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MSc

AEROSPACE ENGINEERING

HANDOUT

19 April 2011
DISCLAIMER: The information in this handout is subject to change. Further details e.g. about Electives, and amendments will be made available on Blackboard and in the digital study guide http://studyguide.tudelft.nl

Table of Contents
1. Programme overview 2. Master Track descriptions 3. Track core and Profile courses

Programme overview

Executive Summary MSc Aerospace Engineering


PROFILE OF THE AEROSPACE ENGINEERING MASTERS PROGRAMME
The MSc programme aims to develop the basic competences acquired in a BSc programme to a higher level in terms of knowledge, critical reflection, making judgements and working independently. In order to achieve the levels we aim for, specialisation is necessary in the MSc programme and students need to choose a specific direction within the domain of aerospace engineering. Since all the education and research is centred on aerospace vehicles, this apparent diversity is focused entirely on these specific objects: aircraft and spacecraft. The programme starts with a general selection in a particular field of aerospace engineering (the Tracks), followed by a refinement within this direction (the Profile). The mandatory internship allows students to experience the professional environment of the labour market and to make an active contribution to preferably aerospace related industries or research institutes. In many cases the internship is performed abroad, adding to the international character of the programme. Eventually, students carry out their final thesis work in a research group where they become actively involved with the latest developments in a particular area of expertise and come into contact with scientists and PhD students. In the curricular framework programme of the Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, the bachelor and master programmes qualify as independent educational programmes with the following profiles: Bachelor programme: Preparing for the masters Broad, balanced, foundational, cohesive, coherent Major theme: design Differentiation: Minors, Outcome-based education (talent scouting) Master programme: Educating an all-round aerospace engineer Coherent and specialised Major theme: research Differentiation: Specialisation, Honours Track programme Both: Effective and compelling The following key words characterise the new MSc programme: thorough and detailed knowledge of an expert field in aerospace; application-directed, problem-solving; integrating disciplines; develop tools and verify through experiments; international context; societal awareness

FORMAL REGISTRATION MASTER TRACKS IN CROHO 2010-2011


The names for the master Tracks: Aerodynamics & Wind Energy; Flight Performance & Propulsion, Control & Operations; Spaceflight; Aerospace Structures & Materials are registered in the CROHO list for 2011-2012 as Register Opleidingen van de Technische Universiteit Delft.

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Executive Summary MSc Aerospace Engineering


ORGANISATION OF THE PROGRAMME
The baseline has been to project one master Track per department and one Profile per section. Thus a transparent relation exists between a sections field of expertise and the master Track/Profile. There are two exceptions to this rule: The Section ASSET does not own a Profile but collaborates with Profile Wind Energy (kites) in Track Aerodynamics & Wind Energy Department Control & Operations with the Sections C&S and ATO owns one Track with three Profiles: Control & Simulation; Air Traffic Management & Airports; Air Transport & Aerospace Operations.

Figure 1 Master Tracks and Profiles and their ownership

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Executive Summary MSc Aerospace Engineering


The Head of Department is the Master Track Owner and is accountable for the Track. He appoints a Master Track Coordinator who is the point of contact for the students. The Section Head is accountable for the Profile. Accountability involves organisation, content, quality and feasibility of study of the Track respectively Profile. (Changes in) Tracks and Profiles are approved by the Master Track Owner and, after positive advice by the Board of Studies (OpCie) and Board of Examiners, authorised by the Director of Education and the Dean. The MSc Track Coordinator is the central point of contact for the student, for advice, registration and approval of individual study programme: the approval can only be done by the MSc Track Coordinator. He also refers the students to the chair holders or a Profile Advisor. Some Sections have assigned a dedicated Profile Advisor for detailed advice about courses and projects in the Profile, some others take the local approach where students address directly to the professor of their choice. The applicable organisation from student perspective is shown in the figure below, including the current names of staff.

Figure 2 Master Track Coordinators, Profile advisors and professors involved

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Executive Summary MSc Aerospace Engineering


PROGRAMME STRUCTURE AND DESCRIPTION OF THE BASIC CONSTITUENTS
A Track is defined as an identifiable field of aerospace engineering that spans across the expertises of the Profiles in the Track; a Profile as an identifiable field of expertise that is owned by a Section. The master programme Aerospace Engineering has a common outline for all Tracks. Each Track is composed of Core, Profile and Elective courses, a Master Orientation Project or Literature Study, an Internship and the Thesis project, all with a fixed size.

The Core courses enable the student to develop a broad view over an identifiable field of aerospace engineering that spans across the expertises of the Track and are essential for the Profiles in the Track. All Tracks contain the common course Ethics for Aerospace Engineers which is a nontechnical course about the awareness of the technical and social implications of aerospace engineering. The Core courses form a solid package of appx. 15 EC without choice for the student. The Profile courses are essential for the field of expertise of the Section and enable the student to develop a thorough and detailed knowledge of that field. Profile courses can also be produced by other Sections or faculties. The courses have a study load of appx. 17 EC and leave no choice for the student. The sum total of Core and Profile courses has a study load of appx. 32 EC. The Elective courses provide the flexibility for the student to meet specific interest in a specialisation in (sub)field of expertise or add multi-disciplinary elements, repair his deficiencies, or add a personal interest. The Elective courses are selected by the student in consultation with the professor. The minimum study load of the Electives is 14 or 20 EC, depending on the choice of a Master Orientation Project or Literature Study. Students can also fill part of the Elective
Figure 3 Programme structure
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Executive Summary MSc Aerospace Engineering


space by courses abroad (Exchange programme). A Profile contains a Master Orientation Project or a Literature Study, or offers both possibilities so that the student has the freedom of choice. The Master Orientation Project is primarily for students who do not want to develop into a researcher, but who want to be an engineer. The project objectives are the development and application of research skills, and familiarization in a field of expertise to get a sneak preview of what it means to perform independent research on a day to day basis in one specific field of expertise. The project assignment practices the theory on research methodologies, taught in the course Research Methodologies. The deliverable report of the project is assessed by the project supervisor (content) and the instructor of the course Research Methodologies (method). The project is supervised and coached by PhD students. The deliverable and assessment criteria are equal for all students, no matter in which Profile the project is done. The Master Orientation Project prepares the student for the choice of the subject of his master thesis. It has a fixed study load of 6 EC. The Literature Study is a preparatory research in relation with the Thesis project, with the aim to achieve maximum depth in the thesis in the second year. The student practices the theory on research methodologies, taught in the course Research Methodologies. The Literature Study in the first year has a fixed study load of 12 EC. The deliverable is a Literature Study report that is assessed by the supervisor (content) and the instructor of the course Research Methodologies (method). The study is supervised, coached and assessed by the future Thesis supervisor. For those students who take a Master Orientation Project in the first year, the Literature Study forms part of the Thesis project in the second year. In that case, the planning, deliverable, assessment and study load (typically 7 EC) are variable and subject to the agreement between the student and the Thesis supervisor. The course Research Methodologies is obligatory for all students and focuses on the key questions what research is and how to systematically perform scientifically correct research; which research methods exist and what can be the differences and similarities in research projects? The theory is directly applied in the Master Orientation Project or Literature Study. The deliverable output of this course is contained in the Master Orientation Project resp. Literature Study report. The Internship exposes students to a real work environment for a period of 12 weeks on a fulltime basis (nominal study load of 18 EC). It is a learn and explore kind of internship, enabling students to acquire professional skills different from those taught in the programme and has three main elements: 1. Company assignment (as usual) 2. Dedicated assignment about the Engineering Profession 3. Personal reflection on performance in the internship The assignment about the Engineering Profession is a search in the company about how well the it meets professional standards in respect of one of the following areas: sustainable development, project and risk management, value management, health and safety management, knowledge management, or about organisation sensitivity: an appreciation of how the business operates, of organisational culture, policies and processes. This search results in a 5-page chapter of the Internship report. The assignment about the Personal reflection on performance is not about the company but about the student himself, where questions are addressed such as: What did I learn about myself in a professional working environment? Did I discover unsuspected talents? Which points for personal improvements remain? How did the internship broaden my view on future career opportunities? Before starting the Internship the student defines his personal attainment targets. In a 2-page chapter of the Internship report, the student describes his personal reflection.

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Executive Summary MSc Aerospace Engineering


The Internship report is reviewed by academic staff of the Section. They review and provide oral feedback about the personal reflection and Engineering Profession chapters. The Internship cannot be replaced by studying abroad in an Exchange programme. If the Internship and Thesis project are integrated, the learning objectives and deliverables as defined for the Internship have always to be met. The master is concluded by a Thesis project (42 EC). The Thesis is always an individual indepth research or expert design project in the field of expertise of the Profile. Students, who did not take a Literature Study in the first year, take it as part of their Thesis project. In this case the outcome of the literature study is assessed as part of the Thesis project. A student can choose to take an in-depth mono disciplinary thesis project or link his thesis to a multidisciplinary project that runs with contributions and support from various sections. In that case the thesis project has its main point in one specialisation but it crosses over with another one. The thesis work is supervised by the chair who is owns the specialisation, and the project coordinator. Examples are given in the figure below, but the projects are indicative and to be confirmed.

Figure 4 Potential multidisciplinary projects for theses

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Executive Summary MSc Aerospace Engineering


SPECIAL ANNOTATIONS
Master students who are particularly interested in entrepeneurship or sustainable development can opt for a Master Annotation Entrepeneurship or Sustainable Development respectively. A fraction of the Elective courses is dedicated to this speciality. To obtain the Sustainable Development annotation, the students follow 11 EC courses related to sustainable development: 4 EC as part of the Electives and 11 EC supplementary, which includes the 4EC colloquium in sustainable development. The MSc Thesis project includes a sustainable dimension. For the Entrepeneurship annotation, the students follow 17 EC courses related to entrepeneurship: 4 EC as part of the Electives and 13 EC supplementary. The MSc Thesis project includes an entrepreneurial dimension.

Figure 5 Programme with Sustainable (middle) and Entrepeneurship annotation (right)

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DEVIATIONS
Graduates Higher Professional Education have an exemption for the Internship after completion of the Bridging Class (Schakelprogramma) Aerospace Engineering Graduates Higher Professional Education after completing a 30EC Bridging (HBO Doorstroom) Minor Aerospace Engineering, substitute the Internship by a predefined 14 EC Convergence Programme

Figure 6 Programme for HBO graduates with Bridging Class (middle) and Bridging Minor (right) programme

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Master Track descriptions

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Executive Summary MSc Aerospace Engineering


MASTER TRACK DESCRIPTIONS MASTER TRACK AERODYNAMICS AND WIND ENERGY
Master Track Coordinator Dr.ir. S.J. Hulshoff Room HSL 036 Kluyverweg 2 2629 HT Delft +31 (0) 15 2781538 s.j.hulshoff@tudelft.nl Profile Advisor Aerodynamics Dr. S.J. Hulshoff Room HSL 036 Kluyverweg 2 2629 HT Delft +31 (0) 15 2781538 s.j.hulshoff@tudelft.nl Profile Advisor Wind Energy Dr.ir. W.A.A.M. Bierbooms Room 5.21 Building 62 Kluyverweg 1 2629 HS Delft +31 (0)15 27 82097 W.A.A.M.Bierbooms@tudelft.nl

Short description of the MSc Track The master Track Aerodynamics and Wind Energy combines fundamental and applied research disciplines of aerospace and wind-power systems focusing on development and optimization. The track is of interest to students who want to acquire expertise with advanced aerodynamic tools (experimental and numerical modeling techniques) or desire experience with the applications of aerodynamics in design and sustainable energy conversion. The Track offers two Profiles: Aerodynamics and Wind Energy. The first is supported by the Aerodynamics research group, while the second is supported by the Wind Energy and ASSET research groups. Didactic approach of the MSc Track The student builds experience through courses, a directed internship and a supervised final research project. The consolidation of the theoretical aspects treated in the various research topics is made possible by a wide range of experimental and computer facilities available for the MSc students. Learning objectives of the MSc Track The objective of this track is to provide students with the opportunity to become a specialist with specific knowledge in analysis of aerodynamic systems, and the methods used for their application in design. The students will obtain a thorough fundamental basis in aerodynamics as well as in modern techniques to investigate such systems. Structure of the MSc Track In the first year of the MSc, the student follows core courses from the Aerodynamics and Wind Energy program, which is designed to provide a fundamental background in fluid mechanics and its applications. Aerodynamics analysis by means of experimental, theoretical and computational methods is also taught in the first year. Concurrently, the student follows two or three elective courses associated with a selected profile. After completing the courses and an internship, the student joins one of the research groups for a literature study and final thesis.

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The literature study and final thesis are performed under the supervision of a scientific staff member, working on a project of current relevance to the field. In some cases, the thesis work may be carried out in conjunction with a company or a research institute. The supervisor and project should be chosen early in the MSc to aid the selection of pertinent courses, nevertheless they can be defined at latest during the second part of the course period.

AERODYNAMICS PROFILE I The Aerodynamics Profile is concerned with the analysis of the aerodynamic behavior of aerospace systems for the application in vehicle design. The profile also puts emphasis on the development of advanced techniques for flow measurement, computation and active flow control. The profile offers courses on aircraft aerodynamics, aeroelasticity, experimental methods and CFD. Graduation topics range from aircraft aerodynamic design, aero-acoustics and the analysis of complex unsteady flows and their control to the aerodynamics of flapping wings and highspeed aerodynamics, including launchers and re-entry vehicles.

WIND ENERGY PROFILE II The Wind Energy profile focuses on methods and systems of energy extraction from wind. Both wind turbine and kite power systems are addressed. The profile offers courses on atmospheric wind conditions, rotor aerodynamics, wind turbine design, design of rotor blades and kite systems and of offshore wind farms. Graduation projects range from numerical wind field modeling and wind turbine aerodynamics to design aspects of large offshore wind farms, kites and other non conventional wind energy systems. Projects related to energy extraction from other moving media such as water currents and waves are also possible.

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Executive Summary MSc Aerospace Engineering


MASTER TRACK FLIGHT PERFORMANCE & PROPULSION
Master Track Coordinator Dr.ir. Mark Voskuijl Room: LR NB-2.60 Tel: +31 (0)15 27 83992 E-mail: m.voskuijl@tudelft.nl Profile Advisor Dr. ir. Mark Voskuijl Room: LR NB-2.60 Tel: +31 (0)15 27 83992 E-mail: M.Voskuijl@tudelft.nl Short description of the MSc track The MSc track Flight Performance and Propulsion (FPP) focuses on three research areas: 1. Aircraft Design and design methodologies 2. Flight mechanics 3. Aircraft propulsion & gas turbines. Didactic approach of the MSc track The students are guided to build their MSc track and profile specific knowledge through courses, practicals, and assignments followed by the Literature Study. The MSc is completed by a directed internship and a supervised final thesis project. Learning objectives of the MSc track The objective of this MSc track is to develop eligible students into competent engineers and designers with specific knowledge and competencies in contemporary methods in aircraft and propulsion system design. PROFILE I: FLIGHT PERFORMANCE & PROPULSION The research area Flight Performance & Propulsion (FPP) fulfils a crucial role in the faculty of Aerospace Engineering. AT FPP we integrate the knowledge and expertise of various aeronautical sub-disciplines into conceptual aircraft designs and subsystems which can meet the stringent requirements of the future. We investigate the flight mechanics of novel airplane configurations that would lead to more efficient aircraft. Being responsible for the largest efficiency increase in aviation, the propulsion sub-discipline is an integral part of this group to tackle many challenges in aircraft propulsion and aircraft-engine integration. An aircraft can only be successfully designed and optimized when the capabilities of the separate disciplines (i.e. aerodynamics, structures, propulsion, stability and control, flight operations etc.) are integrated in a synergistic manner. The main characteristic of the research programs is to focus on the system as a whole and aim for development of hardware. Wherever possible, the research goes beyond the theory and aims at working prototypes/solutions, whether it concerns an aircraft, rotorcraft or a propulsion system. The three competence areas are addressed by four main research programs: (1) new aircraft concepts, (2) high fidelity modelling of complex aeromechanical systems, (3) design and engineering engines, (4) new and improved propulsion systems and engines.

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Executive Summary MSc Aerospace Engineering


The set of courses offered to the students is selected in a way to prepare for the final thesis work, which will either be conducted within one of the research programs, or on a related topic in an industry. It is also possible for students to work on their own ideas if this fits within the context of the group. Keywords Flight performance / mechanics Aircraft propulsion and gas turbines Aircraft design and design methods

Focus on advanced / innovative aircraft configurations and novel propulsion concepts.

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MASTER TRACK CONTROL AND OPERATIONS
MSc Track Coordinator Prof.dr.ir. M. Mulder Section Control & Simulation Department Control & Operations m.mulder@tudelft.nl Profile I Advisor (Control and Simulation) Prof.dr.ir. M. Mulder Section Control & Simulation Department Control & Operations m.mulder@tudelft.nl Profile II/III Advisor (Air Traffic Management and Airports, resp. Air Transport and Aerospace Operations) Prof.dr. Ricky Curran Section Air Transport and Operations (ATO) Department Control & Operations r.curran@tudelft.nl Short description of the MSc Track Control and Operations is focused on the through-life operations associated with aerospace industry. It studies the avionics systems of individual aircraft, flight control and flight deck design, airline operations and support (maintenance), air traffic control and air traffic management, airports, as well as the operations associated with air transport as a whole. By selecting one of the three C&O profiles, the student chooses an educational programme that contains a particular balance of these elements. Theory and practice are combined in exciting and challenging fields of study for talented and ambitious students. Our graduates easily find their way in finding a good job in engineering, research, consulting, and management. The C&O profiles incorporate a research project that builds on the learning gained from the taught modules. C&O research projects focus on academic quality and the contribution to the body of knowledge in the field. There is also a strong recognition of the importance of understanding problems coming from industry, through industrial collaboration, and experimental validation of the novel operational concepts in real-life scenarios. Didactic approach of the MSc Track The student builds experience through courses, practicals, a directed internship and a supervised final research project. Learning objectives The focus in C&O lies on first establishing a sound theoretical and framework and then to sharing our departments expertise in applying this knowledge in practical problems.

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Executive Summary MSc Aerospace Engineering


Structure of the MSc Track The Track consists of three Profiles that share a common core of 16 ECTS. Each profile programme consists of a 'Profile core' of mandatory courses, ranging between 16 and 17 ECTS, supplemented by Electives (13 to 20 ECTS) that can be adjusted to either the subject of the final thesis work, or to the student's own taste. The MSc thesis project is an individual research assignment, conducted 'in house' or at an appropriate external organization partner. Profiles offered I. II. III. PROFILE I Control and Simulation Air Traffic Management and Airports Air Transport and Aerospace Operations CONTROL & SIMULATION

This profile focuses on the design, analysis and test of automatic and manual flight guidance and control systems. Our main goal is to enhance the safety, survivability and performance of aerospace vehicles through creating better automation. The profile embarks with the essentials of systems and control theory, stochastic dynamic systems and signals, real-time computing and flight simulation, and modelling human cognition and manual control performance. In their electives and final graduation, students can then either focus on the design of autonomous guidance and control systems, or concentrate on the analysis and design of human-in-the-loop control systems. Students have the opportunity to work with state-of-the-art facilities to close the loop of theory and application, using the laboratory aircraft, the moving-base flight simulator SIMONA, and many unmanned aerial vehicles, such as Delfly. Regarding autonomous systems, students will have opportunities to tackle challenging problems focusing on the design of highly-automated, intelligent and (semi-)autonomous aerial vehicles. Depending on their interests, students will learn advanced control theory, global optimisation approaches, state and parameter estimation techniques, and modern dynamic modelling techniques. Examples of aeronautical applications are fault tolerant and re-configurable flight control design, flight envelope clearance and protection, vehicle dynamics model identification using flight data, and advanced flight test instrumentation systems. Space applications include rendezvous/docking vehicle control system designs, formation flying spacecraft GNC system designs, modelling of spacecraft with flexible structures and liquid sloshing, and optimal terminal area energy management of re-entry vehicles. When considering human-in-the-loop systems, students will learn to understand and model human perception and control behaviour at the level of skills. Research aims at modelling the 'human component' in closed loop vehicular control, using modern identification techniques and classical control. Example applications are the design of haptic force-feedback manual control systems for aerospace vehicles (and also haptic control devices in automobiles), modelling human visual-vestibular perception and control, the neuromuscular system dynamics and biodynamic coupling effects, the optimal tuning of flight simulator visual and motion cues, aircraft handling qualities and advanced fly-by-wire systems, three-dimensional flight guidance displays, and the tele-operation of unmanned aerial vehicles. Learning objectives: 1. Knowledge on modern methods for analysis of control problems and synthesis of control systems 2. Knowledge of modelling human perception and control behaviour, including modern methods for identification 3. Skills in the use of modern control and simulation programs, such as Matlab/Simulink
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4. Skills in the programming, setup and execution of experiments in flight simulators or in flight tests 5. Insight in related disciplines such as artificial intelligence, statistics, sensor fusion, distributed computing and real-time simulation AIR TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT AND AIRPORTS PROFILE II This profile is concerned with the understanding and development of more effective air transport infrastructure and operational implementation. Consequently, the primary focus is on ATM and airports and associated performance issues such as noise, emissions, capacity, cost, safety, and efficiency. This profile includes the development of novel operational concepts for ATM and airports, their interfaces with air traffic service providers and airlines, as well as the design of collaborative decision support tools for the humans (pilots, air traffic controllers) involved in future ATM environments. This unique and innovative Profile in the Faculty is designed with two explicit flavours in terms of either higher system level integration or lower level sub-system capability so that students are offered more possibility in their electives and final graduation through the one profile; focusing on either 1) ATM and Airport operations at a higher systems level (Prof.dr. Curran) or 2) the design of lower level decision-support systems in ATM (Prof.dr.ir. Mulder). Students may choose for the ATO flavour (with Prof.dr. Curran) that focuses on ATM and airport operations and is concerned with the understanding and development of more effective air transport infrastructure and operational implementation. The primary focus is on ATM and airports and associated performance issues such as noise, emissions, capacity, cost, safety, and efficiency. This profile includes the development of novel operational concepts for ATM and airports, and their interfaces with air traffic service providers and airlines. Therefore, students who choose to graduate with Prof.dr. Curran will take a more system level approach to first understand and exploitation and utilisation of aerospace technology and operations in providing services and truly adding value. The deepening of understanding and knowledge will then be addressed by focusing on specific operations associated with ATM and airports, as well as the environmental impact from aircraft emissions and noise. The main learning outcome is that students will understand the key operational and supporting challenges faced now and in the future for air transport; for example with respect to SESAR (EU) and NextGen (USA) approaches. Alternatively (with Prof.dr.ir. Mulder), regarding the design of decision-support systems, students work on either the development of advanced flight deck avionics systems to support pilot decision making and situation awareness, or on the design of support tools for air traffic controllers in future air traffic management concepts. Research aims at the use of techniques from cognitive systems engineering, such as ecological interface design, to create a work environment, possibly including automated systems, that helps pilots and controllers in conducting their tasks effectively and efficiently. Examples are the design of separation assurance interfaces, support systems for advanced noise abatement procedures, synthetic vision systems, and human-centred alerting and warning systems. Students often test their new interface designs with real pilots or air traffic controllers, using the SIMONA flight simulator and the human-machine systems lab fixed-base simulator. Learning objectives: 1. Engineering problem solving ability in a manner that truly adds value through technological advancement, rather than just coming up with a possible solution. 2. Understanding of the key operational and supporting challenges faced now and in the future for air transport.

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3. Knowledge of air traffic management, airports, noise and emissions, optimization and guidance and control problems. 4. Knowledge of human cognition and decision-making, and the design of support tools through cognitive systems engineering and ecological interface design. 5. Skills in the programming, setup and execution of experiments in flight simulators or in flight tests 6. Insight in related topics such as statistics, optimization, distributed computing AIR TRANSPORT AND AEROSPACE OPERATIONS PROFILE III This profile is concerned with the understanding and development of more effective aerospace and airline operations and support (maintenance), as well as how the industry is structured to deliver maximum value to all stakeholders. This will include the Lean and optimal implementation of the operational processes associated with aerospace industry, airlines and air transportation in general. There will be a particular focus on airlines in terms of their flight, fleet, network and maintenance operations; including business awareness and ultimate value analysis. Operational processes are researched from value engineering perspective to learn how value is optimized and therefore, maximized. Aircraft reliability and the operators maintenance program will also emphasize maintenance cost analysis, as well as the basic understanding of the associated performance and scheduling issues. Learning objectives: 1 Engineering problem solving ability in a manner that truly adds value through technological advancement, rather than just coming up with a possible solution. 2 Understanding of the key operational and structural challenges faced now and in the future for airlines and the industry. 3 Knowledge of the operational value of aviation technologies in terms of 2020 Key Performance Indicators; value, cost, capacity, efficiency, safety, and environmental impact. 4 Knowledge of value engineering methodology to design for operations, to create value with aircraft operated by airlines interacting with airports and ATM providers. 5 Skills in operations research and associated methodologies such as Lean and Six Sigma theory, theory of constraints, revenue management, and maintenance RAMS (Reliability, Affordability, Maintenability, Supportability) modelling, etc. 6 Insight in related subjects and capabilities such as advanced statistical analysis, finance, aerospace law, advanced optimization, etc With regards to graduation projects (Profiles II/III), ATO has a 50/50 approach where approximately 50% of students perform their graduation projects within industry; such as Air France-KLM, Airbus, NIST, Boeing, Bombardier, Martinair, Transavia, Fokker, Rolls Royce, Schiphol, LVNL, NATS, SESAR, Eurocontrol, etc. This is seen as important applied research in aerospace industry that spans problem definition and solution validation. The other 50% of projects are either carried out in-house or at other international universities or research establishments and are of a more theoretical nature, creating new understanding and adding fundamentally to the body of knowledge; including collaboration with MIT, Georgia Tech, Nanjung University, Nanjing University, Northwest University, Beijing University, Taiwan National University, REMIT, QUB, Cranfield, Manchester University, Westminster University, Athens University, Padova University, Belgrade University, NLR, DLR, NASA, Volpe, ONERA, etc. The 50/50 approach links to the Value Engineering Methodology vision within the ATO Section in carrying out research in air transportation that truly makes a difference and establishes ATO in a unique educational and research position in the world. Please note that within ATO it is possible to couple the internship to the final thesis but the internship must meet all the normal Faculty

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requirements, while additionally being used as an orientation platform to maximise the return on the effort to engage in an industry-collaboration project. Additional Information 1. Within Profile I, students will conduct a 12 EC literature survey and have 14 EC for choosing their elective courses. They will graduate under the supervision of professor Mulder (section Control and Simulation). 2. In Profiles II and III, students have the added flexibility of the choice between either the 12EC literature survey (and either 14 [profile II] or 13 [profile III] EC electives), or the 6 EC Master Orientation Project (and then either 20 or 19 EC electives). 3. In profile II, students either graduate under the supervision of professor Mulder (for the ATM decision-support for human operators-part) or professor Curran (for the ATM and Airport part). 4. In profile III, students will graduate under the supervision of professor Curran (Section Air Transport and Operations).

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MASTER TRACK SPACE FLIGHT
Master Track Coordinator Prof. ir. B.A.C. (Boudewijn) Ambrosius Room 9.18 Kluyverweg 1 2629 HS Delft +31 (0) 15 27 85173 b.a.c.ambrosius@tudelft.nl Profile I Advisor (Space Engineering) Prof. dr. E.K.A. (Eberhard) Gill Room 8.15 Kluyverweg 1 2629 HS Delft +31 (0) 15 27 87458 e.k.a.gill@tudelft.nl Profile II Advisor(Space Exploration) Prof.ir. B.A.C. (Boudewijn) Ambrosius Room 7.18 Kluyverweg 1 2629 HS Delft +31 (0) 15 27 85173 b.a.c.ambrosius@tudelft.nl

Short description of the MSc Track This track focuses on space engineering and space exploration. It covers a broad field, ranging from satellite engineering, space systems engineering, orbital mechanics, instrumentation, launchers and propulsion to mission analysis, planetary exploration and scientific interpretation of satellite observation data in which precise orbit determination is the central theme. Astronautics is quite different from aeronautics because each space mission is uniquely designed to perform a specific task related to its operational or scientific objectives. This requires an end-to-end approach where the objectives drive the design of the mission and data processing is an integral part of the mission. Within this track, you are offered opportunities to participate in ongoing engineering and scientific projects at the participating chairs. The track consists of two profiles, Space Engineering and Space Exploration. Each profile has a different focus, but they are interrelated. On the one hand you will become an all-round space professional, on the other hand you will acquire generic skills that enable you to pursue a career in a broad spectrum of industrial and research environments. Didactic approach of the MSc Track The didactic approach is straightforward. It is based on knowledge transfer through dedicated lectures, exercises, literature study or master orientation project, internship and individual thesis project. The participating chairs offer students to associate their MSc thesis projects with ongoing research activities and/or projects. Learning objectives of the MSc Track The high-level learning objective is that you will develop skills to carry out an engineering or research project independently and individually. This will be achieved by a highly focused MSc thesis project under strict supervision. The lower-level learning objective is that you will acquire broad knowledge in the field of space and its applications. These objectives will make you a broad aerospace engineer with generally applicable engineering and research skills and with a clear focus area. Experience has shown that all students who selected this profile have made a succesful career in industry, knowledge institutes, agencies and academia both within as well as outside the space world. Structure of the MSc Track

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A.Kamp 19-Apr-2011 Executive Summary MICA.doc

Executive Summary MSc Aerospace Engineering


The track consists of two profiles that share a common core of 15 ECTS. The track core contains four space courses covering astrodynamics, space systems engineering, microsat engineering and planetary sciences (and one compulsory course on ethics of aerospace engineering). These courses provide a strong and interesting basis for any space engineer. The profile courses (both 15 EC) are intended to broaden this basis depending on your interest in the engineering or the exploration aspects of space missions. The courses of Profile I go deeper into the rocket propulsion, space instrumentation and mechatronics in spaceflight, while Profile II highlights the mission design, rocket and reentry systems and the retrieval and data processing of satellite signals. In addition, there is ample space for elective courses. The two chairs in this Space Flight Track provide an interesting and choice of recommended electives, but it is also possible, in consultation with the MSc supervisor, to choose elective courses from other chairs within and outside the faculty. The literature study (12EC), internship (18EC) and final thesis project (42EC) are mandatory. Please note that the literature study, the internship and the MSc project may be combined in a coherent fashion. Profiles offered I. Space Engineering II. Space Exploration PROFILE I SPACE ENGINEERING This profile focuses on the engineering of space systems and missions. It comprises the launch element, the ground element and mission operations, the communications architecture, the mission subject, the orbit as well as the payload and spacecraft bus. Learning Objectives 1. Develop skills in systems engineering, technology development and application, and in the engineering of space systems 2. Develop skills in space mission analysis, spacecraft design and data processing PROFILE II SPACE EXPLORATION This profile aims at developing the skills required for a space applications mission scientist, covering planetary missions and satellite navigation. The Mission Scientist is able to relate the physics of measurements acquired by space payloads and missions, via the mathematical principles of data analysis, to information of planets. Mastering this chain enables the designer to design space missions and their observation and navigation systems used in the interesting area of space exploration Learning objectives; develop skills to: 1. Identify space application systems and understand the corresponding observation methods 2. Translate scientific objectives to mission requirements and advise system engineers 3. Process, analyze, and interpret space data for a variety of space explorative missions 4. Design observation and navigation systems fit for a given purpose 5. Advise on quality control and reliability of space data

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A.Kamp 19-Apr-2011 Executive Summary MICA.doc

Executive Summary MSc Aerospace Engineering


MASTER TRACK AEROSPACE STRUCTURES & MATERIALS
Master Track Coordinator Dr.ir. O.K. (Otto) Bergsma Room NB.018 Kluyverweg 1 2629 HS Delft +31 (0) 15 27 85135 o.k.bergsma@tudelft.nl Profile IV Advisor (Aerospace Structures & Comuptational Mechanics) Ir. Jan Hol Room: LR NB-2.02a Tel: +31 (0)15 27 85379 E-mail: J.M.A.M.Hol@tudelft.nl Short description of the MSc Track The Aerospace Structures & Materials track aims at providing the knowledge, insight and skills required to become an independent engineer in aerospace applications of material and structural engineering. This includes issues such as detailed composite design, novel material design, safety, structural integrity and damage tolerance, and contemporary and future aerospace structures, but also practical applications such as production processes and design of smart and adaptive composites. Didactic approach of the MSc Track The track specific domain knowledge is taught using a combination of required and elective lectures and practical work. This domain knowledge constitutes the foundation for the master thesis project which usually contributes to the (international) research activities of the involved chair and is carried out in close cooperation with scientific staff and other MSc students. Industryhosted projects are also possible. Learning objectives of the MSc Track To provide a broad understanding of composite design procedures, composite production technologies, material science, structural integrity, damage tolerance, and contemporary methods for aerospace structures. Structure of the MSc Track The core courses (14 EC) provide a broad background in material and light weight structures engineering. Students may chose from four profiles with specific (16 - 18 EC) and elective courses. The elective courses aim to further deepening of the master thesis work and are chosen in cooperation with the MSc Track Coordinator and the thesis supervisor. During the MSc the preferred elective courses might change as the theme of the master thesis work becomes clearer. This change is facilitated by filling in a new form in agreement with the thesis supervisor, to be approved by the MSc Track Coordinator To open the programme to a broader range of students, who are basically qualified for the programme but may lack domain specific knowledge, part of the elective courses may be used to repair the deficiencies.

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A.Kamp 19-Apr-2011 Executive Summary MICA.doc

Executive Summary MSc Aerospace Engineering


Profiles I. Design and Production of Composite Structures II. Novel Aerospace Materials III. Structural Integrity IV. Aerospace Structures & Computational Mechanics PROFILE I DESIGN AND PRODUCTION OF COMPOSITE STRUCTURES The purpose of this profile is to develop a student into an engineer who is capable of solving problems and creating solutions relevant to the design, realization and manufacturability of advanced composite products and structures. Depending on the interest of the student, the emphasis will be between theoretical aspects and practical aspects, sometimes resulting in the start of a new company. Learning Objectives: 1. To show knowledge in the field of conceptual designing, manufacturing techniques and choice in selection of advanced composite materials 2. To show the ability to apply the above knowledge to definite problems 3. To prove skills in analyzing and synthesizing problems related to the field of study of composites 4. To show skills in communicating in a team 5. To develop the ability to motivate decisions 7 To show the ability to bear responsibility for ones own work 8 To act as an academic entrepreneur instead of an employee Typical themes for graduation projects: Development of composite pressure vessels in general and composite fuselages in particular Development of composite related low cost manufacturing, joining techniques and composite materials alike. Development and optimization of advanced sport car bodies at a structure and system level. Development and optimization of novel, smart wind turbine blades and super yacht structures. Research of fatigue, failure mechanisms and impact behavior of polymeric composites. PROFILE II NOVEL AEROSPACE MATERIAL the aim of the profile Novel Aerospace Materials is to train students in the development of novel state-of-the-art materials with dedicated properties for aerospace applications and to prepare them for research positions in universities as well as industrial multinational laboratories. The students are actively supervised during their thesis work and stimulated as junior scientist. Learning Objectives 1. To become familiar with the underlying principles of material properties, physical characterization, and structure-property relationships 2. To gain experience with design and testing of new material concepts in the areas of metals, polymers and ceramics. 3. To apply new material concepts towards new aerospace applications Typical graduation themes: Developing new light sensitive polymeric actuators for morphing wing concepts Making and testing aluminium shape memory alloy composites for space applications Developing aramid fibres with cross-linkable units to improve compressive strength

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A.Kamp 19-Apr-2011 Executive Summary MICA.doc

Executive Summary MSc Aerospace Engineering


Developing self healing polymers and composites. Using ultra high pressures to make not-yet existing steel grades.

PROFILE III STRUCTURAL INTEGRITY the aim of this profile is to expose students to the wide range of factors that contribute to the balance of performance and safety in aerospace vehicles and provide the tools and understanding that will enable them to design the high performance aerospace vehicles of tomorrow without sacrificing safety. Focus is placed on understanding the links between material and structure, the role of manufacturing and production, and the importance of maintenance and repair on performance and safety. All work strikes a balance between scientific understanding and practical application, giving students a firm background for becoming leading scientists or engineers. Learning Objectives 1. To provide understanding of damage tolerance and structural integrity 2. To show knowledge in the field of detailed designing, manufacturing techniques and choice of materials 3. Design for durability 4. Involvement in real aircraft programmes and to become familiar with industrial practice (international) 5 How to innovate and get innovations introduced Typical graduation themes: Design and realise innovative solutions for the next aircraft programmes (in close cooperation with industry) Design, optimise and implement manufacturing processes (in close cooperation with industry) Develop methods and tools needed for research and design projects Design and realise innovative solutions for the next space vehicles (launchers, re-entry, sample and return , etc..) Design and realise innovative solutions for aircraft engines PROFILE IV: AEROSPACE STRUCTURES The Aerospace Structures & Comuptational Mechanics profile focuses on the development of analytical and numerical analysis tools, ranging from fast approximate solutions to high-fidelity detailed solutions, for lightweight structural systems with linear and nonlinear response characteristics. Use of these analysis capabilities to design practical and innovative structural configurations in areas of applications of multidisciplinary and multifunctional nature having contemporary importance. Development of efficient design and optimization tools, and their software implementation in high performance computing environments. These efforts require a thorough knowledge of the fundamental aspects of structural mechanics as well as mechanics of materials of metallic, composite, and hybrid material systems. For experimental research the AeS section shares extensive laboratory facilities with the AMM department. For computational research the AeS section has access to powerful compute facilities.

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A.Kamp 19-Apr-2011 Executive Summary MICA.doc

Executive Summary MSc Aerospace Engineering


Learning objectives 1. Have in-depth knowledge of structures and structural analysis and know how to apply it 2. Have in-depth knowledge of tools and methods for structural design and know how to apply them 3. Have in-depth knowledge of tools and methods for structural optimization and know how to apply them Additional information In the master Track Aerospace Structures & Materials students are advised to orientate themselves for the internship and possible thesis themes after half year of study. In this way you can plan the literature study, the internship and the final thesis work properly in time. Availability of the internship is often bound to certain periods in companies, and your study plan has to match with this. First performing an internship, followed by literature study and final thesis work is not a problem, and sometimes even preferable.

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A.Kamp 19-Apr-2011 Executive Summary MICA.doc

Track core and Profile courses

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Master Track Aerodynamics and Wind Energy


Profile I "Aerodynamics" (track 12 EC, profile 16 EC) ID
AE4010 AE4030 WM0324LR AE4131 AE4930 AE4120 AE4W20 AE4133 AE4140 AE4180 AE4115 AE4130

Course name

EC
2 12 3 3 3 3 3 4 3 3 3 3

Research Methodologies Literature Study Ethics for aerospace engineering CFD-1 Aeroelasticity Viscous flows Wind power CFD-2 Gasdynamics I Flow measurement techniques Experimental simulations Aircraft aerodynamics

general general general track track track track profile profile profile profile profile

Profile II "Wind Energy" (track 12 EC, profile 14 EC) ID Course name


AE4010 AE4030 WM0324LR AE4131 AE4930 AE4120 AE4W20 AE4T40 AE4W12 AE4W13 AE4W09 Research Methodologies Literature Study Ethics for aerospace engineering CFD-1 Aeroelasticity Viscous flows Wind power Kite power generation and transport Rotor/wake aerodynamics Wind & site conditions Wind turbine design

EC
2 12 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 5

general general general track track track track profile profile profile profile

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Master Track Flight Mechanics & Propulsion


Profile 1 "Flight Mechanics & Propulsion" (track 13 EC, profile 14 EC) ID Course name
AE4010 AE4030 WM0324LR AE42XX AE4214 AE4212 AE4130 AE4240 AE4245 AE4233 Research Methodologies Literature Study Ethics for aerospace engineering Aero Engine Technology Aircraft Propulsion, Noise and Pollutant Emissions Aircraft Performance Optimization Aircraft Aerodynamics Advanced Aircraft Design I Advanced Aircraft Design II Advanced Design Methods

EC
2 12 3 4 3 3 3 4 4 6

general general general track track track track profile profile profile

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Master Track Control & Operations


Profile 1 "Control & Simulation" (track 13 EC, profile 16 EC) ID Course name
AE4010 AE4030 WM0324LR AE4301 AE4301P AE4393 AE4425 AE4304 AE4304P AE4360 AE4360P AE4361 WI2056LR Research Methodologies Literature Study Ethics for aerospace engineering Introduction to flight control Introduction to flight control Exercise Avionics and operations Value engineering & operations optimisation Stochastic aerospace systems Stochastic aerospace systems practical Aerospace human-machine systems Aerospace human-machine systems project Flight and space simulation Mathematical system theory

EC
2 12 3 3 1 3 6 3 1 3 1 4 4

general general general track track track track profile profile profile profile profile profile

Profile II "Air Traffic Management and Airports" (track 13, profile 17 EC) ID Course name
AE4010 AE4030 WM0324LR AE4301 AE4301P AE4393 AE4425 AE4212 AE4428 AE4415 AE4360 AE4360P AE4214 Research Methodologies Literature Study Ethics for aerospace engineering Introduction to flight control Introduction to flight control Exercise Avionics and operations Value engineering & operations optimisation Aircraft Performance Optimization Air traffic management Airport design and operations Aerospace human-machine systems Aerospace human-machine systems project Air traffic noise and emissions

EC
2 12 3 3 1 3 6 3 3 3 3 1 4

general general general track track track track profile profile profile profile profile profile

Profile III "Air Transport and Aerospace Operations" (track 13, profile 17 EC) ID Course name
AE4010 AE4020 AE4030 WM0324LR AE4301 AE4301P AE4393 AE4425 AE4212 AE4414 AE4413 AE4340 Research Methodologies Master Orientation Project Literature Study Ethics for aerospace engineering Introduction to flight control Introduction to flight control Exercise Avionics and operations Value engineering & operations optimisation Aircraft Performance Optimization Airline operations and management Lean enterprise processes Airline maintenance operations

EC
2 6 12 3 3 1 3 6 3 4 4 6

general general general general track track track track profile profile profile profile

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Master Track Space Flight


Profile 1 "Space Engineering" (track 15 EC, profile 14 EC) ID Course name
AE4010 AE4030 WM0324LR AE4874 I AE4S12 AE4S10 AE4890 AE4S01 AE4S06 AE4S06P AE4880 AE4S12P Research Methodologies Literature Study Ethics for aerospace engineering Astrodynamics I Space systems engineering Microsat engineering Planetary Sciences I Thermal rocket propulsion Spacecraft power, electronics and mechatronics Spacecraft power, electronics and mechatronics practical Space instrumentation Exercise space systems engineering

EC
2 12 3 4 3 4 4 4 4 1 4 1

general general general track track track track profile profile profile profile profile

Profile II "Space Exploration" (track 15 EC, profile 14 EC) ID Course name


AE4010 AE4030 WM0324LR AE4874 I AE4S12 AE4S10 AE4890 AE4878 AE4870A AE4870B AE4E95 Research Methodologies Literature Study Ethics for aerospace engineering Astrodynamics I Space systems engineering Microsat engineering Planetary Sciences I Mission geometry and orbit design Rocket motion Reentry systems Satellite signals and data processing

EC
2 12 3 4 3 4 4 4 3 3 4

general general general track track track track profile profile profile profile

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Master Track Aerospace Materials and Manufacturing


Profile 1 "Design and Production of Composite Structures" (track 14 EC, profile 17 EC) ID Course name
AE4010 AE4020 AE4030 WM0324LR AE4632 AE4735 AE4X02 AE4509 AE4628 AE4653 AE4684 AE4640 CH2071TU Research Methodologies Master Orientation Project Literature Study Ethics for aerospace engineering Composites: materials, structures and production processes Fatigue of structures and materials Designing materials with AE specific properties Advanced design and optimization of composite structures I Structural design of composite aircraft Composite trinity exercise Fibre reinforced materials in aerospace structures Polymers and polymer composite manufacturing Polymer structure and properties

EC
2 6 12 3 3 4 3 4 3 4 3 4 3

general general general general track track track track profile profile profile profile profile

Profile II "Novel Aerospace Materials" (track 14 EC, profile 18 EC) ID Course name
AE4010 AE4020 AE4030 WM0324LR AE4632 AE4735 AE4X02 AE4509 AE4X04 AE4X05 AE4X09 AE4X10 MS4021 CH2071TU Research Methodologies Master Orientation Project Literature Study Ethics for aerospace engineering Composites: materials, structures and production processes Fatigue of structures and materials Designing materials with AE specific properties Advanced design and optimization of composite structures I Material selection in mechanical design New developments in aerospace polymers Sensor and smart materials Self healing materials Structure characterization techniques for materials Polymer structure and properties

EC
2 6 12 3 3 4 3 4 3 3 3 3 3 3

general general general general track track track track profile profile profile profile profile profile

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Profile III "Structural Integrity" (track 14 EC, profile 16 EC) ID Course name
AE4010 AE4020 AE4030 WM0324LR AE4632 AE4735 AE4X02 AE4509 AE4731 AE4736 AE4740 AE4760 AE4786 Research Methodologies Master Orientation Project Literature Study Ethics for aerospace engineering Composites: materials, structures and production processes Fatigue of structures and materials Designing materials with AE specific properties Advanced design and optimization of composite structures I Materials & manufacturing in the aircraft industry Experimental techniques in structural analysis Design and analysis of joints in aerospace structures (Joining methods) Aircraft structural integrity and maintenance Sheet metal forming

EC
2 6 12 3 3 4 3 4 3 3 4 3 3

general general general general track track track track profile profile profile profile profile

Profile IV Aerospace Structures & Computational Mechanics (track 14 EC, profile 17 EC) ID Course name
AE4010 AE4020 AE4030 WM0324LR AE4632 AE4735 AE4X02 AE4509 AE4520 AE4525 AE4510 II AE4515 AE4536 Research Methodologies Master Orientation Project Literature Study Ethics for aerospace engineering Composites: materials, structures and production processes Fatigue of structures and materials Designing materials with AE specific properties Advanced design and optimization of composite structures I Advanced structural analysis Advanced computational modeling Advanced design and optimization of composite structures II Introduction to adaptive aero structures Buckling and vibration of structures

EC
2 6 12 3 3 4 3 4 3 3 4 3 4

general general general general track track track track profile profile profile profile profile

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