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GRAND E'OEIiS, NBKTH D A K Q ~ TUESDAY, ~,~, SEpTEi\B$>E 29, 1920,

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Proposall Naw Goes "P" C~e~nrncii

For Adion
The Gnnd Forks Cily Couilcil will be presented with a proposal lo proceed ilnmediately on t h o construction of a new airporl southwesl of the city when it ~lleclls ~lext~ o n d a ~ . The unanimous recominendat io11 comes from the Grand Forks Citizen's Comlnittee on A i r p o r t, Bridges and Highway, which met Monday in the City Hall. The committee also asked to meet with the Collncil Oct. 26. The proposal is the result al' an investigation by Assistanl C i t y ' ' Engineer Thol)urn Peterson which founcl that a new airport "w i l f mean less new money" invested j than under any other- plat1 being ;studied. City Cost $195,50(1 i With matching federal funds, PCterbori said, the copt of a new installation west of U.S. Bigllway 81 ' and south of Grand Forlrs will be P!15,500. This includes land purchase, basic construction, w a t e T mains, lighting and an administration building, The ather plans all ,iilvolve improving the present site and range ,in local aost from $275,000 to $562,-

Total cost of ~novinlgLhc a~rport, inclucling federal and city funds, i? $1,666,500. Dcridline for applic+:ctin11 for Iedcral fl~nilsf o p airpnrl conslr~rction for 1961 is Nov. 30 this vcar. I The City Comncil will be asl~ccl to act on the matter with this date in mind, officials said. Offer Nolet1 I 01lp of State the reasons for Lhe comparatively low cost for the new airporl is the profit thal can be inade on the sale of the present 1 site. Peterson's report slates: t "The Statc Highway Dept. ha!; offered $576,700 for a portion oI the present airport to be used for right-of-way for the interstate highway. In addition, the rcmaindyr of the airport could be sold and the land acquired by purchase for (present) clear zones could be sold." The highway department wants ' the righl-of-way for ihe new northsouth superhighway proposed in this area. The new site would bor1 der on the proposed highway iI moved. Otllors Interested Pelersnn said Tuesday t 11 a t "there have been indications from g number of sources" of a desire to buy the land for industrial use. Other local officials have saici the 'Great Northern Railway is intertested in the site, 1 His report statcs that "190 acres I (left afler state purchase of the !right-of-way) al: $700 per a c r e :would yield $133,000 and the re- I ilnaining clear zone properties !would probably yield approximate$15,000." ' ly The other plans investigated with the city's share of cost arc: To pave the long runway, of the present airport without any relocation or extension of runways; new money needed $275,000. 1 (Turn to Page 10, Col. 3) '-- L- - -- _ __ - -

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To uxtencl the long runway to the north, shorten on the south and pave; ncw Inoncy neecled $317,500. To construct new optimum direction runway with required, cleariulces on pfescnl ailport site; ilew lnoney needed $317,500. i Peterson pointed out thal t h e iuajor problems of the present site call bc resolved into three basic points: Innrlequi~cies OF the runway ' surfacing and base and inadcquacy o f the space available for extension of the runways. "The first of tliese points is evidcnccd lly the annual closing of the airport airline traffic during the period of the spying thaw and frost: break-up. The base pl-ovicled for the present runways has proven to he inadequate with poor drainage for the asphaltic surfacing used. Wlietl the s p r i 11 g thaw occurs, the frost cannot be drained away. This providcs a spongy cushiol~ which causes the surface to break under the heavy loads, of commercial aircraft," he I said. He also noted that the present I site prevents expansion (19 the city to the west. .___----- _-------I

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*rbe Grand Forks City Council1 n~onday night will receive a r"e-i porl of the Citizens' Committee on 1 Airport, Roads aiid Bridges backing immediate re-location of the Municipal Airport. The committee asks that the City Council move the site to a location southwest of Grand Forks ( bordering on the proposed route of U.S. Interstate Route 29. The nlove is recommended as the best nlethod of solving present airport problems with. the least cost to city residents. According to tt report accompanying the recommendation the nlajor problems at the present site are: Inadequacies of runway surfacing; inadequacies of b a s e and inadequacy of space available for extension of the runways. One problem, not mentioned, is a state request for a right-of-way through the present airport site, for proposed U.S. Interstate Routei
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One point on which there is not agreement among city offiials, the Citizens' committee and interested parties is whether or not federal funds are available for the construction of a new ad( ministration building. Other airI ports in the state have in the pas1 received such approval, but t 1 1e 1 understanding anlong some offi- I cials is that this i s no. longer "easy 1 t o come by."
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To move the airport would cost taxpayers $195,000; to repave the present runway would cost $275,-# 000; to extend the runway and

pave would cost $317,500; to construct a new runway with required clearances would cost $562,000, The need for action at this time is three-pronged. If the airport is moved to a new site f e d e r a l matching funds will be available -but, Nov. 30 is the deadline for application for the 1960 building season; the state has offered to buy half the present site for $575,700 for highway right-of-way, and present facilities are inadequate. The cost to local taxpayers for purchasing the new site is figured on the City's ability to sell the 190 acres left after the state purchase for $133,000, as well as on the federal grants. Lncal officials state that this fig'ure is based on independent esti'mates of $100 to $1,000 per acre "depending 011 accessibility." The sale 'of the land at these prices is justified by tentative offers of the Great Northern Railway and "others" to buy the land for industrial development, they said, Total cost of the move would be one million six hundred and sixtysix thoudand five hundred dollars, "It is believed that all of this cost is eligible for matching funds, so the total cost to the city would be $833,250," the report said. 1 Improvepent and expansioil of present fdbilities would require the full city share td be paid from; the1 present airport fund apd-or a bond issue, ,it stated. Re-location would have several sources available. "The primary source of ,such funds would be the clisposal of the present airporL and related land$ . the net available to the pity then would be $61,000 , witjl this money the net cost to tqe city would bec~me $195 . I 000," lt said,

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0lsject.ions Seen to Bypass Plan


A NUMBER OF OBJECTIONS HAVE been raised to the North Dakota highway departmeutls proposal to route the new Interslate Route 2 through Grand Forlts just east of the municipal airport. objectiolls iillclude a strong proof the University of test rrolT, North Dalrota, who see ir~the proposed of the Univel; route a sharp sity's for future expansion. ing the inadequacy of the present airport and highway and other restrictions that make it almost impossible to expand it adequately for future demands. Quite likely the present airport will become inadequate and restricted ill service within four or five gears. Certainly we cannot expect to land DC6's Or DC7's at the present site, regardless of anytllillg we might do to improve the runways without While the insiclc route h ~ many s advan- materially extending them, which cannot be done a t the present site. &ages for Ihc city over the proposal of :ic ;:f: so!ne that it go two miles west of the airIF WE ARE TO KEEP PACE WITH port, it is important that the routing of progress in air travel and with the Air the highway through the city cause a min- Force jet base just west of the city the inlii~ninterference with the University and demand for commercial air service will inexisting businesses. crease we must be prepared to spend : I :$ the money that such progress naturally TI-IERE IS OBJECTION, TOO, To THE demands. intersection of Interstate Route 2 with ~~~i~~ the airpoll, would not lneall a present U. S. highway 2, for there is in- loss the everythillg we now have volved a cloverleaf co~lnectionthat would present site, for lalld would have cosTerquite an alca almost within bhe city. ue for resale, much of it for industrial Oile suggestion has been Illade in purposes alld $he routing of Inlors(~te Chamber of C o ~ ~ ~ r n e highway rce commit- R~~~~ 2, and tile hangar. and that the present U.S. be swerved other builclings could be moved to a i~ew northward a quarl.er d a inile at a point about two miles west of the city limits ~l~~~~ is need now to about tZ00,. and intersect Interslate Route. 2 approxi- 000 in itnproving the at airpresent port, but f&ore this is done there sllould nlate1y a quarter nlilo north of cn try point. be a thorough study of the s~lggestio~~ for site so will be no un,,ecessary Another suggestion that would overcome a all routing objections ahd provide ade- expenditul,es until deoision can be quate substilute routes would be the moving of the lnullicipal airport 10 a point with the development of conllnercial possibly north and west of its present site. jet planes, it would be just as well, This would I , space ~ ~a ~ to have ~ fie ~ ailport ~ located two or three route for Interstate Route 2 through the miles beyond our and business present airport and remove all objections diStdCts, for it must be ulcre is by the Univ.ersity as we41 as the intersec- avoidable danger in that lion with U.S. 2, for the route and the I: k : : I intersection with U.S. 2 would be west of NO ONE WANTS TO SPEND LARGE the GreatNorthern tracks bordering the sum d if it can be present airl~orlsite on the east. impairing $he future development and : I ; $ :b wellbeing of the city. The Herald o i ~ b sugTHERE IS A GREAT DEAL TO COM- gests that colnpetetit engineers and econmend the suggestion for moving the air- omists make a study of the airport situaport, and the only objection, perhaps, is tion, so that we can know now -ghat we dihe expense involved. While the Civil Aero- may lleed to face in the future. nautics Administration would participate If anything w e do lo our present airport i n nnebhalE the expense of the land and still cannot prevent it from becoining certain construction, it is likely the city's grossly inadequate within a few years &are would be about $1,250,000. even five or six we should avoid ~ n y This is a large sum of money but there wasteful oxl~enditureand examine closely in the moving of the all phases of ihe proposnl to move ale air. are consid~ratia~s airport bhal, call for careful study, includ. port,

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I Fsr Federal

Order ~ e ~ u e s t
Funds Drawn

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The Grand Forks City Counol? ;Monday delayed action on moving the M~~nicipal Airport southwest of the city but initiated proceedings for application for federal funds in case such a shift is found desirable. Alter two hours of debate, Coun. cilman Homer Sopdreal moved to /direct the City Engineer's office to 'draw up the rec1uests. A substitute 'motion made by Councilman An,thony Feist fo mako the airporr ;problorn thc first order of busiticse I at the ncxt Council hwting and ;to refrain From drawing the re-. quest was defeated. Nov. a0 Qeadliite The decision was made in order / t o allow application to be corn'pleted by @ov,$ $0, That date i s the cyt-off for 'teddpd funds Ior the 1461 construcfiom season. The Maybs's Citizens Committee on Airport, Bridge and Highway I problems i.e~Bnt;Iyrequested t h e I Coqncil t a proceed iinmedfat+y 04 ' m o v i n g $e airpork. Committee Chairman HaroIq $haft told the ~ouncil Monday that clearances at the preseat site are innclequate; douMe Xa~ing; of U, S. HFghway 2 is, prevented by ihe present site; and the ,stat&wants a portion of % a e I airport fbr ,thq plamea norbh~south I Intersfate hdgj~a8~ . , , ,,,
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He pointed out that tko intercity bridge also is invoked in the problem of widening and improv- , * ing U. S. Highway 2. 'In One Package' * ' " ~ t is all tied in one package," he said. Until something is donc about the airport tllc state has said it wilI not help with improvii~gthc highway; the new north-south interstate highway cannot be completed, and the bridge to IS R s I: Grand Forks i s being held up, he said, Opposing the move were several local pilots and plane operators. Lester Jolly, pilot for George Cox, 'said he thought "the present facilities are very adequate." The main reason for moving tho lpresent site i s to give con~rnercial planes more opportunily to use the facilities, he said. He claimed thq airlines will pattern their equip ment to tHe facilities. "There are , more than 100 emply seats a day I 011 planes" leaving Grand Forks ( City, he said. "What we ~leecl are smaller planes and more trips a day," he said. Clear Zones 'Inadequate' At one point in the dLcussioll it was pointed out that present clear zones are inadequate and U. S. Highway 2 will have to be moved ' to permit space 'for FAA required safety zones. "We're not interested in-11 i g hways," Jblly said, He also said thal: he as a taxp8yel. was worried ,about the mopay needed for t h CI !new airport. -- - I, .--

James Montgomery, of M 0'11 tgomery Airspray, also opposed the move, saying tlte present airport is one "of the finest there is.'! Louis Gershman, Grant1 Forks, businessman, also opposed tho move. Montgonlery also cotnplained thr! proposeil new site calls for ,only one runway and wautcd to h o w where the small pl.ane operalor wouId operate. Assistant City Engineer Thoburn Petcrson staled that it would be a@ oplirni~m norlhnorthwest runway, usnblc 92 per cent of the time. He also pointed out that the proposed airport would only be a beginning. Just enough tu make tha new site a "going con. ;tern," he said. Total cost of the new site is estimated at onc and a half million j [dollars with Grand Forks City t a x I payers paying $195,500 and federal i gfauts and sale of the slte taking care c~fthe rest. T h p: s a t e has offered the City $576,700 ,for a porlion or the prcseut air[port for right-ofdway for the inter. ,state highway. In addition, the re. nlpinrler ~f the land could be sold 'at?$700 an acre, Peterson said. He sa@ that he fell this estimate was lo*. I-Ie told Councilmen that since esiimaling the land for the new :site,al $400 arl acre he had had a higher estimate. ' Councilman Anthony Feist said he hid been told that the Bismarck Airport had only received 35 per cent federal aid for their adrninistratiotl building construction rather lh8n tl>e 50 per cent Peterson esti-

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I mitlec, saicl his ~astinlalewas bas-

ed on previous grilnls, Three alternativcs were prcsunted in 'the re. port, invulving inaprovement of presct~tfacilities. ! The cost estimates ranged from 1$2753,000 to $5ti2,500 to the city. None l of them were eligible far federal kgra~zls,the Citizens' Committee told the Council. ' I h 'e Committee ~.ccomrnended , acceptance of ils report a11 the basis illat the move would mean less new money to the texpkyers. 'The Council adjourned wilhout final clecision but instracted t h e l City Engineer's office to dl'aw the1 application for fcdcral grants in orIder to keep t&@matter open, I

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GaRAND FORKS, NORTH DAKOTA, THURSDAY, SEET. 29, ISGO


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TtIIS,IS A STATE Highway Deparlment sketch of how the proposed Skidmore Avenue Bridge across the Red River may look after it is completed. The sketch shows the bridge approach
crossing 12 feet above Lewis Boulevard and on over the river. .+,.
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In East Grand Forlrs the bridge approach would curve t o c9nvenue N. This sltetcl~ was unveiled at a meeting with Highway Department spokesmen Wednes8~3 night. Additional pictures on page 22.
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Hope F o r Final 1 ~ e c i s i o nOn Span , . Before Year End


City officials here were brought up to date Wednesday niglit on plans for highway dcvelopment and construction of the proposed Skidniore Avenue Bridge across t l ~ eRed River. R. E. Bradley, chief engineer I for the State Highway Departlnent, said the state will be ready to luove ahead rapidly as soon as a final decision is made on relocation of the present inunicipal airport. Until then, he said, "We can't get too excited."

No Deadline Asked I Bradley emphasized that he I was iiot trying to impose any deadline. upon the city nor to b e ; dictatorial in any way. He said, I however, that he and others in 1 the department have been discussing a second inter-city bridge with Grand Forks officials for so long that it is difficult to be convinced t l ~ a tone is nearing the final design stages. Alderman W. H. Mahler, chairman of a City Council com~nittee on the airport relocation propo, sal, said his group has been in contact with a nu~nberof airport engineers and will meel with some within the next week nr so to get further recoinmendatjons. , IIe expressed hope tliat a final decision can be made hefore the ,I t ear

Shaft Cites Law Harold Shaft, chairman of a citizens committee on highway, bridge and airport problems, said that if the city is to get federal aid funds for a ncw airport it must make application before , Jan. 1. He pointed out that tlic 1 present law for such federal aid expires next June. I Bradley said the state department is far enough along on preliminary plans for tlie bridge, for improvement of U.S. Highway : ! leading to the bridge and for Interstate Highway 29 that it will be ready to hold a public hearing on all three projects here in mid-October. He said the hearing may be scheduled Oct. 19. Questions Answered The meeting Wegnesday niglit was to acquaint city ofiicials and Lhe citizens comlnittce with developments in advance of the public hearing. Bradley's review and subsequent a n s w e r s to questions brought out: gola1 city cosl for the bridge and Highway 2 iniprovement through the city would amount L oI $440,750. Tlie total overall cost of those two projects, would be $3,087,000. The cost for Interstate 29 from , a point where it would leave the present route of U.S. 81 about three miles soulh of the city to a juncture with 81 four mile:; north would be $8,050,000. The city would iiot contribute to tliat C09L.- " - ---"--,,-

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I Tlie present routes of U.S. 81 and U.S. 2 through tlie city would

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highway system after construction of the new Skidmore routing for 2 and of the Interstate Ilighway. Minnesota highway officials and the Bureau of Public Roads have approved the Skidmore Avenue bridge location and re-routI ing of U.S. 2 011 a general basis. IBradley said he would anticipate no difficulty reaching the final agreements necessary with Mill' nesota and federal officials. Tlie proposed Interstate Route would include interchanges a t U.S. 2 and Sixth Avenue S. in 1 Grand Forks and a grade separation with possible future interchange ramps a t 32nd Avenue S. Tlie earliest possible date 0 1 1 which contracts for U.S. 2 and bridge construction could be let would b c sometime in the fiscal year starting next July I. Construction of the interstate route here is probably three or four years away, a t lcast. Traffic Still Prohleln 13radley said he regards the bridge and Highway 2 improvement project a s a worthwhile one, but said it will not relieve the downtown traffic problem a s well as the Bruce Avenue bridge location proposed earlier. Easl Grand Forlts and Minnesota officials turned down the Bruce locatidn. The four-lane bridge approach would pass over Lewis $oulevarcl in the Riverside Parlc area and one or two homes might be affccted, Bradley said. A number of problems rclnaill to be worked out in final design, including congestion a l thc intersections with U.S. 81 and the Mill Road and pedestrian crossings a t Wilder l School. I ---------.--I
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1940 In' Review:

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mporfant Projecfs Sforfed By During Year Busy Cify


By LLOYD C. TINNES Cost of Interstate Highway 29 Projects of outstanding imporGroup Organized tance to the community were in the Grand Forks area, includMeanwhile, from the sidelines launched by a busy Grand Forlrs ing five interchanges, would be had come spaslllodic but caustio about $8,050,000, engineers h a v e City Council in 1960. fire froln pers The pace was swift and obsta- calculated. Ninety per cent of the the so-called As ' cles were many. There was much cost would be borne by the fed- Forks City and discussion and the usual measure era1 government and 10 per cent ers. the state. The would pay of argument among the alderOrganization of' the taxpayer men, plus a bit of heckling from nothing. group was in April for the within and for the new the sidelines which had dwindled purpose of "tax reduction through bridge, the city's share,wou1d toby the end of the year. , greater planning and less haphaz- 1 GIAowthof the city's area and tal $440,750. ard spending." C. B. filsom, Engineering estimates place the mounted two of the top decisions state petroleum engineer here, ' cost to the city of moving the increasing t r a f f i c congestion was naped temporary chairman. airport and constructing needed of the year. From that point on, however, and be System Outmoded about $700,000 after deducting re- Keith V. Bacon, manager of the , the h e launched large-scaie im- ceipts from the sale of present Dacotah for thk Hotel, taxpayer group, first provement of an outmoded sewproperty, plus and ' against the lagoon project, and erage system, the other brought state aid. They estimated t h is reloca-l nearer the "go ahead" stage of would be $100.000 less than the l against the the long-sought second Red River , city's share of' reconstructing the 1 Ads Enlivened bridge. There were many others, ' present airport and moving HighHis heated charges of "extravThe city's sprawling new busi- way 2 to the north. ness and suburban districts had Sewerage and airport - bridge1 city spending, reckless outgrow$ an antiquated and un- I plans alike encountered frequent wast117g taxpayers' nloney" dersized sewer system before the I stumbling blocks a s <they moved and a variety of othc? censure enlivened ilumerous large ads he year began. Sewage was being ahead. somecouncillnen hesitated to - placed in the Herald in the past pumped to a northside treatment with the lagoon phase of few months, The "guerrilla" atplant incapable of processing it. I The big load was going "raw" the sewerage program, believing tacks were aimed at what Bacon into the Red River. a n interceptor and plant treat. termed "Webster & c0.1the City merit system to be preferable,, Co~lncil,': p d sometimes both. I Sewer Project Started - -- -- - ,The lagoon plan was approved by' To correct the sewage prqblem, early fall, however, and work be- He rererred to City Manager tlie Council set in motion a mod- gan Oct. 15. Alas Webster. eru, $3,315,000sewerage improveAirport plan Approved The taxpayer group's warfare ment project: including sewage As to the airport's relocation, lift stations, force mains and a even stiffer opposition came from on the lagoon plan died down lagoon. It was nearly halt con- seberal aldermen. This group when work began on the project structed a s the year drew t o a wished to postpone action pend- and opposition to the airport reclose. To figance the job, the ing receipt of further evidence location also appeared to have council floated a $2,815,000 bond that the plan was "economically lessened considerablv. And so as 1960 faded, the airissue, largest in tlie city's his- feasible." tory. Federal aid will provide the I A resolution of approval finally port project appeared to have I gained momentum, with prosbalance. came through Feb. 15, but it conAnd approaching the final de- ; tained the hedging clause, "if ec- pects good that final clesign work sign stage were plans for a long- ' onomically feasible." Even then, on a new bridge a.nd Highway 2 awaited second bridge to reduce the vote was. only 7 to 5 for the will be started early in '61. the DeMers A ~ e n u etruck-car pa- action. Council sentiment for ap'Yes' Answer Needed rade tliat was intreasingly stran- proval seems to have increased, City officials have been tqld by gling the business district. however, since the April city elec- R. E. Bradley, chief engineer for tion which broueht in several new the North Dakota Stale Hi~hwav Meet With Diff ieulties The flew briflge, to be ,built a t aldermen favGing Lhe project Department, that a definite"yes" the erl'd44 dkidmorei Avmue, was , while losing two others who' had on the airport move, without a one segflredt of lalassive, four- 1 opposed approval and who left hedging clause, is needed to start ronged Penntllre, i~volvi~ng the the council by resignation or by his engineers on the job o f draft. ing final plahs for tbe bridge and I failure to gain--re-election. [ridge, a new four-lane.stietch of , ----- its Skidmore Avegue approaches. U.S. aigbway 2 from the river They beliqve this assurance l to a pojnt west of the, airport, will be forthcoming at the meek oon$t;ruction of a, new alrport at ing @n: k$ at which the council mother ,)scation, and of new Inis .t&i;ddtd to receive a final terstate EI i g h w a y 29, slicing beflg$ekm$ neport includi~~g findthrbuih 'the pres&t runway area, , "-. 1 idg$ regarding the "fcasibility" of I the aipport

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Several Retire/,/,& /I Retirements of d e P a r t m ent heads during the ye'ar included those of veteran Carl Amundson, 1 manager of the airport, who quit iin October and was succeeded by Norman Midboe, acting manad ger; Thomas Fahey, forevan in the sanitation bureau; R. M. Jenson, water and sewage superintendent, succeeded by Col. A. E. Forsman, and A. J. Bontley,, superintendent of inspection whose place was filled by A. B. Dickie, , In July, the council approved a ' 1960-61 budget of $2,441,947based on a city tax levy of 43.05 mills. It 'marked the secogd successive year the levy had been de- I creased. The 1959 levy was 43.06, 1 mills, with a budget ol $2,049,780,
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GRAND FORKS, NORTH DABOTA, - - - . _ = _ -- TUESDAY, JANUARY


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Decision
Move lmvolvea New Bridbe, 4-Laning No. 2
By LLOYD C. TINNES The City Council toolc a united stand Monday for relocation of the Granct Forks International Airport to clear the wav for a
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Vole Unanimous Follow Own Advice All 14 members of the council Then, at the Council's adjournvoted for the airport move which ed meeting Monday, it "followed involves the construction of a ils own advice" in giving a new airport Iour miles west of sweel~ingendorsement of the airthe city. Alderman W. H. Mallport project. ler moved the adoption of the airThe Burke report fouild the port-move resolution. It was sec"copslruclion of a new airport at onded by Clarence Sage. a new site is economically feasIt was a n~ileslonein feeen$ ible and recommended that it be council history, marking the first , carried out. It held that the time it had unanimougly gone on , /'present airporL is obsolete and record in favor of the airport /unsafe for modern airline opcrproposal, When the matter was ations" and that "reconstruction , voted on lasl: Feb. 15, the coun- 1 and expansion of the present air- / cil had split, 7 to 5, in approving port, due to site limitations, can-7 the relocation, buf with a rescrnot furnish a safe or adequatd I vation "if ecoilomically feasible." facility under cross-wind conclij ,, The airport problem had been 'tiorrs." It added that "reconstrucl* discussecl since 1958, Ition at tlm present site yill cost ' Approved By Committee /the city nearly $500,000 more I The resolution adopted Monday than the cost for a new airport!' eliminated the "hedging .clause,'* The net cost lo the city was es. which was required before fed* / timated at $664,000. I cral aid would be made available Plan Explained for the new Highway 2 construce The airport relocation problem tion, a sweeping arc to the south I was interpreted for the council by past the present airport and for I City Manager Alan Webster, wha a distance of one mile west of used the Burke report as the ba. the airport where, it would jdn I $is Ior his statement. the present highway. ,I Webster explained three sugq The foundation for Monday's i gested plans for solving the airaction was laid at a "comn~ittee. 1 port matter. One would be to of-the-w h o 1 e" session of the place the airport in usable condir , council Friday at which the altion, but not up ta federal $e l dermen heard and approved a

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City's Share Cut J The thircl plan, which p s ap proved by the council, involves a total cost of $2,400,000 for a new airport, but with federal aid and proceeds from airport land sale, cutting the city's share to about $664,000. O f this sula, $240,000 b h ready is available in the city's airport Fund. The Burke report stated that "the FAA (Federal A v i at ion Agency) office at. St. Paul has ' more than $1,000,000 which could 1 be allocatccl to this (?rand Forks I (Turn to Page 3) 1
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Highway 2 c6uId be bent to the north to prov'ide minimum air'. clearance. Ths govI, port-highway ernment then Wou@ $hare the ex-

1 Procedure Sfarts To
G I e f Airport / - /P-U.S. Aid
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Fine Airport Seen Alderman Mahler said the "new ' airport will give us one of the (Continued form Page 1) ' finest small airports in the United Airport and there is no doubt states.= H~ added that "we have that all of this money or a large a good chance of losing aboul portioll of it can be granted 10 $8 lnlllion in bridge alld highway the City of Grand Forlts on n money at a cost to the city of matching basis. only about $400,000 if we don't "These FAA funds must be ear- act tonight." marked (for Grand Forlrs Air- ~ ~ said lthe airport ~ lrelo- ~ port) before June 30, 1961, or ,ation will not raise anyone's / they will be diverted to other pro- taxes dime,- since the jects and any new North Dakota will be repaicl in revenue funds after that date may be 'from the new airport in future very small or non-existent a s the yea,. 1 current R h r a l Aid to Airports 1 speakillg in behalf of tile Prograln expires on June 30. aiqlOrt was former State "Therefore it is Lhe recom- 'sen. J , B. ~ ~ i , j ~ veteran t ~ ~ , mendation of this rcporl that afof the Chamber of ter its acceptance by the Cily Co~nmercebridge committee. Council that a request for aid be I Lunseth Talks submitled to the FAA and that engineering drawings of this M ~ ~ A -familiar voice was hearcl ter Plan be started imnlediately.,j ;again in the council chambers when Former Mayor Oscar LnnAlderman Comments seth, a veteran of a score of It was this "urgency" IhatFro- years of council deliberation a s mated A l d ~ m ~ a n C. Bundlle to conncilnian and mayor, also spolce com~nent before voting for the in support of the airport move. 1 airport niove that "although 1 He also praised the council for have 0pp0sed the S i d m 0 r e /its llnanimity in back the "imAvenue bridge location," (wliich portant project." 1 is involved in the airport relocaAnd, for tl,os. who cantt revote tion plan) the , member the liames of all the new airllort because it appears at one lime, here is to be the best thing for the city." the of tllose who finally 1 Ho said the Burke report was a were gotten togelher by tile "im. "fine reporl." I portance of the airport project The Ieeling that an "important ( to the community: matter was on the lint?" was evi- p. C. Bllndlie, Jerome H. Endent as Mayor Nelson A. Youngs ares, Lloycl V, Hillier, Dr. M. A. rnpped down the. gavel .at 7:30. Hoghaug, W. H.Mahler, Hugo ,R. Magnuson, Myron Molstad, Oscar Engineer Discussed ~ouncillnenwaited for "opposi- ~ 0 r b Y . Gordon Obie. Mrs. 0 n tion'' lhat might come from some ! Rose. Clarence T. Sage, R. R.1 , of the persons in the

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tho~lgh thc matter "local engineer" instead of the ~hicago specialists was suggested by a few aldermen ahd several persons in the audience. Discussion in the council, however, converged again on the need for "urgency" in the matter and it was explaineb that any delay might cost the city "huge sums" in federal aid. The' engineer matter- then was drzpetl.-__ L-

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The city of Grand Forlts has ton, a tentative allocation of the begun procedures expected to ac- money will bc made. The prucess then starts at1 over I tually "put in the banlc" the million plus clollars oI federal aicl to again, with a "projecl applicahelp build the new airport it tion" and final construction drawagreed to "relocate" at Monday's ings traveling the same road as the reques) for aid. ( council meeting. The "federal aviation roulinc" F~ni~lly,with FAA approval consumes time, however, and the gained. a grant offer will bc nlacle "couol-down" ends June 30, 1961, by the Washinglon o f f i c c and at which tilne the Federnl Aid to when this has been accepted by the city, the grani agreement will Airports program will expire. Ahead for the various requests, be finalized, with ~ h clnoncy to be ~nacle available thereafter as ~ plans and estimates connected needed. with the project lies a long trail around several "curves" and The airporl relocalion is a prethrough three separate levels of requisite tc~ completion of the bridge i ~ n inspection hy the Federal Avia- cily's a~rport-highwayprove~nentproject, involving fourtion Agency. laning of Highway 2 past the Urgency Still Present presenl airport, construction of a So "urgency" still is the key new Red River l~ridge at Slciclto achieving the airport goal just more Avenue, relocation of the as it was before the council look airporl, and later, the bisecting the rccluirecl step of approving of the'oresent a i r ~ o r lsite bv Inthe, airport move. lerstate Highway' 29, whicil is The ditfere~iceis that the first scheduled to pass tll,.ough the air. "consent" IIOW CIS been gained- purl ill a llort~-sollt~l direction, a unanimous agreement of the As of Tllursdav, city I Cily Council - and 011ly the llllal llavc their hn julle 30 but V ~ r o v a lof the F A A slands be- expect to wind up tlic airport ail1 {ween ihc city allc1 negotiations before that time, I aid money with waich lo finish "with good lucl;.. - - I the big job. H.tve Airport Fund Tlte federal grant is expected to provid~ somewhat illore than a n~illiondollars of the total estimated cosl of $2,300,000 plus for the new airport. Proceeds from 1 sale of the nresent a i r ~ o r lsilc are estimntk a t upkards of; '-. -----+&-he 1( @*3 $640,000 with the city finally com- 1 I ing up with aboul $660,000 of 1 Airpsrf Reven,ue which more than $200,000 already 1 Bond Bill Asked I I BISMARCIC (AP)-A new bill' 1s in its airport fund. J. L. Donaghue, i~esident of in the senate would add airports Ralph H. Burlre, Illc., Chicago to projects for which a city coLl~d co~isulting engineers, who drew revenue the master plan for the new airSen. George Longmire of Grand \ field, said the FAA district office porks, one of the sponsors said I at St. Paul has more than $1 mil\,ill is sought because lion dollars which coi~ldbe allo- ~~~k~ proposes build a llew caled to the local airport. 'rhese and wants to issue selfrunds must be "earmarlted" (for licluidating bonds, Grand Forks Airport) before the ~ h nleasur, , c,r,;cs June 30 deadline. gency clause, under wliich it Proccdnre Explnined would become cflectivc imnlecliThe money-gelling procedure ately q on passage and signing by now under way is this: r the go\Qrnor. I - - - First comes the "requesl f o r - - - aid," with a preliminary sketch of the airport plan. Burke is preparing the request and sketch, the city will sign the request and speed it along to the FAA districl office inlSt. Paul. When ap- / proved there, it goes to the Kan- , sas Citv regional office and then on to "the -FAA in Wfshington, D. C. Assuming approval in Washing- /

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~ l ~ statement' e by

Engineer

"The b?st prec would call for i i ' n be built wiLh a 151 if this is done, alc

Errsr Found

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la %~aqimeers
CQS* Estisrreafe

rand Forlrs' airpo~trelocation project Iaced two new problems Thr~rsday in proceed~ng with fii nal planning on Lhc council-?proved program lo build a rl:w t i r p o r l iour miles W C S ~ of the
From Bi5rnarclc came word that new Statc ~lighway Con~misI sioner Walter Hjelle said the , pro~osed of Illterstatc lHighway 29 lhrough the presenL airport is not yet certain, while

concrete - pave~nt. "Our talte-offs from the Stale Highway Department failed to ~ n clllde the price of cement in the , square yard average prlces. Thls resulted in an average clifference of about $1.65 per squarc yard for the collcrete paving which a r e sllould routes because of the amoun' of I woulcl nlalte a total of allout criiicism wc havc encountered." $350,000 in cost, or about $175,000 Since the hcaring7 lhc Grand addltlonal to the city if the samc Forks City Council has commit- , desigl and proglaln wcrc Itept, ted itself to movc its airport on t 100-Foot Widtll Sean the. basis of offers for part. of the "1, Is our feeling illat the crosspresent land which 'he Highway wind rllnway could be built hiDepartment Ilad illdicated was tially wit11 a width of 100 feet, for the interstate 29 mute allcl for widel,illg U.S. ~ i ~ h . the heavy aprons reduced k way 2. about 2 , m square yorcls, I5 per cent in area, ancl the light apron Woulil Go Wcst reduced by 33 1-3 per cent in The 'lighway commissionarea, without materially arlecting er, who toolc office ,ran. 3 under Lhe usefulness of the airport. appointment: of ~ o v William . GUY, "The airlines, naturtllly, would chief highand R, A. Backed Ren~oval Hjelle said lie has not yct time to analyze the transcript of a recent hearing at Grand Forks On proposed h i g h r v a ~ rOu'itlgs in the area, but "frankly 1 believe

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"In turn, this $1; sull ~n $90,000 a needed by ihe cit funds from bonds lrom $460,000 to "This $550,000 v hond issue ol abo ing the $580,000, f coverage based 01 ues and expense1 duccd to about 1.5 shown in the rep be q'lite sat , bond houses. The "o' be affected ' lbe a and Prices Said "It is our feeli~ paving prices are I sonablc limits an cics o f abouL $2

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A letter Ed Purcc'l* Ralph H. Burke, Inc. Parlr Ridge, Ill., engineering firm which dcSlg:led the new airport, explained that his computations had failed to include thc price of runway cement in square-yard average

Great Norlhern Railway tracks. Vatllcr said his clicnts feel the llcw highway shoL,ld go down the section line west the prescll~ proposed

foot wide main runway. Could Remain Sanie "~Naturally, a reduced widlh on

ccss land may cOlnplishillg "The other it

plans are rapidly on design of a new inter-~ity ,bridge across the Red Riven: at. Slcidmore Avenue and a new U. S. Highway 2 approacll to t l a ~t

aggregate ancl o financial picture to remain fie to believe that s ? ~ E E ~ r!?ort ~: ~ - ~ might ~ be achiev pi1 run gravel i aggregate for th -- - -- -

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Mot C001ied Ul,,iqj-&( "I callnot," ~ a i t l&layor Youngs / , "rnaltc it tr~o L I c ~that ~ this is 1 : this, of cl.,ui.se, will tlepend upon the niaterial rnceti~ig F.A.4 rc1 IIL some scheme cooked up by ( cluirc~nents.We have usecl pit 1.~111 1 1 s at Gra11cII;o~.l~sL o geL llie High- ! gravcl in other installabioi~s with viay department Lo buy our airport. It was not. It is true, how- I , 1 FAA approval. If the pit run gravel ~nects Lhe FAA reouirclever, Iliat il \vas a fortuitous de- 1 velopment so Ear as we are con- i Mayor Nclsol~ A. Youags has that L1iel.e can be no worlr 011 the cerned. rcquesled p r o n~ p 1 infonnalion proposed new Highway 2 unless Youngs said "sincc this proavailable From this item. clearance is provided a t the north from North Dakota Highway Corngram has been dcvcloped by the "We have clieclted the figures 1 missioner Walter Hjelle regarcling edge of the airport. Also that if I-Iighway Departme~its of Minne011 lights and wiring and feel that the status of the plan to relo- No. 2 is not ~niptoved there can sota a d North Dakota, it has llley are reasc*.lable, and as Mr. cate the Grand Forks Inlerna- he no new Sltidnlore Aventlc met with rather general approval Pelerson ~iotcrl,a further rn\ring bridge. tional A~rport. in the city ot Grand Forlcs, the coultl I ~ c cffcctcd by salvagi~~g In a lelter Forwarded to FIjelle, Prclirninary plans currently are Ci t i z e n s Advisory Coniniitlee the conlactor ant1 transformers with a copy to Gov. William Guy, being completed for the new unanimously recommended it, a from h e present airport. Youngs asserted "the matter is bridge and its approaches along "Criticism i n regartl Lo t h e thirty-member committee of the eslremely urgent. If we are to Skidmore Avenue (Highway 2) Chamber of Commerce studied it drainage has been well answerand the plan for relocalion of the move our airport, we must know rcco~n~nended it; and ~~nanimously etl by Mr. Peterson as [he eleairport to a point four ~nileswesl imnlediately ." vation of lhe runways will allow I Lhe Board of Directors of the "Recent press rcporls," s a i d of the city has been approved by fur the use of Frcnch drains Chamber of Cuinmerce unaniYoungs, "collcerning your (Hjcl- the City Council. which should serve atlequately. mously recommended it, and the le's) conference lasl weelc w i t h Cunforrns . To LBIV Cily Council of Grand Forlrs ofReven~~es Cited Robert Vaaler (Grand Forks at- Y~~~~~~ that Bmdley7; ficially and unanimously approv"Naturally any statements in rctorney) and a group frolll ~tate~ment regarding h i g h a y ed and adopted il. gard to clrainage i n ~ ~ be s t tentacones Township, together with an clearance at the coll~orllls 1 I.ivc as lhc actual soil conditions Bacol~ Oppasilion Notect ndvcrtisernent in Sunday's Grand to ullc~erstandi,,g~~ of federa "Of course (here are those who ant1 clrainage at the site will be Porlcs Herald by Keith Bacon, law ant1 regulations of ~ 1 Ellrear1 1 ~ disapprove. 7 would not try to del.ermining Factors. But it is our have been very disturbing." of public Roads and ~ t ; ~ ~ it ~ l ~ was for opinion that these drains and if (The Falconer farmers' l a ;n d,s D ~ ~ ~ malte you~think everyone ~ ~ ~ t for , thal is nnl so. Mr. Bacon necessary some ponding should would be bisecled by the proposed ~f~~ mayor with his iu the most vocal opponent, he provid~ aclequate clrainage, at highway route norCh of a n letter a copy of hav~ng published critical aclverminirnun~ cost. After the airport Forlts). tisenlent, which stated that the tiselnents nearly every week for is in operation, the increased opYoungs also referred to testi- ~~~~d F ~ A ~ ~ I has ~ ~ u a ~ ~~ so-, ~ ~ ~ : ' a number of mouths. I shall 1101 crat.ing revenues will p I .o v i d e 1no11y of Chief Engineer R. E. lutely 110 t,eari.ng(he conattempt, to speak for him, bul as Ilnlds to compicle ite~ilsof I h e Hl.ficlley of the highway str,ction of a new bridge and tllat we understa~cl his posilion, he j~lan which initial capital proh: nic~~l: al: a public hearing here in prol~osalto locate lnterslala iliinlrs (1) that. Interstate Highlems may cause lo be deleted. 1)ecemher. There Bradley w a s ~ i 29 tj,ro,lgl, ~ h airprt ~ ~ ~ way No. 29 slloulcl not bc huilt "We cannot alibi on the mistake quoted a s saying, "We couldn't is instigal,ecl by M ~1 . at dll, and (2) thal if it is built in Illc c,e~nent.It was an overdo any improvemenl: with a n Y ~~~dj~.,~ youngs tllal. tllc ! it should Iollow the prcsenl route sight which should have been apbriclgc across the river, or any hints that 1 of Higl~way 81 ,through the cily. parent. We are presently re- ! jnlpro\reine~~t iql the vicinity of ~ ~ may be ~ replacecl d as l,,hie[ ; ~ ~ appears to favor the builcling Hc r:hecliing the future incomes ant1 the airport: unless those airport engineer by your deparlment.of a Skidmore Avenue ir~ler-city past incomes and so far have unclearances arq resolved in some Says Matter 'Urgent' bridge and believes that can be ct~vcred nothing that woulcl lead manner." *'It' is ~ most urgent," said the clone withoul: reference to any im- I us to l~clievcthat there could he ~ ~ has ~ previously d stated l ~ . . . .. ..-..--:__. mayor's letter. "from the city's provcment of Highway No. 2 any tlcclinc in the present: reven1 standpoi111that. we Itnow wlietier 1 along Slridtnore Averiue and past ues or ilny material increase in it is Mr. B a c ~ i lor, Chief EngiI the airport. futurc cxpcnscs. Copies of finanI neer Bradlcy who correctly intercial, tables are being prepared Alternates Cited ~ r e l s the laws and rc~ulations , and will be' sent to you a s , soon "As nltcrnale contentions he governing thesc ~naitcrs." 1 as p6ssible." I also appears to believe that H i ~ h .T. L. Donoghue, presidenl c~f "If il is gning to be pons~hle _. .-. ----A the engineering tirm of Ralph H. way No. could be improver1 as for us L o have a rrcw inter-cily 1 it passcs the airport, without tlie Burke, Inc., which designed Lhe bridge and to have Highway 2 necessity of shorlcning our runproposed new airport, told City inade a four-lane highway From ways, or thal the Highway could /Manager Alan Wcbster thnt he the city to Grand Forl<s Air Force be bent north a half mile as it 1 conferred in SL. Paul Thursday Base, without interfering with thc i passcs thc airporl, IIIIIS permit-I oiwith Edgar P. Vie, a cl~str~cl operation of our airport a t ils ting us 10 lengthen our runways ficial of the Federal Av~ation present locatioo, all of our thi~illlrnod slill give a d c q ~ ~ a tclearance e Agency. They discussed tlie form ing and planning of the lasl three over the highway. He also thinks / and other deta~lsof the applica- years wc have a fineairport as it is, 1 tion to be submitted by the city vised." niust be completely reand thnt ~iorhing~rnorc thnn we I of Grand Forlts for approx~mateHistory Traced .now have is nercssary. We unly $1,100,000 in federal aid for Rcvjewing the historj~ of tl~e derstand that he feels that an airairport construclion. airport matter, the mayor's Ictter ' port should be nlnintained ollly Meanwhile, in Bismarck, nego+elated that thrce years ago, Mayfor local nitwaft end that the tiations were r e ~ o r t e d with a or Oscar Lunseth appointed a loss of our airlines service and view to solving tie problem poscornmiltee of 12 oulslanding cilii.nternationa1 port af entry W O U ~ ~ ed by Highway Commissioner / Procedures toward financing W a l t e r Hjelle's announcement zens to assisl the Council in conbe of little consetpence. We must 'the relocation of Grand F o r It s concede that he has some folloivThursday that the routing of In- ) nection with the airporl-highwayInternational Airport continuecl bridge problems. ing, but we believe it is fair tn terslale Highway 29 through the 1 Friday in the wake of reports of A plan to route the highway state that a11 representative airport is "not yet certain." "uncertainty" regarding proposed 1 another d groups who studicd the problem Relocation of Lhe airport was i east of the airport a ~ ~ higliwny routing through the airto run il west of the airport boll1 and have taka1 aclion theron disvoted unanimously by the C i t y port and of "an error" by engiwere discarded because of oppoagree with him and agree with Cou~icil earlier this month a 1 1d neers that upped the airport cost si(i011. the Council action." Webster said the city is continu' est.:illlate_@. !ipo,.p!?. . . ,Then the highway depart~iieul: Youngs added that ''!ye would/ ing its efforts to reach the filial ~ a d c a new suggcstion, to run be willing to appear before yo114 planning stage for work on the 1 e Intorstate down through the and the governor at any lime if new airport, new Highway 2 and airporl a d this was apprprpved you feel that we all could beasfit the Sltid~noreAvenue bridge. sfter considerable study. -by -- m ( - : I ; n g _ with_ ~0u.l'- -._- 1 - "-- --

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Bacon Asserfs Mavor


Keith V. Bacon has talten ex- t l ~ eheavy truclc and semi-hauling ception to certain slateinents by out of the downtown area. I would Mayor Nelson A. Youngs regard- never favor a bridge a t the Sltiding Bacon's views on the Grand inore Ave. location such as Forlis airport-highway-bridge im- is being planned, necessitating overj~assingof streets and ruinprovement project. Park ~h~ ~ ~ ~ ~ manager, t ~ ~ ing lt Slierloclc ~ h in East Grand who has vigorous~y opposed the Forlts in addition to the necessity proposed relocation of the Muni- of purchasing property that Peacipal Airport, referred to state- pie are reluctant to sell. ments made by Mayor Youngs in "There I ~ ~ L Ibe S ~ such a, thing a letter last week'to Walter Hje]le, as a practical bridge for this 10state highway colnl~issioner~ cation, similar to the DeMers He said the has urnis- Ave. bridge, which would not reideas with regard quire I-lane approaches. Such a interpreted to colnmercial aviation and the bridge would eliminate all of the airport of entryu predicted above that "the airport: will remain Perplexed Over Stand where it riow is." Bacon said: "I am perplexed Bacon said the Mayor stated at the continual insistence that\ that "I (Bacon) think that High- there will be IIO bridge unless way 29 should not be built al: all. No. 2 highway is reconstructed. chairmen of thes This was never ~ n yidea and is The con~n~ittee no1 a Lrue statement. I have al- many commiltees, along with the , , ways favored the passing through Chief Engineer of the State High:' ancl no1 by-passing Grand Forlis way kpartnient, havC apparently/ Such a move could bankrupt lost sight of the fact that since' ; many Washington Street business the construction of the Air Forcq ventures completed only in recent Base the Hifillway 1 Lraffic proh* lem has ended. It seems normal years. "This, however is par1 of the to m0sL people who are clriving1 Federal Highway prograln that, this road every day. 'fiOr thid will go where and wllen they reason, it is n ~ ycontention that ; choose and whether or not we Ilighway 2 should ,remain, that : l in Grant1 Forks like it. four lanes are pos~t~vely unnec- 1 "I know that it is very danger- essary, a1 least from thc west ous to route potenlial business on gide of tlie airport to the bridge , a by-pass around any small city approach at the cnd of Skldnlore. 'like Grand Forks especially via This distance ,call bc wiclened a considerable amount w i t h o u t I Lhe most important arterial in the touching the airport. area. Whcn the construction of "FAA as well as statc avialion No. 29 is continued to extend through the Grand Forlts area. officials, I am tolcl, will okay lhc in5 or fi possibly 10 years licncc, this simple changc wilh Llicn there is a chance tlie new stallation of Lower controlled planners will think that our city blinltcr lights a t either side of the airporl on Highway 1. should not be by-passed. Tells Airport Views "The Mayor states Ll~atI favor I a Sl;idmore Ave. Bridge. This i , ~ "'The Mayor has also inisijl;" correct to the extent that I favdr terpreted n ~ yideas wit11 re$\'a' a bridge anywherc that will take lo co~nmercialaviation a n d 4 the --. .- . - - - -- ; Airport of Entry situation. When the Airport of Entry was moved , t o Pembina beforc we had runways, several of us wbrlced diligently in getting it transferred bacli to Grand Forlcs and it has remained here since. The Airport of Entry is important to us, the location is important to the government. I predict that it will remain where it now is. "The com~nercial airlines are important to us but rio single flight of any airline is so important that we must spend millions because they cannot land for three or four weeks in the spring. When jet service is inaugurated on the Winnipeg flighl, in all probability wc will lose Northwevt but gain a Norlh Cen, tral fligllt to Winnipeg. "New airports will never stop? jets in cities a s small a s Grand Forlrs anywhere in the nation.: Passengers must plan to makk, qnch rotin~rtinnsnt i p t t@rm;n-1-

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ICr~thV. Bacon, manager of Ihc Forlts Air Force Ba:,e for any 1 :Unrutali Holel, preri~ctedIn a lallt ,Ll,lways liecdcc], should the p r e s Mon(1i~ythat Grand F o r k will be rullways be lollg shrck 1~1th what he termed an obello~lgh for jets desiring to stop , solete and unuseablP teni t r d St,~tion"in but a few years, if liere. thal L ~ c pre:;city planners go 1 h ~with ~ con~ ~ Bacon ~ 1 asbertetl ~ ent airporl need not he moved to slruclion of a ncw ailport. for the new highway 1 IIe told riiembers of thc Grealer l"al{e m - ~ n l Grand Forlts Exchange Club tIlal and thal there is adequate room cilles the size Minol, Fargo between the highway and the airant1 Grand Forlts don't sla~ida Port to widen I I i g h w a ~2. chance of becoming jet terminals The extension of the highway tahecause Iiigh-speed airliners of Llic ward the airparl need crcnte no future could not afford to abat~tlot~ hazards to aircraft, he explained,, jel streams high in the stralo- because the highway could b r %sphereevery few hundred miles lowered about six feet for the 1501 for Lo~lchdownsat inirior cities. l o 200 yards the higliway runs ill: line with the runway. This pro-, Officials Quoted olficials with whoin lie ce(lure shoulc1 prove cheaper than the ailport, he said. hrs talltcd, Bacon said, Lllinlc il more prohal-rle thal airline pas- As for arguments that a bottlb-i sengers will he ferried by Iielicop- neclc wo~ildbc created if the fourter flam cpnter of tllcM l m e highway were reduced to a smaller cities to jet terminals in lnoclified but wiciencd two-lane in, high population areas. Helicopters line with Lhe airport, Bacon as-' which will have a speed capabil- serted Illat he unders~oocl there ity ol about 200 miles per hour woulcl be n bottlcnccli further cast 1Zoar.l anyway. should nialte such a systeln feas- -along Columbia - ---_ ible, he acldccl. Re reinforced earlier statc~nentsthal Lhe present airport is adequate fnr presenl ~iccds Ily pointing 0111 that since 19% there Iiad been or~lyone accidenl involving vehicles and aircraft on Flighway No. 2 and tliat that rnibh;~p was not t h ~ h u l t of the lncation of the highway. An investigation following the mishal3 bctwecn a plane and an alltomobile-calbryilig transport resulted in a charge of negligence and the sabsequenl dis~nissalof the pilot, Bacon asserted. Leasing Discussed It is not in~prubablc, he said, I that when military aircraft are retired in favor of guidccl missiles in a few yenrs, thal fhe city1 i could lease runways a t G r a n d ' -- - --- - __I

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Airport

Aid Bid
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An application for more than, $1 million federal aid to help finance construction of a new Grand Forks hternational A i rPort has been received by City ( Manager Alan Webster and will be forwarded immediatey to of. ficials of the Federal Aviatioll Agcncy. t

Given Comparatively consistent soils, safety, efficiency and conveni- 1 ence were listed among the rea- / sons for selection of the site. A site south of the city previously had been promiaently mentioned as a prospective location but the I engineers decidcd thc west location was inore feas:ble, The City Council late in Jan' uary committed itself to relocation oi the airport.

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Airporf Revenue Bond Revived, Passed


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be addeddo Xonies from existirstrip and its builclings. The proposed site is four miles west of Grand Forks. 1 I Steps Explained If the application is approved, Lhe FAA at Washington will malced a tentative allocation of the mon-, ey. Then the city must file a pro-. ject application, colnplete with construction drawi~ngs,and if this, is approved, the FAA will offer ' a grant. Acceptance of lhis offer by the city would coinplete the agreement and "nail down" the airnorl aid money. The application, prepared by Ralph 1%. Burlre, Inc., Chicago \~onsultin~ eng:neers, indicates no . pha-nge in the last estimated lotal cost o E the project $2,500,000. This includes thd previously staled addition of $150,000 for cement' costs which h ~ d been omitted f?om an original estimate. ( Funds Itemized Iie~ns which would be added lo the aid money to coinprise lhe 1$2,500,000 tola1 cost inch e $576,. 000 offered by the state for the proposed strip through the exisling airport for Interstate Highway 20, a matter 01 70 acres of land; $176,000 in existing c i t y ' funds; $69,000 from sale of clear zqne land .near the present airport; anticipated tax revenue of $90,000, and a propose c i h rev-

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Edgar Vie, district engineer in charge of thk St, Paul office of the Federal Aviation Agency, made an inspection Thursday of the proposed site of the new Grand Forlrs Internatiohal Airport, four miles wesf of the city. He arrived Wednesday a d lefl: Thursday to visit the Grafton area befo~ereturning to St. Paul. ~ i $ Manager Alan Webster said Vie inspected the site in connection with Grand Forks pity's, application for f L,185,700 in federal aid to help finaace struction of the new airport. conThe St. Paul F A A office has the aid application under consideration and will check various angles of the proposed site before forwarding it to the Kansas City 1 \'regional FAA office for scrutiny. I.approved there, the application must ,go t~ Washingtw for final appripvril before a teptative allocation of the aid money 'can 1 be made: The ney airport would be paid with the aid money, plus iar'id sale, fur& 04 hand gnd a $580;-, OQO revenue h d ' j issue. Relocation. bf th$ pr{s8nt a i ~ o r t w?s , &$proved by th3 City Council in Decbmber.

By HERALD STAFF WRITER far as the city is concerned, all BISMARCK - A bill that gives that is necessary for approval of Grand Forks, and other cities, the the airport project is approval of right to issue revenue bonds to f$de~al-i3idand the go-ahead from, finance construction o f an airpprt the Stak ,Highway Department. was revived and paqsed' dqring "My Senate colleagues and I the wind-up stage's :of the IegisB- talked with t$e highway commisjive .sqs&ion h 'e ! @ .- . ,sioner some ti,me ago and I be' kcp. adnet\). ~ ~ w ~ ~ m n t ta a g lieve e d everytrvifig is in order for ;gcr the bill. revived through per. the acceptance of the plans propd~d by g. E. Bradley, the chief enginapr," Longrnfre said. The<1eg.islatons said::final plans : for highyay and Abfid&9 development in the Grand Forks area, which call for use of part of the city's present Municipal Airport,, i~~portance to their city aqd final- are expeqted to be worked on dur-, ly Rep. Clifford Lindberg of ing the coming week when state i J&nestobn agree'd:it'o move f i r highway orficials will meet with ;'reco1isiddr8tibn: 'S i c h motions city and county officials a t . ,I .amusY be n~ade'.by someone who Grand Forlrs. Goted:oi~the p ~ e v a i l i side i ~ in the (In Grand Forlrs City Manager' Alan Websler said no meeting has original vote, trqubfe .bd'-the'bill apparently been arranged by Highway DeI slernm& f$orfi an amendment un- partment officials, but. that it 'hek ~ l i i c hcities also were given inight be arranged at any time. the right to issue revenue'bonds A meeting scheduled earlier was canceled because of illness of for financing swimming pools, Highway Commissioner Walter Pool Provision Disliked "We almost lost the bill because $elle.) ---- .. d the swimming pool amendment," Lowe said. ''Some of the legislalors weren't in favor of giv1 ing this right lo the cities and our particular problem in Grand 1 Forks got losl in the shuffle." 1 Sen. George Longinire agreed / with Lowe on the importailce of the airport bond bill, saying it was one of the most important measllres of the sassioi~affecting Grand Forks. He noted t&t as - ---- h .

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GRAND FORKS, NORTH DAKOTA, TIIURSDAY, MAECH 9, 1961 ----

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Me@+, C o u n ~ i l On Road, Bridgq Airpar+ Plans i

Gov, William Guy told the City Council Thursday afternoon that all of his administralio~l's quesLions about the proposed bridge. highway-airport projects here have been answered satisfactorily. "I am confident that we will bc able to move out on Lhe projects , right away," he said. Guy, State Highway Commissioner Walter I-Ijelle and Highway Department Chief Engineer R. E, Bradley "went over the terrain" before attending a luncheon wilh the council. Guy said they now are able to understand the reasons for the proposals that have been made regarding the three inter' related projects. Mayor Thanked The governor thanked Mayor Nclson Youngs tor arranging die meeting and,%@essntation on the problem byhfader City Attorney Harold D. Shaft. "If those who complain would take as much time as those who want to get things done," the gov. , ernor said, "things would be better off!' Shaft des~rihodthe second Red River hridge as a "desperate need for our community." He said despite the protests Guy may have heandid; almost all rasidents of Greater. G P E'orlrs ~ ap in apgepent on f&lr things: The qebd fdf a second inter-city 1bridge, , , --

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Highway Needed The need for a four-lane, divicled highway to Grand Forks Air Force Base. That Interstate Higl~way 28 &odd be routed close enough to the city lo be a real access service to the city without preventir~gwcstward growth of the city 'and the University of North DaIrota. And, of the nced lor a good airport which will serve local flyers and allow conlinued service to the city . by . commercial airlines. Members Encouraged Several members of the council told Guy as the lneeling broke up that his relnarlrs were the "most encouraging news" the city has had in a long time. Guy had apologized for requesting thc meeting, saying that it must be frustrating to those who have worlted so long on plans to have a new stalo aclministration suddenly ask thcln t o justify the plans, Questions btiswereil IJe said that he had "a number of questions" several weelrs ago, I but Lhal all have been answered by studies of the problem in Bis- I marck and his visit to G r a n d Forks, Later Thursday ailernoon Guy ' was to meet on the highway plans , with the Grancl Forks County Com- ; lnission. IIe also expected to call on Dr. George W. Starcher, presi- ) dent of the Universily of Norlh \ Dalcota, briefly betore flying; back lo Bismarck. i
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GRAND FORKS, NORTH DAIZOTA,

SUNDAYIAPR~ 9, 1961

I tl~roygh The ~ a r e & of Public Roads, its Bismarck Division ofI

Iln+ers+bfe 29 Route Through Airport Backed

Grand F o r l ~ ~ bridge-high$ay. ' airporC package has been appyov. I ' ed by the State Highway Depqrk. , menl* and U.S. Bureau of Public Road$, Mayor Nelson T. Youngs has been informed. As a result, R. E. Bradloy, chiel engineer for the State High. way Department, says it is hopqd I {hat a December, 1961, contract letting will be possible b r a n e b inter-city bridge at a Skidtnore Avenue site. Approved By Both Bradley told the mayor that both the state and U.S. Bureau of Public Roads had "concluded that die overall public interest will be best served by a final I decision to route Interstate High- I way 20 through the Grand Forks Municipal Airpprt as px~sel~tly I planneci, and to i ~ p r o v e U.S. I Highway 'Z approxiinately on its 1 present Q$atIon fron~ g poinb j west of Grand Fokks, Bastward on I Skidmo~ Avenue, lo. b Y con?: (laetion wttPtha pi@ed n e w bridge at the SkiiYmo're. Avo~ua s,itq." ,

ifice has approved the Interstate Highway 29 location after thorough study, he added. I Right-of-way Required I I One of 'the first steps neces- , sary, Bradley said in a letter ta the mayor,. will be acquisitioiz of right-of-way through the present airport, Plans and appraisal work / are under way, he said, and "it j is hoped that it can be completed at an early date." I Funcls for acquisition of t h e right-of-way may not become 1 available until July 1 this year, he said. "With the condition that fie re, quired airport right-of-way wilI ' 'be available on a norma1 basis, we are in a position to go ahead with the proposed improvements ! on Skidmore Avenue from Colum- t bia Road eastward, including the bridge," Bradley said. "It is our I I hope that all necessary plans and procedures, including the necessary agreenlents and coordina. tion with Minnesota, will ba ac. A< complished so that a December, 1961, contracC 1 ting will be p o s sible." 1 I (Turn to P ~ g e 2, Col. 4) ,

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ment and the Bureau of P~iblic I Roads studied the resolts of a public hearing held here Dec, 13 before approving the proposed route of the interstate higlzway, Bradley said. They also gave "a thorough review of all other per-, tinent facts and information avail- j able," he added. I "Ydu are aware of the many j sladies, invesligations, meetings, t have led to the present, highway development," wrote. "These have inlvoIved cooperative planning and I agreement among two cities, two I coullties an& two s and have been a c c o h p ~ l ~ h a s a r long /period of time. R "It is our hope that all groups !will now give their full sqpport, that we can proceed with the matter of providing badly needed highway improvenlents in this area in as rapid a manner a s k;!ble." t 1 1

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hotel ma^^ Keith Bacon tossed "bombs" at the Grand Forks airport plan, the city manager ancl council, and Lhe size of the budget in a talk before the city Board of Realtors here. He spolte Thursclay in behalf of the Association of Grand Forlcs Taxpayers which is sponsoring the May 15 special election on a proposed changc from council l o commission form of city govc1.nment. Bacon related that approval i st111 has not been cecieved from the federal or state aviation authority to abandon the present I airport in favor 01 a new loca' tion and eqrcssed belief that "the traffic problen~ to Grand Forlrs Air Force Base has vanished, malting the double-Ianing o E Highway 2 entirely unnecessary". Could Be Discharged The coming election, Bacon stated, "~vould only change the form of government to a five-man ] commission" and "the cily manager would not be affected u111il com~nissio~iersdischarged t 11 e manager for cause." ' The ccn~missiuncould, he said, "call for a volc to. eliminate the office of cily manager at the first regular elcction or they can votc to call an election." I E a chnnge should bc approved, Bacon said, a comnlittee from the Association of Grand Forlrs Taxpayers would select five men who will run on a "pay-as-yougo" platform, including "no city manager, elimination of departments by turning much of city work over to private operation and stop the heavy payroll at Cily EIall." Support Urged He said it is "now or never" at ihe coming election as new I legislation "will maire it next to ( impossible to malre a cllaage as it has been with the city manager sitt~ationfor many years." He urged support of the taxpayers' plan "if for no other reason than the danger of tax increases with the 'project minded manager and rubber stamp council' that we now have." Replies To Webster Bacon spoke in reply to a tall< by City Manager Alan Webster before the realtors last month in which Webster described the progrcss of the airport relocation plan and dcsign work on the proposed Skidmorc Ave. bridge and its approach horn Columbia Rd. to L e Red River. _ _-

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The City Council Monday ap- Referred to the Finance Corn- 14th Aveilues S, from S. Washing-, [proved a request by Ralph H. i mittee and the City Board of, lon to S. 17th Street, ant1 S. 14th Burke Associates, Chicago con- Health a request by Bridgenian Street from 11th Avenue S. to the sulting engineers, that soil test Creameries for a revicw of the alley south of 14th Avenue S., and 1 borings be talten immediately to licensing provision of the city or- 15111, IGLh and 17th Streets from 1 confirm its previous findings re-. dinance relating to millc licenses 11th Avcnue S. to 17th Avenue S. I garding the suitability of soil on in order to secure "more equit- , and S. 18th and 19th Streets from the proposed new airport site four able licensing." I 11th Avcnue S, to Ninth Avenue S. rniles west of Grand Forlts. Delayed action on petitions for Requests Referred The Burlte firm submitted the Referred to the pd,lic Service 'paving Pollt Street between Linreport nn the airport removal Colnlllittee ? recl1lest by Art Hag- ~0111 Drive and Euclicl Avenue, project in January this year. It ,less to I.,4n10ve the curb and and on Euclitl Avenue from the states now that the test borings pave the berm adjacent to a lo- 1 alley between Plum and Maple to are required to complete detailed cation for a proposecl lninjatllre 1I Lincoln Drive. Also delayed acfindings regarding the proposed golf course, ~l~~location is on the tion on petitions for paving Lansite in order to prevent delay in (south side of ~ i ~ Avellue l h at ark Avenue fro11 Euclid to Linindicated approval of the project by the ~ ~ ~Street h and i for~a dis. ~ coln ~ Drive. i The ~ council ~ Federal Aviation Agency. more petilion names should be : 1allce of 100 feel to the cast. Reading Postponed ~l~~ referred to the public secured on both proposals. Study Lighting Plan Second reading o E the omellcle(l Service Committee a requesl by / civil service ordinance was post- Cliftoll Jacoby for ~ernlissionto I The possibility of widening the poned untiI May 15 to permit fur- erect a small temporary officc I W:rshinfiton Street u~iderpassas a I ther steps loward adjustment of building at 1630 Mill Rd. trnfl~c safety lneasure hnd been the wording so thal it will be s ~ t - Referred to the Public SaEety studied by the Public Safety Comisfactory to bolh tlie city and its c~lnnlittee a proposal to install millee and al the meeting, it was "yield right of way" sig~ls 011 rocommended that ilie city engiemployes. For this purpose, a meeting I Cottonwood Street at the inter- nccr confcr with State Highway with 15th Avcnuc S. Department officials to determine 1 was scheduled at the Cify 1-Iall for , scctio~~ Tuesday night to permit repre- Ordered plans and specifics- the possibility of such a step and 1 sentatives of the city, its unioil tions drawn fur paving or N. 19th to stucly possible meatis of financrepresentative, department heads I SL. bctwcen Fifth and Sixth Ave- ing it. and members of the civil service nues S. The council also: Paviug Plalls Ordered Studied the plan of local busicomnlission to "iron 0111 wrin- 1 plans and specifica- ness men to secure new lighting Itles" in the ordinance. The council also recomn~endecl that the tlons drawn' lronl 11th Aveni~eS.1 in certain business areas, with 0 11 to S. Lhc business people to fitiancc the city manager contact other larger from S. W a s h i 11 g I Stsect, and 12111, 13121 and' installationi The area affected is state cities in the meantime re- 20th -garding their civil service practhat from the Sorlie Bridge to Fijtlt Street on DeMers Avenue tices. Previous differences here had arisen regarding a so-called , alld on Thircl Slreel from DeMers "open register" for civil service ) L o ICittson Avenue. The council decided to obtain bids on the injob applicants. This had been op- / posed by union representatives 1 stallation to securc a price on and some others. which basis the business men could arrange a "cash deal" lo Aliendance Ordered 1 pay for the lights. The council also: Ordered that certain city repStudy Parade Routes resentatives attend the public 111 other action, the council reservice commission hearing in ceived an ordi~~ance oa first readthe City Hall here at 10 a.m., ing which would tighten alley April 27 on the request of the i parking enforcement. And partly Great Northern Railway Co. to because of this fact, it denied a discontinue passenger trains 9 requesl of McDonald Clothing Co. and 10 through Grand Forlts. The to construct a guard rail in its trains now operate daily except alley. Sunday between St. Paul and MiOrdered the chief of police to not by way of Fargo, C' and prepare a lisk o f recommended Forlts and Devils Lake. As1 d to routes for parades. attend the hearing were the city Alaarclecl to Midwesfern Elmattorney, the city manage1 and tric Co. of Grand Forlcs the con_e_"g!nxr-.----_ - -, -. - I tract for installation of new and converled traffic signals in the city on its low bid of $20,740.,0ne of the localians for a signal Was City officials Friday were await at Fourth Street and Universily in6 word from the Wderal AviaAvenue but a temporary slop sigll; tion Agellc~ regarding its study has been placed there instead and I , of the proposed airport site four signal apparatus for that corner miles west of the city. The Bu. now will be installed at Skidmore reau of Public Roads and the Avenue and N. 20th Street, the State Highway Department recouncil decided. cently announced their approval I _ _ . g hw ay of the bridge-airport-h i parkage.

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Bids On A i r ~ort To Be 2 -/v- 6 3 Opened Monday Nighf

All signs point to lively compe- sonry structure, one story high a tition when bids are opened by the 48 by 160 feet in ground dimenGrand Forlts City Council Monday sions. night for construction of the new Housed in the structiire will be $2,600,000 airport west of the city. offices for two airlines, a lobby, M~~~ than 40 sets of plans and a United States customs office, city airport offices and space for specifications for the projoct has another office. been mailed last week by City When the airpori bids have been Auditor Harold Martin to firms handled, the council must conscattered across the western t w e sider whether to object to proposthirds of the United States. Some ed plans by two Grand Forlts men ' were conlractors, some sub-con- to construct a new public-use airtractors interested in special port, for general aviation but not for airlines, south of the city on phases of the project. The bids are due in Martin's of- the west side of Highway 81. Seek Permission fice not later than 5 p.m. Monday and will be opened at the Odney Flaat and Jim Montgoincouncil meeting at 7:30 p.m. in ery applied to the Federal Avia- I the City Hall council chambers. tion Agency for permission to A large audience of representa- proceed with building plans for tives of interested firms is expect- the airport on a sile 1% miles ed to view the proceedings. south of 32nd Avenue S. and the FAA has asked the city if it has I 1st Phase Largest "any objections based on valid Bids to be opened Monday are aeronautical reasons.u I for the first, and principal, phase promillent On the agenda of the airport job. Items included the are construction of runways, taxi- is a 'ec0n'melldaLion ways and drainage facilities. cil's committee-of-the-lvhole that Solne time laler, bids will be ask- the city manager pelition case be ed for the secolld phase, cornprism appealed to the North Dakota I ing the maintenance equipment preme building, water alld sewage facili- In this controversial tussle between the city governmenl and ties and the entrance road, a n ~ the third consisting of the the Association of Grand Forlts Taxpayers, Judge Hamilton Engterminal building. lert held on Feb. 9 that the coun-, Target date for colnpletion of ci17s pelition checlters abused I the airport is Nov, 15, 1983. This their discretion in holdillg insufresull i~ the ficient on Dee, 3, 1962, ptiliolls so that it not 'lave to asIting a vote on retention of city repair the Presanl niallager government here, ways next spring as has been reVote To Appeal auired each vear in recent vears. The controversy over whether ' The new airport site is "three and one-half miles west of the to appeal the case racked the present airport. It consists of ap- council committee at its meetproximately 1% sections of land ing Feb. 8 and the group finally lying about one-quarter mile north voted 8 1 to 6 to proceed with the appeal. of U.S. Highway - 2. The council also will hear a re1 2 Ru~lwaysPlanned port of the Citizens' Urban Re1 There will be two runways, the newal Study Committee and will I main strip lying north and south, coilsider on second and final readbeing 5,300 feet long, and a cross- ing two ordinances, one to rezone wind runway 4,200 feet in length. two lots in Alexander & Ives AdThe main runway will run par- dition to general business area allel to the main strip at Grand and another to adopt by reference Forks Air Force Base, 10 miles the North Dakota State Pliunbing west of the new city airport. 1 Code. 1 The terminal building, last A number of routi~leitems also for consideration at phase of the project to be constructed, will be a brick and ma-

GRAND FORKS - James T. Montgo~iieryhas a top reputation as a flyer and has done a terrific job of building a business ini~~ortant to the Grand Forlts Community. He is a personable man, one whom I lilie and enjoy talking with. However, I disagree with, the biased picture he pr~~sents as the I-easons for establishment of a second airporl in the Grand Forlts area. He states that the prssent airport has an excellent location. It is convenient for those who use the airport, BUT, the runways do not have the required clearances over the highway on the north, the railroad on the east and the F the railroad on the southeast. I runways were shortened to iiiect clearance requirements, they would be shorter than the runways lie proposes for his new airport..His airport is not proposad for airline use and the runway lengths would prohibit airline use. Thus the present airport coulcl only be used for sillall aircraft if it were to conform to the required standards. Does he believe that the City of Grand Forlts should spend tax money to maintain an airporl to be used only by Lhose who have their own airplanes? He quotes Harold Shaft on the reason for public tax support of an airport. In so doing, he infers that only the airlines are wanted on that airport. Nothing could be farther from the truth. General aviation is important to the community and those who own and operate their own aircraft are not second class citizens. They are a very important part of the aviation picture in Grand Forle and their needs have been given much consideration in the design o f the proposed new Municipal Airport. His quotation of percentages of income from general aviation nnd from airlines may be correct. I believe in his veracity, BUT, anyone drawing a paycheck ltnows there is a difference betweed) gross income and take-home pay. You must live on the talte-home pay, not the gross. These per-, centages are very misleading. When the cost of merchandise sold is deducted from the gross income in each case, the airline-general 1 aviation parcentages of the tiel are cluite different, It is this nel tbal. provides the funds for operation and maintenance of lhe airport.

3.-/7-6 3 THE AIRPORT QUESTION

If the people o f Grand Forlcs believe that Grand Forks .will: prosper and grow without airline service, theti [he Montgomery airport will serve the needs of the com~nunity, but, the 'Municipal Airport is necessary if the airline service is n~~eded. My sole co~nplaintagainst Mr. Montgomery is that he considers f his ow11 seg- , only the needs o ment of the aviation industry and ! does not consider the total needs, of the conitnunity. There is some doubt that the; City of Grand Forks can successfully operate an airport without I the iniporlant general aviation, segn~entof the industry, but there is no doubt that it can not operate / an airport without. the airlines. The City proposal is to operate n niodarn airport facility to meet the community needs for ALL i segments of the aviation industry, MI.. Montgomery would deny fl major part of Lhat induslry from having any part in our conlinl~nity existence. TAOBURN F. PETERSON,

3- /7-6-7 AGENDA

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CITY COUNCIL MEETING MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 1963


ROLL CALL: READING A N D APPROVAL O F MINUTES: February 4, 1963 PUBLIC HEARINGS, PETI'I'IONS, REMONS'TRANCES A N D COMMLINICATIONS:

Sealed bids for construction of Grand Forks airport. 3-21 Request for consideration of installing school crossing signal at 23rd o r 25th Avenue N. and 2nd Avenue N. 3-3 Consideration of resolution for Gauchos (Sondreal). 3-4 Resolution for annexation of portions o f Sunset Acres Third Addition. proper3-5 Reques) +o install lighting facility above ~ u b l i c .i)r at rear of new First Federal Savings and Loan Buildrng. 3-6 Communication relative t o continuance of garbage container program. 3-7 Inspection during airport construction. 3-8 Petition for vacation of Ella Street between Maple Avenue and Lincoln Drive. 3-9 Petition for watermain on S. 2Ist Street from 7th Avenue S. to Westward Drive. 3-10 Petition for watermain on S. 20th Street from 13th Avenue S. to 17th Avenue S. 3-1 1 Petition for paving Oak Street and Olive Street from 25th Avenue S. t o 28th Avenue S., 28th Avenue S. from Cherry Street to the lot line between Lots I 6 and 17, Block 8, White Clover Subdivision, and S. 10th street from 24th t o 25th Avenue S. 3- 12 Various surety bonds.

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REPORT OF OFFICERS: Various reports. 5 ACCOUNTS, CLAIMS A N D BILLS: 5-1 Monthly bills for January, 1963. 5-2 Time rolls for January, 1963 REPORTS OF STANDING COMMITTEES: Review of annexation of area north of city,.relative t o postponement until July. 6-2 Proposal for school stop signal at University and Stanford Road. 6-3 Request t o consider yield right-of-way signs a t 5th and Belmont interseciion. Notification from Federal Aviation Agency relative t o proposed new public use airport. 6-5 Recommendation from Committee o f the Whole on Court decision relative t o city manager plan election. 6-6 Report of Citizens' Urban Renewal Study Committee. b

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PRESENTING O F ORDINANCES: Public hearing and consideration on second reading and final passage of an ordinance rezoning Lots 9 and I I, Block 49, Alexander & Ives' Addition, t o B-l (Gen. eral Business). Consideration on second reading and final passage of an ordinance t o repeal the detail specifications of the Grand Forks Plumbing Code and adopt by reference the North Dakota State Pl~lmbingCode with amendments. UNFINISHED BUSINESS: Estimate No. I for construction of fence enclosure at Public Works property.

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CITY AMZ AVIATO S MY friend jini do~&l!er$,% the February 14 Mail Bag, correctly quoted tlie transcript of a portion of my statement at the t'y-6 -3 Highway Department public hearing of December 13, 1960. However, I believe that the transcript omits one word that I used. It indicates that I said "We are not supporting an airport for the purpose of providing a place for these local commercial operaMegarry Bros. of St. Cloud, tors to fly their airplanes anyMinn., submitted the apparent low more than the city would be paybid of $1,484,136.45 among eight ing for my office downtown." I bidders at the City Council meetbelieve that I actually said we ing Monday night for construction were not supporting an airport of the new Grand Forlrs Airport. "only" or "just" or "merely" for The council then tentatively the purpose of providing a place awarded the contract to Megarry for these local operators, etc. At subject to final approval by the least, that's what I meant and Federal Aviation Agency, which intended to say. was expected to be received withI appreciate fully the position in a few clays. Targel date for of the local operators. I know completion of the airport job is that they are a strong and vital Nov. 15, 1963. part of our local economy, that Bidding was on the first and they pay more local taxes than principal phase of the airport projtlie airlines, and that they are a ect including the runlays, taxifine thing for our community. The ways and drainage facilities. The citizens committee and the City second phase consists of mainteCoullcil were both aware of Bis. nance equipment, building, water For this reason they insisted on a and sewage facilities and enhard-surfaced cross-wind runway trance road, and the third phase for light aircraft, and upon space is the lerminal building. The latbeing provided for private planes, ter two contracts are expected to hangars and service, both involvbe let this spring. ing considerablc expensc. I am Big Help Seen sure that all aircraft, large and small, and all operators and air Mayor Nelson A. Youilgs said services will be most welcomc at he was "very happy" over the the new municipal airport. bid, which is approximately 15 per cent below the consulting enThe quote re~iiarlt was not gineer's estimate of $1,754,117. He made with any intention to beviewed the outcome of the bidding little tlie local operators. Instend, as a big help in financing the it was made in connection with project. my argument that Grand Forks City Auditor Harold Martin simply must have an airport useopened the bids before an overable by the airlines; that if we flow audience including contracshortened our runways a1 the old tors, architects and other interairport to meet CAA and Nighested persons. Officials of the way safety requirements, ccrtairiFAA and of the Ralph H. Burke ly Northwest, and probably North Associates, airport consulting enCentral, could no longer land gineers, sat a t a table inside t11e here; and that It Grand Forks council horseshoe. ever lets itself get isolated from airline passenger and mail servBidding Range Wide ice, as i l is now practically isolatThe range of the bidding was ed from rail passenger service, wide, with more than $1 million our town could expect nothing but separating high and low proposto go dcf~n hill in the air age als. The bids were: which lies ahead. Schultz & Lindsay Construction Neither the committee nor the Co., Fargo, $2,727,962.05; Central Council is trying to do something States Construction Co., Crosbyfor the airlines. We are interestWillmar, Minn., $1,783,424.60; ed only in Grand'Forks, which we Wcstern Contracting Corp., Sioux sincerely believe must have airCity, Iowa, $1,814,335.75; McCorline service if it is to continue mick-Erling Co., Fargo, $1,670,to grow and prosper, and we can't 101.80: Megarry Bros., $1,484,-, have that service without an airU6.45: McCree & Co., St. Paul, 1 port which meets CAA standards. $2,083,933.02; Johnson, Drake & 1 If anyone wants to compete Piper, Inc., Minneapolis, $1,893,~wlthtlie city for the private oper436.65: S. J. Groves & Sons Co., atop' business, no one can q ~ p Minneapolis, $1,840,778.70. tionlhjsright to do so. But hei (Turn t o Page 10, Cola 3) shouldn't act oh tlie asi?mpJ%inJ ,*. that he must do so because the! city doesn't want him and his business. If anything I said made the private operators think the! committee or the Council do not, like or want their business, let{ me eat (mycareless words right naw. Of course the city wants \hem l HAROLD SHAFT

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:Firm Has Low Bid

ST. CLOUD
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Representing the FAA at the meeting were Edgar Vie, assistant district airport engineer, St. Paul, and Glenn Haugen, FAA I airport engineer for North Dakota. I Burlte Associates, which the city Ftonr The Hr,rnEd's i hired as consulting engineers for Bi+nrnrck B I I O II I I L I the airport project, was representBISMARCK The North Daed by J. L. Donoghue and Harald 1 kota House of Representatives' Vinje, both of Park Ridge, Ill. Political Subdivisio~ls Committee I Monday put its seal of approval 1 Vie said the council's contract 1 on a measure which would allow award would be subject to appyova city to act as its own airport al by the FAA but that if everyauthority. thing appears in order, approval should come within a few days. The bill, previously passed in 1 the Senate, was slightly amended 1 The site of the new airport is by the committee. Action was ex3% miles west of the present airpecied to approve the amendport, on the north side of U. S. Highway 2. 1 ment. Final action on the bill may be taken before the end of the Need for colnpletion of the air- 1 I week. port job this year was stressed The bill would allow Grand i by city officials who would dislike Forks and other cities to have all 1 having to repair the runways of the powers of an airport authorthe present airport again this ity. Included in these powers spring to permit continuance of would be issuance of revenue anairlines service. ticipation bonds for airport con2nd Proposal Collsidered struction purposes. Another airport proposal also The bill has been considered by was considered by the council Grand Forks city officials as esduring the busy Monday session. sential in the construction of the This was the one proposed to be new municipal airport there. The 1 constructed by Jim Montgomery, city of Bismarck also has been local crop duster, and Odney I backing the bill. Flaat, Grand Forlis, on FlaatThe amendment, which does not owned acreage lying 1% diiles affect Grand Forks, would allow south of 32nd Avenue S. a protest by the voters in cases The matter came before the where airports have a restrictive council in a notice from the FAA 1 deed with the federal government relative to the proposed new "pubfor airport land. - -lic use airport." The FAA asked -. the council for any "valid aeronautical objections" to the p!ojI ect. 1 I Ci,ty Engineer Thoburn Peter- ( son was called on to explain his views in the matter. He stated that he hacl no "valid aeronautiOfficial approval of the contract' cal" objections to the plan but / award to Megarry Bros. of St. pointed to certain factors he beI Cloud, Minn., for construction of lieved should be considered in the new Grand 'Forks Airport has , connection with the proposal. been received by City Manager Scl~ool Location Noted Alan Webster. He noted, for instance, the proxThe $1,484,136.45 contract was imity of certain buildings and awarded to Megarry by the City building sites and the continuing I Council Feb. 18 subject to FAA growth of the city soutl~wardto- I approval. ward the proposed airport site. Webster said there now remains He cited Schroeder Junior High only the actual execution of the School being lvcated a t 32nd Avcontract and the completion of I enue S. and Cherry Street, just formalities in connection with it, /one and one-half miles north of including a performance b o n d, l the airport location; that there is insurance, etc. These details are a right-of-way reservation for an !expected to be cleared within a arterial street through the airport week or 1D days. site, that Interstate 29 will cut When first work will be done across the section in which the on the airport site five miles west new airport would be located, that I of Grand Foi.lcs was not yet the new drive-in theater location i known, although principal activity 1 is in the area north of the airport; Is expected to be started after site and that the city continues to I the frost goes out in the spring. grow to the south. Meanwhile, there a r e two farm The council finally decided it houses and a number of other should get clearanc farm buildings on the airport site ier ,from the State partment and that t which will be removed by Megarxy Bros. before other work is to the city should be doqe. I to the department a10 erson's comments, eration.

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!Airport City F O -A2Te .3 r -3 - ,3 - d 3 3 $ 3 Of Airtort Site I Bill Passed The City of Grand Forks bethe owner of record Wed'/ came nesday of the site of its new airport following the conlpietion of
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final steps in the acquistitian of 1 title and recording of the deed to the property. The property is equivalent in area to one and one-half sections of land. The site and the clear zones comprise a segment of land approximately in the shape of a huge cross, located at the north edge of U.S. Highway 2, about three miles west of the present city airport. Contract for construction of the t first phase of the new airport has bee11 let to Megarry Bros, of St. Cloud, Minn. The project is scheduled for colnpletion by Nov. 15, 1963.

BISMARCIC - Tlic Nortb D a k ~ la House of Represenlatives passed the so-callcd "airj~art bili" Saturday in an anlender1 forin. ; :Vote on lhe measure was 35-9. ; I The bill allows a city governi ~ n c n tto act as its own airpull I authority. 'l'he clly goveranlcnt nluy then is5ue rcvcnur! anticipatitax bond3 for construcl~on pur-

Prorrr ?'hrr I.Iorctld'.s ilisrr~trrc*/i Hrlrcr~tr

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Grand FOI-lts city officials h ; ~ d strongly bacliecl the bill, They ter~ncdit "very i~nl~ortarll" in Ihr: devclop~nentof the new 1nu11rcip:tl airport t h c ~ c . The revenue bo~lds in Grand IForlts would be bacl:c!d by 1112 I revenues of thc airport, plus the 14-mill ritywidc levy for ailpa t purposcs which is now in effect. The anlendn~entsmust now go to (he Senate for approval by that body. The ameudmenls deal with i certain special cases in the state, ~vhcrethere is federal land invol\.ed in the airport. Grand P0rh.i i s not affected by - _t11c amendments. - ---1

A i v ~ o r f Site Annexation ,a-3- 6 3 On City Council's Agenda


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A resolution to annex to the arranged, it wiU mark another I1 I 'city the new Grancl F'orlts airport final step preliminary to actuall 'site and a connecting strip with construction of the new airport, I the city will be acted on by the City c~~~~~~~ at its meeting at starting when weather permits in 17:30 p.m. Monday at the City the spring. It is to be completed Hall. by Nov. 16 under terms of the The sile includes a section and construction contract with the a half of land three miles west of general contractor, Megarry the present airport and north of Bros. of St. Cloud, Minn. 1 U.S. Highway 2. The connect- Other matiers to corne before ring strip lies on State Highway the council include petitions and Department right-of-way a 1 o n g requests for rezoning, paving a n d , the higl~way'snorth edge. It is 25 water lines, a sewer connection I 1 feet wide. fee ordinance and further consiI The Highway Department has deration of the mobile l~oome orbeen contacted regarding the mat- dinance. ter and has no objection to the The council will have before it procedure, according to City En- for the special city election on regineer Tlmburn Petcrson. tention of city manager governWhen the annexation has been l ment in Grand Forlts. I -----. -

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Letters on timely subjects invited. Limit letters t o 300 ruords: Herald resemes tight to conderrae. Gibe narne arid udrlress; ilurna omitted i ~ rpulrlicution ors rcrlzrest.

Letters o n timely subjects invited. Limit letters to 300 words; Herald resorues right to condense. Give nanre a n d , address; name omitted in publication o n request.

I 'w0~11d call their attention to CITY ELECTION VIEW GRAND FORKS - iqow that chapter 40-10-07 which states that 1 the powers or duties imcontracts have been let for the I ' I . "first pllasem of the new airport posed or granted by law to the construction project it can be con- executive officer of the governing ( cluded that the city council has body shall be deelned to be susno intelltion of consulting the peo- pended for and during the periocl ple as to how their money is to in which the city-manager plall is in force in the City and durillg be spent or their property gaged. This is not the first multi- 1 the employment of a city manmillion dollar projdt wMch has ager thereullder." In other words, the City ManI been jammed through on tile sole I recommendation 0: tho+ who ager, who is not an elected official, has dictatorial powers over I initiated it. Of course, we are told that a YOU' Mayor and your City Coun- 1 you "committee of our fellow citi- cil zens" studied this matter at great Actually, we may hope that tholength and voted, unanimoosly, pwsent City Manager will be leavthat the city should proceed with ing Grand Forks in the near fu- / the "package deal." What we ture regardless of the outcome of 1 were not told was exactly how the election since his reputatiod for promoting multi-million dollar many of the colulnittee me~nl~ers were actually present when this projects is now established and I he may soon be eligible to move 1 "unanin~ity" was reached. talIt was alfortllante that bile pea- on 10 a larger city where l ple of Grand Forks were L'touted" ents for banlrru~ting the property to a owners will meet an even greater, 1 the proposal to I commission form of government 1 challenge. When this occurs, and 118 months ago. Had that proposal i if the manager plall is retained, to see ancarried we would now have the We Can then right of referenduln and could other bright Youllg man, from a 1 have forced the city administra- smaller town, brought in to gain \ deal" his experience and reputation at tion to put the our expense. to a vote.

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The people were told that this I projecfwould be carried out with- ' out extracting additional levies lfrom the thxpayers. They were 1 told that any deficit between funds l on hand and the cost of the Dro-

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jcct wodld be obtained from the Biarnrocl, Bltrc,ult 1 sale of revenue bonds. It was nev- BISMARCTC - A joint Soilateer made clear where they expect- House conferellcc co~n~uittee Moned to find a responsible company day decidecl on the final forln of willing to buy revenue bonds on the so-called "airport bill." a fncility that loses money con- The cotllmittee hacl becn apsistently. NOWconles a rush in or- pointed to worlr out details of a der to leave us without an air- 1 protest provision which hacl been port! This action is ridiculous and j put on the bill in the House. of should be investigated, I Representativcs. On March 18, the people of this As the bill will now reach the city will have an opportunity to floor of both houses for final acvote on the rotelltion of the City tion, it says that 20 per cent of Manager form of government. assessed valuation in the city Many words will be exchanged could protest the issuance of gonand many pcrsonalities blackened era1 obligation bonds for airport in an effort to take the attelltion construction. I of the voters away from the main Grand Forlcs is not affected by L issue. tho protest provision. The li~nits Tile people, and particularly the of the bill would not allow Grand members of the League of Wolllen Forks to issue general obligation Voters, should be advised of a section of t l ~ eNorth Dalrota Staconcur in the tutes that will not be brought out co~nmittse r e p o r t, by the proponents of the manager would be allowecl to @Y!P.L--.. - -- . :ssue revenue allticipation bonds 1 for airport construction, All rev- 1 eoues, however, must come from i income of the airport and the, I four.mill city-wide levy for air/ port purposes. Action on the committee reporl was expected late Monday or I Tuesday. __ I -__I

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hind it. They are also going to GRAND FORICS - In answer- limit the number of operators ing ~ h Peterson's ~ Mail b BQ ~ on the ~ field, which is illegal on letter on the airport situation, I any airport with federal funds in make further comments and ask it. questions which I wish he would 4. I would like to see in black answer for the public to read: and white how the net income of 1 . why wasn't the already FAA airlines compares with that: of (then CU) approved ex- general aviation. Who causes the pansion plan, drawn up and ap. extensive runway repairs that 1 in 1943, used? provid,ed are so vital to this airport? Thou1 for a 6100 foot NW & SE runway sands of dollars are spent each to the present one, by year On the runways for I parallel . caused by the moving it over southwest: of t{?e has to ]lave fie present nine hundred feet, equipnlentrdnways clear of s n m 24 hours a This would involve the city buyand days a When ing about fifty acres of land instead of seven quarters. TIle rest the already government-subsidized were refueling in of the present airporl would be retained for both general and air- Grand Wrks, why did the city sell fuel to them at 3c a gallon line use. over cost and everyone else pay 2. u n l ~ can they get a full price or ~ O Ca gallon over highway between the cerneterles cost? 1 repeat, how much taxes on Slridmore, but have to take do the airlines pay into ~~~~d several acres out of the north end ~~~k~ with *e airplane of the existing airport when go- owners on the field? I ing by it? 5. Why wasn't this airport quoswas inforllled by Our Pestion put to the vote of the people ent airport manager of the proposed facilities at rhe new airport rather than city hall malting the for general aviatioll they decision? One of the councilmen were none. The only office space asked for it lo be put to a vote provided was for airlines and of the people and he was voted down to four, customs in the administration 6. Why did Interstate 29 have building. I have a 20-year contract f ~ i t hthe city for space for nly to go through the middle of an building, but at this new airport established municipal airport and 4 1 doing so cut U P the most valumy contract mcans nothing, He 1 inforn~edme my lease would be able farm land so as to make several times higher, if my loca- this land next to worthless for tion was comparable to bhe one 1 farming Purposes? 'fiere w e r e now have, I have to pay several thousand signatures obfor half the concrete in the ramp tained on petitiolls opposing this by farmers and people in in front of it, and half the cost h f t h e bIacl<top entry road be- the community, but it Was ignored ( -by city hall. -There is no question that the present airport could have becn i saved economically by using the 1 method described in question 1. I The future will tell whether or not the airport can survive on the airline income alone as it is 1 indicated thal it can. It's as the old saying goes, "The steam that: blows the whistle doesn't turn the wheels." JIM MONTGOMERY j

ANSWERS CITY ENGINEER

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ANSWERS M3NT&O+@N I Grand Forks --1n th %arch 12 Herald, Jim Montgomery presented a numbered list of questions which he asked that I answer for the benefit of the p u b lic. He then gave his own answers to those questions. Since his answers are not in accord with the facts, I am happy to answer for the benefit of the pub lic. 1. I have no knowledge of the 1943 plan he refers to as having been appwed by the CAA. Tlie Master Plan of the present airport labeled "as built" carries the date 11-21-49. This does not correspond to his version in any . way. If there were such a plan, a p proval in 1943 is not binding upon the FAA in 1963. In 1956, the clear zones were added to the present airport with Federal Assistance, yet, immediately thereafter, a request for assistance in resurfacing the runways was rejected because of inadequate clearances over the railroad and over U. S. Highway No. 2. Any such 6100 foot NW & SE runway as described would not have those required clearances. . Engineering studies: by myself, later repeated by Forx Engineering, showed that it would cost the City of Grand Forks less money to build a new airport than to bring the present airport up to standards. These I studies were made independently, but the same conclusion was reached. 2. The decision of the Highway Department to take several acres from the northend of the airport 'was a result of the decision to construct a new airport, not a cause. While it is true that the Bureau of Public Roads was unwilling to participate in improvement of Highway No. 2 so long as the airport was bz that location with inadequate clearances, the additional land from the a i r p r t was taken to obtain a better design configuration for the highway, not to force removal of the airport. Had the Interstaie Highway been located elsewhere and this additional land not been available, the Highway No. 2 improvement would have occurred within the existing - right-of-way. , -I

The ailines provide 22% of the 1 nct revenue from which the airport operates. The operators based on the field provide 41/z%. Other locally owned aircraft provide 9%. Transient aircraft passing through (a part of general aviation) provide 19.8%. The balance is a subsidy from the airport levy, 44.7% of the net. Incidentally, many of those transient aircraft are going to or coming from Canada and use the airport custom facilities. They would not land where such facilities were not available. The fuel for the airlines was handled on a service fee basis. The city did not buy the fuel 3. ~ r Midboe, . the airport man- ' ager, could have shown you the planned construction on the new airport. This shows hangars to be moved from the present airport and a flight line office. These facilities are completely unrelated to airline operations and can only be for general aviation use. They are also at the expense of the city without participation by the FAA. How much additional hangar space will be constructed (at city expense without FAA participation) has not been finally determined. The plans have not yet been approved to call for bids. Phase I, the basic airport, has been bid and the contract awarded. Phase I1 and Phase 111 are yet to come. The contract for space for the Montgomery building on the present airport included a clause that the contract was void i f the airport were moved. It stipulated the possibility of this occurrence and specified that the fa- ' cilities would be removed at the owner's expense. It further stated that this contract would guarantee the same space as desirably located, if possible, at the same 1 price, $100 per year. Is this a contract that means nothing? Jim Montgomery accepted this contract despite these warning, provisions, but now says the City is being unfair to him. Since there has not yet been any application to lease space on the new airport, the fees for such a lease have not been discussed nor a policy established. This will be done by the City Council, not by the Airport Manager, the City Engineer, nor the City Manager. Similarly, the statement that the number of operators will be limited is a deliberate falsehood. One of the members wf Jirn ; Montgoinery's Taxpapers Assocb ation has been talking about an exclusive fixed base operation; for himself, but there has not' been any discussion or decision by the City Council,
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The greatest damage to the runways has been from airline operation, it is true. But general aviation also wants the runways cleared of snow. Does Jim Montgomcry believe that the taxpayers of Grand Forks would continue to pay the airport levy to subsidize the airport just For genera1 aviation? He must be well 1 aware that the subsidy is for the ' sole purpose of keeping airline service into Grand Forks even though general aviation does benefit. -' and resell it to the airgks. The airlines bought the fuel and the citv handled it through for them. 1 shEinkage losses and such were not included in the city expense but were at airline cost. It costs very little more to put 800 gallons in an airliner than it does to put 4 0 gallons in a private aircraft, In similar vein, why dws the truck driver taking 50 gallons pay less than the private motorist taking 15 gallons? 5. Since no new taxes are involved in the construction of the new airport, the law does not require a vote of the people. The decision was made by the City Council, the elected representatives of the people. 6. Interstate ,29 did not have to go through the middle of the airport. It was proposed first through the middle of the University Housing area east of the tracks. This was objectionable. The other alternative was much farther west, completely by-passing G r a n d Forks, leaving the city as anothI er "Ghost Town" disconnected I frum the world. The airport loca-: , tion was chosen to help the city of Grand Forlts obtain sufficiept Ilnoney from the old airport so it /would be unnecessary to levy new taxes to construct the new airport. With this location, the city is getting about $900,000 from the old airport. Without the Interstate there, it is doubtful that he price would have exceeded $300,000. RegardIess of location, the interstate highway would ialre farm )land. There is considerable disagreement with the Montgomery statement concerning the farm 1 I land adjoining being next to wotthI less, Jiin Montgomery's final paragraph is a completely biased and distorted statement. The two independent engineering s t u d ie s showed that it was not econwolcal to attempt to maintain the present airport. Jim Montgomery and his associates are the only ories I who have indicated that the city airport would survive on airline incme alone, My last reply indicated that it was doubtful that it could survive wlthout general aviation, But, it is a certainty j that it could not survjve, ~j~thout 1 the airline service.

THOBURN F. PETERSON

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A MULTI-MILLION-DOLLAR shopping center in the Grand Forlts Airport area was the lopic as M. D. Spivak, (center), president of Castle Investments, Ltd., of Winnipeg, outlined plans for the developmenl he expects to start building in 1964. Listening to Spivak as he made his announcement at a meeting here are Lloyd V. Hillier, left, president ol the Grand Forlts Council, and Edward L. Olson, presidenl of the Chamber of Coinmerce. (Herald Photo).

M. D. Spivak, Winnipeg finan- ern 110-roola air-conditioned mocier, announced here Thursday tel, a large national discount / t h a t he has engaged a leading house, supermarkets, a large na'United States developer to carry tional department store, a shoe out a multi-million dollar develop- store, drug store, bowliw lanes, ment of part of the present Grand open-air drive-in theater, restaurant, a modern air-conditioned ofFqrlts airporl area. Spivak is president of Castle In- fice building, apartment bloclcs vestment, Ltc1.i of Wmnipeg, whicl~ and approximately 1,500 homes. paid $l,0&;ind August, 1902, for an Spivak said Draper and I<ra- . . I " -- -optiori' to,' pEirchase rfie i?rporl mer have negotiated with a number of national merchandising land for $495,@00. ' He said his firm has retained firins wilh reference to the pro.Draper & ~ r a m i r of Chicago tc posed shopping area and that a develop the krea for a shopping large share of these firms have center and the balance for indus. indicated their desire to locate on try and housing. The cost was es- the project. He said because negotimated at $4 n~illionexclusive oi tiations still are pending he did not deem it advisable to list the housing. The plans call for a large mod- names of the firms but that they - --- - - are some of .the largest merchandising firins in the Unitecl States. \
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1964 Start Seen Thc Winnipeg man made lhe announcement to a group of Grand Forks City and Chamber of Commerce officials and newspeople at the Cily Armory-Auditorium late 1 I Thursday afternoon. 1 Spivak said he felt confident' that the developmenl will be carried out. If it is, he said, the first work on the project would be started early in 1964. He lsaid he expected to take up Lhe purchase option on Lhe land before the May 31 option deadline. After taking up the option, and upon delivery of vacant possession of the present airporl land, the Castle firm would pay the for land. balance of the inoney . . -- lhe --4 Tracls Included Incli~dedin the land negotialions arc four tracts, two lying on ei- / ther side of the new Interstale Highway 29 strip ancl the others a t eithcr end of the airport. There are approximately 80 acres on the West side of the No. 29 strip, a like acreage on the easl side and 10 acres at the norlh edge of U.S, 1 Highway 2 north of the airport. 1 The remaining piece is the 20- 1 acre Fairlawn Addition a t lhe J south edge of the main runway. The oplion agreement provides that if the University of North Dakola does not buy the 20 acres for $35,000, the Castle firm will have first chance to purchase it. The firm wants the land if thc University does not take it, Spivak said. Officials Elated City officials were elated a t Lhc latest development in lhe nego-1 tialions which have been carried 1 on since last August between Spi- ' valt and City Manager Alan Webster for sale of the land. They were excited about the big development plans and also because the nearly half nill lion dollars they would 'receive for the land would materially aid in financi~ig construction of the new air~ort. west of --the city. . -- . - -. . Snivak a i d in his announcenlent 1 tliai because the building of both Highways 2 and Interstate 29 and ' t h e interchange between tlsm m a y obstruct the shopping center during construction, the national, firms in particular require assurance that access to the shopping center will not,be obstructed dur-

ing the building period. He said this has created a problem which his firm is trying to solve in cooperation with the North Daltota 1 Highway Department. Webster informed Spivak, however, that he had been told by Highway Commissioner Walter 'Hjelle that the present interchange design and access points a t the interchange location now have been stabilized and that only 1 arrangements for detour roads remained to be coq&ete& - not Spivak said, "We have dealt wilh any small retail outlets because we felt that the downtown merchants are entitled to first priority, especially in the fields OF shoe stores and men's and women's apparel shops. Draper & K r a ~ n e rmill in the near future contact the downtown merchants to ascertain their needs in tge new shopping center. Great Benefit Seen "As the success of the new shopping center depends upon the people residing in the Grand Forks area, evetything will be done to give the local merchants and residents first preference. Not one dollar will be spent outside, the Grand Forks area if requirenients can be met in the Local area a t competitive prices, 1 1 "We feel that Grand Forks will be greatly benefitted by this de-' I velopment because preferencc will be given to local contractors, local builders and local suppliers. No1 including the h o u s i n ~ and 1 1 apartment Mocks, our cyrrent es- I timate of constri~ctingthis develop~nenlwill be well over $4 million." -- -. - - -. .

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LEGAL NOTICES
DAKOTA

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1#EXTENDING RESOLUTIONADOPTED MARCH 4,1963 BOUNDARIES OF T M


CITY Or? GRAND FORKS. NORTH
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Whereas, the. number of rouerty owncrs In the Lerrltory herelna?tcr described I I and there bein no assessed valuation, i no assessment Raving been made of the 1 Prollerty O f the C I ~ Y ot Grand Forks 1 nor of the Property of tlic North Dakota State Hlnhway Department, and I Whereas, the area within said territory i s less than one-fourth of the Dresent area of the City of Grand Forks, and Whereas t!~c munici~al services offer- / cd by the' Clt of Grand Forks are de. sired in and dlcsirable for said territory, and Whcrceg, said territo7 7s not now Included w~thin the boun anes of any Incornorated municinal~tv. NOW. THEREFORE: 'BE IT RESOLVED by the Mayor and Clt Counc~i of the Cltv of Grand Forks,. A r t h Dakota that the boundaries of sald City af rand Forks be extended ,to ~nciude , the following described territory, to.wlt: Bc!4illIIin~ at the nohit oE iiitersectlon of tlve east line of tile Northwest Quarter (NW W of Section 6. Township 151 North Jan e 50 Wesl w ~ t h the. south line df the aorth ~ a k d t aState Highway f i f ~ ~ ; p p : o ~ l ~ ~ d of -w United a ~ States

has been cnmuuted. to be Twelve (12)

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All pilots, aircraft owners and t 1 other interested parties seeking inforillation regarding facililies or other matters pertaining 10 the I new Grand Forks Inernalional Airport are requested by Norman Midbw, airport manager, to contact him at the airport.
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President George W. Starcher of the Unixfgrsity o f North Dakota has notified City Manager Alan Webster that the University will purchase the 20-acre Fairlawn Ad. dition west of the campus from the city for $35,000. The city had reserved the right to sell the piece to the University under the terms of an option agreement with Castle Inveslments, Ltd., of Winnipeg, which expects to purchase approximately 170 acres of land in the present airport area for $460,000. The option expires May 31, by which time Castle Investments will announce its final decision regarding taking up the option. M. D. Spivak, president of the Castle firm, said his company already has spent considerable sums of money in investigation and financial arrangements preliminary to the proposed multimillion dollar development of the airport area. The area includes land oh either side of the Interstate Highway 29 strip and at the north end of the present airport. The Fairlawn Addition is located east of the Great Northern Railway tracks and south of University Avenue. It is adjacent to part of the present University housing area*
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Final plans for the second phase of construction of the new Grand Forks Airport have been received by the office o f City Manager Alan Webster. The plans include water and sewage installations, access road and the equipment storage and electrical control building. Bids are expected to be authorized in about two weeks and a bid opening ordered about May 20, Webster said. The first phase of the airport, providing for. the runways, taxiways and drainage, was let in February to Megarry Brothers, St. Clo~d,Minn., for $1,4$4,136.45 and preliminary arrangements are being made for staking out the site, located three and one-, half miles we& of the present air- 1 port in preparation for the start of excavation work this month. The third phase of the airport job is the terminal building and hangars: This job also is expected to be let shortly after the petond phase. Cost o f the entire project was estimated at abovt $2,600.000. Completion date for the airport project is Nov. 15, 1963,
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Plans for preliminary work on ?the new Grand Forks airport were ' 1 discussed Monday at a pre-construction conference of cantractom, engineers and city officials at the City Hall. Following the session, it was 'announced Lhat staking o f the airrporl area three and one-half miles iwest of the city will be started next Monday, and that dirt' movIng will begin April 15. Stanley S. Johnson Associates, ilocal engineering firm, will do @e "taking for Megarry Bros., St. Cloud, Minn., the contractor, for the first phase of the pmject which includes runways and taxiways and drainage facilitim. First work to be done will be cleaning out about 1 % miles of 1 ditch at the north side of the air-1 lport so there will be drainage1 j from the airport to Salt Cre& i :at the west of the airport site. Attending the pre-consttuctlon 1 #-2 8 3 conference were Edgar Vie, dis- j trict engineer for the Federal: Aviation Agency, St. Paul; 'Har-'i iold Vinje, engineer with Burke; Associates, the airport designers, i Action was taken Monday night who will be resident engineer ~ Q F bygthe Grand Forks City Council inspection of work on the airport; i ofi several important projects, inRonald and Harry Mecarry of cluding the new airport, Highway 81 improvement, urban renewal i Meghrry Bros.; Lloyde Richmond i l and Rudv Kuchar of Forx $ngi- i and others. The council decided to hire a ' neering Co.; City Manager Alan Webster; City Attorney Gordon. resident engineer of Burke Associates. the designers of the new k~aldis; City Engineer Thoburn 'Petemon and Robert Schoenborn, airport, to direct the inspection of assistant city engineer. work during airport construction. , Megarry Bros.' bid for the air-; Local engineering firms also would have a part in the inspec-' port first phase was $1,484,1J6, The overall airport job wqs''e$ti-,i tion job. mated to cost about 82% million, Total cost of the overall inspecc including the second and thlrdl tion job was estimated roughly at phases for which contracts are8 about $33,900 by City Engineer Thoburn Peterson. The Burke in-, expected to be aivarded by early' summer. The ail?port is schedul~d ; 1 spector would receive $1,218 a for coit7pletion by Nov. 16, 19Q. month for his services during ihe inspection period, with allowances, of about $1,000 for mileage, telephone and miscellaneous expenses, and $625 for five visits to the : proiect by other Burke firm pep ple during construction. I

Decide On nspecfor -

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Airport Site Staking


Firs1 on-the-site work prelimin- expected to cost about $2!h lllilary to construction of the new lion. The airport project is sclieduled Grand ~ o airport ~ k is scheduled ~ to start when a survey crew be- for conipletion NOV. 15, 1963. gins stakillg work wednesday for Meanwhile, behind - the - scenes Fd-d3 Ule first phase of project, activity continued without letup An engineering crew of stanley by financial interests who have plalis for a nlulti-oi'1 N ~ ~~ . i ~ ~will l~ suspend i ~ ~ , ~ ~ ~ S.~ Johnson ~ ~ & Associates, Grand lion developrnen1 pa' Of the I operations at ~~~~d ~~~l~~ followForks, will do the staking job for Present airporl area. ing the s o u l ~ l ~ o u flight n~ from Megarry Bros. of St. Cloud. Minn.. on the site localed north of U.S. Involved in the project is M. winnipeg id^^ because of softHighway 2 about 3% lmiles west Spiva"l presidentof the Castle Inened runways due to ihe spring g, of the present airport. Megarry vestlllents. Llcl., of W i ~ n i ~ e who ~~~~~d peterson, airlines excavation has engaged the Chicago firin of Bras. plan to start , manager, announced Tuesday. Drapr & Kra'nicr to develop the 1 Examination of the main runWork 15The first phase of the project 'Id airport area for a shopping way used by the big Lockheed includes runways, taxiways and center and the balance for indusElectra turbo props disclosed and housing. The cOsl was spongy areas and progressive drainage facilities. It is the prinestimated at 94 nlillionJ cracking of the surface which will cipal segmenl of the big job which housing. prevent its use by the Northwest will be followed by the second planes, Peterson said. p h a s e including maintenance 80 Acres Included equiplnent building, water and castle ~ Northwest Airlines operates two ~ has an op~ flights each way daily, stopping sewage facilities and an entrance tion ulllil May 31 to pllrchase the at Grand Forks. These will be road, and the fiid Phases whicll approxilllately 170 acres of airsuspended after the Friday flight is the new terminal port land for $460,000, Included is until the runways are ill condiDitch Clearing First approximately 80 acres on either tion to handle the big ships. side o f the Interstate Highway 29 Sonic heavy machinery is exService be slrip through the airport and 10 petted to be moved 10 the airport Central area this week in preparalion for acres at the north edge of the airwhich operates two flights each, I earth moving. First work will be Port. and an cleaning out 1% miles of ditch Spivak has illcIicated he expects Omaha' Neb+' run' North a t the north of the airport to pro- to take up the if he uses the lighter DC-3 planes. vide drainage during construc- does so and upon delivery vaIn previous years when Northtion. Excavation for the runways cant possession of tlie present airAirlines used a DC-6 plane, will follow. port land, his firm would pay the it ordinarily discontinued service Plans and specificalions for the city the iiioney. Pending delivery 15-20' but this year' air$ortls second phase are beiiig of tlie land following the taking ihe Eleclra planes are heavier finalized preparatory to a call for up or tile option, arrangeiiients and the runways softened up soonbids, aiid both the second and wonlcl be i n ~ d ethrough a local er, so the suspension date will be third phase contracts are expeci- bank to guaralltee payment when earlier. . . - -.ed to be awarded by late in May the city turns over the lands 10 or early June. -The overall job is- the Winnipeg firm. - --

To Sf arf +'Wednesday - 7'-&.d

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while preliminary survey continued at the site of the new Grand Forlcs Airport west of the city, a meeting was held at the City Hall between city and Rye Township representatives to finalize an a,:reement for cleaningn and maintenance of a drainage ditch at the north side o E the air. port. Members of the township board at the meeting were Everett J. Lurid, Charles Clementson and Henry Stromsodt. They met with City Attorney Gordon Caldis, R. S, Niles, director of finance, and City Engineer Thoburn Peterson. I An agreement was worked out a n d will be forwarded to the ~ e d era1 Aviation Agency at st. paul, Minn, Megarry B r o s., St. cloud, i Milin., the general contractor for I the first phase of the airport conIstruction, wilI do the ditch clearing ~job, which~ is required l for ~ drainale during the airport building work. An engineering crew of SLanley S. Johnson & Associales was putting in temporary bench marks and setting control points in the ditch area Thumday and Megar. ry Bros. will start after they get a final go-ahead from the FAA and when soil conditions permit cxcavaion ~orlfr--

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W d e Variety Of Pub
ding h i e c f s n Works Here
By LLOYD C. TINNES
Construction is a big word in Grand Forks this spring. under survey or actual construction is the widest variety of public and private projects in the city's history. -I

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Fheailwhile, negotiations contin"ed the proposed large shopping cenler and housing project to be built in the area of; the present airport. An oplioii held by Castle Invest- I ments, Ltd., of Winnipeg, to ~ u r - l chase part of the present airport' for $460,000 for the big development expires May 31 and it will be definitely announced at that; time- whether tlie multi-million : developnient s h a 1 1 go

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Another big project is starting ing oul large drainage at the site of the new $2'/2 million jusl north of the airport. Grand Forks Airport, three and Cleaning out the ditch one-half miles west of Lhe pres- the first work to be done I garry Bros. of St. Cloud, ent airport. Out at the new site,) engineers of Stanley S. Johnson1general contractors for & Associates of this city are stak- port construction.. The - - .- also is to be finished in

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M. D. Spivak, president of Castle Investments, has stated he planned to proceed with the developmenl providing certain remaining details are cleared up and when he receives vacant possession of the airpore property by a definite dale. The city already has promised delivery of the approximately 170 acres of land liot later than Aug. 1, 1964, But il, the new airpori job is completed 1 on schedule Nov. 16, the falid can be released earlier, thus permitting an earlier start of the development project if it is finally adopted by the Castle firm. The land under Castle option side ~ of the Interlies on c i t h q ~ state Highway 29 strip through the airport and at the north end of the airport. '
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Castle Investments, Ltd., holds The Spivaks told the council a ' the option which was good to May "key tenant" is prepared to come 31, 1963, but which now has been to Grand Forks and will move a 1 extended t u Nov. 30. The land in- million dollars worth of goods cludes about 9 0 acres at the west here when its building is ready of the Interstate Highway 29 strip for occupancy. They said an ;through the airport, 80 acres on American firm mill be employed i the east side and five acres at for the cnnstruction work. the north end of the main runOther Action Taken 1 I The Grand Forlrs City Council way. One of the big reasons for the will consider a variety of matters Need Definite Date mole1 and apartment accommoincluding four ordinances governM. D . Spjvak and his son, Sid- , dations in the development is the 1 ing mobile home operation, a neY Spivak of Castle Investments, expected influx of many hundreds communication r~gardingrunway appeared before the council at its of workers connected with instalrepairs at the airport and the use Monday meeting to explain their 11 lation of the Minuteman Missile of sewage system iinpact money need for the time extension. They Complex in this area, Sidney Spireceived from the federal governsaid their negotiations require a . valc said. -- - -- ment a t its meeting at 7:30 p.m. definite commitment by the city Monday at the City Com~cil. as to when the airport land will A public hearing and considerbe del'ivered into their possession atiop on second reading and final Ifor purposes o f the development. passage is scheduled on four orRented to Staveteig Bros. for They stated that since the new dinances affecting the mobile $1,121 a total of 123 acres of new {airport west of the city is schedhome operation. uled for completion Nov. 15, 1963, airport land which will not be aE The r 11 n w a y repairs matter they anticipated the city at that fecled by the air ort construction arose from the softening of the -I/-I& - - 6 3 ---1 time could definitely set the time work. airport strip following the spring it can give them vacant possesthaw, rmulting in the suspension sion o f the airport land as providof plane service by Northwesl ed in the option agreement. Airlines. Northwest said ils heavy Area Potential Surveyed planes would have difficulty landing on the softened runway and By that time also, they expectcut off its service a week ago as ed the time schedule for construcit has in recent years for poriods' tion of the Interstate Highway, inof several weeks. volving improvement of U.S. Highway 2 north of the airport. , The sewage sysleln impact fund was the topic of a proposal at the would be settled and they would last council meeting by Alderman have assurance that the jobs Alvin Austin, who asltetl that the would not interfere with access to approximately $167,000 impact their development project. tnonE*ybe used to recluce the lnill Caslle Investments hired Draplevy for the sewage project and er & Kramer, which was lermed I not for any other purpose. the largest shon~ing center de- , First actual work in the new! Platting proposals, paving projveloper in the United States, lo I I Grand Forlrs Airport area has ects and other matters also are negotiate with various larce and 1 been started by Megarry Bros, of included in the council agenda. smaller firms who would lease St. Cloud, Minn., the general con-, buildings in the new development. tractor, who began cleaning the This firm has been surveying the ditch at the north edge of the uses and economic potential of airport Wednesday. 1 this area since last July. Cldaring the ditch for drainage Need Definite Date purposes is part of the first phase To aid them in finalizing leasof the airport construction which, ing agreements with the various includes construction of runways, , firms, Draper & Kramer must taxiways and drainage. give them a definite date on The work was started after ofwhich they can occupy a shop ficial approval was received from ping center building. The Spivaks, the Federal Aviation Agency's rein turn. must have the building / gional office in Kansas City, MQ., 1 readv bv that date. and to do thi; I I r for the start of "off-site constructhey" mbst have firm commit1i0.n" on the airport project. ment when they can get the land Rarold Vinje 'is resident engiand begin the building operation. neer for the airport sconstruction So, aespite the scseduled new, which also includes second and airport completion by Nov. 15, third phases, the second pha4e Winnipeg Firm thev .referred to wait until it is being the mainteriance equipment, before they pay for the building, wate and sewage and; Gets 70 Nov, 30 finfshkd land. Weather conditions, they an entrance road, and the third' i Airport Deal p~intedout, could cause some dephase being Ihq new termio81, iay in the airport operation. building, water and sewage end The Grand Forks City Council the latter phases are expected tii Shopping Area Described granted a six-months extension be let by June. Monday of the option by a Win- Plans for lhe airport developEtltie cost of the airport ;ufk# ment call for a motel with a minnipeg firm to purchase approxiing is estimated at about $2,800,rqately 175 acres of local airport imum of 100 units, an enclosed 000. Megarry got the first phase <I area land for $460,000 for a pro- shopping center modeled after the job on its low bid bf $1,484,136, C e ~ ~ t e r in Brookdale Shopping posed multi-million dollar shop The airport is scheduled for 1 ping center and housing develop. Minneapolis, apartments gnd a hnusing develo~meni. --.merit.

Agenda /%r +/@3 City Council Has Variety

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First Work

Airport Site

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! ~Airport t Site

The contractor for the new Grand Forlis Airport continued, ditch cleanillg work at the north , edge of the airport with a clragline outfit Monday while waiting for the arrival of machinery for' runway excavation. The off-site work on the ditch was expected to require several j days for completion, after which stripping work for the north-south runway could begin if the machin- I ery is available by that time. It was being shipped Monday from 1 St. Cloud, Minn. Megarry Bros., St. Cloud, the general contractor, has found the ground ill good condition for ex. cavalion work and planned to start the runway stripping as soon as certuin details are cleared up 1 and a final go-ahead is received the Federal Aviation Agen-

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Start Excav
First excavation work was started Monday on the site of the new Grand Forlzs Airport. I Only about four machines were in action and their work consist' ed mainly of earth stripping because of the dempened condition ( of the ground following Sunday's rain. The scope of the work will be I increased as soon as the ground I is drier. Megarry Bros. of SL. Cloud. 1 Minn., has the construction contract for the first phase of thc airport which includes runways, taxiways, and drainage work. A Megarry crew has been engaged in cleaning and deepening a drainage ditch at the north edge o f the airport for the past week.

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OFF-SITE CONSTRUCTION in the new Grand Forks Airport area was initiated when this drag line crew of Megarry Bros., St. Cloud, Minn, began cleaning out. a drainage ditch at the north edge 01 the airport site. Megarry Bros. has the general contract for building the first phase of the new $2,(i00,000 airport and is cleaning the ditch in co~lnect~on with the drainage recluirements. (Herald Photos).

Airport K Gets 'Go- heab

City Engineer Thoburn Peterson) announced Wednesday that the ti-' nal "go-ahead" has been received for on-site construction of the new Grand Forks Airport and that excavation is expected to get under way Monday. The permission was given by , Edgar Vie, district engineer for the Federal Aviation Agency, St. Paul, Minn. Meanwhile, Megarry Bros., St, Cloud, Minn., who have the first phase of the airport construction contract, have movecl two large earth-movers to the airport site in preparation for the start of ex1 cavation for the' north-south run-1 way and taxiways, 1 A Megarry dragline crew has [ been working the past weelr just north of the airport cleaning out a ditch for drainage purposes dur-' ing construclion,
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A MEGARRY BROS. patrol crew blades a con$truc~ioqaccess

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EW GRAND FORKS
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THE GENERAL LAYOIJ'r of Ihe m a Grand Forlcs I~~lelnalional Airport includinR


runways, installations and facililies, is s i ~ o w ~ in l this sltetch. Tlle $2,600,000 projcct will be located on a site five iniles west of the city limils a t the north side ol U. S . Highway 2. First worlc on the site, the stripping of earth for the runways, was starled last wcelc. The airport is scheduled for completioil Nov. W, 1963. The general contractor for the first phase of the work, including runways, Laxiways and drainage, is Mcgarry Bros., SL. Cloud, Minn. Final phase of the worl; is the lcrininal building, sho~vnnear lllc apron area III the sketch.

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AUTO PARKING A R E A

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Landing strips For New 5-5City 63 Airport Taking Shape


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IThat is because the City Council 4 in Lhe future. Space also has pected to have bids authorized 1 BY I,L(aYp C. TTNNES ' r ~ oll ~ ille ~ broad t ailiali flatlalid ~~"nexcdthe lJOOil-aele airport been allowed for clear zones a t Monday night and bids will five nliles west of the city limits, piece a c 0 u ~ l oof each end of these pieccs. The received about June 3. For the maclilncs are I bringlllg it within the city's 1loun- ~ 0 ~ 1end t h of the m a ~ n runway now heavy earth phase, the terlninal buildbeing built will be approxiniately shaping the landing strips of Idaries. .Ihe bids are expected lo be t of U.S. Highway 2. ~~~~d Forl;s* new $215 million air- In ally event, Megarry Brothers 4.010 f ~ north has thc big job under way. They The new termillal building will June 17. work 1 port. lo be finl~hed by Nov. 15. The nlac~lilles rvere moved in a starled about two w e e k ago with be about one mile north of the Probable occupants of the new weel< ago by Megarry Rrotllers, off-site work cleanillg and cleop- highway. building will be the off~ces of enillg the drslinage ditch at the Tamways will be bu~lt to conNorthwest St. C l o ~ ~ Miiin., d, general contracNorlh Central Air-! side the then nect the easl-west and norlh-south tor for the first pliase of the airwent On the sile and stripping runways. The terminal area apron lines, the U~iiledStatcs Custo~ns I porl project. all last will ba lighted by floodlights. Service and the office of Airport Runways, taxiways and draina f e comprise the first airport More machinery will arrive There also will be a light duty Manager Norman Midboe, Anothphase; later w ~ l l come the en- soon and full scale o~erations, apron and a taxiway, 960 feel by er office space also may be availtrance roadway, the equipment including extensive digging work, 30 feet, leading to the T-hangar able. storage and electrical control 1 will then be undertaken. area. Other items in the project Megarry Brothers got the airbuildings, water and sewage fa-1 The contract agreemelit calls include a beacon light and lighted p o r l contract as the lowest of cilities, and finally the now Lei.in-, h)r high intensity lighting on the wind indicator; termilia1 apron eight bldders, bidding $1,484,136 inal building, all to be completed I llorth-soulh landing strip and med- safety fencing and perimeter fenc- for tho first phase job which was by mid-November. 1 ium ii~t~llsity lighting on the east- ing, ditching, drainage, aircraft about 15 per cent under the engitiedown devices and i~larkiiy of neer's estimate of $1,754,117. An interesting angle regard~ng 1 wesl runway. ---. thc airporl's location is the seem- Lalid has been provided for a runways and taxiways. I ingly paradoxical fact that while 1,300-footaddition to the south end Phase 2 of the airpnrl is ex. II - -the site is five miles wesl of the of the main runway and for a city linl~tsat Columbia Road, it 1,000-foot extension of the eastactually is inside the city limits. west strip, if these should be need-

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Taxpayer G r 5ou p 6.-LS

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Fond Trans ers

Cites Austin Resolution "Alderman Alvin Austin has introducec~ r resoiulion which has ; awakened the public to the dangers we are being subjected to in connection with the airporl projecl ently had financing. in mindAustin a safeguard appar-

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ns and specifications for ,Phase 2 of the new Grand Forlts Airt~ort will be received by the Grr~nil City Council at its meeting tonight at 7:30 at the City Hall. A call For bids is ex- j pectecl to be issucd following con- i siclcration of the plans. lncluded in the second phase arc maintenance equipnienl build1 ing, water and scwage facilities , and the entrance road. The t h ~ r d I and final phase, including the teriilinal building is expected to be up for bids shortly aftcr the i second phase has been handled. The council also will h e a r ' a , report from the Point Bridge commitlae. Scheduled for ranrideralion are niore than $330,000 in paving, wat. I er and sewer bids wllich will be

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Promises Conlratlictetl againsl juggling the federal im~~~~~~f~~ of nlollies from other Grand Forks City dcpartnle~its "Th~s is in direct contradiclion pact grant of $166,000 from the illto the general fund to lnalie to the promises made by thc sewage deparlmenl into the genthen1 available for fi~lancingc 0 1 1Mayor's Comn~ittec, lhe Citi-ns eral fund. Rumblings of the trans- I struction o E the new airport is Comrnitlee and the hired city em- fer of $150,000 from another city criticized in a resolution release</ ployes. Chairmen of these com- revenue department raises by Keith Y. Bacon on behalf of nliltees repeatedly nlade slale. more immediate danger signal. the Associati011 ol Grand Forks ments lo the effect that a ncw up- "Who is master-minding this a ~ ~nanipulati~ig lo-date airport would be construct- I ilrastic ' d ~ s ~ l of Taxpayers. The resolutio11 was signed by ed alid paid for by Lhe sale of! our city finances? The AssociaHoward Gucltenberg, presidenl; revenue bonds and thal il would 1 tlon of Grand Forks Taxpayers Russell H. Thompson ant1 Harry no1 cost the taxpayer an exlra' believes Lhat the citizens who, I Geist, vice pyesiclents; James D.I penny. only a few weeks ago, voted a Gronna, treasurcr, and B a c o n , ' " n e transfer of funds frolli mandate by a 2 to 1 majority, secrelary - of the taxpayers group.,I the sewage department has as- agalnst such methods, are entitled --to have this question a m ~ e r e d . Said the resolution: "It appears 1 sisled materially in creating the necessitey for a one and a llalf Fund Protection Seen that the and some of our mayor or our city is duty aldermen are of the opinion that xpayer in the city bound by mandate or the volers, a1 properly. 11 has lo put ill motion the federal impact grant to our council-alsewage deparlment of approxiofficials derlnallic opcralion in its entirety f the airport reveas outlined by tlle laws of the mately $166,000 shoulrl be transeen very 'lifficult. Slate of North Daltota, All city ferred L o Lhe general fund. No re in handling Lhe deparlments, if operated by aldcrdoubt they plan to add this his unnecessary proj- manic committees, would have amount to the thousands that gering the ecOnOrnlctheir surplus funds n~~lornatically have already been transferred Our entire cOmmu- protected by elected, not hired from several revenue producing departmenls of the cily, to be officials." The resolution urged taxpayers made available for the a ~ r p o r t , to "support the Auslin resolution construction project. 1 which will leave the federal im"The 1963 increased budget for 1 pact grant in the sewage dethe City of Grand Forlss shows1 partmenl /o reduce the debt inthat $100,000 has already been curred by the lagbon project" ear-marked to be transferred froni and also to "request that your t h e sewage department to thc co~mcil member insist that the ' general fund for the purpose of cou~icil-aldermanic government be airport construction. In addition, the new airport accounts for $600,-000 of the enlarged general fund b u d g e t :

Heavy Work St17--b,3


Alderman Alvin E. Austin read 1 money has been pledged to the prepared statement to the airport construction fund. (Grand Forlts City Council Mon- So Austin Monday requested ( 'day which attaclted Keith Bacon that: "If it is finally indicated 1 'and Taxpayers' Association offi- that financing of the new airport i ; cials for their "harping criti- can be accomplished without use cisn~" of the city government and of the ilmpact grant moneys, they challenged them to "offer some- -or a like sum-be allocated to thing constructive--if they can." reduce special assessment mill Austin asserted his previ.ous re- levy for the, sewage lagoon (for quest to the council that sewage which they were originally desigI system federal impact molley be nated). used to reduce the special assess- And "If, through sale of the old ! ~ n e n t mill levy was entirely his airport, o r from funds accruing own proposal and that the taxpay- in any other manner, any surplus ers' association had nothing to do remains in the airport constn~ction fund when the new airport with it. is completed, such surplus funds , Mentioned In Story .His statement followed publics- to be used to restore the moneys I tion Monday in the Herald of a borrowed from the city interest story released by Bacon whi,ch fund, the surplus from the sewer cited the Austin resolution re. project in the engineering fund garding the $168,000 grant the city and the $100,000 proposed transexpects lo receive for sewaee sys. fer from the sewer operating fund -all now pledged to the airport ten1 i'mpacl. fund." I Here is Austin's statement.: "I would lilte I:o have it made His request p a s referred back ltnown that any resolution or pro- to the Finance Committee for posal that r have made in the fu_rthcr.s:ud_y, -.__City Council has been entirely my own, made in what I be the best i.~lterests a n d its residents. Neither i ard Guckenbere. R u s s e 1 l ' '~11om~so11; Geist, ~ a m e k Gronna nor 1CeitI-i Bacon ever have had a thillg to do with any of these proposals. I deplore the fact that this group, 'seemingly utterly devoid of any Progranl or ~om~actii tests n were conduct-,' % a n yideas of its own, insists on ed ~ h with a ~ l-,ew-type ~ ma- ~ echoing the things 1 have pro,-hille on the site of the new posed. Grand Forks Airport. I Hits At Criticism The new device enables the op"I discovered about a year ago erator t* secure on I now that you could sit arnund and 1 conlpact~on immediately, criticize the city government just according to the usual long - then you 'lad lo do test methods, would require cylsomething about it or shut up. So illder involving considerable , I ran for office and I am doing I and expense. what I can. But Mr. Bacoo prework on the first phase of-airfers to sit in his million dollar , port construct~oll by M~~~~~~ hotel and conlinually criticize the B,.~~.,the contractor, has been city government, but offers notllhandicapped by damp soil. Seving but harping criticism, eral caterpillar-type dozers and "I will continue to offer what two al-yard earth movers have I consicler callm, constructive probeen used in with posals for the improven~ent of Our stripping operations for the north'city taxpayers' situation. Alld 1 south runway. Then, to secure would hope that this small POUP faster drying, the worlr crew has of Taxpayers' Association officers used duclrfoot cultivators to stir would try the approachup the soil whicb was spread in Coninlittee Denies Request the stripped areas. Instead of issuing slaklnents To dale, the worlc has illvolved full of vague threats and innuenapproxilnately 1,000 feel a t the dos and rather than grasping, north end of the runway, the strip leech-like, at the p ~ p 0 S a l s of my- (being 150 feet wide. self and others, they should offcr -. something constructive - if they can." The council's Finance Committee had recommended against adoption by the council of Aus-' tin's previous proposal to use the $167,888.42 sewage lagoon federal impact grant to reduce the mill levy for lhis project becaufie ihe

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The Grand Forks City Cou~lcil ' waded through more than three, hours of steady worlr Monday to j complete an agenda o~d~nances paving projects, airport items, Of and a wide variety ol requests i and communicalions. High on the list was a total o f : more than $330,000 paving, sewer, water main and other projects for, which apparent low bidders were / listed. Another important item was the I approval of the consulting engineer's plans for specifications for Phase 2-maintena~nce equipment and electrical storage building, water and sewage facilities and entrance road-of the new Grand Forks airport. Call For Bids June 3 The city auditor was authoriz-I ed to call for bids June 3 on the airport project, for which runway construction, phase one, already __is underway.

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LEGAL NOTICES

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Northwest Airlines, which -suspended stops at Grand Forks Airport April 5, will resume service here Tuesday, according lo HOWard M. Peterson, station rnanager. The service was suspended bed of broken ~ ~ places that decause veloped n runways with the spring thaw. These now have been repaired and the subgrade has hardened enough L o permit the heavy Northwest planes to land here, Peterson said. With the resu~aption of service here, the airlines also will increase its schedules from t w o round trip flighls daily to three round trip flights. First flight will be a n eastbound plane leaving for the Twin Cities at 7 a.m. Tuesday and a westbound ship leaving for Winnipeg at 10:40 a.m. Second flight: Eastbound at 1:05 p.m. and westbound a t 5:30 p.m. Third flight: Eastbound at 7:40 p.m. and west at 8:25 p.m. The service will be by Electra jet-prop planes except for the 5:30 p.m. northbound plane and the 7:40 p.m. eastbound plane which 1 will be of the DC-6B type. North Central Airlines, which operates lighter planes than Norlh west, has continued its service here through the Northwest Air-, lines period of suspension. Meanwhile, Northwest has operated a ' limou~sine service to and from Fargo airport.

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Work Movino We 3 Big Pro ects Were


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Grand Forlrs' bridge, airport and struction job was making progrcs.. In the runway area which has were moving well Saturday, all 1 been stripped, soil has been filled the jobs being practically on 1 in and is being dried with duckI I schedule to date. ( foot cultivators and then compaclI On the East Gcand.Forlrs work ed with sheep's foot roller masite for the new Sltidmore Avenue s the bottom area of ) bridge, the laying of top steel for chines. This i the runway which will be built up I four of six river banlc bridge piers has been completed and cross about three feet above ground , struts were beine removed fro111 level as the worlc progresses. Other areas of the airporl site the big cofferdan; in the center of also were being cleared of trees, I the Red River. ! The main pier which will support farm fences and othcr obslacles. i tlie bridge center rises from the Harold Winje is resident engi!cofferdam which has been pumped neer on the airport job. 1 out to perlnit removal of the in- On the U.S. Highway 2 (Skid-: terior bracing rods. Whcn this more Avenue) i~nprovementproj/work ha6 been finished, the sheet ect, storm sewer work will bc I piling around the cofferdam will started Monday from Columbia! !be pulled out from around the 95- Road eastward, following complefoot-tong main pier. tion of the sewer job from the f Slridmore Avenue back At the airport site, five miles east end o west of the city limits, the soil to the Mill Road. drying operation has been aided Bridge, airport and highway jobs by windy weather and soil com- are all scheduled for completion j /paction work for the runway con- Nov. 15.

i highway improvement projects

i'

Hertz Rent A Car was awarded the contract to operate a car rental service from the new Grand F o r k s Airport on the basis of its bid submitted Wednesday, City / M a n a g e r City Webster a l r I nounced. , Hansen Ford Sales, the local Hertz representative, bid a payI ment to the city of $2,256 a year, 'plus 5 per cent of any gross in excess of this figure for the privilege of doing business from a reserved space a t the new airport. The nda contracl: will provide t h e city with an additional $1,896 /annually from the car rental arI rangement which previously paid ,only $360, including $180 from Hertz and a similar amount from 'National rental service. Under I the five-year cmtract awarded, I the increase in the payment would total $9,480. Hertz will operate from the new terminal building to be construct. , ed on the airport site. '

Architect Matter Cited I Willianl E. Harrie, G r a n il Forlts, a member of the North Dalcota State Board of Architects, reminded the council that it will be in violati011 of law until the architect who drew the terminal buildine ~ l a n shas bcen licensed I 1 as an irchitect in North Dalrota. I a I !The architect was arranged for by Ralph Burke ~ s s o c i a t e s of Chicago, consulting engineers for the airport, who informed city officials the matter will be talten care of soon. ' The request for the co~nmittseFor Bids On I ( of-the-whole meeting regarding diI Work June 17 rection of the city government I I will be presented to Mayor Youngs I The Grand Forks City Council as soon as he returns to the city Monday approved plans and spe- this wselr. City manager governcifications for the third and final i inen1 was voted out a t the elecpllase of the new municipal air- tion here March 18 and thc law port and ordered a call for bills provides the manager form then June 17, with final completion of musL end not less than t h r e e the air^@ s gfor-Nov. 15, 1963. i months nor more than six months The airport plans for whichlafter tli! election, . . bids were ordered June 17 were To Name Board l presented to the council by City Adopted a rwolution to name a 'Manager Alan Webster, who re- joint airport zoning board for neceived them Monday morning. gotiations with four affected townThe plans were for Phase 3, the ships regarding creation of the final phase of construction of the hazard areas around the new airairport located 5% miles of the port.

Let ~ I For
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Approved
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A second contract to operate car rental service from the new Grand Forks Airport was awarded T h u r s d a y to National Car Rentals of this city, following ,an award announced Wednesday to Hortz Rcnt A Car for similar service. National's bid was a $1,500 minimum annual guarantee or 5 per cent of the gross receipts, wichever is greater, for a five-year p e r i o d. The guarantee thus [amounts to $7,600 in addition to (the previous Hertz contract which, guaranteed $3,256 a year for five 1 years, or 5 per ccnt of the gross, ok a total of $9,480. City Manager Alan Webster noted that the two contracts togethe r guarantee a total income for \five years of at least $16,980 'to the city. The contracts give the rental firms the privilcgz of doing biisiness from designated reserved spaces at the ngw airport terminal building. The two firms currently pay the 1 city a total of only $360 a year for their privileges at the present

airport,

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ans Received Here 5-26-& 3 For Airport Termina


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IAirporf# ' - zfem Acfion -/zz Tops Counci Agenda - -

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The modem terminal building at the new Grand Forks Airpot will be a one-story structure, one-half ot it with basement, occupymg much larger ground area than the building on the present airport. The. new terminal building is included in the third and final phase of the $2'/2 million airport complex which will sprawl across the site located five miles west of Columbia Road and a mile north of U.S. Highway 2. Plans and specifications for the building were received here last week. ' Although the airport itself will 1 be built with funds including more than a million dollars in federal aid, the terminal building will be financed wholly by the city, at a cost of probably kss than $300,-

000.

Bids Called For June 17 Construction bids for the building have been called for June 17, although construction of hangars, also part of the final phase, still is in the "arrangement pending" stage. Completion of the airport jbb is set for Nov. 15, 1963. The new building will be built of concrete blocks with brick facing. Length will be 153 feet and width 48 feet. The entrance in the front center of the structure will face a large parking space in the terminal area. To reach the terminal area from the city, one will drive west five miles U.S. Highfrom Columbia Road~on way 2, then turn north from the highway at the airport entrance I road and drive north one mile. ( Has Entrance Canopy Largest area in the terminal' building will be the waiting mom, measuring ID4 by 23 feet. The center portion of the room will be taken up with telephone h t h s , car rental areas and washrooms. Travebrs arriving at the building will drive under a 12.foot wide canopy extending out from the entrance and .go directly into the waiting roam area.

Other areas on the main floor will be the offices of Northwest Airlines, at one end of the building, and North Central Airlines at the other end. Airlines building space will include ticket offices, the station manager's offices( radio room and baggage storage. One Room Unassigned Across the waiting room from the entrance will be the exit doorway leading to the plane passenger loading and unloading area. Other main floor areas will include the restaurant' and offices for the airport manager and U.S. Customs inspection. Another room, 19 by 17 feet, presently is unassigned and available for rental or possibly for extension of the customs office. TO Vacate Old Gilding In the basement will be the boiler room, storage areas and a 22 by 27 foot classrobm or meeting room which will be used for pilot instruction and various other uses. The old airport which is schedo vacated on completion of uled t the new one in November, has a two-story brick terminal building, but the upper area is used en-" tirely by the Federal Aviation Agency. In. the netx airport lay. out, the FAA will have a separate building. The original old building built in 1943, was 86 feet long and a 28-foot addition has been made to the structure since. It has a full basement.

A varied agenda topped by action on acceptance of the construction grant offer for Phase 2 of

1 the 3ew Grand Forks airport and


LEGAL

: /including such matters as Master

Plan, underpass repairs and pridening of S. Fourth Street faces the City Council at its regular I meeting at 7:30 p.m. Monday. Acceptance of the $95,500 grant offer from the Federal Aviation Agency would clear the way for letting the Phase 2 airport contract on part of which bids will be opened at the meeting. Bids will be opened Monday for thc water and sewage facilities and the access road to the 'airport, and f o r , the electrical control and equipment building, and the airport terminal b~iilding, on June 17. 1 Completion Due Nov. I5 The water-sewage and access road items are part o f Phase 2 and the terminal building is Phase 3, the final pfiase of the airport. The contracts call for completion of tha airport by

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g-ci?-423

Lease ,Offer Jteferre4


Acceptance of the grant offer would clear the way for letting, the construction contract for the ' , second phase which includes water and sewage facilities, the electrical control and equipment build- , ing and access road to the air* port. The $95,500 represents about onethird of the total cost of Phase 2, the balance being, financed by the city. Bids are scheduled to be opened by the council Monday night for the equipment and electrical building of Phase 2 and on June 17 for the balanbe bf tbat phase of the contract.

" Referred to the Finance Committee an offer from Eide Ayto Sales to lease citjr property for-, rnerly leased to Borchert 'Trailer Sales on Norlhwest Streek at $960 annually on a five-year lease afta a i.ecommendation from the, aif- , port advisory committee bn a fix- I ed base operator franchise for i gasoline and storqp sales at the aew airport. Approved renba-car ' %as0 P W, posals for the new airport termina1 building by. Hansea pfJ& (Hertz) alld Ryddl ~VevPletCo* ' (Hational Car). .__i_J_.---- - --

ln other action the council:

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(SmLl 21,~June ~ ~3,

LO, 1863)

'-1I W ebsfer

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1 1

New. Airport 6--Po,-&3


By Weather

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I

Resigns
)

AGENDA 6 - id--6.3 C I " $ COUNCIL MEETING MONDAY, JUNE 17, 1963


ROLL CALL: READING AND APPROVAL OF MINUTES: 2 June 3 , 1963 3 PUBLIC HEARINGS, PETITIONS, REMONSTRANCES AND COMMUNICATIONS: Sealed bids on field niaintenance equipment and electricial control building. I @ Sealed bids on airport terminal building. 1 Communication from City Planning & Zoning Commission relative to Zion E.U.B. Church request for special permit. 3-4 Appointment of members to Board of Budget Review. 3.5 Communication from State Health .Department relative to private raw sewage discharges into Red River. 3-6 Public hearing on proposed annexation of Flaat's Subdivision No. I and portions of Brown's and Flaat's Additions. 3-7 Application for moving permif by Kenco Painting and Decorating to move frame building from Greenberg I Industrial Site to 2600 Skidmore. 3-8 Application for moving permit by Victor Kukowski to move frame building from outside city limits to 18 17 I I th Avenue North. 3-9 Underpass improvements. 3- 10 Communication from Police Magistrate relative to appointment of an alternate police magistrate, 3-1 1 Re-appointment of two members to Board of Zoning Adjustmenis. 3-12 Re-appointment of membel-s of Planning & Zoning Comrnissio~i. 3 13 Comrnunication from consulting engineer re-suggested colors for airport buildings. 3-14 Disc~~ssion relative to need for police summer uniforms. / 3-15 Communication re-selling of goods on city streets. 3-16 Report from Board of Zoning Adjustments on meetings held. 3-17 Communication from N.D. State Highway Department , re. inter-connection of highway traffic 'control signals a t junction of Highways 81 and 2 with flashing light milr road grade crossing signals a t intersecfion of U.S. 8 1 and railway branch line within the cify. 3-18 Recommendation for transfer of funds to Sanitation Bureau. 4 REPORTS OF OFFICERS: 4- 1 Various reports. 5 ACCOUNTS, CLAIMS AND BILLS: 5-1 Monthly bills for May, 1963. 5-2 Time rolls for May, 1963. 6 REPORTS OF STANDING COMMITTEES: 6- 1 Refinancing of outstanding refunding improvern'ent bonds. 6-2 Re-approval of pledged securities from depositories of public funds. 6-3 Bids for of repairs to building on S. 3rd Street leased 1 to bus company. I 6-4 Consideration of lift station to serve Westward Acres I Subdivision. 6-5 Notice from Northern States Power of expi1,ation of I first 5-year period on overhead street lighting agreeI ment. 6-6 Recommendation from Chamber of Commerce rslaSive to Armory-Auditorium policies. 6-7 Proposal by Eide Auto Sales to lease Cify property in Blocks 78 and 79, Alexander & Ives' Addition. 6-8 Request for two 15-minute parking zones on southeast corner of Bruce and S. 4th Street intersection. 6-9 Report of action on request to consider stop signs a t 8th Avenue N. and N. 2'5th Stlqest 6-10 Various requests re. annual Crazy Day on Monday, July 15, 1963. Request to prohibit parking on portion of N. 28th k e & o o d h L o f 6 t h Avenue h.
I

Alan Webster's resignation as j 1 Grand Forlts City Manager was accepted by the City Council at Monday night's meeting with s I stipulation that .he continue ihis t e n u r e : through t h 0 l first week in j July. A record 8,055 v o t e r s w e n t to the ! polls March 18 this year to ballot out 1~ years of City Webster I Council - managcr operatioil overwhelmingly, ,5,350 to 2.505. In a formal letter to the coun, cil, Webster said he had accepted a new position in California, declining, however, to say what his elnployment would be, Webster, who had been city manager here since June 1, 1957, expressed his appreciation to the governing body and others for their cooperation during "six years of progress." I Webster was the third manag- 1 er to serve tho city in a decade. His predecessors were Byron J. Rockwood, who was succeeded by Rap Case. I Coming to Grand Forlrs from Homewood, Ill., where he had, been city manager for four years, Webster previously had held a 1 similar position at Concordia, 1 Kan., and as assisiant at Norman and Durant, Oltla. Webster's letter to the council 1 read: "Please accept this letter as 110tice of my rmignation from the position of city manager of Grqig /Forks. I will continue to be on 1 the job here during Ihe rcst of, i this month and the first week of I July. I Cooperation Cited I "May I take ibis opportunity to thanlc the present mayor and council and all those who have, served on the governing body during the time 1kdve been here for the cooperation given me personally. Our working relations al[ways have b ~ e nexcellent and I ; wish yo11 individi~ally and collec, tively pleaslire in your official , civic duties. "I also should like to thank the employes of the city who have co1 operated and remained 1o y a 1 I through six years of progrcss." He concluded, "My new position will be in California. I am leaving further details, if any, to be released by my new employer." Mayor Nelson A. Youngs said 1 unfamiliar with Webster's assignment, I

Rainy weather halted work on the new Grand Forks a i r p o r t 1 Monday after similar delays last week on Friday and Saturday, according to Harold Vinje, resi1' dent engineer. Up to the weather delays, huwever, the Megarry Bros. construction crew had made good prcgress on stripping and filling runways and improving drainage in the I work area on the airport site, located five miles west of the, city limits on the north side of U. S. Highway 2. On the main runway, a 5,300foot stretch, the work crews had stripped and filled approximately 4,000 feet. Approximately 1,000 feet of the 4,200-foot east - west runway also has been stripped. The main problem facing the crews operating the big dirt mQVl em is to dry out the earth so it can be worked and compacted, properly for the base of the runway. They have been using duck- 1 foot drills and other farm equip- 1 ment to stir up and aerate the dirt during the filling process. 1 When the dirt fill for the run- I ways has been completed, it will be several feet above ground level and on this fill the concrete runway will be constructed. Drainage for the airport is provided by a large ditch extending across the north side of the airport which is being cleaned and 1 reshaped by dragline and bull dozer crews. The airport is sclieduled for completion Nov. 15 this year.

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Opening

'-"8f

Airport Bids On Agenda


Bids will be opened a t the Grand Forlrs City Council meeting at 7:30 p.m. Monday on construction of the new airport terminal building and for the field maintenance equipment and electrical control buildinp The items up for biddiilg comprise the final stages of the airport construction contracts, exkepting arrangements for hang- 1 ars which are to be made later. Runways are being built at the airport now, with completion of the airpoa due Nov. 15.

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ans To 4 -A2-kBoy AirporI Mere H ~ n g


A nearly hali million dollar Grand Forlts Airport purchase deal hung in the balance Friday while Boeing Aircraft Co. considers two alternative pians involving several hundred housing units for Minutetnan Missile personnel scliccluled to move here this fall. Boeing officials have proposed to city officials that Boeing move from 200 to 800 trailers into a 65acre area at the west edge of the city, locating them along the west edge of Stanford Road and on the north and west sidcs of Lake Agassiz School. An alternate proposal was made to Boeinn bv Castle Investnients, 1 Ltd., of 7vinnipeg, which has an 1 option to buy the present niunicipal airport for $460,000. Under this ! plan, Castle would build pernia- / nent housing units in the'number required bv Boeina which "would ' noi be triiler houses but houses I . t ha sustaining value." 1 w~ Grand Forks Aldermen R. R. Smith and J. H. Endres were in Minot Thursday to study a Bocing trailer housing setup there which would be similar to that proposed for lhis city. They and other city 1 officials are studying the Boeing I proposal with a view to deterniinling under what conditions this city would accept a trailer arrangement. Members Nanled On tlie coni~iiittee with Smith, as chairman, and Endrcs, are Aldermen H. R. Magnuson, Lloyd V. Hillier and Albert Strand. The comniittee met Tuesday here wilh I Boeing representatives and now /plans to meet the Boeing people again next week. Meanwhile, il is I attempting to conipile facts and figures on which to base a reply I to the missile inslallers. City officials noted that a nuni- , ber of factors niust be considered 1 in regard to the Boeing trailer proposal. Boeing representatives informed city officials they would bring hi not less than 257 family trailers and possibly 200 trailers for single persons, or the figure might be double that number in both instance~, depending on future de1 velopments, Want Annexation They indicated they desired the trailer area to be annexed to the city and that it would require 1 the usual city services and that several hundred school children would have to be placed id local schools. If an agreement were reached between Castle and Boeing to1 use pernlanenl housing built by the Castle firm, then the latter would have first to talte up its option to purchase the airport property, Castle has proposed 10cating such permanent 1 using along the west side of 42ntLbtreet (the north-south road a t the e a s t , edge of the airport) and south of the airport terminal building. City officials were hopeful Friday that some decision will be forthcoming from Boeing during next week as to which pldn they favor.

3 - ~ rject o 6 - 3 -'Package1 ~ d13 ~ Movincr On A


4

- . Grading of tlie north south runway on the new Grand Forlts ; airport has been stopped at the ) 4,100-foot mark until a jet fuel pipeline between the Great Lalres Pipeline Co. and Grand Forlts Air Force Base has been lowered to ; permit further runway excava- 1 tion, resident engineer Harold Vin- i jc said. 1 The underground pipeline runs i east lo west across the airport runway area and niusl: be sunk : further down to allow the ground stripping machines to do their job on th'e runway. Thc 4,100 feel: of the runway 1 have been stripped and then fillccl to grade level over n o s t of I its length. Then, when the pipelin has been lowered the worli will be extended to the end of the 5,300-foot runway strip. Staking of the terminal building area is scheduled to be started this week and when that is finish- , ed the area will be graded. i Culver~s were being installed which will carry excess water to [he drainage ditch a t the north edge of tlie airport.

Gralng Stopped
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City Manager Alan Webster has ( been notified of the approval b the Federal Aviation Agency an increased grant offer of $111,- 1 000 in federal aid funds for construction of Phase 2 of the new 1 Grand Forks International A i rport. The previous grant offer was $95,000 but action on this offer was deferred previously because 1 construction bids ran higher than I the engineer's estimates. The offer will be presented to the City I Council for approval. I Included in Phase 2 a r e the equipment and electrical control building, access roads and utilities. Phase 1 includes the runways now under construction and the , terminal building and hangars

sed A i p c s r i , ~G$ved I 1
31
1

Local .Traffic Squeezed By LLOYD C. TINNES The much talked about and oft- In. this west end area# local has nlanaged to squeeze en controversial bridge-lli&~,rayairport was nlovlng by to and from business places Ion all three fronts last weel< as but "0 other traffic is possible the route. Back on the east Slridlnore Avenue bridge construejob, there are tioll hummed with activity and end the places where motorists )nay U.S, Highway 2 illlprovenlent in the city and building of [he new Cross to and from the Riverside airport west of town made steady Parlr area while the work is under way. progress. All tliree projects are acheclu]cd1 Traffic 6Il111 offs and other hanI for completion by Nov. 15 this dicaps will continue in varying year and by then or sliort\y after- f e g r e ~ as the worlc goes on dmward four-lane trarfic is expected 1 lng the summer. Northern Inito be ,rolling through G r n d Provemenl: Co- of Fargo is doing Forks and East Grand Forks the highway work and Gibbs and across the stoutly built new Red Sons of Fargo have done the siorni sewer installation in conRiver span. nection with the road improve1 Bridge Deck Poured ment. As of Saturday, the Walter 1 Outside the city, five miles &vest Giertsen CO. bridge builders had of Columbia ]toad at the north, just finished pouring the four-lane of Highway 2 is the 1,000- 1 concrete deck of the bridge on - ---acre site of the new Grand Forks tile East Grand Forks approach and heavy steel piling was being International Airport, driven lo hard bottom for the Construction there is in the first bridge abutment on the Grand phase, with runway worlt, considForlts side. Footings for same of ered the main item of the job, the briclgc piers also have been well ,under way. About 4,100 feet pourcd on this side of lhc river of the 5,300 fool north-south or 1 and the North Dakota side piers main runway has been stripped will be goiiig up in tlie ensuing and filled and this piece is being weeks. lined up to "true grade" la prepMeanwhile big stecl for the aration for laying a thiclt gravel center section of the span con.' coat laler. to arrive O n the wnstruc- The aast-west runway also has tion site, l~caterl on the East been partly and excava- 1 Ckand Forks bank of river, tian has bmn started for ihe new / and these huge pieces will be terminal building, I joined laLer with Ille bridge ap- Megar1-y Brothers St. Cloud, proaches from either end. Minn. is doing the first phase of Excavate For Undeipass the airport jab. Thcre'll be an underpass of the Const,,ction of the i a1 bridge approach at Lewis Boule. vard and excavation for this iteln ( building is the third and final already ],as been conipleled andi phase of the airport project exinstallation of catch hasins start-) cept for hangar construction for which a r r q e m e n t s are being ed. The earth cut goes six feet made, below ground level and a c t u a l Weather has been generally favclearancem beneath the bridge ap- orable this season for construcpreach will be about 14 feet, tion work and barring unexpected delays, the various contractors >c lrope to wrap up the Grand Forks Sltidniore Avenue between the ,,package,, at the scheduled time, I I bridge and the cily limits at Co...--__ lunibia Road is a highway jungle 1 a t present, a no man's land where ' earth movers and bulldozers have rlpped up the slrecl and now are buiMing a grade on which to lay the new four-lanc concrete road-

The gradc building is proceeding on Uie piece from tlie bridge area was1 lo Highway 81. Here the pavenient was torn out and hauled away. And from No. 81 on w s t to Columbia Road, the area also is blocked off and will be ripped up this wcek preliminary to grading work.

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--$3

2
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1 ProJes t

Discussions

On f7Housing 9 -6 3
Move

iF o r

Tra

Ahead

iTo Discuss lI Boeing$ -&I Firm -63 Housing Plan Site For Boeing 1 A five-man comlnittee of Grand
Forks aldermen is tentatively scheduled to discuss a trailer proposal here this week with representatives of Boeing Aircraft Co., holder of the contract for installation of the Minuteman Missile complex in northeastern North Dakota. Boeing has propmed to move several hunclred family trailer units into the Boyd Addition at the nor~hwestedge of the city, locating them just west of Sanford Road and on the north and west sides of the Lalce Agassiz School. Boeing administrative personnel would use the housing. R. R. Smith heads tlie colnmib tee, which also includes Aldermen Albert Strand, Lloyd V. Hillier, H. R. Magnuson ancl J'. H. En. d m , with City Atlorney Gordon Caldis as their legal adviser. Also in the housing picture is an alternate offer made to Boeing by Castle Investments, Ldt., of Winnipeg, holder of an option for purchase of the present Grand Forlcs airport, which proposed to construct permancnt type housing for the Bwing people on the airptrrt land instead of having them housed in trailers. If such an arrangement m r e finalized, the Cat+ tle firm would have to exercise its option, good until Nov. 30, to buy the airport land for $460,00U. l The Winnipeg firm prop~sed to build the housing just west of 42nd Street and south of thc present airport krininal building. City officials ate liopcful that tliis week will bring a decision from Boeing as to its wishes in the housinn matter.

Thirty residents o f Boyd's Addition b Grand Forlis voiced unanimous oppositio~iat the City I Council lueeting Monday to a Boeing Aircraft Co. proposal to move 'several hunclred trailers into the addition to house administrative personnel connected with tlie Minuteman Missile installation in this area. First of several spolresmen for

the Boyd's dclcgalion was Al Graham, 3412 Sixlh Ave. N., who said the group came to the council meeting to sccurk more information regarding the Boeing proposal, which currently is bef ing considercd by a comniittee o the council, along with an alternate proposal by Castle InvesC- , ments, Ltd., of Winnipeg, to build perinanent housing for the missile personnel on the present city airport. Argue Against Plan Others who spoke against the Boyd [railer proposal included said he Richard Franlc. A Grand Forlcs City Council planned to build in the addition. conl~nitteewhich met with Boeing S 0 ln e arguments advanced Aircraft Co. representatives here againsl the trailer move-ill includMonday is studying the possibil- ed that it would halt developrnenl f tlie additioii in the ensuing 1\40 ity o f locating in thc nearly local o area several hundred trailers to to three years, cause increased house Boeing administrative per- traffic volun~e and add expense sonnel con~lectedwith the Minute- to otlicr Grand Forlcs residents who must bear the added expense man Missile installation. f educating trailer family chilFive differenl'trailer sites were o listed as possibilities, including dren in the local schools. one in the Boyd Addition, which Mayor Nelson A. Youngs, who Boeing officials said was their presided at the meeting, said the Boyd site was under coosidcra1 top choice. I tlon, along with several other alI ALte'din~ the ""on we'' " 1 I ternate sites, but that no ,jeasion of the "lnmittee R. R' 1 had been by the coullcil I Smith, cliairman: Lloyd V. Hill- comlniltee added all ier' R' Magnuson' J' H' En- possible consideration would be i dres and Albert Strand, ancl City area protest' 1 AttorIley Gordon Caldis, Auditor I given-Lo-the grant Harold Martin, Finance Director 'rile council ac$eptccl R. S, Niles and Engineer Tho- offer of 5111,000 by the Federal burn Peterson. Boeing represents- Aviation Agency for Phase 2 of tives were Robert Allen, facilities the new Grand Forlcs Intcrnation(represelltalive; Paul &rand of 8 1 Airport. Incl~Jeda s the electile Seattle, Wash., Boeing office, trical control and equipment build- ) and T, p. McElroy, Grand Forlcs access roads and utilities. A I attornev. i previous grant offer of $95,000 Meall',vllilc Boeing,s Sea,tle of- was "01 processed because bids fice also is considering an offer ran higher than expected on [his by CastIc Investments, ~ t d . , OF phase .of -the - constructionn I \Vebster Thanked Winnipeg to build per~nanent I Granted Lhe application of Dahousing in any neecIecI anioulit on the prescnt local airport to house kola Sales Co. Lor a lilnitcd the Boeing personnel. I wholesale liquor license. I A Boeing official indicated he Adjour11cd to Mollclay, July 15, expected to ICIIOW by the end of this week what the coll1pany's re- Before adjO~lrnmellt, M a Y 0 thanks on beaction to the Castle offer may Y~u"Es ex~re~secl half of lii~nself and the council be and that some from the ,-ity councilregarding [he for Webster's assistance during ~~~d lnove ill plan is his tern1 of office here since 1957 by about - ~ ~ l and ~ wished him luck in the fu--- turc. Webster responded by saying that "99 per cent of my stay here has been a pleasure and you know ab~yf;,~the other 1 per cent." - --..- - 1

Trailers Studied

nlembersl

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Officials of the Boeing Aircraft I Co, and the City of Grand Forlrs ( moved ahead Monday in their attempts to reach a financial agreement covering the housing of approximately 250 Bueing administrative personnel here in the ensuing three years. Boeing, which has the contract for the Minuteman Missile installation in this area, is seelcing a site for its trailers and also an agreement on the amount to be paid the city for the various municipal services which will be required by the trailer personnel. Boeing representatives, a committee of aldermen and several ral estate men attended the meeting. Issues Narrowed The issues were narrowed when Robert Allen, Boeing facilities chief, announced that an offer by Castle Investments, Ltd., of Winnipeg, to build permanent housing on the present Grand Forks airpork site had been rejected by Boeing's Seattle office. Rcasons related by Allen for denial of the Castle offer were Chat the cost would be higher than by using the trailers presently owned by the Air Force, that Boeing must take reasonable and economic steps not to create an unnecessary impact on the community and that the Castle offer coniained a legal proposal which Boeing could not accept. Bayd Site Dropped The comnlittee then decided to recorninend to the council that one of four proposed sitcs for the Boeing trailers also be dropped from further consideration. T h e one dropped was in the Boyd Addition, which Boeing had proposed as a trailer location, but to which residents of that area have objected, because they felt it would interrupt the present residential develol>ment of that community. Following a 2%-hour discussion, the session was adjourned to permit Finance Director R. S. Niles and City Auditor Harold Martin to 'prepare further figures on the financial impacl of the trailcr village on the community. Thia information was to be ~ s e d by the coutlcil committee in its negotiations with Boeing at a meeting to be held with in the next day or

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6dunci1 committeemen were R. R. Sjnith, chairman, who presided: Lloyd V. Hillier, J. B. Endres, H. R. Magnuaon and A 1b e r t grand. Other city officials included Niles, Martin, City Attorney Gordon Caldis, and City Engineer Thoburn-?. .Peterson ----I , , ---'------

Represel~ta tives Named Boeing representatives at' the Tuesday meeting included Allen, Paul Durand, Frank E. Bradley, : industrial relations chief for the 1 area project, and Grand Forks 1 dtol+neysThonzas I,. Degnan and i Thomas P. McElroy. -.I

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Housing Disvssions I 7-/-63. Move TO Washington


A Winnipeg firm's offer to build on the airport land at once since housing here for Boeing Aircraft Boeing needs housing for approxipersonnel which was rejected mately 50 of i a personnel not laby Boeing's Seattle office was 1 scheduled to be reconsidered at a ter than oe representatives nveeting ~ h in w ~ ~ ~ ~ Y ~i n ~g d ~ ~ ~ ~ in Grand ~ ~ ~ D. c,, according lo R. S. Niles, Forks have conferred several I ; ~~~~d ~~~k~ city director of fi- times with the coullcil headed by Smith regarding a site nance. ~ ~ asd a , result, "Mr. Slnith b r up to 250 trailers for their 1 people but have/ ( ~ l R.R, d smith) ~ ~ Goes ~ to ~ administrative ~ been unable to ~ ~ ~ represent l ~ the City i ~ ~ ~ reach ~ final ~ agreev council at the Smith is. merit on terms of such an arrangechairman of the council commitTrailers Used tee which has been negotiating wiUl Boeing representatives here The Air Foroe owns the trailers ' regarding a site on which to house and Boeing has made use of them about 250 families of Boeing ad- in connection with previous missile rninistrative personnel in charge wing installations at Great Falls, ' of installing the Minutelnan Mis- Mont., Minot, N. D., and other 1 sile colnplex in this area. Sinilh areas. left for Washington Wednesday And while Boeing's Robert Al- I afternoon. len, Paul Durand and Frank E. Bradley worked with the commitOfficials To Attend Niles was informed that others tee here last week, their Seattle attending the Washington meeting office also was considering the will include representativm of Spivalc offer which it rejecbd SatBming Co., U.S. Air h r c e and urday. Site M.D. Spivak, president of Castle The rejection of the offer was Investments, Ltd., of Winnipeg, announced by Allen at a meeting investments an Op tion, g o d until NOV.30, to buy the with the council comjllittee Manpresel't Grand Airport land 6 c ; 2 t " s I : : ~ ~ 'Or r460~oo0' Spivak's offer house the Boeing personnel in the terms under wllicl~ it nlighi 1 Permanent housing lo be built on be set up here, especially as to reimburse,ent to UK the ai ort was rejected Saturday i was undenstood by local city for n-~uni~ipalservices to occupants. officials that the Washington NOW, with the Spivak offer meeting to reconsider the matter scheduled for another discussion was called at his request. in Washingbn, Niles said the cornBoeing Men Confer inittee will delay scheduling another nieeting with the local Boeing people until it hears the result of the Washington talks, He said he planned, however, b contlnue discussions with Boeing rep---resentatives here . in the meanttme, Smith is expected to return frola Washington Friday night. -I

Boeing Agrees To Study 7-/2-d 3 I Reviskd Housing Proposrr


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, Land Affected Herald Washington Bureau He did say the revised proposal Boeing Air-, he is preparin,~will require a WASHINGTON craft Co. officials agreed here new arrangement between his Thursday to study a revised pro- firm and the city of Grand Forks, posal for family and bachelor "because it affects the land" on the proposed housing would , housing of workers on the Minuteman Missile project at Grand ibe built. He said he will meet Forks, participants at a ,meeting 'with Grand Forks officials on the in Sen. Quentin Burdick's office matter next week, said afblwards. Smith said "some progress" had Details of the proposal were been made. He declined to prounavailable froin M. D. Spivak, vide further details, Winpipeg real estate prollloter Spivak said he is changing his in respnse to who holds an option on much of ~ ~ the present city airport. He wants tion receive& from B ~ ~ and added that cost figures in his to build permanent housing facil, ities on the airport property to earlier proposal, rejected by Boehouse Boeing personnel duriIlg ing, were "not in contenti~n." construction of the Minuteman Won't Elaborate complex. Boeing, however, had said the' rejection of the first offer was at No Change Planned Alderman R. R, Smith, who rep- least partly due to the fact that be greater thap resented Grand Forks City at the the *st the new proposal I that of using Air Force trailers. meeting, 1 will not involve any contractual There are indications that the propsa1 would bring the city , change in the city arrangements 1 with fie developer. H~ said next I into the deal in a more active I week's meeting will be for the Way, but neither Smith nor Spkpurpose of inforlning the city t "k would elaborate abo t it. C~urlcilabout tho changes in Spi- ! The new offer will be rwarded va~s proposal to the Boeing co,It0 Boeing headquarters in Seattle If ac=~tReporters were excluded from for for ~ h rneetillg ~ at the ~ re- able, ~ negotiations d ~ a ont tract ~ ~ quest e of spivak. ~ ;vague ~and ~ would ~ be ~ cohtinued. Participants in the r n e e h l ingless nplies wen given by Spivalc to quations aftell ard, T h u r d a ~ were Smitll~ S ~ i v a k T~ a comment *hat he was be. and Boeing representatives. The ing secretive and vague, Spivak Air Fbrce and Burdi& sent ob- I cotnmentcd "that may be becayse -you've ncver dealt with a Canadian before." I

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~:~c:t;:~~~~~t;t:;;e~;~ was made Friday following a meeting in Washington of Boeing, I Air Force, Castle Investment and, Grand Forks city officials. M. D. ; Spivak, Cstle president, repre- ; 7:/3-c;3 sented that firm and Alderman R. R. Smith represented Grand Forks City. Castle Investments holds an option to purchase the local airport land which will exire Nov. 30 and previously had gnnounced plans fo; a large shop Land Prot@ried ping center and housing to be constructed an the airport land. ci)y Re~resentatives of Boeing fn The Grand Forlcs Board of R e . ~ & dFmks anticipate a to altors forwarded teleg~ams the Castle proposal "early next week." N o r t h Dakota's congressio~~] Robert. Allen, Boeing facilities I delegation at Washington, D, c., Friday opposing a Winnipeg firm@ chief for the area project, has city officials that Boeing , proposal to Boeing Aircraft Co. to build 300 permanent hwsing have housing available for 1 units for temporary rental to 50 of its administrative per-, '~oeing employes on p s e n t local airport land. The proposal was made by Gastle Investments, Ltd,, of Winnipeg while Boeinn officials here were negotiating with Grand Forks city ' 1 1 officials to secure a site for Air Force-owned trailers to house Boeing adminiskrative personnel who will direct the Minuteman Missile installation in this arw. Sent To Congressmen Copies of the realtors' telegram were addressed to members o f the North Dakota congressional delegation in Washington and also Mayor Nelson A. Young$ oP Grand Forks and C, A. Kirkey, base activation manager for the Boeing aerospace division in Se1 attle, Wash, The telegram contained a copy qf a resolution adopted by the Board of Realtors and signed by Grant f ensen, Realtors' secre-tary, which read as follows: "Grant Jensen moved that the Grand Forks Board of Realtors 1 go on reco?d to oppose the actions , of the City Council to promote and enaqurage the develbpmont .d perma&& %ushg on as air- 1 'port! fhnd that ~ o u l dhave disastrous effeots on the real estate ma~kdt in approximately three years when Boeing completes their. project In the community. A J J further ~ requests thdt the City .Founcil oooperate with the Boeing C~mpany' in providing city s e w ices in areas with$ QF adiacenj to, tha oity ;that would be acceptable tu thl community and P6e- I, ing .Co&priny." I

Housing

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Oppose
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Regulation Noted Spivak said Friday that cost I was "not in contention,'' slthough I Boeina had said the first plan was ' J 1 rejecGd at least parlly on the ba- I sis of cost. Air Force officials j , here point out that 'under procure- I , ment regulations, the prime contractor on defense ~roiectsmust, let all contracts at &e iowest possibie cost to the government. The Air Force said the trailers ,have been partly amortized at I previous projects. 1 Members of the North Dakota Spivak Would congressional delegation here now Build. Then have received protests from the Forks Board of Realtors Lease To Boeing Grand a,qainst any proposal under which ~pivakw6ulb build new permaBy BILL BROOM nent housing for the Boeing per-) Herald Washington Bureau WASHINGTON A new p r o p sonnd. ----- - -sa\ for housing families o f missib -'workers at Grand Forks during I construction of Minuteman Wing 'XI in eastern North Dakota, oflfered at a meeting here lasl Fri. !day, calls for the city of Grand 1 JForlrs to enter into a contract / wilh Boeing Aircraft CO. 1 1 Under the proposal, M. D. Spi- 1 vak of Winnipeg would build permanent housing on part of the present municipal airport property ,pn which he has an option, then turn it over to the city of Grand Forks. The city, in turn, ,would lease the housing to Boeing during the construction af the missile f acililies. Once Boeing had relinquished the housing, the city would turn, it back to Spivak, Wants Discussion (In Grand Forks, Alderman Earl Strinden said he would insist , upon a discussion of the Boeing housing controversy at a Monday evening meeting of the City Council, although the matler was not on the agenda. He said the pub- 1 lic had th"e right to know what negotiations were going on between Boeing, the city and Spivak. At the Friday meetillb in Scn. Quentin Burclick's office here, Spivak asked that the prebs be exduded. Afitorwards he refused :til, :say what his "new proposal" In-. volved, Boeing said the new would be studied by its execqtives in Seattle. An earlier proposal was 'turned down in favor of using Air Force pwned trailers to house the workers and their families, 'as has been ddne 4at five earlier Minuteman wingsk_'

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Boeing Trailer Locafion Issue In Long Session

Boeing Aircraft Co. housing was not on the agenda of the Grand Forlrs City Council meeting Monday but a post-meeting discussion 'of its raniifications before a full house of idterested persons overshadowed an otherwise routine 1 session of the aldermen. In the audience, many of whom took part in the talk, were r e p resentatives of the Grand Forks Board of Realtors, Boeing Aircraft, Castle Investments, Ltd., of Winnipeg, which holds a purchase option on the present city airport land; attorneys and interested, taxpayers. Castle Offor Cited The council discussion came on ths heels of a meeting jn wash-1 ington, D. C., last Thursday al' which a second offer by Castle1 Investments to provide perma- 1 nent housing for Boeing personnel ' on the airport land was the topic of discussion. Boeing representatives previously had sought agreement with city officials on terms for locating 250 Air Force-owned trailers 'for its administrative personnel #here during construction of the 'Minuteman Missile installation in {this area. , And the Boeing-city confer! ences appeared to be making 1 good progress toward a settle1 ment when M. D. Spivak of Casltle Invevtnle~ltsoffered a revised , version of an offer he made ear- , lier for permanent housing on the airport land.

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Meeting Described I As the council met Monday, the 1' Seattle Boeing office was considering the latest Spivak offer, with 1 an answer anticipated to come / within a day or two. The housing discussion popped ; up in~mediately after adjournment of the regular meeting when ' Alderman Earl Strinden called on Aldermen R. R. Smith, chairman ' of a City Council committee on Boeing housing matters, for a briefing on what happened at the Washington session. Smith told of the session, held ' in the office of U.S. Senator Quentin Burdick from 9 a.m. to ' 7 p.m. Thursday which he had been invited to attend. Reprcsentatives of Boeing, the U.S. Air Force, Spivak and Burdick's of. fice attended. Reviews Council A c t i ~ Smith said the Spivak offer was presented and discussed and that a Boeing man then contacted the Boeing Seattle office on the mat'ter. Smith said he attended as an ,observer. Alderman Lloyd Hillier then ' reviewed the council's part in the housing matter here. He said Boeing men came here some time ago and determined there was not sufficient furnished housing for their needs. They then sought a site for their trailers as they have used at five previous missile sites. Sewer and water connections were involved in the plans and a council committee headed by Smith was appointed. This committee, he said, has met with Boeing men here several times. 1 Questions to be determined in-' cluded whether the trailer site should be in or outside the city, what payments Boeing should make for municipal services for thc trailers, and others. Says Boeing Contacted He said Spivalc then contacted Boeing regarding its revised per, manent housing offer and requested that a city representative attend the Washington meeting. He said the Spivak offer is just another proposal for Boeing to consider in securing its housing. He also noted that the University of North :Dalzota appeared interested in securing additional housing in the future. Robert Allen, Boeing's facilities chief here, noted that Boeing representatives met more than a week ago with the council corn* rnittee and the understanding then was that some housing offer $by the. city to Boeing would, be prepared for recommendation to
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the council at the Monday meeting. He said he had worked with City Finance Director R. S. Niles on the possible contents of such an offer and had made progress but the new Spivak offer interfered and was causing the present lull in housing negotiations. In answer to a question, Allen said "Boeing also has had an offer from "private people' here for housing its administrative person(nel trailers." / At the suggestion of T. P. Mc,Elroy, Boeing attorney here, All len gave a rundown on Boeing's search for trailer housing here. He aid he contacted the city manager's office as long as four 1 months ago, and again about two I months ago. Later, he said, he presented Boeing's needs to representatives of the city, the Chamber of Commerce and local 'Realtors. 15 Trailer Parks Built The 250 families of administrative people, he said, comprise bnly about 20 per cent of the total Boeing personnel. "About 750 others also are on our payroll and must provide their own housing," he said. "Possibly 400 to 500 of these will be local workers hired by Boeing for the missile job." ' Allen said Boeing previously has built 15 mobile home parks for its personnel at other places and that the trailer park is a "complete identity", of modern clesign, well managed, and with various facilities for its people. The parks are located where they have "the least impact" on the comn~unity. November Said Deadline He said it is unfortunate we are late with our arrangements here and that "We must have something built by November or nothing can be built here" because of weather conditions. "If we were agreed on a site right liow, I it would take us a month to get started with the project," he said,, He said the new Spivak proposal I is "holding us up now." In response to a question by Mayor Nelson A, Youngs, Allen said, "We are willing to pay any impact cost that can be identified I due to our being here." Alderman Albert Strand wanted to know if it were not true that! Spivak contacted Boeing regarding his new offer and Allen said /it was true, Re also answered that the cost of housing to Boel
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ing is a "main factor" in that i firm's decision on housing. Another council member, MPS. Virginia Rose, said "I'm all for the trailers coming in and Ihope the delay will not force Boeing to accept the Spivak plan," Alderman H. R. Magnuson said I the council was not ready at this meeting to present figures on payments for the trailers but he hoped this pan be resolved soon. Finance Director Niles said that should the Spivak offer be turned down, "we probably can accept a Boeing offer on one of three sites" .being considered here. Statement Denied .Louis Gershman told the meeting he understood that Smith had told the Washington session that Grand Forks, people generally favored the Spivak offer, but At, torney Robert Feidler, Spivak attorney here who attended the meeting in the capital, said Smith only answered questions put to him and that he did not hear, {Smith malce such a statement. Smith also denied it. I 1 Gershman also inquired about ' a report that the University would like to take over permanent housing built on the airport but Feidler said he had only talked I to UND President George Starcher informally and nothing had come of it.
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Allen tor, has andspent other many Boeing hours represenwith Officials of Boeing Aircraft Co. The result of [he Spivak bid altatives in an effort t~ idelltify and a committee of Grand Forks ready has held up the trailer ' various items which would COLII; aldermen are expected to huddle housing negotiations between the I I under the heading of municipal again here Thursday in an at- aldermen and the Boeing men I services that would be required tempt to reach a contractual cost but some further action in the I by Boeing personnel during tlle three-year construction period of arrangement for housing 250 trail- housing mattcr, one way or the ers tor Bocing administrative other, is expected at the Thurs- t i tlie Minuteman Missile complex personnel here during the instal- day meeting. 1 ' in this area. Both sides in the negotiations exlation of Minulenian missiles in I pected to receive information vithis area. I ;+,rC-tal to any contractual agreemelrt - - -Time of tlie meeting was not 11 - - - -between the two negotiators at learned but a Boeing representa- / the session Thursday. tive said he understood the meetExpected fifit is Boeing's foring was planned. R. R. Smith, 17- /8-&:3 ma1 answer to a proposal by Cas- , chairman of the committee r e p tle Investments, Ltd., of Winni- l resenting the City Council in the peg, holder of an option to buy 1 housing negotiations, was out of the present city airport land, to the city Wednesday, his office provide permanent housing on the said. I airport for the Boeing personnel. 1 The ilegotiators were hopeful I Other Topics Listed that the oeing firm's Seattle OFIf the proposal should be refice will have an answer before jected, then the meeting would 1 the mect~ng to anolhcr offer, lnadc by M. D. Spivak of winnl., The pre~~ure-packed talks be- concentrate immediately on a pcg, to providc permanen1 llous-, tweell re~reselltatives Boeing number of cily proposals coverI Aircraft Co. and the City of Grand ing several suggested trailer sites, ing instead of trailers. . Forks were expected to reach a and including costs to Boeing for peak at a meeting scheduled the various municipal services Thursday afternoon at the City1 their people will require. Hall. Thursday's meeting marlred Boeing's Robert Allen, the another chapter in a series of / firm's facilities chief, has stressed negotiations between the C i t y that time is running out on the Council's committee on housing 7 - i C P - t B negotialions and that arrange- for Boei11,g and the aircraft firm's ments must be made proniplly representat~vns,with Niles assignfor housing approximately 260 ed the task of digging up figurcs Boeing administrative personnel, that can be accepted by Boeing, either in Grand Forks or some-1 R. R. Smith is chairman of the where else in the apfa. -I council committee, whose other members are H. R. Magnuson, Al- , The city then made a proposal berl Strand. J. H. Endres and' to Boeing officials based on fig- Lloyd V. Hillier. I uses conYpiled by R. S. Niles, Represe~~tatives ol the Boeinp city director of finance, with AlNiles said Friday he espectecl Colnpany and Grand Forks City lenJs assistance. The offer was to to have a revised prol~osalready were llalnmering out a proposal charge Boeing a total of $90,000 to present to council ~Friday which both sides hoped for water, sewer and sanitation tee by Monday. it is acsites will per~nit moving to this city services On any One of ceptable to the colnlnittec as p ~ o i located outside the cily li111its. tecting the city's interests, the appmximately 250 Boeillg admi,,L1lc west and a sites are committee will recolnlnend its 1 islrative personnel to direcl the third to the south of the city. adoptioll by the City Council a t , Minuteman Missile installation in this Other Charges Planned its meetin= Wednesday. 1 ....- area .,--... In these charges The texcof Allen's iet~er Which Negotiations were in the sl~owg Irailer was read to those at the meeting down stage following a meeting the e l ~ follows: of Boeing lnen here Thursday would pay a ~ ~ r o x i 1 7 1 a t$6~000 three- 1 "'The Boeing Compally'G-as-i with a City Coullcil housing corn- to $7,000 a Year during nlitteo which narmwed fie pro- Yea'. perid of the installation for sembly contractor for the Mintrailer site areas 10 three, police and fire protectioii. The uten~anProgram will be centerall outside the city, and which latter charges were worlred out ling its operations for Wing VI in was informed that a Winnipeg 011 the basis of 8 mills for policenthe vicinity of the Grand Forks firm's offer to build perlilanent and 10 lnills for fire protectioll, Air Force Base. Our contractor housing for the Boeing 0' $14.58 Per trailer lot Per Year. support area will be on'the Air on the present airporl had been Aflet the meeting, Boeing head- Force Base. We plan to establish quarters in Seattle, Wash., were dispatch stations for our personrcjecled. Ask Firm Decision contacted by Allen on the tele- nel in Finley on the south and, I Adams on the north. J, Robert Boeing facili. phone and it was learned that repressnted C. A. brtlier adjustments m u s t be "In support of our effort, we ties cllief, plan to provide housing lor our ~ i ~ base k ~ aclivation ~ , manager, made. So Niles went to work with: personnel in the general vicinity ar the T~~~~~~~~ session present- Tlioi~~as P. McElroy, Boeing atcily represcud to~mey here, to work out a re- of the contractor suppost area ed a letler to the clispnlch stations. Family trtives fiat stabd "It is impera- vised city offer which both the and are required for tive a firlII decision be c i v ancl Boeing could accept. I accommodations our transferred supervisory and Revised Plan DUE reached by the City of Grand R, R. Smith, chairman of the Forks respecting casts and or charges for scrvices rendered by council mmmiltee, pre;ided at the citv for a mobile hornc park t h e Thursday meeting. .Other and that such decision be arrived cornmilteeme; p r e s e n t were , .Endres, at by the lime of the conclusion Lloyd V. Hillier, J. H of the City Council meeting July H. R. Magnuson and Albert . resentcd Strand. Allell Boeiiig. and McEl1.o~ rep24, 1963,"

an To Discuss kourlng Thursday


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R. S. Niles, city finance direc-

Confer Many Hours

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Trailer Park Described "In the majority of cases to / date we have provided the necesI sary housing with transportable type unils. These units are placed upon leased rrailer pads or upon1 ; pads buill hy Boeing through a 1 local conlpetitive bid to a construction contractor. Our housing parks are desisned in the best4 practice o f the industry commensurate with the short term occupancy that the pragram dictates. "As you know, the company has received an unsolicited pro;p ~ s a l from the Grand Forks Realty Co. acting in behalf of Mr. Spivak. This proposal was carcfully analyzed ancl evaluated and has been rejected by the corn-, pany. (The Spivak referred to is I M. D. Spivalr, president of Castlc 1 Investmcnls, Ltd., of Winnipeg, which holds an option to purchase the Grand Forlrs Airport h r $460,000). 1 More Iliscussions Held "Subseq~ient to this rejection, we have had further discussio~t kith Mr. Spivak. The colnpany now considers this particular case closed and theref01.e plans, to proceed nn expedited basis to provide housing for our person11el. ' I "The Boeing Company wishcs 1 to express its appreciation to I those city ofEicials and local cili1 zcns who have assicjted us in our, I efforts to provide adequato ternporary bousii~g d a minimaf (cost while meeting local require'

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nlcnvk*ress Need For Skirt 'The proceedings lo date have f we arc 1 cost us valuable timc. I t o beat the winter season, planning, design, and construct~onof, our facilities must proceed urnin- 1 terruptcd from this dqte forward. ; "Our personnel in the Grand' Forks area will be working with local communities to establish I agreements satisfactory t u both 1 the comniunity and the Company for providiw housing facilities for I , the short tertil inclicatcd. We hope I lo reach early undcrstancling with local officials in various conimunities under considcration so tbal sites selection can be fitialized. Decision Awaited "In older lo evaluate the ccono~nic characteristics of bcating a inobilc home parlr in or acljaceilt to the City of Grand Forks, ( should this location be selected, / it is imperative that a firm decision be reachcd by the City of Grand Forks respecting costs and-or charges for services rendered by tlie City of Grand Forlcs for a niobile home park and that such decision be arrived at by the I time of the conclusion of Ihe City Council meeting scheduled for July 24, 1963. "The Qoeing Con~panyand its 1 employes are looking forward to j a favorable association in the l mmmunities finally selected for1 our hodsihg. "Thank you for your assistallce 1 and consideration."

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For Airporf

Same Work ?-2 At 9-Q Airport Resume


Work was resumed on some areas of the new Grand Forks Airport Monday but it remained suspended on the runway area because the soil still was too damp, according to Harold Vinje, resident engineer. Sewer and water line installation occupied some crews and wodc continued on the new term-1 inal building where footings and foundations walls already have been put in. The concrete plant which will inix the batches for the runways was being set up and materials for the aggregate were hauled to the airport. Two double drum mixers will keep 10 batch trucks going when the mixers are in o p , eration, Vinje said. The site has been laid out and stripped for the equipment storage and electrical control building and if the ground dries out a little more, a crew will begin spreading gravel for the subbase of the main runway.
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Preparation of tlie grade for the runways at the new Grand / Forks International Airport has been practically completed, and pouring of concrete is scheduled I to be started Aug. 15, according I to Harold Vinje, resident engiI neer. Vinje said the fill and grading up of the norbh-south and the east-west runways has been finished and the gravel base is being laid for the concrete. The north-south (main) runway is 5,300 feet long and 150 feet wide and the east-west strip is 4,200 feet long and 100 feet wide. Worlc also is progressing on the airport terminal building. T h e foundation is in and the basemen[ walls will be poured soon. 'Briclrwork on the walls is ex! pected to be started in about a week.

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The Federal Aviation Agency has given the "go ahead" signal to the final two phases of the new Grand Forks International Airport and the Work will proceed at once, according to Harold Vinje, resident engineer for the project. The first phase, principally the runw%ys, is well under way, and Che latest FAA approval is for Phases 2 and 3. No. 2 includes construction of the airport entrance road and waler and sewer facilities, with Megarry Bros, of St, Cloud, Minn., as the contractor. Also in Phase 2 is the field maintenance equipment and electrical control building which Johnson-Gillanders Co. of Grand Forks will build. Phase 3 is the new terminal building and hangars. Baukol Construction Co, has the building job and arrangements are being made for the hangars. Footings were being poured Friday for the lerrninal building. Work on the runway portio~iof Ule job was slowed up by recent rain which soaked the soil. Machinery was being used Friday to aerate the dirl. The north-south runway has been stripped and filled for about 4,300 feet of jts mile length, the stripping and. base work is nearly finished for the east-west runway and some stripping and filt work has been done on the taxiways. All of the fill and basework is in preparation for laying the concrete surface laler. I Completion of [he north-south 1 runway job waits un the current job of lowering a jet fuel pipeline that runs beneath the airport land Base. lo Grand Forks Air ~ o r c e Excavation work has been completed but the crew ow must lower the pipeline an$ case it,, also cuvering the case pipe with concrete in critical areas.
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gravel sub-grade Manday on, north-south runway of the (new Grand Forks Airport. The work was being done on approx-' . iinately 4,100 feet of h e north' ' end of the 5,300-ioot runway. 1 i About half of this north area was I being graveled and the balance. was being fine-graded in preparation for the gravel. Fine gradix ,also was being done on the east/ west runway.

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-O-816-6f I Pouring of concrete for t e north-south runway of the new Grand Forks Airport is scheduled to be started Monday, according to a member of the engineering' staff on, the job. The runway is 5,300 feet long and 150 feet wide. 1

-i3 Harold Vinje, reslden engineer


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zonillg for the new G r a 1 1d Forlts International Airport also got attention from the Council. It designated the city planning and zoning commission as the airport zoning comlnission for the purpose of establishing flight approach zones. The step was proposed by the city attorney who pointed out that townships involved in the airport area had shown no interest in forming a joint airport zoning commission as permitted by law and that in such a case the city call establish its own z o n i n g body. Establishment of flight zones for the airport would limit the lleighl o f T buildings in certain areas surngunding the airport in ' order to maintain flying safety. 1 The airport zoning commission must study the matter and then, have prepared a proposed ordin- I ance and map which would be presented first to the city ning and zoning commission for #the purpose of conducti~lg hearings, and then would go to the City Council for its

for the new Grand Forks Airport went to his home at Elgin, Ill., for the weekend. Be will return I R. S. N i l c s ~ ~ ~ ~ f i City1 o r h s Sunday. director of finance, and Harold 1 . - -- _ ---I . -Vinje, resident engineer on the 1 nEw city airport project, went to St. Paul Wednesday to confer with Federal Aviation Agency of$--18-63 ficials regarding payments to be, made by the FAA to the city on I the airport construction.
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' director R S. Nilef'&i&fForks City of finance, and Harold


Vinje, rcsident engineer on the' new Grand Forks Airport project, have returned from a one-dav trip to St. Paul where they cdifer\red with Federal Aviation Agency officials regarding FAA participation in financing the airport. The FAA is expected to contribute approximately $500,000 to the first phase, including the run-' ways, of the new airport. Niles said details of the application for this item have been imdsd out.
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ans On 1 Hangars To Be Aired


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--7-+4-6$ The Thursday nigh r a n su pendad Work on the new Grand ' F o r k Airport, where work was, ;under way on runways, culverts :and the earIy stages of the ter-, 'minal building and the equip, l rnent storageelectrical con trol (;building, according to Harold iVj~je,,resident engineer, I

Friday on approximately half of I the 5,300-foot north-sou* runway 1 of the nekv Grand Forks Airporti i preparatory to pouring the mri-1 way concrete starting about Aug. : 18, according to Hamld Vinje, resident engineer. B a s e m e n t walls were being built for the1 ' new terminal building and foot; ings poured for thg electrical con; 1 ; trol and equipment storage build-

I ing.

Plans and specifications for I hangar construction a t the n w i Grand Forks Airport and moving hangars from the present airport to the new one are expected t o be presented to the City Col~ncil at its meeting Monday at 7:30 p.m. Plans for the new bhildings call for two new steel hangars, one 80 by 120 feet and the other NO by 6 0 ' feet, and an eight-place Thangar with individual stalls and space also for light twin engine / planes. It will be about 50 by1 180' feet in ground dimensions. 1 Also in the plans are a flight B e office building with a b o d , '1,200 square feet of space, an airline equipment storage building for Northwest Airlines, and an air- / c~aft fueling facility. I I WU Be Relocated 1 Hangars from the present airport which will be relocated in-; clude a 60 by 80 foot building and an eight-place T-hangar, also of I steel construction. Tentatives plans are to move! the old hangars to the new air- i port about Nov. 1, just ahead of1

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First pouring of concrete, for the north-south runway of the new Grand Forks Interhational i Airport located five miles west of Grand Forks, north of, Highway 2 , was started Monday. Harold Vinje, engineer for t h e airport construction, reborted at noon h a t about 500 or 600 feet of a 25-foot strip of cement had been poured. He explained it will be necessary to make six passes to complete the 150-foot wide run-' way. Other phases of the project,' such as grading, laying aggregate sub base and construction of ., buildingJ for the airport, continue.
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pletion of the new Grand Forks, Grand Forks, was the low bidder Airport was taken by the city in both cases, getting the water- ( , -council at Monday night's meet- main work for $12,794.20 and the ing when plans and specifications sewer work for, $13,783.90. Valley for hangar construction and fuel- Construction Co. I n c., Grand iag were approved without dis- Forks, was the only other bidder, cussion. To handle downtown traffic Bids for the projects must be during the beet hauling season, received a t the city auditor's of- the council ordered no parking on the south side of DeMers Avenue fice by Sept. 16. Three new hangars, an equip fro111 F i f t h Street to Sorlie ment storage;,building for use by Bridge. Mechanics of posting and Northwest Aiftines, fueling facil- patrolling were left to the police ities and moving huo hangars department Offenders will be from the old airport site are cov- warned but tickets will .not be is-, 'i ered in this final phase. sued uncler council action. The i . . The overall project includes parking ban will last the duration \ the runways and the airport ter- 1 I of the haullx,season on&. 1 minal building, now under construction. The council also gave its a g '..proval to a sewer and wafermain : "project, approximating 1,000 feet,
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' t i 2/44YL.

'Yt

ORDINANCE NO. 1 3 1 1 RESTRICTING AN ORDINANCE REcuL,&;Nc THE WEIGHT O F STRUC-

A p m

i, TURES OBJECTS OF NATURAL f:,?$? 'AND + & D $If~fjkSHTy"E&U\~Tp:


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VICINITY OF THE GRAND FORKS IN. TERNATIONAL A'IRPORT B Y CREATING AIRPORT PPROACIi ZONES 1 TRAN~ITIGN z o fi E s HORIZONTAS , Z O N E AND CONICAL ZONE. AND ESTABLISMING TtIE B 0 U N D A R I E S ' I THEREOF PROVIDING F O R CHANGES IN TllE ~~ESTRICTIONS A N D DOUNDARIES OF SUCH ZOYES. DEFINING ( CERTAINTERMS U S ~ D HEREIN. REL FERRINC 0 TNE GRAND FORKS I N TFRNAT~OSAL AIRPORT TONING WHICH IS INCORPORATGO IN AND MADE A PART OF TflIS ORDINANCEPROVIDING FOR ENFORCEMENT: ,ES: TABLISXING A BOARD O F APPEALS: ANTI IMP041NG PFNALTIES. B E IT ORDAINED BY T H E CITY COUNCIL O F THE CITY O F G R A N D FORKS. NORTH DAKOTA. THAT: 21.0217 Penalties Each vlolatian of t h i s A r t i c l e or a n y regulatioi~, order, o r . ruling p~omulgated t hereuader shall co~stltute a rnlsdemeallar and be ~m!shable b y a tine af not more than or I m risonmcnt f o r not mere than 90 bays or goth flne n.nd mari is onment and enrh day a vlolatlon conllnu-s ! a eiist s h a l l constitute a se~arate o f -

R E S T A U R A N T CONCESSION
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On new G r a n d Ferkr International Airport completel y n e w and m o d e r n facility bid forms available in Airport Manager's Office. Inkrested parties r e q uested t o call 774-50 1 1.
Bids w t l l b~ r-relvtd
umtil 10:00

/ 1'

o'rlock am., Thunday, January

SIOBOO
H.

'E MARTIN, ~itir Airditor Tntrod~l~tion and First Reading: N bcr I8 1963 ~ublic Hemine: December 16. ID63 Second Readins and Flnal Passage: ember 16, 1963 Anom ed: December 16. 1963

Attest:

NPI-SON A YOLINGS. Mayor


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NOTICE TO RESTAURANT OPERATORS CALL FOR BIDS FOR RESTAURANT CONCESSION ON NEW GRAND FORK8 ZNTERNATIONAL AIRPORT . -Notice 1s lpreby slven +hat sealcd bldn will be rece~ved by the unliorsikned anti1 10:OO o'clock A M on Thur~dau JW ary 23 1964 in tlli dffict! of & ~ l r e c t o r of ~ i n h n c e in the City &ill in City ot Grand Forks North Dakota. and Wlll be presented to' @e members o f t h e CIL Council a t I?IZI~ ~ l r meetin r schcdd ed for faronday. F e ruam 3. lo& a t 7:30 o'clock P.M. far a Resraurant OpeFato on the New Grand Forks 1nternatiw8 Aimrt ~ a c h '~d mu& be submitted on bla by the .A'ir ort Mapaor I p~ust be aecomnm~ed a cert~fred check m the amount o P $50.00. myable to Ihe I ~ Y of Grand FOI-b.as a m a n t e e that I %e bidder wxll enter into a contract as Che Restaurant b e r a t o r i n case contra@ is awarded. the $50. 00 oheclc to be re,tu~nerii by tlic Cit a s llquldat'ed damages ~f succevful biddkr fails o r refwee to enter into a contract when requested to do so anq/ or i f all tile requirements as EBt f&th IQ the contract aocuments are not fully com-

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The last half oft h e 2 3 0 by 32foot T-hangar at t h e present Grand Forks Airport will b e moved, probably late this week, depending on weather c o n a ition$, t o the new airport f i v e west of the c i t y , according to Norman Midboe, airport: manager, The first h a l f of t h e has been moved to t h e i1 hangar airport and set on i t s

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' Harold Vinje, resldent mgineer the new Grand Fork *lrport* expects to here for! the nextweek Or to supervise completion Of b ing construction work on / 2-Zcj-63 airport. ------

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dings al: the new Grand


planes d u e to

the a n n u l s

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day he expected the final half of the big T-hangar on the / old airport will be moved to the new airport Tuesday. After this movs has been made, he said, Jim Montgomery's hangar-work- , shoq will be transferred to the new airport which wiU conclude the building relocations fFom tha old to the new location.
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airport,

aentral Airlines offices, the U.S.

tion of the doors "8d one re-located %pace hangar (from the old airport) i~ &bout rettdy fop use, In addition, the final half

Old Grand Forks Inlernatianal Airport Land For Sale


Three parcels of land totaling approxsion of University Avenue, and a lot for a proposed future fire station. Consideration will be given to any offer for all or any part of the three parcels. The City of Grand Forks will subdivide and rezone to suit the requirernents o f an adceptable offer.
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imately 176 acres is the remaining portion of the old Grand ~ o r k Inters national Airport

- after deductiiig

the right-of-way for Interstate 29,


the right-of-way for U.S. EIighway

No. 2, the right-of-way f or the exten-

Prospective purchasers may contact Mr. R. S. Niles, Director of Finance or MF. Thobum F. Peterson, Director of Public Service for additional information or t o submit an offer.
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Sale of $560,00 general obligation highway bonds and $400,000 airporl revenue bonds was authorized by the Grand Forlts City Council a l its nleeting Monday night. The highway bonds were sold a t a net interest rate of 3,00257 per cent and the airport bonds a t 4.027 per cent. Buyer and low bidder on the lii~liwavbond issue was a I<ansa; ~ i t j r ,Mo., syndicate of H. 0. Peet & co.; Barret, it^-,, Nortli & CO., ~ n c . , Stepp Investments, Inc. I Helps PRYFor Bridge I The issue is to help pay the I city's s11ai.e of the new Skidmore Avenue bridge and Skidinore paving, an additional Washington Street underpass facility ancl improveinent of U.S. Highway 81 and Sixth Avcnue S. The unclerpass, H i g hway 81 and Sixth Avenue S. projects are scheduled for construction this year. The airport ,bonds are to help pay construction costs of the new Grand Forlts International Airport. They will mature in ;mounts of $25,000 each year starting in 1966. ICalnlan & Co., Minneapolis investment, f i r ni, was the buyer. Debt Limit Given The new airport is scheduled to open about Feb. 1 for general use, although Northwest Airlines has been using it since Nov. 15. Finishing work must be done on several buildings beforc the airport will be operI ational. I Sale of the $560,000 highway 1 bonds brings the bonded indebtedness of the city to $1,680,448.75 coinpared with the legal debt limit of $2,255,000, according to R, S, Niles, city finance director. He said the statute does not include airport revenue

' ingDoors for the Terminal buiidat the new Grand Forks,
/ Airport are scheduled to get
here about Feb. 25 but it is expected that temporary entrances will be constructed to permit 'the opening of the airport, now tentatively scheduled for about i an. 31. /-/?- G L/I
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'.Z$'-k City Auditor Harold Martin returned Tuesda!l night from a city bond delivery trip to Minneapolis and Kansas City, Mo. He delivered ,$400,000 airport revenue bonds to a Mill City bond buyer and $560,000 highway bonds to a Kansas City bond firm which bought those bonds. j T& highway bonds are for the Skidmore bridge, paving and ' South Washington Street improvement project. 1

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I Accepted a n offer by the city '

1 of ~ u g b y N.D., , to buy the wind

1 New Air

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R. S. Niles, city director of finance, not~fied the North Da-' kota H i g h w a y Department Thursday that the old local air1 port will be vacated Saturday when the new airport becomes fully operational. The city llas been leasing the Interstate Highway 29 strip through the old airport since the fall of 1962, when 1 it sold the strip to the Highway, 1 Department for $440,000. The i lease payments will end Satur- 1 I day. . -

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Airport Manager Norman Midboe annoi~nced Wednesday ; that the new Grand Forks International Airport will become oyerational Feb. 1. I He sala lhat means that genI era1 aviation and building tenants must be moved to the new I A milestone in Grand Forks location by Jan.?31and be ready ; aviation will be reached when to operate the fpllowing day. 1 the city's whole airport comAmong those moving from the I plex moves to modern quarters present airport to the ncy one on the new $2% million airport will be Northwest Airlines, five miles west of the city SatNorth Central Airlines, Unit6d 1 urday. States Customs Office, Mont- I The big move istarted Friday gomery Airspray, Grand Forks with Airport Manager Norman Airmotive, Inc. and private Midboe, Northwest and North nlane onerators. Northwest need Central Airlines, U.S. Customs, , bnly move its offices since it has car rental offices and others 1 operated from a trailer office 1 setting up for Saturday when land used the new airport since the new field becomes fully opNov. 15. eralional and the present old Midboe noted that the new, airport becomes a no man's airport, located five miles wesl I land for airplane flight operaof the city, will be a "fairly tioiis. complete" airport facility on Runways Cleaned opening day although the res- To prepare for opening day, taurant opening will be delayed bollds as parr of the debt lilllit Midboe has had the long conand temporary vestibules will fjgure. _ crete runways cleaned and had ' b e used for the front and rear ~cce~te the d low bid of tlle 1 doors because the new doors I crews scraping ice from the Texas Co. for aviation gas for aprons near the terminal buildI l a v e not arrived. airport use. The bid was 18.2 ing and hangars and from the But starting Feb. 1, passengcents a gallon for 80-87 octane "tie down" areas for planes ers will purchase their airlines gasoline and 20.2 cents for 100 I parked outside hangars. I I tickets from offices in the termI to 130 octane I - 2 --.. i inal building on the new airport 1 No formalities have been ar- 1 u and incoming passengers on 1 ranged for the start of the full I aviation operation a t the new 1 both airllnes will arlve there. The final half of the big TI airport because formal dedica1 North Central still is using the I hangar a t the present Grand, tion ceremonies are planned a t , Forks Airport was moved to the 1 old airport but will niove at the a later date not yet set. end of the month. new municipal airport I i v e I Passengers will buy their tickOne facility will remain on I wiles west of the city Tuesday, the airport for a time. This i s ' ets at the new airport instead of completiiig the moving of citythe old one and will use either owned hangars to the new loca- ; the Federal Aviation Agency private car or taxicab transporwhose building on the new airtion. The new airport is schedtation to and from the city until port is to be cons.tructed this uled to become o eratioilal year and occupied about Sep-' Some o t h e r arrangemerk is I. / ^ made, Midboe said. A &mmb~--.-

A t Hand

A-

Building 'Functional' The big new 153 by 48-foot term~nal building s t i 1 1 laclrs son~efinishing work but it is functional in all respects and will be fully normal within a few weeks. The two airlines will begin a 100 per cent operation from the new airport at the opening although Northwest has been using the new runways since Nov. 15. Now, with the opening, North Central also will be in the picture, with both airlines di- 1 recting their operations from offices in the new terminal. (Turn to Page 8, Co!. 4) -. -- -For those who don't remem- 1 ber the flight schgdules, Northwest will set down its first fllght, eastbound for Minneapolis, a t 8 a.m. Following east flights will depart a t 2:20 p.m. and 9:20 p.m. and westbound planes will arrive at 11:40 a.m., 6:54 p.m. and 11:30 p.m. Plane Times Given North Central brings in its first eastbound plane at 7:44 a.m. and another east plane leaves a t 2:39 p.m. Another plane leaves for Omaha at 3:40 p.m. and the incoming plane from Omaha arrives a t 2:30 p.m. Westbound NC times are 12:38 p.m. and 9:48 p.m:, Poth from Minneapolis. Howard Peterson is Northwest Airlines manager and James Butala is manager for North Central. The new airport lies one mile north of U.S. Highway 2. The entrance road to the airport turns north from No. 2 five miles west of the city limits a t Columbia Road. The entrance road leads directly to the new terminal building. Malte Final Cheek Here for the start of full operation %t the airport was Hal-. old Vinje, resident engineer, who returned from his home at Elgin, Ill., for the occasion. Vinje, Midboe and City Engineer T. F. Peterson made a final check of the airport buildings in preparation for the Saturday opening. Beginning Saturday, the old airport will assume a "Field is Closed" status, with big "X"s marking the runways, The Federal Aviation Agency, however, which provides weather and o t h e r flight information to planes, will continue to operate in the old terminal building until a new one is built later this year at the new airport.
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THIRD SECTION

JANUARY 26, 1964

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PAGE 25

Big New Airporf Here Becomes y Operafional Nexf Saturday

1 1

New Air~or~k I

By LLOYD C. TINNES terminal bullding is 153 feet long Parking in the paved area Grand Forks' new airport be- and .48 feet w~de, with ample about the terminal building for comes fully operational Satur- park~ngspace opposite the front 100 cars. A large rotating beacon for day - and the old airport d ~ e sI.building entrance. 111 becomillg operational, the 1 Housed in the building will be airporl location at night, also a modern $2% Inillion layout will 1 the offices of Northwest Airlines night - lighted ,w~nd indicator. to all airlines and 1 and North Central A~rlines,U.S. With the old airport flying be o p e ~ ~ e d prlvate planes, wlth its two long, Customs, Hertz and National field a "no man's land" under sl~clcrunways in use instead o f ' car rental services, offices of the new airport regime, there the bumpy strips on the old air- I Airmotive, Inc.. and Montgom- will, however, be two lonely opport. 1 ery Airspray, and later, other erations remaining on the airFor the arr passengers, there operators. Howard Peterson is port to be wound up i11 the enis the new terminal building NW manager and James Butala suing months. wit11 its modern facilities ready manages the North Central of- One is the Federal Aviation Agency under Chief Lon Dafor use although temporary shel- fice. tered door entrances will be Donald Porter is deputy cus- harsh which will remain in the used ulltil new doors are receiv- toms collector. Jim Montgoinery old terminal building until combearing pletion of a new flight service ed. Opening of the airport res- heads the airspray f ~ r m taurant will be delayed about a his name and Airmotive's oper- building for FAA to occupy on ( ators include businessman Louis the new airport later this year. month. Gershman of Grand Forks. Planes Need Repair To Close Old Field To Move Offices The other is the completion of And any pilots who happen to wing over the old airport at the Both airlines will move their repairs to a number of private west edge of the city Saturday office equipment to the new ter- aircraft at the Valley Aircrafl or thereafter will see large minal building this week. North- building. When these planes are "X"es, meaning "Field is Clos- west has operated its planes repaired, they will have the uned," on the airfield's three from the new flying field since usual privilege of being the only abandoned runways. Time will Nov. 15, driving passengers by ones permitted to use the old 1 have run out for the traffic- bus betweell the old and new runways, and then only for the worn airport and the new avia- airports. North central has con- purpose of taking off - perination center will be the modern tinued to operate its lighter nently. I layout five nl~leswesl and one planes from the old airport but FAA, with a force of 25 men, ' will have its entire operation has Paul Bossoletti in charge mile north of the cily. The attractive new - story in the new location Saturday. of maintenance personnel in the light brown and white colored In general charge of the whole group. It provides weather and -airport operation will be Nor- other flighl information for piInan Midboe, airport manager, lots operating currently at both with a staff of nine city en~ploy- the old and new airports and es. Their operation includes beginning Saturday at the new plane storage, fueling and oiling airport only. planes, ~ 1 1 0plowing ~ on runWill Inspect Buildings ways general building and Returning this week to checlc field maintenance. on completion of the airport Assets Described buildings will be Harold Vinje, These are some of the assets resident engineer on the airport of the new airportproject, who lives in Elgin, Ill. Two hard - surfaced (con- Vinje, City Engineer T. F. PeCrete runways, the north - south terson and Midboe must accept one 5,300 feet long and 150 feet the airport buildings including wide and the east - west strip terminal building, hangars, elec4,200 feet long and 100 feet wide. trical control and others before Paved taxiways with three the airport can become operatimes the apron area of the pres- tional. ent airport in the terminal and Megarry Brothers of St. hangar building areas. Cloud, Minn., built the airport Hangar space for 46 aircraft runways and Baukol Construcof various sizes of single and tion Co. of Grand Forlts built the light twin engine aircraft. terminal building. Johnson - GilFive tie - down facilities for 33 landen Co, of Grand Forlts built aircraft outside the hangars. the electrical control building.
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national Airport became fully ) operational this morning a s pas- 1 senger planes of two airlines came and went on schedule before 8 a.m. It was an aviation "first" in this community s i n c e only Northwest Airlines had used the new runways until Saturday when they were joined by North Central Airl~nes. Passenger who hoarded the first North Central plane a t 7:43 a.m. and the first Northwest plane at 7:47 a.m. went to the new airport by private car or taxicab but it is expected that airport - city limousine service will be set up soon. Both of the first arriving planes were easthound. Each airline operates six flights daily eastbound, southbo~md or westbound. Airport Manager Norman Midboe, Manager Howard Peterson of Northwest Airlines and Man-, ager James Butala of North Central all moved their office equipment from the old airport to the new terminal building Priday. Also moved in are the car rental of!icer of Hertz and National firms, Donald Porter, U. I S. Customs collector and Grand Forks Airmotive, Inc. Harold V i n j e, resident engineer for the new airport con-, struction project, was moving Saturday to an office in the new electrical c o n t r o 1 building, where he planned to be headquartered for a couple of weeks during the initial operation of I the new airport.

Operational 1 ' The new Grand Forks Inter- 1

I Ot the entlre airport operation

1 who is assisted 1 eight men. The

by a force of restaurant, loI cated at the southwest corner, will be opened in March. 1 At the north end of tlie build!!ing are the U. S. Custonis ofii fice of Deputy Collector Donald 1 Porter and the Grand Forlts Air[I motive, Inc. offices in charge of ( rshman and Harold

' a shade of off white. The airport project, part of the 1 1 i g h w a y - airport bridge "package", emerged from 111.1merous, so~netimes stormy, public and other discussions beiore the first phase (principally run- ' ways) of the airport was awarded to Megarry Bros, of St. Cloud, Minn., last February. The $1,484,136 bid was 15 per cent beI low the eneineer's estimate and NORMAN MIDBOE, MANAGER of the new Grand Forlts International Airport, is shown in pleased ci& officials. the roomy 104-foot-long waiting room of the airport terminal building as the airport became Started Last Spring fully operational Saturday. The waiting room was empty at the time but scares of air pasWork started last spring arid sengers came and went during the first day of full operation of the new flying field. (Her- by March all the finishing touchald Photo). es are expected to be completed. The terminal building was built by Baultol Construclion Co. of Grand Forlts. The airport was financed with a million dollars federal aid, $440,000 from sale of; 1 the Interstate Highway 29 strip! of the old airport, and other money provided by the city. I11 vacating the old airport, --- - -- the city offic~ally turned over to By LLOYD C. TINNES These include the large brick bia Road, then turns north from state ~ i Departmellt ~ h ~ Smiling air passengers, pleas- equipment maintenance a n d the highway at the airport en- the I~~~~~~~~~ 29 slrip purcllased ed at the lilodern surroundings,, electrical control building, five trance road (which is clearly by and at the ushered in a new era of Grand steel aircraft hangars, the larg- marked) and drives north one s;lne lime contilllled to lor Forlrs aviation when the city's est of which includes a flightline mile. sale the reniaining 170 acres of Drive Under Canopy International Airport, five miles office and storage area and a old airport, with several west ol the city, fillally became brick airline equipment and stor- Travelers arriving a1 the fers already received for the reage facility for Northwest Air- building will drive under a 12- ,,illing lancl, fully operational Saturday. foot-wide canopy extending out Convenient entry and exit be. lines. Old Airport Quiet tween the spacious new terminal, Will Build Otller Facilities from the entrance and go directbuilding and the flightline at the ly into the waiting room area. The old airport was quiet Satto be in The waiting room measures urday, rnbre so than it had ~ C C I ~ rear of the building marked the/ spring are a new opening day's air traffic. f0ri104 by 23 feet. The center froat since the first planes landed on I the and area of the building contains sod runways there in the early / Planes On Schedule an aircraft maintenance shop Hertz and National car rental 1930's. Although certain areas relllain facility for Grand Forks Aismo- oifices, telephone booths and Only surviving activilies were unfinished, the new 153-foot-long tive, Inc. James Montgomery moderl, wasllrooms~ FAA in the old terminI terminal building was elltirely also has an aircraft main- Other main floor areas include al operation and the machine shop functional for handling Passen- I tenance shop facility which will the airlines offices al the where the few relllaillillg gers, and the plalles of ~ o ~ t hbe - 1 moved from the old airport or rear side of the boilding, vste planes are being repaired and W a s L N ~ r l h w eAirlines ~t ticker coun- for trallsfer to the new flying arrived and departed on sched- 1 ter at the right, and North Cen- field. The FAA will remain in its d e on an opening day with tem- i not Yet opened Saturday and at the left. present localion until EL new peratuses in the comfortable up. tllere Was finishillg work to be I doorways but other 1 The exil doorway leading to FAA building has been coinplctdone per twenties. I the plane passenger loading and ed on.the new airport later this So, a s of Saturday, the $2% facilities were and convenient and the pas. 1 unloading area is direclly oppo- year. million airport project that trav- ern w senger with its 10.4I site the front entrance and be- Forty private planes bad made & , eled a long and difficult road to feet of waiting the old air- 3 + length provided ample tween the two airlines offices. their last flight f r o ~ n even get started, had finally at- space fpr evell unusually heavy Each airline office also has a port by Saturday and were quaf { 3 ~3 sv d tained full stature, and everyone air passenger traffic. The air- rear exit door for loading bag- iered In new airport hangars. c a %dm seelned l l a ~ ~with Y the reslllt- lines Opoling day (gage headed for the flightline Within a few weeks, tho remain- E?a g g and for receiving incoming bag- ing 10 or 12 planes also will have .Spread over the wide expanse travel was normal or .g 3 gage. Howard Peterson is North- flown to the new location. Then 9 3 of the airfield were the 5,3005 that foot north-south (main) runway T~~ front entrance of the termwest Airlines manager and all will be quiet in the old air- 2 * g aa ~ames Butala is the North Cen- 1 port shops with the FAA office a and the 4.200-foot east-west a i r - qlinal building faces a a tral chief. strip, the roomy one - story and concrete pariring area, ( the lone surviving occupant of fi : . 3 New Office For Manager basement terminal building. and/ T, reach this area the old flight ares. 2 %m a 3 UP front at the southeast cor1 all the other b~lildingsthat make I city, one drives west Incidentally, itls illegal to land 5 % I ner of the main floor is the of-, on the old airport now. There i3 -82 I up on U, S. Highway L - a - modern airport complex- --fice of Norman Midboe, manager , are "2% on the runwa~s_tes:1g-1s a -- a? _ . _

Air Passengers P As Mew Airpor


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Hundreds of people looked over the newly - operational Grand Forks International Airport Sunday afternoon, according to Airport Manager Nor'man Midboe. He said the big waiting room of the new terminal building was filled with people most of the afternoon. I
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Doors Due Soon

New doors for the front en-\ I trances and rear exit of the terminal building at the new Grand Forks International Airport are expected to be received here about Feb. 25, airport Manager Norman Midbae said. Restaurant equipment will be installed and in operation some time in March, This will practically complete the interior fa1 cilities of the building, Midboe j anticipates, In use since Feb. 1 are the fa- I I cilities of Northwest Airlines, North Central Airlines, the U.S. Customs, Hertz and National car rentals, and offices of Grand Forks Airmotive Inc,, and Montgomery Airspray. Hangar facilities on the airport are complete except for , [electrical apparatus on the doors ' of one hangar. The flightline building, a 40 by 35-toot brick structure, i s nearly ready for use. It is attached to a 120 by i 80-foot hangar, largest on the base, and will provide gasoline pumping and other services to aircraft. ,

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O.K. Limousine Service Temporary arrangements for 1 immediate lin~ousineservice between the Grand Forks International Airport and the city were set up when the council granted Louis Pierce of Lake of the Woods Bus Line a 30-day1 permit to instal1 this service, starting immediately. 2 /B-kY The council acted on a recommendation of the Public Service Committee and the matter was referred back to the committee to work out a perma-, nent arrangement after the 30-' day -. period is ended.
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Offer Made

( Equipment For 1 ficiiit He$e,+ a- - 1


Most of the equipment for the at .~ t h e new Grand 1 Forks Airport terminal building has been received and the installation crew already is here, according to Harold Vinje, res- 1 ident engineer, who returned here from his home at Elgin, I Ill., to supervise the job. Letting of the contract for operation ,of the restaurant has been delayed pending completion of the installation work. 1 Yinje plans to remain here unti1 the equipment has been installed. The doors for the terminal building still had not been received Tuesday but were expected at any time, Vinje said. Temporary doors are being used in the building until the permadoors are available.

I restaurant
A representative o f the Wing Six Minuteman Missile contractors has offered the c i t y of' Grand Forks $1,500 a month for, the terminal b u i 1 d i n g and a a two-year period for rental of large hangar at the old city airport. J. A. LiUy, project manager for Morrison Knudsen CO. of' the m i s s i 1e contractors' joint venture, appeared a t the City Council meeting Monday night, in support of the offer. He was accompanied'by R. K. Woodhead of the Los' Angeles office of Morrison-Knudsen. , Would Be Headquarters , Lilly said his firm desires to I rent the buildings as headquarters for its administrative personnel during construction o f the $121,290,000 launch and launch , control facilities for Wing Six. He said that from 100 to 150 per-, sons would be employed at the old airport site if the rental of-' fer is accegted. I Council members immediately I expressed their interest ill the 1 offer but decided they first must consult with members ofathecity Park Board, who are interested in using the terminal building and hangar in connection with a proposed future recreation ' area in the southeast corner of' the airport property. To Discuss Plan On motion by Aldermarf Eugene Lavoy, the council decided to seek an agreement with the Park Board on the basis that, the buildings would be available for possible use by the Parki Board after the two-year period I in which it might be rented out. The top floor and basement of the terminal is currently occupied by the Federal Aviation Agency on a temporary basis pending cpnstruction of a new FAA building at the new airport later this year. ' The matter finally was refer\ red to the Public Service Com1 mittee and the council adjourn[ ed until next Monday night at p 3 0 pqm.

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The Grand Forks City council will hear testimony for and against the proposed annexation of areas lying north of the city a t its meeting Monday at 7:30 p.m. A large part of the area lies north of the Valley No Trailer Court and north of Conklin Avenue. Bids on operation of the restaurant at the new Grand Forks Aiiort will be considered and a report will be heard from the special salary committee of the Council. .

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Montgomery Airspray is put-, ting finishing touches on its air- I craft maintenance hangar which was transferred recently from the old Grand Forks airport to the new one five miles west of the city. The business is operated by James Montgomery, who has his office attache to hangar. du'$dd$i
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#its. 1 3-9-64 , Rejected all bids on operation of the new airport restaurant be- 1 cause the restaurant is not ready for operation. Denied a request by E. Rhonemus for extension of time for his Birplane repair operation on -- . the old airport property.

Harold Vinje, resident engiheer for constrilction of the new Grand Forks International Airport, has returned to his home / i n 'Elgin, 111. but will return a t ,the end of this month to supervise installation of the restaurant facility in the new adminis: tration building, 9 -/3-6V Replat Approved \ Referred back to the Public :s&rvice CqmmitteB tlie matter i

-3-4+ A repor? on rental of office space in the new airport terminal%dlding was sent back to ' the Public Service Committee by a roll call vote of 8 tb 6 after Jim Montgomery, veteran airplane service operator here, argued that he should have part, of the space the city previously had agreed to rent to ,Grand Forks Airmotive. Inc.

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A s p e c ia 1 meeting of the 1 Grand Forks .City Council has I been cillled for 7:30 tonight to I lace on a committee recommendation concerning the proposed rental of buildings on the old airport for the use of administrative personnel o f the Wing Six Minuteman Missile contractors. The recommendation, terms of which were not announced, will be made by the Public Service Committee of the council, which met Wednesday night to consid'er an offkr by Morrison Knudsen Co. of the missile contractors' joint venture to rent .the buildings for two years at $1,500 a month. Bvildings involved in the negotiqtiorls are the old terminal building, the former equipment !building and a large hangar. These buildings wohld be equip[~ped by fie contractor for use as I headquarfers for up to 150 'officials aqd employes starting in 1 the near hture if, a rental contract is approved by the Council, The council aIso wfll recsive for consideration a res~lutidr! Tor or ale, of approgimately 50 'acres iw' the squtheast area of the old airport by the city to the Park Board and School Board ~ e ~ r e g ar$p+: pr " . ,. ,

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It was an "all old airport" agenda Thursday night a s the Grand Forks City Council leased three buildings on the old city airport for $2,000 a month for two years and then authorized sale of 50 acres of airport land to the Park Board and School Board for $48,097.44 for a recreation site. Meeting in special session a t the call of Couilcil. President Lloyd V. Hillier, the council acted to lease the old terminal and equipment buildings and a large hangar on the airport site to the contractors for the Minuteman Missile project for use of their , administrative personnel. J. A, Lilly, project manager , for the missile icstallation, who is currently operating from te.mporary offices at the Dacotah Hotel, expects to move into the airport buildings next week. The council acted on recommendation of its Public Service ' Committee, which had reached I verbal agreements with the interested parties previously regarding the leasing and the land
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Start of excavation for the chinery will be u s e d to $121,291,000 Wing Six Minuteman cut through the frozen farm land I Missile project has been tenta- and carve out a 27-foot-deep tively set for Tuesday afternoon bowl in a 200 by 100-foot area a t instead of Wednesday, project the site of the first of 150 misengineer 0. I. Paulson said Mon- sile launcl~ersto be housed in day. 100-foot-deep concrete silos in a Plans for the earlier start 7,500 square mile area lying were made because heavy ma- west of Grand Forks Air Force chinery for the first earth cut Base. The deep shaft to house had arrived at Conway, N. D., a missile will be bored in the big Monday and was being rushed bowl. immediately to the first work The initial silo will be located site, an area just south of Park in G Flight of Wing Six, a 20 by L!*rs. _ , , River. 30-mile area lying between Park The city also retains titled& Heaviest earth ripping ma- River and Larimore. G Flight I -the hangar, the same to be 'is one of five flights in the Wing, considered p e r s ~ n a l property, each including 10 ~nissile launchand with the right to remove , ing units and one clontrol cenit. Sale of the airport land stemTo Watch Operation med from a previous transacAlthough no formal ceremony tion under which the city deis planned for the event, it will posited with the district court a be witnessed by top people of similar amount of qoney in paythe Morrison-Knudsen Co. of the ment by the city to the park and contractors' joint venture and of school Boards for right-of-way the S i t e Activation Task for the extension of Sixth AvenForce. ue S. through the present baseJ. A. Lilly, project manager <-.&-6 y! ball park. c!!21~ ---". for Morrison Knudsen, was in Project Scheduled Under the leasing plan, the Cheyenne, Wyo., Monday but contractor lessee agrees to pay !was due back in time to go to for all maintenance and utilities , t h e Parlr River earth cut start. and to leave the property 'in Col. John Dacus, commander of goad condition at the end of the SATAF, will be there with othlease term. Hilliqr presided at the meeter members of his staff, includIncluded with the bu~ldiiigsin ing in place of Mayor Nelson A. i11g Col. ,Henry D. Weston of the lease arrangement is 11% Youngs, who was out of the the Army, Corps of Engineers, 1 acres of land jn the building who will supervise the construcarea. The council previously had set tion job on behalf of the U. S, The F d e r a l Aviation Agency, an adjourned meeting $or next Ajr Corps for which the missile located on the second floor of Monday at 7;30 p.m. and on mo- I installation is to be made. --- - -- -. I the terminal building, is to re- tion after the special session I main- there, with the Msee Oc- Thursday, the aldermen agreed c~pyl11gthe main floor and the to meet Monday at that time basement. FAA is presently usiiig the basement for storage ittee o'f the whole to conthe report of the council's but will move out its s t o r e d items and house them in a trailcommittee, *'to be provided by the lessee. The 50 acres sold to the Park cludes the three buildings leased to the missile contractors, with certain reservations. One reservation is that if any part of the realty should hereafter be sold, the City of Grand Forlrs shall be entitled to onehalf of the sale urice. Another reserves to the cjty the exclusive possession af the tel-minal building, hangar and equipment 1 building for the two-year term of the lease made with the con-

/ cated in the southeasterly section of the old airport and in-

Board and School Board is lo-

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Final plans were readied Tues2nd Office Opened I day for the initial bite into froz-1 H~~~~ office work and unendLease Approved en ground Of Park ' ing telephone calls have forced Approved a proposed lease River, N. D.9 which will launch the Morrison - Knudsen admin. 1 with the Federal Aviation AgenI construction of the $121,290,000 iStrative force open a tern- 1 cy to cover the site for the new Minuteman Missile Wing S porary office in the Northern I flight service station on the new. ~ m j e c tat a.m- Thursday. Construction Cto. building at 509 city airport. The lease plan The starting time which was included in a previthe ex- S. Third St. for accounting, paycavatiOn was changed 1 ous grant agreement with the 0I ' roll and engineering, in addition Tuesday afternoon after FAA, piovides a 25-year lease to their present suite of offices tation between representatives on the ~~~~~~h~~~~l mezzanine. ,with an option to renew for anof the contractors, the Corps of The S, Third Street officewill other years. - 25 -- 3 - 1 ' 7 -6 9! ] Engineers and the Site be used until son,e tirne next Activation Task Force (SATAF). Earth ripping machines of tre- week, when it is expected the force will move into new permamendous power and _other heavy - nent quarters in the Administraequipment were being moved to I tion Building at the old airport. the site of the earth cut to rip Remtodeling of the airport I and scoop out the dirt covering terminal building was being the site of the first of 150 mis- rushed and Lilly and some t o p , I sile launchers and 15 launch officials may move to the buildThe long-awaited doors for the conrol centers in the 7,500- ling before the end of this week, terminal building at the new square-mile Wing Six area. with the balance of the force Grand Forlrs Airport have ar[coming in the fcllowing week. Officials To Attend rived and will be installed startThe official group attending the 1 Among the top administrative ing Monday, according to Harfirst excavation will include J. ( people arriving here from Chey, old Vinje, resident engineer on the airport project. A. (Jim) Lilly project manager 1 enne was Richard Cornell, confor Morrison-Knudsen Co., span-! crete engineer for the Wing Six Vinje said equipment for the sor of the joint venture which project. Morrison - Knudsen reI terminal restaurant has been in- 1 will build the missile complex, cently completed a missile wing I stalled. The restaurant will b e , his top executives; Col. Henry a t Cheyenne.operated when an operator has -- -,been secured through bidding D. Weston of the Army Corps and letting of a contract for i t s , of Engineers, who will superoperation. ! vise construction of the entire When tlie doors, including 'project, and Col. John Dacus, both front and back doors, have commander of SATAF, who has the overall responsibility for ac- I - been installed, there will retivation of the missile project, 1 main only minor outside work I to complete the entire airport and other executives serving 1 project, Vinje said. The airport with Col Dacus and Col. Weston., was opened for use by NorthMeanwhile, other segments 3-i/7-~$ wesl Airlines Nov. 15, 1963, and connected with the missile oper- , for North Central Airlines and ation continued to gain momem- I i full general operation Feb. 1. tun' in the Grand Forks area. 1 Remodel Building Lilly was gupervising the remodeling of the first floor of the Referred to the finance comterminal building on the old airmittee was an offer by Attorney An offer of $250 for a 120-day port for use as his administraoption to buy 10 acres of the George Longmire on behalf of ! tive headquarters, and Harold old Grand Forks Airport land i I several clients to pay $1,000 for Johnston, project manager for a steel fabricating operation, for $70,000 was referred to the.' a 60-dav ontion to purchase 31 Finance Committee by the City, acres of old airport land at $3,moved into the entire second ,000 an acre. The land lies east Council Moday night. floor of the Henry Building at The proposal by the Pure Oil 1 of the Interstate Hinl~way 29 Fourth Street: and First Avenue Co. concerned land on the west I strip and south of U.S. HighN. Johnston will operate an open 3'-8-S$ I side of the Interstate Highway way 2. ' y a r d area a t the north edge of 1 Grand Forks employing up to 29 strip and just south of U.S. The Council also: Deferred action on bids for Highway 2. The oil company's 250 men. offer also included its intention sewers, watermains and sideI He is with the American / Bridge Division of U.S. Steel, / t o negotiate for an additional 10 wallts for further checlring. Rented to Grand Forks Airrno/acres of the airport land. Corp. and the operation here will ---- -tive, Inc. the entire office space 1 fabricate various types of reinthey requested in the north side 1 forcing steel for all of the 165 of the new airport terminal 1 concrete structures in the niis- 1 building, the snace to Fe rented I sile complex. as one office at the ti111 rate. -I -- --

, ~rotlosalReferred ~eferred-tothe Public Service Committee a proposal from Ronan Air Spray, Inc. to purchase an old building on the old city airport for $50. 3 ? -# Approved transfer of $25,000 from the general fund to the 1 airport fund, I -- - -- construction . --

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S. NILES Dlrector of Finnnce ILernl) (Ant11 1. 6 : 13. 1964)

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Offer To B u y Laid A%Airport 1 ,

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Doors for the termianl building at the new Grand Forks Airporl have been hard to come by but they a r e on hand now, awaiting installation by a company crew which is due here Monday, according to Norman 1 Midboe, airport manager. The building has been operated with temporary door installations since the airport became operational in February. The airport restaurant in tlie terminal building also needs entrance doors, although the bslance of the restaurant equipmen1 is completely installed, Midboe said. These doors also are scheduled to be installed

called for opening a t 10 a.m. next Wednesday a t 10 a.m. at the City Hall.
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Organization ueeting
The present Grand Forks City lection fees for garbage and ;Council will meet for the last rubbish and providing off-street /time Monday to wind up re- parking requirements. maining business, then will ad- At the Tuesday meeting, City 1 journ sine die to regroup - its Auditor Harold Martin will reof oaths of election changed forces for port on the office by the new mayor, alder-, ensuing mo-year periodmen, police magistrate and Park, Exactly one-half of the pres- Board member. --ent 14 membership and the mav. or will bow out after the Monday meeting, and the organization meeting, set for Tuesday, will see a new mayor and sevDedication of the-new Grand en new in their seats Forks International Airport was 1 around the council horseshoe. set for Aug. 22-23 at a meeting I of the Chamber ouf Meetings on both nights are late ~ r i d a i scheduled for 7:30 in the city Commerce committee planning the event, Hugh Robertson, cornHall council chambers. Monday's agenda i 1 d s mittee chairman, announced. Rlobertsori said a full program opening of bids on the restaurevents is being planned ant concession at the new Grand including flymin Forks airport and consideration the two of ordinances up for second and breakfast for private final reading. These are ordin. gmund displays of aircraft, rides 1 antes to license airport limou- ,in both small planes and airlin- I and a forma1 dedication sine service, speed regulations, use of special garbage and rubA famous person bish containers, amending colwith a baclrground in aviation. . - .- . ., .--. --- dedicatory is being sought to malre the speech, he said. The late summer date was ~ 0 r ) chosen to permit mn~oletionof as much of the facili6 as pos, sible and to avoid conflicts with other events, according - to Robertson.

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FOR SALE
New and used Aircraft Repair Parts, Supplies and Shop Equipment. Please contact Airport Manager Grand Forks International Airport for complete listing and Bid Forms. Bids accepted until 10:OO A.M. May 7, 1964.

Airport Termina
~ h ; long-delayed installation ,of new doors has completed construction work on the terminal building of the Grand Forks (International Airport except for incidental items, according to Harold Vinje, resident engineer, , The remaining work includes minor inside finishing and some outside painting, grading and lawn seeding which will be done when weather conditions permit. Meanwhile, the new restaurant in the building is being readied for opening soon, with Mr. and Mrs. Levi DufauIt as the operators. I Vinje was scheduled to leave, ~Fridayfor his home at Elgin, I Ill., but will return later for a final inspection. The doors installed in the 180 by 50-foot terminal building are I two sets of double doors on either side of the front center area of the structure and two sets of double doors at the rear.

LEARN TO FLY 150 Cessna. Twin engine Instruction Grand Forks AIP motive. Inc. ~irgbrt. Phone 772.632'1

1 G eI' Air

Concession .
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The Grand Forks City Council Monday night awarded the restaurant: concession at the new Adopted on second and final 1 were ordinances: city airport to Mr. and ~ r s . reading Levi Dufault, 1901 Eighth Ave.1 Relative to licensing of airport N, at the final meeting of the1 limousine service. 1 old council before organization( SeEing a 50 miles per hour of the new one Tuesday night, speed limit on the entrance road The bid.submitted by the Du- to the new airport. fault's was the only one r e Tabled were proposed ordiceived on the concession. It calls nances relating to the use of for a payment to the city of $106 special containers for garbage a month or 5 per cent of the!and rubbish and amending fees gross receipts of the restaur-,for collection and disposal of ant, whichever is greater, garbage and rubbish. Share RBvised 1 Signs Ordered I Also adopted by the council ' The was a revised version of the Ordered "yield" signs ~ l a e e d l -city's agreement with the North O n Seventh Avenue S. at the inDaPota State Highway Depart- tersection with Cherry Street' ,merit which calls for esti- g.iving Cherry Street traffic the, mated city share of $180,000, rlght-Of-way. $ompared wf# the $revlougly G~a?ted an a ~ ~ l i a~' 'estimated $15fl,000, for improve beer license by W a l k Lufidsten ment of Sixth Avenue S, and of
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OR USINESS ' OPEN1 G of Montgomery Airspray, Inc., and Montgomery Aircraft, Inc., on the new Grand Forks International Airport was announced by Jim Montgomery, president and chief pilot of both firms. Montgomery, who said he has the only privately-owned hangar on the airport, said his firms offer a complete aviation service. Included is a complete shop service for major and minor repairs, as well as aircraft licensing. He is obtaining a Federal Aviation Agency-approved I repair station designation. The Montgomery operations include sale of new and used 1 aircraft, accessories and parts; a flight school of FAA-approved flight courses for private, commercial, flight instructor, instrument and multi-engine instruction; an audio visual g r o u p d school; and air taxi in both single and mu1 i-engined aircraft flown by ins ument-rated pilots. A fleet of sprayers and dusters for all types o f aerial , application is available. I The shop personnel includes Bob Hewitt, a local aviation veteran, who holds various mechanic's ratings and who also is an FAA-designated aircraft illspector and commercial flight i instructor; Russ Ingaldson, in aviation maintenance since 1949 sad who carries all apfir~priate mechanic's ratings, and Mpntgomery, who started flying in 1942 wiq the old A r m y Air Force, serving a combat Four in the European Tkieater. xis airmap fatings include commercial siqglq and multiengine land,, flight instra~$r, ipstruhent insWac~ ~ inqpument, b ~ tor, and g l i d e & : ' W e hlgo is 9 ?or-

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itying equipment hosting $2,566 " Avenue S: to 42nd Street Aveque O 'm S :lath for the city's data ~rocegf& dl-

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m q FAA' labr#meg~ial fllgbt examiner ,and is being reinstated tts hlght lexamlper fn t h ~ s apde, MontgomefY rs$d, ' p e has ap air-conditfoitiobed ofand. pqitlnk S o m ! a,ttachad hi$ Range a17.d plans to a d ! . ,rq'",4J~tpge, thi? p~Irnrperi, ' i 1 , r I.. $4; %'"< 4 8..
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Excavation will be started May 12 for the new flight service station of the Federal Ayiationi Agency at the Grand Forks In- 1 tetnqtional Airport. I Eickhof Construction Co, of Crookston, Mifin., the prime con-I tractor, has the $117,500 contract, to erect the tri-lbvel' modern structure, with 175 days specified for completion of the job. The FAA headquarters are currently located in the terminal building at the old airport, ~ s l n ~ $ 1 the building jointly with Morrl,son - Knudsen Co., contractors for the Minuteman Missile installation. FAA uses the uprler floor and M-K has the first floor and basement, along with other buuding space on the qitport. Approxlmatqly 5,000 tlquare 'feet of floor space id 4he new brick, metal aid glass structure: will provide FAA nearly three ' times the 1,760 square feet available in the. old bullding. The Grand Forks station is one of more than 300 in th8 ~'nited States providing such vital aviation services as airground communication$, pilot l briefings and airport adivsories : ,and handling of flight plans for 1 both general aviation pilots and ' pilitary pilots.' Lon Daharsh is

Airport Finlsh~ag

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~Non-Stop Air Service Sef


Outside finishing work in the new Grand Forks Airport area was nearing completion Monday and a final inspection of the job is expected in June, according to Norman Midboe, airport manager. Grading of the yard area a r 10u n d the terminal building was started last week the building canopy was plainted and other miscellaneous jobs were don Midboe said the a t i condilioning system of the terminal build- 1 ing also is in operation now and the restaurant is in full operation. Harold Vinje, resident engineer on the airport project, is 1 expected to return here next monlh for a final inspection of the job. 1

Contract A ~ v a r d e d G I ? d Bradshaw Gravel Supply of Arvilla was awarded the conVact for furnishing gravel for surfacing city streets in 1964 on its low bids of $2.40, $4.50, $4.95, and $2.95 per cubic yard for various types of gravel. The only other bidder was Swingen Construction Co., which bid on I only one type of gravel. The council voted to accept an offer by Mrs. Levi Dufault, II operator oi the new airport res- I taurant, to deposit $1,000 cash in lieu of a surety bond to guar- 1 antee payment of rent and a n y , damage to property. Mrs. Dufault had stated she was unable I to provide the sum of $5,000 in negotiable securities which was required in order to secure a bond. Amendment Approved The council also: Approved an amendment to add 2.1 acres of land to that j included in the city's 1 e a s e agreement covering land in the old airport with Morrison-Knudsen & Associates, Minuteman IMissile p r i g , c:ntrtra_cgy_s, -

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Mayor Hugo Magnuson had 60 cast the deciding votes when the Grand Forlts City Council split down the middle, 7 to 7, on two issues under considera/ tion at its meeting Monday night. 1 The first was on approval of a proposed agreement on gasoline and oil service charges for North Central Airlines a t the new airport and the other was a proposal that the city's monthI ly bills should go to the Finance Committee before being submitted to the council for appnoval. Give Payment Schedule The North Central plan called for payment by tbe airlines of a service charge of 3% cents a , gallon for the first 10,000 gallons of gasol~ne furnished, 3 cents for the second 10,000 gallons, 2% cents for gallons above 20,000 and 25 cents a gallon service charge Ion oil. On the first vote taken, the motion to adopt the agreement , lost by a vote of 6 for qnd 8 ' against but a motion to reconsider was made by Alderman Earl Strinden. Alderman Alvin Austin then moved ior adjourn- 1 nlent but before his motion was sectonded, Alderman 0' Keefe seconded Strinden's motion. Mayor's Vok Decides Then, on a motion to adopt the North Central agreement, Alderman Eugene Lavoy, Wenry Havig, John O'Keefe, F. C. Bundlie, Strinden, Percy 'Lilleboe, and Robert Kennedy voted to adopt, with the other sever1 aldermen casting votes against it. Magnuson's yes vote decided the issue. On the "monthly bills to Finance Committee" matter, the, yes votes were by Myron Molstad, Dennls Hogan, Vernon Freeman, C. 0. O'Neill, Mrs. I Virginia Rose, Austin and Allen 1 Otto. Magnuson then voted no 1 'and the motion was lost. I

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First non-Stop air passengel-, North Central Airlines recentservice between Grand Forks' ly has added two nlen to its and Minneapolis will be started ) staff, making a total of iive here June I. by North Central' agents in addition to Manager Airlines using twin-engined, 44- Butala. N.C. offices are located passenger Convair planes, ac- ) i n . the air-conditioned ter~ninal cording to J. A. Butala, local, building at tlle new Grand Forlts manager. International Airport. B ~ ~ t a lsaid a the first Convair Howard Peterson, local n,alla. leave the Mil1 June ger for Northwest Airlines, also at 7:15 p.m. (DST) and arrive mnounceced an extension of presat Grancl at 7:50 (CST). ~t will leave here at 8 ent east bouncl service. Starting p.m. and arrive in Minot at / May 24, he sai'd, the Northwest 9: 05 p.m. I flight leaving here at 7 a.m., , On June 3, the east bound : which now terminates at Min! Convair flight will leave Mi~lnt neapolis, will continpe on to 1 at 7:30 a.m., arrive Grand Forks Washingtoi~, D. C. Stops en at: 8:25 a.m., leave here at 8:35 route will be made Rochester, a.m. and arsive in Minneapolis Madison, Milwaultee, Detroit at 10:57 a.m. (DST). and Cleveland. Northwest opesTile p ~ r s e n tllortll - south run ateS a total of Six flights daily go to Winllipeg an.([ between Onlaha, Neb., and Far- 11ere. go, N.D., also will be exlended three are east bound flights into Grand Forlts. Beginning June cludW the use of Electra Prop 1, this flight will leave Onlaha Jets. at 5 p,lll, and arl.ive Grand , Forle at 9:21 o.m. Tlie return I trip on .rune 2 bill leave Cirand I Forks at 7:15 a.m. and arrlve in On~aha, via Sioux Falls, S.D., at 11:47 a 111. TIE new Convairs and the extendecl Onlalla sesvicc will be An Eickhof i i n addition to Present North crew began excavation work Central daily flights which in- l w~~~~~~~~~ for the new S11,,500 clude two trips to Mi~iaapolis, flight service station of the Fedall Omaha flight, alld service to Minot and Devils Lalte. eral Aviation Agency a t the -- Grand Forlts International Airport. I Matt Loranq is building sup1 erintendent for Eickhof, t h e Grad'inq. Seeding A% l Cmoltston. Minn., firm which the prime contract for the ~irport 4r9p ~ g n e has tri-level modern building, schedGrading anci s e d Tn work uled for completion in 175 days. around the terminal building at The new brick, melal and the new Grand Forks Internaglass structure will have aptional Airport has been com- proximately 5,000 square feet of pleted by A. G. Moran, Red floor space, nearly three timesl Lake Falls, Minn., sub con- the space available in the prestractor lor Megarry Bros., en1 quarters in the terminal St. Cloud, Minn., who had the gen-, building of the old airport. era1 contract for the dirt worlr. FAA chief Lon Daharsh and The other areas adjacent to funways and taxiways w e r e his staff currently share tlle terminal building with Morrison seeded last fall and grass is coming up now. These areas will, Knudsen Co. and Associates, contractors for the Wing Six be re-seeded in the fall, accordMinuteman M i s s i 1 e project. ing to Norman Midboe, airport F A A is on the upper floor and manager. M-I<uses the first floor, base1 ment and some other space on I the old airport. L
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Exc~v~Ao~ or FAA

Airport Planned

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A f&al illspection of construction projects at the new Grand Forbs International Pairport is 1 scheduled Wednesday, according to Norman Midboe, airport manager. Here for the inspection will be Harold Vinje, Elgin, Ill., resident engineer, and representatives of the contractors and the Federal Aviation Agency's airport division. Approval of the projects is required before final settlemeilt for the work by t h e , city. B a LI k o 1 Construction Co., Grand Forlts, built the terminal building, storage hangars, flight line building and the maintenance equipmelit and storage building and Johnson - Gillaiiders Co. of Grand Forks built the field maintenance and electrical control building. M e g a r r y Bros., St. Cloud, Minn., built the runways and did the dirt work including seeding, of the areas around tlie terminal b~ilding, the taxiways and otller areas. - -- -.

- &- /lz-& y I dation Pourhe of t e con rete fou.11-. f& the new Flight Serv.

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ice Building of the Federal Aviation Agency at the new Grand Forlts Airbort has been partly completed. The b u i 1d i n g is scheduled for completion this fall. The FAA currently occupies upstairs quarters in the 'terminal building a t the old airport.
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Final inspection of the Grand Forks International Airport was conducted Wednesday by repre1 sentatives of the city and state, I and the contractor. Approval by the inspectors is required before final payment can be made by Grand Forks City on the new airport facilities except the terminal building which was financed entirely by the city. Inspected Wednesday morning were the runways, taxiways, aprons, roadways, parking lots, field lighting system and grading. Scheduled for Inspection Wed, nesday afternoon was the field, I maintenance and electrical control building. Taking part in the inspection tour were Harold Vinje, Elgin, Ill., resident engineer; Robert Schoenborn, assistant city engineer; Harold Vavra, Bismarck, state aeronautics commission- / er; Kenneth W lisi t n e y and James Topp of the St. Paul district FAA office; June Wilson, / regional FAA office, Kansas City, Mo.; Norman Midboe, airport manager, and Harry Megarry, representing Megamy Bros., St, Cloud, Minn., the general contractor. The new $2% million airport was opened for general aviation use in February.

Operation Approved I Approved the G r a n d Forks Airmotive operation at the new city airport. Granted a Wright Flying Service request to use the new airport a s a crop spraying base. Approved an amended lease agreement with Gran Forks Airmotive. - ! 6 - .

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( Commerce The Grand Forks Chamber o f I , committee planning ~


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(the dedication in August for the i new international airport here (will meet a t 9:30 a.m. WednesI day a t the chamber office, Hugh , Robertson, committee c h a i r 1 man, announced. L: - / 6-G.q

All three crop spraying firms located 011 the new Grand Forks Airport were busy Saturday spraying farm fields. Aerial, spraying was necessary because f~eldswere too wet for ground spray work. & 2 /- L
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New Airporf Keeping Up With Tro


By LLOYD C. TINNES able along with two car r e n h The new Grand Forlrs Interna- services, national and Hertz. tional Airport, complete with Each firm has a booth opposite mile long concrete runway and the airlines offices. a n air conditioiled t e r m i n a 1 building, is keeping pace with The terminal building has a the steady growth of air traffic roomy lobby 'in its 145-foot by in the local comn~unity. 45-foot interior. At the southwest Fourteen flights of commer- corner of tlie building are the cial airliners and scores of pri- offices of Airport Manager Norvate planes use the long slick mat1 Midboe and the modern runways daily and practially ev- restaurant operated by Mr. and ery service available at the l a r n Mrs. Levi Dufault. e r metropolitan airports a r e , , T Fixed Base Operators available at the local airport. In the north end of the buildHeadquartered the terminal ing are the U,S. customs Office, building are Northwest Airlines, in charge of deputy collector and North e n C. Porter, and the head. headed here by Donald quarters of Grand Forks Airmomanagers Howard Peterson and tive, Inc., in charge of Louis James Butala. Gershman. Airmotive is a fixed Each firm has large modern base operator handling charter accommodalions for plane pas- and air taxi service, a flying sengers and is equipped for con- school, crop spraying and airveliient handling of hggage. ~ i rnaintenanLe work, h sect telephones connect the firm has eight planes. terminal building with hotels and cab stands downtown and Montgomery Airspray, operat" limousifie service also is avail- J,ed by veteran flier Jim Mont- --- .--- gomery, also ' is a fixed base operator on the new airport. His operation, similar to aiat of Airmotive, includes aircraft maintenance shop facility, a flight school, charter and air taxi and crop s~raying.Montgomery has his office in his own shop.

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Finish Inspection&.//,, Of A i r p o r f Work


Federal Aviation Agency and State Aeronautics Board officials left Grand Forks Wednesday night after completing inspection of the runway and taxiway construction a t the new Grand Forlts International Airport. These are areas in which there was federal participation in construction cost. ResidcilE Engineer Harold Vinje and representatives of the city and tha conlractor inspected the new terminal building and .hangars Thursday. Baukol Construction Co. built the terminal building,

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Harold Vinjo, E gin, Ill., resi. dent engineer on construction of ( the new Grand Forks Airport, will return to Elgin Saturday following inspection of the airport Wednesdday and Thursday. 1 He said the FAA and other in- I spectors listed some minor corrections to be made and when these a r e done he will return to check on their completion.
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AIRPORT MANAGER Norman Midboe, left, enjoys a cup of coffee with Donald C.,Porter, d a p t y oollector of U. S. Customs, in the &em restaurant of the ,new terminal building. The wide windows of the eating place provide an excellent view of arriving and departing planes, one of which is shown on the flightline at the rear of the picture. (Herald Photos).

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Many Planes StoredG ~1 A third operator is Guy Wright, operator of the Wright Flying Service, which also does . crop spraying. The airport has five hangars ' for aircraft stgrage, storing 45 private planes in the hangars, t other planes an. with a b ~ u 15 chored to tie downs outside the 1 hangars. Paved tie down soace is available for 33 planes. There also is tie down space on the grass for 16 additional privates if required. Midboe said all of the paved tie down space bas been used at times. Private plane traffic has been boosted by use of the airport by planes of tlle Morrison Knud. 1 sen Co., Minuteman Missile contractors, and by planes of, sub-contractor firms in the missile operation. These are in addition to the growing local private plane operation. Services Available In connection with the staraqe hangars is a flight line building attached to $he largest gf the hangars, from which various services, are available including sale o f gasoline and W l and hapdling o f arraxernentfi for $;hatage. A flightline crew of eight men handles this job, They also I do field and building maintenance work, including plowing snow from runways in winter. The new t i e l d maintenance and electrical codtrol building is a large brick structure in which large eqhipment is stored and where minor maintenance work 1s dpne. THe rest )of the buuilding contains an Blectric vault l for high voltag4 aequipment' for the entire building 'and runway .lighting complex. Also in the bullding is a water pumping sys. tern with a 20,000-gallon xeservoir' with an emet'gency unit tcan be used In case the regular water supply from the air base water line Is cut off temporarily. Emergency Layout Used Midboe said the emergency water layout was used once fora week.and a half when a breat occurred in the air base water line. Also in this mitiphrpose building is 8n auxiliary power plant which can be activated in case of a temporary power failure. The airport aIso has its own sewage disposal plant, of the type formerly used by the city, but operated in cannection with a" small lagoon. And asi:de from the city-owned

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Harald neer for consthction of the new Grand Forks International Airport, returned to his home in Elgin, Ill., Tuesday after a final inspection of the airport. The inspection was required in connection with the making o f final payments to contractors for the job. Vinje plans to return here for the airport dedication Aug. 22-23.
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b-S-e;$ Vinje, res~dentengi-

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A FEW OF THE colorful array of 60 private planes quartered at the airport are shown at tiedown stations on a long concrete area near one of the hangars. More than 40 private planes are housed in storage hangars and the others, like those above, are anchored at the tied~wn g -a/-&$ spots outside the hangars.
structures on the airport is the new Federal Aviation Agency's flight service building currently in the early stages of construetion. FAA now is located at the old airport, but wilI move into the new place in September.. Both Northwest and North Central Airlines reported air traffic is definitely up as com-

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pared with last year. N o r t'h 'million. Baukol Construction CO. Central's non-stop round trip built the terminal building: The flight recently inaugurated be- federal government shared in tween G r a n d Forks and the the cost of the airport except Twin Cities has greatly increas- the terminal building, financed ed that firm's air traffic, Man- entirely by the city. ager Butala said. The airport was opened for The new airport was built by general use in February, alMegarry brothers of St. Cloud, though Northwest Airlines movMinn.. at a cost of about $lr/, ed in in November, 1963.
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Erpelion of the w a b far the new Federal Aviation Agency's 1 flight service building at the Grand Forks International Airi I port, has been practically completed and roofing work is scheduled to be started soon. j The FAA presently is quartered , 'In the administration building at the old Grand For

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Airporf g- / 4 -d $ !'

Fly-in Breakfast 1i byThe event has been arranged a special Chamber of ComS d

/ ~ u n d r e d rTo Be Mailed:
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i merce committee headed by


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Hugh Robertson. Events Sunday will start with

Letters For

ed at the Grand the airport Forks by Mrs. members Jaycees. of Afternoon events will include: Two-thousand toy gliders will the brief ceremony, at which O children . Mayor ~ u g o Magnuson will dedbe distributed free t accompanied by their Parents icate the new facility, Dean to 'the two day open house ands Thomas Clifford of the Univerdedication festivities at the new sity of North Dakota will be Grand Forks Internation~lAir- master of ceremonies. . port next weekend. Air Show Planned Open, House activjties are he program also will include ' scheduled both Saturday a n d flyovers by military aircraft 'Sundq~t with special events and and a number of air show events the formal dedication Set for featuring area *flyers and skySullday afternoon, There will be divers. The ejents will include smcial aircraft: displays on the both racing and precision dem- , ~@tound bptha d ~ y s Including , both onstrations. They are scheduled ' 'oivilian and niliFary ailtcraft. at intervals throughout Sundajl 1 hirplane rides also will be aft noon. both days, - #e new airport ha8 bem in since last winter, but the ! I use dedication was delayed for completion of a number of laoilities.

This Week
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farmers and private pilots f r o m a wide area. They will he sew-

Airport Dedication
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Hundreds of air mail letters l; A Navy P2V Neptune afiti- ' will leave Grand Forks this submarine plane will 8e amdng ' weekend bearing a special ca-,military aircraft on ground dischet signifying the dedication play a t the airport both days of and open house scheduled Sat- the open house. A number of urday for the new Grand Forks other military planes an$ a International Airport. I large li& of c l v i l i ~ ,q~r@a$t The stamped envelopes, ei- Is0 will 'be on display. " ther empty or with just a small! -eird E d , prevent folding 'insicle, [were sent by individuals to the Grand Forks Chamber of Coinmerce over the past several months so that they could be w i l e d during the dedication ceremony. They will wind up in .c o 11 e c t i o n s throughout the United States and in a number ,of other copntrjes. The speclal cachet will in- 1 , clude a map showing the Red i River Valley and Grand Forlrs location in it in relsition,to the ,Canadian, Minnesota and South Dakota borders. It includes the lslogans "Grand Forks, Heart of the Red River ~ a l l e p and iuGatewaYto 1Ldvontur.e;: id adkdi$ion to showing the. dates d {bhafiifedication and open h~U$e.
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Nearby Gr$nd Forks Air Two base aircraft, a C47 and of events for drop contest open to all area j Force Base will help provide e U3A, will be on static disI Sunday's dedication of the new pilots. the color for the dedication and play at International Airport 1 Grand Forks International Air- Two-thousand balsa wood glidopen house scheduled a t Grand both Saturday and Sunday, ' . port was announced Thursday by ers will be distributed to chilForks International Airport this alorig with a large number of 'Hugh Robertson, chairman of dren attending the open house weekend, in a salute to its civil- civilian aircraft of various types. ' the committee arranging the and dedication. The gliders will ian neighbor. A T33 jet trainer also will be be given to the first 2,000 chil- added event. to the ground display on dren accompanied by parreiits 1 An Open house is at who attend the Saturday and Sunday. the airport both Saturday and Sunday events. Also scheduled fo; the static display area during the weekSunday, with numerous military A fly-in breakfast for private end is a Neptune anti-submarine and civilian aircraft on ground pilots from a wide area is schedaircraft from the Naval Air Stadisplay, All facilities of the air- uled Sunday nlorning. The tion a t Minneapolis-St. Paul. breakfast will be served by the pons itsell, be Open Mrs. Jaycees organization of The big Air Force salute to for inspection. . Grand Forks. International Airport will come Tbe main entertainment pro- The G r a n d Forks Junior from FlOlB jet fighter planes &am is scheduled Sunday after- Chamber of Commerce and of the 18th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron. The supersonic fightnoon, beginning with a brief for- Greater Grand Forks Sertoma ers will swoop over the civilian mal dedication at 1:30 p.m. Club will operate concessions a t Dean Thomas Clifford of the the airport both days. .- airport in formation during ceremonies at 2 p.m. Sunday. University of North Dakota will GRAND FORKS CHAMBER OFCOMMERCE. Also scheduled for showing be the master of ceremonies. during the two - day open house 10s NORTH T H I R D STREET Sky diving exhibitions by G R A N D FORKS, N O R T H DAKOTA I is a Minuteman Missile display members of the Grafton Skydivarranged by the Wing VI Miners Club a r e scheduled a t 1:35 uteman Site Activation Task p.m. and 2:30 p.m. FlOlB Voofarce. The display will include d ~ jet o interceptors of the 18th a miniature missile and a phoFighter - Interceptor Squadron tographic explanation of t h e ' a t Grmd Forks Air Force Base ,work now going on in northeastwill shlpte the new facility with'!' 1 ern North Dakota in preparation a low-level flyover scheduled a t ' of the most advanced version of 1 2 p,mv intercontinental ballistic missile A oolorful aerial spray and in the free, world's arsenal. dusting demonstration is schedOther events scheduled during uled a t 2:10 p.m. by fliers for two tenqnt firms a t the new air,the two-day dedication and open, 1 house include a colorful crop) spraying and dusting demon-( on the program, a t 2:45 p.m., 1 stration, e precision flour- / bombing exhibition, a fly in will be a precision flour bomb breakfast Sunday for private fliers, and distribution ol ) . W O souvenir gliders to children ac'

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Y o u and your wife nre c o r d i n ~ ~ in y v i t e d t o attend


a S o c i a l l o z ~ rand 8morgasOord

i n connection w i t h the Grand a p e n i n g of the nero Grand P'orks flnternational Airport from 6:30 p,m. t o 9:30 p.m., Saturda?], ilui7v.st, 2:' a t the n e w Airport T e r n i n o l Bu.ilding Hugh IZobertson, C h ~ ~ i r m a n Airport Dedication Committee

R S. V . P . R c g r ~ t s

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LARGE COMMERCIAL AIRCRAFT, always interesting to

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children of all ages, will be anlong the planes on exliibition Saturday and Sunday a1 the dedicalion and open house for the new Grand ForlrS International Airport. Two unidentified youngslers got a preview Fr~day,as shown at left. In pi~oto a1 righl, Airport Manager Norm Midbo is in the coclrpit of a Piper Pawnee 235 fitled for aerial spraying. The craft will
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spray about 100 acres per load while flying a foot off tIle ground. The spray boom with nozzles is shown on the trailing edge of the wing. A crop spraying and dusting exhibition is scheduled to be one of the features of Sunday afternoon's dedication program, with six planes from Air Spray Inc., Montgomery Airspray Inc., and the Wright Flying Service participaling. (Herald Photos).
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Open house hours are 9 a.m. Skydiving Planned ' to 5 p.m. each day. Other events scheduled inAirplane rides are being offer- 1 clude two parachutine exllibied today and Sunday by local tions by members of the GraC charter service firm?. Sunday ton Skydivers Club, a low-level only North Central Airlines also f[y-over by ,qunersonir: jet fiahtwill offer brief rides in a Con- ers from Grand Forks Air vail' phne, similar to that Force Base, and a "colured wabv n Promptly at 1:30 p.m. SLIII- be featured both days of the which North Central flies on its t e r $ s n r a v i n ~d ~ m o n s t r ~ t i o local crop spraying and day, Mayor Hugo Magnuson open house. There also will be n0n-stoP G r a n d Forks-Twin tin^ firms. will climb into a light plane a Minuteman Missile display,' Cities fligllts. Area Fliers Comhg Ground di~nlavsof both miliwhich then will taxi forward, featuring a model of the missile and civilian aircraft will cutting the ribbon holding a to be implanted in 150 under- The rides, of course, will not - -- ----------cluster of helium-filled balloons ground siloes in northeastern 1 be available' during the Sunday I before taking off from Grand North Dakota in the coming ~afternoonair show events. Private pilots from a wide nionths. ,Forlts Zntemational Airport. 1 area will fly into Grand Forlts Plane Rides offered The ceremony will signify the morning official dedication ol the airport A two-day open house at the International S ~ ~ n d a y and ope11 a more than 2-hour airport opened today, during for a traditional "fly-in breakprogram of aerial entertain- which its new facilities are be- fast," to be served by Grand ment by area fliers and sport ing sllown off to all comers and Forks Mrs. Javcees. Many of airplane rides are available these pilots will stay here to &a~ch~~Usts. over city. thousand participate in the final event of stunt-flying balsa wood gliders the air s h o w, a precision are on hand to be given to chil- "bombing" event in which onedren accompanied by parents pound sacks of flour are dropas--.-,. souvenirs ped from 500 b e t a t a target -- -- of the-eve?. ipn the airoort.

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THIS IS THE LINE office and hangar at Grand Forks International Airport which will he the scene of a fly-in breakfast for area pilots Sunday morning, as one feature of the two-day open house and dedication of the ncw fac~lityfour miles west of here. See story on Page 1. (Herald Photos).
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Big Crowd I -.13-6f Seen For


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NORMAN MIDBO, manager of Grand Forlts International Airport and a One-time crop-spraying pilot himself, looks at the radial engine of a Stearman aircraft, a World War I1 primary trainer now quite often used for crop dusting purposes. A crop spraying demonstration, using colored water, will be one of the features of Sunday's dedication air show.
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Drop Florrr Bombs In the latter competitioa, two Grand Forks Inlernatiollal , nlan flying teams in light planes close they can col1le Airport gets its official dedica- ; See d l ' O ~ ~ ia ng one - pound sack tion today, although it has been in use for months handling 16 of flour into a 55-@llon drum commercial airline flights daily from an altitude d 500 feet. AS each sdclr breaks on the ground, , in and out of the city. A cluster of helium - filled it will mark the point of imballoons cut loose by a taxiing pact and the distance from the drum airplane in which Mayor 1 . 1 ~ ~ ~ will be measured off. Magnuson will be a passeilger An allllOuncer will keep the will officially signify the dedi. crowd informed aboul the identity of the fliers and how close cation a t p.m. today. they come to the target. Air Show Slated A fly-in breakfast opens toThe cutting of the ribbon hold- day's program, with dozens of ing the balloons also will signal pilots fro~nthroughout the area the star& of an approximately expected to come in for a visit two-hour air show by local and to the new Grand Forks Interarea fliers and sports parachu- national. Many wiI1 s t a y tists. With clearing skies and around for the afternoon bombwarmer weather forecast for to- ing competition, it is hoped, day, the Chamber of Coinmerce Rides Available committee arranging the cere. rides Over Greater mony expressed hope that thou. be sands of persons will attend the Grand Forks air show and the open llouse both in light charter aircraft a big Convair airliner I scheduled froln 9 a.m. to 5 p,*n. in e s ~ e c i a l l ~by North 1 Events on air sllow pmAirlines for the occagram include two sky divillg exbibitions by members of the sion. Grafton Sky Divers Club, a sa- The Grand Forks J u n i o r lute fly - over by jet intercep- Chamber Of Commerce and the tors Of the 18th Fighter-InteF Greater Grand FOrlts SertOma (ceptor Squadron at Grand Forks Club wilt operate concession 1 Air Force Base, a demonstra- S1al'ds at the airpol'. ion of crop-spraying techniques Hugh Robertson has b e e n Chamber 'Om1 using colored water spray, and cl'airman Of a "bombing contest" Open ' to lttee which planned the weelcl end open house and dedication. area pilots.
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THESE CHILDREN not only got a closeup of real airplanes, they also got toy gliders with which to play airplane afterwards when they attended the open house at Grand Forks International Airport Saturday. Four-thousand of the gliders were to be given away Saturday and today to young airport visitors accompanied by their parents. These children are Wendy, 0, and Tom Bakken, children of Mr. and Mrs. Roy Bakken of Cmokston. (Herald Photo).
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.SECOND SECTION
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AUG. 24,1964

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PAGE 11

&ock$fd,~d?~ a jet plane formation flyover at Sunday afternoon dedication ceremonies at the Grand Forks International Airport before a crowd estiAnother picture on page -? - mated at 16,000 to 20,000. (HerrtlWhoto. . - - 11).
PICTURESQUE CLOUDS formed a
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We Dedicate this airport to the citizens of Grand Forks and t o the c i t y and community leadership which worked s o diligently over the years i n planning t o make it possible. This new air transportation facility is an example of the progress of Grand Forks, the fastest growing city in the northwest. Sixteen commer-cia1 flights a day serve the people from this entire area and the flight services provide charter -and ambulance service and flight instruction. Nearly 100 local and area private pilots hangar their planes at the G r a d Forks International and fly out of this airport. Hugh Robertson, Chairman Airport Dedication Committee

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The Grand Forks International Airport is on a 900-acre site. The north-south runway which is 5,300 feet in length and an east-west runwcry 4,200 feet long form a huge 'X'. The longer runway is 150 feet wide and the other is 100 feet in width. The runways crre paved with portland cement concrete eight inches thick with the l a s t 500 feet (impact areas) of each strip built with 10-inch thick concrete. The taxiways, covering an area of 25,000 square yards, are paved with 11-inch thick concrete.

SATURDAY - SUNDAY AUGUST 22-23,1964

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Out at the new Grand Forks and 369 (1963 totals for April International Airport, it isn't and May are low because North1 only the air passengers who go west suspended s e r v i c e for up the volume of traffic has about six weeks due to soft rundone likewise, i n fact, it went ways on the old airport); June, up about 60 per cent. A285 and l,2W; July 1,256 and Improved service, including a 1,138: August, 1,301 and 1,214. big DC-6 airliner in addition to North Central Reports the Electra prop jets o f North- These are the North Central west Alrlines and a new daily figures: 1964, January, 301; 1963 round trip and non-stop flight January, 281; February, 218 and between Grand Forks and the 249; March, 230 and 233; Aprll, Twin Cities by North Central 296 and 396; May, 354 and 377; Airlines, was a big factor in the June, 573 and 279; July, 625 and gain in passenger travel. 224; August, 655 and 259. The Getting down to figures, the big gains in June, July and Aug- 1 1964 t o t a 1 of air passenger nst were caused largely by the , 'boardings to Sept. 1 was 16,269, inauguration of the non-stop compared with 8,910 for a simi- Twin Cities flights. lax period of 1963. Northwest Airlines has t w o j Comparative monthly totals round trip flights w i t h Electra for the two years were announc- prop jets, 77-passenger capacity, ed by the airlines managers, and one DC-6, 68 -. passenger Howard Peterson of Northwest plane round trip. Starting Tuesand James Butala of North Cen- day the latter flight will be tral, both of whose offices are made with DC-7 planes, accomlocated in the new administra- modating 71 passengers, and tion bullding on the airport. with lower, tourist class only, For Northwest, the compari- fares. $mailer Planes Used sons for the first eight months -of 19M and 1963, respectively, North C e n t r a 1, operating were: 1964, January, 1,263; 1963 smaller planes, has a total of January, 886; February, 1,162 eight f 1 i g h t s, including six and 831; March, 1,213 and 914; through flights, three west and April, 1,271 and 53; May, 1,268 three east, and two originating -. -- flight#, south to Omaha, and north from Omaha, stopping here. NC1s new non-stop Twin Cities flight is with a Convair 440, a 44-passenger piane. 0 t h e r planes are 26-passenger, DC-3s. Installation of the Convair flight boosted NC business about 100 per cent, Butala said. The airlines managers saYd many reservations are called in two or three weeks ahead of f 1i g h t time and sometimes flights are sold out for a week or two afiead. Since businessmen can't always know ahead of time when they must go, the afrflnes t r yt o handle them .ad far as posnlble acmrdlng ta

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To Move In 1965 ' Some time early in 1965 it is I anticipated that the entire flight service station operation will be transferred from the old airport to the new and much larger i~uilding. Roofing work has been pracOne FAA station of another tically finished on the new flight +ype is located a t Jamestown. service building to be operated Under the new program, this j by the Federal Aviation Agency will be either a manned facility at the Grand Forks Internation(MANICOM) staffed by several J al Airport. FAA flight service specialists I' The tri-level 61 by 69 foot and linked to the nearest hard I structure will provide quarters core station, or an unmanned] for the flight service station facility known as Airport Infor-. now located in the old adminmation Desk. Current weather istration building at the former data and other information ne- , airport location. cessary for safe flight planning ) After completion of construcwould be available at both fation. which is scheduled late this cilities. I fall,' will come the installation of Give Vital Information 1 electronic equipment for airThe stations at Grand Forks, ground communications. Dickinson and Minot provide Occupancy of the building is such vital aviation services a s expected some time after the air-ground communications, pifirst of the year. lot briefings, airport advisories, James Hpndprson is acting handling of flight plans for both ihief of the FAA operation here general aviation pilots and milisince the transfer to Milwaukee tary pilots, direction finding and in June of former chief Lon Daflight assists. harsh, who assumed charge of the Milwaxkee station. The new flight service station here will have 5,000 square feet of floor space in the brick, met-, a1 and glass structure, providing nearly three tiqes the present I floor area. The proposed modernization plan will include 151 flight service stations. Compared with the - present 297, and 67 combined station towers against the present 61. Two of the latter type ; are located in North Dakota, at 9-20-64 Fargo and Bismarck. Towers Control Traffic The station tower lavoi~ts control traffic directly at" the air~ort.su~ervisine aN landings D also 1 and take-ifis. Sy The Federal Aviation Agency vide weather information but 1 has announced plans to modern- are not set up for airport advis- ) ize its flight service station sys- ory information such as is hnndled by the flight service statem with savings o f $3 million a tions at Grand Forks, Dickinson year and reduction of station and Minot because their tower personnel by 500 to 600 persons. controls traffic at the flying The Grand Forks station, how- field. ever currently located at the old U n d e r the modernized arcity airport, remains ill the sys- rangemelit, the flight service statem as one of three "hard core" tions will form the hard core of flight service statibns in North t l e system, operating continuDakota. The others are at Dick- ously, seven days a week, 24 inson and Minot. hours a day, and would handle Grand Forks early next year all the present en route navlalso will have the added advant- gation, communications and terage of a' new $120,000 tri-level minal services. modern station, now under con-, Henderson is acting struction on the hew Internation- manager of the ~~~~d Forks a1 Airport five miles west of the FAA station, city.

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FAA Station Here Vital In , t e Setu

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Construction o f t h e n e w Crand Forks International Airport typifies the t h i n k i n g o f progressive community leaders w h o have faith i n the economic growth o f this area. Many members o f t h e community worked diligently planning for t h e replacement o f t h e old outgrown airport. The Crand Forks community is t o be congratulated for taking this forward step t o provide t h e entire area w i t h modern airport facilities, planned t o permit handling o f all future "air age" traffic. Over 10,000 area residents recently attended the formal dedication ceremonies a t t h e airport. T h e facilities are b u i l t on a 950 acre site located six miles west o f Crand Forks. T h e north-south runway is 5,350 feet long and t h e east-west runway is 4,200 feet long. Both runways can be expanded t o handle the larger j e t traffic if required. T w o airline companies, t h e Northwest and N o r f h Central, have a total
' o f 1 4 daily flights. Norman Midboe, manager, reports that during the

past summer months there have been as many as 90 aircraft movements a day. T h e facilities consist o f the terminal building, hangar rental space ( n o w occupied by 40 private aircraft), outdoor parking space ( n o w occupied by 25 planes), leased space for private related air businesses, the U.S. Custom facilities, and a n e w F A A building still under construction. ( M o r e o n back page)
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SHOWING THE W A Y , day or night. This sign at the junction of the airport road with Highway No. 2 has two mercury vapor Nite Lites which illuminate the sign as well as mark the junction.

The Grand Forks Airport (see front cover) is "International" as i t contains a U.S. Customs office and serves'as a point of entry from Canada. Besides the heavy local air traffic which has been greatly influenced by the defense construction projects in this area, there were 1110 commercial flights and 800 private flights from Canada t o be cleared through the customs office a t this airport during the past year.

More About the Grand ~ E P T ~ A ~ B - (,YC E 4 s Airport Site Forks lnternat~ona P ~ ~ r ~ o r /A t WASHINGTON (AP) - Con! gressional sources r e p o r t e d

' Thursday that

THE FRONT of the terminal building with a Northwest airliner loading in background. Nodak installed 16 transformers to serve the overall facilities - with much of the primary, by necessity, @stalled underground.

the Federal Aviation Agency has issued a new national airport plan recommending construction of 727 new landing facilities and improvements at many other places at I an estimated cost of $1.2 billion )over the next five years. Inclusion of a facility in the plan is the first step toward be. / corning elibible for federal ; grants under the federal-aid air' port program. Locations of recommended ' new landing facilities include: i Minnesota: Ada, Anoka, BuE falo, Caledonia, East Grand Forks, Ely, Glencoe, Granite Falls, Mahnomen, Minneapolis, Northfield, Orr, Preston, Silver Bay, Two Harbors, Waseca, Wells. North Dakota: Beach, CasseE ton, Edgeley, Garrison, Kenmare, Luverne, Medora, New England, Oakes, Riverdale,

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Other "air" businesses lease facilities a t the airport for their operations. The Montgomery Air Spraying Corporation and the Grand Forks Airmotive Service have flying schools, charter service, aircraft maintenance, and aerial spraying while the Wright Flying Service specializes in aerial crop spraying. Mr. and Mrs. Levi n u f a u l t operate a modern restaurant with a full view of the landing and loading area. The FAA Flight Service Station has under construction a new building which will operate in conjunction with the airport. This federal agency handles all of the radio communications with the aircraft in the area. They also handle flight planning and disseminate weather information. Future plans include the latest navigational facilities which will include a terminal VOR (Visual Omni Range) for direction of air traffic. Air movement is presently handled through the VOR facilities which are located south of Grand Forks and the VOR facilities a t the Air Base. T h e parking lot has been equipped with modern mercury vapor lights similar to those used in Nodak's yard lighting program. Adjacent to the main runway, high intensity incandescent lighting has been installed and high intensity flourescent lighting is used around the aircraft apron.

Installathn of underground cable for the new Federal Avia- , I tion Agency facility on the Grand Forks Airport has been started by the Northwestern Bell Telephone Co. The cable will connect the FAA's flight service building with all buildings on the airport.

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( ?he new flight servlce bulld!ing of the Federal Aviation l~gency on the Grand Forks International Airport has been enI closed and inside work was pro\ ceeding Wednesday. The new building will be opened some,time after Jan. 1 following installation of electronic equipment.

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Time Extension Referred to P L I ~ I Committee a request for a 60day extension of time for construction o f an aircraft repair shop facility by Grand ForFs Airmotive, Inc. The firm previously had agreed to finish the building by Oct. 1but said it was delayed because it was unable to get materials. Approved the city audit r e port for the period ended June 30, 1964, Decided to offer an insuranqe company $1,500 in settlement of a claim filed by Jamieson Larimore 111 for wind damage to hi$ plane on the Grand Forks International Airport. The company paid the $1,500 and thereafter contacted the citv, claiming negligence in handling the plane caused the damage. Boys Moved PlaQe Airport Manager Norman Mldboe told the council that two boys working on a Sunday morn1 ing had moved Larimare's plane in Order to get another plane lout of the hangar and then failed to pnt it back. The wind came up, tossing the plane on its back and damaging it, he said. Granted a request by the University OI North Dahota Honlelooming committee to erect a reviewing platform for the UND i Homeooming parade on the 1 street in froht of the City Park E-Z and extending six feet back on the sidewalk. UND RequestGranted ' Approved a request by the UND Homecoming committee to put an a fireworks disglay in the area west of Presidefit, George Starcher's home on( 1 Homecgming night, Granted 'a request for a flas* ing red light at the pedestrian crossing at 24th Avenue S, and Oak Street.' Granted a request by Clifton jacoby for permission l o install a water standpipe at 2317 S. Washington St. for qale pf water to haulers. Aoproved an offer by Iftttisedr Fqrd Sales t o *fitN 8 60 by 90 foot area 611 the hdw city airnort for erettion of a 24 by &* fdot car storage buildiflg for Tental cars, , ,

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Purchases Appraved /O -0 Approved the purchase o f a portable chipper (for cutting up tree branches) from Chester 01son & Sons, Minneapolis, for $3,590; a caterpillar motor grader from Butler Machinery CO., Grand Forks, for $21,750; a sewer rodding machine from Flexible Pipe and Tool Co., Aberdeen, S. D., for $4,774,. less $1,000 for a trade-in item; a rotary snowplow and truck from Oshkosh Motor Truck Co., Oshh s h , Wis,, for $27,046.50; and a sprayer from North American ,Pump Corp., Grand Forks, for $1,079. Approved extension of time for construction of an aircraft repair shop facility on the Grand Forks International A i r p p r t from Nov. 1, 1964, to Jan. 1, 1965, for Grand Forks Airmotive. Other Items Handled Approved r e subdivision ef portions of the airport addition, and Block - 1 in Flaat's Addition. - -

ane For Disp


The Public Service Committee will recommend to the Grand Forks City Council that it accept a U. S. Air Force donation of a Sabre F86L jet f i g h t e r plane for display purposes a t the City's new International Airport. Mayor Hugo Magnuson said the plane was secured for local display through the efforts of , Col. Fred Webster. commander /of the 18th Fight& Interceptor 1 Squadron at Grand Forks Air Force Base. The plane is valued a t about $102,000 stripped down, Webster said. It is 37 feet wide, 40 feet long and 15 feet high. , If the council accepts the committee's recommendation, it will make a study of the situation to determine what type of base 1 should be used to display the ' plane. The matter first came to the council's attention through Magnuson, who had received a letter from an Arizona AFB re-, garding display of the p 1 a n e 1 i here. The council referred the / matter to the Public S e r v i c e 1 Committee, which now will recommend the plan. I If the arrangement is accepted by the council, Magnuson said, a dedication ceremony will be arranged to officially launch the display of the plane. The committee favors display/ ing the plane in the circle in front of the airport building.

City Counci Accepts ,


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The Grand Forks City Council Monday night accepted the gift of an F-861 jet aircraft from the U. S. Air Force for -. -31display at the city's new Inter-, 1 ThomabBretonTrand Forks, national Airport. ( a field attendant at the InternaCol. Fred Webster, commandtional Airport, has b w n promote r of the 18th Fighter Intercep- (ed to assistant airport manager, tor WIadron at Grand Forks , effective Monday, Airport .ManAir Force Base, said the only ager Norman Midboe announccost to the city would be the ined. He succeeds Doyle Cargill, stallation of t h plane at the airwho has taken the position of port. He estimated this might president of Grand Forks Airmobe about $250. tive, Inc., located on the airport, Delivery of the plane lo Ehe _ --2 airport will be made on a day mutually satisfactory to the city I and Air Force, possibly next I --spring. 1

Cify Offered f' -(4-&4 F86L plane


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The U. S. Air Force has offered to donate an F86L jet plane to the City of G r a n d Forks for display purposes, Mayor Hugo Magnuson said. The offer was made in a letter to the mayor from Charles L. Bushey, stationed a t headquarters of the 2704th aircraft storage and distribution group, Davis - Monthan AFB, Arizona. Magnuson said the offer will be considered but had no other comment at this time. An airport official here suggested that if the offer were accepted, the plane might be displayed at the Grand Forks International Airport.

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Applicat~Ons for i e balance of federal aid from the Federal Aviation Agency for construction of. the new Grand Forks International Airport were being ,completed Monday a t the office ;of City Auditor R. S, Niles. One application for $110,862.54, was for the runways and land, and the other, for $11,281.47, covered the money for the- .airport entrance road, water and sewer lines and the electrical control and equipment building.

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Eltgibility registers , which to fill ouenlngs for assistant Gr,\nd ~ o r h sairport manager and two patrolman jobs on the police force were set up Saturday by examinations conducted by the City Civil Service: commission. Six names were registered for the airport posi-' ; tion 'and four for patrolmen. .
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THE GRAND FORKS INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT continues


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to grow! In the bacl;ground is the newly completed FFA flight control building. Under construction is the Air Motivc flight hanger from which chartered flights will originate. The front entrance of the terminal building is at right.
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Advances

The new $117,500 tri - level flight service station on the Grand Forks International Airport will be occupied by the Federal Aviation. Agency about the middle of April, an FAA official here said, Headquarters offices of the maintenance branch of the FAA operation already have been moved to the new structure, altbugh two maintenance employes remained a t the station on the old airport to control operation of flight service equipment there. Bossoletti Heads Technicians Paul Bossoletti of Grand Forks, chief technician of the I FAA's maintenance division, I heads a staff of six persons in'cluding the two remaining a t the present headquarters on the top floor of the old airport administration building, Chief of operations is G. Wesley Campbell, local manager, whu, has 14 persons and one , trainee on his staff. A staff of five installation engineers from Minneapolis is presently installing the equipment in the new building, with the aid of ,Bosmletti and his staff. Bossoletti said the installation now is approximately 35 per cent finished and should be done by mid - April and ready for occupancy. Give Communications The Grand Forks FAA station is one of Inore than 300 in the United States providing such important aviation services as ground communications, air pilot briefings and airport advisories and handling fiight plans I for general aviation and miBta$y pilots. cahpbell succeeded acting manager James Hentlerson at I the local station in December, , 1964, after former manager Lon / Daharsh went to Milwaukee. I Campbell joined the FAA at Detroit in 1938. He has been employed a t several stations since, 'including nickinson, N. D., from 1960 to 1955, aqd Vahdaua, Ill., 1955.1964. H e r;we'her9 born Vmdalla, H e live$ with his wife at add Cogtunwoad St. Th'hey havc a slon fRq&e TJ. rj. Navy. ,,",, ," ,,, ,-,,a
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e Sorbo Dies Here At Age 36

Dale Sorbo, 3 6 : 311 Lincoln Dr., died Tuesday at a hospital here following an extended ill- 1 ness. Funeral services will be held at 2 p.m. Thursday at the United ,Lutheran Church with Rev. Roger Schlaefer officiating. Burial will be in the Walle Lutheran Cemetery. The body will lie in state Wednesday evening a t Anderson Mortuary Hanson and at the church Thursday for an hour before the service. Mr. S o r b o was born July 24, 1928. a t Thompson, Bnd married Marilyn Miller at Grand Forks July 18, 1954. He was a field attendant a t the Grand Forks International Airport. His wife survives, as do a son, ,Dean Leonard, and two daughI ters, Lori Ann and Sue Ellen, all at h>ome; a bnother, Neal 1 Sorbo. Tl~ompson:and his moth., er, Mrs. Lilah Sorbo, Thompson. ;His father, Leonard Sorbo, died in 1952. Be was a member of the United Lutheran Church and the Civil Air Patrol. -- -._ 1

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Cify Man On Job Gfe! 1


fer Crash Landing
Omar Vein, vice president.of the Valley Bank here, crashlanded his four-seat airplane and walked away uninjured after circling the Grand Forks International airport for about two hours Tuesday while crashequipment was marshalled and an emergency runway was cleared of snow. The crash landlng became necessary when the retractable landing gear failed to let down, Vein, alone in the plane, had no parachute. "I spent the time trying to sell the plane to the fellow in the control tower," Vein joked later. 'We couldn't get togeth-

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er. I wanted to sell it as it I was; he wanted to wait until after I had landed." Vein's wife, Ruth, was wait-, ing on the ground nervously during the last part of the prep- / arations for the landing. S h e didn't know that when the go ahead for a landing finally was given her husband was told not to land until the third low-level ' pass over the grassy area from which the snow had been cleared. "Each time I came in. she ' would close her eyes," Vein, said later, "only ta have me up: in the air again when she opened them," (Turn to Page 9. Cola 7)

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l~ale Sorbo 4- J o . . ~ 1 Pallbearers for Dale Sorbo,


36, 311 Lincoln Dr., who died Tuesday, will be Thomas Bret-/ 1 on, Norman Midboe, ' Dennis ; Miller, Russell K g g , A1 fred Johnson and Warren Block, Funeral services will ble held at 2 p.m. Thursday a t die United Lutheran Church with Rev. Roger Mr. Sorbo Schlaefer officiating. Burial will', be in the W a 1l e Lutheran Cemetery. The body will lie in state this Evening at Hansoni Anderson Mortuary and at the, church for an hour before the' service. L---.--

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Vein was returning from Fargo a b ~ u 9:30 t a.m. when he discove%d' as he was touching down that he had no wheels. !He pulled back into the air and was ordered to circle w h i 1 e emergency equipment was sum[maned from Grand Forks Air Force Base. Meanwhile, the offrunway grassy area was cleared for the belly landing. A helimpter was in the air 'close a t hand as Vein finally ~ made the landing, prepa$ed m blow any flames away as rescue personnel went up to help Vein out if the aircraft burst into fire. Vein, 529 Harvard St., rela- necessary precautions were tak, tively unruffled by the experi- en. ence, was back at his bank desk early Tuesday afternoon. ,"I was late for work~today and I've got a lot to do," he commented. The propeller and 'fuselage of Vein's Mooney four-place single engine plane were damaged in the landing but the plane remained upright. A i r p o r t Manager Norman Midboe called it a "good landing." Gear Fails To Fuactlon , Vein was coming into the airport about 9;30 with p 1 e n t y of gas in the tank when he dlscovered that his right landing gear would not function. Then, with the aid of his two-

of Montgomery Airspray on the alrport. Montgomery, using a two-way radio in one of his own planes. kept in touch with vein- in an advisory role, which was concluded successfully after Vein made Wo simulated approaches and then landed on his first actual try on the sod taxiway ! which had been cleared of snow by airport employes. Meanwhile, other help was arriving from all directions. The air base sent two pieces of fife equipment, an ambulance and a helicopter, the city sent a Pumper unit and the ' airport people were prepared to offer anflhing that might be r e quired. As i t turned out, none of the equipment was needed but all
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df cooperation f r o m vat'ious sources including the Federal Aviation Agency, Grand Forks Air Force Base, the Grand Forks Fire Department, airport

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THIS IS HOW Omar Vein's four-place, single engine plane came to rest on an improvised grass runway a t Grand Forks International Airport Tuesday after he was foxed to crashlqnd it. The belly landing became necessary when the retractable landing gear would not function. He circled for two hours while snow was, cleared from the landing area and crash equipment was summoned from Grand Forks Air Force Base. (Herald Photo).
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RI. d Forks City Hall for applicants , for two positions as attendants ?atethe City Airport.

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!$ads Staff of 14 I Campbell heads the FAA staff of 14 and Paul Bossoletti is chief of maintenance, assisted by three other technicians. ' Wires far teletype and radio use of the local FAA station are leased fmm the Northwestern Bell Telephone Co. A crew of FAA techntcians from Minneapolis handled the installation of electronic equip ment in the new building. They started work here in mid-January and their job now is finished, with the final switchover scheduled Wednesday. Telphone number a t the new FAA station is 772-7205. A formal opening will be held new building, Camp-

FAA Starts 3-20-6s'


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1/ a It was moving day Tuesday I t the flight service station of /


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New Area Larger

The new place has IF~deraI Aviation Agency at the 1 WO Square feet Of flmr ,nearly three times that of the old Grand Forks airport. Transfer of office furniture !present quarters, located on the airpart second floor of the administra,from the longtime air~o*. location to the ultra-modern tion building Of the I tri-level building on the new new construction is of brick, fietal airport five miles west of the and glass. Eickhof Construction city w&j started Tuesday mop, (50. of Crookston had the $117,500 ning, G, W. Campbell, FAA, ~ d m contract e for the buildng, flight service chief here, said, zam~hll said that cutting in I The Grand Forks iflight 8eF. com~un~ca~ions lines to the vice station is among 309 staIhew location was scheduled to tion~ih the United States which such viral as 'be started at 8 a.m. Wednesday, and that he hoped have the: an-ground communicati~ns, pi. t ( ngfer completed and the o p l rn handling of flight plans &tion m, the new site going for P e r 4 aviation m d E~ednesday afternoon. tarppilota A,

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OUT AMONG THE LINGERING snowbanks o n the new Grand Forks International Airport, the brand new flight service station of the Federal Aviation Agency has become operational after 11 months of construction work and installation of electronic apparatus. All-important services to pilots such as air-ground communications, pilot briefings, airport advisories and handling of flight plans will be provided from the new location. The $117,500 building is constructed of brick, metal and glass. Eickhof Construction Co. of Crookston was the general contractor. (Herald Photos). --

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Resolution Adopted&-&.-&, I The council sent to the Public I Safety Cominittee a request by 1 Northwestern Bell Telephone Co. to locate sidewalk telephones in the downtown area. A resolution was adopted starting the intent of the city a s to I dispositio~) of monies received from the sale of property on the old airport. Noting that the city had termhated operations at the old air-, port, ha,d sold part of the land I and had decided to sell the balance, th6 resolution declared it to be the intent of the city that all net proceeds realized or to be realized from old airport land shall be utilized for the development, maintenance and operation .of the new Grand Forks International Airport.

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Apl~roveda paving%$&h&t with Montgoinery Aircrafl, Inc., at the new Grand Forks Airport which added"$125 a year to the previous annual cost of the lirm's lease. ..---

Planes Delayed V-6 &ocal and area bus services /continued on schedule but planes 1 were delayed a t International 'Airport until the runways were cleared of one-half foot of snow, I The precipitation here started as rain late Monday, changing to snow about 11 p.m. The University of North Dakota U.S. Weather Station's 7 a m . reading Tuesday put the precipitation total a t 1.12 inches and the snow depth at 5. The tempera- 1 ture at that tlme was 34 after 1 an overnight low of 32.

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Dr. G. G. Thorgrimsen, coun- / ty coroner, was called to the1 wreck scene at daybreak. He said death was instantaneous and was caused by inultiple in- / juries including head injuries, which alone would have been I fatal. He said there will be no -. -autopsy. -. .. . -. .- - -.--Firs1 report from the FAA g-LS' ( w a s that a "D. Harris" of Ne- I (wark had filed an instrument flight plan over Minneapolis Ilwhile en route to Grand Forks. Later he cancelled instrument flight procedures. The FAA reported the pilot contacted the flight service station and said he was unable to locate the airport in the dense fog. The pilot then apparMen ' * O m 'lane By LLOYD C. TINNES ently went back to radar and Death struck swiftly early The terrific impact hurled both approach control and was in( Thursday in the fog - shrouded lnen from the plane, still at- formed lie was ill the vicinity area of the Grand Forks Inter- tached to their seats by safety of the airport. ~h~ airport obsernational Alrport when two Ne- belts, and dropped them into ver couldntt see the plane warlc, N.D., electric firm of- foot - deep water aboul 30 fect through the fog bzlt heard fie ficials were killed instantly in ' from the plane. The p 1 a n e engine quit, the crash of their light plane. skewed around and stopped as Grand Air Force B~~~ Dead in the 10:40 aim. crash the men were tossed out. The said it observed the aircraft about one-half mile east of the, undercarriage and the entire radar and advised the pilot o f l airport are Glenn Ellis, 40, vice front end of the plane were de- his position prior to the impact, , 1_prgsident of Federal Pacific strayed as it the The plane did not b~irlm. Electric Co., the p i 1 o t, and I 1 Two FAA officials arrived] August Teixeira Jr., a field en- Brief cases, Papers and other here about 10 a.m. Thursday f gineer of the company which is belongings of the two men were and began a n investigqtion of' a sup-contractor for Fischbach, flung out of the plane into the the accident. No information contractor on the Wing VI Min- Water. ,was immediatdly available as to uteman Missile project. Ellis and Teixeira both had their findings. One of the FAA visited Grand Forlts several Inen here was Lester Severance, Plane Wit Ditch times during the progress of the chief of the FAA's genera1 Aviation veterans at the as\ Minuteman project here and aviation safety office, Fargo. who Observed the I- a were well a c q u a i n t e d wiUl I t has been 25 years since area said the plalle Fischbach, Foley and Howard the last previous fatal accident officials. One of these, Robert a t the Grand Forks Airport. On the side Of a Goilbeault, Fiscchbach project That was in 1810, when a flying 1 section iille which rullsllengineer, and Adnah Sadaka, an instructor and two flying sttieast f r ~ m the airport entfance'lernploye of the Federal Pacific dents were killed in the c01'road ill front of the admllllstra- firm, identified the bodies a t lision of two planes over the lion building. 1 the Norman F u n e r a 1 Home old airport. Killed were the in-

ane Cras

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H e r e Shows Sharp Gain


Sharp gains in air passenger traffic a t the new Grand Forlts ! International Airport were recorded for the first quarter of 1965, compared with the first tliree months of 1964. Reports by Northwest Airlines and North Central Airlines i sllowed 1965 loadings of the two 1 airlines here totaled 5,930 for January thi'ough Marcli this year, against 4,385 in a similar : period of the previo~is year. Passengers deplaning h e r e ! totaled 6,118 this year compared I with 4,669 in the first quarter ; of 1964. fioward Peterson, manager of ! Northwest Airlines, made the I following repart: Passenger loadings, 1965: January 1,373; February 1,190; March 1,348; 1964 1 o a d i n g s, January 1,263; February, 1,162; March 1,213. Passengers deplaning in 19G5: January 1,326; February 1,306; March 1,507; 1964: January 1,382, February 1,277, March 1,1 334. i Loading totals for the first I quarter were 3,911 in 1965 and 3,638 in 1064. Unloading totals r were 4,139 for 1965 and 3,993 for 1964. For North Central, the figures supplied by Manager J a m e s Butala showed: 1965: loadings, January 698; February 663, Marcli 666, total 2,027; 1964, loadings, January 301, February 216, March 230, total 747; unloadings, 1965: January 705, February 575, March 699, total, j 1,979; 1964 unloadings: J a n ul ary 230, February 189, March 257, total 676.
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BODIES OF TWO electric firm officials from Newark, N. J., still fastened to the seats of tlleir plane by seatbelts, lie in this water-covered field where their planoe crashed just east of the Grand Forks International Airport early Thursday morning. Glenn Ellis, vice president of Federa1 Pacific Electric Co. and August Teixeire Jr., a field engineer, werc tossed from the twinengine light plane when it missed the airport in heavy fog and crashed, ltilling both men. (Herald Photos. Another picture on Page 2).

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Illspectors for thc Civil Aeronautics Board and the Federal Aviation Agency Friday view,ed tlie scene of the fatal plane crash near the Grand Forlts In- I ternational Airport in which two electric firm officials died early : Thursday. The nearly - demolished twin engine plane has been kept under guard at the death spot, about one-half mile east of the airport administration building pending completion of the investigation. The crash occurred about 12:40 a.m. Thursday The inspectors are loolting for further information as to-what may have caused the crash. Killed in the wreck were Glenn a t daybreak five planes manned - . . c. A. P. SQUADRON+-^^^^ by CAP lneinbers took off. CAP Ellis, 40, vice president of Fed5-6 - 6 ' 9 1 HAS BUSY NIGHT eral Pacific Electric CO., who observers John Jellson and RobWalter W. Brewer, auditor for The Civil Air Patrol Sellio1' piloted the plane, and August wood were in the Boeing the Federal Aviatiori Agency, I Squadmn here spent a busy 1 ert Teixeira, Jr., 27, a field engiCompany helicopter, which d i s is in Grand Forlts this week to Inight on a search and rescue the plane. neer for the company, who lost, check city records on construe- ' /mission before the bodies of two addition to Edwards, Jen- j their way in heavy fog, hit the I tiou costs of tlie new airport. men were discovered in a light , s o , and Wood, other CAP memedge of a section line road, and ' He is making the check in orfinally crashed in a water-covplane after bers who took part in the mis'der to clear the way for release iThursday One east I SIOI were Capt. Donald F l o ~ n , ered field about 300 feet from / of the approximately $120,000 of the Grand Internation- Senior Squadron commander; the road. I holdback of federal funds in a1 Airport. connection with the government /Maj. Jakc SchLlll and pilots Jim The body of Mr. Ellis was to Capt. Byr0n Edwards* Montgomery, Guy Wright, Dale grant of about $1,200,000 for the be fbwnto ~~~t worth, mandcr Cadet Squadron, 1 Wright, Dale Hillstrom, Ardell The that: of M ~ ~ . ~to N ~i ~ . ~ airport~ job here. i ~ govem~ was about 1:30 awn1. Bestland, E d Burlre, Jack Kruemeat holds back 10 per cent unN J, the crash, which occurred about ger, R~~ H 1 t and Rodney til final clearance is given by Federal Pacific Electric is a 50 minutes earlier. I~roocmo,and cadet Fred Claythe auditor. subcontraclor of Fischbach, - -- -- --- -Members of the Senior SquadFoIey and Howard on the Wing ron searched in their c a r s for . . 6 Minuteman Missile project the plane . - -- d ~ i s - t h enight and 1 and the two officials were on their way here on company business.

-+-9-45nspeetors View I Air Crash Scene


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62.y-&,$NORTHWEST ORIENT AIR- 1 lines 1)lans to schedule Boeing 727 fan-jet aircraft into Grand Forlis starting May 23, accord; 1 ing to advance schedules ed by the company. I The B o e i n g 727 is powered with fan-jet engines mounted at i the rear of the aircraft. It will ; seat G9 tourist and 24 first-class I passengers as compared with 43 tourist and 34 first - class on j i the Electra 11. ' Developed by Boeing specifically for smaller airport opera-, tion, the 727 is smaller over-all than the larger 720 or 707 jets but flies at the same speed and provides a passenger. cabin the same width a s the larger aircraft. Northwest said Grand Forlts and Fargo will be the first of the smaller cities on its ; / SySteln to receive jet service. j Flight 415 from Chicago, the : ! Twin Cities and Fargo, currentI ly beirlg operated with jet-prop Electra 11 aircraft, will depart Mi~lneapolis - St. Paul at 9:45 a.1n. (CDT) and arrive at Grand Forks at 10: 17 a.m. (CST), de- ! parting $r Winnipeg at 10~30 ; a.m. New flight 550 will depart the Twin Cities at p s m ' (CDT) and fly neon-stop to Grand Forks, I arriving at 1:25 p.m. (CST). It will depart at 1:45 p.m. for Far- i g o , Minneapolis, Chicago, Cleveland and Philadelphia, arriving there at 9:58 p.m. (EDT). I Flight 550 will provide a fourth arrival from the east for Northwest and will replace fligl? 336, 1 , also currently an Electra 1 eastbound. "' fir' :':: . . . . .

MAy 7, 19G5
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CALL FOR CONSTRUCTION PROPOSALS Notlce be mceivtd IS hcrcb?; bTr ntveli tile undersl-lled that qeclled U h~(i:~ I~~II ~ at: W 111s ~ . office O ' C ~"h1. O 111 & Ule & City Melid. ~ " ; e 7. 1965 1 1 1 th.2 C I ~ J of Gr:lnd Forks. Y U I ~ I I D;ll:ota, and \r;iil he Prcsentcd to tlie membr-rr o C Uir City COUI~CII at tllelr rfauiar mcetlnp schcdulrd for said d a r at '.30 o'clock P.M. lor filtnisli~na all n l ~ i i t . labqr. materials er~ill~rnelit and, o m t r f a c ~ l ~ t ~ and c s thi~!gs n ~ c e s s a t s o r lncldental for construct~on of the follow~inp: PAVING PROJECT NO. 1799 Portland ccmel?t concrete navemellt Tor tamurus and drives at the Glrod Forks lnternat~onalAirport Grand Forks North Dakota. (The work ihclndes a~~:ox;rnatclu 3.351 snuare yurds of 6" unrel~~lorccd concrete.) And all apnurteaaaces uvon tke basis or cash a ~ m e n tf o r the cost ,of the s3ine. ~ ' 4 % bid must be suhm~ttedon blanks furn~shedby the C ~ t yEtlnineer and must

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amount of S"U.00 made naviible to the Mayor of tile City of Grand Forks. Nnrlh Dakots, and ~n ucceqtnl~le bidder's b011d rlmninn to sald Citv 111 an amount equ>l to OLE I~undrcd "00, mrc-nt of,&c h!d total. >Rid c h e ~ k and bond lo he tssucd 1.n 1 cornellance w ~ t h statutes eoveriiiiiu till* 1 clnss of work. , Contmctors ivili be paid with cash for this work. ! i\ll bids must 11.e s~lbniilred jn a sevli!d elivelouc upon ivli~c!i they! 1s d~sclosedtllr followine ~nlc~rrna!!on: Rid 011 Paving Pro,ect No, 1799 nanle firm biddin8 N.' D. Stntc conir~ctorn license numdcr clr?ss or license d n t c license was is&~:d or relieived. , + ' lild submitted yitlio~itthis i!ilqrmatio~i on 1110 envclone. W I I not hc cnns~drred. B i d s ~ v ~ bc l l talrcn under advtsem~nland tlic alr;~rd of the contract. if amnrd.~d n l k r br ivill HIP made niitc or within nnc~ilni: .thirty tile (30) bids. di.~; Tlir work sb;~ll be mrnpietcd hy October 1.
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~ ~ , l $ ~ ~ ~ m $oFYbi;d;, ~$,i; ,:~tf&$ id

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?lie City Council reserves the ~ i - l ~LO t PLt any o r all b ~ g sor to. wa& any

;;a :;;$ :; ~;;el~;~tT;;l;~5;y~vo\2 able lo the interest of t h t City of Grand ryi;ies of UE contnc* dgcumentr im cluding plans and s ~ e c i f ~ c a t ~ o !m i sa , i he lieen or obtained a t t1i.e o f f ~ c e sof tila I C T L . A ~ ~ Forks C I ~ YE I I P I I I ~ BC ~ .I ~ Y Hnll. Grand Forks. North Dakota. ! Dollc by order tho City Council of the city of. Grand Forks. N o r h Dakota. Lhis 4U1 day of May. 1965. ,., ARNE E. LOVEN Deputy City Auditor (SEAL) ----.*..-. (May 7. 14. IDBS)

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The first regularly scheduled 1 ileapolis and points east - ultij e t passenger plane flights in n1Me destination Philadelphia. lched One of the "first flight" pas, Norill Dasta sill be i seugers on the 1:45 p.m. jet j1ie1.e today 011 rhe Twin Cities-/ flight from here will be E, J. I Winnipeg rouLe by Northwest i Hanson, tl.affic manager of the i isl lines. I Grand Forks Chamber of Coinby! merce, who is going to ~ h i c a g o Service ,,,ill be the new 777 Boeing fall jets, on business. I . , w~th a capacity of 93 passengers, Replaces Electra Flights 1 largest ever used 011 a schedul~ h ,llew "big jet- service led flight serving Grand Forlts. taltes the place olle of the I First of two flights will ar- Electra prop jet I.ot,rid trips to rive here from Minneapolis at 1 ~ i ~ ~accor~illg ~ ~ to ~ HO. ~ l 10:17 a.1~1.(CST) today, leaving \vaSd petersoll, ~ o r t 1 ~ Aip ~e~t , al. 10:30 a.m. for Winnipeg. This lines nlallager here. Northwest I flight leaves the Twili C i t i e s also operates two other rourld at 9:45 a.m. (CDT), stopping trip flights to the Twin Cities. at .Fargo en route, here. On an orientation run last week, one of the 727s went 10 Other Flights Listed It flies non - stop frolll win- Winnipeg, stopping a t Grand r,,ipeg to Minneapolis on the Forks on the return t1.i~ 10 check out local perso~l~iel on southbound run. flight leaves Mill. ground handling, opening doors, ~h~ (CDT), ar- getling into cargo b'ins, etc., on neapolis at 1:30 riving at Grand Forks at 1:25 -... .,. . p.m. (CST) - flying time 55 minut.es. This plane turns here and leaves at 1:45 p.111. for1 i! % r g a , then goes .p n l o ~ i n ~ i

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to any firm agreemen! on what would be done in .this regard. 1 The School Board interest: in : the airport property reportedly stems from an old agreement 1I under which it once turned over 1 Municipal Park land to the Park Board with the understanding that if sold, the School Board' would share equally in the proceeds. The land swap proposal involved exchange of the MuniciDevelopment Out

The Park Board has called at the

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A U. S. Air Force jet fighter plane will be placed on display ;soon at Grand Forks Internation/ a1 Airport. ; Tenlative arrangements have I been made to move an Air Force Sabre F86L plane Wednesday morning from G r a n d Forks Air Force Base to the airport. The big plane will he displayed ,in the center of the traffic circle east of the airport terminal building. It will be set on a pedestal arrangement with three posts supporting the plane tin the position of an aircraft . .... .. .. I climbing ieft turn. The shiny aluminum plane, valued at about $192,000 stripped down, is 37 feet wide, 40 feet l~ng and 15 feet high. It's a donation by the Ai.r Force for display pnrposes at the airport and was arranged for this purpose by Col. Fred Webstcr, co~n~nande of r the 18th Fighter Interceptor Squadroll a t the base. Plans hage bee11 discussed for a dedication ceremony later to officially launch the display of the plan but no definite arrangenlents have been announced.
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an illustrated article in "Concrete Paving," a publication w h i c h circulates throughout North America. Entitled "New I Airport Provides Gateway to the North," the two - page fea-, ture article describes the airport, which was officially dedicated last August at a pro, gram sponsored by the Grand ; Forks Chamber of Commerce. The article notes that more t h a n 280.140 sauam vards of
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, tional Airport is the subject of

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GRAN

T-/r-J5 FOR S INTERNA-I

I n the heart of the rich grain belt of the northwest plains a modern new airport has arisen to serve the needs of a thriving North Dakota community. T h e city of Grand Forks, self-styled "the fastest growing city in the northwest," officially launched its new international airport last August 22-23. T h e dedication program included an open house, speeches, flying exhibitions, a n d aircraft displays for thousands of visitors. T h e all-concrete field replaces a sn~allcr,outmoded airport swallowed u p by the expanding city. With its US. Customs facilities and sixteen commercial flights daily, Grand Forks International anticipates a bustling future as port of entry for travelers from Winnipeg and other Canadian cities. T h c airport is located on a 900-acre tract four miles west of Grand Forks. I n this flat Red River Valley country, the huge white "X" of its two runways is a focal point for aircraft operating within miles of the city. More than 280,140 sq.yd. of concrete went into the two runways, taxiways, and parking apron. With the prevailing winds from the north, the 5,300ft. north-south runway was constructed to meet airline requirements. I t was placed in six 25-ft.-wide lanes of

concrete. T h e lanes were then sawed longitudinally ancl trai~sverselyinto 12sx20-ft. panels. The shorter crosswind runway of 4,200 ft., primarily for light aircraft, was placed in four 25-ft.-wide lanes and sawed in panels in the same manner. Both runways are 8 in. thick, increased to 10 in. in critical areas. The 25,000 sq. yd. of taxiways are 10 in. thick. Both runways and taxiways are elevated above surrounding terrain to provide a windswept sectioil similar to a rural highway. This minimizes snow removal problems and also assists drainage. The airport project also included the construction of a runway ancl taxiway lighting system, a terminaladministration building, two equipment and mainlenance buildings, two large hangars, two sets of "T" hangars, a beacon tower, a wind tee, a sewage disposal system, an oxidation pond, a water pumping system, and placement of thousands ol' feet of concrete curbing, pipe, electrical ducts, and fencing. The old Grand Forks Ii~ternational Airport, built 25 years ago, was adequate for the aircraft of its day. However, poorly drained flexible paving on the runways deteriorated under the loadings of DC-6 and Electra landings. Maintenance costs began to skyrocket, and it

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became apparent that some improvement was necessary. The thrcc short runways cramped the operations of the largcr planes. Also lacking was required clearances over neighboring railroads and highways. With only 264 acres of land, there was not sufficient space for expansion. Further objection to the old airport was its hindrance to expansion of the city which had grown right up to the airport boundaries. This nearncss to the city, however, was turned to an advantage. The State Highway Department purchasecl the land as a right-of-way for 1-29, providing the city with some of the funds needed for the construction of a brand-new airport four miles to the west. Most of the land was in soil bank, so the acquisition costs were reasonable. The new airport is designed for future expansion. When lengthened to the planned 7,200 ft., the end of the northsouth runway will be a good safe half-mile from the highway. The east-west runway can be expanded to 5,600 ft. and have adequate clearance over any of the county and township highways in the area. Northwest Airlines began operations froin the new airport on November 15, 1963, contracting with a bus line to transport passengers between the new field and the

check-in counter at the old airport. Both Northwest ancl North Central Airlines share a busy schedule of daily flights from the new facilities. An aircraft maintenance compaily and a crop-dusting firm have leased sites a t the new field and have built or are planning hangars and shops. Nearly 3 00 local and area private pilots base their planes at Grand Forks International. Ralph H . Burke Associates or Chicago were the cngineers and architects for the entire project, with Ilarald Vinje as their resident engineer on the job. Megarry Brothers of St. Cloud, Minn., had the priine contract for the construction of the field, the parking areas, the entrance road, the water and sewer systems. Key figure in the airport planning and development was Grand Forks' director of public service, Thoburn F. Peterson. Mr. Peterson's efforts, along with those of Mayors Nelson A. Youngs and Hugo Magnuson, and airport manager, Norman Midboe, were acknowlcclged by Hugh Robertson, cllairman at the dedication program. Tribute was given to "the citizens of Grand Forks and the city and community leadership which worked so diligently over the years in planning to make it (the new airport) possible."

i[htrs' Arriva
A certain U.S. Air Force jet fighter plane will become airborne a t about 3 a.m. Wednesday a t Grand Forks Air Force Base for a "Flight" to Grand Forks International Airport but it will be a slow trip. Scheduled to be placed on dis- I !play a t the airport, the planei will be transported there while ,dangling from the boom of a huge crane. i Cars of the North Dakota i State Highway Patrol will es1 cort the jet on its early morning, move to the airport, which is expected to require about 1% hours for the 10-mile trip. The Air Force Sabre F86L plane has been stripped for di3-' play purposes and will weigh about 8,000 pounds. It is being1 donated to the city for public display in the center of the traffic clrcle east of the airport tarminal building. Arrangements for the gift to the city of the big' jet were I made by Col. Fred Webster, commander of the 18th Fightkr qferceptor Squadroti at the a i t 1
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Ibase. ' >Adedicatioq


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DAVID LANE, 5 MAY feel as though he is peering out from the mouth of a whale but it's really the "mouth" of the Sabre F86L jet which was given to the city this week by Grand Forks Air Force Base for display at International Airport. The plane was stripped of engine and armament so David is in no danger up thet'e. He is the son of Capt. and Mrs. Nelson D. - --- -fheairbase~LHerald Photo)_. -- - ._. . _ -__ - - -

Moving of a jet of the 18th Fighter Interceptor Squadron which has been donated to the city of Grand Forks fon display purposes has been rescheduled for Thursday morning, Col. Fred Webster, commander of the 18th, said Wednesday. Col. Webster said the plane transfer from the air base to the Grand Forks International Airport was halted Wednesday mwning by 45 mile - an - hour , winds. i Arrangements had been made to move the USAF Sabre F86L, jet to the airport by \using a1 large crane to pick up tbe plane 1 and traveling U. S. Highway 2 1 with a State Highway Patrol escort. The high wind, however, prevented handling the plaly. I Col. Webster said the plan is to leave the air kase with the plane by 4:30 a.m. Thursday, / arriving at ,the airport about 5:30 a.m. The move will be s,~&ewisedby Major L e w i s iVheelar, chief of maintenance f o r 18th Fighter Squadr~n. The pllne ds to be placed on dlsplqy in khp traffic circle east ' ,@d @fQipi@tratltm building, .,>,,, ,,,< " ~ , &

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Wind s w u n g the dangling plane a little during Ohe trip but failed to halt the operation, 5-''i' br wWc$ #as supervised by Maj. Lewie~.Wheeler, chief of m a i b tenanCe with the 18th Fighter Despite same wind and ,iC. a .big Interceptor Squadron, which do~ a s i o n a lsnow and jet plane donated to the city j nated the plane to the city for / at the was moved from Grand Forks, Air Force Base to the airport Muddy conditions at the airport, however, prevented mountabout daylight Thursday. ofi a pedestal we-. The Air Force Sabre F86L ing the ~ l a t l e engine and qrma- pared for that purpose and the was hoisted by a huge Plane was parked a t the east and moved from the air edge of the parking circle east at 4:20 a,m, The crane of the administration buildin!! into the airport with its M a n a g e Norman minutes later, at 5:15 said plane will be I

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ane Mbved TO City Airport

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Next Sunday

JUD REGISTER, Bismarck, vice president of the University of North Dakota Flying Club, stands beside tlie club's four-passenger Cessna 172 airplane. The 90-member group also owns a pair of dual-control two-seater Cessna 150s. (Herald Photo). I When a ?c 1 u b member be- l I comes a qualified private pilot he may work toward his commercial license if interested. ! I High in terms of club interest 1 I is p;ecision flying competition. ' In a r e c e ~ ~ meet t held within 1 the club, Ray Grandbois was declared winner of the sl~ortBy MIKE GUTENSOHN ' In recent years club members takeoff woll landing Sport flying bus evolved far have gone to Florida, Califor- the power-On Switzer the beyond the blali~ig wire and nia and New York. During break chewing gum stage of 30 y e a n from classes this spring a group, Mike Henago. It's now a carefully-regula- flew to New Orleans for the 1 Judging the contests were ted skill. Present day eathu- Mardi Gras. siasts, however, seem to get Membership is restricted to John Odegaard, Minot, club just as much kick out of it as UND students and faculty mem- president and Jim Montgolnery their trlal-and-error trained pre- bers. At present there are 90 of Montgomery Air spray, Inc. boolts, but faces are always wel- Intercollegiate meets qre held decessors. \ each year. This year the midAs a c t h e a group of sport come. No Experience west event will be at St. Cloud, flyers as could be found any~ Bismarck, vice Minn., with University of Minwhere is the University of North J u Registrr, presidcnt of the club, notes that nesota, Duluth, University of' dakota Flying Club. few had any flight experience South ,Dakota, Macalester and The UND group, a ~elf-~upportSt. Cloud competing. ing club and owner of three when they joined. airplanes, gets its flying fun Register e x p 1 a i n e d that Although UND has never e11from precisioll manuevers and through the low renlal charged tered the Midwest event, the n the planes a person may ,club l00lts forward to con~pecross-country trips, and looks O , down its nose at the barn-buzz. win his private pilot's license tition in the future. h g antics prevalent ill days of 'with a cash output of about $440, Formed in 1958 with an old ( o r about half of what it would Taylorcraft two-seater aircraft, 1 yore. the club has offered mote than cost othenvise. Big Investment Before one recieves his pri- Sport to several forlllcr mem1 with nearly $20,000 illvested vate license, according to Reg- ber% as some a r e now in fullin two dual control Cesslla 150 I two-seaters a Cessna 172 ister, he must have six to eight time aviation. hours dual flight time with a four-seatcr, the club can't af-

Fun, Training

Grand Forlcs Clv~l All. Patrol Squadron wilI conduct its annual "penny - a - pound a ~ r l ~ f tSun-, " day, June 6, at the new Inter-, nahonal Airport, five miles west of the clty. Hours of the lift will be fronl, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.:"with pa%.ons charged a penny for each pound of weight or a minimuin of $1 per person. Proceeds of the airlift will be used by the CAP squadron for its search and rescue operat~oiis, including the survival equipment used in connection w~th these operations. Don Floan is comniander of the squadron. During tlie airl~fl, CAP cadets will do the we~ghii~g of plane passengers, sell t i c k e t s and 1 handle the concession stand a t the alrporl. Senior CAP members will fny nish the planes and pilot the111 for the rides. Eight to 10 planes are expected to be used in thc opel.at~on. There are about 70 members in the GAP squadron.

evelltl

gBruce

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ing the i~ninediatoGrand area, but members

Contracts totaling more than $lRO,OOO were awarded Monday night to low bidders by the Grand Forlcs City Comcil on a variety of paving, watermain and sewer projects. R e m a i n i e a f t e r tlie awards was between $150,00D and $ZOO,-' 000 in bids on similalr projects which are being tabulated by the city engineer's office. Contracts, 1 awarded went to: I V a 11 e y Contracting Co., for / paving at new airport, $21,344. 1 Swingen Construction Co., $7,909, watermain. Swingen Construction Co., $4,263, watermain. Valley Contracting Co., $4,392, sanitary sewer. Geelrge E. Hagerf 1 h c , , $58,391, watermain, I Swingen Construction Co., $6,885, sanitary sewer. i Swingen Construction Co., $10,272, watermain. Swingen Construction Co., $26,849, sanitary sewer. Robert Gibb & S m s , $17,505, watermain. Swingen Construction CO., $5,459, watermain. -I

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Monday afternoon when a gust of wind caught a Piper Cherokee 245 plane landing at the Grand Forks International Airport and blew it off the runr way. I. Substantial damage was re,ported to the plane, piloted by ,, iFridolin A. Duss, a Flight in' structor for Trans World Air- 1 ;lines at Kansas City. He was I landing at the local airport to clear customs on a flight from! I Winnipeg to Kansas City when, the,yind caught the plane. I e&sengers were identified by, the Federal Aviation Agency as 1 I Hans Kissner, William Meyer 1 and Kurt Fedier, all of Kansas City. Bill Robertson of Grand Forks Air Force Base, who witnessed the mishap, said the plane buunced twice In landing and on the third bounce was, caught by the whd, coming1 down on the left wing about 20 feet off We runway. ,

AGENDA CITY COUNCIL MEETING MONDAY, AUGUST 2, 1965


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ROLL CALL: READING A N D APPROVAL July 19, 1965.

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August 8 will be a dedication and open house day at Grand Forks International Airport, according to Norman Midboe, air,port manager. 1 Planned for the day are ther 1 dedication of the F-86 jet fighter plane in front of the airport terminal b u i 1d i n g and open houses at the new Federal Aviation Agency flight service building and Montgomery Airspray and Grand Forks Airmotive headquarters. Plans Meeting Set Final program plans for the F-86 dedication are scheduled to be made a t a meeting of air-' port officials with the military 1 affairs committee of the Grand Forks Chamber of Commerce Friday, Midboe said. The flight #service station is a modern tri-level. 61 by 69 foot masonry and glass trructure, opened for use early this year. It %is one of more thah 3W such buildings in the United States providing services to the avia, tion industry. The services include air - ground communications, pilot briefings and air- 1 port advisories, I 1 Handles Flight Plans The station also handles flight I plans for general aviation and military pilots. Grand Forks Airmotive is a1 fixed base operator handling1 charter and air taxi service, a flying school, crop spraying and aircraft maintenance work Montgomery Airspray also is la fixed base operator, the oper- 1 l atiw being similar to that of Airmotive.

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PUBLIC HEARINGS, PETITIONS, REMONSTRANCES A N D COMMUNICATIONS: 3-1 Request by Sweet Clover Dairy f o r truck delivery and customer parking behind store a t 3 1 4 Cam: bridge. 3-2 Request by .Aero-Equipment & Supply Ca. f o r permission t o sublease old airport property t o MorrisonKnudsen. 3-3 Request for additional traffic signals on 4th and 5th Streets a t intersections of University Ave., 2hd Avenue N., Kittson, Bruce and Division Avenues. 3-4 Placing of lighted stop sign a t 5 t Ave. back in service. 3-5 Reqirest that the Park Board be asked t o plant flowers on University Ave. dividing strip starting a t N. 20th Sf. and on other islands and triangles. 3-6 Matter of nuisance created b y noise from automobile races a t Fairgrounds. 3.7 Request t o eliminate "no parking" restrictions a+ 5th St. and University Aye, 3-8 Request for one-hour parking restrictions o h streets i n the area of the Grand Forks Post Office. 3-9 Matter of chairmanships of Council standing cornrnittees. 3-10 Request for change in parking restrictions a+ )he corner of 4th St. and DeMers Ave. in front of the

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the city of Grand Forks for display purposes has been placed on display in front of the city airport terminal building. The F86L plane, a gift from 18th Fighter I n t e r c e p t 0 r Squadron at Grand Forks Air Farce Base, was placed atop ,three metal posts set in concf'ete i n the centerkf the parking circle .east of the terminal building. ~t was set in the position of a sweeping left turn, slanted So that it can be better viewed by airport visitors, Airport Manager Norman Midboe said. Movement of the plane from 1 fie air base to the airport sev- 1 era1 weeks ago and erection of the plane on its pedestal was 1 supelyised by Maj L. E. Wheeler,,,ch*fef of maintenance for the $8fH FIS. -

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UNFINISHED BUSINESS: Cartificate of completion, Proiect No. 1781, Brezina Homes, Inc., for construction of sewer i n Blk. 3 and watermain on Willow Drive i n Valley Park Addn. Resolution t o authorize funds and issuance warrants, Storm Sewer Project No, 1843. Various Engineer's estimates. C i t y Engineer's plans and specifica+ions for construction o f North Central .Airlines equipment buildIng. C i t y Engineer's plans and specifications for construction of watermain on South. 19th Street and Drees Drive.

FAA Plans I $-/-6s ;OpenHouse


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, Visitors will be welcomed at i open house Sunday Aug. 8, 'of i the ultra modern flight sewice of the Federal *via.' /tion Agency at GranP Forks hternational Airport.

L15E ANY DRIVER who gets st~lekin the mud, Airline pilot
at Grand i?orks International m
Rolberrt ICramer looks back in diswst. The incident h~ppened ~ Friday t night M e n fie right wheel of the big airliner slipped off the t a d m y and

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became mind in Mn-smked grwnd a t the edge. A w e c k e r finally had t o be oalled .ID free the big plane from ilts a d e d e g rut. Meanwhtle, passengers a b o a d the plane sat and wadted -jwt like a n p n e else ~ o s mn.mrtution e gebs m c k in f i e Snud. (Herald Photo). _ -- ---

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Airport I 8-3 -64I

I A request

( Co. to sublease a building on the

Aero-Equipment

Projecf
I The G r a n d Forks city engi- I I neer's specificatiolls for con- 1 I struction of an addition to the North Central Airlines equipment building at the International Ailpart was approved Monday night by the City Coi1ncil.l Estimated cost of the additioa is $9,200. Bids were ordered called for Sept. 9, with completion of the building schedulI ed by Jan. 1.

old city airport to Morrison Knutson GO. & Associates was referred to the public service committee. Aero - Equipinent holds a lease on the old concrete block building previously used as an airport hangar. Terminal Space Requested Richard Anderson's request to rent space in the terminal building a t International Airport for 1 use as a gift and novelty shop I was referred to the public serv- , ice committee. Anderson, an employe of Northwest Airlines here, asked for use of the space formerly used by Grand Forks ; Airmotive which has moved into I a new building on the airaort.

AUGUST 5 , 11965;

GR A

An air show fealuting flyovers by military jet and civilian aircralt, a crop-sprayisg demonstration and a sky-diving exhibi- ; Lion will feature dedicalio~iccre- 1 monies Sunday for an F86 Sabre Jet which has been pernl;!nently mounted on a pedestal a t ' Grand Forks Internalional Air- ! port. .,

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TI-IIS F86 JET FIGHTER plane, donated to the city of Grand Forks by the U. S. Air Force, will be dedicated officialiy at a public ceremony at Grand Forks Internat~onalAirport Sunday. Shown mounted on its high pedestal, in a climbing left turn position, the plane I S located ill a trafflc circle near the airport terminal. The new flight service stalion of the Federal Avialion Agency can be seen in the backgrauncl. (HeraX Photos).

CHARLES ALTER, FLIGHT service specialist for the FFA here, monitors the arrival of an aircraft a t Grand Forlts Interilational Airport. The FFA provides airport advisory service to airmen approaching the field. - .
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G. W. CAMPBELL, chief of the Federal Aviation Agency's flight service station here, is shown at the station's UHF/VHP direction finding equipment. The device locates planes flying in the airpgrt area, lhen monitors their flights to a landing on the airport. The station will be open to the public from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sunday.
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open house for the new ~ " r a l Aviation Agency faciliB e d e a t the airport is scheduled 'leg ~ a m e day. e air show-Sabre J e t dedicaprogram is scheduled be~ f z e 215 r ~ and 3 p.m. lwe Jetliner To Arrive I $ ~ e sponsoring Grand Forks chaflber of Commerce group ests, however, that many s?gg want to visit the airport % ' I 1 to watch tbe &rival and eal-!$fture of a Northwest Orient a@p jfles Boeing 127 "Jetliner." 41r1 new jet plane has been ! 'l'hi5jng Grand Forlcs only since SC'*r and will be a novelty to of the airport visitors. it to arrive a t 1:35 E . f l . and will depart a1 1:55

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It was given to the city b y the 18th Fighter-Interceptor sqaadron at Grand Forks Air f o l - ~ e Base, which a t one time was equipped with the Korean : war vintage F86. The 18th now t flies FlOl Voodoo jet interceptors and will stage a low-level "flyover1' to start the Sunday after., noon program at 215. Magnuson To Accept I Following the national anthem i arid FlOl flyover, Mayor Hugo / M a g n u s o n will officially accept the Sahre Jet from a represent a t i v e of the 18th FIS. A civilian aircraft flyover and I the crop-spraying demonstration are scheduled at 2 4 5 p.m., foll o w i n g by a skydiving exhibition at 3 p.m. add~tion to the FAA open / house following the formal cere-; r n o n y , facilities of two private i =?lalion firms located on the a l r p o r f will be open to the p u b l i c . They are Grand Forks A i r m o t i v e and the Montgomery 1 : A i r s p r a y Co. A i r l i n e type rides over the G r a n d Forlcs area will be available during the day on a Northl C e n t r a l Airlines Convair "North- I

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A device has been invcllted to ] perQit skin divers to communi! cate with each other and personY J Qn ~ their ~ surface boat. The

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The plane was given to the city by the 18th Fighter Squadron a t Grand Forks Air Force B a e which a t one time Was in the equipped established with air superiority the F86, which Korean Conflict.

The program is aII set for the dedication ceremony Sunday of an F86 Sabre Jet which has been permanently mounted on a ped-

SEVEN ~ 1 0 JETS 1 ~ of the 18th ~ i i h t e r - ~ n t e r c e i t o -squadron r fly overhead as visitors, to an open house a t Grand Forks International Airport gathered around a big Boeing 727 jet airliner. The open ltouse Sunday marked dedication of a permanently-mounted F86 Sabre Jel a t I the airport, a gift to the city by the 18th FIS. (Herald Photo).

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Air Show
Affracfs I Many ~ e r e i
An estimated 3,000 to 4,000 people attended an open house and air show a t Grand Forks Internatianal Airport Sunday. Highlights of the p P o g r a m were a flyover by jets of the 118th Fighter Inceptor Squadrun a t Grand Forks Air Force Base and formal presentalion to the city by the commander ,of the 18th, Lt. Col. Fred Webster, of an FI36 Sabre Jet. The F86 has been mounted on a pedestal a t the airport for per, manent viewing by visitors, The Sunday program was designed to dedicate the F86 memorial agd to offer visitors an -opportunity to tour the new !Federal Aviation Agency flight service building and the headq u ~ r t e r sof commercial flying services a t the airport. I The 18th, now flyilng FlOlB Voodoo aircraft, at one time was an F86 squadron. The older model plane was the "hottest" plane in the U.S. air arsenal in Koreah wati days. Col, Webster's squadron has compiled an amazing safety record since being stationed a t the local air base. It has gone more 'than five years without a fatal . a I-, accident,

GRAND FORKS CHAMBER O F COMMERCE


GRAND FORKS, NORTH DAKOTA

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August 12, 1965

MP. Norman 1Edboe, Managey


Grand Forks I n t e r m t i o n a l Airpod Grand Forks, North Dakota

Dear ljorm: On behalf of the members of the Military Affairs Committee and citizens of Grand Forks, we would l i k e to sincerely thank yoti f o r your excellent cooperation in p a r t i c i p a t i r i i n t h e F8$ Sabre J e t dedi.catf on. A s you know, the eventi was highly successful and well received by a l l present.
Your job especially was d i f f i c u l t since it entailed not only extensive work d w h g the dedication, but much planning and preparation prior to t h e program. Everyone t h a t attended was very complimentary and seemed t o enjoy -themselves completely.

Again, l e t us thank you.,


Sincerely yours,

~Zhn 0' Keef e, C h a i m Military Affairs Corrunittee

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FAA ~ e d u e r ~ t ~ppp$..~d The council approv d request by the Federal Aviation ' i Agency to move a navigational aid device for airplanes from the present location seven miles south of the city to a site on the /. International Airport. _ - - . _ +.- -I

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Longer Runway Asked -At New Airport Here


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license fee for ice manufacturing plants was introduced. Also introduced was an ordinance to zone property north of ' Gateway Drive between U. S. j 1 Highway 81 and the cemeteries as service business district instead of no zoning. .. Two bids on const~uction of an addition to the airline equipment storage building at the International A i T p o r t were referred back to the city engineer and the Public Service Committee for consideration and renort {back on.Sept. 20, The bids were: , Hqrpster Construr+:on CO., $12,045 and Johnson Gillanders Co., $13,850. The engineer said the bids were about $4,000 above the engineer's estimatk, . -

The jet age has brought re- for 6,500 feet by 1968 to accomquests for additional runway modate Douglas DC-9 planes it length at Grand Forks Interna- expects to have in .operation here by that time. tibnal Airport. The requests by representa- Widening of the east-weft partives of the two airlines serving tion of the taxiway to the e+tthe a Q o r t were considered at a west runway from 50 to ?75 Qet meeting attended by city and also was asked by ~orth$;t chamber of commerce officials Airlinqs. here Wednesday afternoon and Money for any extensibn *hioh will be studied by city affidals. might be made would be providNorthwest Airlines and North ed on a 50-59 basis by the fedqthe Central Airlines officials both a1 goverr)ment and the. OI$@~ said a 6,500 foot north south federa1,fands abeady have<been runway will be needed within appropriated and city officials the next two years to accom- now will consider the city's timodate larger jet passenger nancial position and if it Seems I planes and a passenger traffic feasible would take steps to apload which continues to Increase ply for a grant of federal money. in volume here. Northwest officials said that Mayor H. R. Magnuson pre@dairline will need 600 feet more ed at the meeting which wasratthan the present 5,300 foot north- tended by several members' of south strip bv n e x t summer the City Coyncil, representatives and that within the next two of the Federal Aviation Agency or three years a 6,500 foot length from Minneapolis and C r a n d Forks and by represtfnEatiues:of will be needed. North Central showed a need the two airlines-

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Auto Problem. Discussed /"I27- (27At Cify Officials Meeting


Problems arising from illegal For instance, the mayor sadd, parking and abandoned there was cooperation Sunday cars and car bodies were dis- between Manager NormOrlling at a man Midboe and City sj$det cussed meeting of Grand Forks city de;. Supt. Ray Corbett in cleddng partment heads with Mayor badly$drifted Columbia ' It. Magnuson. Airport Used The grgup was told that ille- / gal parking of hundreds of cars ' For this job, Midbe sent ifi was hampering snow removal I the airport snow b b ' e r whidk in many areas of,the city. / worked with Street DewtmBt; equipment in clearing the stree0) ~h~ officials also were traffic use. ed thit old car bodies left i n Department heads at the meetmany back yards in the city were there in violation of a city ing were A1 Forsman9 Q ~ I @ ordinance but the city has no and sewage; Robert J- Simon% place to put them if they are c i t y ' a s s e d ? i ; ; " $ % ~ h ~ TO get such space, it Fairweather; Park E-z ~anig. ' mnoved. was speculated that the city er Carl Bergman; Auditor R. $, , may to rent an Out-Offbm Niles, City Engineer Roben area. Schoenbarn: Treasurer bn g e a I Problem Referred Ohstad, Auditorium Motnagv ., The problems finally were referred to Public Safety Corn- 'Kenneth Lapson; Larr3; PJe~infl, mittee of the City Council for data $mcessing chief; IbJarvih, I investigation. Deb, chief sanitarian; PqUcB Meetings of department heads Chief3 Duane nubo on btnd 'Gb& r . with the mayor are held every bett, I * four to six weeks so that each & '., department head may present his problems, and to encourage cooperation with any other de,partment chiefs who mag Ibe ablg to asfist is4salution of the
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v-J-"&.s.-- I Bids will be oaened at the! Grand Forks City kouncil meeting @t. 7 for construction of an add'ition to the airline groundl eqwpment storage building at the local International Airfiort. Airpoft Manager Norman Midboe S8id the, present building is used by No~ChwestAirlines and 1 I that bhe addition will be for North Central Airlines. It will be bf masonry canstruction. .
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BUILDINGPERMITS//J~~ South Forks Shnoalnn Center, shon~lnn ecnter b u l l d ~ n ~1826 . S, Washmaton St..

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SUNDAY,JANUARY 16,1966

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Carl Amundson

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Airport Runway

Ion Council's Agenda

A request for federal aid on The council also will consider extension' of the north - south a petition for annexation of ap-i runway at Grand Forks Interna- proximately two acres of prop- 1 erty located just outside the old tional Airport from 5,300 to 6,- city airport at its northwest, 500 feet will be discussed at the boundary. i City Council meeting Monday An option to purchase land) a t 7:30 p.m. h o r n John A. Croy, East Grand Under the request filed by the Forlts, ,for construction of a new city, the Federal Aviation Agen- Red River pumphouse on the! cy would share in the estimated Minnesota side will be consid-, I $237,000 cost of the runway ex- ered. One ordinance up for second, tension. The sharing would be on the and final reading would grant 1 basis of 40.7 per cent by the additional exceptions for future, FAA and the balance by the city. outside water and sewer servThe extension was anticipated ices, and another would revise 1 in the original plans for the air. the boundaries of fire zones of port and space was provided for five lots in Boyd's Addition Igcatit. Lengthening will be required ed about 1% blocks south of in future years to accommodate Highway 2 near 13th Avenue N. the large high speed jet planes and Stanford Road. which will require more length In other business, the. cpuncil than the present runways pro- will consider bids on a new fire , tnlck, traffic regulations recomvide. Principal use of the airport by mended by the Police Departcommercial airliners is on the ment, and a State Highway Denorth south or main runway. partment traffic survey of DeThe east-west strip a t the air- Mers Avenue and Washington port is 4,200 feet long. I Street. ' ,
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Pallbearers for Carl J. Amund' son, 73, 1310 Chestnut St., who died Thursday, w i l l be L y 1 e I Olson, V. E. Peters, Norman S. Midbee, Vernon Ellingson, W. E. Freeman and James T. Pear'son. Services are scheduled a t 2 p.m. Monday at Calvary Lu. theran Church with Rev. Gerrit / VanHunnik officiating. Burial 1 will be in Sunset Memorial Gar1 dens. The body will lie in state / a t Adams Boettger Funeral /Home after 2 p.m. today and 1 at the church Mollday for an I hour before the service. M r I Amundson had been manager of 1 the city's airport from 1943 until

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~irlines Seek Wider


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Requesits to lengthen the northsouth runway a t Grand Forks ; In other budiness the council: International Airport by 1,200 Assessed $2,325 in liquidated feet W W received from Northfrom Bauke] ~onstruc. weat and North Central Airlines tion co. on airport construction, at Monday 'night's City council' 'including $1,550 on the terpinal meeting. build& and $775 on hangars, 1 Immediately, the city filed k~ request with the Federal Aviation Agency for $96,000 in partici,paring funds to complete the ;$237,0QO project. Further action &a referred to the Public Ser-

idamages

4 s ,,$,~Qoteet, not sufficient y 1 long enough to perwit the land- I ing Ibere of fanjet airoraft, ac- 1 cording, to itii'partJ!#&nqge~ h$n,,Midbe. The east-west 1Jk 4400, feet ,Igqg,, *r
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jvio4 C~mmittee. ,< B%~8~#t airport n d w a y leng

Speakers Named Jack K. Daniels, Williston Municipal Airport manager, will be chairman of the opening session. Semlnar speakers include John A. Hargrave and Enoch W. Anderson of the Minneapolis area /*--30 66 office of (the Federal Aviation Agency, speaking on federal aid j to airports, and Harold G. Vavra Bismarck. director of the State aid municl- -~eronauticsCommission, whose 1: Aviation pal authorities from Grand topic is airport authorites. . Forks and throughout the state Other speakers will be aer?' will attend a three-day conven- nautics people from Kansas City, Mo., Fargo and Minot. ; Friday's program is topped by the banquet speaker, Maj. Gen. Joseph D; (Smokey) Caldara, USAF (Ret.) from New York City, president of Flight Safety Foundation. Caldara heads a nationwide 1 air safety program for general aviation p i 1o t s and aircraft owners. Local Men On Panel ( , to -- brinn - -- to'gether Gajors, members of city Friday speakers will include governing bodies, airport man-, Robert C. Crockett, vice presiagers and airport operators in 'dent of the Greater North Daan .airport seminar to discuss, kota Association and FAA offimunicipal airport programs and I cials from Fargo and Minnea, policies. polis. Approximately 250 North Da- James Montgomery, veteran kota municipal officials have r ~ r a n d Forks flier and crop been invited to duster, and John Odegard, president of the University of North ':' Dakota Flying Club, are mem. - - ----'bers of a panel Friday on avia* tion safety. Montgomery is chairman of agricultural aviation. , All inteiested gllots and aircraft owners have been invited b y the aviation operators' group to attend the meeting, The convention will end Saturd ,day 'with election of officers, ?

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Steps toward improveme~~t of highway facilities and expansion of the iunway pattern at Inter- I national Airport loom ahead for the Grand Forks community in 1966 i These important items include ( t h e proposed construction of a I Cheriy Street overpass, the letting of first contracts in connection with the building of the new Interstate pighway 29 bypass and the lengthening of the main runway at the airport. I The City Council presently is 1 i considering hiring an engiheer- I ing firm to make a preliminary feasibility study based on the 1 Cherry Street overpass plan proivided in the City's Master Plan I The overuass would omvide a link betweei the city's south side and the central business district bv means of a mute connecting ite erst ate 29 with Cherry street , and then across the overpass to DeMers Avenue. The No. 29 bypass will extend from a junction with U.S. Highway 81, about 3% miles norih of the city, to Highway 15 near Thompson. It will traverse tlha east area of lhe old city airport, .Bids are scheduled to be op&ed in August, 1966, for conslruction of the Sixth Avenue S. and Great Northern Railway in. terchai~ge structure, also for e-t w en 'three box culverts b ----" Grand Forks and ~ h o m ~ s o n . In November, 1966, bids will he opened for the interchange with U.S. Highway 2 west of Grand Forks and in February, 1967, bids have been called for grading northward from a pint near University Avenue: Contracts for paving the bypass a r e expected to be let in February, 1968, with the new four-lane facility to be opened for traffic that year. The City Council has applied to the Federal Aviation Agency for a grant of $96,000 in participating funds to complete an estiinated $237,000 project of lengllreaing the north-south runway a t International Airport. %he application was flled after Nortliwest Airlines and Noah Central Airlines requested exteib sion of the runway from 5,300 feet to 6,500 feet to accommo. date the new fanjet aircraft which will use the local airport in the future. Room for such expansion was provided in, the original plans for the airporl, a t which traffic has' continued to increase. The concrete slab for ;he $11.000 North Central Airlines equip-: ment building at Grand Forks International Airport has been i laid and work on the superstruc- / ture will be started when wea- I ther permits. The building is ' city - owned and is an addition I to the present structure leased from the city by Northwest Airlines. I
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0 - d-!&-.L,4 i Pilots, aircraft orvile= and 0thers interested are being invited , by I\J o r in a n Midboe, Grand Foi'lis International Airport mailq e r , to attencl an airport fligl~i safety seminar next Monday in I the terminal b~~iltling al. (:he air! port.

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ef y Seminar
An airport flight safety seminar will be conducted at 8 p.m. Monday in the basement of the terminal building at G r a n d Porlrs Inteimational Airport. The announcement by Norman Midboe, airport manager, included an invitation to all pilots, aircraft owners and other ,interested persons to altend the meeting. Midboe said aircraft movements have increased 30 per cent and a i r 1 i n e passenger lmardings have doubled since the transfer of operations from the , old city airport to the new m e ' early in 1965. i Control Tower Needed As a result of having updated facPities, Grand Forks now is 1 served by fan-jet: a.irliners. Midboe added that due to the j added traffic and the use d 1 larger and more complex aircraft, there is a need for a n airport traffic control tower for controlling this traffic. The meeting will discuss the traffic increase and means to Insure the safety of all pilots atld passengers flying in and around the ainport and a petition will be circulated for inslal. -latioil Of a ,temporaty control tower. Speakers will include G. W. Campbell, station chief of the Federal Aviation Agency flight service station; Wayne Peterson, FAA air traffic representative, and Lester E. Severance, supervising inspector for the FAA General Aviation District Office at Fargo. Campbell will explain services avnilable from tlie FAA flight service statim and Peterson will discuss FAA rules and radlo requirements which apply to flying in conlrolled airspace, general operating procedures operating into and out of cantrolled airports and fundamentals of radar. Severance will talk on flight safety topics. Film To Be Sltown Movies will be shown relathg to the use of radio equipment in aircraft, one of the films concerning VORTAC (all directional radio aid) facilities. A permanent VORTAC facility is scheduled for erection at the local airport this spring. Everyone interested In pramoting safety in flying is invited to attend the meeting, Miclboe said. - ----

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M-K Suggesfs 2-[L- LA Old A;rpor+ 1


Leasing -

Morrison - Knudsen CO. & Associates, currently closing out the coi~struction phase of the / Wing VI Minuteman project has 1 proposcd a leasing arrangemcilt i on the old Grand Forlts airport 1 property to be effective starting March 5, 1966. M-IC currently holds two leases on the airport area which expire March 5 and now offers to lease the property on a monthto-month basis after expiralion of the present lease. I Rental $2,125 The proposcd montllly rental would be $2,125, providing the same terms and conditions as are provided in the existing leases which became effective March 5, 1.364. The proposal provides that termination shall be conditioned upon service oi 30 days written notice by either party upon the other party. The canstruction firm leased the land and certain buildings in one of the present lease5 and an additional property known as the Anderson hangar under lhe other lease. Consideration Promised The M-K proposal was contained in a letter signed by Jack D. Maulin, projecl manager, to the mayor and City Council. Mayor H. R. Magnuson said the matter will be considered by members of the council at its next mecting. Morrison - Knudsen currcntl y has an ofiice force and a small force of field worlrers engaged in windup office worlr and in making n~inor corrections due to work change orders a t various Wing YI missile sites.

z -4r.IInar & & p o r t ~ I I ~safety M semi- 1 is scheduled a t p.m. to8

day in the terminal building at Grand Forks International Airport. Federal Aviation Agency officials will speak and films will be shown. The meeting i s open to all interested persons.
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Traffic ~ - At . ~ ~ - ~ Airpori. Here


Aircraft movements a1 Grand Forks International Airport have more than doubled in the past 10 years with a 33 per cent increase since transferring operations to the new airport two years ago. Norman Midboe, ahporl manager, reported on this and on the need for a Federal Aviation Agency control tower to control , increased traffic at a safety ' seminar a t the airport attended by 90 pilots. According to the last official a i r traffic survey made by the Federal Aviation Agency, conducted from Oct. 7 through Oct. 13 last year, the airport now generates 23,821 local aircraft movements and 25,932 itenerant aircraft movements yearly. Eligibility Explahed It was pointed out that an airport has to generate 24,000 intinerant aircraft movements three successive years to qualify for a contml tower. Therefore if the official count can be maintained above the 24,000 level in the next two counts, the airport would become eligible for a tower facility, Midboe pointed out. A petition requesting the FAA to install and man a temporaly mobile tower fac~litywas signed by nearly all pilots present. Midboe said the facility would be of great assistance in controlling a i r traflic until tlie airport beconles eligible for a permanent facility. Speakers Named It was conleiided that tower facility is needed lo facilitate safe arrival and departure of aircraft using the airporl. Speakers included G. W. Canzpbell, stalion chief for the local F A A Flight Sellrice Station, who told of services available a t the local station; Wayne Peterson, FAA air traffic representative from Grand Forks Air F o r c e Base, who e x p 1 a i n e d FAA rules and radio lrequiremeiits which apply to flying in controlled airspace, and Lester E. Severance, supervising inspector from fie FAA General Aviation Agency District Office a t Fargo who discussed the traffic problem at the Grand Forlis airport I and items related to acquisition of a colltrol tower.
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Candidates Genera For R u n w y ~ Extension

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(Third of a Series) 1 election from the Second Ward: Candidates for Grand Forlts "I've always been a little opposalderman 111 n e x t Tuesday's ed to the new alrport, in regard electron generally favor exten- to cost and location. I feel now slon of runways at Grand Forlts I that the runways should be exInternalioiial Airport to meet tended." the needs of larger jet allcraft. Cost Factor Cited Hcre are anrwers they gave A. C. Thrane, running for to a question on the subject put fYlolstad's seat: "I do not think to them by the League of Wo- ~t would bring in enough revelllle to offset the cost." men Voters: Eugene Lavoy, unopposed for Homer Reese Jr. also opposre-election from the First Ward: ing Molstad, did not specifically "Our new airport is experienc- answer questions put to him by ing the trcnd of today: Keeping the League. He said he would ahcad of and not just In s t e p depend upon adv~ceof 111s conwill1 progress. I believe it is stituents in day-by-day contacts necessaiy to our c~ty,citizens i:i making council decisions. and economy to lteep ahead." H a r r y F. Rice, u110pposed Myron Molslad, who seelts re- candidate from the Third Ward for a seat being vacated by alclcrman .John O'ICeefe: "Yes." Mrs. Virgiilla Rose, Fourth Ward lncunlenl seeking reelecLion: "This I believe has already been authorized." Extension Favored David D. Keely, Mrs. Rose's Fourth Ward opponent: "With the amount of air travel out of Grand Forks and the building of t'lle new city airport and the large numbel' of jcts that are nsed for transportation, and undoubtedly thcy will be larger, I feel that the runway a t Grand F o r k s Internal~onal Airport should be extended." .- , AIvitl E. Austin, Fifth Ward incumbent seeking re-eleclion: "There is no question that planners of our new airport failed h o see that the jet age would be with us this soon. But the runway has to be expanded now or we will lose the kind of airline service we need and are en. - -t~tled to. I definitely am in fa- vor of this." 7-. /) 1 C & -5 , : GC C1 ,i,v/ ,b G? - /-/,yfb c,/c j /-/&;> ,@/7.?0&: j ~ ~ l f t -~/ t L =O ~ L * ! ! Citys Growth Noted 3 7 L - , j < , 9 d ~( - 5 ~ t / L / ) / f b 6 ' , Donald Berg, Austin's opponenl: "Granrl Forlts I S a rrowiilg city and as such musl-have Larry Lealte of Emerado was ' a first class airport. We musl nanied one of the 25 best male therefore, do these things that pilots in colllperil~on involving large and modern aircraft need power - on and power - off landto use the Grand Forlts faciliings, navigation and bon~bing. ty." Kathy McFarland, Minneapolis, F. C. Bundlie, unopposed for I The University of North Dako- was named onc of Lbe five best reelection from the Sixth Ward: I ta Flying Club entered i n t e r- woman pilots. I "As a matter of safety-and the 1 collegiate flying skills con~peti- Meet chairman Donald John-' airlines say it is-I would favor tion for the first time last week ston, Crystal, reported 400 colextending the runways. The 1 and now llolds the distinctioil ol lege and university studenls repgreatesl chance of accident is I being one of Lhe top clubs in the resenting up to 40 clubs across the take-off and landing of airnation. the nation pai4ticipilted in lhe craft. As the bonds for the airA delegation representing the competition a t Boulder, Colo, , port conslnrction are paid from . - I 150 nienibers of the UND club -- - -- - - revenues, it is not part of thc I was awarded the Collegiate Avis n ~ ~ ~ ~ mill r a l levv assessed 1 ation Progress Award for the flyiiig club the U.S. showing the greatest progress, growth and
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Rec Tape Bogs


By ART RAYMOND Plan Same Service . Tied up somewhere in (he h 1962, the nun~ber of pasmaze of Washington's bureau- North Central Airlines, now us- sehgers boarding commercial cratic red tape, a request from ing twin engine DC-3s, and Con- airIines at Grand Forks was 11,Grand Forks is awaiting action vair planes, has announced its 126. Last year the boardings while the construction season inteiltion to start us of DC9 fan were 24,623. Midboe predicted jet service by 1968. that when 1966 boardings have here shortens day by day. Time is a critical factor in the M i d b 0 e said that by 1970,been coiupleted the number will request for federal aid to help Northwest Airlines plans to be be somewhere near 30,000. lengthen the main north - south wing only fan jet aircraft iiitol Shipments by air express increased 50 per cent and air runway at International Airport Grand. Forks. "Failure to go through with freight shipments by 600 per to accommodate the latest fan this project," declared Midboe, cent in the last four years, he jet type planes. said. Last week, Norman Midboe. "could result in R severe curtail- ' me111 of scheduled air serv~e:' 111 1963. the last full year of airport manager, said: When collstructloll of the ail.- opelations at the old airport, "If we don't hear wlthin about a week, we probably woll't be Port: was approved by the c ~ t y I there aveie 34,842 air "moveable to do the job this year:' l963, a' th~rougl] shltly of nientr." take-offs and landings. needs was made, Last year the count was 43,(jG6, I Could Hurt Traffic Growth Exl~lained Of this, nedrly 26,000 were itinT h ~ scould have adverse affects on air traffic and out In an address to a G r a n d erd"L lllovelnellt~,01' those not of ~~~~~d porks next winter Forks service club last week, b Y reg~llarl s~ ~hedded collllner1 cia1 alr s~rvlce. when snow. slush, ice 01. ~ ~ a iModbOe n said: Count Increases indicate how rapidly the on runways drastically curtalls on aviation industry is moving, T1lere are about 55 pirvate air- I bralring at the 1 runways, Midboe pointed out. Northwest Airlines informed the I crafl in The formal request +or federal engineers that it would not in In Ills last anllual rellort to aid was sublnitted Jan. 13, four the forseeable fulure use any- the city, June 30, 1965, Midboe's / showed an operating profit nlollths ago, The request was thing larger than the Lockheed I sublllitted to and approved by turbo-prop arcraft which has a ;of $411072.59. Niles explained the lower level offices at Minneapo- nl"hl~m certificated gross can levy L I P to four mills, rests landing weight r ~ f96,650 pounds. for an ail'~ortfund. These funds ]is and Kansas city used to Pay off a $400,000 now with a federal agency .in The engineers, with this in mind, i dccided that the runways should 1reVenLie bond floaled to help Washington. be designed to accominod;ltp air- build the new alrpot and LO make Officials Contacted ' t a 1 inipmvements. It is craft weigh~ng to 120,000 c City officials have contacled lloullds~ throu$h this arrangcine~~t that. federa1 authorities and contact- "If was felt this added. the City's share of the p~ojecf 1 ed Rep- M a n Andrews, accord- strength would lahe care of our *I would come. I - -* I illg to Ray Niles, city auditor, needs for years to come. The in an effort to speed actIan on tmbo-proP aircraft y a placedl the request. in operalion before wc"'fi-ans- ' Or to ferred lengthen the runway by 1,200 1 -... , operalions to the new air- 1 feet is set at $237.000. he re- '1 yu!~hortly after to quest for federal support is $96,the new airport the DC-7s, with a + OOO. Tile city would I gross landing weight of 111,000 $141,000 balance. "We've got the money," said pounds making scheduled landidgswere at the airport. Last m i @ t even be &Ie M a y Northwesl inaurgurated fan '0 ScraPe U P 1 '' " 1 ' none^ on jet service, hi^ aircraft grossour owl1 if the federal p b l e 1; es oul at better than ,25,000 let' US know what t l l e ~ ' r e 1 poullds and we have already going to do." 11 reached the critical point in-so- , Bind 1 far as our runway load carryillg 1 Tile need for lengthenillg Lhe 11 capability is concerned." north - south runway came about Midboe later explained tllat II with the start of fan jet service these plal~esnow approach the / last MayI Northwest Airlines, Grand Forks runways wlth a 1 starled using the 93-passenger lightened load, around 120,floo. 1 Boeing 727, a fan jet. Need Top Conditions After about five ~nonths of ser- .'{At present jet aircraft call vice, Midboe said, Northwest land only when runway concli-) concluded the 5.300 - foot run- I tions are near perfect. Any trace way was too shorl for year- of snow, ice, slush or water on round selvice. In addition, the runways w o u Id malte it ncFederal Aviation Agency revis- cessary L o pass up Grand Forks. ed its criteria for runways and I The 1,200 feet of additional runsaid additional length was need- way would give the airlines the ed to offset poor braking action I additional safety factor needcd," / because conditions. ----- said Midboe -- -- _-- I ---- or - --winter -

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Asks Status /d Of-d g Airport Money


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The statlls of federal funds to help finance extended runwal construction and additional lighting a t Grand Forlts Inter. national Airport p r o m p t e d Mayor H. R. Magnuson TuesI day to call Rep. Mark Andrews in Washington. Approximately $95,000 is in. volved and Magnuson had the assurance of Andrews that an immediate reply would be received. Over-all costs of extending the north - south runway 1,200 feet and to a width of 150 feet, plus lighting, amounts lo $237,000. Tlle cith share is $141,000. Iinproveinents are necessary to meet the jet age requirements, according to Magnuson. EIe said the city's application has b e e n approved by all agencies and was submitted in Washington months ago.
-/J-&/ ) theNorn~sn Midboe, manager of Grand Forlts Inteknational
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Airport, described ,operations a t the airport and cited the continuing gain in passenger traffic I in a talk a t the Lions Club J meeting here Wednesday. 0 -- . - - --.------_I

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The Federal Aviation Agency j has amended its fiscal 1966 program to include extension of the main runway at Grand Forks International Airport, members of the North Dakota Congressional delegation reported Tuesday. Federal funds totalling $95,682 were allocated to assisrthe city in financing the improvement. The estimated total cost of the groject is $237,000. Drawiug of plaus and specifications for the work was ex- 1 pected to be started in a week ta 10 days and airport officials hope to have the new areas in use by this fall. Airport Manager Norman Midb e had said last weekend that unless the federal funds were promised within a week, it miglft be impossible to undertake the project during the cur* Pdnt construction season. .1 The major portion of the projIeCt is a 1,200 foBt extension of ,We no~th-southrunway, from 5,300 e e t to 6,500 feet. The project also includes grading of the carresponding taxiway and wldening of the east west taxiway and lighting the runway extend sicm* , Rep. Mark Andrews, to whom !be city had directed an urgent request for assistance in making the federal funds available, said from Washington that he .was happy that it had been possible to find funds available so that the Grand Forks project could be inserted into the fiscal 1966 program. Had it been Ieft for the fiscal 1967 program, stalting July 1 , Grand Forks would hqve ,had to compete with the re~~guesliq bf hundreds of other citties fq$;funds $om the o9tc;h-all %$p~rqfiIfitionI'AadreWs said. , I ,panatom Qyentin N. Burdick i&nd #Miltpn R. Young also re( dkted $fie aWqa in allocating ,,.,:,.I,., , ,,,

- - - - -. . The Grand Forks City Coun- Mcirfisbn - Knudsen &- Associ- 1 cil cleared the way Monday ates, construction contractor for night for construction of a mil- the Wing VI Minuteman Missile ' 3-/'?-66 lion dollar Holiday Inn here complex, served notice on the A special meeting of h when it accepted a $125,000 offer-city that it will terminate its ~~~~d ~~~k~ Citv Council at for a site. *leases on land and buildings 7:30 p.m. today will consider reInn Operations, Inc., holder at the old airport June 6. The ( taining an ensineering firm as of the Holiday Inn franchise for ffrst lease of the old administraconsulting enoiqeer i n , Grand Forks, bought the black! tion building and adjacent land ti0 with extensio of the Iterof land located just esst of the was approved March 5, 1964, be*irrnrt nlnwsvs alld 1 Interstate 29 right-oi-way and fore Wing VI construction work f ' tRXi StrinS. up for considerimmediately south of U.S. High- began in eastern North ~ a k o t a d .tion will be a chamber of cmn- - way 2 in t$e Airport Addition. - merce request Wat the city ofInn Operations, had been nef ~ ar land parcel in the Airnort i gotiating with the city for the 1 Addition as a possible site lor a , urovosed lignite research pilot past year for purchase of a ff61-y plant. iday Inn site. The price, of the : land was approximately $17,580 1 . _ _ __ an acre. I Cqnstruction of the rnoaern motel will be started before July; 1 and will be scheduled for com] pletion in February, 1967, Brock 1 -- - - --- - has informed city officials. He I , I 1 was represented a t thg council 1 me-eting by Attorney Paul BenI $--A 2 -d 6 son OE Grand Forks, Plans for the 112 room Inn , include a large restaurant, cock' tail lounge, meeting room for 250 io 300 persons and a la% The Federal Aviation Agency, Equipment from the old omni-' laut4oor heated swimming pool. on which pilots of big and little range building has been remof- 1 Benson said an application aircraft depend for their safe@, ed and the building itself is bewould be made later for a lif s building its Grand Forks fai quor license. cilities to match those of ~e k g dismantled, A concrete slab, Holiday Inn has franchised for the new building on the airnew International Airport. m o t e l s in many parts of the And to show off its modern port will be poured soon and1 1 United States. I All 11 aldermen present votyear-old flight service station, construction ~f the new build- 4 the FAA has arranged en open ing will be'directed by Thomas I e'd to accept the $125,000 purhouse for June 11-12, according Wilson, FAA supervisor for conchase offer. Council members to G. W. Campbell, statton chief. struction, Who arrived here reabsent i were Mrs. Allen Otto, At the , open house, scheduled cently. Harry Rice and Myron Molstad, during the June 12 Air Show at ' Foght Plans Handled who arrived after the vote was the airport, the public is invited The 0mnirwgeYaciljty and the taken. to view the tri-level brick, met- flight service staff work hand Plant Site Discusset! a1 And glass structure, with FAA in hand to prwide a i ~* t groynd A request by the Grand Forks men on hand to guide them and communications, pilot briefings, Chamber of Commerce regardto explain the various facilities -and airport advisories and h a p ing a 20-acre site as a proso vital to fliers' operational dling to flight plfq~, general posed location for a federal ligaviation pilots. 4 safety fn the airport area. nite research development plant New Facility Due Campbell heads ; a itag&f 11 here was discussed. Such ;. site inJthe flfgtt krvice StaThere's an old variable omni- persoi~s would be in the area of the old range (directional control) facil- tion sand Paul B,ossdetq is chief ,city airport and adjacent to the ity nine miles southeast of Grand df a staff of deveral techrlicians University of N a r t h Dakota korks which was decommission- in chacge of maintenance sf the Campus, ed Iast Ootober and replaced operating equipoxqnt. The c 0 u n c 1 decided that a with a temporary truck-mounted To enhanpe &U:ap~ea~@eof committee of the 'whole or a spefacility at the new airport, " flighf1$~~@$,#!%tiiifi '&real cial yeeting .ctf the council The temporary device, in turn,', g.& Park fl$~~e'&eit'hav(? sy$houl8 be hkld, with Uqivergity' will be succeeded &$ fall by a veyed the:grounds prelipinaty brand new facility, housed in a' b land#c@pingwfiidh svilPinkludej modern structure in the north- a number of large trees, and" a west airport area between thb varieJy of shrubbery: k notth south and east-west run- The landscapifig ~ o !is~ ex" ways. ? pected to be stay@@ soon.

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Open House Aricmged By FAA For June 11-121

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Enaineers Hired For Air >orf Job; Acfion De ayed On Coa


Would Build In I967 Tests would be continued over a 4 to Cyear period. The plant would be built in 1967 and would employ about 65 persons. James L. Lamb, .chairman of the chamber's Industrial Committee, proposed that the city grant an option on a land parcel of about 20 acres in the old airport property. The option would be for the year or until the property is leased, whichever is the shorlest time. Lamb said this site was deemed suitable because it is available to trackage, water, sewer, and electricity and because of its proximity to the University The site lies north of University Avenue extended and west of the Great Northern spur track, and east of the Interstate 29 right of way. i Hearing Arranged Lamb said Sen. Quentin Bur---. ---dick, D-N.D., has arranged a i For this work, the engineer hearing the week of June G bewould be paid 7 per cent of the fore Secretary of the Interior construction contract price paid lJdall at which a local group will to the contractors. present its proposal that the piTotal construction cost has lot plant be located in Grand been estimated a t $237,000, wifi Forks. Information in support of the federal government provid- the proposal necessarily must ining $06,000 and the city the $141,- clude a suitable site. 000 balance. Because of the time urgency, Donald Lindgren, president of Mayor H. R. Magnuson set the the C h a m b e r of Commerce, special meeting fOr Monday. o ~ e n e dthe discussion of a proOthers Address Meeting pbsed site for a pilot coal piant. He said it would cost about 95 0 t h e r s who addressed the million and that Grand F0i.k~/ meeting included Wayne Menshad a good chance of getting the ing, Northern States Pswer Co,, plant if a site could be made Minneapolis, who discussed prepavaila'ble and other conditions aration of site data; Thomas J. met to the satisfaction of the Clifford, dean of the College of government. Business and Public AdministraI Gulf Oil Co. would operate the tion at the University, and Alplant under a contract with the derman Henry Havig, who h a governinent and it was stressed member of the council's Finance that if he plant were5 located Committee and of the Planning here, there was a possibility that and Zoning Commission. a ,commercial plant costing Havig said he believes the council should consider the efabout '$250 millioii be located here in the future. , fect of providing an a i ~ o r l 10: , Prof. D. E. Severson of the cation on the city's zoning a? chemical engineering ' depart- rangement before granting an ment a t the University of North ' option. Dakota sJd the U.S. Bureau o f Mines plant, at the University, has had many years experience with lignite coal testing and ,would be a suitable choice to conduct an expanded program l of testing, I weald seek cesses b , 4 : $ich coal could be reduced f@,i solvent, then converted f02ajr into s hard substance prWiding 16,000 BTUs to 'the paund;\ such a product, he 'said, wodd be suitable for combustion power as a substitute 1 for diesel fuel and for other paThe Grand Forks City Council, meeting in special session Thursday night, hired a consulting engineering firm for runway extension at the International Airport but postponed action until Monday on selection of a proposed site for a low ash pilot coal plant here, Action on the pilot plant site will be considered a t a special meeting of the council set for 8 p.m. Monday. The Grand Forks firm of Webster, Foster and Weston, consulting engineers, was chosen to draw plans and specifications, supervise construction and provide engineering and survey crews for the airport project. The job includes a 1,200 -foot extension of the 5,300 foot main ninway, lighting for the new stlip and widening of the taxiway strip to facilitate turning of larger type planes.

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IJaycees,

Air Club
Plan Show
The University of Nofih Dakota Flying Club and the Grand Forks Jaycees will co sponsor ; an air show a t the Grand Forks 1 international Airport June 13. 1 The show will include l 0 ~ a l participation and a nationally. known flying troop. The Flying Club chairman 1 for the show, Gregory Lewis, IValley City, said, "We want t o make this a day of family entertainment and provide an opportunity to learn more a b u t the fast growing area of aviation:' ( Events will include a fly in 'breakfast, sky diving by area ' parachute clubs, exhibits and f general aviademonstrations o tion aircraft by a number of manufacturers, a fly over of I military planes and a display of military aircraft, Lewis said there will be concession stands, 1 aviation f i l m s and rides availablle on planes, gliders, and / helicopters. Exhibits will be I shown from 9 a.m. to 5 p,m: I The main event will be a twb hour display of aerobatics and stunt flying by pilots of the Bill Sweet Air Show. The Flying Farmers organization will concluct its annual meeting in conjunction with the a i r , show. Farmer pilots Will attend from North and South Dakota, Minnesota, Montana and Manitoba. Lewis said that more than 25b 1 aircraft are expected a t the airI port the day of the show.
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A. W. Carlson, a representative of ~e Federal A v i a t i o n Agency, Minneapolis, was in Grand Forks Thursday to assist in preparations for construction of a -1,200 foot extension of the main runway and other improvements a t International Airport. Carlson conferred with the consulting engineering firm of Webster, Foster and Weston here regarding plans and specifications for the project, which includes the runway extension, lighting of the new strip and wideaing of the taxiway strip to facilitate turning of larger type planes. He also met with Mayor H. R. Magnuson and City Auditor R. S. Niles to assist them in preparing a project application for $95,682 federal aid in the airport project. The city would I provide the $141,000 balance of ' the estimated $237,000 cost. I Completion of the lengthened runway was deemed esseatial by city officials to prevent interruption of service by the large fan jet planes during the fall and winter months when weather conditions may require a longer landbg strip.

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T ~ Federal B Aviation Agency variable omnirange (directional ( grounds at the Grand Forks In- control) facility building in the ' ternational Airport have been norhwest area of the airport. A concrete floor slab h a s landscaped 'in preparation for ' the FAA's open house at its new been poured and a 100 - foot conflight service station next Satur- crete roadway approach from 1 day and Sunday, June 11-12, ',the north end of the airport run) Trees, a variety of shrubs and way to the new variable omnl/ rose bushes have been set out on range (VOR) facility is belng, the grounds around the building, completed. and the job is expected to be The VOR is the facility on completed by the end of this which pilots dapend for flight inweek, according to G. W. Camp- formation while operating in the,' airport area or when approach* bell, station chief. Meanwhile, construction work ing the airport from a distance. has been started on a modern This function ctirrentlg ip be-

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Tha ' old VOR bpildin$ 'located south of the was , $wornmissioned last fall,

a temporary facility on the

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THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH DAKOTA


GRAND FORKS DEPARTMENT OF GENERAL INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING

May 1 2 , 1966

M r . Norman bfidboe Manager, Grand F o r k s A i r p o r t Grand F o r k s , N o r t h Dakota

Dear Norman: P l e a s e a c c e p t t h e s i n c e r e thanks of t h e Lions Club f o r t h e s c h o l a r l y p r e s e n t a t i o n which you made l a s t Wednesday. One of t h e members commented q u i t e e x t e n s i v e l y t o me a b o u t t h e manner i n which you a t t a c k e d t h e problems concerning t h e f u t u r e o f o u r a i r p o r t , and h e was most impressed w i t h t h e whole program. Sincerely yours,

Alan B . Meldrum

B U Y NORTH OAKOTA PRODUCTS

NORTH DAKOTA AV I A T l O N NEWSLETTER PUBLISHED %I-MONTHLY IN THE l NTEREST OF AV l A T l O N

NORTH DAKOTA AERONAUT1 CS COMMlSS I O N BOX U B ISMARCK , NORTH DAKOTA MAY JUNE, 1966

J u ~ e - 12 1966 ...................................
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LlNlVERSlTY FLYING CLUB & JAYCEES SPONSORING BIG

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a t Grand Forlts,

John D, Odegard, P r e s i d e n t o f t h e U n i v e r s i t y o f N o r t h Dakota F l y i n g Club and R.L. McDaniel s , P r e s i d e n t o f t h e Grand Forks Jaycees announced t h e i r s p o n s o r s h i p o f t h e " N a t i o n a l A i r Showl1 a t t h e Grand Forks I n t e r n a t i o n a l A i r p o r t on Sunday, June 1 2 t h b e g i n n i n g a t 1:30 p.m. The UND F l y i n g Club i s s p o n s o r i n g a e a r l y m o r n i n g " F l y - I n " b r e a k f a s t a t t h e Grand F o r k s A i r p o r t f r o m 8:00 a.m. t o 12:OO noon t o be h e l d i n t h e main hangar. D u r i n g t h e morning, new a i r c r a f t w i l l be d i s p l a y e d and demonstrated b y Cessna, Mooney, P i p e r and G y r o c o p t e r , Movies i n t h e morning f o r c h i l d r e n . I n t h e a f t e r n o o n o f June 1 2 t h , t h e I.IND F l y i n g Club w i l l r a f f l e o f f a b r i g h t and s h i n y Cessna 120 a i r p l a n e t o t h e l u c k y number. T i c k e t s f o r t h e a i r p l a n e a r e a v a i l a b l e a t $1.00 each o r $10.00 f o r a book o f 12 f r o m t h e U n i v e r s i t y o f N o r t h Dakota F l y i n g C l u b . I n c l u d e d w i t h each A i r Show t i c k e t A d m i s s i o n c h a r g e t o t h e A i r Show i s $1.50. i s a chance f o r an a l l expense p a i d t r i p t o the T w i n C i t i e s For t h e Twins-Chicago b l h i t e Sox game on June 18-19th i n M i n n e a p o l i s . The N a t i o n a l A i r Show has 35 y e a r s e x p e r i e n c e p r o d u c i n g t h e f i n e s t i n w o r l d championship a i r show e n t e r t a i n m e n t . The N a t i o n a l A i r Show i s . t h e USA Championship G o l d Cup award w i n n i n g g r o u p . I t has won t h e c o v e t e d Champion o f Champions Trophy three times. I t has been f e a t u r e d on t h e CBS t e l e v i s i o n network Sunday a f t e r n o o n "Sports S p e ~ t a c u l a r ' ~ a,l s o on t h e NBC-TV on "Danger i s My Elusiness". 'The A i r Show i s s c h e d u l e d t o s t a r t a t 1 :30 p.m. and w i 1 1 c o n t i n ~ l eu n t i 1 3:30 p.m. w i t h a b r e a k a t 2:3O p.m., when t h e Cessna 120 w i l l be r a f f l e d o f f . A t e m p o r a r y c o n t r o l t o w e r w i 1 1 be o p e r a t e d by t h e Federal A v i a t i o n Agency a t t h e GrandForks A i r p o r t f r o m 6:00 a.m. t o 6:00 p.m. on June 12th. The FAA w i 1 1 p r o v i d e t r a n s m i t t i n g and r e c e i v i n g c a p a b i l i t i e s on 120.7 Mc and r e c e i v i n g o n l y o n 122.7 Mc. A t r a f f i c c o n t r o l 1 i g h t gun wi 1 1 be a v a i l a b l e t o p r o v i d e v i s u a l s i g n a l s for a i r c r a f t without radio. B i l l Sweet o f Columbus, Ohio, famed as t h e " V o i c e o f t h e Skyways" w i 1 1 d e s c r i b e t h e a c t i o n and c o l o r o f t h e A i r Show. The ace a v i a t i o n s p o r t i n g events d i r e c t o r commentator appears i n Zaclc Mos 1 ey ' s comic s t r i p, " S m i 1 i ng Jack", as "S i 1 1 Sweet", i s a show a1 1 i n h i m s e l f w i t h h i s machine gun tempo c h a t t e r about t h e Sky Champions, B i l l Sweet: a l s o w r i t e s a f e a t u r e column, l l C r u i s i n g w i t h B i l l Sweet", w h i c h appears m o n t h l y i n t h e F l y e r Magazine. The show has i t s own 250 w a t t H I - F I P u b l i c address s y s tem. H a r o l d K r i e r f l y s European s t y l e championship a e r o b a t i c s w i t h a K r i e r K r a f t s t r e s s e d t o 12 G ' s , i n c l u d i n g such maneuvers as "The Lomcevak" end-over tumble somcrsau1,t; "The Avalanche"; I1Tho ~ a c k tla",merl1; IlThe C e n t r i fuse"; "The Cobra R o ~ 1"; "Fan Ta i 1 "sta 1 1"; "Yankee Doodle Loop" and ' o t h e r s . He H a r o l d I c r i e r i.s t h e w o r l d ' s p r e m i e r p r e c i s i o n a e r o b a t i c f l y i n g e x p e r t . h o l d s t h e Champion o f Champions Trophy and i s a t h r e e t i m e winner o f t h e N a t i o n a l p r e c i s i o n aerobat i c contests, f l y i n g a g a i n s t the toughest competition i n t h e w o r l d of a v i a t i o n . I n lgG4, he was t h e USA A e r o b a t i c team member t h a t r e p r e s e n t e d t h e \ U.S, i n W o r l d A e r o b a t i c C o m p e t i t i o n i n Spain.

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Lee 0 . Gensrich, H a t t o n , P r e s i d e n t o f t h e N o r t h Dakota F l y i n g Farmers and Ranchers announced t h a t t h e group w i 1 1 h o l d i t s annual c o n v e n t i o n Saturday and ensr rich s a i d Sunday, June 11 and 1 2 t h a t Grand Forks a t t h e Westward Ho M o t e l . t h e convention dates were s e t e a r l i e r t h i s year t o p e r m i t a f u l l day o f a c t i v i t i e s a t the Grand Forks I n t e r n a t i o n a l A i r p o r t on Sunday, June 1 2 t h i n c o n n e c t i o n w i t h a F l i g h t Breakfast and A i r Show b e i n g sponsored by t h e U n i v e r s i t y F l y i n g Club and t h e Grand Forks Jaycees, The convention w i l l be k i c k e d o f f w i t h a F l y - I n t o t h e Grand Forks I n t e r n a t i o n a l A i r p o r t f o r r e g i s t r a t i o n o n Saturday. G e n s r l c h s a i d t h e r e g i s t r a t i o n w i 1 1 i n c l u d e a complete convent i o n package f o r two days, i n c l u d i n g a banquet Saturday n i g h t a t t h e Westward Ho M o t e l ; t i c k e t s t o t h e F l i g h t B r e a k f a s t Sunday a t t h e A i r p o r t i n c l u d i n g a smorgasbord a t t h e A i r p o r t Sunday noon and t i c k e t s t o t h e N a t i o n a l A i r Show Sunday a f t e r n o o n , Saturday afternoon, the F l y i ng Farmers w i 1 1 c o n d u c t t h e i r annual bus iness mecti n g , e l e c t i o n o f o f f i c e r s and e l e c t i o n o f t h e women's a u x i i i a r y Saturday n i g h t w i l l f e a t u r e t h e crowping o f a F l y i n g Farmer Queen f o r 1966; a f e a t u r e speaker, as w e l l as numerous door p r i z e s . Gensrich s a i d t h a t because o f t h e adr!ed a t t r a c t i o n o f a major A i r Show on Sunday a f t e r n o o n , t h a t i n v i t a t ions would L e extended t o F l y i tlg Farmers from western Minnesota and Mani toba, Canada.
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ROTARY: Normk-%i%e, manager of Grand Forks International Ainort, will be the speaker at the weekly meeting at 12:15 p.m. Tuesday at the Ryan Hotel.
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~eature;devent at the Saturday night banquet will be the naming and crowning o f a North Dakota Flying Farmer Queen for 1966. Master of ceremonies for the banquet at the Westward * O Motel will be John Odegard of Grand Forks. Welcoming the group will be Grand Forks ~ a y The North Dakota Flying Far- or Hugo R. Magnuson. mers and Ranchers Association prizes will include awards to will hold its annual Convention the oldest and youngest flying Saturday and Sunday here a t farmer and the flying farmer the Westward Ho Motel. from the greatest distance. I Lee 0. Gensrich of Ilatton, S u n d a y morning, the group I President, said invitations have will meet at Grand Forks Inbeen set to flying farmers from ternational Airport to participate / North Dakota, western Minne-, in a flight breakfast and dem- 1 sota and Manitoba, Canada. onstration of new aircraft. The The convention will kiclr o f f , Flyirlg Farmers will have a with a fly-in to the G r a n d ' barbecue lunch Sunday noon at Forks International Airport for the airport. registration Saturday morning. The North Dakota Flying Far$amday afternoon, members meF cowention committee inwiU hold their annual btlsiness cludes Lee 0.Gensrich, Hatton; , meeting and election of officers chairman; Rudolph Johnson and Leonard DeSautel, &atton; Carl/ a t the Westward Ho Motel. The second day of the conven- ; RedWnn, Cry~tal,and Harold Pion will include a full schedule G. Vavra, Bismqrclk, "who alss: activities at Grand Forks Inter- ii7 seCrelaQ of the brganization.; national Airport, in conjuncti~n , RedsCration of Flgng Farmwith the air show sponsored by ; ers wig be handled BY Lee tbe University of North Dakota 1 Gensflch, H a ~ ~ n Mrs. : RU'F1y i n g Club and the Grand d o l ~ f i Johnson, Grafton, and ! 9Tr6,' Prances Shaw, -Minot. Forks Jaycees.

Farmers

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Several thousand turned out Sunday L o view the precision aerobatics of Bill Sweet's Na. tional Air Show at the Grand Forks International Airport. The all-day program also featured a flyover by Grand Forks 'Air Force Base jekintei-ceptors,: a fly-in breakfast and several, i aircraft exhibits. Skydiving and some of the, more spectacular stunts wer41 . called off because of strong wind gusts. Highlight of the air show was 1a - cross-wind landing with no power by aerobatic a c e Charlie / HiBlkd Jr. Top rated Harold Krier, who j , h a s won the U.S. aerobatic r championship three times, thrillled the crowd by flying upside , ;,down through two losely - pihc-I
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flying overhead. . The event was s onsored by I the University of ,orth Dakota; Flying Club an&' the Grand, Forks Javcees,

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THE ENTIRE

ILY WILL BE THRILLED! BILL SWEET'S NATIONAL

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A i r Shew Schedule
Fly-in breakfart E x h i b i t s open. Demonstrmtionr s t a r t . Air Forcr Flyovar B i l l 5wrrt A i r Show,.

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.2100 p.m.

GRAND FQRKS INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

DEMONSTRATIONS- Aircraft rnanufacturers will hove a hos~af private-owner types of aircraft on display! RIDES will b e available in canvrntional plants, gliders, helicopttrsl MILITARY aircraft on dirplay, with a thrillpacked flyover and demonstration by the 18th FIS in their supcrronic 1011 Voodoor i'nterceptar~l

'EXPERIMENTAL PLANES. homc.builts ond antiquet wiII be on displayf SKYDIVING b y several area clubsl BILL SWEET 31R SHOW-the wo~ld'smost skillful stunt a n d aerabatic pilots1 COMPLETE FACILITIES for p a r k i n g ploncs a n d earl. Baby sitting service by the Girl Scouts and Mrs. Jaycsss. Sevsrol concession stands and f u l l rertroom facil. itier at the airport. TICKETS a r e availabla a t t h e Chamber of Commerce, C l u b Cigar Stare, Colborns and Popplers. Adults, $1.50, Students, $1.00. Children under 10, frep.
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ACROBATIC FLYING champions will team up for this exciting stuxt, a feature of the Bill Sweet National Air Show scheduled at 2 p. m. Sunday ar Grand Forla International Airport. Above, Iv-lllovie stunt man Reds Didget is seen transferring from tlle hood of a new highspeed coavertibie ro a 12-foot rope ladder swung below a "souped up" aerial kot rod flying overhead at 1 0 0 miles an hour. Sponsorr of the show greethe Uiliversity a f North Dakata Flying Club and the Grand Forks Jaycees,
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Rotary Club of Grand Forks


OFFICERS

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BOARD OF DIRECTORS
PRESIDENT

EDWARD K. LANDER
B O X 608 GRAND-FORKS, 58201

N. D.

SECRETARY-TREASURER CONRAD L. K J E R S T A D UNIVERSITY STATION G R + N D F O R K S , N. D.


PRES I DENT-ELECT

June 10, 1966

WILLIAM T. POWERS
V I C E PRESIDENT

FREDERICK T.G I L L E l T E
MEMBERS

OSCAR LUNSETH 0. L O W E L L FLAAT RALPHS. ROTH R O B E R T MASSEE


GARRY

A.

PEARSON

M r . Norman Midboe 2015 Second Avenue North Grand Forks, North Dakota 58201 Dear M r . Midboe: Thank you so much for speaking a t our Rotary meeting this last Tuesday. We thought you had a n excellent collection of facts and you gave them in a most satisfactory way. We do not think you should spend any time being concerned about whether or not you a r e able t o convey your thoughts properly. To u s , you did an excellent job. We know you a r e in a fascinating field being concerned as you a r e with the inany developments in aviation. Good luck to you in the years ahead.

Edward K . Lander President

Service Above Self He Profits Most Who Serves Best

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AGENDA 'k-i7- 6k CiW COUNCIL MEETING MONDAY, JUNE 20, 1966


ROLL CALL: READING A N D APPROVAL OF MINUTES: June 6, 1966.

Bids Asked Ju
Runway Lengthening
To meel the jet age demands, the Grand Forks City Council Monday night called for bids July 18 for lengthening the northsout11 runway at International Airport by 1,2M feet. The additional length would increase the runway's dimensions to 6,500 by 150 feet. The cost would come to $270,000, with federal parlicipation. The May balance in the city's airport fund was $259,906.
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PUBLIC HEARINGS, PETITIONS, REMONSTRANCES I A N D COMMUNICATIONS: 3-1 Remarks and prayer by Rev. Butz, pastor. of the Firsf I Methodist Church. j 3-2 Presentation of name p1ai.e~by Jaycees. 3-3 Opening of bids on the following projects: a. Nortli end lift station remodeling, Propect No. 18 13. b. Painting of two 500,000 gal. water tanks, Proiect No. 1867: 3-4 Receive bids for sale of fire truck pumper. @ Plans and specification and call for bids on ail-pot+ runway extension. 3-6 License applications for +he following: a. dance halls b. hide and iunk dealers c. liquor d. beer 3-7 Request for stop signs and crosswalks on Belmont Road and 13th Ave. S. 3-8 Requesi. by State Purchasing Div. for duplicate check. 3.9 Letter o f appreciation from fhe 82nd Convocai.ion o f the Episcopal Church. 3-10 Requesi. by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints for vacation of sewer easemen*, Block I, Sunset Acres 3rd Addn. 3-1 1 Appointment of members t o Board of Budget Review. 3-12 Board of Health report on Riverside Park area sanitary condition. 3- 13 City Planning & Zoning Commission communica+ion as follods: a. Replat of Lots I and 2, Auditor's Subdiv. No. 4.' and Lot 2, Blk. I, Bartholomew's Addn. b. Plat of Sunnyside Terrace Addn. in the N r/z of Sec. 22, T 151 N, R 5 0 W . c. Replet of Lo+$ 2 and 3, Blk. 3, Sunset Acres 2nd Addn. d. Replat of Lots 8 and 9, Blk. 3, Sunsef Acres 2nd Addll. 9-14 Petition for four-way stop signs at 17lh Ave. 5. end S. 17th St. ( 3-1 5 Various bonds and insurance policies.
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Norman Midboe, manager of ; the Grand Forks ~nternational 1 Airport, will discuss the past,] p~esent and fulure operations[ of the municipal airport at the; Monday noon meeting of Exchange Club in the Golden Houri Resldurant. I

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4 REPORTS O F OFFICERS: 4-1 Various reports.


ACCOUNTS, CLAIMS A N D BILLS: 5-1 Monthly bills for May, 1966. 5-2 Time rolls for May, ,1966. 6 REPORTS OF STANDING COMMITTEES: 6-1 Request for extension of bus franchise. 6-2 Consideration of bids for rental of vehicles. 6.3 Consideration of re-valuation o f City owned p r o p ~ f i y by Marshal and Stevens, Inc. 6.4 Request for temporary stop light a* infersectio! Highway 2 and Columbia Road. 6-5 Request for loading and unloading zone a+ 5th St. Y W C A entrance. 6.6 Request for elimination of one bus lengfh ~ a r k i n g space at DeMers Ave. and 4th St. 6-7 Request for shorter interval between "walk" lights on the traffic signals a+ Demers and 5th St. 6-8 Request by U.N.D. for City t o pave Northwest Drive. 6-9 Request for water and sewer t o rerve Sprucewood Ct6-10 Petition tho construction of sidewalk at N. 15th St. from 4th Ave. N. t o 10th Ave. N. 6 . 1 1 Problem of no parking lace for camping trailers. 6-12 Petition for extension of sewer and water service t o serve Valley Park 3rd Addn. @consideration of option t o purchwe d r i p of land n u esriaty for drainage a t the airbort. . -

nalion's total air traffic, Peterson said. The dispute involves increases which have been requested in Northwest Airlines at Grand wages, overtime and lloliday Forks will quit operalions and pay and changes in llze pension lay off its station personnel if a program. 1 strilce set for 6 a.m. Friday a - '7- &A ldtlng talces place, Station Manager Contractors 'are c mp the roof construction of the new ' ! ISoward Peterson said l'llursdav. ! flight clirection control building He said tho first Norlhwest at Grand Forks International flight to Minneapolis is schedAirport. The building will conuled to leave a1 6:35 a.m. Fritain apparatus for the guidance day and that he hoped this [light of pilots flying in the airport could be made even if Wle strike area. The present facilitv is a OCCLI~S. temporary -one, located- in a Meanwhile, Peterson . s a i d I trucl< trailer on the airport. I 1 Northwesl is acccptil~fi reserva. I .. - --n- -.. - . -. lions for Friday and l&er iligl~ls y4. & ? ; . because any other action would be "premature." A few persons, he said, changed their departure timc from Friday to 'rtulrsday because of the strilte tllreal. R L I ~ W repairs, ~ ~ due largely I Eleven slation enlploycs woulcl to some cracks in the east-west ' be alfected by a strilce but no strip at Grand Forks Intemamechanics are stationed here, tional airport, will be required Peterson said. to comply with requirements of : Nortliwest has three flights the Federal Aviation Agency, eastbound to Minneapolis daily ancl two daily northbound flights according to Norman Midboe, to Winnipeg. There also is an airport manager ; evening flight from MinneapoMidboe 'said the cracks did I lis that terminates here. not appear too critical ancl that ; I The threatenecl strike is by they were caused by last the AFL-CIO International Asspring's f r o s 1. Most of the i sociation of Machinists which cracks a r e in the east-west / has inforaed its 35,000 member I mechanics L o be prepared to runway, with some also in the I I slrilce five airlines Eastern, main north - south strip, IN a t i o 11 i I 1, Northwest, Trans Tile runways were checked 1 WOI-Idand United (if no wage three weeks ago by FAA inspecagreement is reached. tors and the matter now has The strilte - threatened airbeen referred to the Public Serlines carry 66 per cent o[ the - - ---vice Committee of tlie C i t y ---.Council. Plans also are being made to widen tlie drainage dltch ,at the north edge of the airport to improve drainage runoff from the flying field. -.A**-

Shut ~ o i Here n

Airport Runway

in recognition o f your address before

3 h e Exchange Clu6 Of

Grand Forks, North Dakota

a p p r e c i a t i ~ eof your contribution to our program. W e hope this certificate dill rerye as a m e m e n t o o f this pleasant occasion. Date

Our Club is deeply

PROGRAM CHAIRMAN

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Board

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To Review
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Citv Councii of the C I ~ Vof Grand Forks North Dakota Lhat lhe C I ~ Y Aud~tor wili recelve sealed bids no later than 5.00 P M Central Standard Time July 18' 1906 a ~ i d rile said Council wiil'he 111 risslon on the 18th day of July 1966 a t hour of 7.30 p hf Central Stand; d T ~ m e a the 'counh~l 'chambers In t%e ~ i t v ' oi Grand Forks North Dakota. to recelve sealed bids for the furn~shina of all labdr tools matenal and esulDment necessarj. to b v e n 12009~1~ov extension of h e N-S Runwav and wlden Lhe south side of tile E-w Taxiwav fz5*~390')conpeotinp tile anron to tho E-W Runwav ~ n c l u d ~ nmarkln s l~ahtinn and grading: for the Grand @ororks ~ntirnatlonal A i r nort. Grand Forks North Dakota. . Plans and spec~ficnt~ons a r e on file in he office of the Citv Auditor Grand korhs ~ 0 1 t h Dakota copies f the plans and shecif~cations a i d o'thor aiddina and contract documents may be obtaiqcd by denositlnfi %25,00 w ~ t hthe C ~ t v Aud~toro r EBSTER. bOSTER & WESTON. CON. 5 LTING ENGINEERS 316 Cambrldne 5treet Grand Forks Ndrth Dakota 58201 ior eich s e t .o obtained. Ten $liars ot U1e d e ~ n s will ~ t be returned to ose who r e t u n the doouments In good candlt~on to the Engineer ten (10) days after the dat set far opening of bids A e work consists O E the fouowins aor ximate audnt~tles: gcgedule A: 85:ooo c V. Unclassi. fied Excava'tion 6.950 C. Y. ~g re. ate Base couise. 8 608 s v \l" sortland Cement donciete ~'aveinent. 11,666.7 s. Y. 9" Portland ~ e m e n k Concrete Pavement: (Alt.) 11 688 7 s. v, 10" Portland Cement ~ o & r e ? e Pavementa 36 acres Tudlna' 1 0' 25"xlG" dorrueated Metal ~ i p e ' ~ r $ . 2 p 25"~16" C ~ r r u ~ a ~ t e ~ ~~ (~i c~t d al a r & End section. ~unway Markln s ~cheduke 'B: 12 e a L819 Linht-NewRunwaya L41B Li ht-Green~elocut~d-'I!~re%old: 2 9 0 %. Cable Trench: 3:ooo ft. ~ K V d a h e in .Trench and Duc 3 000 ft Cou~lterno~se Cable ~n Tkenih and' Duct: 81 ft. Up derground Electrical Duct' and dent1 fi r Tvlpe (REIL) ~ i a h t s - ~ e f o c a t ; A?I pro osals and bids ffered shall be r c c o p e a n ~ e d bv a entffied check or cashier's check m ~ a b y e to the Citv for an amount whioh hall not be less than hve (5) percent o f tho a m r e a a t c of thq Dro mal wbrk on the improvement is re uirod to he started on a date ~ ( p be B X P ~~ J T the Cit Council oP t l ~ e Cltv o Gra d Forks korth Dakota, notice of wdicb Be ~ l f e nlo Ulc contractor ten (10, davs m dvano and such work IS to be co ole ed wl%in d m (60) consecutiv en a r dlavs from the date of or&* to commence work Thc City of ~ i a n d Forks. North Dakb t a t rese e the jiffht to hold all b ~ d s hi a p e q o j of thirty 30, ~ W after S Ihe date set for o enmn $ereof and to re- 1 j ct any o r aR of the bid an e f e ts and to a cept any bqds S%O%'~! & e m ~ for PU~I~C m . o d and also reserves rho right: to relect .the b ~ d clt any e r t v who h a s b en dellnauent or un a i fa1 in the nerkrmance of a n y , former contract with the c ~ t v Bidders WIU be re ulred 'to comnlv wlth the REGU O F THE PRESIE T ' c0rnkr-r~ ON ~ EQUAL EM#L&# ENT OPPORTUNITY. O F THE1 SECR TARY OF LABOR AND THE AD., MIN STRATOR 0's THE FAA 9.apbs 1 17 a s eonteloed in tao l c a t ~ os ER$ bid should be m rked on tho ride oI thc enveloae. tfie nature of prowsml and the name of the biddc Can tractor's state 1icen.e number and. class ust be shown on t i e tyld and outside d '~A"T"$$~%S 20th d m June bv o r er o f the City C o p 1 1 ~ m h dF O ~ . North Dakota R $ NILES clhr 'Aud~tor IJune U. ~ u l v 1.9, 1865)

AIRPORT GRAND FORKS. NORTH DAKOTA NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN bv the

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS GRAND FORKS INTERNATIONAL

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Grand Forks City's preliini- i nary budget comes up for review and approval by the City Board of Budget Review at a board meeting set for 7:30 p.m. Thursday a t the City Hall. At that time the board also will have before it for approval the school and park budgets. The 1966-67 city budget show- I ing a grand total of $3,828,415.55 1 is $984,918.51 higher than that lor tlle prevous year. The over- 1 all city tax levy will be $1,296,000, compared with $1,250,000. ( The increases s t e G e d large- I ly from new major items of expense for waterworks and sewage improvements, a new fire station and runway extension at 1 the Grand Forks International Airport. Must Certify Budget 1 'The new budget must be certified by the Budget Board before it can be finally adopted by the City Council a t its meeting July 27. The same applies to the pa& and school budgets. The board has authority by law to approve or disapprove any item of the budgets. It may I lower but not raise any item or the total of the prelilllinaly budgets and the action of the board I is final. Representatives o f the city, School Board, Park Board and I members a t large comprise the I Budget Board, which will be presided over by Alderman F. C . Bwdlie, cjhairman. Budget I t e r n Explained Principal items in the nearly $1 million increase of the preliminary budget over the previous year were explained by Auditor R. S. Niles. High on the list of increased 1 expendit~~res was $617,682 for the airport, a hike of $293,377 over the 1965-66 total. Reasons included a $268,500 item for extension of runways, $19,000 for a new jet fuel facility and $66,000 for jet fuel to be purchased for resale, the three items total' ing about $354,000. The city, however will be refunded $111,000 later by the Federal Aviation Agency but the city first must put up the money during t h e , pre s e n tfiscal year, --- -

Bids on extension of the northsouth runway at Grand Forlts Illternational Airport will be opened a t the City Council meet-' ing set for 7:30 Monday. The pmject calls for lengthening of the runway by 1,200 feet to a length of 6,500 feet. The width is 150 feet. Estimated cost is $270,000 wilh federal partici-

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AGENDA CITY COUNCIL MEETING

MONDAY, JULY 18 1966


I 2 ROLL CALL: READING A N D APPROVAL O F MINUTES: July 5, 1966

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PUBLIC HEARING, PETITIONS, REMONSTRANCES A N D COMMUNICATIONS: 3-1 Bids on the following: a. Extension of norfh/south runways. b. Proiect No. 1870, watermain to serve .parts of Flaat's and Sprucewood Addn. c. Sewer Project No. 1871, par) of Sprucewood Addn. d. Watermain Proiect No. 1842, Sunset Acres 3rd Addn. 3-2 Public hearing on petition t o vacate ortion of alley between Blk, 25, Cox's Addn. and BI! 7, Hvidstonn's Su bdiv. 3-3 Applications for permit to connect fire alarm defector units by Whalen's Inc. 3-4 Application for dance hall and roller rink license. 3-5 Request for one-way traffic on alley ,between 7th and 8th Aves. N. from N. 3rd St. t o N. 4th St. , 3-4 Request for stud of traffic hazard caused by trees a t intersection o 17th Ave. S. and Walnut St, and request for sidewalk on north side of 17th Ave. 5. where trees are now located. 3.7 Request by Aquatics Club t o sell pop and ice cream in front of Bray-Buttrey's on Krazy Day. 3-8 , Request by Grand Forks Public Library Board for bond I issue for new library. 3-9 Communication from Board of County Commissioners I kl, re. study committee for County Health District. 3-fl0 Letters o f appreciation. 3-1 1 Rpport from Board of Adjus+rnents. 3-12 Various bonds and insurance policies.

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REPORTS O F OFFICERS:

4-1 Various reports.


A C C O U N T S , CLAIMS A V D BILLS: , 5-1 Monthly bills for June, 1966. 5-2 Time rolls for June, 1944. 4 REPORTS OF STANDING CSPMMITTEES: 6-1 J e t fuel facilittes at islrporl, purchaqe of 'ef fuel n rate schedule fnr refyjcincy N o r t h ~ p j f ~ i h i n e s ,Inc.
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F a r g o Firm Has Low 7-P3-&6 On A i r p o r t Proiecf

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Northern Improvement Co., ( Fargo, was tbe apparent low ' bidder on extension of the northsouth runway at Grand Forks1 International Airport when bids I were opened ~ o & a night ~ b y '' the City Council. Northern's bid was $289.462 I for construction of the 1,200-foot extension of the present runway which will bring the total length from 5,300 to 6,500 feet to facilitate use of h e a w new iet , planes. Northwest Lirlines e n t l y u s e s a fan jet Iype o f plane and North Central will start using jets here within the next year or two. To Install Facilities The council adopted a com. mittee recommendation for in- I stallation of jet fuel facilities a t the airport and for purchase of jet file1 and a rate schedule for 1 service to Northwest Airlines. The recommendation adopted was that Texaco, Inc., prepare plans and specifications and supervise and inspect the installa-: tion of jet fuel facilities, includIng t w o 15,000-gallon jet . fuel storage tanks. The facilities would cost about $18,000 to $19,000, with the city permitted to pay the cost over a five year 1 period. Service wuuld be prddded to Northwest AWines planes at 3 cents a gallon tor rhe first 15,000 gallons, 2% cents for the next 15,000 gallons, 2 cents a gallon for the next 20,000 gallons and 1% cent$ a gallon for fuel supplies exceeding 50,000 gallons in a monthly period. Price 18 Cents The agreement calls for pur,chasing the fuel from Texaco, Inc,, h r 18 cents a gallon under a tIve-year contract. The city 1 alrwdy bas an a g c e m e n t re' garding regular aviation gasoI line which was extended tor two years. Apparent low bidders on other projects were: Edling Electric, Inc., $13,094 for lighting * the 1,206 toot mway extension; Swingen Construction Co., three projects, watermain in Sunset Acres Third Addition, , $8,609; watermain in parts of Flaatpa land S p r u c e w o o d Addition, and sewer line in Spruced,- Addition, $2,914.

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Airline

1 Strikers
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May Vote
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WASHINGTON (AP) - T h e striking machinists union said today it will call for a vote Wednesday by its members on ' five strikebound airlines on the management's latest offer if there is no agreement by then in the 12 day - old walkout. James J. Reynolds, assistant secretary of labor, announced the latest development after a joint meeting with negotiators , for the airlines an1 the AFL-CIO International Association of Machinists. He emphasized that the union's move -was not by agreement with management representatives. Reynolds siad it would take three to five days to conduct a , vote among the 35,000 striking i machinists of Eastern, National, 1 United, Northwest and Trans World Airlines. Reynolds de' clined to say where negotiations 'stood at the moment. , The union is asking a 53 - cent an hour incrase spread over a 36 morlth contract. The last reported offer of the airlines was 48 cents over 42 months. Monday, Reynolds had reported a new stalemate in the negotiations. The five struck airlines which carried more than half of the nation's commercial air passenger and freight traffic are Eastern, National, United, Northwest and Trans World. The struck airlines agreed ' last August to bargain jointly ' with the union.

Letting of the construction con- 1 tract for a 1,200 foot extension of the north-south runway at Grand Forks International Airport has been delayed because the low bids were considerably above the engineer% estimates. The low bid of $289,461 submitted to the City Coutlcil Monday night by Northern Improvement Co., Fargo, was approxi1 mately $72,700 above the esti'mate and the runway lighting bid of $13,094 by Ediing Electric was about $1,900 above the estimate, City Auditor R. S. Niles said. Federal aid also is involved and the bids must be approved by the Federal Aviation Agency before any federal funds can be I made available. The government; would share 50 per cent of the costs.

Runway

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Bids
FFA Scrutiny .7-ap-sl.d

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Wednesday

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Grand Forlts City's budget for I 1966 - 67 will be presented to the City Council for final approval ' at the annual budget meeting at 7: 30 p.m. Wednesday. The budget with a grand total of $4,813,334 was approved last week by the City Board of Budget Review and now comes before the aldermen for a final O.K. i Another possible item of busi\ ness for Wednesday is the airport runway extensiop project for which an apparent low bid of I $289,462 was submitted by Northe m Improvement Co, of Fargo. 1 The bid, which ran considerI ably above the engineer's estimate, was referred to a consulting engineer for tabulation and ' report back to the council. But before the council can 'award a contract, it first must have the approval of the FederI al Aviation Agency because the federal government will provide 1 an estimated $100,000 of the cpst. i If word is received from the I FAA by Wednesday, the runway matter will be discussed. A 1,200 foot extension of 'the north south runway to a total, length of 8,500 feet is planned to ' accmodate the needs of the big i jet planes:
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Before agreeing to pay half cost o f the runway extension project a t Grand Forks International Airport, the Federal Aviation Agency is analyzling the $80,000 gap between city estimates and the low bid for I the work. . City officials and FAA representatives met Thursday with N o r t h e r n Improvement Co., ! Fargo, to find out why that \firm's bid, the lowest of three1 competitive bids submitted, ex?ceeded the city engineer's by some 38 per cent. Northern Improvement, which, is now widening Highway 2 west of the city, explained that, among other things, the unusually wet soil and high water table in the Grand Forks area complicate construction and 1 boost expenses. The FAA will consider the, matter and return its decision within a few weeks. Without the1 FAA grant, Grand Forks will1 b e unable to finance the $289,-, 462 extension, said City Auditor; R. S. Niles. Federal authorities have already approved the project it-, self, which will lengthen the 5,300 foot north south runway to 6,500 feet. Without the ! extension, airlines are reluctant, to land jets at the airport under less h a n perfect condition$, Mayor Hugo Magnuson expi;ained.. In view of the city's recent decision to install jet fueling facilities at the airport, the loss 1 of jet flights could entail a significant loss of revenue, Magnuson added.

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Presented to

in vecognition of youv aJJress 6efove the


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KIWANlS CLUB OF GRAND FORKS, NORTH DAKOTA

Y o u r contribution to our Club is h e p l y appreciote8. W e hope this certificate dill serJe as a lasting memento of this pleasant occasion.
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1 , 1966

'Date

PROGRAM CHAIRMAN

The city, with financial assistance from the Federal Aviaton Agency, intends to lengthen the north-south runway from 5,300 to 6,500 feet. The cost will exceed $150,000. Schoenborn said runway joints were faulty and not sawed soon enough nor deep enough. He explained there was only one inspector on the entire project. It will cost the city to have ils inspectors (lo the work but the benefits aren't readily seen, Schoenborn said, advising his department to assst with the inspection when runways extendedr are
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1 Strike Hits 1
Taxpayers I g-/ 4 "6& Locally

Lobby Empty "The lobby is awfully empty out here," Midboe said. "There are not too many people around. It also has affected operation of the restaurant to a certain e x - , tent." A year ago in July, Northwest Airlines emplaned 1,731 passengers - at Grand ----- - Forks. At the same time, North Central boarded 880 passengers a t the Grand Forks terminal. James Butala, local manager for North Central, said his line now has more passengers than I it can handle. "We're booked solid several days in a d v a n c e," he saicl. We're sold 01.11 four or five days in advance." 1 In June North Central em-

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Requirement ~ x p I a i n e d The g;eater length ; s required, according to Airport Manager Norman Midboe, to perinit landing of lalrge jet planes in practically any type of weather or runway conditions. He explained

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lthe planed nun~ber 75s passengers. jumped to111 1,310. ~uly I I "We could have had many more 1 but did not have the space," , Butala said. "I suppose we won't know how m a n y we've inconvenienced," The strike grounding five airsaid. "I imagine they're lines is hitting the Grand Forlts Midboe traveling by rail, car of bus-poclteebooks to the or not traveling." tune of about $1,000. He pointed out that even with The $1~000lost nOrlnally Is the sharp increase in traffic on realized in landing fees paid North Central planes, the total the city, Norman Midboe, Grand passenger load elnoluning at Forks International Airport man- Grand Forks was some 1,1 ager, said Tuesday. 1,600below the anticiaated July "We're probably losing about total of nearly 3.000. $800 a month," Midboe told the Closes Early Herald. On. that basis, of ap- The restaurant at the airport proxinlatelv $200 a wPalr. llle fol.merly was operating its busifigure in lost landing fees is now ness from 6:30 a.m. until about nearing $1,000. 9 ~ . m . With the striltebounrl not flying its late eve' Pay Landing Fees I ~ortliwest ~ ~ fees are ~ paid d by air-; i ning~ flight,~ the restaurant now its doors a t about 4 p.m. lines as a collcession for use closes Midboe listed another factor, of runways and facilities at the not hitting local taxpayers pockairpol?. These fees go into the etboolts, but affecting the Cusfund for operation mainten, toms Service. ance of the airport.

lised bv ~ o r s w e s Airlines t liltely would pass up the Grand Forks airport if the runway was s l i ~ u e r vwith ice o r from other I uni~ivo;able conditions. At 6,500 feet, he said, landings Federal Share probably would be made except I I Of Ci+y Pro jecf under very severe conditions of N~~ $1 77,000 runway or weather. City Auditor R. S. Niles estiMayor A. R, Magnuson was mated the overall COSt of the ex'notified Friday that the Federal, tension, including engineering Aviation Agency llas and contingencies at about $354,additional funds wliich will per- 000. Cost To Be Split j mit extension of the nortli-south The FAA would cover half of runway at Grand Forks InternaI this amount with its new authortional Airport. I Rep. Mark Andrews, 8-N.D., ization of $177,000 and the city told the mayor he was advised w o u 1 d foot the balance of the by FAA headquarters in Wash- bill. ington that the authorization for Northwest Airlines, when ap. the extension had been raised erating here, use all jet drive11 I some $64,000, which Magnuson aircraft, some being of the turbo said would permit acceptance of prop type and the others being the larger fan jets. North Cen* the low bid for the extension. tral Airlines, which continues to Early Receipt Expected operate while Nortliwest is idled A grant offer flam the FAA lwas expected to be received b e c a u s e of the mechanics' t r i k e , uses propeller type soon, hopefully before the City s Council meeting Monday night, planes of the DC-3 and Convair

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the co~ltractfor the-ex- 1 i y ~ ~ ' t l lFAA.s e grant offer is ir" job nlay be let at that ceived before council meeting, the council is expected to ''?fiihorization of the additional '$64,000 brought the FAA's parti- accept the offer, which then be. cipation to $177,000, which a p 1 comes a grant agreement. Tlien proximately equals the govern- the council can prweed p let the contract. I ment's 50 per cent participation Weather permitting, city offiin the runway cost. The low bid which was submit- cials hope the extension job can ted by the Northern Improve- be complekd this year. ment Co., Fargo, was $289,462.94 for a 1,200 foot concrete strip which would lengthen the run-

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through paid landing fees, it must be made up m Other sources of public funds. The strike effects only Northwest Airlines here. North Centr.1 is not struck and continues its operations.

With Northwest not landplanes for the uast flve this sharplv illcreases other ,,lanes goillg . - ..-.
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Agenda

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Ci+y Cou~cilMee+inq Monday, AuqusC 15, 1966

Norfhwest

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ROLL CALLP READING A N D APPROVAL July and August 1, 1966. MIMUTES:

Awarded
The contract for lengthening the no1 th south run~~n'ay at : Grand Forlts International Airport was awarded to Northern I~nprovernentCo., Fargo, by the a't an adjourned I City lneeting Weclnesday Northern's low bid of $289,462 had ,,eel,, sublnitted at the July 18 meeting of the council but the award had been delayed while certain legal inodii~cationswere made to conform to requirements of the Ferleral Aviation Agency. The main sticker was a paragraph contained in a contract, between the city and G r a n d Forks Airniotive, Inc., a fixed base operator at the airport. Objection Removed 1 This objection was removed 1 and the way cleared for letting' the contract when Louis Gersh- 1 man, secretary - treasurer and j principal owner, of Grand Forks Airmotive agreed to deletion oil the paragraph in question. The paragraph read its lollows: "Lessor (the city) agrecs thal it shall not enter into a lease with any new tenant under conditions and terms more favorable than those herein set out and as requirements in the fixed ! base operator rentals governing ( leases to fixed base operators, 1 1 nor shall a contract be entered! into with a similar type of tenant if it is obvious that Ike presence of an atlditio~lal conipetitor would result in operating losses for the fixed base operaI tors then in business on the I Grand Forlts Iflternational Air-, I port." 1 Change Agreed On ' The FAA agreed to the contract provision change which now makes the city eligible to receive approximately one-half of the cost of extending the runway from 5,300 to 6,500 feet to facilitate large jet plane operation. The total cost of the project including engineering fees; and other contingencies was es- I I timated a t $354,000. The airstrip is 150 feet wide, a continuance of that width in the present rlmway. The council also agreed to a requested extension of the license period for the portable VOR facility at the airport from the expiration date of Aug. 31, 1966, to Nov. 30, 1966. The facility provides directional information for planes in the airport area. A new facility is being constructed to replace the portl&le one. -

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PUBLIC HEARINGS, PETITIONS, REMONSTRANCES AND COMMUNICATIONS: Opening of bids on +he following projecfsr a. Expansion of water facilities. b. Sewer Project No. 1803, Airport Addn. c. watermain Project NO. 1873, AirpoPt Addn. d. sewer Project No. 1877, Valley Park 3rd Addn. e. Weferrnsin Proied No- 1878, Valley Park 3rd Addn.
Consideration of airpo* runw - --

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resume service at (; r a n d l Forks Monday if the airline mechanics' strike is settled Friday, the company's St. Paul office

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federal aid on the runway extension project at Grand Forks International Airport was received this weekend and will be acted on by the City Council a t its meeting a t 7:30 tonight at the City Hall. . Extension of the north south landing strip from 5,300 feet to 6,500 feet to provlde all-weather landing availability for large jet planes is called for the project for w h i ch Northern Improvement Co. of Fargo submitted the low bid of $289,462. I , Letting of the contract had I been held up pending receipt o f , 'the grant offer of federal aid for, the job. Now, if the offer is acicepted by the council, the con-/ tract can be awarded and the work can proceed. The Federal Aviation Agency participates 50 per cent in the runway cost. Also scheduled a t the meeting tonlght is the opening of bids for expansion of local water plant facilities to double the supply to Grand Forks Air Force Base. The pi-esent nlaxiinum supply to the base of 1% million galloi~sdaily would be doubled by the new construction of a water plant addition and other facilities, with tlie government footing the bill.

i a n striking ~ union ~ mem. ~ ~ bers was scheduled Friday in the long interval since Northwest 1 suspeltded service after t h e 1 mechanics left their jobs J ~ I Y I8 . i First flight service to be reisumed will be Flight 459, ter- I , millating at Grand Forks a t '11:14 p.m., upon arrival from Chicago, Madison, Rochester, Minneapolis St. Paul and Far&"= 1 The following flights a t Grand Forks will be resumed Tuesday: Flight 423, fro111 Chicago, Madison, Rochester, Minneapolis- 1 St. Paul and Fargo, arriving at 1 12:29 o'clock noon. will depart Grand Forks a t 12:55 noon, non, stop to Minneapolis St. Paul. I Flight 334 will originate at Grand Porks, departing a t 6:35 a.m. for Fargo, the Twin Cities, Rochester, Madison, Milwaukee, Detroit and Washington, D.C. Northwest's complete schedllle pattern will be resumed August 27 with the following Gralnd Forks flights added on that day: Flight 505, from Clevela~ld and intermediate cities, leaving for Winnipeg at 11:lO a.m. 1 Flight 437, from Cllicago and, ' intermediate cities, leaving for 1 Winnipeg a t 5:45 p.m. Flight 486, from Winnipeg, de- 1 ,parting for Fargo, Minneapolis- ( I St. Paul a t 8:05 p.m.

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I Cbnferemce Held On

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manent directional facility at Grand Forks International Airport has been completed and installation of electronic equipment wit1 be started following final inspection of the structure. 1 The facility provides directional information to airplanes in the airport area.

I A pre-constr~~ction conference was opened Friday noon at Grand Forks International Airport concerning construction 01 a 1,200 foot extension of the I north-south runway. In attendance were representatives of tlie Federal Aviation Agency, airlines, the consulting engineer, flight senrice station and others. The plloject wilI extend the 5,300foot air strip to 6,500 feet. Northern Improvelnent Co. has the runway contract and Edling Electric of Moorhead, Minn., has the contract for runway lighting.
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Head Toward Norma


NEW YORK' (AP) - The air- theaters, nightclubs, transportatravel industry and businesses tion and other pleasure-oriented dependent on it moved quickly toward norinal operations Sat- services. urday in the wake an agree- The Hawaii Visitors Bureau merit ending tile biggest airlines estimated the island state's strike in history. I losses a t a minimum of $13 mil- 1 Mixed with the long-abesnt lion and said there was a loss of roar Of jets. in many ci)ies were 22,000 visitors in ~ u g u s alone. t sighs of relief from businessmen which was looking weary of rows of empty restaua best-ever summer rant tables, half filled hotels, slowed deliveries and trans- tourist season, estimated losses portation bottlenecks. in the rnetrooolitan area alone The five major airlines Bl~ut a t $2 million a day. down for 43 days by a Machin- Other seriously affected cities ists union strike resumed service smoothly during the morn- included Chicago at $900,000 lost fllg hours. Little crowding was each day, Minneapolis at $165,reported, althaugh reservations 000; Kansas City a t $1 million, were heavier than usual for a including payroll losses from the struck airlines, and ColumSaturday. The agreement approved by bus, Ohio, which reported an 35,400 striking workers Friday estimated $1-million daily loss a t better than a 2-1 majority due largely to grounded execushattered White House guide- tives and slowed freight delivlines designed to limit wage eries. Similar reports came from hikes to 3.2 per cent a year. Benefits in the new three-year Detroit, where the auto industry contract include an estimated 6 views air travel as a convenper cent or more' annual wage ience rather than a necessity; increase totaling 15 per cent and Los Angeles, where one of over three years, plus a cost-of- the largest chunks of its $617,000 living guarantee against sharply daily loss resulted from blocked rising prices that could be worth shipments of perishable goods, up to six cents more per hour in principally foods and flowers. The five struck airlines the final year. As top-rated mechanics, Eastern, National, Northwest, whose average $3.52 an hour Trans World and United - have will jump to at least $407 within estimated their daily losses in U~reeyears, counted their bene- passenger revenue, mail and fits, businessmen across the freight at $7.9 million. Their country, particularly those in or striking and furloughed em. a total of 66,000 clirectly affected by the tourist ployes industry, began to add up their have lost an estimated daily total of $1.6 nlillion in wages. losses. Hardest hit appeared to be the - ------cities that count heavily on ' summer tourist trade qr sumnler conventions. The New York 'Convention and Visitors Bureau estimated a half-million-dollar loss to the clty each day during the strike's iirst week, and three-quarters of armillion each day thereafter, Hotels were bit with 25 per cent of the loss, the bureau estimated, retail stores absorbed another 25 per cent, 20 per cent was restaurant losses, 20 per1 cent in the sightseeing industry, and the rest was spread among 1

IRunway Pro

1 works Starts OR ;
Work on the runway extension project a t Grand Forks International Airport has started with grading of an access road to the work site and excavation for the extension is scheduled to begin Monday. Northern Improvement Co., the runway contractor, moved earth moving equipment to the site and was grading the access 1 road Saturay f r o m the airport entrance road to the construction area. The 1,200-foot extension of the main north-south runway will provide 6,500 feet of airstrip which is considered sufficient for the large jet planes in practically any type of flying weather, The extension will be on the south end of the present run. : way. EdIing Electric of Moorhead, Minn., the electrical contractor, will remove runway lights from the south end of the runway this week so that the excavators can work up to that point. Meanwhile the excavators will work in areas away horn the present runway limit. Plans call for completion of the extension project this fall , and 'contractors expect to do so, weather permitting.
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Northwest was one of five'nia-' ior airlines which expected to be back in sei-vice Monday. The Nortllwest Airlines office The other four lines - Trans at Grand Forks reported Man: \?Tprld, United, Eastern and Na+ day that advance reservation$ Uonal -reported normal or were building up steadily for near-normal service Sunday. the resumption of east - west Northwest said more than 50 pasgenger here in the wake of per Cent of its service has been the &day mechanics strike set- restored but did not expect full stxiice until Seattle - Honolulu. element. First flight scheduled was NO. ( flights will resunae later in the '459, the overnight plane from week. 1,600 American tourisis the Twin Cities arriving here at 'I ~ 0 m e Ed u r 0 P e began I 11:14 p.m. Monday. This flight 1 s ~ ~ ~ r ~ in d e returns to st. ~ a u as l flight 334 Streaming home aboard transat 6:35 a.m, Tuesday. , atlantic flights. Trans World's 1 first overseas flight brovght 145

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I Runway Job
in high gear Thursday.

Excavation for the 1,200-foot 1 dried out following the weekend feet to clear theway for the 1 the nOrth-south runrains and had scooped out 70 ~onstructionmachinery working 1

Excavation Proceeding $ 3 --~f.&k>

firmed up with compaction machinery before a final cushion of I gravel is laid on it. Concrete 1 then will be poured for the airstrip and the black dirt will be hauled fmm the fill piles to place along the edges of the runway. The extension will bring the overall runway length to 6,500 I feet from the present 5,300 feet. Width of the runway is 150 feet. I The contract price for the extension wars $289,462, with $13,094 for the lighting job. The overall cost, including engineering and contingencies, was estimated a t $354,000. The Federal Aviation Agency finances 50 per cent of the nlnway cost.

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THIS IS A VIEW of the new VOR ground statian a t Grand Forks International Airport which The VOR provides bearing informatioll to aircraft in all directions around the airport station. (Herald Photo).

1 will be placed in operation soon in place of the temporary truck-mounted facility now in use.
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New Airporf 8 - Faci A P - ~ Z ;i~f ,y Being Bui


hone of the federal airways nav.1 ly and an access road has been igation system. VOR is the a b - built to the VOR station. breviation for Very High Frc- Funds provided by the Fcdquency Omni - directional range. era1 Aviation Agency built the Very high frequency in thin station here. It is located in the case means 109.4 megacycles, northwest corner of the airport. urhich is in the radio frequency Campbell is station chief and spectrum between 108 and 118 Paul Bos~olettiis chief 01 maillmegayccles (million cycles per t m ~ n c e lassisted by three lechnlcians. The FAA staff includes second). w Omni directioilal means that I l4 persons. . -and distance frorn the station. the VOlR ground station provides, - - -- -. ollly &&ion inforination had 1 bearing information to drcraf t I been available froln old VOR along all infinite number of Statioll Of Grand Wrks (courses; in other words, usable bearings in all directions around The Federal Aviation Agency An analysis of general avia, aQd from .the telllporary, truck. has planiied an a i r safety" tion accidents during the Friday I mounted facility which took its lhe I The present temporary VOR, icampaign for the Labor Day through Tuesday Labor Day place at the airport. weelrend. T . , ~distance information will which has 111.2 megacycles, will weekends for 1963, 1964 and 1965 FAA says the campaign is di- showed there were 307 accidents give additional aid to airlines be decommissioned when the 'rected to a special audience in the 15 days, 30 of which were and military and e x e c u t i v e new unit goes into action. I'pilots - and that it is not a fatal crashes with 47 (lead countF,i!lishing work on the new 1 p l a ~ e s , although it will not be .scareu cainpaign but a posi- ed. 1 required by light craft, Camp- building was completed recenttive approach with the theme The greatest number was I bell said. Pilots can read the1 "Flying is Safe - Let's Make it caused by failure to maintain distance from the s t a t i o n by Even Safer." adequate flying speed, resulting merely referring to a dial on Cooperating with the aviation in stalls and loss of control in their instrument board. industry, the FAA asks all pi- the approach phase. I Government inspectors will lots t6 be especially alert dur- The second greatest factor inlcheck out the new station beillg the Labor Day holiday peri- dicated lass of directional confore it is placed in operation. / od. They are asked to watch for trol on the ground through misIt then will take over the funcI other aircraft, use checklists, use of brakes and or flight contion of the temporary unit nowl fly safely and land safely. trols. .._-_-________-___ --.--.-.i n u s e The VOR is the back- 1 Installation of electronics gear in the new VOR facility at Grand Forlts International Air1 port has been started and a tentative operatiollal date of Sept. (26 has been announced for the ' facility. Station Chief G . W. Campbell said the new station will provide pilots with both direction

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HUNDREDS OF WHITE BIRDS hover over the area in which huge graders and earth movers are stripping the black dirt / cover from the site of the 1,200-foot runway extension a t , Grand Forks International Airport. Northern Improvement CO.,

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tr p ing of black dirt from the north - south runway exten' sion site a t Grand Forks International Airport has been finished and clay fill is being placed and compacted in the runway area and the taxiway extension, Norman Midboe, airport manager said. The present 5,300I foot runway is being lenthened to 6,500 feet. Work crews worked through Saturday and Sunday to take advantage of the warm, dry weather. -

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Far&% oiig e job which will extend the north-south runway from 5,300 to 6.500 feet. When the excavation is done, clay will be filled in and compacted before concrete is poured for the 150-foot wide runway. (Herald Photo).
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SEPT. 12, 1966

*Runway Exfension Job


The r u n a w ay exte sion at j Grand Forks International Air- 1 port aud two road the immediate local prepared for pavlng within short time. ~t me airport, compaction of the clay fill for the 1,200 - foot extension bas been finished and now is ready for laying of a gravel sub-base preliminary to pouring concrete, Work crews have begun gradin$ a gravel haul road to bring1 in the gravel' I Concrete pouring may get under way some time nexl week if weather continues favorable. . The taxiway strip paralleling the north - south runway is being extended to bring it along) side the new runway exlension. With favorable weather, the runway extension could be in use I within a in o n t h and a half, it was anticipated by those in charge. The extension brings the present 150-foot wide' runway f r o p ,5,300 feet $0 0,500 feet ic? the I length. I Mea~while,other paving proparations were pushed ahead at the Washington St. underpass and the two mile stretch of U. S. Highway 2 west of Columbia. A gravel cushion was being laid a t bpth sides and paving will follow.

1 progressing Rapid a
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Reduces Flights
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-7-$k ApproximPtely 750 Teet of 1,200- foot runway extension b e ing constructed a t Grand Forks International Airport has been excavated, filled and compacted, /according to Norman Midboe, airport manager. Gravel for the I sub-base will be added followiilg I coinpletion of the compaction 1 worlr and pouring of concrete for the runway will follow. The j tnorth - south runway is being extended from 5,300 feet to 6,500 feet. 1
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Contractors at ~ 6 n d Forks International Airport expect to begin pouring the 1,200 foot, north south runway extension "--early next week. About one half of the gravel fill I -20Airport ~ e ~ l a ? ~ p ~ r o v % had been laid Wednesday. ~ u r - 1 ing the construction work, the Adopted on final reading was north bound fan jet flight of an ordinance a m e n d i n g the Northwest Lines to Winnipeg street and highway plan to in, and the non-stop rvturn flight clude public rights of way on have been discontinued. The the Replat of the Replat of the flights a r e to be resumed When Airport Addition dated May 2, the runway is fini'shed. Other 1966. The ordinance was acbot- I Northwest Airlines service is by ed to h e l ~ clear the wav for s i l e I ' turbo-jet planes, which have of prop&ty in the aid airport been continued in service. There area which will be bisected b y , has been no change in the North new Interstate Highway 29. ' Central Airlines operation. The couucil approved a plan ' North Central uses propeller to move t l ~ e large hangar from I planes. the old airport to the G r a n d Forks International Airport a t a cost of about $48,000. The low bid of $1 per cubic foot, submitted by Northern Im- -- ---- I , provement CQ. for dirt fill on a I site for the hangar on the new Gravel hauling for t h e ~ t r b b 1 airport was accepted. The hangbase bf the north south ma-/ ar move is Bxpected to be made way extension a t Grand florks 1 ,in a few days. International Airport was poffi-1 pIeted Monday and the sb,eTCh, will be prepared thi~~~he$k fo'ol p~ving as soon as podiibl&!~ir.~ port Manager Norrhan ~ i d b o ~
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THIS VIEW SHOWS progress on the 1,200-foot extension of the 5,300-foot north-south runway a t Grand Forlts International Airport. The exten?&n will bring the total length to 6,500 feet of 150-foot wide concrete. T h ~ e estrips, 25 feet wide each, had been poured when this view was taken. Three additional strips of that width will be poured when the present concrete has cured sufficiently to permit operation of heavy machinery on them. Then the new strips will' be poured, two between the present three strips and the other on the east side of the extension. (Nagle Studio).
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Weafher Aids Airport Runway Job


Favorable weather has speed- ciently hard' to bear the weight quired to accominodate the larg-

ed construction of the 11,200-foot of heavy machines, the remaind- er size jet aircraft and is parextension of the main runway at er of the runway extension will titularly needed in winter when
Grand Forks International Airport, wit.h the job now 50 per cent completed, according to Lloyd Weston, local consulting engineer on the project. The half-way mark in pouring concrete was reached last week and a two-week waiting period now is effective while the cement is curing. When the concrete is suffi.

snow and ice conditions prevail. be poured. While thb first strips of c e Northern Improvement Co, of ment are curing, runway lights Fargo, which is doing the con- .will be installed. crete work, poured the first The total cost of the project, three 25-foot strips in three days. including engineering and conThe extended runways, with a tingency fees, is 0354,000, of total lenath of 6.500 feet. are which the federal eovernment 150 feet wide and will contain I share is $177,00bT 1% nl i l l i o n pounds of conWith favorable weather, the crete mix. exlension is expected to be open The nlllway exlension was re- for use in mid-November.
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assistance to indicate the dis- tion it has available. Both the ly had arranged to purchase !, Direcfiona 1 1 tance of planes from the air- VOR and the flight service sta- jet fuel here after its jets be/ port. tion are part of the FAA's na- gin operation at the local airOther advantages, available tionwide ,port. First of the NW jets will now, or to come later include Distance nleasuring equip- i be a fan jet north - bound plane Facilities a 150-foot, north - south runway extellded to 6,500 feet in length i ment presently is'being installed I on the st. Paul - Winnipeg ; due for service this montll, in the VOR and soon will be flight. On the return trip, this, MOdernized and jet fuel facilities to be installed; available to pilots. 'plane fIies non-stop from WinniI

this fall. UNICOM (voice Corn- Cable has bee. Insta1l.d for pep to St. Paul, Willgs over Grand Forks 1 munication) station operated by the 1$00 foot extension of the Peters011 of Northwest said jet powered and guided by ultra city employes which will pro-! north - south runway and light that a i r 1i n e has arranged to /modern directional facilities for vide such special services as / fixtures are being installed, 1f gradually replace its Lockheed ; I pilots - have entered the picture ,hotel reservations, taxicabs etch permits, the runway1 Eleclra prop jets with Boeing 727 a t International Airport here. , t o incolning pilots. I will be striped with center and full jet planes as they become I It's a long trail yet to full jet 1 Add to these a relnodeled 150 threshhold s t r i p e s. The lat- available and for use here as /operation here but airlines chiefs 2 T foot hangar from the old 1 ter stripes consist of a series of,business volume indicates. He , say it's coming, within two to CltY alrPort to be llloved to the 1 stripes parallel with the runway said four ~Electraswhich prevthree years, depending on jet new airport, and then fop it all which indicate the location of the iouily stopped here had been !engine priorities for the armed with an expected gain in Pas- end of the runway for the guid- sold and new fan jets ordered senger trafflc 1n 1967 for both ance of pilots landing on the but the conversion to jets has services. Northwest and North Central airstrip. Right now, a brand new VOR, !been slowed by national defense / / --- -.-. /facility, commissioned in Octo! The move of thehangar from a;ders which Lake priorily over' x i r j i n ~~~h~~~ e Gains ber, is providing directional aids the old airport must be made:con~mercialjet orders. Delivery Both airlines inanagets, Howto pilob entering the airport soon will offer a d d g a d Petersorl for Northwest, and on hard frozen ground and will time on these orders has been I J m X S Butala for North Cen- be done during December or cut from one to three months,, said. I he tral said this year's passenger [aanuary, according to Norlllan business ~ ~ C e e d ethat d of 1965 ,Mi~boe, airpqrt ~ ~ ~ North i h - Central's Butala sald and that the gains will be larger \HChfisbegun converting its gas 1 still as the conversion to jet work for the pound area of the ,hangar has been completed and *:weTed planes to turbo'jets and service proceeds. I The new VOR facility has re- also for an apron in front $ has ordered DC-9 full jets for placed a temporary truck-mount- the hangar. use later. He said the NC QPed station which ,served dur- A contract will be awarded eration was expected to be coning construction of the new I soon for 'installation here of jet wed to DC-9 full jets and Conbllilding. It's important function I fneling facilities to serve the in110 turbo props in about is an all - directional radio, :creased numbers of jet planes wo years, sending signals which can be [expected to serve this city. Two,----heard irom any direction (omni- 15,000 gallon tanks will be em. range) which aids the pilot in placed for this purpose. locating the airport. The fuel is called AVjet, which Can Exchange Talk actually is a highly refined kerVoice communication also IS osene burned by the big planes, 1 available to the pilot through Northwest A i r 1 i n e s previous'either the VOR facjljty or the ------.------. -=-; flight service station of the Federal Aviation Agency k t the air, port, The flight service station enables the pilot to talk back land forth with itS personnel and I to get whatever flight inforrhaid . .

By LLOYD C. TINPIES

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Mayor H. R. Magnuson has contacted district and area officials of the Federal Aviation Agency with a view to securing a Lraffic control tower and instrument landing system for Grand Forlts International Airpoll, I In a letter to E d w a r d C. Marsh, FAA director, ICansas City, Mo., Magnuson said: "We understand that just a few days ago you completed' the survey indicating that Grand Forks can qualify for an air traffic control tower a s well as an instrument landing system. I Without the instrume~~t landing system, aircraft very often have to pass up Grand Forlts International Airport." The mayor told Marsh that "We have just completed a 1,200 foot runway extension plus,I other improvements to our taxi area and now feel that with the addition of the tower and instru- I ment landlng system jet planes, could land at our Grand Forlts 1 International Airport with very ' little interruption." He said he hoped "that you1 will analyze the surveys that ,have been completed as soon as possible. Our need for this traffic control tower and instrument landing system is very urgent arid ~ere~pectfu'lij;-1~u&; that you, interpret these surveys in the most favorable light.'' I A copy of the "letter was sent to Lyle K. Brown, FAA area manager, Minneapolis. T h r e e surveys have been made at the local airport to determine ale minimum nuinber of flights per year. F 1 i g 1 1t s counted in the surveys inclucle landings and take - offs ill ilights 1 of 25 miles or more. One fan jet fligllt will be stop' pilig at the local airport a s soon as the newly poured runway extension is sufficiently cured and lighting has been illstalled for the extension, Airport Manager Norman Midboe said. H e , 'said he hopes this might be by the end of next week but weather conditions might affect the time of the opening. The flight scheduled to stop here is a northbound f 1 i g 1 1t from the Twin Cilies to Winnipeg, Within the next two years or so, both North Central and Northwest Airlilies expect lo o p erate additional fan jet and prop jet plalies here.

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THIS IS THE new VOR (omnirange\) facility at Grand Forks International Airport which provides vital information to pilots entering the airport area and helps direct them to a safe landing. The tall cone-shaped tow<r above the main building houses the antenna lor directio~~al guidance and distance measuring equipment. The former enables a pilot to point. his plane toward the airport and the latter measures the distance to the airport. Operation of the facility is supei-vised by Paul Bossoletti, who has charge of the airways facilities system at the airport. G . W. Campbell is station chief a t the flight seivice building on the airport which o p r ales in connection with the VOR facility to provide a variety of information for pilots. Both the FSS and VOR are part of Lhe natio~~wide system operated by the Federal Aviatio~l Agency. (Herald Photo).
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the Mmneapolis FAA area, not visible at rear. The gear shown in the pikturc is comparable~~o radar and plpvifles the dis- Lance meawrips oeratiqn.

1 City Airporf Request


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The national Federal Aviation I Agency will consider including in the new budget Grand Forks1 / request for a control tower and 1 instrument landing facilities at , International Airport here. Mayor H. R. Magnuson has been so informed by U.S. Sen. I Milton R. Young and Rep. Mark Andrews of North Dalrota, who said they will do everything j they can to have funds approved for the new facilities. Grand Forks airport officials said they understand a control tower would cost possibly $500,000 or more and that instrument landing equipment might cost near the same amount.

Graild Forks International Airport will be considered for establishnlent of a control tower and illstrument landing facilities Mayor H. R. Magnuson was informed by Edward C. Marsh, Central Region director of the Federal Aviation Agency, Kansas City, Mo. Marsh said an October traffic survey "indicated we should expect 25,080 itinerant operations at Grand Forks during calendar year 1966." A location having 24,000 a n n u a 1 itinerant operations is a candidate for control tower service. ' When the next budget recommendations are prepared, careful consideration will be given to establishing the service at Grand Forks, Marsh said. "We will also consider recommending establishment of an instrument landing system during the next budget preparation,"' Marsh stated. To qualify a s a candidate for an instrument landing system, I an FAA tower location must have had 700 annual instrument approaches over three continuing periods. Grand Forks met this requirement for the last two / peri0ds calendar year 1965 and fiscal year 1966. "It appears," Marsh said, "that Grand Forks will meet the three year counting requirement for candidacy in Jan- I uary, 1967. However, the prerequisite tower will not yet be available. "W h e n a determination is made regarding the tower, we also plan to recommend the instrulnenr landing system in t h e , same Program year, ,providing it does meet this counting rea s anticipated.'.

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Eigl~tNorthwest Airlines pas- I sengers, "leftovers" frow the Monday blizzard, took off ill 1 clear, cold weather Tuesday / morning after being stymied by zero visibility in their attempted take off the previous day. I The passengers boarded the I glalle Monday for a southbound flight when the storin suddenlly became thiclrer, with increased ' wind velocity. i The pilot taxied the big plane to the apron within 150 feet of . the terininal building. But the passengers couldn't see the building for Ilylng snow. So a couple of station em. ployes made their way to the - - - -- - plane and led the passengers back to the terminal building., I t wasn't easy -In the high I LEGAL NOTICES . -. ~. .. . .. . - The large hangar on the old wind with no visibility but yvr.m=roiv Fon urns (4 PRO.JECT NO. I R Y ? they made it. Scaled bid? for '5onseruc1inn of nlorriclr: Grand Forlrs Airport will be Airport Manager N o r m a n n llatificr WIII be r r c c ~ v e d until .l:~nu;,ly moved to the new I n t e r ~ ~ a t i o n ~ l I(' 1967 a t :,:OD o'clock P M. hv tllc Miclboe inanlied a si~owplowuno,;irlersidned in 111s office in illc ~ i l v 11.ii1. Airport this winter as soon as I Oranti Forks Nort'l nalmt? after which til midnight Monday to help time ~ I I C Ywill bc i r e s c p t e i ' t o Lhe mcm- . arrangements for the illove call 1 hcrs of tl!o Cilv Councll. clear the runways of drifted be completed, Airport Manager ' Descriollon of W o r k Movln a 100 font hi1 153 foot hanger snow. They were clear Tuesday rmn~ he a1spol.t to tile New Air, Norman Midboe said. The laminort. and both Nortl~west Airlines and / nated wood building is 150 by 100 Pu.imin:ition or, Bid,Documenls. P'ihis and snoc~Ilcat~ons arr! or! 'Tile rind f North Central Airlines liad no in size. I tlia\: hc obtnincd nt the ofl.icc 01 tnc Citv A11rl111rr Grilnd Forks North Dakotn and as flights went nt tlic nfiicr of IIIP d t v Ennineor. Grand 11 ..-..... -. . . .. -; An airport locatioll having 24,000 annual itinerant operations is a candidate for control tower service and Grand Forlis already has met this requirement, according to Airport Manager Norman Midboe. Previously, E. C. Marsh, Central Region director of the FAA, Kansas City, Mo., said it appeared that Grand Forks will meet the three year counting requirement for candidacy in Januarv, 1967. He said that wllell a cletermination is made regardiilg tlie tower, his office would recoinmend the instruinent landing system in the same progranl year.

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Forks. Norlli Dal[ot;l. ARNE B, LOVEN

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istrator a t Washington, that "budget restrictions for the next fiscal year do not perniit our including these facilities in our current budget request." McKee said, "The competing demands on the federal budget have been outlined by the President particularly in the area of construction starts. As a result, there are no requests for new air traffic control towers or instrument landing systems in the c u r r e n t budget estii mates." The facilities, however, were . The Monday said by McKee to bc "part o( down a wood and ollr long tern1 construction you may be assured ~~~~~~~~S a be and will considered in our budget port. Inside the shelter, work- request at such time as the ov. men were preparillg to begin in- era11 fiscal constraints permit." stallation of jet fuel facilities. ~h~ two facilities had been es. The equipment for the facilities timated to cost about $1 nlillion had been stol'ed on the base and would bring the airport, reacly for the job to Start as Soon here to a high level a m n g simd a s possible. I n c 1u d e d were ilar installations in cities of this P~111ps,filters, piping and other size jn tile nation. items. Another shelter must be, , . set up if any installation work I ls done this winter

Grand Forlis City's request for a n airport tower facility and instrument landing system at International Airport here was not included in President Johnson's new budget, according to word received here from Sen. Milton R. Young and Rep. Mark Andrews of North Dakota. Mayor FIugo Magnuson said the infonnation s t a t e d that Young and Andrews had been informed by Williain F. McKee, Federal Aviation Agency admin-

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The council awai ed t the low bidders the contracts for building footings for a hangar on Intel*national Airport and for moviilg the large old hangar on the old airport to the new airport and placing it on the footings. Hangar Contracts Awarded The successful bidders were James Walford, Grand Forks, $10,413 for the footings, and R. P. Swangler, Grand Forks, $26,500 for moving the hangar. The footings will be built next summer and the hangar will be moved next winter. A stop sign on Fifth Avenue S. at the old Municipal Park alley was ordered removed because it has 1 1 0 furlher use since the old grandstand was taken down and new road was laid through I-the ball ~ a r !. -

SaIe of the land already has begun and iuany inquiries have I bee11 received. The first sale 1 was made to Holiday Inn, which, bought 7.11 acres in tlle northeast corner of tlle area for $125,-1 000. It was a choice location ad-1 joining U.S. Highway 2 on the north and Interstate Highway 29 on the west. Two other parcels were reported in the process of i being sold. I Other indust14ial land, located I just south of the airport proper-, ty, also is available through the Grand Forks Chamber of Corn-; merce. The brochure already has been inailed to real estate firms, banks, savings and loan io~tiiutions,builders, developers a\% others who may he interested in acquiring property for purposes of business, Il or multi-unit housing. Adequate Parking Shown 1 Adequate parking has been J designated in the land plat and water and sewer lines already have been laid through the I nort 1 1 area of West Park to 1 / serve Holiday Inn and others who ivay locate in the district. Other water and sewer lines will be laid this summer to I serve the balance of the area. iEsti~nated cost of tlie service ,lines is $369,000 plus. Land Areas Designated The land for sale breaks down into aoororimatel~ 1 5 1 acres owned by the city and DARK AREA SHOWS OLD AIRPORT LAND OFFERED FOB SALE about 235 acres owned by the Great Northern Railway Co., all of which is being olfered for sale by the Finance Committee of the council. Acreage assigned to various 1 areas includes: Service businesses, 22.07 acres; limited busi' ness 29.85; multiple family residence ( h ig 11 density), 11.28 acres; service business and busAbout 400 acre: of the old The Finance c h i n i t t e e of the iness compatible with light inGrancl Forks Airport has been Grand Forks City Council has dustry developments, 55 acres named West Park, a district invited Pro~osals for the Pur- 1 has been mailed or furnished to and 10.6 acres, shopping center which .hopefully may become a "lase Of West'nulnerous business firnls and business district, all in the citysegments. self-sufficient segment of the o w n e d portion. The railwayresidential, conl- Other interested Persons. Desirable city with facilities complete owned segment includes 33.61 lllercial and industrial use lands The brochure is avilable with. acres of unto itself. limited iudustrial area and 236.54 acres for general industry.

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400-Acre Dis rict At O


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Northern Ralway traclts proval by the City Council. An attractive brochure of in- Sixth Avenue S.

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A pilot seminar a t the Grand Forks International Airport ter- i miilal building May 18 will "kick 1 off" the summer flying season here. Rules and safety while operat ing on and in the vicinity of the airport will be the program theme, according to Norman Midboe, airport manager and seminar organizer. Prograin Chairman Wayne Peterson, G r a n d Forks Air Force Base air traffic representative, has arranged for the following speakers:

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Henry LaBore, air traffic con- panelists Severence: W e s troller from the Fargo airport Calnobell, . chief of the Gralld tower, discussing control tower 1 Forks flight service station; Lt, operational procedures, 1 John Blanchard, USAF tower; TSgt. Harry Dunkerton and SSgt. James Greene, air traffic Jim Hanten9 Fargo$ and Petercontrollers a t Grand Forks Air son will answer questi~ns after Force Base, reviewing Air speakers have concluded. ' Force flying activities and con- ~ 1 pilots 1 and aviation intertrol procedures a t the air base ested persons are invited. Reand radar ser- freshments will be durvices provided the USAF at ing an intermission of the twothe base hour program. _ . - -- -- . Harold Nordstrom and Lyle Wicken, Grand Forks airport flight service specialists, reporting on direction finding equip- 1 m a l t and its use. Les Severence, Federal Aviation Agency, Fargo, discussi~~g I flying safety.

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Work Airport ~dv"i6e"s' Project ,


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Work on several projects at the Grand Forks International Airport has progressed in the past week although it was slow/ ed up by rain Monday, accord( ing to Norman Midboe, airport manager. Forms have been set for the foundation of the big hangar which will be moved to the new airport from the old city airport. Footings were poured previously. I Cable has been laid for the I flashing identifier lights a t the end o f the new extension of the main runway. The lights were I moved from the previous limit 'I of the runway to the end of the 1 extension, 1 Some ground work was done last week beyond the runway extension to provide drainage. The new National Car Rental garage, a six stall affair, has I been practically completed. It is a 24 by 60-foot metal buildI I ing. The rental operation is hanI dled by Rydell Chevrolet.

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Installation of a' jet fueling facility a t the Grand Forks International Airport has been completed and the facility will be the runways wag bein placed in use after testing has Equipment Co. 1 tween the city and the airport. beell finished, according to Nor- ed Swanson of by Fargo. A three-f~ot wide Chevrolet operates the Agency and Hansenthe Hertz service. / IDM) gallon lulderground tanks and pumping I Fuel will be

Opening of bids on extra work on a runway at Grand Forks International Airport and a call for bids for ornamental street lighting project in the Sunnyside Terrace Addition are on. the agenda far Monday's City Council meeting at 7:30 p.m. in the City Hall council chambers. The bid openings are on an airport drainage ditch and runway repair while the cauncit will --call--for bid3 og gllthere, - _ _A

Valley contracting Co. of Grand Porlts was awarded the contract for a drainage ditch, repair and joint sealing and fill at the Grand Porlts Internation, al Airport for bids amounting to $20,758. Meeting Monday evening, the City Council approved the company's bids of $3,311 for the drainage ditch, $10,2M1 for rcpair and sealing and $7,247 for

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8-aa-67

The Grand Forks city Council ' Monday night approved the sale of 8.1 acres of land on the southwest comer of W. 47th St. to Phillips Petroleum Co. h r $NO,000. The decision came after the council meeting was held up 20 minutes because of a lack of the 'required number of members to #vote on the sale. Two-thirds of the members must be present for shch a vote. The bid included a $5,000 check which represents a bind- j ing payment. In Airport Addition Outgoing deputy city auditor Arne Loven said the property is a portion of the old airport land which was put up for sale about a year ago. In recommending acceptance of the bid, the council finance committee noted that this was the only written offer / received. 1 In its bid, the petroIeum corn- l pany indicated it intended to build .a $65,000 Phillips 66 sewlice station and a lO&unit m o t e l costing about $850,000. The Phillips Co. sale was the second in the airport addition with the first going to Holiday *lmft$ l2lO N. 43rd St. for $126,!Ma. , . .

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1967 '1n Review:

ernationa Alrpor
ows Big Gain
BY TED FREDERICKSON Grand Forks residents have been coming and going more and have than ever before been doing i t by air, according to figures released by Ernest J. Hanson, transportation director of the Grand Forks Chamber of ' Commerce. Totals showed that 82,046 , passengers arrived and departed from the Grand Forks InternaI tional Airport in 1967 almost twice the population of the city proper. And the comers outnumber the goers. Passengers departing from the Grand Forks terminal in 1967 totaled 40,133, for a 28.0 er cent jncrease h e 31,$6 h 0 purchased tickets here in 1966. Arrivals for the past year numbered 40,913, 27.5 per cent over the 32,093 recorded for 1966. The increase in t i c k e t e d departures was the biggest since 1964 when 21,358 went aloft durh g the first Year of operation of the new airport a s compared with the 14.426 P a s s e n S e s I departing from the old airport in 1963. The last month of 1967 ended the record year on a record note, as Christmas travelers made December the biggest I month in the history of Grand Forks commercial air service. A record 7,957 persons stepped on and off airliners operated by

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North Central and Northwest. at that time the airport conOrient Airlines, the two major sisted of only two tiny shacks companies serving the area. which served as hangars." A record 4,062 boarded outgo- "And now," he exclaims, 1 ing flights in December a "we're in the fan jet business staggering total when compared and can hardly keep up with with the 4,233 p a s s e n e r s demands.'' ticketed for the entire year of Growth to Continue 1954, just 13 years ago. A consistent annual growth has been the pattern for the Figures Misleading The increase from 1966 to 1967 past* and can be the is somewhat misleading, ac. the manager. cording to Hanson, as the airline have exstrike in July and August of 1966 The usually peak months for air panding their services since the traffic - substantially reduced runway expansion from 5300 feet to 6,500 feet in 1966, the totals for that year. right now 14 airliners arrive and I Next to December, the summer-vacation months Of June, depart daily from the Grand' July and August provided the 'lights' nlost business for the two major Northwest operates liX with Boeing T27 jetliner airlines operating from the local jet-prop terminal, which is located about and five miles west of the city just service, while North Central has eight planes landing daily and Of Highway 2to install DC-9 jet Acmrding to the Chamber of early in February. , 3,873 service Commerce - Control Tower Seen I in 31571 In Midbbe also foresees thk inmonth and another of June 3r730 took in August. top honors The stallation of a traffic control tower by the Federal Aviation for arriving passengers lo2, Some 3,895 got off here in Administration sometime in the december, and another 3,845 in near future. "We've exceeded the 24,000 traffic movements required for a tower," says MidFebruary Slow boe, who points out that in adThe were dition to traffic control, such a February and May when 2,573 tower would probably include and 2,&193respectively, departed the installation of an Instrument the air facility. Landing System (ILS). month for incoming In the absence of an ILS, some passengers was February* when flights in the past have not been Off 'Omallowed to land in Grand Forks mercial airliners. during bad weather periods, but But if the winter months pro- have k e n able to land in Fargo, vide fewer passengers, they still which has such a system. manage to provide than The biggest building addition enough 'Or a p to the airport complex during Manager Norman and the past year has been a garaze his staff of nine. Bad weather built by ,Rydell Chevrolet to and Snow renloval occupy much house cars for rental. of the work load .for the airport To Move Hangar 1 Other improveme& now I11 C'qhings have really changed," process include the building of a says Midboe, who as a city Iounge, office and meeting room employee assisted in the con- for the University of North struction of both the old and new Dakota Flying Club, and the airports. movement of a large airport Formerly Used Skis hangar from tbe old airport to Appointed airport manager in the new. I 1960, Midboe recalls how North The huge 152 by 100-foot fraine Central's e a r 1 y commercial structure is to be moved intact, airliners, two engine, 12-seat and will be rented out by the Electras, landed on the old city as storage spbce for pri- / using vate aircraft and for s t o r h g , airport's sod runways skis in the winter. a i m r t eaui~ment. I "We pyt in 'the first hard- kccccprdiigA to Midboe, the, I surfaced runways in I942 and building will be moved sometime ; '43,'' remembers Midboe, "add in January. , I

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Mobil Oil Coro. has ~urchased I 4.6 acres in the bld rind Fofks Airport Addition for $78,000. Acceptance of the offer was v o t e d unanimously Monday night by the City Council. Mobil paid $5,000 down on the purchase price with the balance to be paid after delivery of the deed to the property. The transaction marks t h e (third sale of land in the 166.65 acre old airport addition and brings the total of sales to $303,- 1 I 000. Location Given Previous sales were to Holi- , day Inn, which bought 7.11 acres I , for $125,000, and Phillips Petroleum Co., 8.1 acres for $100,000. The Mobil property is located just south of U . S . Highway 2 between the Holiday Inn site and : Interstate Highway 29 route. Two Mobil district officials, from Fargo attended the. council meeting. They were L. G. I Wetzbager, district manager, and Jack Boyd, real estate representative.

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City Sells
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' /-/T-L~ A check for $78,000 was received Wednesday by Grand, Forks City Auditor R. S. Niles l which completed the sale of 4,a1 1 acres in the city's airport addition to Mobil Oil Corp. Niles received the check from Jack Boyd, Mobil representative from Fargo. The sale was the third such' transfer d land in the airport, addition, the previous sale being, to Holiday Inn which has built al new motel complex, and to Phillips Petroleum Corp., for a service station. Holiday paid $125,000 for a 7acre plot and Phillips paid $100,000. Mobil will locate a SWvice station between the Holiday Inn site and Interstate 29, and Phillips has acreage west of the Interstate. The city council accepted the I ( ~ o b i offer l last October but the1 'sale was not consuinated until 1 Wednesday.

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Hanaar Wi

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By LLOYD TIMNES What is the most clifficult long distance illove of a 1 a r g e building ever undertaken in the Grand Forlts area? One candidate for this distinction must be the 30-foot-high, 150 by 101 foot airplane hangar. on Lhe old airport which is being braced up for a five-mile cross country roll to Ihe Grand Forks International Airport early in February. Other Rloves Recalled One 01 the largest s'tructures n-loved in this vicit~ityprobably was tile large and unwieldy fairgrounds clance hall which was tiniberecl up and l~auled froill the site of the Valley Ha Trailer Court some years ago to its present spot in the central area of the old iairgrounds. That took a lot of dolng but i t onlv moved about a half mile. Then thert also have been towering grain elevators which often have been t r u c It e d , THIS BIG AIRPLANE hangar, shown partly buried In snow weeli for movement to the new International Airport fi' sometilnes many miles, to new at the old Grand Forlts airport, was being braced up last miles wesl of the city. (Herald Photos). locations, with little trouble except for the power lines they must pass through on the way. Cross Two Highways Getting back to the airport 'hangar, it must be rolled across two main highways, Interstate 29 and U. S. Highway 2, sweral sideroads, a nulnbcr of power lines and many ditches to reach its destination on the new airport. It is'n't just an ordinary building. It has lam i n a t e d rafters with no interior pillars, just wide-open spaces. The foundation of the hangar in its new home is waiting. It was completed last year. Even an automobile, or a truck might have problems traveling the cross country route from the old airport the new one. rucks Do pullu~g But using four big trucks to pull the massive, u n w i e l d y hangar across, the snow-covered prairie sounds like R gmd job-for someone else. The someoe else ia this clafie happens to be R. P. "Dick" Swangler, boss of Swangler Auto Wreckin;: Co., Highway 2 west. He has , a $25,000 contract with the city of Grand Forks to do the job. So he's stuclc with it-and he hopes tlie hangar will liold together lintil 1-le gets it lLhome." Swangler said current job of timbering up the base of tlie old hangar will take the two to three wekks if the weather is favorable. The moving job will not take so long, possibly only a few days. Cross,,Puwer Lines But to c~inplete the move, WORICMEN I N S T A ~ LHEAVY . cross timber s and spike in heavy planks to brace the woodSwangler will need the cooperaen hangar for its cross country ride to the new airport. tion of the U. S. Bureau of Rec- i ,._-_ I - - _ I _ _ - , ---------kd&-N_eU!~b.Elgc~

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1967 In Review:

mprovemenf s
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~ ~ J E i$10,860, S and drain ditch repair, -Sewer Mileage Given I$3,311. _ _ Sanitarv sewer lines totaled 6% miles: mostly in the city's MJRA~ nzmRY FEBRUARY 2,196W FEBRUARY 1 , Is68 airport addition which is undergoing development through the sale of its land and present I and expected construction of 'business buildings and others. This cost $421,069. Water mains were laid ~llostly in the airport addition and for a 1 new water line to connect with t the main to the Grand Forks AFB. These mains stretched out to , about seven miles in all, or 37,348 feet, a t a cost of $585,901. Three miles of sidewalk, totaling exactly 15,824 feet, was laid a t a cost of $38,373. j Lift Station Built I Also q new sewage lift station ! was built int he airport addition a t a price of $47,203 and remodeling of two other lift sta* SERVICE WITH BIG DC-9 100-passenger planes was inaugurated a t Grand Forks ~2lhwsday tions cost $77,796, One is located nxt to th% master lift a t the ! by N d Central Airlines. This fanjet airliner had just' arrived from Chicago as this picture north edge of the city and the was taken. In front a baggage handler trundles suitcases for passengers who boarded the other is just north of the former I plane and a t right incoming passengers have started to leave the plane. The new schedule American Bridge site, north of gives 50-minute service 'from Grand Forks to Minneapolis, leaving here a t 5:10 p,m. and arrivv Gateway Drive and east of the , ing,in Mim~apolis a t 6 p,m; The northbound flight sWwn k r e leaves Chicago at 1 p.m. apd I Mill Road. I arrives h GrAnd Forks a t 4:51 p.m. (Herald Photo), A new wet well, superstruc- 1 ture and a new standby pump ,were installed at the master lift I station and a new well and Refer Hangar R$q!tsjdg Attorney Explains Problem superstructure were built into Also acted on was a petltioil But Kessler said. Swaljgler 111e American Bridge Hft station. from R. P . Swangler who has could not have anticipated that Runway Extended ~-/-4l? the contract for moving the the east half of 1-29 also would Out at the Grand Forks large hangar from the old be' finished in 1967 s h c e the conInternational Airport there were airport to the new one. t r ~ c was t not leit until August 11, expenditures of $335,834 inThe exacting job of jacking up Swangler requested $ 2 ,00 0 1967. the 150 by 100 foot hangar in the cluding principally a $302,000 PaYnlent in addition to the Gach highway portion involves item for extension of the main 1 old airport addition to prepare it $25,000 contract price because of ad!itioml large ditches to cross runway from 5300 to 6500 feet to I for a move to International 1 unexpected expense he must and the approximate cost of ,accommodate large jet planes. ; Airport has beep started by the cover due to the completion last gravel filling to support the Other airport i t e m were contractor in cfiarge. I Year of @he bed for weigh~tof the hangar and rernovrunway repair, $11,434; earth R. P. Swangler, who has the Interstate Highway 29 which be ing die gravel af,te+ward would I fill, $8,188; hangar ioundationl~ moving contract, said it will 1 must cross with the hangar. be about $4,000. Swangler oftake s e w a l days or more to1 Kessler apfered to stand half of this cost or Attorney David mount the big building on rubber peared for $wangler, explaining $2,000 with the city paying Llie tired dollies for the five-mile: that Swangler's bid was sub- differences. cross country ride to the new miltted i n February of 1967 and The council referred the matlocation. he could have anticipated that ter to the public service cornFour big trucks will be used to I the west half of Interstate 29 mittee, the city attorney and the pull the braced-up hangar across would be finiqbed in 1967 if he city engineer for study and the Interstate 29 right-of-way had inquired of the highway 7recommendaion. and across U. S. Highway 2 and department, LAnd ~ l d e d & ~ e " r L111ebw g~ then , over country roads and ditches' 6Gught to 3e--C0un6iI'%Ttt. At the new airport, the hangar t e n t i ~ nthe crowded condition 01 will be set on a foundation which sthe qirport waiting room where has been prepared for it. he said some people have to "sit on the floor" for lack of Space. He said the space problem i s in* creasingly severe with the ad. dition of new and larger planes

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TEERUARY 37, 1968

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GRAND FORKS BERi


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A moving contractor is espected to have the hangar on the olcl airport: mounted 3n rubber lired dollies within a rew days for a n~oveto the new Grand rForlis International Airport. Lifting of the big hangar onto 1t.s carriers was nearly fiiiislled Monday and gravel was scheci~il/ ed to be hauled early this week I to fill a big ditch alongside / Interstate Highway 29 which ' n ~ s be t crossed in moving the new airport.
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This is otle of (1 series Hg MIKE CARRIGAN o ~ t i c l e srepoi.iing on fin? A 237 per cent exp~msion ill a!, itlga of Cornnl~lrlity AC- ,aviation clperations in the next TiON case stucly cornmil.- ; decade is ~~redicted for Grand tees. Abou! 250 citizen-vol- 1:orlis Internatio~lalAirport in a zinleers have been gather- Co~limunityACTION case study illg jucts a n d making rec- made public this week. omnlenda~:ions for. improveACTION volunteers foresee lnent in some 60 comnzun- many needed improvements in ity problem areas. the years ahead in order for the . . ~. . local airport to Beep p:~ce with er;pecte~l growth in ~. all . phases of
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Tlie comlllittee reconlnlended that R. P. Swangler be allowed I i m additional ~2,000 over i i s 1 1 $25,000 contract price for nlov- 1 I ing the hangar from tlie old city / airport to the International 1 Airport, five miles west of the city. Tlie allowance is o r gravel-filling a ditch alongside

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the aviation business here. The two c~lllllle~cial airliner serving Grant1 F o r b , Nortllwest 01.ient and North c e n t r a.1, boarder1 40,133 passengers, all - time Iligll last year. ~t represented a 28.5 per cent. illcrease in pal.ronage over 1966, the report said. "The increase in air service at Grand in r ec en t ye ars can b e; clemonstr~atedby the fact tliat ill 1 1954, only 4,200 p a s s e n ger s I boarded planes at G r a n d FOSI~S.'~

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iiicludecl in his moving job. ~ Water Analysis OK'd

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Pitometer Associates, Chicago, to make an analysis of the city's water clistfiblltioll systelll t o determine where it n e e (1 s 1 strengthening and where ad- i ditional storage inight be required. The last time such a 1 survey was made was in 1955. A meeting at the International I Airport to study overcrowcled / I conditions for passengers in the I administration building was appmvec1 for a date to he set later.
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Truclc crews have started filling with gravel the Interstate Highway 29 ditches which must be crossed by the hangar from the old city airport when it is moved to the Grand Forks International Airport five miles west of the city. Finn1 bracing was being done on the hangarl structure which has b e e n mounted on rubber tired dollies for the cross country move.
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hangar end. lor - end, and dmke the drive Shaft O n Olle of tile pulling trucks in the process. A shaft replacement was made Monday nlomillg and a lllQVe across liiterstate'~.~ighway 29 was ~~cheduled to come next. The roll across 1-29, lying about 200 yards to the west, was expected Monday afternogn i t all ----went well, or later if it does not. 4 Sets Of Gear Four tandem sets of moving gear are used for the hangar move. Two sets are located under one edge of the structure and two other sets bear the I weight inside the building. Each tandem set consis,ts o fa large truck trailer at the front elid and a n eight-wheeled rubber-tired dolly at the rear The big hangar on tlie old end. Grand Forks Airport is tirecl In addition to the tandem sets, rubber tired, that is and there are two eight-wheel dollies ready to roll across country to supporting other areas o f the the new airport, when the building during the moving weatherman permits it. operation. The 150 by 100 foot hangar h ~ s The weight of the 150 by 100 been mounted on rubber - tired foot hangar is borne on giant 18 dollies which will be pulled by by 18 inch timbers which extend large trucks across Interstate from the pulling trucks back to 29, then over U.S. Highway 2 the dollies. and west to its destination. Giant Timbers Buit: mww R. P. Swangler Much work lies aheacl after Isaid he preferred t b move it in 29 has been' crossed. The inless severe weather which would terstate's ditches were filled put less strain on the equipwith gravel to permit the hangar ment. croming and this must be So, when it warms up a bit he / removed and transfesrred to the expects to get moving. i ditches along U.S. Highway 2 Gravel fills have been made in before that highway can be the ditches at 1-29 and U.S. 2 on crossed. The moving of gravel i which the hangar will roll across ' will require an estimated three these obstacles. --_ -_ days. Once on the north side of Highway 2, the h o v e will be simpler, with the hangar rolling across country fields and ditches already filled for that purpose. The airplane hangar on tlie old Grand Forks airport was wheelborne Monday for a ride to the new International Airport five miles West of the city and it j took 112 large truck size wheels ( to do it. The work crew made the inday, turning the

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Moreover, growth of general aviation here in recent years "has been a t least equivalent t o , that exhibited by the scheduled air csarriers. This growth has in. cludecl p ~ i v i q f el y i n g , , agricultural aviation, air taxi 1 and corporate aviation. These activities have hacl a great influence 0x1 the ecorioiny of the region," the report sai?. The report noted 'that at present about 55 aircraft are based in Grand Forlts. By 1970, there should be 80 to 90, and by 1977, 110 aircraft lxlsed locally "if onr growth will be.!ypical d that predicted for the pation."

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The r e p o r t recommended thcsc additions a n d improvemeiits: - It is "likely" an addition will be needed tu accommodare a greater number of passesgers. I I Tlie terminal building "is now ltoo s ~ n a l l and crowded at times." Many airports today provide a meeting room for what has been referred to a s "VIP conferences." The report suggests sonic thought: belgiven to providing such space for a?riving businessmen to meet with ' local ciistomerh at the airport. - There is a "real need" for an enlarged line office a n d , ] pilot's waiting room. Th'k report called present facilities "grossly , inadequate.'' It also suggested direct (telephone) \ines to the I FAA, taxis, car rentals, nlotels and the like. - An effort BOUI; b e "vigorously" continued to obtain a control tower and Instrument Landing Service (ILS). "For three successive traffic counts which h w e been made by the Fedem1 Aviation Authority, our airport has met the minimum; criteria for the installation of

: ~ O I ~the I olti airport will ; !l-!uch gre:iter q~lat~tities of \mi!: a r c olien lorced l a 'go : 1 1 ' 0 ~ ~ l i ~ ., ' , flight rules in tlic arei~." 1 b~ll),hul. tllcr'i: 5'llC~tl!d be piilll- by :ljy. A[, the preselll tinle, (:j~lr i anti clierc js: othc~. sel,ious con< ', - I~llpl,ov~=d pl.ovision for fi1.e iii~ig lor ilicrea5eti facilitirs ail.pol.I:has no t:icilities for i !;i?"~tit711 ~i!iit~~ig iirriving > I I I ~ coritrol - illcludi~lg opera- co~ii~ni.n!;i~f~;lte with I;'le illiul'e : h:~ncIlit?i;:01 air fl.i!i[;Il(. 01, ?11)7! (lep:i~.iirl? :lircrL1fi. pr 1 1 I'll : ;E I:ional crash L~.LICIC! togptller ~ i t l .gl.~\~'th ~ oi a ~ ~ i a t i o ~ i . " i substz~nti:~lqu;~utity or air ex- slrc.;t~n ~ L I I - ~ N I ~ ~ I L SF? I . : ~ LIJI 1.)~ 1iel":ionnel (rained to opzriite ! -- 7 11el.e i a ~.c!:ll jt;l.. i.,l.css, ;,I, incl.ease i a i r taxiing jet. p1nnc.s ha:i c;i~lsed such equil)ment al'e neetleil. All ; prove(1 c o n l ~ n ~ ~ n i c a w i i i~I.~ !I ~ ~ majl," s ~ 2 : ~ l jlnpl.ovetl y tec]l- I appreciable ciamagc Irk ligl~t ai"11or~ vellicles ~tlo~lltl equip- \ ail.iines clurillg h11sy pe~,iod.;. ; lliqlles for l,anr:lling slch tralfic ail.craft i n [lie coligestcrl ral1:jr Iletl \$'it11 fi1.e estingllishers anrl liParLial so!lltions 11ligIit iiicludc: a l . e (levjscrl, tile reporl. 1 ase:i . . . and 11.3s 11ee1.1 the CBIISC? fire c011irol equipment. 1 using telej)lione 3 n s w e r i n s 0 , : s,iitl. .., "Our :iilSporl~iiatiagement O[ Iieiir accid~nts.The soluliolz - Recovery eqlliprnent to i services. or having k~rrivaltimes sholllcl be aler,red to tllese to lal.gely alleviate Ibis problena clear rnnw'ays quickly aiter an / atlnou~icecl over local ri~tiiostn- ileveloplnellts and sonle pl~ln: is to separate these two I.ype!j OE I accitlellC are needed. Plans j tions, as is being (lone in Win(I lljllg slloul(t le e d iln- aircralt: through the inst.allation should he devised lor all possible i 11ipeg." mediately io accumodate 'of paved taxiways anrl ail /I emergencies. ; - ''The fulure will ,qee a con- airport t.0 these tlevelop~i~ents." enlarger1 ranip ;Il'en. mil!? - Hangars are presently ( sidcrrble devclopiiieoi of air 1 , - "The present prilclite of 11s- pilots in this area regard Ihw 1 ove~~cl~owded, resulting i r ~ an ! freight and air erpl.ess. Tli~:il,1 Ing r~1iiwayslor all Lypes ,sf Lasi- ~ieeri 'For tasiwttys as more 1 "excessive amount of 'hangar too, the po:;t oi'lice (rlepartmeiir', in:: ailcraft is e x t r e m e 1 y 1 serious tl~anthat h r il control mrh! Move~-~~eiit of the iiirge is aniloubledly going lo furward! hazardous. Arriving airliaco 1 to\ver.''

many pilots who f!y l~llder visl!al I hangar

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THE 150 BY 100 foot Sl.anie hmgar from the uld Grand Forks airpmt was ready L o malie iiuother move in its five-rn#e cmss country ride to t8llenew Jnterilational Airpout when these picCuLres were .Laken.. The hangar had heal swung around and nloved a slhort dist:wnce buL was still on (he old airport. It was

ing .tihe Interstate the hangar goes inol-lh aososs U.S. Highway 2 and t!l~en west overland lo the new airpor't. This view shows the t.wo pu#ling I.ri~cks a t the front 61 the building. The edge ol the bui:lding rests on giant timbers that extend back to big ~ u b b c rti'red dollies inside the ~tructure,wllich bear {.he inside

Zi? 2 II Grancl The hangar from file old, Forlis Airport was par!ieci 1
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onc-quarl.er ~niles o ~ ~ t 01 l l U.S. ! Ilichway 2 :~St,er c r n s s i I\ g Interstate Highway 29 Tuesrlny. 'The hangar is being lnovedj about five miles wcst to t!le new IiiLernational hirporf. The move , will be resunled when gravelI filling of Hiqliway 2 clitches has J been co~npleted fo'r .the move i across that highway.
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fmnt pullAN EIGHT-WEIEELEI) do'lly at ri~gh~t bears the rear end ol f a tirnbe~ fraltn oilc of ing .&ucl{s. At left is another p1fll;ing t,ruc]c, one al two trucks inside the huild,ing Wlihich carry inside weight and pulu from i~nside tile st:ructi\re as L 1 1 e ha~lgilr is movt!d. (Heraid P h o t Q by ~ Iknnetlr K .
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A moving crew made lastTuesdav to minute preparations move the large hangar from" the old Grand Forks Airport across U. S. Highway 2 west of the city* Barring trouble, ,the move was scheduled to be made Tuesday afternaon. - "

The hangar which measures 150 by 100 feet has been parked just south of Highway 2 for about 10 days because of soft ground resulting from thawing weather. A hardrolling surface the is necessary permit a ato across country on four heavy trucks and rubber~tired dollies which bear the weight lof the hangar as it is moved.
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Some delay has been en. countered this week in getting the hangar moving because it was necessary to remove the gravel fill from the highway ditches when the weather warmed up, and then to replace the gravel and pack it down Monday and Tuesday. When the hangar has crossed Highway 2 it is scheduled to be rolled to the Grand Forks International Airport where it will be placed on a new foundation.
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The hangar from the old1 Grand ~ o r k sairport remained / parked Thursday on the prairie / about a mile west of Weekley's auto body dump and a short distance north of U.S. Highway 2. The movers need colder weather to freeze the ground harder before the hangar can be moved to t h e International Airport about three m i l e s farther west.
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THIS LAMINATED WOODEN monster was crawliilg slowly highway and traffic was detoured by state highway pntrolme~ across the prairie a@ouittwo milles west of Grand Forks Wedto a road one miles south dulring the blockage. The moving crew mesday, headed for irts destination on the new Ii~ternational hat1 a prolMem or two getrig Uhe hangar across Highway 2 A1Spont. It is the 150 by 100 foot airplane.hangar frolm the old to the novh side but they made it. Shorbly aftex this picture abpwt, complete with a heavily beamed laminated roof, 112 was shot, a front comer o f the huge load bagged down in a big rwbber-tiM wheels to ride on and a d d tavssed up inside gravel ditch fill and had to be bolstered with heavy timbers in whth huge t5mbees and s t e d cables to hold it Qgetihw on its the gram1 so it could proceed. The hamgar also nicked a power 9 m g rjde, The hangar sat actride U. S. Higbway 2 a short line pole above the highway as it passed under the wires but distance west of Interstate Highway 29 when this view was had no delay m this account. The job llow i s to get the hengar Itaka Tuesday aftemuon. 1 1 blocked most of he four-lane to i t s foundation on tl1e new sirport befor a e weatberman brings on anotlier thawing spel. (Herald Photo).
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R. P. Swangler was granted an extension until April 1 to, complete moviilg the hangar from the old city airport to !he new International ~ i r ~ o r t . ~ ~ 4 ~ The inove is being made under a contract with the city which expired March 1 but which Was, delayed by adverse weather and, other conditions.
Deferred consideration o n possible expansion of t 1 1e International A ir p o r t ad- j ministration building until additional information is sec ed from the ai!lines. 3 -I 9-6F -- --

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A moving crew was maklng

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preparations Friday to move the hangar from the old Grand I Forks airport onto its new fo~mdation on International Airport. Wheels beneath the building i were being adjusted in preparaI tion for the move which may be ' made this weekend.

The big wooden hangar from the old Grand Forks airport had been lowered onto its new concrete foundalion on the International Airport Wednesdav and workmen -were removicg the timbers on which it was borne across country to its oresent location. A new back wai~,new roofing and other repairs will bk made to put the hangar in condition for use. q - 3 -68
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THIS WAS THE SCENE as the big hangar from the old Grand

Forks airport finished its torturous five-mile, cross-country journey to a location on the new International Airpart, l'he 150 by 100 foot structure survived crossing of two main highways, several country roads, electno power lines and intermittent days of thawing weaklier before reaching its destination late Wednesday. Caterpillar tractors herped ptdl the monster buildlng the f i n ~two l miles of its ride and it stood 'rhursday a t a h te edge of the new foundaltion which has been prepared for it. -. -. -

The movers were adjusting the dolly wheels beneath the building so it could be moved over the foundation and then lowered i onto it. In spite nf a storm that blew out the rear wall, the I shell of the hangar appeared otherwise in sound condition. After the building has been lowered onto the foundation, the rear wall m w t be rebuilt, the big front doors repaired and I hung, the building reroofed, windows installed and other minor repairs made. The big job was done by R. P. S\vangler under - - a contract wifll -- Grand Forlrs-City. (Herald Photo).

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Zoning Referreda--7-6" Annexatio~l and. zoning petitions far University Heights Addsitio~l was referred to the Public / Service Committee. I The council granted a recluest by the University o f North Daltota. Flying Club for a discount on aviation gasoline ol 5 cents a gallon on gas purchases a month. above 500 ~ a l l o n s A low bid of $9,511 by Valley Lumber Co., for roofing the old hangar m v e d from the old city ailport to the new airport was) accepted by the council. Plans and specificalions and estililate of costs were ordered i and call lor bids June 3 was made on a S i r and apron

.the. hangar.

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MAY

12, 1968
I

ine Boardings U p Sharp


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Passenger boardings during April a t Grand Forks International Air,port were 40.5 per cent greater than tihe same month a year earlier. The actual number 0 f boardings here totaled 4,185 in April compared to 2,978 in 1867. E. J. Nanson, director of transportation for the Grand Forks of Commerce, - --- Chamber ------. , said among the various reasons / I for the rise in passengers, is that North Central Airlines is 1 now using DC-9 jet planes which I the firm did not have last year. North Central boarded 1,436 passengers here in April, up 1 from bhe ?dl passengers last year. In addition, Northwest Orlent Airlines also showed a rise in Passenger boardings. Hanson said Grand Forks has a faskf NorthWest flight to New York Citv which was n o t available -last year. He s a i i North Central Airlines now serves Kansas City, Mo., on, a flight from Grand Forks that was not available earlier, and ; has also begun to generate jn-, I creasing traffic an the north1 south route from here to Omaha , and Kansas City.
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'Spring, I Pi
Seminar Set
1 The second annual spring pilot

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Guest speakers will be Harold G, W. Can~pbell,chief of the Nordqtrom fmm the Grand flight service station a t the Forks flight servlce station; Sgt. 1 airp~rt, and Wayne Peterson, ' J a ~ e s Greene from Grand air traffic manager, will conduct Forks Approach qontrol, and a 30-minote slide presentation on Maj. Robert FOX,from the 18th "Aviation m e r e Career OpFighter Interceptor Squadron at parbmities Are &ight." It Grand Forks Air Force Base. a v e r s almost all career op-

1 Norman

Midboe, manager of Grand F o r k s International Airport. The seminar will be held a t I the airport Thursday starting at 2 p.m. . - - - - - - - - - - ~ _ _ - _

1 seminar, has been announced by

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at Grand Forks Air Force Base, will preside at the seminar,

Hangar Being54d -&a nsf rumenf 1/ Renovated Here Renovation of the large frame 1 banding hangar formerly located on the 1 1 proceeding old Grand Forks airport was 1 Monday a t its loca1
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tion on the new International Airport. Old roof sheathing was being ripped offf to make way for a new pre-painted panel type of 1 roof and other pre-painted metal panels are being installed on the rear wall of the hangar. The big front doors of the building also are being repaired and will be hung soon. They were removed for the move from the old , airport to the new one. , The roofing job is beling done ' b y Valley Lumber Co. which bid in the job at $9,511. Bids have been called for June 3 on construction of a new hangar floor and a concrete ;apron to connect the hangar I wibh existing taxiways. The entire hangar will be painted in a green and^ white color pattern and tranducent windows will be installed in thc roof which also will be green and white.
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Funds Sef 4.---'7-6 %

Moving
Bv LLOYD TINNES There's new hangar On Gratid F o r k s International Ailport that outdoes any similar structure on the airport. ' It can be-called new becuase all of the outer shell and the roof the 'OnCrete have recently been installed, leaving a green and white strucuture that adds m1ic11 to the appearance of the building area. You're looking right at the rear of the hangar as you drive into the entrance road to the airport. Trip Nearly Failed This new building, however, attained its present stalus the hard way, after a treacherolls cross colintry trip from the old city airport which came close to being a flop. The moving operations had to survive below zero weather and a tlweatening spell of muddy weather to reach the airport in battered condition March 21, The handsome hangar wlll store 20 to 25 local aircraft clepend~ingon a e i r size but it also will always have rc~omfor itinerant planes, according to Norman Midboe, a l r p o 1, t manager. Five Other Ilnngars There are 115 planes presently n!.ing five other hangars and 15 planes are moored o u t s i d e hangars. In all, they comprise the 60 locally-owned planes usI ing the new airport. The hangar is green and white overall, including the roof. The old asphalt roof was replhced with rolled-on metal roofing and the walls a r e covered with prepainted metal panels. There's a wide green stripe down each sidc of the white rnof which serves as a guide for incoming planes, - --,

Adven t u ~ e
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Contracts were awarded to low bic'ders on four 'special improvement projects and awards on eight other projects were postponed until the next meeting by the Grand Forks City Co~mcil Monday night. SUcces~fulbidders, their bids and location of the projects follow: . I i Valley Contractil~gCo., paving 'orthe hangar flooi, the roadway land apron for the large hangar receiltly moJec1 to the Intenlational Airport, V a 11 e y Contracting Co., $51,410. Swingen Construction C o , Water main r e d ~ c e o l e n ton Oalc Street from 13th Avenue S. to

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The Federal Aviation Agency in Washington, D.C. h a s allocated $128,000 for an instrument landing system at , Grand, F o r k s International Airport, according to w o r d received by the Herald from the office of Rep. Mark Andrews, RN.D. The system would b e installed and completed some time in 1970. 1 Mayor Bugo Magnuson con, tacted Washington officials in 1966 with a request for an inl strument landing system in a ,control tower a t the airport. There was no reference to the control tower in the notice received here. FAA officials here s a i d , however, that a n instrument landing system can be operate& without a control tower and can provide increased safety for fliers operating from the airport whether o r not a control tower also is in operation. Grand Forks officials hope to get a control tower eventually since an airport location having 24,000 annud itinerant operations is a candidate for control tower service and the local airport has met this require-) ment.

The Doors front Open doors 120 of the F ehangar z ': open to 120 feet width, wide enough for any plane in the area except the monster B - 5 2 bombers a t Grand Forks AFB. The hangar could hold four of the DC-3 type, 26 passenger planes or up to 35 small private planes, Midboe said. When the hangar left the old airport last winter for the fivemile ride to the new site, it was just another huge old frame building, 152 to feet In size. The building was laboriously jacked up and set down on 112 big rubher-tired wheels, on trucks and four wheeled dollies which carried the awesome burden.

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inder a new proposal would be 10.71 mills, The removal of s p e c i a 1 assessments for the Airport Addition from the airport and the placing of a nil1 levy would raise a e Defidency L e v Improvements from 1.03 to 2.65 mills. -. . " I

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Was Tough Move R. P. "Dick" Swangler managed the moving job which probably was one of t h e torlghest ever accomplished in this area. There were some breakdown$ during the move, a major one happening when a corner bogged down while the hangar was rolling across U.S. Highway 2. But the building was jacked up and moved on. Then when tho hangar wab only two miles from the airgorl;, a spell of warm weather turngd, the ground surface into quagmire. The s u p p o r PI wheels sank deep into the of the alkali flats and if the warm weather had lasted a few days more, the two miles might as well have been a hundred. ' The movers just couldn't have made it because it was strictly a cold weather job. Then came March 21 and it Pmved tho biggest: day of dl. . The rear wall of the hangar blew out in a high wind but then came a spell of cold weather and the movers decided it was now or never. They ,made a fast two-mile, move and the hangar reachedi its final location that night. Later the hangar was moved, onto a new foundation and nowj the walling up and roofing has1 been practically completed. The hangar will be placed in, use as soon as a concrete aproni llas been finished to connect the / building with the taxiways from, the runways.

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ald Pliotas by Ken Kleven)

THIS VIEW SHOWS the frorit of the hangar on wh'ich retnodeling was nearing

completietl last wcek. Some panelling remains 'to be insral.led abave the door;
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I Tile finance and bu"blic safety i


t ~ m m itee t of the Grand Fo1.k~ City Co~~rlcil will meet at 7:30 p.m. totlay in the city hall to consider a recommenda.t~ion .to the council regarding bids sublnitted for A four-wheel drive

2.,7g.il&;g* Remodeling of t le a I g e

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hangar a t .Grand F o r lt s International Airport has been con~pletedand tlie building now 1 1 i s ready for use, according to .Norman Midboe, a i r p o r t ; , j manager. He said two planes I already have been moved into l the hangar and that capacity now exists for any planes which I may require it as a result of an i expected increase in plane count ; I I in the n ~ x few t ITPRIS

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Course y - ; 7 p- & ? Given OK


BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) The aviation flight course that was initiated a t the University of North Dakota last year got a boost Thursday from the State Board of Higher Education. The board approved a request that laboratory fees for the basic flight course be set a t $125 and flight hours beyond the basic 10 be charged at the rate of $10 per hour.

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Prior to the approval, a n assistant professor a t t h e ,University told the board of its problems in getting the program off the ground. Had Protests i John Odegard, assistant professor in data processing and in the flight aviation program, said the in-the-air section of the course had run into protests from operators of alrplane instruction a n d maintenance /organizations because of an alleged interference with private enterprise. Odegard, a pilot, said he and others had conferred with the1 operators and agreed verbally the University would not interfere with maintenance of the aircraft, provide no air taai,or charter flights for the pubIic and use no aircraft from the l University Flying Club. i He said the university also i promiised not to enroll part-time college students in the program, give no lessons under the GI.bill 1 program and cooperate fully with the operators on an army I ROTC contract already in force.

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Failed T o ;Me,et : Odegard said the operators were supposed to'meet with him Wednesday and sign the agiee: ment but failed to appear. R e p r e s e n a t i v e s of t h e , operators went before the board. ~ h u r s d a y to lodge a protest agaiqst the program, .The board ~ a s s e d a . motion 1 that -the u n i i e s i t y could not sign any "agreernerlts with any 1 other parties regardlng how the program would be run o r who: , could participate in it.
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Airport Use Granted


By LLOYD TINNES operating on the airport they rangement must provide for the1 Permission to use the Grand should be considered. as fixed specified instruction only and; Forks International Airport for base operators and therefore re- that it be ratified by the FAA specified flight instruction for quired to comply with fixed for fear of some conflict which University of North Dakota base regulations, including a might cut off federal aid monw for .- the airport. students was granted to the building requirement. - -1 University Flying Club by the Airport Manager N o r m a n City Couacil Monday night. Midboe talked with FAA counsel The permit extends to JuIy 1, Monday, however, and they 1969, for use of the airport stated that in their opinion the runways and storage of in- University would not be acting struction planes, t h e ar- in the capacity of a fixed base rangement being subject to operator providing no services rafification by the F e d e r a 1 were offered to the public and Aviation Agency. the curriculum is part of the Fixed base operators on the regularly approved curriculum airport had objected to the ar- within the University, rangement based partIy on their. John Odegard of the Universiargument that the training pro- ty Flying CIub toId the council gram might operate in a m - that the club would give inpetition with the base operators. stniction only to students as They noted that the flying club part of the University course would train fliers, some of and that the club planned to whom might otherwise.be taking purchase gasoline from the city flight instruction from t h e and that their planes would private operators. receive any required servicing 1 The base operators felt that if from the base operators. the University planes were The copncil felt that the ar?-

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The Grand Forks City Counoil voted Monday to seek federal aid for construction of additional runway facilities a t the tional Airport five miles west of the city. Cost of the instalIation of additional parallel taxiways along the north-sourh runway and other paving items was estimated at upwaras of a half miuiop doIlars. f The federal government would share half and half with the city on the cost of the taxiways extending from the east-west runway to the north end of the, north-south runway and from the hangar area to the south end of the northsoubh runway. Also included would be four *turnoffs from the parallel taxi strips to connect with the Northsouth runway. The council authorized Mayor Hugo Mpgnuson in apply for/ federal aid on the project and to! hire the engineering firm ot Webstsr, Foster gnd Weston to 'survey the project and provide an estimate of cost. If the application for federal Sunds is granted, the city would provide its '50 per ,cenl share ,af ,the cost from the airport fund which will be sufficient to cover 1 the amount, the a u d i M s office 1 said. If more land is sold frbq the old city airport these 1 ' rectlip$s also would go Ink0 the / j airport Sund, . The appl$Qaf!ion fsr federal .&id m u s t be file& by Nov. $3 and any aid gran,ted .would ,Wrne fr~~ 1968-1970 ;1 ,fedprdil, ful'ids~ tor; fqonstrpctioh in 2989 6b 1970, go$ording,i to Nop)m g~(f$hy$

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port suffeis much the same malady as Pargo's 15-year old Hector Municipal Airport: Inadequate facilities. The reasons for building the new airport at Grand Forks differed from the pressing concerns facing Fargo officials. The old Grand Forks airport bordered the city's western edge. It was hemmed in, unable to expand, and its nearness to the city in turn prevented the westward growth of Grand Forks.
the runways. Built in 1941 to withstznd no more than the weight of a loaded DC-3 airplane, the runways soon became dangerous as heavier aircraft became the principal carriers. "Every s p r i n g," Grand Forks airport manager Norman RUdboe recently recalled, "we had to stop comrnerciaI flights for about three to four ~! weeks. With the s ~ r i n thaw, the runways became too sfmgy for heavy loads, and we felt it better to stop flights for a few weeks than to ruin the strips altogether." Annual costs to the taxpayers for repairing the runways were running upwards of about $25,000. Clearly, there was a need for a new layout, and after many heated discussions in City Council chambers, it was decided that for reasons of both safety and space the airport be relocated some seven miles west of the city. "UTe moved,'' said Midboe, "because we felt it would be chezper in the long run, and because we needed mare mom to expand." It was a wise decision, but it did not go far enough towand alleviating other inadey the phe~omquacies caused b end d s i ?of air traffic in North Dakota. The costs of b d w g the ney- airport at Grand Forks

\%-re the unsafe conditions of

Beyond these considerations

a place for the heavy commercial jets to taxi, we're going to ruin them. "No runways are built as solidly as the taxi-ways and aprons. Except at the ends, the runways are constructed of lightduty concrete. They can't withstand a static load, and for this reason the aircraft should be off the runway and onto the taxiway as soon as possible. We've been lucky so far, but if we don't get s o m e heavy-duty taxi-ways soon, we'll be facing the same troubles as before." Another problem: "Without adequate taxi facilities, we cail't m o v e traffic as we should. This may not be as critical a problem as it is in Fargo, yet aircraft movements are increasing almost on the same scale here.'' In 1963, the last year the oId terminal was used, total aircraft movements through Grand Forks (including landings and take-offs) numbered

We've got to provide a larger area for cars." What is Midboe's advice for Fargo as this city approaches the threshold of redeveloping its own airport? Simply these: "There seems to be no end to the rise of air travel. People today can fly to Europe for about $3O&maybe less in the future when more and more people begin to travel by air. "The problems we've encountered since building a new airport are being faced by every city in the nation. We in Grand Forks weren't totally unprepared, of course, and we are still working on our master plan, which runs until about 1975. Yet as far as building and redeveloping airports is concerned, I think the sky is the limit." If there's a lesson here for Fargo, it might be: Plan, but don't plan short.

ed quickly (above), as can passenger waitiig room, shown beIow 01%a quiet day. Grand Forks airport authorities are considering plan to add to the building.

According to Grand Forks Airport Manager Norman Midboe (left), automobile parking space at the facility is in such short supply that customers are parking on the grass (above).