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ARTILLERY NOTES

No. 32

SEARCHLIGHTS
(Hrvision of Artillery Note No. ~1)
PUBLISHED t)"J\:DER SUPERvISION OF THE

SCHOOL
COAST

BOARD
SCHOOL

ARTILLERY

PREPARED

IN DEPARTMENT

OF

ENGINEERING
COAST

AND
ARTILLERY

:\HNE
SCHOOl.

DEFENSE

Fort
COAST

Monroe.

Virginia
SCHOOL PRESS

ARTILI.ERY

1912

TABLE OF CONTENTS

PART I. (Pages 1 to Zl.)


TYPES OF SEARCHLIGHT PREVIOUS TO MODEL 1910.

Parts. : Electrical Control and Training System. Controller. . -Training Mechanism. Hand Training. The Arc. PART II. (Pages ~8 to 70.)
GENERAL ELECTRIC 60-INCII PROJECTOR.

Methods of Control. The Training System. The Lamp. Occulting. Rheostat. Switchboard. Tools and Spare Parts. Nomenclature of Parts: Projector, elevating mechanism, lamp, pilot motor, focusing carriage, training and elevating motors, controller, couplings, contact plungers, miscellaneous, spare parts and tools not illustrated, rheostat. PART III. (Pages 71 to 74.)
CARE AND PRESERVATION, TRANSPORTATION AND NOTES.

Care .and Preservation.

Transporta tion. APPENDIX. (Pages 75 to 81.)

Notes.

PORTABLE

SEARCHLIGHT

SET.

Portable Searchlight Set. Power Plant Truck.


PRESENT STATUS OF THE SERIES

Searchlight Truck.
NOTES.

OF ARTILLERY

(Page 82.)

~ILLUSTRATIONS
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9, 10. 11. 12. 12a. 12b. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 6o-Inch Projector and Controller. Diagrammatic Sketch of Searchlight Lamp, Early Type. , Searchlight Lamp. Parts of 6o-Inch Lamp l\lechanism. 7-\Vire Controller. Sketch of 7-\Yire Controller Circuits. Connections in Detail for 6-\Vire Controller. 9-\Vire Controller. Sketch of Circuits for 9-Wire Controller. Connections of Electric Control nnd Training Mechanism. 9- Wire Type. Connections of Electric Control and Training Mechanism. 8-Wire Type. Diagram of Improved Electric Control System for Sea'rchlights. Front View of LenIanc Searchlight Controller .. Rear View of LeBlanc Searchlight Controller. Vertical Section of Training Mechanism, 9-\Vire Type. Training Mechanism. 6-Wire Type. Training Mechanism. 7-Wire Type. Sketch of Horizontal Training Mechanism, 9-Wire Type~ Sketch of Horizontal Training :Mechanism. 8-Wire Typt". Mechanism for Horizontal Training, 8-Wire Type. Old Type Projector ancl Controller. 7-Wire. Old Style Projector and Controller. 6-\Vire. Carbon Showing Crater in the Positive. 6o-Inch G. E. Projector. Frontispiece to Part II. 22. Vertical Training l\lech:mism. 23 .. Section of Elevating l\lechanism. , 2.1. Section of Training and Elevatin~ Mechani~m. 25. Lower Side of Lamp. 26. Rheostat. 27. Switchboard and Rheostat Wiring. 28. Connections of Switchboard anel Tlheostat. 29. Pilot Motor Connections. 30. Connections of Electric Projectors, 6o-Inch Form N-2. 31. Top View of Connections. . 32. Connections to Trainin~ nnd Elevating Mechnnism Roxe!4 33. Barrel Crated. 34. Base Crated. 35. Projector. 36. Projector. 37. Parts of Lamp. 38. Parts of Lamp. 39. Parts of Pilot Motor. 40. Parts of Focusing Carriage. 41. Parts of Training and Elevating Motors. 12; .. :Parb of Controller. 43. Parts of Courlings. 44. Plungers. Connectors anel AdJusting Hod. 4j. Portable 36-lnch Light. 46. Portable Power Plant for 36-lnch Light. 17. Portnhlt" Pow ..r Plant for 3R-Tnch Li~ht.

'I

.'

PART I.

TYPES OF SEARCHLIGHT
PREVIOUS TO

MODEL 1910

Illustrations from A rtillery Note No. 3 I

1'1'.

t,(

Illch

ProJtl!ol

<llId

COlltrol!l'J

3
PARTS

The principal parts of a searchlight are: A reflector, a barrel, a glass front door, arms for supporting the barrel, a turntable for enabling the barrel to be revolved in azimuth, a base for supporting the turntable, training mechanism for changing the directidn of the beam in altitude and azimuth, and an arc lamp for supplying the light. (See Fig. 1.) The reflector used almost universally is a parabolic glass silverbacked mirror. An arc is maintained at the focus of the reflector and a beam with the rays essentially parallel is projected from it. Searchlights are designated by the diameters in inches of the reflectors. Those in the Coast Artillery service are: 2.1-inch, 30-inch, 3G-inch and GO-inch. The first two are obsolete types but several of them are still in use. Metallic mirrors, gold-plated, silver-plated,. nickel-plated, and of Monel metal, have been experi~ented \vith and some have been issued, but all of them are markedly inferior as reflectors to the silver-backed glass mirror. The barrel is a metallic cylinder carrying on the back the reflector, on the front a glass door, and on the bottom a lamp box for supporting the lamp and a rack for changing the direction of the beam in altitude. It is supported by the arms, \vhich are fastened to the turntable; the latter is mounted on the ba..o;;e and is moved by horizontal traversing mechanism to change the direction of the beam in azimuth. The gla.o;;s front door consists of a metal ring on which are mounted strips of glass. The only function of this door is clos:. ing the front of the drum. . The parts mentioned above are essentially the same for all types of searchlight, the different types resulting from differences in the lamp mechanism, training mechanism, and apparatus for controlling the training mechanism. . The lamp consists essentially of a pair of carbon-holders, mechanism for starting the arc, mechanism for feeding the carbons so as to maintain the arc properly. Starting the arc and feeding the 'carbons may pe. accomplished automatically, or by hand, the mechanism for the purpose consi~ting of .~lectromagnets; feed-screws, pawl, and~ ratchet wheel, as shown ..diagr~mmatically in Fig. 2. . .. ,': , The upper feed-screw has a little longitudinal play. ~':-U~a.t~ it. with the negative carbon-holder may be moved a short di~:-:~, tnrice by the armature of the starting magnet; both carbon ...
I

.1

holders are moved when the feed-screws are turned by mean~ of the ratchet wheel. The actions in starting the arc and feeding the carbons are as follow: The carbons being apart, power is supplied to the light, whereupon the feeding magnet attracts it~ armature, cau ing the pawl to move the ratchet wheel a notch, thus moving the carbons slightly together; the circuit is broken by

N~al'r'e
(jpp ,

Ctlr60n CQrna.!l' -

.-

~ced Je,eN So-eN -F~cd maqnel_


,fwd,"),

L .... r~c.d

Sfarllng _ ma!l"t
t

N('!lm/y,
("o,./~/:1Ioe"

II Ymaic/N: P.J,/"",e
COMlac!

Shoe

F1S?'

l.

DIA

rammatic

Sketch

of

archlight

Lamp,

Early

Typ

this movem nt, th :pring withdraws the armature, disen~aging he pawl frolll the ra.tchet wheel and again closing the circuit; thL, in urn, ('au: ... the p~t\\I to engag the ratchet whe I again and mo -e it another note-h. Each repetition of this proces. bring 1,h carbon. clospr and ('loser tog "her and when they touch, th . tarting magnet atLrads an armature which withrlra . 1h n Rative carhon-holder, and an arc is form fl. The'

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,)

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III

'iJ
II) I) \ I l I

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1
II

1\
I)

I 1I

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l] \ I
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I) (

I[ 0
I 0) I)

II)

I J,
(,

II

QI

11
III

'J I f,
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l) I,

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v,
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7
spring of, the armature of the feeding magnet is adjusted so that the current through the magnet due to the proper voltage across the arc wiII give a current producing an attractive force in equilibrium with that of the spring. If the voltage across the arc is too small, (arc too short), the spring wiII keep the feed magnet circuit broken and the arc will become the proper length by burning of the carbons.

If the voltage across the arc becomes too great (arc too long), the current through the f('ed magnet wiII overcome the action of the spring and the carbons will be fed together. .The arc is kept at the focus of the mirror by moving the lamp with a hand feed-screw not shown in figure.
Fig. :1 shows lights. The parts A. B. C. D. Negative Positive a type of lamp for the :1G-inch and smaller of this lamp are: carbon-holder. carbon-holder. for carbon clamps. for positive carbon. carbon.

Clamping-screws Vertical Horizontal

adjusting-screw

adjusting-~.wrew carbon-support.

for positive

F. G.
H. K.

Negative Positive

carbon-support.

Lamp frame. Main lamp-contact Hand feed-screw. Fixed nut for focusing-screw. Stud of lamp switch for cutting Ratchet and pawl. armature. out feed ma..,.{net. shoe.

L.
M. N. O. P. Q.

Feeding-magnet Contact

of circuit-breaker. for ratchet and arm.

R.
S. T.

Adjusting-screw Starting-magnet. Fepding-magnet. Adjusting-spring

U.

for feeding-magnet.

Fig. 4 shows the parts of the lamp for type of GO-inch light previous to Model l!)}O (Type N-2, G. E. Co.).

8
ELEC'TRIC

Co

TROL

AND

TRAINING

SYSTEM

CONTROLLER

The electric training mechanism consists of sets of gears actuated by two motors whose power is supplied through a piece of apparatus called the controller. One motor with its gears move' the light in altitude, the other in azimuth. With the

Fi~. 5.

7-Wire

Controller.

olde. t type of controller, th' armatur' current passes through the controller, the fi leis for the motors being in series across the Plain:: of thi .. t~.J)l' of cont roll 'I' there are two classes, 7-wire and fi-wir'. the latter b'ing t he later type. 'I'h' G-wir model WW' repla(' cI h~ what is kno\ n as the relay type, in which the armatur curl' nt doe not pass through the controller. Of

9 this type there are two classes, 9-wire and 8-wire, the latter being the later type. The latest t:rpe for l\Iode11910 (N, G.E.Co.) is described in Part II. The classes 7- and 6-, 9- and 8-wire are based upon the number of conductors in the controlling cable. When the controller handle is in its normal or neutral position the motor armature is short-circuited. If the fields are

+ ..
horizontal 'JjU/nI'?j Co.7tacf

Vertical

7rQ/l7i~

Contacls "

SoPS.

TSwdcil

7 Core Conduc t.or


I

.5

I.

.5

7 Connec ts

With Contro{,'cr

Prqjec

':)r

Fi~.

6.

Sketch

of 7-Wire

Controller

Circuits.

energized under this condition and the turntable rotated, the motor will act as a short-circuited generator and offer great resistance to the motion, thus acting as an electric brake. This is true for all types of electric controller. \Vith some types of controller the handle flies back automatically to this normal position when a turning force is removed; with others it remains in any position to which it may have been turned.

10
The electric circuits for the 7- and 6-wire controllers shown in Figs. 6, and 7. Referring to Fig. 6, horizontal training side, it will be that each of the motor leads has two terminals, one of which be thrown in contact with the positive main and the other are seen may with

COUp/ir13 in Controller

Rheostat Controller Cable

otor.s

""."
a

.....
I

S/(,t-.
, 5 ,

/ie/tis

8J '5. : t> cQJ ~


~

----

Coupling on Base

Fig. 7.

Connections in Detail for 6-Wire Controller.

the negative main; and, further, that five taps to a resistance are indicated. \Vhen the controller handle is turned, contacts A and B or C and D are made, depending upon the direction 'of the turning; portions of the resistance are cut out from the circuit depending upon the tap point at which a contact finger

11

12
operated by the handle is stopped. As there are five such stops it is possible to vary the resistance in the armature circuit

\,

+,

... ~ ~ ~~ ....
(\I
"~

.~

~ ~"t

\,J""'~

t: < () " lO ., ~ ., N -

!lUi.
~ Ji1I/OJl-uo.?

Fi~. 9.

Sketch of Circuits for 9-Wire Controller.

five times and five speeds of the motor may be obtained, the direction of rotation depending upon whether A and B or C and D are made. The circuit for the slowest speed is, + main,

13

....
Q

WI

.~

~
a

.14

13 1\. (or C). I, motor, ~. H, (or


111:1 Ill.

I> I.

IO\\(,

't tap of t \1(' I'r.'i.'LIIH'l',

H,v 1I100'ing t hl' handll' up and dm n tlH' :\('t ion of t IH' \ l'l'(i(':11 (I':lilling motol' i.' .'imilal' to that of tll<.' horizont:d ju, t d ('S('I'i hl'd,
Tlw :l('(ion 111 tll<' ('a.'p of tll<' (j-\\il'(' ('ontroll( I' i.' .'imil;11' to for (he 7-, l{l'fl'l'l'ing to Fig, 7. it \\ill 1)(' .'(I('n that tlwf'(' :11'(' 110!:IPS to I Ill' 1'('.'i.'t:lIH'l' :Ind all or nO!H' of it n1l1.'t IH' thro\\ll III th(1 1110(01' al'maturp ('il'('ult: thu.' onl, 1\\0 "p(,pd .. inl'a('h dil'l'('t ion :11'(' possihl(', '1'11('('ir('uil for t hI' .'10\\ (', t horizont al .',.('('d is as follo\\'s: I main, I, d, f. n'. i.talH'l', I. motor, :L P, g, ~~, Ih:d
Ill:IIl1,

'1'1]('
'I'hl'

('I('('j

!J-\\'iI'P ('Ollt roll ('1' i.' ..h()\\ n in Fi.tr. , , I'i(' ('il'('u't.' for t Iw !l- and. -\\ iI'(' ('ont rolll'l'.'

;11'(',

hm\ n

ill Vigs. !). 10 and II. Tlw 1110\ I'I1H'n\. of 1111' I'ont I'f)lll'r h:lIld 1(' l'11('l'giz(1 t 111' \';ll'iou.' r('lay ma,trlW\. \\ hi('h ('Io.'p t h(1 Irainin,fr 1I10tOl' ('il'('llils. gi\ ing t\\O .'1 ('('d.' in l'adl dil'(.('tion for \loth I 1':lillillg 1l1olol's.

I II 1/ (' (' ( ~ 1/ fro II, ,.. T hI' ('0 nt ro III .1" pI'(' \ i 0 u -I. d I', T I'iI lId \\'(11'(' dl'silrlll'd Ily I Ill' (;1'111'1':11 EI('I' I'it' ('ollll'al1~. Ilm\ ('\ 1'1'. ;1 lilllikd numlH'1' of a 1'(,I:ty t. 1,(', dUI' 10 \11'. I.I'/)I:IIH'. h:l\1' 1)(11111 supplil'd. Thi.' typ(' I'('quin" (lnl a ('oup](' of dl'.\ _('('II.' for OP('I';l! ion and 1\\ 0 .'111;111 \ in',' froll1 IIH' ('onl rol1pr 10 I hll Ii, rh (, t h us ad I 11 i I I i n,L:'of ('(Inl ro I from ;In. d i,' t ; I Ill' P. 'I' h(, I' i I'_ ('Iliis and olJ('l'ation al'(, a.' 1'0110\\.':
This ('on(rol](,1' i,' opl'rat('d 11,\ 11 (';111,' of a hp.\ \\hi('h h.\ 'lI'oP('1' 1110 \'('111 ('nl ('10.'('.' t Iw ('in'uil from: 1'(.\\ dl'.\ (,('II" through 1(';l(ls (d' \\'0 \\'il'('s and a ground to 0111'(If 1\\0 101;11'l'('la.\.' Oil :1 s\\'il('hho;ml IH'ar tl1(' light. ()!H'I'(.1:t i. for IWl'izont:l1. :lI1d 11t(, ollwr for \ ('I'I i('al mo ('I1H'nl. '1'111':lI'lnalul'I' of a I)olal' !'I'lay (,Ios('s (1)(' ('il"'uit through ('ith(r 01':1 pair of .'ol('noid,' (If t hI' hOl'izon( al or \ ('1'(i('al n'\ ('1',(' II1;VIW1., Th(.,'(, Ill;I,l"IH'l s al'(' ('llI'rriz('d frolll a tlO \olt ('in'uit. Tlw ('01'(' L\ (If \\hi('h ('\'('1' 111:1"11<'1 is ('n('rgjz('d i, dra\\n up and 0ll'l'at(' tl1(' h:lndl(' (If a I'('\'('rsing s\\it('h, Thi,' ,'\i ('h (,1(1,1' llw ('il'cuil through (1)(' rll(llol' ;\J'lllalul'(' and J'( .'i, 1:llll'l' II~ in .'('ri(, \\ il h it, Till' flo\\ ing in t Ill' annat UJ'(' ('ircllit i ju. Ilnd'r 1111' :tll IIlInt l't'ljllil'(ld to .'tart tlH' lllotor. \\'h('n llw,' \it('h of lhl' (,olltmlll'J' is l'I,I(';I.'('d llH' ('ir('uit of t 111' 1'(' (. ,'1' 1l1;I,L:'11I't i. Ilroll'n :lI1d 1111' ('01'(' ( ) falls, ()n ag;lin ojl('r:tl in,' t 11(' ~ (I. of 1 h( ('ont mlll'l' ill Ih(' s; 111(' din'('tion tl1(' ,';ln1(' ('on' of hi' .;tIlW 1'(' 1'1',1'lI1;lgl1l't I'ais('s and ('arri('~ \\ith it lhi.' tinl(' t111' circuit ('10,('1' 1('1, Thi,' cil'('lIit ('Io~l'r cuts out in ,'U(T('. ion [our n' -i. l:lI1('(', \\ hi('h an'
('111'1'1'111

/,('n

16

17 in parallel wit h t hr rr. i:t anrr (B) in th(' motor armature circuit. Variations in :plrd are ohtainr<! h.- openin.g and closing thr rin'uits by means of t hr ke~' on t he <'ant 1'011('1'.

I'i~

12a

Front

View

of Le Blanc

archlight

Controller

11-:

12h

Rf.' r

, rc hll Th

Controller

1 1l1l111ller of I' '. i. 1; nr' ar} upplied \\ ith 111(' contro\lrr. 111<' OIlt'S to 11(' It:t't! for a part indar Ii rht hl'lIlg d,tPrlllin d hy Irial. 'I'h ('Oil I I' >\1 'I' ha not 11)(' \\ i1h uniform :lIC(" :.

18
TRAINING MECHANISM

The training mechanism actuated by the motors has been developed along with the controllers, the various types used being shown in Figs. 13, 14, 15, 16, 17 and 18. The mechanism for the 6- and 7-wire types are shown in Figs. 14 and 15. An this mechanism is beneath the turntable and very inaccessible. The mechanism for the 9-wire controller is shown in Fig. 13.

..

I'

c
B

I
~

-_._------------- ---_-_ --------------------------------

_.

-----------._._ ..- -._-- _ . ._----------------_._---- ..__ ...

Fig. 13. Vertical~Section of Training Mechanism, 9-Wfre Type.

A. B. C. D. E. F. G. H. I.

J.

Clutches and mechanism for horizontal trainin~. Shaft for hand horizontal training. . Turntable roller ring. Standard. Horizontal motion gear-wheel. Clutch for vertical training mechanism. Reduction gear-wheels for vertical training. Turntable gear-wheel for horizontal motion. Turntable. Bevelled ~ears for vertical training.

K,

L.
M,

\' C'rt ical t rammg motor Horizontal t raininl.! motor. Pedest a!.

For \'C'rt ical t ,.aining. motion i.' tran ..mit t I,d from th \'er. tical t raining mot ')1' to t h<: d nun a' follo.\ .. : Tlw mot or r (F'ig. I:~) transmit, motion through a b(' rll('d graring ,J.' to ;1 "rrtical :hafL pa ... ing through thC' cpI1l('r of th ' turntable: ntar t 11(' Lop of the :haft a 'pare gear. a. 1 fa:t 'neel : mot ion of gC';lI' i: (':IITif'c! lhI ough a '('c!ucin T TC':r- rain h. c anc! d) to ; ..haft on

1'1~

14

r Inlll

hanl m.

fl

Wn

Typ

(,('aI" '('ar. in (); prt ical rack at tachC'eI Uw drum, h('I1('(' an~ motion of (' 1110 (': th' 11<:;"1111 in a \,('rtical plal1(', 'I'hil-i v('aring i d(' 'ig!1('d ..0 a to I!i\ P a \ ('r~' much :Io\\,pr :I)('('d to tll(' drum than th:lt of thC' motor. h)r horizont al t rainin:. h motor L (Fig. \:~ I opC'rat . ('ill1<'r of 111<' t \\"() Vt':lr-t rain: 1,. m "In. of a worm. Pinion E lll('sll('.' in a IaW(' v('ar II. on th t unnahl(', H~ III 'all: of th {'\(.(.( ric clutclt{, .. hO\\ n in ri" Ifj ('i lwr of tlw t 0 g(': r-train .. (dC'si 'lWei to vi\ (' ditf('n'!1t . I ('('d ma. h al'tu; t 'd h. th(' motor. lw mot or 1I1a Ti (, 1 \ 0 11('( d. 11 Ilwan. of lw ('ont roll r
10

\\'h ich gp:lr (' is Ii ('c!,

20 and either of the gear-train~ may be operated by either speed, the turntable may be given four speeds in a horizontal direction. The operation of putting either gear-train in motion may he under toad by reference to Fig. 16. The electromagnets A and J are fastened to a shaft which i.. actuated by the worm D on the motor shaft. When clutch i energized the armature B causes the train of gears terminat~ ing in 0 to be revolved. 0 is fastened to the shaft P, which

()II

lit

1,1

, J

O. rI . It7~
t/f\.

i;lr/I(~

/W"T{)1r'

"

..."

(;{

1\
/

'I"
j,

of

(J

~ C 'r

Fig. 15.

Training

Mechanism,

7-Wire Type.

('aITi '. a rear for a tuating the turntable. 1n a similar manner, when J i. en rgized the armaLlir I revolves with it and causes a moLion of the Lrain of gears tl'lTninating in L, which actuate. the turntahle through the shaft P, to which it is key d. These two gear .. are d 'signed to givC' Lh proper spe'd in connection with the two motor'p cis. The ('!utrh.. ;11'(' en('rgiz('<! h~' ('ontads madp in th(' cantrall r.

21
The vertical training mechanism designed for use in connection with the 8-\\'ire controller is the same as that for the 9wire. The motor shaft has a worm meshing into a worm-gear on whose shaft there is a bevelled gear meshing with a gear on a shaft containing the vertical rack pinion. The pinion receives power from the shaft through a spring clutch.

/I and J
/ aha!
Fig. 16.

P
E/l1cfrom0!7nt!"t$.
of Horizontal Training

0" Worm "" n7otor


Mechanism in 9-Wire

shQ'~

B. /lrmatvr~s.
Sketch

p:l ~r"tab/t" !It'ar/ng shQ~t.


Type.

Fig. 17.

Sketch

of Horizontal

Training

Mechanism,

8-Wire Type .

.for horizontal training, there are two speeds of the motor; the gearing is arranged as described below, so that for each motor speed two speeds of turntable are possible; so that there are four speeds in each horizontal direction. One of the gear-:rains in this case is direct, the other is differential; the former gives a speed fifteen times that of the latter. The selection of the gear-

train is made by mean: of a single electromagnetis clutch, as explained below. The horizontal training mechanism is shown in Fig . 17 and 1<- The operation of-'the direct gear-train is as follows: (See Fig. 17.) The horizontal training motor M has two worms on its -haft L which ma~' operate both Hand E or H alone if the magnetic dutch which throws E into gear is released. H meshes into gear G whieh is solid with O. () turns idly on shaft J and me he with C and '; turning them causes A and P to turn, for C, A, " and P, respectively, have shafts with bearings in gear R. Gear. A and P hath mesh with Q which is keyed to shaft J

- -

---------------Traillin~, 13-Wire Typ~

Fi~. 18.

Mechanism

for Horizontal

J h~ a pinion I which I1wshps into K on Che turntabl

'. When the magnetic elu teh is on, t}1<' motor ':lUSl'S worm I~~ to operate \) on \ 'ho. shaft B is kl.')' ('<I . B llll'shes into R, which is an idl r on J. '1he \'arious gears an' c!('signed so that B if acting alan would turn J in an opposite direction to tha received 1.~ ;:U' fa't. Therefore, whpn both arc ac ing at the from Hand sam time J will turn 11 .. as fast as it dol'S when H only is acting . 'ormally a :pring holds the t'lu1,eh so that I~:is aduated by th. motor shaft; but when Ow l'lfletro-magnpL is enflrgized E i not actuated.

23
HAND TRAINING

All the forms of training mechanism are provided with appliances for training the searchlight by hand. In general, there are clutches for throwing off the motor training gear and handles for slow motion hand training. Figs. 19 and 20 show the clutches and wheels. for 7- and 6-wire training mechanism. For the 9-wire controller mechanism, the turntable may be revolved by hand without affecting the motor when the magnetic clut~hes are not on, for gears 0 and N mesh with idlers under this condition. (Fig. 16.) For quick vertical training, clutch F, Fig. 13, must be unscrewed. For the 8-wire mechanism, the bevelled gears of the vertical training motor system may be disengaged by pulling and turning a marked clutch handle. A hand-wheel is supplied for giving slow motion. Pinion I, Fig. 17, of the horizontal training system, may be actuated by a clutch handle for hand control, as follows: (1) It may be released from shaft J, thus becoming an idler as the turntable is revolved by hand. (2) It may be made solid to a worm-wheel which engages with the worm on a shaft carrying a handle for giving slow motion to the turntable. (The normal position of I is solid to J, for electric control.) In the 9- and 8-wire types of mechanism, the pinions meshing with the drum and turntable racks receive power from their shafts through spring clutches so that the shafts may continue to revolve should some accident cause the pinions to stop; this is a safety arrangement.
THE ARC

Two carbon electrodes are used for the arc, the positive being the larger. Both carbons are cored. The negative has a core consisting of a copper tube enclosing carbon which is as hard or harder than the carbon proper, from which it is separated by a selvage which holds it in place. Two kinds of core are used in positive carbons-hard and t:>oft. The hard core is as hard as the carbon proper and is held in place by a carbon selvage not so hard. The soft core is made softer than the carbon proper. Cores are provided for the following purposes. . 1. Centering the arc. 2. Increasing the length of the arc so as to expose as much of the crater as possible to the reflector. 3. Causing the crater to cup in such a way as to give best illumination.

Fig. 19. A. B C. U. Eo F. (;. II. I.

Old Type Projector

and Controller,

7-Wirl'

J.
K L.

. t.

<J.
P H.. T. L . \'

\\

Hand. tar wheel for ~low V('rtical trainin~ (hand control), Clamp nut for horizontal trainin~ clutch nul. Hand whel'l for ,'low horizontal trainin~ (hand eont,)'ol). ...ut for horizontal trainin~ elutch. \\ (lod handl(',' for liuic\' hand contra\. Cluteh for throwin~ out \'I'r!.ical trainin~ rT)l'chanism for hand control. ConLroll-r ,'\\ itch. ConLroll(-r hand II'. ConLro]1pr fu,'(' block:-;. Plug r('('l-p leiI' for conlroll(>r eahll'. Foeu 'ing ,'crl'\\' for brin~in~ rays of lll'am sl'nsibly paralle\. . 'ockpt for in.'l'rtin~ \\Tl'n(.h for opl'rating f{'pd ma~n .j, Hwitch . .'ockPt for in,'l'rling \\1'('neh for f('l'ding lamp by liand. , Q . .'liding door,' U.'I'.1 for adjustin~ lamp and el('anill~ mirror and front door. Uoor u.l'd wh('n arlju,'tin~ or changin~ carhons, (;la."fron door for pro pctin~arc. .'idt' p('I'p-.'ight for oh '('r\'in~ condilion of arl'. \'('rlieal IW('p-.'i~ht for oil "-1"\ in~ wl1l'n ('ratpr is in focuw, Lamp ca "'. Jain !'lmp .\\ i eh. Latch!:' for ia:.tl'ning ha.'l' apron. H-'(' apron for protPcLing training mechanU:!m.

2.

II

"
J ------

FIg. 20.

Old

tyle Projector

and Controller,

6-Wire

A.

H.
(" [l.

,.'
I'.

t;.
II. I .I. I"

L.
(l.
('.

IL
S.

'I'. U.

Shaft for. lo\\ VI.rt ical nwchaIlIcal tra1l11l1g ";c("('ntric for t hrc)\\ in~ out horizontal training 'I'ar. Shaft for ,'lo\\ horizontal m, chanical trainin~. ( lutch for throwing out \ l'rti(':t1 training nw('hani. III lorquick Main lall1p ,witch. ('onlrollt.r handit .. ('ontrolll'r fu, I' Illock. ({I'('l'pt.al'11' for ('ontrulll'r cabll' cuupling !{l'('('plaelp for main liIH' cahll' ('ouplin~. 1{1'('I'ptaelc' for mot I' \ in', Sidl' Jl('Pp-. i~ht. V('rl i('al P('('p-. ight for ob.-('n illg imagl' 01 crater So('kl'l, for in.'l'rtill' H,.nci1 for f((.din r lamp h~ hanc!. FlH'u.'ing .'cn'\\. SlJ('lt.t for in.'t'rting wn'!wh to Opl ratl' f('I.<lin~ ma~nl.t .'witch I Joor. for a<lju, ting lamp. ('lamp for a<lju, tin r balan('(' of drum. Turntahll'. 1'1'<1( .. l~d. Lall'hl'.' for. l'c'urin '~Ia lront <1001'. Ilan<lIt .. for controllin~ b 'am h} hand

hand control

V.
\

1f the positve core is too soft the crater will be Loo deep, with consequent loss of light. Furthermore, cracks develop. With hard-core carbons the selvage often burns out around the core cau'ing evere cracks. The development of cracks is fatal to the proper burning of the carbon; cracking is always accompanied by fier.;e hissing and screaming, large pieces of the carbon falling off eventllall~' and ruining the arc. As soon as crack I" develop re-carbon, especially if they develop soon after starting. In earchlight operation more trouble results from poor carbons than from all other defeeLs together. Carbons are, upplied in ealed boxes which should not be opened until the carbons are required for use. Carbons which have been e.'posed to the :-IiI' for any length of time are much

r l~,

21,

Carbons Showing

Crater

in the Positivtl,

impw\'<.1 by h 'ating. This is done ennv'niently by putting th m in,'id \ t1w easing of a boiler. CarbonI" are very xpensive and great conom~' ma)' be ef[eeled by turning down in a lathe tho e whicl1 have been lIsrd ntH'(' and llsing them a second and ev n a third tinH', Fig. 21 ..ho\\,' a good <:l'aL<.>I'. '1he ('haral'teri ..t ies of till' ar(' arp shown i'n th<.> following tabl ':
'izl' ul ormal ('urrl'IH ormal volla~(' a('ro,'s an'
~.j ,/0

"osit i v(' ('arboll (approx, )

l'~a(,i VI' ('arhon (approx, )

lig;hl

IX
;"l()

I"
I

x 1~"

:w
:Hi
till

i:w
1701

"
2"

J~I! tr~ I' oJ

1;0
(jol

It" . J~"

7" 7" I" x 7" III l~" 101 "

:/" x

7"

The important characteristic is the current and every precaution should be taken to keep it constant. After trying several special types of generator it has been found that the ordinary 110-volt compound wound generator and a resistance in series with the arc give by far the best current control. The latest arrangement is sho\\-n in figure on next page. Ammeter and voltmeter are necessary at the light in order that the attendant may operate it intelligently.

,,'

60-Inch

G. E. Projector.

PART II.

SEARCHLIGHT, SWITCHBOARD, CONTROLLER AND TRAINING MECHANISM


MODEL 1910

Projector : Type EC. Fonn N-2.

Oa5S

60-10. General Electric Co.

Extracted from General Electric Co. Instruction Book, No. 84/3, July, /9/0

30
METHODS OF CONTROL

Electric.-This projector is equipped with a synchronous type of control; that is; the movement of the beam in both the horizontal and the vertical planes follows the movements of the controller hand wheels, the rate of travel of the projector beam being proportionate to the speed of rotation of the controller handwheels. This is explained below. Hand.-A clutch is provided on the training and elevating handwheels, so that the control may be changed from electric , to hand control by pulling the vertical handwheel 21 (Fig. 35) and the horizontal clutch 50 (Fig. 36) outward toward the operator. It will be noted that a part of the clutch for the vertical mechanism is formed by the hub of the handwheel 21. The projector is then operatoo 1Jy means 'of the handwheels 20 and 21. Free.-By throwing the clutches 21 and 50 out of engagement, the electric control gear is disconnected and the beam may be moved f~eely, in both horizontal and vertical planes by grasping the barrel and one of the arms.
THE TRAINING SYSTEM
,

TheController.-The controller, Fig. 42, is provided with two

handwheels, parts 322 and 323, for the purpose of training the projector electrically; one in altitude, the other in azimuth. These handwheels rotate shafts on which are mounted simple current changing devices (contact cylinders, part 353), by means of which the direction of current through leads Nos. 1, 2 and 3 (Fig. 29) of the pilot motor is made to change according to the table (Fig. 29). On each of these current changing devices or contact cyHnder.s Jive ~ontact fingers rub; one plus finger, one minus finger arld'thre'e plIot motor fingers connected respectively to leads Nos. 1, 2 and 3 of the pilot motor. Geared to the horizontal training handwheel is a graduated azimuth circle, part 362, showing through an opening in the cover of the controller and illuminated by a small lamp. This azimuth circle revolves with the horizontal handwheel of the controller and consequently, as will be explained, with the projector beam, indicating the number of degrees through which the beam ..has.,moved. _'.., .. , The Pilot -AJolor.'.-.:.':'Referriilg to. 'Figs. 22, 29 and 39;~it will be seen that the pilot motor, part 63, consists of six stationary armature pole pieces, part 249, on each of which are mounted two coils, part 229, which will be referred to as the armature coils. The armature poles are arranged on the circumference "

a elrel m:idp of which i.' placed a movable field, part 24 , the eiting ('oil., p.ui ~2('. for the field bing connect d in erie. across tlw training ('irnlit. a :ho\\"n in Fig. H. Br l' ferring to I~'igs. ~!) and :W. it will h . en that the ann. turf' coil: on each 1'01(' pit'(.p art' connr('(p<l in . erie .. th coil: on diff.>rent polp piccps hping int '/'{'onlw<'1e<l .0 a: 0 le,l\ e hI' e lead. which run h~1('k to tlweontrolll1r.
of
p

}< I~

2l

V rt leal

Tralnlllg

M ch

nI

'1'11(' lipid of thi. pilot motor i: eon:truetr<! so. to tak up wplve pC! u id istant po:it ion: during onr ('omple( r ,"olu tion. ach position dr!Jending on the combination of ('UIT nt' through Icad.. 0. I, 2 and ;~ (/. ig. 29). \hich run ha('k to th ('ontroll r. I~'or in. lan('e, if eurrent nt r. th motor h rough I<.>ad '0. 1. I('avin r through I 'ad . '0 .. ~ and;) th' lipid \ ill tak tip a c rtain po. ilion. If. h~ Ilwan. of th eontac c,"lind r. part :t1;) (Fig. I~).

32

in the controller, the current is caused to enter the pilot motor from the positive side of the circuit through leads Nos. 1 and 2, passing out through lead No.3 to the negative side of the circuit, the movable field will advance one-twelfth of a revolution. It will thus be seen that different current combinations through, the pilot motor will cause the field of the pilot motor to rotate ... The successive current combinations, polarity of armature poles_ and positions of revolving fields are shown in the table, Fig. 29. Fig. 29 also shows the method of testing each individual" armature spool, the series connection of two spools on each annature pole for the proper polarity of armature pole and the, method of interconnecting the six pairs of armature spools. . Operation.-Referring to Figs. 22,23, 24 and 39, the opera", tion of the elevating mechanism will be described. Rotating the elevating handwheel of the controller through two-thirdS of a revolution causes the revolving field, part 248 (Fig. 39)'1 of the pilot motor, part 63, to advance one-third of a revolution't The rotation of this pilot motor field causes the cam cylinder'4 part 240 (Fig. 39), to rotate through 20 degrees by means of th~ spur gears, parts 225, 221, 222 and 224, and the bevel box gearing, part 226 (Fig. 23), and the bevel gears shown mounted im,id~ the cam. cylinder, part 240 (Fig. 39). The movement of thi cam cylinder, part 240, operates contact fingers, part 258, (Fig. 39), connecting the elevating motor, part 65 (Fig. 22), to thl circuit for the proper direction of rotation. The projector the~ immediately begins to rotate by means of the worm, part 308~ the worm gear, part 67, and the spur gears, parts 68, 69 and 48, the gear, part 48, engaging with the elevating rack, part 22 (Fig, 35). The projector, through the bevel gears, parts 70, 219 an~ 220, the latter engaging with .the gears inside the cam cylinder: rotates the cam cylinder, part. 240, in a direction opposite thE direction of rotation caused by the pilot motor; the movement OJ the cam cylinder being the resultant of the movements induce by the rotation of the pilot motor field ~nd the rotation of th projector. . . ~ Summary.-These movements have been described sepa rately. As a matter of fact they occur simultaneously. Thl instant the pilot motor field moves, the elevating motor is cori nected to the circuit and rotates the projector, which in turl tends to rotate the cam cylinder back to the off position. j 'Vhen the controller hand wheel is advanced through sever~ revolutions and stopped, the pilot motor field revolves, advancin the earn cylinder, which, in turn, connects the elevating mo~o

11I

o c

S
v

to the circuit through the contact fingers, the elevating motor


advancing the projector. In advancing, the projector the cam cylinder back to its original off position, opening the circuit to the elevating motor and causing the projector to st.op. A slow movement of the controller handwheel advances the caIll cylinder an amount sufficient to connect the armature of the elevating motor through a resistance, thereby operating the elevating motor at a slow speed. A fast movement of the con" troller handwheel advances the cam cylinder still further, circuiting this resistance and causing the elevating motor to revolve at full speed. It will thus be seen that a slow movement of the controller handwheel results in a slow movement of the beam and a fast movement of the controller hand wheel will produce a correspondingly fast movement of the projector beam. It is possible, by revolving the training handwheel of the controller at a very rapid rate, to rotate the pilot motor field, and thus advance the cam cylinder at a rate which cannot be counter~ balanced by the full speed of the training motor. The cam cylinder will then advance until it reaches a stop, which prevents further rotation. By continuing to revolve the handwheel, after the cam cylinder has reached the stop pin, the controller and the projector beam will be thrown out of orientation; that is, while the azimuth circle in the controller may have been rotated through, say 180 degrees, the beam, under this condition, may have moved through an arc a few degrees less in magnitude .
. THE LAMP

Rating.-The lamp is rated Type H, Form D-3, Class 60 in. The normal current is 175 amperes, and. the voltage at the arc is 65 volts; the difference between 'the arc voltage and the line voltage being taken up by the'rheostat which is in series with the arc. Type.-The lamp is of the Double Feed Type, the carbons being fed together or apart, according to the conditions of the arc voltage. This lamp differs from previous lamps, in that the striking magnet is omitted; this being replaced by the feed apart armature of the feeding magnet which is controlled by the pilot magnet. Carb011ing.-In carboning the lamp, lock the feed apart armature, part 201, (Fig. 25) of the feeding magnet by means of the lock, part 173, and separate the carbons by means of the handle attached to the main feed screw or by inserting the hand

.~

UJO

197 /'JR

/ II.
'/ 'I')
, }I

~ 'tJ fl,'
(I

IJ

(,

,,'11

f<

l~.

2<'

Lo

ldt'

of Lamp

36.

feed wrench through the opening in the rear of the lamp casing frame end, part 17 (Fig. 36). Insert the carbons in the clamps, making sure that the larger or positive carbon points toward the mirror. The carbon clamp screws, part 122 (Fig. 37), should be set up tightly to insure good contact between the carbon and carbon clamps. The positive carbon may then be lined up by means of the adjusting handles, parts 44 and 45 (Fig. 36), extending through the side of the barrel. These handles are marked for the movements of the carbon in both horizontal and vertical planes. It is not , necessary to release the lock, part 173, as this is done automatically when the lamp circuit is closed. Operation.-Separate the carbons slightly and close the circuit breaker. As no current is flowing there is no drop in vol tage in the rheostat and full line voltage is thrown. across the terminals of the pilot magnet, part 159 (Fig. 38). The feed together armature, part 171, and the feed apart armature, part 172, of the pilot magnet are attracted, locking the feed apart armature; t' part 201, and unlocking the feed together armature, part 200, ; of the feeding magnet, part 205, (Fig. 25). , The feed together armature of the feeding magnet now brings the carbons together, and as soon as current begins to ;' flow through the carbons the voltage across the carbons decreases, due to the drop in voltage in the rheostat. The excitation of the shunt winding of the pilot magnet, the terminals of which are connected across the arc, is reduced to a minimum and the heavy current flowing through the series winding of the pilot magnet,' acting in opposition to the shunt winding, further reduces the magnetic fiux through the pilot I magnet. Both armatures of the pilot magnet releas.,e, locking /' the feed together armature, part 200, and unlocking the feed . apart armature, part 201, of the feeding magnet. i The carbons are then fed apart until the voltage across the ~ arc has reached its normal value of 65 volts; when the flux through ~ the pilot magnet, part 159, is sufficient to attract its feed apart \ armature, part 172, locking the feed apart armature, part 201, of the feeding magnet. It will thus be seen that, under the conditions of normal arc voltage, the flux through the pilot magnet is sufficient to attract its feed apart armature against the tension of its spring, part 16:3,'while it is insufficient to attract the feed together armature against the tension of its spring, part 164. Under these conditions, both armatures of the feeding magnet, are locked, and the lamp cea.o;;es to feed. \,

I.

37
the carbons burn away and the voltage of the arc increases, the flux through the pilot magnet increases sufficiently to attrac't its feed together armature, part 171, releasing the feed together armature, part 200, of the feeding magnet and feeding the carbons together until, at normal voltage, the flux through the pilot magnet decreases and the tension of the spring, part 164, forces the feed together armature, part 171, of the pilot magnet outward, locking the feed together armature, part 200, of the feeding magnet. Summary.-It will be noted that, when voltage in excess of the normal voltage of the arc is present across the carbons, the carbor.s are fed together until normal voltage has been reached. \Vhen the voltage across the arc is less than normal, both armatures of the pilot magnet are released, locking the feed together armature and unlocking the feed apart armature of the feeding magnet and restoring normal voltage at the arc. Adjustment -
Each lamp is carefully tested and adjusted before leaving the factory, and no changes should be made in the adjustment unless the lamp fails to maintain normal voltage acros the arc when 175 amperes are flowing through the carbons. ]n this connect on it should be noted that with a given arc current the voltag which the lamp win automatically maintain across the arc is less upon first starting than it i~ after the temperature of the pilot magnet has increased. This is due to the fact that the resistance of the pilot m~gnet upon first starting the lamp is less than it is after current has passed for some time through the magnet and consequently when starting a lower voltage is required to produce through the pilot magnet a flux su fficient to attract its armatures. ]n adjusting the lamp, lock the feed apart armature, part 201, of the feeding magnet 'and adjust the tension on the spring, part 163, until the pilot magnet armature, part 172, is attracted at 65 volts if the lamp is cold and at 67 volts if the lamp is warm. The feed together armature, part 200, should then be locked and the tension on the: spring, part 164, should be adjusted so that the pilot magnet armature, part 171, will be attracted when ~he arc voltage has reached 64 volts if the lamp is ~old and at 67 volts if the lamp is warm. In adjusting" the springs, parts 163 and 164, the set screw, P~rt 170 (Fig. 38), should be turned in a counter clockwise dIrec;tion, the screw, part 167, turned clockwise to increa.."'ethe tenSIon on the spring and counter clockwis~ to decrea..c;ethe the tension on the. spring. ,\Vhen the proper adjustment has

As

88 been secured, the set screw, part 170, should be turned in a clockwise direction, clamping the screw, part 167.

*
OCCULTING

In order that the crater of the positive carbon may be kept heated and eady for immediate use, an extra or occulting resis.. tance is contained in the rheostat connected between the termi.. nals marked "Arc " and "Switch" and is controlled by a single f. pole single throw switch on the center of the witchboard marked ~ "Open to Occult Light." This switch is normally closed when ~ the lamp is in operation. This extra or occulting"resistance is designed to cut down the current through the carbons, when in intimate contact, to 75 amperes, although the current will vary according to the contact area and the pressure between the carbons. To occult the searchlight the followingprocedure is necessary: 1st. Trip the circuit breaker. 2nd. Open the occulting switch. 3rd. Closethe circuit breaker. 4tho Feed the carbons together by hand. 5th. Raise the knob, part 173, to lock the feed apar armature of feeding magnet. In occulting the light it is a"ways necessary to first trip the ; 1 drcuit b-eaker as, if this is not done, a severe spark and burningi: or the switch clips will be caused by openingocculting switch when\; the circuit breaker is closed. .' To throw the-searchlight.back to normal conditions. 1st. Separate carbons slightly by hand feed. 2nd. Throw down knob, part 173, to unlock feedin magnet. 3rd. Closeocculting. witch. In throwing the searchlight back to normal operating conditions, always separate the carbons by hand before closing the '. occulting switch, as the tips may :ometimes fuse together. ,

*
RHEOSTAT

*t

The rheostat is composed of three sections of resistance. 1st. The pe manent section. 2nd. The variable section. 3rd. The extra or occulting section.

447

443
44444')

446
442

440

44/

4>'9

Fig. Ui.

Rh

tat

Both the permanent and variable sections are composed o' " iron grids of sufficient capacity, when connected two in paralle},l to carry the full rated current of the projector, or 175 amperei'. The permanent section has five taps which are brought out 41 to the five terminals marked "Line." Several gcids of a section ,~ of the permanent resistance are short circuited by means of ::L ' jumper. In case a grid in the active section breaks, it can be replaced by one of these short circuited grids. . The variable resistance has equally spaced taps connected to the various clips' with which the movable blade engages. The current may be reduced by moving the handle of the r.heostat to the left or increased by moving the handle to the right. The extra or occulting resistance is composed of iron gridS of sufficient capacity, when connected two in parallel, to carry a current of 75 amperes when the searchlight 's occulted.

I
I..

SWITCHBOARD

A circuit b~eaker controls the entir.e current for the b~ar except that earned by the double pole smgle throw fused sWltch,~ at the upper left hand corner of the switchboard, which is wired outside the circuit breaker, or across the line between the sourcl of supply and the circuit breaker, and supplies the station lightsl~ At the upper right hand comer of the switchboard a doubl pole single throw .used switch controls the current passinl through the feeding magnets of the lamp, the field and armatur~. currents for the elevating and training motors and current for the pilot motors, which is delivered through the' contact cYli.nder/ in the controller. .' The occulting switch in the center of the switchboard short circuits the extra or occulting resistance contained in the rheostat' this switch being marked "Open to occult light.'" The ammeter indicates the amount of current passing through the lamp, and the voltmeter, by means of the small switch located t beneath it, will indicate the voltage of the supply circuit wherEl it enters the switchboard, or the voltage across the carbons 0 the lamp, the positions of this switch for indicating the line anJ arc voltage being marked on name plate above the switch Directly below the ammeter is a receptacle into which the at each1'" ing plug of the portable lamp may be inserted. By openin one side of the circuit to the portable lamp near the lamp and removing the insulaiton On both sides of the opening in the wireL~ these free ends may be used as a testing circuit to discover ground'

I
.

or open circuits at the projector or rheostat. After being used for this purpose the wires should be carefully twisted together and covered thoroughly with several la~rers of tape.

21,
-

l/adalJ~

-JVmper
-PermantPnt

Fig. 27.

Switchboard

and Rheostat

Wiring.

The t<.'rminals on the switchboard are clearly marked with name plates and the connections are indicatHi in Fig. 28.

48

~'ll~~ .f
~ ~

~d~I"

;!~~

I I I + "'~:t::t: I/):t:~:t: :t:,:t: 't .. II) II) :t: ~ :I:. II) .. ~ ~~ ~:t:'1t .... ~ :I:. ~ II) .. II) :I:. ~ ~l!:_lI) ~ 11')" :t: :I:. :I:. .. II) I/) ::t ~ 't ~~ r.a .. :t::t::t:..,II) .. ~~:I:. ... 1I') "~ .. ~:t: ~:t:C:II)II)II):t:
'Cl .... 11\

l<) I I I + ~. + I + + + I I .. + .. I I I

I I

I , + + + + + ... I I

,,':tfi-Z

..,- .... 'Q

OI_~d

44

45

Fig. 31

Top View of Connections.

, t
~
-

..

ui
Q)

/Xl
-l

-. 'a -~.cl + ... I


C\l
Q)

S rn

~
C\l

b()

1 r

~ ~
Q)

:3

"=' Q

-u

_ ....'a
-,
-II a;s

a;s

b() Q

f-t rn

'"

1
I
II

.E
Q

:3 ...
Q)

Q Q 0 t)

--i

,
1

oil i:;;

47

48
TOOLS AND SPARE PARTS

\Vith each projector a box marked "Tool Box A 60 in. S.L."

is furnished. A di,trict box i, also furnished. containing the spare parts Cor several projectors. This box i, marked "Tool
Box B 60 in. S. L." The" A " box contains the following articles:
Part No. Fig.

No. 1 Set (2) Pilot Magnet Armature Springs 163-164 38 2 Feeding Magnet Armature Springs; . . . 196 38 1 Set Positive Carbon Clamps and Screws 122-3-4-5 37 Set Negative Carbon Clamps and Screws ~ '. . . . . , 122-129-130 37 2 Pa\\'ls 105 37 5 10/32 Hexagonal Brass Nuts . 425 5 12/24 Hexagonal Brass Nuts .. 426 4 Pawl Springs ' ... 106 37 2 Feeding Magnet Contact Screws . 174 38 2 Feeding Magnet Contact Springs . 206 38 6 Glass Beads .................... 115 1 Set (2) Sight Glasses . 37 . 43 36 6 Pilot Motor Contact Fingers, complete with Springs . :l Pilot Motor Armature Coils . 255-256-258 39 229 ,39 1 Pilot Motor Field Coil ..... 228 39 1 Piece (lOin.) Pin \Vire for \Vorm Gear 427 8 Training Motor Brushes .... 315 41 1 Plug for Lamp Feed and Training Circuit 5[, 35 1 5 c.p. Instrument Lamp . 363 42 1 Lamp Receptacle . 364 42 1 Ruby Glass in Frame . 428 1 Carbon Tongs , ; .. , 429 1 Spanner \Vrench for Cable Coupling ., 4:W 1 Carbon Clamp \Vrench " 431 1 Chamois Skin ' 432 1 Large Dust Brush ................. 433 1 Small Dust Brush 434 2 \Vrenches for 10/32 and 12/24 Nuts .... 435 .. " 1. Set (42 pieces) Mica Insulation for
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 00 " "

Lamp

37-38

49
Part No. Fig. No.

1 Set (two 15 ohm and one 35 ohm) Resistance Units for Training Motors. . 76 22 18 250 volt 10 amp. Fuses, Cat. No. 34952 1 Portable Lamp Guard, Cat. No. 112158 with attaching plug. Cat. No. 34153 and 25 ft. No. 16 Twisted Lamp Cord 1 Socket Wrench for Hand Feed.. ... .. 436 The "B " box contains the following articles: 1 Set complete Pilot and Feeding Magnetsfor Lamp . . . 38 1 Set Feed Screws, Nuts, Gears and Ratchet for Lamp 37 1 Training Motor Armature "41 1 Set (2) Training Motor Field Coils .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 2 Sets (4) Motor Brush-Holders, complete with Springs and Insulation 41 1 Set Lamp Cables and Terminals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 1 Set Contact Plungers with Springs and Insulation (6 Main Contacts with 3 Bases and 8 Training Circuit Contacts with 2 Bases 44 1 Set Interior Fittings for Couplings for Controller Cable. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . .. . ... . .. . . . . 43 1 Set (2) Contact Cylinders for Controller. . . . . . . . . . .. 42 2 Sight Glassesfor Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 i Set (10) Contacts with Insulations for Controller. . . . 42 consisting of 8 Plunger Boxes with Plungers and Springs 2 Contact Fingers 38 Pieces Mica Insulation When' spare parts are removed from these boxes for use on the projector, lamp or switchboard, a requisition should be made immediately for new parts to replace them.
NOMENCLATURE OF PARTS

. In making requisition for parts, always give part number . ' name of part, figure number and Instrucbon Book number . . In making requisition for parts shown in Figs. 22, 23, 24, 35, 36, 39, 40, 41, 43, and 44 give complete name plate stamping of projector. In making requisition for parts shown in Figs. 25, 37 and 38 give complete name plate stamping of lamp. In making requisition for parts shown in Fig. 42 give complete name plate stamping of controller.

50

name plate stamping of the rheostat.

In making requisition for parts shown in Fig. 26 state that the parts are required for 60 in. searchlight rheostat and give

. In making requisition for switchboard parts state that the parts are required for switchboard for 60 in. searchlight and give name plate stamping of switchboard.
Part. No.

THE PROJECTOR
Name of Part.

No. Base........................................ Turntable , .. 35 Base Sheeting .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. : . .. .. .. .. .. .. 35 Ann Elevating Side .. , '. . , 35 Bolt for Ann and Turntable , .. 35 I) Ann Training Side .. ' " '. " .. " " " " " 35 6 Trunnion Block Elevating Side .. " " .. " .. " " " 36 6a Bolt for Trunnion Block and Ann . :35 7 Trunnion Block Training Side , 35. 8 Mirror Ring and Sheeting, complete . 36 9 Barrel Sheet Metal , . 36 10 Front Door Ring , 36 . 11 Box for Training Mechanism , 35 12 Box for Elevating Mechanism . 35 13 Cover for Elevating Mechanism Box , , .. , 35 14 Cover for Training Mechanism Box ' . 35 15, Front Ring .. 35 16 Rear Ring .. 35 17 Lamp Casing Frame End (rear) . 35 18 Lamp Casing Frame End (front) , 36 19 Door for Lamp Casing Frame End .. , , . 35 20 Training Handwheel ,; . 35 21 Elevating Handwheel " '. " " " " " .. " 36 22 Elevating Rack ' ' . 35 23 Rear Stop for Elevating Rack .. 35 24 Front Stop for Elevating Rack .. 35 25 Strut for Front Door .

1 2 3 4 4a

Fig.

35

26 27 .28 29 30 31 32

Front Door Strips : : : : : : : : : : : : : : .' : : : : : : Top Ventilator .. Bearing Block for Front Door Strut , . Bearing Pin for Front Door Strut " , Notch Pin for Front Door Strut " , Bolt for Front Door Strut Bearing Block . Front Door Handle " " ' " ,

36 35

35 36 36 .
35 35

35

51
Part
No. Name of Part. Fig. No.

:33 Cap Screw for Front Door Handle " :),1 Latch for Front Door :35 Bolt for Pront Door Latch :~6 Bearing Block for Front Door. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. :37 Trunnion Block for Front Door..

:35 35 35

:is
:3S

--15

39
9 6 64 8 40 16

10

26 37 36
'3'1

28
33

42
4

32 . 35 34
/9

23 22
/3

18 /4
II

2
4A

24
Z /2

424
.3

407 57 55

54
53

Fig. 35.

Projector.

:~8 Bearing Pin for Front Door. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. :~9 Side Rod. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 40 Sid e Rod " ill Nut for Side Rod. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. <12 '.' Handle for Mirror. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..

36 :36 36 :3(1 36

52
Part
No. Name of Part.

Fig.

43 Side Sight Glasses " " No. 36 44 Carbon Adjusting Handle, complete, (Horizontal) . . 36 45 Carbon Adjusting Handle, complete, (Vertical) .... ' 36 46 Tie Rod for Front and Rear Rings " " " .. 36 47 Locking Strut for Barrel.. .. .. . .. .. .. .. .. .. 36 48 Gear for Elevating Rack .. " " 36 49 Door for Lamp Trough " 36 50 Clutch for Training Handwheel 36 51 Main Lamp Cable (+).. . . .. .. .. .. . .. .. .. .. 36 52 lIlain Lamp Cable (-)......................... 36 53 Controller Cable Plug, complete, for Projector Base 35 54 Cap for Controller Cable Plug Projector Base .. '" 35 55 Plug for Lamp Feed and Training Circuit. . . . . . . . . 35 56 Receptacle for Lamp Feed and Training Circuit. . . . 35 57 Cap for Lamp Feed and Training Circuit Receptacle 35 58 Thumb Screw for Training and Elevating Mechanism Boxes " 36 59 Bracket for Elevating Rack " .. . . .. .. 36 60 Barrel Cable.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 36 61 BalTel Cable .... , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 62 StUffing Tube for BalTel Cables .. " " " " " " " .. 36
ELEVATING MECHANISM

6:1 Pilot Motor, complete.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . . . . .. . . . . 22 64 Friction Clutch for Elevating Mechanism .... " '" 22 65 Elevating lIlotor, complete.. .. .. .. .. .. .. . . . . 22 66 Training Motor , '.. 22 67 Wonn Gear for Elevating Mechanism .. '" '" .. " 22 68 Spur Gear for Elevating Mechanism. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 69 Spur Gear for Elevating Mechanism '" . . . . . . . . . . 22 70 Bevel Gear for Elevating Mechanism .. . . . . . . . . . 22 71 Spring for Elevating MeChanism Clutch. . . . . . . . .. 22 72 Nut for Elevatirlg Shaft.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 22 7:1 Bearing for Gear Shaft " " " .. " .. 22 74 Bearing Cap for Elevating Shaft .. " '" " " " .. " 22 75 Bearing Cap for Elevating Shaft.. . .. .. .. 22 76 Resistance Tube for Elevating Motor . ~ " 22 77 HOllow Shaft for Elevating Mechanism .. '" '. .. .. 22 78 Collar for Elevating Mechanism Shaft :. 22 79 Solid Shaft for Elevating Mechanism .. : . . . . . . . . . . 22

LAMP
Part No. Name of Part.

RB

80 Upper Lamp Frame 8] Lower Lamp Frame 82 Lamp Cover and Dust Guard
Bw:;hing for Carbon Clamp Lead. .

Fig. No.

. . . .

37 37 :37 ~i7

-/6
d

.9 /5 39 36 3"8 4.5 28

-/2

4/

7 44 40

;'3 4.1

30
.2"'6

26
/0

/7 46
b/

49 22
,j

/4 50 -

23
/..1 t>/

424 60 20 /2
41
.j"!

.5/
48

.J8
//

.5')

Fig. 36.

Projector.

84 85 86 H7

Nut for Carbon Clamp Lead Bushing ere\\" Screw for Carbon Clamp Lead Bushing Positive Feed Screw . Nut for Positive Feed Scre\\'.

:37 :37

:n

~37

;).1 Part o
J
( (

Name

of Part.

Fig.
No.

Collar for I10sit in' 1"p('<1. 'erew Pin for Po ..it in' !,,('pd . 'c,/,P\\ Collar .. Pin for Hand 1"rrd \\'rpn<.:h ..... Crar for Po ..iti\"(, Fred Serew " Pin for Po ..it in' Frrd . 'c'/'ew Cear . . .('gatin' h'('d . 'erpw . 'llt for. '('gal in. h,pd .'crew . ('ollar fur. '('gati\ (. h'ed . '<.:rp\\ (rear) " '" Pin for. '(lgati\'r !"l'pd .'('rpw Collar (rear) (~('ar for. '('gali\(' Fl'('d . 'nrw .... ('ollar for, ' P.~at i\t. !"l'pd . 'c,/,('\\, (front) I{;tl('h(.! fur. '(.gati\'{. h'p</ Serew .. Handl(, for. '('ga i\'l' 1"('('</. 'new .. \'/'l'\\ fo I' I ,am p ('0 ('I'
"
" "

:37

IO()

"

I0 I IO~ 10: : !UI 10.-) I Of i


]()"j'

Cap. '('1"(' \ for l' PP('r ;lnd I,owl'r Brakt' for. 'p,lrati\(, 1"('e</ .'new .\dju.
Pawl

I''rames ,.
.
.

tint! . 'c'/'P\\ and,


u

'lIl for Brake

10,

I'a \I.'prin I n.lIlal ion for Po ..iti\'(, ('arbon

Clamp

..

10!) I I (l III II~ I\:: III

. '('r('w for (';lrhon ('/amp.- and Supports ..... , ..... In, 1I'" I ion for 1'0,' ili\"(, a nel .' fga ti ,. e Carho n Sli p_ I'o port.. ..il i\(. (';trhon I'o.ili\(. Carbon . 'upport .'uPPO/'l
. . '. , .

:n
:n

11.-) I1fi 117


II

T('rminal for Carbon Clamp L lad (lippeI') .. T('rminal for Carbon Clamp Lead (lower) Po 'iti\ (. ('arbon Clamp Lead , . (~Ia. B('ad .. for ('arbon ('/amp Leads . !{oll"r for I'o,'il I\(. and .. "gatl,." Carhon CalTlag-c, .. ' '," d for 1'0,' ill \(' (' arho n ('alTlag-e Ro IIcr' .'.,. , .. , . 'lit for. 'I 1I</of Po. it i (' and. 'egative Carhon Carnag(' . '.,. " " " " " ..

11 !l
I~()
I~ I
]~~

I~:: I~ I I~:; I~,;

' 'r lid for. '" 'all\(, ('arhon ('arTlage Roller'. , , , .. , . , 1'0. it i\(, Carhon Carrlag" .. , .. , .. , . , , , , ... , .'IT( 'II for' 1'0, iI I '" ('a rho n .'u P POlt and CarTiage, , , ('arhon ('lamp S<'I'CII , , , , '. "'" .. ", Po. it i\(. Carbon Clamp lliPp I' half) , ... " . !'lr,'i' i\ (' ('arhon C!amp Clower half) , . , , , , .. , , , , .. .'llId for IAl\\ "I' Half I'o,'il ire Carhon Clamp .. , .. , "'I" 'II fo I' ('a rh'lll ('I am panel L ad .. , ,.,,

55
Part
No. Name of Part. Fig. No.

127

Plate

for Positive

Carbon

Support

128 Plate for Carbon Supports 129 Negative Carbon Clamp (upper half) 180 Negative Carbon Clamp (lower half)
131

. . . . . .

:17

]32
]33

Negative Negative Negative

Carbon Clamp Lead . Carbon Support ., Carhon Support .. . . .. .

:17 :37 :37 :17

:n

Fig. 37.

Parts

of Lamp.

1:34 Screw for Negative Carbon, upport Negative Carbon Carriage .. 1:1() Frame for Positive Carbon lamp... 1:37 Bearing for Positive Carbon Clamp. J:18 Spiral for Positive Carbon Clamp. . 1:39 Knuekle Joint, complete for Carbon 140 Insulation for Carbon Clamp, piral

1:35

and Carriage.. . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Clamp Spiral..

:n :n
:17

:17

:n :n
:37

50

..... o

57
Part No. Name of Part. rig. No.

141 142 143 144 145 146 . 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179

Sleeve for Carbon Clamp Spiral.. . . .. .. . . . . .. .. .. Worm for Positive Carbon Clamp.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. Shaft for Carbon Clamp Worm. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Knuckle Joint complete for Carbon Clamp 'Vorm.. Insulation for Carbon Clamp Worm.. .. .. .. .. .. .. Sleeve for Carbon Clamp Worm ....... '. .. .. .. Plate for Negative Carbon Clamp. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . Retaining Screw for Feed Screw Brake.. . . . .. . . .. Lamp Frame Leg .......................... :. Locking Screw, complete. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stop Sleeve for Positive Feed Screw. . . . . . . . . . . . .. Stop Sleeve for Positive Feed screw ' Mica Insulation for Positive Connection Strap Mica Insulation for Positive Connection Strap. , . .. Positive Connection Strap. : . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Positive Connection Stud .. : .. ; . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Negative Connection Stud and Blade.. . . . . . . . . . . Screw for Positive and Negative Connection Studs. Pilot Magnet complete with Flanges and Pole Faces Glass Beads for Magnet Leads. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Terminal for Magnet Leads Base Plate for Pilot Magnet. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Pilot Magnet Armature Spring (Feed Apart Side) .. Pilot Magnet Armature Spring (Feed Together Side) Foot for Pilot Magnet Armature Spring (Feed Apart Side) Foot for Pilot Magnet A mature Spring (Feed Together Side) .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. Adjusting Screw for Pilot Magnet Armature Spring Plate for Pilot Magnet Spring Foot. . . . . . . . . . . . .. Screw for Plate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Clamping Screw for Pilot Magnet Armature Spring Pilot Magnet Armature (Feed Together Side) : . . . .. Pilot Magnet Armature (Feed Apart Side) . . . . . . . . Lock complete for Feeding Magnet Armature. . . . . . Feeding Magnet Contact Screw. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nut for Feeding Magnet Contact Screw '. Bracket complete for Feeding :Magnet Contact Screw Insulation for Contact Screw Bracket. . . . . . . . . . . . Screws for Positive Connection Strap and Stud .... Positive Connection Stud and Blade. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

37 37 37 37 37 37 37 37 37 37 37 37 38 38 38 38 3S 38 38 38 38 38 38 38 38 38 38 38 38 38 38 38 38 38 38 38 38 38 38

58
Part No. Name of Part. Fig.
No.

180 181, 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 201 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213

Connection Blade for Feeding Magnet Circuit. . . . . . Screw for Terminal Block and Frame. . . . . . . . . . . . Terminal Block ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Connection Strap for Pilot Magnet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Insulation Block for Feeding Magnet Connection Strap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Connection Strap for Feeding Magnet. . . . . . . . . . . . Turn Buckle for Pilot :Magnet Link. . . . . . . . . . . . .. Link for Pilot Magnet Armature. . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . Series Coil for Pilot Magnet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shunt Coil for Pilot Magnet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Insulation Flange for Pilot Magnet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Strap for Pilot Magnet Armature Spring. . . . . . . . .. Latch for Feeding Magnet (Feed Apart Side) : . . . .. Latch for Feeding Magnet (Feed Together Side) . .. Link for Feeding Magnet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nut for Feeding Magnet Latch Link. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Feeding Magnet Armature Spring. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adjusting Stud for Feeding Magnet Armature Spring .. Arm for Feeding Magnet Armature " " Arm for Feeding Magnet Armature. . . . . . . . . . . . .. Feeding Magnet Armature (Feed Together Side) .. Feeding Magnet Armature (Feed Apart Side) .... " Pivot Pin for Feeding Magnet Armature. . . . . . . . .. Latch Block for Feeding Magnet Armature (Feed Together side) Latch Block for Feeding Magnet Armature (Feed Apart Side) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... Feeding Magnet Coil. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Feeding Magnet Contact Spring. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stop for Feeding Magnet Armature. . . . . . . . . . . . .. Screw for Feeding l.Iagnet and Lamp Frame . . . . . .. Connection for Feeding l.Iagnet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Screw for Pilot Magnet and Lamp Frame. . . . . . . . . Terminal Block for Lamp (Same as 182, Fig. 38) .. Main Lamp Blade (Same as 157 and 179, Fig. 38) . . Feeding Magnet Connection Blade (Same as 180, Fig. 38) " . . . . . . . . . . .. . .
PILOT MOTOR '\",

38 38 38 38

38 38 38 38 38 38 38 38 38 38 38 38 38 38 38 38 38 38 38 38 25 38 38 38 38 38 38 25 25 25 39

214

Supporting Frame for Contact Fingers,.

. . . .. . . ..

59
Part No. Name of Part. Fig. No.

215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226' 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 23'9 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256

Bearing Bracket for Pilot Motor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Screws and Insulations for Contact Plate. . . . . . . . . 39 Screw for Supporting Frame. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Screw for Supporting Frame. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Bevel Gear for Pilot Motor (Large) 39 Bevel Gear for Pilot Motor (Small 39 Spur Gear for Pilot Motor , 39 Spur Gear for Pilot Motor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 ,'Bearing Screw for Pilot Motor Spur Gears 39 Spur Gear for Pilot Motor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Spur Gear for Pilot Motor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Bevel Gear for Pilot Motor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Bushing for Pilot Motor Shaft. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 Pilot Motor Field Spool 39 Pilot Motor Armature Spool. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 39 Connection Lead (Long) ','. . . . .. 39 . Connection Lead (Short) ,............ 39 ' End Plate for Pilot Motor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 39 End Plate for Pilot Motor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 39 Screw for Supporting Frame and Top Plate , 39 Screw for Connection Board and End Plates ., . . .. 39 Guide Block for Contact Fingers , .. , 39 ~.
39 Guide Block for Contact Fingers Insulation for Pilot Motor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 39 Insulation for Pilot Motor , . . . . 39 Pilot Motor Cam Cylinder Complete , 39 'Connection Board .. , , ., 39 Terminal Block for Connection Board. . . . . . . . . . .. 39 Nuts for Terminal Block , , .. , , 39 Connection Straps , .. , , . . 39 Contact Plate , .. , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 39 Contact Plate ,. , ,. 39 Insulation Block for Contact Fingers .. , . " . . . . . . . 39 Field for Pilot Motor .. , , , , , . . . . . . . . . 39 Pole Piece for Armature Spools: .. , , ., .. .. 39 Core for Armature Spools. 39 Roundhead Screw for End Plate and Armature Core 39 Flathead Screw for End Plate and Armature Core 39 Contact Finger Complete , , 39 Nutfor Contact Finger Studs. , , , . . . . 39 Spring for Contact Finger, , .. , ,. , , . . 39 Connection Leaf for Contact Finger , ., , 39
'0' , ,

GO

61
Part No. Name of Part.
Fig.

No.
0

257 258 259

260 261

Stud for Contact Finger Spring and Tip for Contact Finger Frame and Roller for Contact Finger Cotter Pin for Contact Finger Stud .. Screw for Contact Finger
0

00

39 39 39 39 39 40 40 40 .40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40

FOCUSING

CARRIAGE
0 0 0 0 ~ 0

262 Focusing Carriage ..... 263 Rack for Focusing Carriage .


264 265
0 0 0 0 0

.,

"0

266
267

268 269
~70

271 272
273

274 275
276 277

278 279 280 281 282 283 284


285

286 287 288 289


290

Focusing Rod .... Focusing Crank . Handle for Focusing Crank Rail for Focusing Carriage Rail for Focusing Carriage (not illustrated) . Cap Screw for FocusiI}g Carriage Rail. Stop for Focusing Carriage Worm Gear for Focusing Carriage Shaft. . . . . . . . .. Screw for Bearing of Focusing Carriage Shaft. . . . .. Bearing for Focusing Carriage Shaft Focusing Carriage Shaft Pinion for Focusing Carriage Shaft o. . . . . . . . . .. Worm for Focusing Rod Insulation Block for Contact Clips Screw for Contact Clip Insulation Block ..... Small Contact Clip with Flexible Connection, complete Large Contact Clip with Flexible Connection complete ... Washer for Large Contact Stud. Washer for Small Contact Stud , Insulation Block for Connection Studs. . Screw for Contact Stud Insulation Block .. Contact Stud (Large) Nut for Large Contact Stud Contact Stud (Small) ..... Nut for Small Contact Stud .. o. Locking Nut for Lamp .. Stop Pin for Focusing Carriage
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

O'

00

'0

'.

o.

O'

o.

...

..

..

..

..

..

....

TRAINING AND ELEVATING MOTORS

291
292

Bearing Head, Commutator End Bearing Head, Worm End

000

O'

41 41

. ..'

.
",

.. \

65
Part
No' Narne of Part.

Fig. No.

328 Bracket for Lamp 329 Screw for Top Plate and Frame
330

331 332 333 334 335 336


337 338 339

340

341
342 343

344
345 346

347
348
349 350
351

:352 353 354


355

356
357

358 359 360

361
262

Screw for Frame and Support Screw for Lamp Bracket and Frame Dial Cover (1 in. Diam. lJr; in. thick Glass) Retainer for Dial Cover Rubber Gasket, Dial Cover Contact Cylinder, complete .................... Shaft for Training Handwheel '.' . Shaft for Elevating Handwheel . Pointer . Support for Medium and Small Gear '," , Collar for Elevating and Training Handwheel Shafts Screw for Large Gear, and Indicating Dial . Pin for Contact Cylinder and Elevating and Training Handwheel Shaft Taper Pin for Elevating and Training Wheel Collars, and Shafts (No. 0, ~ in. long) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Nut for Large Gear and Pointer Support. . . . . . . . . . Plunger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Large Gear with Bushing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Medium Gear , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Small Gear Screw for Plunger Receptacle and Contact Finger Support, long . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Screw for Medium and Small Gear Support.. .. .. .. Nut for Plunger. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Plunger Receptacle, with Plunger, Spring and Nuts, Spring for Plunger. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Mica Insulation for Plunger Receptacle, Medium. . . Mica Insulation for Plunger Receptacle, Large. . . . . Mica Insulation for Plunger Receptacle, Small. . . . . Plunger Receptacle with Plunger, Spring and Nut, left hand. . . .. . '.............. Plunger Receptacle, with Plunger, Spring and Nuts, right hand. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Contact Finger, with Support and Contact Tip, right hand .0..................................... Contact Finger, with Support and Contact Tip, left hand Mica Insulation for Contact Finger Support. . . . . . . Indicating Dial. . , . , . .. . . .. .. .. . . . . . . . . . . .. .. ..
0

. . . . . .

42 42 42 42

42
42 42

42 42
42 42 42

42
42

42 42 42 42 42 42 42 42 42 42 42 42 42 42 42 42 42 42 42 42 42

bJ)

'.Ii

p. u .....
0

.~

0..
'''l

t ~
or.

-t"

\'1

67
Part

363 364 365 366 367 368 369 ,370 371 372 373

No.

Name of Part.

Fig.

No.

5 c.p. 125 Volt Incandescent Instrument Lamp Receptacle for Lamp ,complete Receptacle, complete, for Controller Base ' Cable Receptacle, Shell only. . .. . Insulation Block for Cable Receptacle Cap for Cable Receptacle Chain for Frame and Cable Receptacle Cap Female Contact Center Contact Screw for Frame and Cable Receptacle Insulation for Contact Cylinder
COUPLINGS

. 42 . 42 . 42 . 42 . 42 . 42 . 42 . 42 . 42 . 42 . 42

374 375 376 377 378 379 380 381 382 383 384

Plug for Controller Cable (Controller End) .. , .... , Interior Fitting for Controller Cable Plug and Plug in Projector Base , , , ., ,. , " Controller Cable Receptacle Projector End ,. Interior Fitting for Controller Cable Receptacle and , Controller Receptacle " Gasket for Controller Cable Plug and Receptacle.. Interior Fitting for Lamp Feed and Training Circuit Plug , , , Rubber Washer for Lamp Feed and Training Circuit Plug , .. ,.,....................... Rubber Gasket for Lamp Feed and Training Circuit Plug .... ,................................. Brass Washer for Cap of Lamp Feed and Training Circuit Plug , " Interior Fitting for Lamp Feed and Training Circuit Receptacle , , , , Rubber Gasket for Lamp Cables" ,', " ., ,
CONTACT PLUNGERS, ETC.

43 43 43 43 43 43 43 43 43 43 43

385 Carbon Clamp Adjusting Rod , . . . . . . . . . . .. 44 386 Ball and Socket for Carbon Clamp Adjusting Rod. . 44 387 Locking Lever .for Carbon Clamp Adjusting Rod. .. 44 388 Spring for Locking Lever. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 389 Handle for Carbon Clamp Adjusting Rod. . . . . . . . . 44 390 Connector (Outside) for Main Contact Plungers. . . . 44 391 Connector (Inside) for Main Contact Plungers. . . . . 44 392 Main Contact Plungers 'with Insulations. . . . . . . . . . 44 393 Main Contact Plungers with Insulations.. . . . . . . . . 44

..

69
Main Contact Plunger , ., , ., . Nuts for Main Contact Plunger . Spring for Main Contact Plunger . Cap for Main Contact Plunger Spring Box ., . 397 Small Contact Plungers with Insulation" for Lamp 398 Feed and Training Circuit , . . . . . . .. Small Contact Plunger .. " . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 399 Nut for Small Contact Plunger. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 400 Spring for Small Contact Plunger. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 401 ~ Cap for Small Contact Plunger Spring Box 402 Spring Box for Main Contact Plunger ., , . .. 403 , 404 Spring Box Gong) for Main Contact Plunger ., " 405 Spring Box for Small Contact Plunger 406 Terminal for Plunger and Connectors 407 Locking Bolt for use during transportation 394 395 396
o'

Part No.

l1ame of Part.

Fig. No.

44 44 44 44
44 44 44 44 44 44 44 44 44 35

MISCELLANEOUS

408 409 410 411 412 413 414 415 416 417 418 419 420 421 422 423. 424

Nut for Center Bolt .. " , .. .. .. Nut for Center Bolt .. Center Bolt " Small Contact Rings '. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Large Contact Ring (outside) , . . . . . . .. Large Contact Ring (inside) Insulation for Contact Rings Tread Roller Spoke for Tread Roller Spider. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Collar for Tread Roller Bevel Gear for Training Mechanism , . . . . . . .. Bevel Gear for Training Mechanism , Nut for Gear Stud. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Gear. Stud Spur Gear for Gear Ring , Gear Ring. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Washer for Handwheels
0 " , 0 " , 0 , 0 , 0 0 0 ., 0 , , 0 -..

24 24 24 24 24 24 24 24 24 24 24 24 24 24 24 24 24

SPARE PARTS AND TOOLS NOT ILLUSTRATED

425 l~ Horizontal Brass Nut 426 ll- Horizontal Brass Nut 427 .Pin Wire for Worm Gear 428 Ruby Glass and Frame 429 Carbon Tongs 430 Spanner Wrench for Cable Coupling

70
Part

No.

Name of Part.

Carbon Clamp Wrench 432 Chamois Skin 433 Large Dust Brush 434 Small Dust Brush 435 Wrench forl~ and -U Nuts 436 Socket Wrench for Hand Feed
RHEOSTAT

431

Fi~. No.

437 438 439 440 441 442 443 444 445 446 447

Large Grid. . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 26 Small Grid . 26 Mica \Vasher for Grids. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 26 Tenninal 26 Nut for Connection Stud , 26 Contact Blade , 26 Handle for Switch Arm .. .. .. 26 \Vasher for Switch Arm Handle.. .. .. .. 26 Switch Arm .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 26 Slate Base , 26 Cap Screw for Slate Base. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 26

PART III.

CARE AND PRESER VA TION. TRANSPORTATION AND NOTES

72
CARE AND PRESERVATION

An inspection of all parts of the light should be made once each month "and the lamp mechanism 'cleaned carefully after each period of operation, being careful to -remove all carbon dust. All parts of the light should be kept free and clean from dirt. at all times. The moving parts should be oiled occasionally wIth a small amount of good oil; if the oil hardens or gums on any of the parts it should be removed with a cloth moistened with kerosene oil and fresh lubricating oil applied. . . The feed-screws of the lamp, magnet, armature bearIngs, and latches, should be oiled with a very small amount of good clock oil. Special attention should be given to the following parts of the Model 1910 searchlight; they require occasional oiling. The same is true for the similar parts of the other types of light. A. Parts 415, 418, 419, 422 and 423, Fig. 24. To reach these parts it will be necessary to remove the base sheeting. B. Bearing-pin for front door, part 38, Fig. 36. C. All gearing in training mechanism boxes and the shaft, part 79, Fig. 22. D. The field of the pilot motor; it may be oiled through oil-holes in the pilot-motor end-plates. E. Parts 263, 271, 273, 275, 276, Fig. 40. F. The latches, parts 192 and 19:3. All electric contact points should be kept brigh~. The electric motors need the attention usual for such apparatus, special attention being given to brushes, commutator and oil for. the bearings. The oil should be renewed occasionally, whether or not any signs of heating appear; if there is any heating, the plugs at the bottom of the bearings should be removed, the oil drawn off and replaced by new. In smoothing the commutator and fitting the brushes to it, sandpaper should be used. EMERY CLOTH MUST NEVER BE USED ON THE COMMUTATOR OR BRUSH. . The searchlight should never be operated with the arc inside the fOjeus,that is, between the mirror and the focal point, as the excessive heat from the arc might cause the silvering to peel or the mirror to crack. (A divergent beam indicates that the arc is inside the focus; a crossed beam that the arc is outside the focus.) Moisture should not be allOWed to accumulate on the surface of the mirror or run down between the mirror and its ring,

73
as its presence in the barrel is detrimental to the silvering. The beam should not be elevated above 30, as hot carbon particles might drop on the mirror and crack it. . Clean the mirror as follows: Rea:ove all dust with a dustbrush and then polish with a chamois skin. If the mirror . hecomes dirty or greasy, clean with the following preparation: ! parts precipitated chalk (by volume), .! parts water, 2 tablespoonfuls alcohol to a quart of the preparation. The preparation should be applied carefully with a sponge and in Yery .small quantities, polishing when dry with a piece of clean cheesecloth. Never use anything which will scratch the face of ~he mirror. ' In removing the lamp Model 1910 from the barrel lock the barrel with the st~ut (part 47, Fig. 36, Part II.) which engages with the pin on the locking rack. \Vhen the carbons are redhot, first remove the hot carbons with the door open 45. If the door is swung open 90 the hot carbons may crack the middle glass strip. . When operating the lamp-feed by hand, insert a wooden gauge between the feed-together-arrnature of the feeding-magnet and the leg of the lamp, for the purpose of keeping the feedtogether-pawl out of the engagement with the ratchet. When the light is not in operation, keep it cmiered with a canvas cover.
TRANSPORTATION

The barrel, with the mirror and glass door in place, is shipped in one crate, the barrel being suspended on heavy cross timbers. The base,:'With the arms in place, is shipped in another crate' (Figs. 33 and 34, Part II.) , The' crating throughout must be of the most substantial construction, to insure the safety of the light. The skids should be not less than 8" x 3", the uprights supporting the barrel not less than 4" x 6", and the cross timbers not less than 4" x 6J1'. The base must be closed in underneath by planking to protect the open connection plugs; the handles on the side must be protected by the crate, as shown in Fig. 34. For shipping the Model 1910 light, a locking bolt (part 417), to be inserted in place of the bolt 4A, Fig. 35, is supplied. The locking bolt pa..<;ses through a hole in the base and locks the turntable to the base, preventing strains on the training mechanism during transportation. Bolt" 4A should be securely wired to the locking bolt and marked with a prominent tag bearing the following inscription:

74
CAUTION!!! LOCKING BOLT. THIS BOLT PREVENTS MOVEMENT OF TURNTABLE DURING TRANSPORTATION AND SHOULD BE REMOVED AND STANDARD BOLT SHOULD BE INSERTED WHEN THE LIGHT IS INSTALLED.

If the particular light to be shipped has no locking-bolt as described above for Model 1910, provision similar to that described above for the Model 1910 light should be made.
NOTES

The beam is focused best by instructions from an observer . well off to one side. . In order to get satisfactory results, the controller operator must be in the vicinity of those for whom the target is to be illuminated. Experience is the only guide as to how the beam shall be directed for best illumination. It is absolutely impossible for an observer on the water to estimate his distance from an o~erating searchlight. The ranges at which targets may be illuminated by a 60inch light for satisfactory observation are as follows:

-_.---.-

;.
I.

Very clear atmosphere. --------__ 10,000 yards (Further under exceptional conditions)

Average atmosphere. 6,000

Heavy. Slight haze Mediumhaze haze (or rain). (graydawn). or fog. 3,000

---------

to
8,000

to
4,000

yards

yards

1,000 to 2,000 yards


-----~--

APPENDIX

PORTABLE

SEARCHLIGHT

SET

Illustrations from A rtillery Note No. 3 I

76
PORTABLE SEARCHLIGHT SET The necessity for some form of portable searchlight has been lon~ felt and one or two types have been designed. Figs. 45, 46 and 47 show a portable set of recent make of which quite a number have been purchased. These were constructed for coast artillery purposes and are suitable to be taken on fair roads at ordinary speeds. As may be seen from the photographs the power plant ,and searchlight are mounted on. separate trucks, each to be drawn by a pair of horses. The power plant and its truck complete weigh 6,580 pounds, and the searchlight and its truck complete weigh 5,800 pounds. .The large figure for the latter is due considerably to the weight of the cable, the power cable being 500 feet of four conductor cable (one pair being 90,000 c.m.) and the controller cable 1000 feet of eight conductor cable. Both trucks are equipped with brakes. SEARCHLIGHT TRUCK This truck carries the searchlight, a cable reel, and a mec~anism by which the light may be elevated, keeping it in Its vertical position. The mechanism referred to is as follows: A pair of arms are fastened to the truck through pivots and in a similar manner connected to the projector's base, see Fig. 45. These arms are heavily constructed and carry most of the weight. A pair of arms of light construction are similarly connected below and to one side on the truck and to an extension from the projector's base, making a four bar* linkage of -the form of a parallellogram. The bar between the pivots on the truck being fixed, it is evident that whatever position the mechanism takes, the bar betw~en the pivots on the projector's base and base extensions remams parallel to it. Hence the searchlight will keep upright. Motion for moving the light up and down is obtained through a bell crank fastened to a cross-arm at about the middle of the two upper bars, the other arm containing a nut into which a scr~W engages. By turning the screw the light may be raised or lowe:ed as desired. The screw is turned by a crank, the handle bemg removable. \Vhen the projector is put in its elevated position, it may be further supported by means of an auxiliary bar, shown loose in the photograph. This support may be necessary in high winds to give stability.
two points.
*As appJi~d to a mechanism, a bar means a rigid connection

between

(j

78
The projector its~lf is the 8-wire type already described. It is equipped with a voltmeter and ammeter, mounted in the the same case, attached to one of the drum supports. A platform for the attendant extends from the base. This platform folds up when the projector is brought down on the truck. The cables are carried on independent reels mounted side by side on the same shaft. Plug .and socket joints are used for the cable connections. In connecting up the projector the two cables are drawn from the reel and the plugs inserted in the sockets of the generator and. exciter respectively. The other ends of the cables are brought through the reel shaft to sockets at its ends, in which the plugs of the lamp cable and training mechanism cable respectively may be inserted.
POWER PLANT TRUCK

This truck carries a 3-cylinder gas engine direct connected to the generator and exciter. The engine is cooled by water circula~ion with a gear pump. A small water tank is used and the water after coming from the cooling chambers of the engine is taken to a radiator where a fan is brought to play on it. The fan is of the radial type and belt connected to the engine shaft. A jump spark ignition is used for the engine, the current being furnished the primary from a battery of a few storage cells. The battery is connected to a small generator (Apple type) through an automatic switch so that it is automatically disconnected when the battery is charged and begins charging whenever the battery becomes slightly discharged. The battery spark coils and switch are all together in a box. On account of trouble with this system, it is to be modified when conditions require it, by substituting for the "Apple" generator a permanent field magneto to operate directly on the spark coil, and for the storage battery, a set of four ignition dry cells which will be used when starting the engine. A double throw switch will serve to throw the coil from the dry cells to the magneto when the engine has . come up to speed. The magneto will give 7 volts when the coil. is using the proper amount of current, which. is about ,80 amperes. The generator is a 9.6 k.w. and runs at 600 r.p.m. It gives 130 amperes at 74 volts. This generator has a series field and a field differential to it, the latter being separately excited. The exciting current is furnished from a t k.w. generator mount~d

79

81 on the engine shaft, its v9ltage being 110 volts. In addition to furnishing the exciting current, this generator furnishes power for the electric control and for four 16 c.p. lamps on the engine truck. " . . Since the main generator is enclosed and also located close to the engine, it is necessary to use a. fan to supply a good circlliation of air to keep the temperature down. The' fan is of the "radial typ~ and. belt connected to the engine shaft .

: ..

0'

"

-:

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.......

:"

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,",',

::.

. ~. ," ..

"

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.'

Present Status of the Series of Artillery. Notes


No. Title . 1 Instructions for Regulating Powder Charges of Coast Artillery in Target Practice . 2 Armor Attack Sheet. 3 Directions for Setting Up, Adjusting and Using, the Lewis Type .. A to Depression Position Finder . 4 Proceedings of a Board of Officers, Convened at Governor's Island, New York, for the Purpose of Preparing and Formulating a Syst~m of Electrical Communication for Artillery Fire Control. 5 Construction of a Difference Chart 6 Description and Diagram of the Telautograph . 7 Curves and Tables of Robinson's Anemometer 8 The Lewis Depression Position Finder. Function and Method of Operation of the Elevating Screw. Device for Illuminating the Cross-\Vires. Supplement to Artillery Note No.3. ~ Searchlights . 10 Mortar Zones and Mortar Range Tables. 11 Seacoast Engineering. 12 Notes on Oil Engines. 13 System of Nomenclature of Parts o( Modern BaUerIes. 14 Form for" Report of an Inspection Relative to Coast Artillery Instruction, the Condition of the Batteries, and the Fire Control and Direction System. to 15 Test of Experimental Fire Control Installation at Pensacola, Florida . 16 Notes on Explosives. 17 Notes on the Telephone . 18 Theory of the Storage Battery. 19 Digest of Orders and Circulars Issued by the War Department Pertaining to the Care and Use of Seacoast Armament (rom January I, 1896, to January I, 1904. 20 Correspondence Relative to Preparation of Data for Elevation Scales of Seacoast Guns. 21 Topical Index of Artillery Subjects . 22 Practical Method of Adjusting a l\fodern Gun 23 Discussion Bearing on the Tactical Use of Mortars. 24 Topical Index of Artillery Subjects. Supplement to Artillery Note No. 21. 25 Note on Ballistic Tables 26 Construction of a Difference Chart. 27 Topical Index of Artillery Subjects. Second Supplement to Artiller)' Note No. 21. 28 A Study of Attacks Upon Fortified Harbors. 29 Correction of Range Scales (or Height of Sight and Curvature . 30 Tables of Logarithms of Trigonometric Functions Computed for Degrees and Hundredths of Degrees. 31 Searchlights. 32 Searchlights. Out of print. t Obsolete. S To be reprinted. '. a Not to be reprinted as such tables can be purchased commerclally. b To be included in a future edition of uBa.llistics". . c Included in Coast Artillery Drill Regul~~lons. . .. d Superseded by Weaver's "'Notes on Mlhtary Expiollves

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