi-
dent and chief executive officer,
requesting reconsideration of the deci-
sion.
I understand that there has been no
nding of student misconduct, yet the
College Boards draconian decision is
punishing students, Mullin wrote.
Absent a nding of at least one exam-
ple of student misconduct or cheating,
I cant fathom why all students are
being penalized.
Last week, the district has hired on
Burlingames Cotchett, Pitre &
McCarthy law rm to work collabora-
tively with district counsel Lozano
Smith Attorneys to sue College Board
over the invalidations.
Packer said he cant comment on if
students will impact the litigation if
they retake the test.
The situation began July 17 when
the school district reported that
Educational Testing Service, the
College Boards security provider that
administers the AP Exams, invalidated
tests in 11 AP subjects taken this past
spring because of seating irregulari-
ties. Packer said 98 tests, the world
language exams, at Mills were admin-
istered properly.
angela@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 1
MILLS
to open Hoover for the 2014-15
school year.
The school districts attorney, Stan
Barankiewicz, said the traffic engi-
neers plan for the area is enough to
show that the 93 expected cars driving
to the school during the peak hour
would not cause trafc issues.
The current plan calls for two 8-foot-
wide curbside bays to be created for
pickup and dropoff along the west side
of Summit Drive adjacent to the school
providing enough curb space for 15
cars, according to a staff report. In
addition, the existing school site curb
would be shifted west to provide for the
bays and two 10-foot-wide vehicle
travel lanes, which will increase the
width of Summit Drive to 17 feet in
some areas.
It will greatly harm the education of
students if we are not able to go for-
ward, Barankiewicz said yesterday.
There are very few petitioners who are
crying the sky is falling because they
do not want the school rebuilt. They
lack expert opinion backing their
claims.
Christine Fitzgerald, one of the peti-
tioners in the case and member of the
alliance, said the district incorrectly
made it appear as if those who objected
to the project were a small group of
people exclusively from
Hillsborough. She noted that there
were also a good deal of objectors from
Burlingame.
Barankiewicz went on to say that the
petitioners should have participated in
the public hearings prior to Nov. 13,
2012 if they wanted to have input in
the process.
Judge Marie Weiner, who will decide
the case, brought up her own concerns
about lack of access to the school
other than by car because of the lack of
sidewalks, back entrance and bike
lanes leading up to the school.
Are the circumstances such that
every parent will drive their kids?
Weiner asked Barankiewicz.
Hoover was founded in 1931, closed
in 1979 and repurchased by the district
for $4.8 million in 2010.
Superintendent Maggie MacIsaac esti-
mated the costs for renovations and
new equipment will be about $13 mil-
lion. Measure D, a $56 million bond
measure passed by voters in November
2012 will cover most of the costs.
Some residents who live near the
school felt the approval should be
postponed to allow for more discus-
sion and possible changes to the traf-
c plan, which led to the lawsuit led
in January.
Judge Weiner will render her nal
written decision on the case within
about 60 days. The preliminary injunc-
tion, that prevents construction from
being done on the road leading up to
the school, is still in effect until
Weiner issues a decision. The injunc-
tion was to have blocked the removal
of at least one tree on the property, but
the tree was already cut down.
angela@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 1
HOOVER
COMICS/GAMES
7-30-13
mondays PUZZLE soLVEd
PrEVioUs
sUdokU
answErs
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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1 London lav
4 Night hunters
8 Stick-in-the-mud
12 Corn serving
13 Arthur and Lillie
14 Jai
15 key
17 Barrette
18 Term paper
19 Like old bread
20 Youth org.
22 Chinese principle
23 Hepburn nickname
26 Comic book heroes (hyph.)
28 Like the horizon
31 Indigo plant
32 John, in Edinburgh
33 Strong soap
34 Remove, as branches
35 Belly dance instrument
36 Brick oven
37 USN offcer
38 Pierres girl
39 Coup d
40 Tummy muscles
41 Regret
43 Hospital worker
46 Alpaca kin
50 Word of assent
51 Museum area (2 wds.)
54 Solar plexus
55 Third-rate
56 911 responder
57 Secy
58 Mystique
59 Ginnie
down
1 majeste
2 Shade trees
3 Raw metals
4 Heeds
5 Moist
6 Mekong native
7 FICA number
8 Ipso
9 Earthenware jar
10 Olympian Devers
11 Omigosh!
16 Tag
19 Andreas Fault
21 Principles
22 Sore
23 Leafy green
24 In a while
25 Gratuities
27 Pineapple island
28 Move like a butterfy
29 The Mammoth Hunters
heroine
30 Budget item
36 Ship bottoms
38 Honest prez
40 To date (2 wds.)
42 Very very
43 Ibsen heroine
44 Miniguitars
45 Charlie Browns word
47 Polite cough
48 NYC art gallery
49 Cathedral part
51 College stat
52 Debt memo
53 In favor of
diLBErT Crossword PUZZLE
fUTUrE sHoCk
PEarLs BEforE swinE
GET fUZZy
TUEsday, JULy 30, 2013
LEo (July 23-Aug. 22) -- There is good reason for
your ears to be ringing today, because others are
likely talking about you. Dont worry -- it would
boost your ego if you could hear what theyre saying.
VirGo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Even if to the casual
observer a recent development appears to be rather
insignifcant, youll know its true worth. Itll elevate
your hopes and expectations.
LiBra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Look to turn a small
proft today, either from a situation where you might
share a common interest with another or from being
in a position to serve as an intermediary.
sCorPio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Youre presently in a
cycle where you could be extremely fortunate in some
kind of partnership arrangement, provided both you
and the other party play your assigned roles.
saGiTTariUs (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- You stand an
excellent chance of earning a bit more than usual
from the utilization of your acquired knowledge and/
or talents. Dont hesitate to ask a fair price for your
services.
CaPriCorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Youll have
a marvelous way of brightening up situations
wherever you go. You have the gift being able to
offer constructive suggestions to people who lack
the answers.
aQUariUs (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- Be imaginative,
resourceful and assertive, and success in your
endeavors will be inevitable. In fact, there is little
doubt that your brightness will win out over others
boldness.
PisCEs (Feb. 20-March 20) -- The best way to get
the support of others in an important venture is to
give them some logical reasons why it can be as
meaningful to them as it is to you.
ariEs (March 21-April 19) -- Do your best to stay on
top of a situation from which you could fnancially
beneft, even if the gains seem small. Dont let the
size of it dilute your efforts.
TaUrUs (April 20-May 20) -- Listen to the
suggestions of others, but be sure not to ignore you
own counsel in the process. Your ideas are likely to
be superior when it comes to personal matters.
GEmini (May 21-June 20) -- Even though your
ambitions are extremely strong, youll keep them a
secret from other people. It looks like youll end up
getting exactly what you want, to the surprise of
many.
CanCEr (June 21-July 22) -- It could prove to be
helpful to discuss with a friend a matter that has
been giving you trouble. Go to someone who has
proven to be helpful in the past.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Tuesday July 30, 2013 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Tuesday July 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
Employment Services
110 Employment
CASHIER - PT/FT, will train. Apply at
AM/PM @ 470 Ralston Ave., Belmont.
EXPERIENCED PIZZA Maker, Eve-
nings, Avanti Pizza, (650)508-1000 2040
Ralston Ave. Belmont
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
CAREGIVERS
NEEDED
Hourly and Live In
Sign on bonus
650-458-0356
recruiter@homecarecal.com
CAREGIVERS, HHA,
CNAS
needed immediately.
Please apply in person at:
15 N. Ellsworth Avenue,
Suite 200, San Mateo, CA
or call (650)206-5200
CARLMONT GARDENS
NURSING CENTER
2140 Carlmont Drive, Bel-
mont, CA 94002
Immediate openings: CNAs
- experience preferred. Must
be able to work 4-on, 2-off
schedule. Apply in person.
We hire nice people!
110 Employment
COMPUTER EDUCATION -
CONNECTED
LIVING
seeking Part Timer
to teach
computer classes
to seniors at
Assisted Living.
Please send resumes
to:
mwills@teamenterprises.com
CUSTOMER SERVICE/
SEAMSTRESS -
YOU ARE INVITED
Are you:
Dependable
Friendly
Detail Oriented
Willing to learn new skills
Do you have:
Good English skills
A Desire for steady employment
A desire for emplployment benefits
Sewiing skills
If the above items describe you,
please call (650)342-6978.
Immediate opening available for
Customer Service/Seamstress.
Call for appointment.
Crystal Cleaning Center
San Mateo CA, 94402
EMBROIDERY MACHINE OPERATOR,
Full time, busy Burlingame uniform and
advertising. Near public transportation.
Experience preferred.
Call (650)697-7550
HELP WANTED: FOSTER CITY REC-
REATION FACILITY - part-time staff po-
sition open. Evening and weekend shifts
required. Must live locally. For a full job
description, please email:
Rob@themanorassn.com
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
TAXI DRIVER
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
Clean DMV and background. All shifts
available. Call (650)703-8654
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
OFFICE HELP -
Part Time, $9 per hour. Must have CDL.
Flexible hours. Spanish a plus. Apply in
person, 718 Warrington Ave, Redwood
City.
RESTAURANT -
Now hiring for Quick Service / Counter
Service positions. Apply in person at
753 Laurel Street, San Carlos
110 Employment
RETAIL -
What if you found opportunity right in
your neighborhood? Choice. Ad-
vancement. Excitement. FULFILLED.
Theres a way. At Walgreens, our
stores offer you numerous and varied
career paths. From beauty advisor to
management trainee and photo tech
to opportunities in Pharmacy, we de-
pend on our team members to be the
face of Walgreens. In return, each job
offers you the potential for growth and
a clear path to advancement both
within the store environment and be-
yond. Its a diverse atmosphere in
which youll find supportive co-work-
ers, a positive environment and the
tools you need to pursue your inter-
ests and grow your skills.
We are currently hiring for part time
and full time positions for Daly City,
San Mateo, Palo Alto, Mountain View
and the general Peninsula area
stores. To apply, visit www.wal-
greens.jobs.
Walgreens is an Equal Opportunity
Employer and welcomes individuals of
diverse talent and backgrounds. Wal-
greens promotes and supports a
smoke-free and drug-free workplace.
Walgreens. Theres a way.
RETAIL JEWELRY
SALES
Start up to $13.
Experience up to $20.
Benefits-Bonus-No Nights!
(650)367-6500 FX 367-6400
jobs@jewleryexchange.com
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
127 Elderly Care
FAMILY RESOURCE
GUIDE
The San Mateo Daily Journals
twice-a-week resource guide for
children and families.
Every Tuesday & Weekend
Look for it in todays paper to
find information on family
resources in the local area,
including childcare.
180 Businesses For Sale
COIN LAUNDRY For Sale in San Fran-
cisco, Net $3-4K a month, $200K,
(650)520-5851
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 522104
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Natalie Nickole Brauckmiller
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Natalie Nickole Brauckmiller
filed a petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Natalie Nickole Brauck-
miller, Natalie Nickole Maxon, Natalie
Nickole Abrams
Proposed name: Natalie Nickole Abrams
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on August 27,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 07/15/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 07/05/2013
(Published, 07/23/13, 07/30/2013,
08/06/2013, 08/13/2013)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256654
The following person is doing business
as: 1) The Learning Lab, 2) Learning
Lab, 1050 Chestnut St., Ste 201, MEN-
LO PARK, CA 94025 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Amanda
Sparr, 20 Willow Rd., #24, MENLO
PARK, CA 94025. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 07/08/2013.
/s/ Amanda J. Sparr /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/05/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/09/13, 07/16/13, 07/23/13, 07/30/13.)
23 Tuesday July 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256658
The following person is doing business
as: Lai Lai Restaurant, 334 Broadway,
MILLBRAE, CA 94030 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Jimmy Lai
Lai & Company, CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 10/31/1983.
/s/ Vincent Lin /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/09/13, 07/16/13, 07/23/13, 07/30/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256414
The following person is doing business
as: QBeFiT, 1072 Shell Blvd., Ste. 1,
FOSTER CITY, CA 94404 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Andrew F.
Stebbins, 351 Stanchion Lane, Foster
City, CA 94404. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 05/01/2012.
/s/ Andrew F. Stebbins /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/18/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/09/13, 07/16/13, 07/23/13, 07/30/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256565
The following person is doing business
as: Maggies Medical, 1075 Annapolis
Street, SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Maggie LaBarbera, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 06/23/2013.
/s/ Margaret LaBarbera /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/28/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/09/13, 07/16/13, 07/23/13, 07/30/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256314
The following person is doing business
as: Avenue Lesage, 1208 Admiralty
Lane, FOSTER CITY, CA 94404 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Celine Hakoun, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on
/s/ Celine Hakoun /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/13/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/09/13, 07/16/13, 07/23/13, 07/30/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256470
The following person is doing business
as: Pendragon Studios, 871 Newport Cir-
cle, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94065 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Debra Elaine Fowler, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Debra E. Fowler /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/20/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/09/13, 07/16/13, 07/23/13, 07/30/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256476
The following person is doing business
as: The Law Offices of Francoise Espino-
za, 430 Peninsula Ave., Suite 3, San Ma-
teo, CA 94401 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Francoise Caroline
Espinoza, 16 West Barrymore St., Stock-
ton, CA 95204. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 03/25/2013.
/s/ Francoise Espinoza /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/21/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/16/13, 07/23/13, 07/30/13, 08/06/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256584
The following person is doing business
as: C U Members Mortgage, a Division of
Colonial Savings, F.A., 4100 Newport
Place, Suite 280, NEWPORT BEACH,
CA 92660 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Colonial Savings, F.A.,
TX. The business is conducted by a Cor-
poration. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
05/01/1994.
/s/ Kenneth Majka /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/28/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/16/13, 07/23/13, 07/30/13, 08/06/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256585
The following person is doing business
as: Colonial National Mortgage, a Divi-
sion of Colonial Savings, F.A., 4100
Newport Place, Suite 280, NEWPORT
BEACH, CA 92660 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Colonial Savings,
F.A., TX. The business is conducted by a
Corporation. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
05/01/1994.
/s/ Kenneth Majka /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/28/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/16/13, 07/23/13, 07/30/13, 08/06/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256667
The following person is doing business
as: Lauren Clayton Inc., 1308 Bayshore
Hwy., #101, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Lauren Clayton Inc., CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 10/26/2012.
/s/ Donald Gibson /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/16/13, 07/23/13, 07/30/13, 08/06/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256691
The following person is doing business
as: Green Collar Limo, 1308 Bayshore
Hwy., #101, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Green Collar Limo, Inc., CA. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Corporation. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 02/05/2013.
/s/ Patrick Richard Deschamps /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/09/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/16/13, 07/23/13, 07/30/13, 08/06/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256668
The following person is doing business
as: Coldwell Banker Optima Realty, 1435
Huntington Ave., #310, SOUTH SAN
FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: BEZ Group,
Inc., CA. The business is conducted by a
Corporation. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
06/26/2013.
/s/ Edward Wong /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/16/13, 07/23/13, 07/30/13, 08/06/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256442
The following person is doing business
as: Law Office of Dolores Gonzalez, 11
Airport Blvd., Ste. 209, SOUTH SAN
FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Dolores
Gonzalez, 1069 Grand Ave., South San
Francisco, CA 94080. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 06/03/2013.
/s/ Dolores Gonzalez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/19/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/16/13, 07/23/13, 07/30/13, 08/06/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256635
The following person is doing business
as: Alexander Property Care Services,
200 East 39th Avenue, SAN MATEO, CA
94403 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Karen M. Alexander, same
address. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/ Karen M. Alexander /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/02/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/16/13, 07/23/13, 07/30/13, 08/06/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256765
The following person is doing business
as: Julies Hair and Nail Salon, 755 Ber-
muda Drive, SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Thanh Ngoc Tran, 1992 Tobago Ave.,
San Jose, CA 95122. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Thanh Ngoc Tran /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/16/13, 07/23/13, 07/30/13, 08/06/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256711
The following person is doing business
as: 1)Bay Capital Real Estate, 2) Bay
Capital, 3) Bay Capital Realty, 36 W. Bel-
levue Avenue, SAN MATEO, CA 94402
is hereby registered by the following
owner: David Howarth, 795 Burnette
Ave., #5, San Francisco, CA 94131. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s/ David Howarth/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/10/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/23/13, 07/30/13, 08/06/13, 08/13/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256851
The following person is doing business
as: The Paradise Gardener, 973 Daisy
St., San Mateo, CA 94401 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Elie Ta-
baa, same address. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on
/s/ Elie Tabaa /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/19/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/23/13, 07/30/13, 08/06/13, 08/13/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256846
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: 1)Mamata Day Care, 2)PK
Software Services, 1529 Beach Park
Blvd., FOSTER CITY, CA 94404 is here-
by registered by the following owners:
Pradip Kumar Banerjee & Mamata Bane-
rjee, same address. The business is con-
ducted by a Married Couple. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Pradip Kumar Banerjee /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/19/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/23/13, 07/30/13, 08/06/13, 08/13/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256745
The following person is doing business
as: Dogland Rescue, 633 ONeill Street,
BELMONT, CA 94002 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Michael
Tuck, 502 Edgewood Road, Redwood
City, CA 94062. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on
/s/ Michael Tuck /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/11/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/23/13, 07/30/13, 08/06/13, 08/13/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256859
The following person is doing business
as: Redwood Mobile Estates, 2053 East
Bayshore Road, REDWOOD CITY, CA
94063 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Redwood Mobile Estates,
Inc., CA. The business is conducted by a
Corporation. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
07/01/1964.
/s/ Rick DeBenedetti /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/22/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/23/13, 07/30/13, 08/06/13, 08/13/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256462
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: RMV Registration Motor Vehi-
cles, 21 S. San Mateo Dr., SAN MATEO,
CA 94401 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owners: Salvador Costillo Cue-
vas, 556 Mangels Ave., San Francisco,
CA 94127 and William David Mena,
1169 Adams St., Redwood City, CA
94061. The business is conducted by a
General Partnership. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on
/s/ Salvador Costillo Cuevas /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/19/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/23/13, 07/30/13, 08/06/13, 08/13/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256814
The following person is doing business
as: Frontier Group, LLC, 795 San Mateo
Drive, MENLO PARK, CA 94025 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Frontier Group, LLC, CA. The business
is conducted by a Limited Liability Com-
pany. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Hisae Chiba/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 7/17/2013. (Publish-
ed in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/30/13, 08/06/13, 08/13/13, 08/20/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256950
The following person is doing business
as: Silicon Valley Catering, 1501 Ralston
Ave., #304, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Sedri Gundogdu, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s/ Sedri Gundogdu /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 7/26/2013. (Publish-
ed in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/30/13, 08/06/13, 08/13/13, 08/20/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256884
The following person is doing business
as: Emere - San Mateo, 101 S. San Ma-
teo Dr., Ste. 202, SAN MATEO, CA
94401 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Emere Medical Professional
Corporation, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 06/30/2013.
/s/ Paul E. Hughes, M.D. /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 7/23/2013. (Publish-
ed in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/30/13, 08/06/13, 08/13/13, 08/20/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256594
The following person is doing business
as: Miss Chan Chan Kitchen, 179 Santa
Barbara, DALY CITY, CA 94014 is here-
by registered by the following owner: Wai
Yu Shirley Chan, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Wai Yu Shirley Chan /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/28/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/05/13, 07/12/13, 07/19/13, 07/26/13.)
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256747
The following person is doing business
as: SFSkytour, 445 Park Way, SOUTH
SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Mi Sun
Kim, 1797 Ellis St., #10, San Francisco,
CA 94115. The business is conducted
by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 07/08/2013.
/s/ Mi Sun Kim /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/11/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/30/13, 08/06/13, 08/13/13, 08/20/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256889
The following person is doing business
as: Merchant Access, 1120 Lassen
Drive, BELMONT, CA 94002 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Stacy
Levesque, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 02/26/2011.
/s/ Stacy Levesque /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/23/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/30/13, 08/06/13, 08/13/13, 08/20/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256615
The following person is doing business
as: Health and Fitness Solutions, 387 8th
Street, MONTARA, CA 94037 is hereby
registered by the following owner:
Charles Heaney, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Charles Heaney /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/01/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/30/13, 08/06/13, 08/13/13, 08/20/13).
NOTICE OF INTENTION TO SELL
REAL PROPERTY AT PRIVATE
SALE
Notice is hereby given that, subject to
confirmation by this court, on August
12, 2013, at 10:00 a.m., or thereafter
within the time allowed by law, the un-
dersigned as Administrator of the Es-
tate of Richard L. Sanden, San Mateo
Superior Court Case No. 123091, will
sell at private sale to the highest and
best net bidder on the terms and con-
ditions hereinafter mentioned all right,
title, and interest of Richard L. San-
den in the real property located in the
City of Foster City, County of San Ma-
teo, California, as follows:
Parcel One:
Lot 98, as delineated upon that cer-
tain Map entitled, Tract No. 857 Fos-
ter City Neighborhood No.2, San Ma-
teo County, California Unit No. 4,
filed for recorfd in the Office of the
County of San Mateo, State of Califor-
nia, on November 28th, 1969 in Book
70 of Maps, at Pages 22, 23 and 24.
Parcel Two:
Those certain Rights and Easements
appurtenant to Parcel One above, as
said rights and easements are set
forth in that certain Declaration of
Covenants, Conditions and Restric-
tions, executed by Warwick Land
Company, a California corporation on
December 16, 1969 and recorded De-
cember 18, 1969, in Book 5728 of Of-
ficial Records of San Mateo County,
at Page 495, Series No. 83474-AC
and as conveyed by deed to Frank J.
Spiegelberg, et ux, recorded October
28, 1970, Book 5851, Official Re-
cords, Page 614.
APN094-223-760
This property is commonly referred to
as 1483 Marlin Avenue, Foster City,
CA 94404.
The sale is subject to current taxes,
covenants, conditions, restrictions,
reservations, rights, rights of way, and
easements of record.
Bids or offers are invited for this prop-
erty and must be in writing and will be
delivered to Daniel A. Conrad, attor-
ney for Administrator Gene Marchi at
1550 Bryant Street, Suite 760, San
Francisco, CA 94103 personally, at
any time after first publication of this
notice and before any sale is made.
The property will be sold on the fol-
lowing terms: all cash, ten
percent(10%) of the amount of the bid
to accompany the offer by certified
check, and the balance to be paid
upon confirmation of sale by the court.
Taxes, rents, operating and mainte-
nance expenses, and premiums on in-
surance acceptable to the purchaser
shall be prorated as of the date of
sale.
Examination of title, recording of con-
veyance, and any title insurance poli-
cy shall be at the expense of the pur-
chaser or purchasers. Payment of
transfer taxes may be by the purchas-
er or the Administrator.
The undersigned reserves the right to
refuse to accept any bids.
Date: July 29, 2013
/s/ Gene Marchi/
Administrator of the Estate of Richard
L. Sanden
Published in the San Mateo Daily
Journal on July 30, August 2, 7,
2013.l
203 Public Notices
SUMMONS
(CITACION JUDICIAL)
CASE NUMBER: CLJ521614
NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (Aviso Al De-
mandado): HUNG HUANG aka HUNG
MANH HOANG, KIEN TRUNG HOANG,
and DOES 1 TO 10.
YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF:
(Lo esta demandando el demandante):
STATE FARM GENERAL INS.CO.
NOTICE! You have been sued. The court
may decide against you without your be-
ing heard unless you respond within 30
days. Read the information below.
You have 30 calendar days after this
summons and legal papers are served
on you to file a written response at the
court and have a copy served on the
plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not pro-
tect you. Your written response must be
in proper legal form if you want the court
to hear your case. There may be a court
form that you can use for your response.
You can find these court forms and more
information at the California Courts On-
line Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your
county law library, or the courthouse
nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing
fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver
form. If you do not file your response on
time, you may lose the case by default,
and your wages, money, and property
may be taken without further warning
from the court.
There are other legal requirements. You
may want to call an attorney right away.
If you do not know an attorney, you may
want to call an attorney referral service.
If you cannot afford an attorney, you may
be eligible for free legal services from a
nonprofit legal services program. You
can locate these nonprofit groups at the
California Legal Services Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the Califor-
nia Courts Online Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by
contacting your local court or county bar
association. NOTE: The court has a stat-
utory lien for waived fees and costs on
any settlement or arbitration award of
$10,000 or more in a civil case. The
courts lien must be paid before the court
will dismiss the case.
AVISO! Lo han demando. Si no re-
sponde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede
decidir en su contra sin escuchar su ver-
sion. Lea la informacion a continuacion.
Tiene 30 dias de calendario despues de
que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles
legales para presentar una respuesta por
escrito en esta corte y hacer que se en-
tregue ena copia al demandante. Una
carta o una llamada telefonica no lo pro-
tegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene
que estar en formato legal correcto si de-
sea que procesen su caso en la corte.
Es posible que haya un formulario que
usted pueda usar para su respuesta.
Puede encontrar estos formularios de la
corte y mas informacion en el Centro de
Ayuda de las Cortes de California
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/),
en la biblio teca de leyes de su condado
o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si
no puede pagar la cuota de presenta-
cion, pida al secretario de la corte que le
de un formulario de exencion de pago de
cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a
tiempo, puede perder el caso por incum-
plimiento y la corte le podra quitar su su-
eldo, dinero y bienes sin mas adverten-
cia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es re-
comendable que llame a un abogado in-
mediatamente. Si no conoce a un abo-
dado, puede llamar a de servicio de re-
mision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a
un abogado, es posible que cumpia con
los requisitos para obtener servicios le-
gales gratuitos de un programa de servi-
cios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede
encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro
en el sitio web de California Legal Serv-
ices Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro
de Ayuda de las Cortes de California,
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/)
o poniendose en contacto con la corte o
el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO:
Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar
las cuotas y costos exentos por imponer
un gravamen sobre cualquier recupera-
cion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida
mediante un acuerdo o una concesion
de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil.
Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte
antes de que la corte pueda desechar el
caso.
The name and address of the court is:
(El nombre y direccion de la corte es):
Superior Court of California, County of
San Mateo
400 County Center
Redwood City, CA 94063-1655
The name, address, and telephone num-
ber of the plaintiffs attorney, or plaintiff
without an attorney, is: (El nombre, direc-
cion y numero de telefono del abogado
del demandante, o del demandante que
no tiene abogado, es):
Harlan M. Reese, 118226, Joseph M.
Pleasant, 179571, Dana N. MEyers,
272640
REESE LAW GROUP
6725 Mesa Ridge Road, Ste. 240
SAN DIEGO, CA 92121
(858)550-0389
Date: (Fecha) May 14, 2013
John C. Fitton, Clerk
(Adjunto)
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
July 30, August 6, 13, 20, 2013.
210 Lost & Found
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
210 Lost & Found
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST JORDANIAN PASSPORT AND
GREEN CARD. Lost in Daly City, If
found contact, Mohammad Al-Najjar
(415)466-5699
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
RING FOUND Tue. Oct 23 2012 in Mill-
brae call (650)464-9359
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
SOLID OAK CRIB - Excellent condition
with Simmons mattress, SOLD!
296 Appliances
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
JENN-AIR 30 downdraft slide-in range.
JES9800AAS, $875., never used, still in
the crate. Cost $2200 new.
(650)207-4664
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
KRUPS COFFEE maker $20,
(650)796-2326
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor,
(650)726-1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24 wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 (650)341-1628
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
TABLE TOP refrigerator 1.8 cubic feet
brown in color, $45, call (650)591-3313
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
298 Collectibles
"OLD" IRON COFFEE GRINDER - $75.,
(650)596-0513
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
1940 VINTAGE telephone guaranty
bench Salem hardrock maple excellent
condition $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
1990S UPPER DECK LIFESIZE CUT-
OUTS - Aikman, Marino, Jordan, $20.
each, (650)701-0276
84 USED European (34) and U.S. (50)
Postage Stamps. Most issued before
World War II. All different and all detach-
ed from envelopes. $4.00, 650-787-
8600
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
$100., (650)348-6428
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
AUTOGRAPHED GUMBI collectible art
& Gloria Clokey - $35., (650)873-8167
BARBIE BLUE CONVERTIBLE plus ac-
ccessories, excellent shape, $45.,
(650)344-6565
24
Tuesday July 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
298 Collectibles
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
CHINESE STAMPS - (90) all different,
early 20th century, $6.for all, (650)430-
6058.
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JAPANESE MOTIF end table, $99
(650)520-9366
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MENORAH - Antique Jewish tree of life,
10W x 30H, $100., (650)348-6428
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
TATTOO ARTIST - Norman Rockwell
figurine, limited addition, $99., (650)766-
3024
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
VINTAGE 1970S Grecian Made Size 6-7
Dresses $35 each, Royal Pink 1980s
Ruffled Dress size 7ish $30, 1880s Re-
production White Lace Gown $150 Size
6-7 Petite, (650)873-8167
VINTAGE BLOW torch-turner brass
work $35 (650)341-8342
VINTAGE TEEN BEAT MAGAZINES
(20) 1980s $2 each, SOLD!
WORLD WAR II US Army Combat field
backpack from 1944 $99 (650)341-8342
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertable
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14 x 21, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18 high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE OAK SCHOOL DESK - with
ink well, pencil holder and under seat
book shelf, great for a childs room or of-
fice, $48., (650)574-4439
ANTIQUE STOVE, Brown brand, 30",
perfect condition, SOLD!
ANTIQUE WALNUT Hall Tree, $800 obo
(650)375-8021
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72 high, 40 wide, 3 drawers, Display
case, bevelled glass, $500
(650)766-3024
VINTAGE THOMASVILLE wingback
chair $50 firm, SSF (650)583-8069
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $20 each or both for $35 nice set.
SSF (650)583-8069
303 Electronics
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
46 MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
HP PRINTER - Model DJ1000, new, in
box, $38. obo, (650)995-0012
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
1 COFFEE table - 15" high x 24" wide x
50 1/2 " long. Dk walnut with 3 sections
of glass inset. SOLD!
1940 MAHOGANY desk 34" by 72" 6
drawers center draw locks all comes with
clear glass top $70 OBO (650)315-5902
304 Furniture
2 END tables - 18" x 21" Dk brown wood
with glass tops & open bottoms. SOLD!
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 LAMPS. 25" high. Cream ceramic With
white shades. SOLD!
2 PLANT stands $80 for both
(650)375-8021
2 SOLID wood Antique mirrors 511/2" tall
by 221/2" wide $50 for both
(650)561-3149
7 FOOT couch with recliners & massag-
ers on ends. Brown. $100., SOLD!
8 DRAWER wooden dresser $99
(650)759-4862
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
bankers rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BBQ GRILL, Ducane, propane $90
(650)591-4927
BLUE & WHITE SOFA - $300; Loveseat
$250., good condition, (650)508-0156
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CABINET BLOND Wood, 6 drawers, 31
Tall, 61 wide, 18 deep, $45
(650)592-2648
CHAIR (2), with arms, Italian 1988 Cha-
teau D'Ax, solid, perfect condition. $50
each or $85 for both. (650)591-0063
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
CHINESE LACQUERED cabinet with 2
shelves and doors. Beautiful. 23 width 30
height 11 depth $75 (650)591-4927
COPENHAGEN TEAK DINING TABLE
with dual 20" Dutch leaves extensions.
48/88" long x 32" wide x 30" high.
SOLD!
COUCH - reclines, very good condition,
fabric material, SOLD!
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36x58 with one leaf 11 1/2. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER - 6 draw dresser 61" wide,
31" high, & 18" deep $50., (650)592-
2648
DRESSER, FOR SALE all wood excel-
lent condition $50 obo (650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLE, medium large, with marble
top. and drawer. $60 or best offer,
(650)681-7061
GLASS DINING Table 41 x 45 Round-
ed rectangle clear glass top and base
$85 (650)888-0129
GLIDE ROCKER with foot stool. Dk
brown walnut with brown cushions. $75.,
SOLD!
GRANDMA ROCKING chair beautiful
white with gold trim $100 (650)755-9833
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
I-JOY MASSAGE chair, exc condition
$95 (650)591-4927
INDOOR OR OUTSIDE ROUND TABLE
- off white, 40, SOLD!
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 medal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MATCHING RECLINER, SOFA & LOVE
SEAT - Light multi-colored fabric, $95.
for all, (650)286-1357
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
ORGAN BENCH $40 (650)375-8021
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO TABLE , UMBRELLA & 6
CHAIRS - metal/vinyl, $35.,
(650)344-6565
PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs, glass top,
good condition 41 in diameter $95
(650)591-4927
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36 Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
RECLINING CHAIR, almost new, Beige
$100 (650)624-9880
ROCKING CHAIR & HASSOCK - light
wood, gold cushions. SOLD!
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Great condition,
1970s style, dark brown, wooden, with
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
ROCKING CHAIR with wood carving,
armrest, rollers, and it swivels $99.,
(650)592-2648
SHELVING UNIT interior metal and
glass nice condition $70 obo
(650)589-8348
SOFA 7-1/2' $25 (650)322-2814
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
SWIVEL CHAIR - dark blue leather, very
comfortable, good condition, bought for
$900., sell for $80.obo, (650)345-5502
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
WICKER DRESSER, white, 3 drawers,
exc condition 31 width 32 height 21.5
depth $35 (650)591-4927
WICKER ENTERTAINMENT CABINET -
H 78 x 43 x 16, almost new, $89.,
(650)347-9920
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
3 PIECE fireplace set with screen $25
(650)322-2814
8 PLACE setting 40 piece Stoneware
Heartland pattern never used microwave
and oven proof $50 (650)755-9833
BATTERY CHARGER, holds 4 AA/AAA,
Panasonic, $5, (650)595-3933
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
JAPANESE SERVER unused in box, 2
porcelain cups and carafe for serving tea
or sake. $8.00, (650)578-9208
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good con-
dition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
TWO 21 quart canning pots, with lids, $5
each. (650)322-2814
VINTAGE LAZY susan collectable excel-
lent condition $25 (650)755-9833
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
WATCHES - Quicksilver (2), brand new
in box, $40. for both, (650)726-1037
308 Tools
1/2 HORSE power 8" worm drive skill
saw $40 OBO (650)315-5902
10" BAN SAW- SOLD!
12-VOLT, 2-TON Capacity Scissor Jack
w/ Impact Wrench, New in Box, Never
Used. $85.00 (650) 270-6637 after 5pm
BLACK AND Decker, 10 trimmer/edger
, rechargeable, brand new, $50 SOLD!
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10,
4 long x 20 wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CIRCULAR SAW-BLACK & DECKER -
2 1/8 hp. 7 1/4 inch blade. Good condi-
tion. Extra blades. $20., (650)654-9252
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTMANS PROFESSIONAL car buf-
fer with case $40 OBO (650)315-5902
CRAFTSMAN 1 1/2 HP ROUTER & TA-
BLE - Excellent condition, case, acces-
sories & extra cutters included. $60.,
(650)654-9252
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 3D SANDER - Brand new
never used-still in box. Great for sanding
furniture or round surfaces. Extra sand-
ing disks. $25., (650)654-9252
CRAFTSMAN 3X21" BELT SANDER - 1
hp w/ dust bag. $50., (650)654-9252
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, $35., (650)521-3542
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
ELECTRIC HEDGE trimmer good condi-
tion (Black Decker) $40 (650)342-6345
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
308 Tools
MAKITA 21 Belt Sander with long cord,
$35 (650)315-5902
NEW DRILL DRIVER - 18V + battery &
charger, $30., (650)595-3933
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
RYOBI DETAIL SANDER - Pointed tip
can sand small area, good for
furniture/chairs, good condition, $25.,
(650)654-9252
SANDER, MAKITA finishing sander, 4.5
x 4.5"' used once. Complete with dust
bag and hard shell case. $35.00 SOLD!
SMALL ROTETILLER 115 Volt Works
well, SOLD!
TORO ELECTRIC POWER SWEEPER
blower - never used, in box, $35. obo,
(650)591-6842
309 Office Equipment
COPIER - Brother BCP7040, Laser(black
& white), printer & fax machine, $35.,
(650)212-7020
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
2 GALLON Sprayer sears polythene
compressed air 2 1/2 inch opening, used
once $10 San Bruno (650)588-1946
3 LARGE old brown mixing bowls $75
for all 3 (650)375-8021
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History,
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
5 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $9. for all
(650)347-5104
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
AIR CONDITIONER - Window mount,
SOLD!
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office, new,
$100., (650)619-9203.
ALOE VERA PLANTS - (30) medicine
plant, $3.00 each, (650)678-1989
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99., (650)580-
3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99., (650)580-
3316
ANTIQUE LANTERN - (7) Olde Brooklyn
lanterns, battery operated, safe, new in
box, $100. for all, (650)726-1037
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
ASTRONOMY BOOKS (2) Hard Cover
Cambridge Encyclopedia of Astronomy,
World of Discovery, $12., (650)578-9208
BACKPACK- Unused, blue, many pock-
ets, zippers, use handle or arm straps
$14., (650)578-9208
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BASS PRO SPOTLIGHT - (2) one mil-
lion candlelight, new in box, $100 for
both, (650)726-1037
BATHROOM VANITY light fixture - 2
frosted glass shades, brass finish, 14W
x 8.75H x 8.75D, wall mount, $40,
(650)347-5104
BAY BRIDGE Framed 50th anniversary
poster (by Bechtel corp) $50
(650)873-4030
BELL COLLECTION 50 plus asking $50
for entire collection SOLD!
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BUBBLE GUM MACHINE - Commercial,
$50., (650)726-1037
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
COLEMAN ICE CHEST - 80 quart, $20.,
(650)345-3840
COPPER LIKE TUB - unused, 16 inches
long, 6 in. high, 8 inch wide, OK tabletop-
per, display, chills beverages. $10.,
(650)578-9208
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
310 Misc. For Sale
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 (650)375-1550
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
GOOD HEALTH FACT BOOK - un-
used, answers to get/stay healthy, hard
cover, 480 pages, $8., (650)578-9208
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
HABACHI BBQ Grill heavy iron 22" high
15" wide $25 SOLD!
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HUMAN HAIR Wigs, (4) Black hair, $90
all (650)624-9880
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15., (650)345-
3840
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX - for dogs 21-55 lbs.,
repels and kills fleas and ticks. 9 months
worth, $60., (650)343-4461
KIRBY COMBO Shampooer/ Vacuum/
attachments. "Ultimate G Diamond
Model",SOLD!
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9 tall, 11 diameter, great con-
dition, $10., (650)347-5104
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide in wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
LAUNDRY SORTER - on wheels, triple
section, laundry sorter - $19., (650)347-
9920
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
MATCHING LIGHT SCONCES - style
wall mount, plug in, bronze finish, 12 L x
5W , $12. both, (650)347-5104
MEDICINE CABINET - 18 X 24, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MENS LEATHER travel bags (2), used
$25 each.(650)322-2814
MICHAEL CREIGHTON HARDBACK
BOOKS - 3 @ $3. each, (650)341-1861
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW COWBOY BOOTS - 9D, Unworn,
black, fancy, only $85., (650)595-3933
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
NIKE RESISTANCE ROPE - unopened
box, get in shape, medium resistance,
long length, $8., (650)578-9208
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OUTDOOR GREENHOUSE. Handmade.
Ideal for Apartment balconies. 33" wide x
20 inches deep. 64.5 " high. $70.00
SSF, (650)871-7200
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
PRINCESS CRYSTAL glasswear set
$50 (650)342-8436
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
PUZZLES - 22-1,000 pc puzzles, $2.50
each, (650)596-0513
RALPH LAUREN TWIN SIZE COM-
FORTER - sheets & bedskirt, blue/white
pattern, perfect condition, $60., SOLD!
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICARDO LUGGAGE $35
(650)796-2326
RN NURSING TEXTBOOKS & CD un-
opened, Calculate with Confidence, 4th
edition, like new, $25., (650)345-3277
RN NURSING TEXTBOOKS - Human
Physiology Mechanisms of Disease, 6th
edition, $15., and Pathphysiology Bio-
logic Basics, 4th edition, $25., (650)345-
3277
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SAFETY SHOES - Iron Age, Mens steel
toe metatarfal work boots, brown, size 10
1/2, in box, $50., (650)594-1494
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48 x 69
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. $35.
(650)574-4439
310 Misc. For Sale
SLIDE PROJECTOR - Airequipt Super-
ba 66A slide projector and screen.
$50.00 for all. (650)345-3840
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6,
$60., (650)294-9652
STAINED GLASS panels multi colors
beautiful work 35" long 111/2" wide $79
OBO (650)349-6059
STAINED GLASS,
28x30 Japanese geisha motif, multi
colored, beautiful. $200 (650)520-9366
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TOM CLANCY HARDBACK BOOKS - 7
@ $3.00 each, (650)341-1861
UP STAIRS DOWN STAIRS - first two
years, 14 videos in box, $30 for all,
(650)286-9171
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VHS MOVIES and DVD's. (20) Old to
current releases. $2 per movie. Your
choice. South San Francisco
(650) 871-7200
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WEATHER STATION, temp., barometer
and humidity, only $10 (650)595-3933
311 Musical Instruments
GUITAR FOR sale. Fender Accoustic,
with case. $89.00 SOLD!
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
MARTIN GUITAR 1971 D-18S Great
shape, Great sound. Price reduced to
$1200. SOLD!
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
100% COTTON New Beautiful burgundy
velvet drape 82"X52" W/6"hems: $45
(415)585-3622
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
COAT - Dressy ladies short trench coat,
red, brand new, weather proof, light-
weight, size 6/8, $25.,(650)345-3277
DINGO WESTERN BOOTS - (like new)
$60., (408)764-6142
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
IONIC BREEZE quadra, Sharper Image,
3 level silent air purifier. 27h, energy
saver, original box with video. Excellent
condition. $77. (650)347-5104
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
LEVIS JACKET - size XXL, Beautiful
cond., med., $35., (650)595-3933
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
NEW! OLD NAVY Coat: Boy/Gril, fleece-
lined, hooded $15 (415)585-3622
WHITE LACE 1880s reproduction dress
- size 6, $100., (650)873-8167
25 Tuesday July 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Understand
4 In a chair
10 It may be
crushed at a bar
13 Dinghy gear
15 Water-carved
gulch
16 Traitor
17 What baguettes
may be served in
19 Torontos prov.
20 Cover, in a way,
as a car
21 Baltic Sea
republic
23 Hannah
Montana star
Miley
26 Minor argument
27 Mimic
29 Fifth wheel
33 Bird: Prefix
34 Mobsters code
of honor
36 Dashing style
37 Old sheriffs
badge
39 Self-respect
41 __-Seltzer
42 Jeans giant of
the 80s
44 Grant-giving gp.
45 Cozy place to
read a book
47 Identifies in a
Facebook photo
49 Penultimate-
round game
50 Egyptian life
symbols
52 Numbers to
crunch
55 Title Gilbert and
Sullivan emperor
59 Pub offering
60 Emotional
response (which
might be induced
by 17-, 29- and
45-Across?)
63 Mud bath site
64 Manuscript fixer
65 Just
66 __ ejemplo:
Spaniards for
example
67 Hate
68 Cowboy singer
Ritter
DOWN
1 Mongolian
desert
2 Be worthy of
3 Very, in Vichy
4 Pirates weapon
5 Time to
remember
6 Latin art
7 Casino gratuity
8 Cause of blurry
vision, perhaps
9 Nashvilles West
10 Speck in a
magnetic field
experiment
11 Kids plea
12 Jazzy James
14 Alfredo, for one
18 Timber trouble
22 Frequently
24 Logon
requirement
25 Mar.-to-Jun.
season
27 Walled city of
Spain
28 Kids digital deal-
sealer
30 When the cock
crows
31 Rent-a-car
charges, e.g.
32 One-named Irish
singer
33 Run __: drink on
credit
35 Star brightness
measure
38 Cut, as logs
40 Wuthering
Heights genre
43 One __ customer
46 Painted a picture
of, say
48 Invite as ones
date for
51 Target competitor
52 Coarse talk
53 Brand for a pooch
54 Toiling away
56 __ She Sweet
57 Mete (out)
58 Jet-black gem
61 GPS suggestion
62 Camera named
for a goddess
By Steve Blais
(c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
07/30/13
07/30/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
316 Clothes
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, beauitful color, megenta, with
shawl like new $40 obo (650)349-6059
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10. Elie Tahari
brand new, never worn for $25
(650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
(2) 50 lb. bags Ultra Flex/RS, new, rapid
setting tile mortar with polymer, SOLD!
150 COPPER spades for #6 strand.
Copper wire. $50.00 for all.
(650)345-3840
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3 & 4, approx.
20 of 3, 40 ft. of 4, $25.all,
(650)851-0878
ELECTRICAL MATERIAL - Connectors,
couplings, switches, rain tight flex, and
more.Call. $50.00 for all (650)345-3840
PACKAGED NUTS, Bolts and screws,
all sizes, packaged $99 (650)364-1374
PVC - 1, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
PVC SCHEDULE 80 connectors and
coupling. 100 pieces in all. $30.00 for all
(650)345-3840
STEEL MORTAR BOX - 3 x 6, used for
hand mixing concrete or cement, $35.,
(650)368-0748
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
4 TENNIS RACKETS- and 2 racketball
rackets(head).SOLD!
318 Sports Equipment
AB-BUSTER as seen on T.V. was $100,
now $45., (650)596-0513
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18 di-
meter, Halex brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
FISHERS MENS skis $35 (650)322-2814
FOR SALE medium size wet suit $95
call for info (650)851-0878
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16 wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF CLUB Cleveland Launcher Gold,
22 degrees, SOLD!
KELTY SUPER TIOGA BACKPACK -
$40., (650)552-9436
LADIES BOWLING SET- 8 lb. ball, 7 1/2
sized shoes, case, $50., (650)766-3024
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
ROLLER SKATES - Barely used, mens
size 13, boots attached to 8 wheels, $85.
obo, (650)223-7187
ROWING MACHINE - SOLD!
STATIONARY EXERCISE BICYCLE -
Compact, excellent condition, $40. obo,
(650)834-2583
TENNIS RACKETS $20 (650)796-2326
TENT - one man packable tent - $20.,
(650)552-9436
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
THULE SKI RACK - holds 3 pairs, $85.,
(650)594-1494
TREADMILL EXERCISE- Pro Form 415
Crosswalk, very good condition $100 call
(650)266-8025
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
VOLKI SNOW SKIS - $40.,
(408)764-6142
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTMAN 5.5 HP gas lawn mower
with rear bag $55., (650)355-2996
LAWN MOWER - 48 volt Craftman elec-
tric lawn mower, SOLD!
LAWNMOWER - American made, man-
ual/push, excellent condition, $65.,
(650)342-8436
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
SHOWER CHAIR, WALKER, WHEEL-
CHAIR, POTTY - $25. each obo,
(650)766-9998
SLEEP APNEA breathing machine com-
plete in box helps you breathe, costs $$$
sacrifice for $75, (650)995-0012
WALKER - $25., brand new, tag still on,
(650)594-1494
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journals
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650)595-0805
FURNISHED ONE BEDROOM APART-
MENT - $1300. month, $800. deposit,
close to Downtown RWC, Call (650)361-
1200
SAN MATEO, Near Hillsdale and 92, 2
bed room $1195 per Month, 3239 Glen-
dora Dr. #5, RENTED!
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
1997 LEXUS LX 450 full size SUV with
152k miles in best shape, room for 7 &
excellent conditions clean Car Fax must
see hard to find #5011 reduced price for
$8500.00 plus tax,lic., (650)637-3900
2000 TOYOTA SOLARA SLE coupe
with 160k miles with Toyota reputation
for quality and longevity. automatic with
power package #4523 on sale for only
$6350.00 plus normal fees, (650)637-
3900
2000 VW Passat GLX 4Motion Wagon
with 103kmiles loaded clean Car fax au-
tomatic great safe family or work sport
wagon #4237 on sale for low price of
$5995.00 plus normal fees, (650)637-
3900
2001 AUDI A6 AVANT Wagon All wheel
drive with 79k miles in new conditions
fully optioned from factory she is very
popular with families who are looking for
luxury & safety #5050 for $8500.00.plus
fees.
2001 HYUNDAI ELANTRA GLS sedan 5
speed with 159k miles with power pack-
age & new cluthch great on gas & cold
air conditioning #4333 sale price
$2995.00 plus normal fees, (650)637-
3900
2001 MERCEDES BENZ ML 320 SUV
with 133k miles she is loaded with all op-
tions including 3rd row seating great mid
size luxury SUV #4430 on sale for
$6995.00 plus tax lic,etc, (650)637-3900
2002 HONDA CIVIC EX coupe with 161k
miles 2 door automatic runs & looks
great & very gas efficient & reliable
#5047 with clean Car Fax & ready to go
on road $5750.00 plus tax lic,etc,
(650)637-3900
2004 SATURN ION 3 Sedan with 94k
miles in excellent conditions 4 door with
manual stick shift transmission clean Car
Fax power package #4521 priced on sale
for $5850.00 plus normal fees, (650)637-
3900
2012 TOYOTA CAMRY LE automatic
with only 24k miles like new with big sav-
ings still under full factory warranty for
60k miles black with new rims & tiers
#4420 on sale $17995.00 plus fees,
(650)637-3900
CHEVY 1998 Monte Carlo 59,000 Miles
$5,000, Call Glen @ (650) 583-1242
Ext. # 2
620 Automobiles
Dont lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
ACURA 97 - 3.0 CL CP, Black, Auto-
matic, $2800., (650)630-3216
CHEVY HHR 08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD 93 $ 2,000
Good Condition (650)481-5296
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
MERCEDES 06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
OLDSMOBIL79Royal Delta 88, 122k
Miles, in excelleny Condition $1,800
(650)342-8510
625 Classic Cars
FORD 63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$7,500 obo (650)364-1374
630 Trucks & SUVs
2000 TOYOTA Tacoma Prerunner Extra
Cab with 195k miles two wheel drive
hard to find in this excellent conditions
tractions control & rear lock differential &
all power package #4501 for $9995.00
plus fees, (650)637-3900
DODGE 06 DAKOTA SLT model, Quad
Cab, V-8, 63K miles, SOLD!
635 Vans
67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW 03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON 01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $6,200.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
HONDA 90 - 1968 excellent, 165 mpg,
can deliver, $900., (831)462-9836
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $50. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35., (650)670-
2888
NEW MOTORCYCLE HELMET - Modu-
lar, dual visor, $69., (650)595-3933
645 Boats
72 18 RAYSON V Drive flat boat, 468
Chevy motor with wing custom trailer,
$20,000 obo, (650)851-0878
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4 wide, 6
1/2 long & 2 1/2 deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
670 Auto Service
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
2 1976 Nova rims with tires 2057514
leave message $60 for all
(650)588-7005
2 BACKUP light 1953 Buick $40
(650)341-8342
2013 DODGE CHARGER wheels & tires,
Boss 338, 22-10, $1300 new,
(650)481-5296
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
EDELBROCK VALVE COVERS - for a
389 engine, new in box, $100., (650)726-
1037
FORD FOCUS steel wheels. 14in. rims.
$100. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
HONDA SPEAR tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
MECHANIC'S CREEPER - vintage,
Comet model SP, all wood with
pillow,four swivel wheels, great shape.
$40.00 (650)591-0063
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
RADIALS - pair, PT215/60R17, $15. for
pair, (650)344-6565
RUBBERMAID 2 Gallon oil pan drainers
(2). Never used tags/stickers attached,
$15 ea. (650)588-1946
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Dont lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
26
Tuesday July 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Bath
TUBZ
Over 400 Tubs on display!
Worlds Largest Hands-On, Feet-In
Showroom
4840 Davenport Place
Fremont, CA 94538
(510)770-8686
www.tubz.net
Carpentry
D n J REMODELING
Finish Carpentry
Windows Doors
Cabinets Casing
Crown Moulding
Baseboards
Artificial Grass Gazebos
(650)291-2121
Cabinetry
Contractors
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
Home repairs &
Foundation work
Retaining wall Decks Fences
No job too small
Gary Afu
(650)207-2400
Lic# 904960
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Cleaning
Concrete
CHETNER CONCRETE
Lic #706952
Driveways - Walkways
- Pool Decks - Patios - Stairs
- Exposed Aggregate - Masonry
- Retaining Walls - Drainage
- Foundation/Slabs
Free Estimates
(650)271-1442 Mike
Construction
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed Insured Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
LEAK PRO
Sprinkler repair, Valves, Timers,
Heads, Broken pipes,
Wire problems, Coverage,
Same Day Service
(800)770-7778
CSL #585999
Gutters
O.K.S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
RAIN GUTTERS
Gutters and downspouts,
Rain gutter repair,
Rain gutter protection (screen),
Cleaning service.
Free Estimates
(650)669-6771
(650)302-7791
Lic.# 910421
Handy Help
FERNANDOS HANDYMAN
Painting - Exterior/Interior,
Stucco, Floors, Demos,
Lawns, Pavers, etc.
Free Estimates
Senior Discounts
Lic.& Bonded
(650)834-4824
Handy Help
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
Fences Decks Patios
Power Washes Concrete
Work Maintenance
Clean Ups Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)4581572
contreras1270@yahoo.com
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior Roof
Repair Base Boards New Fence
Hardwood Floors Plumbing Tile
Mirrors Chain Link Fence Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
Refinish
High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
AAA RATED!
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$40 & UP
HAUL
Since 1988
Licensed/Insured
Free Estimates
A+ BBB Rating
(650)341-7482
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Hauling
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsulas Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
10% OFF
PRO PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MK PAINTING
Interior and Exterior,
Residental and commercial
Insured and bonded,
Free Estimates
Peter McKenna
(650)630-1835
Lic# 974682
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
HAMZEH PLUMBING
5 stars on Yelp!
$25 OFF First Time Customers
All plumbing services
24 hour emergency service
(415)690-6540
Plumbing
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
HARVEST KITCHEN
& MOSAIC
Cabinets * Vanities * Tile
Flooring * Mosaics
Sinks * Faucets
Fast turnaround * Expert service
920 Center St., San Carlos
(650)620-9639
www.harvestkm.com
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
Trimming Pruning
Shaping
Large Removal
Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
27 Tuesday July 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Tile
BELMONT TILE &
FOLSOM LAKE TILE
Your local tile store
& contractor
Tile Mosaics
Natural Stone Countertops
Remodeling
Free Estimates
651 Harbor Blvd.
(near Old County Road)
Belmont
650.421.6508
www.belmontile.com
M-Sa 8:30 am - 5 pm
CASL# 857517
Window Coverings
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tors State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Beauty
KAYS
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
DR INSIYA SABOOWALA DDS
DECCAN DENTAL
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
Cantonese, Mandarin & Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6 M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACKS
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
Food
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WALLBEDS
AND MORE!
$400 off Any Wallbed
www.wallbedsnmore.com
248 Primrose Rd.,
BURLINGAME
(650)868-0082
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
Health & Medical
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AUTO HOME LIFE
Brian Fornesi
Insurance Agency
Tel: (650)343-6521
bfornesi@farmersagent.com
Lic: 0B78218
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you cant
Refuse!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
Insurance
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
* All commercial insurance policies
* Employee benefit packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$45 per Hour
Present ad for special price
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
SEVEN STARS
DAY SPA
615 Woodside Road Redwood City
(650)299-9332
Body Massage $60/hour
$40/half hour,
$5 off one hour w/ this ad
Open Daily 9:30 AM to 9:30 PM
UNION SPA
Grand Opening
Open Daily
Full Massage and
Brazilian Wax
(650)755-2823
7345 Mission St., Daly City
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes Multi-family
Mixed-Use Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
ODOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
Video
ADULT VIDEOS - (50) for $50.,
(415)298-0645
WORLD 28
Tuesday July 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Nicole Wineld
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ABOARD THE PAPAL AIRCRAFT
Pope Francis reached out to gays on
Monday, saying he wont judge priests
for their sexual orientation in a
remarkably open and wide-ranging
news conference as he returned from
his rst foreign trip.
If someone is gay and he searches
for the Lord and has good will, who am
I to judge? Francis asked. We should-
nt marginalize people for this. They
must be integrated into society.
Francis predecessor, Pope Benedict
XVI, signed a document in 2005 that
said men who had deep-rooted homo-
sexual tendencies should not be
priests. Francis was much more concil-
iatory in his rst news conference as
pope, saying gay clergymen should be
forgiven and their sins forgotten.
The comments did not signal any
change in church policy. Catholic
teaching still holds that homosexual
acts are intrinsically disordered. But
they indicated a shift in tone under
Francis young papacy and an empha-
sis on a church that is more inclusive
and merciful rather than critical and
disciplinary.
Gay leaders were buoyed by Francis
non-judgmental approach, saying
changing the tone was progress in
itself, although for some, the encour-
agement was tempered by Francis talk
of gay clergys sins.
Basically, Im overjoyed at the
news, said Francis DeBernardo, exec-
utive director of the U.S.-based New
Ways Ministry, a group promoting
justice and reconciliation for lesbians,
gays, bisexuals and transgender peo-
ple and the wider church community.
For decades now, weve had nothing
but negative comments about gay and
lesbian people coming from the
Vatican, DeBernardo said in a tele-
phone interview from Maryland.
Pope says he wont judge gay priests
By Jamey Keaten
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PARIS Wearing a scarf to mask
his face, the gunman sneaked into the
posh Cannes hotel and held up a dia-
mond show as three security guards
looked on, then ed on foot about a
minute later. In the end, he made off
with a breathtaking $136 million
worth of valuables the biggest jew-
elry heist in years, maybe ever.
It was a French Riviera robbery that
might make Hollywood scriptwriters
smile. And it even happened at a hotel
that was featured in Alfred Hitchcocks
jewel-encrusted thriller To Catch a
Thief.
On Monday, a state prosecutor pro-
vided new details about the brazen
heist a day earlier at the Carlton
Intercontinental hotel not least that
the loot was actually worth more than
twice the (euro) 40 million ($53 mil-
lion) estimate that police had first
announced.
The noontime caper Sunday along
the towns seaside promenade, La
Croisette a playground for the rich
and famous, sunbathing tourists, and
most notably, world cinema stars
every year looked set to dwarf the
value of two other jewelry thefts in the
Riviera during the Cannes Film
Festival in May.
Official: Cannes diamond heist actually nets $136 million
EU diplomat seeks a way out of Egypts crisis
CAIRO Europes top diplomat on Sunday searched for a
way out of Egypts increasingly bloody and complex crisis,
looking for compromises in talks with the military-backed
government and allies of the ousted president.
Supporters of deposed President Mohammed Morsi
appealed for an end to a crackdown that killed 83 protesters
over the weekend, calling for a political settlement instead.
Ahead of her visit to Egypt, European Union foreign poli-
cy chief Catherine Ashton deplored the loss of life and
appealed for a political process that includes all groups,
including Morsis Muslim Brotherhood.
There were no signs that any side in the complicated con-
ict was willing to heed her calls. The Brotherhood rejected
calls to work with the new leaders and called for new demon-
strations on Tuesday, the government made no conciliatory
gestures, and Morsi remained in custody in an unknown loca-
tion. He has not been seen since the military coup that oust-
ed him on July 3.
Militants attack prison in northwest Pakistan
DERA ISMAIL KHAN, Pakistan Taliban militants dis-
guised as police and armed with guns, rocket-propelled
grenades and explosives attacked a prison in northwest
Pakistan holding 40 high prole inmates Monday night in
an apparent attempt to free their colleagues, ofcials said.
Pakistani Taliban spokesman Shahidullah Shahid claimed
responsibility for the attack, saying 150 militants took part
and around 300 prisoners were freed.
The attack in the town of Dera Ismail Khan began around
midnight with a huge explosion, said intelligence ofcials,
speaking on condition of anonymity because they were not
authorized to talk to reporters. A local resident, Sharafat
Khan, said the blast was so loud it rattled every house in the
neighborhood.
Wave of car bombings in Iraq kills at least 58
BAGHDAD More than a dozen explosions, mainly from
car bombs, ripped through marketplaces, parking lots, a cafe
and rush-hour crowds in Iraq on Monday, killing at least 58
people and pushing the countrys death toll for the month of
July toward the 700 mark, ofcials said.
The bombings 18 in all are part of a wave of blood-
shed that has swept across the country since April, killing
more than 3,000 people and worsening the already strained
ties between Iraqs Sunni minority and the Shiite-led govern-
ment.
Around the world
REUTERS
Pope Francis listens to journalists questions as he ies back Rome following his
visit to Brazil.

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