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COMMUNITY NEWS, CULTURE, COMMENTARY u FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2012 u VOLUME I, ISSUE 20 u FREE

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Last weeks heavy fog and hoar frost offered many opportunities for stunning landscape photography throughout the area Pictured: The Hi-Line Bridge and Sheyenne River at Valley City. (Photo/Lowell Busching)

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Area students set for MATHCOUNTS battle


An accomplished group of seventh- and eighth-graders from schools throughout Barnes County will compete head-to-head in the county MATHCOUNTS competition, set for Wednesday, Feb. 15, on the campus of Valley City State University. Sixteen students from Valley City, Barnes County North and Maple Valley school districts will compete in math areas of probability, algebra, statistics and polynomials. e competition includes a sprint round, a target round and a team round. Winning teams and individual students will receive recognition with the winning team advancing to the State Competition. Additionally, the two highest-ranking individual competitors not on the winning team (who may be registered as individuals or as members of a team) will also advance to the State Competition. Participating students include: Barnes County North West Campus: Tess Scott, parents are Tom and

PAGE 2 the independent

Kelly Scott; Alexis Rath, parents are Donovan Krueger and Teresa Rath; David Fletcher, parents are Dana and Amy Fletcher; and Mat Rose, parents are Lee and Vicki Rose. Barnes County North East Campus: Laura Limesand, parents are Lisa and Scott Limesand; Taylor Bingham, parent is Jerome araldson; Samantha Wieland, parents are Kim and Dave Wieland; and Spencer Piatz, parents are Kelsey Janse Van Rensburg and Eric Piatz. Maple Valley School: Erin Grieger, parents are Dalen and Vera Grieger; Jacob Bodziachowski, parents are Albert and Isabella Bodziachowski; Sam Richman, parents are Matthew and Jenni Richman; and Ryan Janish, parents are Rob and Cathy Janish. Valley City Junior High School: Brandon Pritchett, parents are Monte and Lori Pritchett; Maddie Bennett, parents are Les Zaun and Kathleen Bennett Zaun; Mikaylah Ross, parents are Rick and Cindy Ross; andJacob Berntson, parents are Mike and Stacey Berntson.

Valley City State University reported a nal headcount of 1,306 students for spring semester 2012, an increase of 7 percent over last year's gure. e current semesters student enrollment numbers mark the h consecutive spring semester of enrollment growth at the university and represents the largest spring semester student count since VCSU moved to a three semester academic year in the summer of 1992. As pleased as we are with these results, we remain focused on our mission, vision, and values, and our goals of providing accessible, innovative, and high-quality educational experiences and programs for VCSU students.,

Growth trend continues: More students, more programs


said Steve Shirley, president of VCSU. To accommodate the enrollment growth, VCSU Steve Shirley has been taking several steps within the framework of its strategic plan, according to a release issued by Doug Andersen, VCSU director of marketing and communications. For example, the University has increased its instructional faculty and has introduced new programs in high-demand subjects such as majors in Medical Laboratory Science, Athletic Training, and Business Process Integration Management (BPIM), and a concentration in Criminal Justice, according to the statement. In addition, VCSU is upgrading its facilities, including a $10.3 million expansion and renovation of the Rhoades Science Center, the renovation of Snoeyenbos residence hall into apartment-style suites and a new arti cial turf surface on its football eld. VCSUs student numbers for spring 2012 follows its fall 2011 headcount of 1,384 students, the largest fall semester enrollment in the universitys history.

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the independent PAGE 3


Food, is currently at the Barnes County Historical Society Museum in Valley City, now through March 11. The free exhibit is open to the public MonSat 10AM-4PM and Sundays 1-4PM. Formal tours and other hours by appointment. More info: Wes Anderson, 701-8450966.

Saturday, Feb. 11

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Cars l Trucks l Semis Trailers l Motorcycles Campers l Snowmobiles l Jet Skis l & so much more

List your event


We welcome all submissions for area events and activities that are free or low-cost and open to the public. Send a complete description of the event at least ve working days in advance. Include the events date, time, place, and other relevent information. Please also include a contact name and phone number and/ or email address. We prefer to receive information for listings by email, but will also accept submissions delivered by U.S. mail. Or use our easy online submissions form at www.INDY-BC.com Email your event listings to submissions@indybc.com or mail to The Independent, 416 Second St., Fingal, ND 58031. Be sure to verify event details before attending. The Independent cannot guarantee the completeness or accuracy of published listings.

MUSEUM WITHOUT WALLS


Right: Norwegian Lutheran Church in 1909. S.K Thollenhaug, Pastor. Built in the early 1880s. (Photos/Collection of Dennis Stillings)

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100 Years Ago: The Mill & the River in Winter


By Dennis Stillings his post card was sent by Emma Siegrist (a student at the Normal School) to Mr. J. M. Siegrist of Richardton, N.D. e inscription reads, in part: Dear Papa, How is the weather? And do we get a bum-

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Friday, Feb. 10
Fingal Wildlife Clubs Fun Night starts at 7 p.m. at the Fingal Hall. Cash and door prizes; food. Tickets: $10 in advance; $15 at the door. Parent-teacher conferences from 8 a.m. to 4

p.m. at Valley City Public Schools No school: Valley City Public Schools District ii High School Boys Basketball Tournament is Feb. 10, 11, and 13 at the Fargo Civic Center.

BBB District High School Boys Basketball Tournament is Feb. 9-11. Valley City High School boys basketball vs. Fargo North. The Smithsonian Traveling Exhibit, Key Ingredients: America By

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MUSEUM

BARNES COUNTY

Below: Winter view of the Russell Miller Milling Co. and the river in 1912.

HISTORICAL SOCIETY Valley City, ND 58072

Phone: 701-845-0966 Mon - Sat: 10 AM-4PM

315 Central Ave N,

per crop? Crops look pretty good here but all the rain there has been since we got here was a couple of sprinkles. Friday night we went with Aaser to a Norwegian concert at their church. It was just ne. ey sang two songs in English. ...

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PAGE 4 the independent


CALENDAR: ARTS n COMMUNITY n GROUPS n GOVERNMENT n SCHOOL n SPORTS
The Bluegrass Association of North Dakotas monthly Valley City jam session is from 1 to 5 p.m. at the Barnes County Museum in Valley City. The acoustic jam is free and open to the public. More info: John Andrus, 701762-4891 or via email at jandrus.60@gmail.com The music of Andrew Reichenberger-Walz from 6 to 9 p.m. at Sabirs in Valley City. District ii High School Boys Basketball Tournament is Feb. 10, 11, and 13 at the Fargo Civic Center. BBB District High School Boys Basketball Tournament is Feb. 9-11. Live Band: Jim Geiger plays at the Eagles in Valley City. For people 21+. The Smithsonian Traveling Exhibit, Key Ingredients: America By Food, is currently at the Barnes County Historical Society Museum in Valley City, now through March 11. The free exhibit is open to the public MonSat 10AM-4PM and Sundays 1-4PM. Formal tours and other hours by appointment. More info: Wes Anderson, 701-8450966. Traveling Exhibit, Key Ingredients: America By Food, is currently at the Barnes County Historical Society Museum in Valley City, now through March 11. The free exhibit is open to the public MonSat 10AM-4PM and Sundays 1-4PM. Formal tours and other hours by appointment. More info: Wes Anderson, 701-8450966. The Smithsonian Traveling Exhibit, Key Ingredients: America By Food, is currently at the Barnes County Historical Society Museum in Valley City, now through March 11. The free exhibit is open to the public MonSat 10AM-4PM and Sundays 1-4PM. More info: Wes Anderson, 701845-0966. berger-Walz from 6 to 9 p.m. at Sabirs in Valley City. The Buffalo Community Health Ministry board meets the second Tuesday of each month. More info: Parish Nurse Gwen Fraase, 701-6335533. Tower City Park Board meets the second Tuesday of each month. Maple Valley high school girls basketball plays Northern Cass (away) starting at 6 p.m. Barnes County North girls basketball plays Napoleon at 6 p.m. at North Central. Valley City Rotary meets every Tuesday at noon at the Valley City VFW Club. Memory loss support group for friends and family of those with memory loss meets the second Tuesday of the month from 6:30 to 8 p.m. in the Health Education Center at Mercy Hospital, Valley City. The group is sponsored by the ND/MN Alzheimers Association and Faith in Action. More info: Gail Pederson, 701-845-3874. Valley City High School boys basketball vs. Wahpeton. The Smithsonian Traveling Exhibit, Key Ingredients: America By Food, is currently at the Barnes County Historical Society Museum in Valley City, now through March 11. The free exhibit is open to the public MonSat 10AM-4PM and Sundays 1-4PM. More info: Wes Anderson, 701845-0966.

Sunday, Feb. 12
Sunday Bingo Fundraiser at the Hope American Legion; supper served at 5:30 p.m.; bingo starts at 6:30 p.m.; every Sunday through the winter months; proceeds benefit seniors attending March Close-Up trip to Washington, D.C. 9-Ball Singles Pool Tournament at Punkys Br & Grill in Dazey starts with noon registration. Free food. Double elimination. For people 21+. Public Open Roller Skating sponsored by the Optimist Club runs from 6 to 8 p.m. Sundays through April at the Rec Center in Valley City. Indoor Ice Skating open to the public runs from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Youth Sports Complex in Valley City. The Smithsonian

Monday, Feb. 13
District ii High School Boys Basketball Tournament concludes today at the Fargo Civic Center. Buffalo Senior Citizens meet every Monday at the Community Center, Buffalo, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Indoor Archery Range is open Monday and Wednesday evenings at 7 p.m. in the basement of City Auditorium, Valley City. More info: Neil Pederson, 701-840-0173.

Tuesday, Feb. 14 VALENTINES DAY


NARFE meets at noon at the Senior Center in Valley City. More info: Vern Hedland, phone 845-4999, or email vern@ southcentralseniors.org Sheyenne Valley Friends of Animals Membership Meeting begins at 7 p.m. in the Municipal Court Room of the Valley City Police Department. Refreshments, happy tails and door prizes. Everyone is welcome. Bring your Valentine! The music of Andrew Reichen-

Wednesday, Feb. 15
Valley City Kiwanis Club meets every Wednesday at 12:04 p.m. at the Valley City VFW Club. Open Mic at Duttons Parlour in downtown Valley City is every Wednesday from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Entertainers (music, comedy, poetry,

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the independent PAGE 5

02.10.12
THE INDEPENDENT of Barnes County
A publication of Smart Media LLC 416 2nd St. Fingal, ND 58031 Volume 1, Issue 20 All Rights Reserved

To highlight and publicize local contributions to education, the arts, and quality of life; To provide quality news content relating to the activities and concerns of the local population; To be a marketplace of ideas, and a forum for free debate; To feature local talent and achievers; To provide a venue for showcasing local products and services through attractive and stimulating advertising.

MISSION STATEMENT

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Editor & Publisher


Nikki Laine Zinke NLZinke@INDY-BC.com 701-840-1045 cell 701-924-8349 home Lori Froemke LoriAds@INDY-BC.com 701-320-0780 cell Your participation is welcome at all levels. Submit online at or via email at:

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ach year, when my high school's newest yearbooks hit By Nikki Laine the hallways, Zinke I marveled at the short list of students who had somehow managed to make it through another year with perfect attendance. ough the list grew shorter as my class advanced from year to year, by graduation to my utter astonishment a handful of names still remained on that perfect attendance list. ese were students who, through 12 years of public school, had never missed a single day. Imagine! Now try imagining committing 50 years to a single organization. Week in, week out, never missing a meeting. at's Howard Langemo, who was recently honored in a pin ceremony for his unswerving devotion to the Valley City Kiwanis Club. Yup, 50 years of perfect attendance! How great is that?

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At a recent Valley City Kiwanis Club meeting, Club President Larry Robinson (left) presented Howard Langemo his 50 years of perfect attendance pin. Kiwanis meets every Wednesday at noon at the VFW in Valley City. Kiwanis is a service organization that focuses on the needs of children all over the world. (Submitted photo/Jeff Nathan)

Email Me at bbrsconstruction@gmail.com

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nesota Public Radio, and was pleasantly surprised to hear a local Valley City man identi ed simply as Tony call in seeking suggestions about Korean cookbooks. e caller, Tony, shared with acclaimed food writer cooking teacher and national radio host Lynne Rossetto Kasper that he is passionate in his quest to dish up tasty Korean morsels at home. ough the program, like most national call-ins, didnt share the callers last n On Saturday, I was lis- name, I cant resist trying tening to the wonderful ra- to attach a last name to dio program e Splendid the rst name. Was caller Table, one of a wide array Tony our own Anthony of eclectic o erings on Min- Dutton, known widely

around here for his love of Korean foods? I dont know. Do you? (To hear a podcast of Saturdays rebroadcasted show, go to http://splendidtable.publicradio.org/) n For those of you who enjoy a good band while enjoying a cold one, but not the smoke- lled air that often accompanies live tunes at the local tavern, youll soon have a new venue. Deb White of Valley City noted on her Facebook page recently that e Labor Club of Valley City is going smoke-free e ective April 2.
Nikki Laine Zinke is editor and publisher of The Independent. Reach her at nlzinke@indy-bc.com

Remember: If youre not the lead dog, the view never changes.

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www.INDY-BC.com ONLINE ALL THE TIME! THE INDEPENDENT is published weekly from its Smart Media LLC home in Fingal, N.D., and is available free of charge at designated distribution outlets in the Barnes County and surrounding area. No one is permitted more than one current issue of THE INDEPENDENT without permission. Additional copies and back issues are available for $5 prepaid. Annual subscriptions are also available. Send check or money order for $52/year to THE INDEPENDENT, 416 Second St., Fingal, ND 58031. Theft of THE INDEPENDENT will be prosecuted.

CALENDAR: ARTS n COMMUNITY n GROUPS n GOVERNMENT n SCHOOL n SPORTS


etc.) and audience-members welcome. No cost. College Dance runs from 10 p.m. to 12:45 a.m. at the Valley City Eagles. Tower City Senior Citizens meet every Wednesday at the Community Center in Tower City from 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. A meal is served. More info: Betty Gibbons, president; 701-840-0184. Texas Holdem Tournament every Wednesday night at 7 p.m. at the Eagles, Valley City. Open to all player levels. More info: Richard Hass: 840-2612. Free, for people 21+. Valley City State University basketball vs. Dickingson State College, Osmon Fieldhouse in Valley City: womens game 5:30 p.m., mens game 7:30 p.m. Entry deadline for Valley City Park and Rec Youth Basketball Tournament to be held Feb. 24-25. Indoor Archery Range is open Monday and Wednesday evenings at 7 p.m. in the basement of City Auditorium, Valley City. More info: Neil Pederson, 701-840-0173. The Smithsonian Traveling Exhibit, Key Ingredients: America By Food, is currently at the Barnes County Historical Society Museum in Valley City. More info: Wes Anderson, 701-845-0966.

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Thursday, Feb. 16
Second Crossing Toastmasters continues to meet every Thursday at noon in the Norway Room, VCSU student center.

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PAGE 6 outdoors the independent


OUR OUTDOORS N.D. OUTDOORS

An On-Ice Epiphany Easy early winter aids ND wildlife recovery


recall clearly many days where an ahha! moment changed the way I did things forever. One such moment happened Dec. 26, 2000, and it altered the way I fished through the ice permanently. The converted trailer shack that my buddy Holmes, his cousin Adam and I were By Nick fishing out of on the day after Christmas Simonson had taken on a distinct chill, and I held my hand out over the flickering propane heater, which sputtered and spit the last fumes from the 20-pound cylinder on the outside of the house. Being back from Florida for my final holiday break of undergrad, I still was not used to the North Dakota winters I had fled from in 1997, and I nervously asked how we planned on keeping warm the rest of the day. Well have to go back into town and refill the tank, said my buddy, obviously annoyed. His cousin nodded and agreed to drive. I volunteered to stay behind just in case a school of fish decided to cruise by our spot on the channel edge, though I was doubtful. I watched the duo pull away from the ice house in Adams Chevy, opened a set of handwarmers and clicked the bail on my borrowed ice rod. The Northland Buckshot Rattlespoon zipped down the hole off to one side and disappeared from view in the 20 feet of dingy water below me. I looked to my left at the whirring disk of green, red and yellow on the Vexilar FL-8 hanging in the next hole over while I jigged my lure about four feet off the bottom. With each twitch of my rod, I saw a yellow flash on the monitor of the sonar device. I would rip the lure up and down and the color would change from yellow to red to green and back to yellow, or when Id move it just slightly, it would flicker between a light green bar and a thicker yellow bar. It was like a video game of sorts and, as my brain made the connection, I smiled with the onset of that ah-ha! moment. I would open the bail and the lure would drop into the solid red bottom and the line would go limp. Id slowly pull the spoon up and it would creep up warily from the edge of the sonars viewing area. This is pretty neat, I said aloud as I banged the spoon on the bottom, ripped it up and let it fall; and then reeled it up a few feet in the water column. I glanced at my watch, looked out the window and sat down as I jiggled the fishing rod some more. I again turned SIMONSON: 7

inter officially began in December, and except for a few days of normal cold, it didnt even feel like By Doug winter throughout Leier January. Except for people who thrive on snow activities, and businesses that cater to them, most of us have breathed a sigh of relief that we arent having a fourth straight hard Midwest winter that seemingly lasts six months. The mild start to winter is just what the doctor ordered for wildlife as well. Late winter or spring storms are still a threat, especially to pheasants, but to this point North Dakotas resident wildlife is not nearly so stressed as the last three years. Theres still more stress than in fall, but winter mortality is likely minimal so far. While winters positive benefits for wildlife have generated a lot of attention, the real good news is also coming from the fishing side of things. While ice formation on most lakes is not as far along as it normally is this time of year, ice anglers are making up for lost time. Instead of drifted over county roads and plugged section line trails leading to favorite fishing waters, anglers can get to a just about every lake in the state this winter. Lakes arent clogged with snow, so anglers can explore a bit as ice conditions permit. Fishing has been good so far, according to Greg Power, fisheries chief for the North Dakota Game and Fish Department, and its probably only going to get better. Another benefit of an open winter like were experiencing this year, is a

A lack of heavy snowcover on North Dakota lakes means less winterkill this year. (Photo credit/NDGF)

break from a threat of winterkill on When the plants die, they also use lakes. Over the past three years more LEIER: 7 than 60 lakes suffered at least partial winterkill of fish because of owners: Brian & cole Mindt prolonged, deep Powdercoating & Gold Plating snow cover. Winterkill is a common threat in plains states, Power says. It typically happens when snow n custom-Built cables - stainless steel Braided and Black n Machine shop services comes early and piles up on the ice, blocking orthwesterN light penetration to underwater NdustrIes plants. Without light, the plants Supplier to the dont grow and Shooting SportS produce oxygen.

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the independent outdoors PAGE 7

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PISTOL LEAGUE STANDINGS


Valley City Rifle & Pistol Club Indoor Pistol League Results: Week 5 Team Standings: AA.22 (WK Total/TOTAL) 1. CCI (571/2813); 2. Northwestern Industries (558/2810); 3. Precision Shooting Group (570/2809); 4. Carico Shooters (565/2802); 5. Al and Mikes (548/2741). A.22 (WK Total/TOTAL) 1. Quilting Goddess (569/2718); 2. Socialites (548/2672); 3. Great Plains Plumbing (522/2666); 4. Als (527/2629). Centerfire (WK Total/TOTAL) 1. Weber Trucking (562/2791); 2. Precision Shooting Group (568/2771); 3. Northwestern Industries (527/2743); 4. Valley City Auto Parts (545/2722); 5. Mikes (500/2595). Revolver (WK Total/TOTAL) 1. Tom Cruff (285/1419); 2. Travis Carico (285/1376); 3. Aaron Carico (277/1368); 4. Ron Koslofsky (285/1329); 5. Harvey Carico (238/1248). Week 5 High Scores: AA.22 (Total) Handicap: Garth Weber (289); Ron Koslofsky (285); Chad Coulure (285). High Actual Score: Garth Weber (289) High Team Score: CCI (571) A.22 (Total) Handicap: Tanya Couture (285); Tanya Couture (285); Linda Carico (284). High Actual Score: Tim Lockwood (244). High Team Score: Quilting Goddess (569). Centerfire (Total) Handicap: Garth Weber (285); Chad Couture (285); Tom Cruff (285). High Actual Score: Garth Weber (283). High Team Score: Precision Shooting Group (568). Revolver (Total) Handicap: Tom Cruff (285); Travis Carico (285); Ron Koslofsky (285). High Actual Score: Tom Cruff (274).

our prairie lakes and reservoirs. Power LEIER: From 7 says it wouldnt hurt to get a little snow the oxygen in the decaying process. Sometimes the waters dissolved oxygen rest of the winter so theres some runoff, falls to a level that no longer supports fish. but most lakes are full so one year without much runoff isnt much of a concern. No matter what happens the rest of the Collectively, theres a lot of water on our winter, Power says its likely late enough landscape, he said. that even widespread heavy snows would not create much danger for winterkill. Leier is a biologist with the Game & Fish Department. He A winter like this , he said, where now can be reached by email: dleier@nd.gov were into February and we have virtually 1530 W. Main St. - Valley City no snow on most of ExTEnDED HouRs foR YouR ConvEniEnCE the lakes, is absolutely great news, Dr. R.L. Thomsen Dr. Brent Thomsen especially coming off the past few. If there is any downside to an open winter, its a lack of potential spring We aCCept: Blue Cross/Blue Shield, Medicare, Aflac & Combine insurance. runoff typically needed to recharge

701-845-2481

youll be heard?

Think

SIMONSON: From 6 my attention to the whir of the FL-8 and saw something that looked out of place. A large red blob had materialized on the circular screen, just below my offering. I jigged the rod to make sure that the object wasnt my spoon, and as I did, the red bar rose up toward it and paused about a foot below the yellow mark on the screen. I then ripped the spoon upward and the red mark exploded after it and I felt the fish whollop my offering. The drag on the reel began to scream, the ice rod was doubled over pointing straight down the hole and the fight was on. I went from watching the Vexilar, to looking down the hole, to loosening my drag. Occasionally, the red mark would zoom through the screen and then quickly disappear. Each time, the line was higher up on the sonars display. Finally, I saw the fish a large pike swim under the hole. My adrenaline surged and I cranked on the reel, attempting to steer its head toward the surface. Finally, the gaping, tooth-filled maw angled just right and I put the last few turns on the reel. I reached down and grabbed the northern behind the head and hoisted it out of the water. It was a five-pound pike, my first ever through the ice. My friends rumbled up in the pickup

shortly thereafter with a tank full of propane. I stepped outside the metal shack and held the fish up for them to see. That Vexilar is really cool, I said to Adam, as I explained how I saw, triggered and caught the fish with the help of his sonar unit. The next year, graduated and relocated back to North Dakota, my parents bought me one for Christmas, and that old FL-8 still ranks as one of the best gifts anyone has ever given me. A few years ago, I upgraded to an FL-20 and passed the old unit on to my brother, who still uses it to this day. Ive often said that a sonar device is only slightly more important than an auger when ice fishing, and I wouldnt leave home without one. Today, there are more brands, models and options to fit any anglers needs and budget than just the FL-8, which was the only unit available at the turn of the century. If you fish with any of them, youve probably had that ah-ha! moment on ice, seen what was once unviewable and learned how fish react to your presentations. As a result, you probably agree with me that your chosen sonar is the most important piece of ice fishing equipment. If you havent yet fished with one, its time to see what youre missing and experience an epiphany of your own in our outdoors.
Nick Simonson grew up in Valley City.

Yeah, Right!
The typical radio station reaches only 3% to 12% of adults during its best time slot morning drive time. 74% of radio listeners report changing the station when a commercial comes on while in their car. The use of portable digital music devices and satellite radio penetration continues to grow and erode broadcast radios audience.

Be Loud and Clear!

independent
Despite all the doom and gloom news you hear about newspapers, the decline in readership that the pundits report as near death is about -2.5% nationwide in THE the past two years and the primary reason is that community newspaper readership is growing at an unprecedented rate. Add to that the fact that 44% of all active Internet users visited a newspaper Web site last month, and youll realize that communityOF newspapers and their affiliated Web sites & BEYOND BARNES COUNTY deliver the largest loyal, local, repeat audience of any media in the marketplace. Newspaper advertising gets results. Call us today and well help you develop a plan to get a great return on your advertising investment.

PAGE 8 the independent

Honest, complete discussion on Devils Lake outlet projects required


Letter from Richard Betting Valley City On Tuesday, Feb. 7, the Barnes County Commission passed a resolution asking the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to change its Tolna Coulee Operating Plan. The Commission recognized the potential downstream damage along the Sheyenne River that the Tolna Coulee Control Structure could cause if the coulee were allowed to erode. Commissioners asked that the Control Structure be allowed to be rebuilt and capable of controlling water once again. If Devils Lake reaches 1458 feet above msl, and the Tolna Coulee erodes, as the Corps plan encourages it to do, the resulting lower elevation--perhaps down to 1446 feet--means that all of the water in the Devils Lake basin above that elevation will flow into the Sheyenne River without any control at all. The Control Structure will be left open, uncontrolled. The result will be that the entire 3810 square miles of the Devils Lake watershed will be added to that of the Sheyenne River (about 4,000 square miles contributing above Baldhill Dam) and for all practical purposes doubling it. The Corps plan endangers the entire Sheyenne River valley downstream of Devils Lake. Why was this allowed to happen? The Corps held a meeting of state and federal agencies--the Devils Lake Executive Committee--in Bismarck January 31. The group failed to insist that the Operating Plan be changed. Why is that? Perhaps because they failed to realize the incredible arrogance of such a plan, doubling the watershed of the Sheyenne River and probably doubling the amount of water dumped into the river without any downstream studies of what such an action would do. Another item that the agency representatives were not told was that the North Dakota State Water Commission is planning a fourth outlet, the West Stump Lake Emergency Outlet. If a fourth outlet is built, it will mean that water could flow out of Stump Lake at an elevation of about 1452 feet msl, and Devils Lake will be allowed to fall to that level. If erosion is allowed to occur, the West Stump ditch could erode to even lower levels, perhaps down to 1446 feet msl. Thus, if the West Stump project is built, it could also mean that the Corps Tolna Coulee project will never function. Devils Lake would never rise to an elevation above 1452--or lower. One could ask, then, Why should the Tolna Coulee project be built? Why should roads and dikes around Devils Lake be raised to levels of protection of 1465 feet msl, because if the West Stump project is built without a control structure or with one at an elevation lower than 1458 feet, Devils Lake/Stump Lake will never rise above that elevation. Why haven't such plans and possibilities been dealt with by the DLEC? By the SWC? In either case--West Stump Lake ditch or Tolna Coulee Control Structure-

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

-should the permanent elevation of Devils Lake be lowered? What will happen downstream as a result of adding the entire Devils Lake basin watershed to that of the Sheyenne River? That discussion has not taken place. It should happen before the projects are built and operated, not after.
Richard Betting is a member of the group People to Save the Sheyenne.

Find-a-Word Week of Feb. 10, 2012

LLOYD OMDAHL

Measure #2 will confound local government finances

ore and more local officials are becoming alarmed over the impact of Measure #2 on the June ballot that proposes to repeal all property taxes and By Lloyd dump the mess into the laps of the state legislators. Omdahl Instead of offering specific solutions to specific problems, the sponsors of the measure have been offering a variety of specious claims and generalities that are not supported by the language in the proposed constitutional amendment. Some have suggested that the money can be found by firing 12,000 public employees; others say that the measure will not require replacement revenue for local governments. Neither of these claims is substantiated by the language in the measure. Here is the exact language on the ballot: The legislative assembly shall direct a share of sales taxes, individual and corporate income taxes, insurance premium taxes, alcoholic beverage taxes, mineral leasing fees, and gaming taxes and any oil and gas production and extraction

taxes, tobacco taxes, lottery revenues, and financial institutions taxes not allocated to elementary and secondary schools to counties, cities and other political subdivisions according to a formula devised by the legislative assembly to fully and properly fund the legally-imposed obligations of counties, cities, townships and other political subdivisions. It is clear that this amendment, if passed, would require the legislature to take money ($800 million annually) from the state treasury and pay local governments for the money lost by the repeal of the property tax. All we need to do is look at the number and complexity of local governments to understand the problem in developing a payback formula. North Dakota has more local governments per capita than any other state in the Union. We have 53 counties, 350 cities, 1100 townships, over 300 fire districts, around 175 school districts, over 200 park districts, around 50 soil conservation districts, nearly 75 water resource districts, close to 95 libraries, and scores of ambulance districts. Each of these local governments has a unique financial OMDAHL: 9

C A R D S T S Y R T D F F

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THIS WEEKS FIND-A-WORD BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

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STEAK NIGHT

YOUR HEALTH: Healthcare Reform: Keep Whats Working and Boost Prevention
By Vicki Voldal Roseau f, as Benjamin Franklin famously said, "An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure," then the Affordable Care Act (ACA) that became law in early 2010 is an extremely beneficial step. The healthcare act greatly improves efforts to

the independent PAGE 9

prevent disease. For starters, the new law requires insurers to cover a long list of high-value preventive services without charging any deductible, co-payment or co-insurance. The list notably includes mammograms and colonoscopies; and additional preventive services

will be added in 2012. In addition, the ACA is funding local initiatives to develop and test new models to drive healthcare system reforms. This includes establishing the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation, which engages local health champions to

OMDAHL: From 8 structure with varying degrees of reliance on property taxation. Take counties, for example. According to the latest posting by the State Tax Department, Bottineau reported an average of 129 mills for the county; Slope reported 152; Grand Forks reported 379 mills, and Morton reported 363. All other counties fell in between. What these figures tell us is that county governments across the state have varying needs for property revenue and they also have a wide range in the services they offer their citizens. Consequently, a simple one-size-fits-all solution will not work for each and every county government. We can bet that schools, cities, townships and the hundreds of other local governments have unique budgets as well. A single solution, such as flat across-the-board percentage refunds to all, would give huge windfalls to some local governments while short-changing hundreds of others. Because each political subdivision is unique, the only fair and rational approach would be for a legislative committee or some state agency to review the budget of each local government and dole out money accordingly. To protect the uniqueness of local governments, representatives from our 2200 local governments would have to travel to Bismarck to justify their budgets and convince some state entity or legislative committee that their budget needs are legitimate. This process would certainly threaten local control of local ser-

vices. The problem of getting money required by the measure back to the local government is only one problem in this simplistic approach to state and local

finance offered by Measure #2 . An arbitrary change of this magnitude requires the deliberative process of the legislature over a 10-year period.

revitalize and sustain critical Medicare, Medicaid and Childrens Health Insurance Programs and ultimately improve the healthcare system for all Americans. However, some observers are concerned that efforts to privatize Medicare, Medicaid and even the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) might slow healthcare reform progress. Just a few days ago, I read an interesting essay

by Paul Krugman, awardwinning economics professor at Princeton University. Krugman notes that some politicians are now pushing to partially privatize the VHA, even though for the past two decades this program has been a huge healthcare success story. Several surveys have documented that the VHA is providing better care to vets than most other Americans receive and at the same

time the VHA has held its cost increases below those of private insurers. It doesnt make sense to change something that is working well. We need to build on programs and systems that are already providing superior care while controlling costsjust like the current Veterans Health Administration.
Vicki Voldal Rosenau is the Tobacco Coordinator at City-County Health District.

PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD TODAY


Free Private-Party Ads o Ads do not pertain to a business venture. o Ads are not services offered. o Ads are not employment. o Ads are not auction sales. o Ads are not sale or rental of real estate property, including land and mobile homes. Price: 1-35 words: Free Additional words: 10 cents each. Paid Classified Ads Line Ads - 1-35 words: (frequency discount available) o 1 wk: $6.50 o 2 wks: $12 o 3 wks: $18 o 4 wks: $23 Additional words: 10 cents each. Boxed Display Ads: $6.50/column inch Add a photo to any ad: $5 extra per run

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- Since 1976 -

845-4705 800-752-5142

1269 Main St. W Valley City, ND

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TASTY SNACKS BEEF STICKS JERKY SAUSAGE

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VALENTINES DINNER
STEAKS: Ribeye, T-Bone & Tri-Tip SEAFOOD: Lobster, Crablegs, Shrimp, Salmon

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PAGE 10 classifieds
NOTICE Announcements
Jamestown Church of Christ looking for brothers and sisters in Christ. Join us for worship services instead of driving to Fargo or Bismarck. Please call or email me for time and place of worship services. John Burleson, 701-368-1696, or email: bjburles@daktel. com $150. 845-1525.

Vehicles
1997 Chev Blazer $2500 1997Chev Blazer $3200 1996 Chev Blazer $3500 1995 AstroVan AWD $4200 1988 Chev Pickup 2X4 $2800

Fair condition. $950. Call 701-845-4077.

2120.

NICE SELECTION

Land/Real Estate
LAND FOR SALE. 50 acres located 3 miles west of Valley City in SW 1/4-26-140-59 south of I-94. Call 701845-4303 after 10 AM.

Call 701-840-0166

WANTED
Interested in purchasing a folding screen to be used as a room divider. Phone 701-4901325. Want to buy: Older Ford pickup from the 50s or 60s. Prefer running. Call 701-845-3723, ask for Boomer. WANTED. Forks for a backhoe Bucket. Also V.W. truck, any year. Call Kent at 701-4906462 or 701-646-6462.

FOR SALE Household - Misc.


Newer front-load washer and dryer. LG brand. $800. Flat-top stove, 1 year old, $350. Call 701-789-0449. Becker Brothers antique piano, early 1914. Excellent condition, $1,800. Green floral loveseat for sale, $100. Antique chair, $50. Deb: 701-845-2364. FOR SALE: 64 string harp guitar, 1915 model in original box. Call 845-1525. 40-plus 4X6 Rubber Mats. Only $40 each. call 701-789-0228 Pews for sale. Contact Donelda to make arrangements to see. Four antique pews to choose from. Plus an ornate high-back chair. Call 845-3845. Light-blue davenport for sale. Like new. $250. Will negotiate. Grace, 8450877. Pair of 225/70/15 studded snow tires mounted on rim. Fit Ford or Dodge.

NICE APPLIANCES

For Sale: 1991 Chevy Lumina van. Five seats. Runs good. If interested, call: 701-845-3311 (home) or 701-848-6943 (cell). 2004 750 Honda Shadow motorcyle. Only 5,200 miles. Can be seen at The Iron Stallion in Valley City. Call Kyle at 701-799 3264. $4,000 or best offer. Must see to appreciate. Dodge 1/2 ton Ram. Runs good. Only 69,000 actual miles on it. 318 engine. and a topper. automatic transmission, full-time 4WD. $1,596.00 840-1892 or 845-4554 Blazer, red, 2-door 4x4, 154K miles; PW, PL, tilt wheel, cruise, roof rack, towing package and CD/MP3. Within the last 20K miles: rear end rebuilt, trans. rebuilt, new idler arm, both oil cooler lines replaced and a new windshield. Have the paperwork. Asking $2500 OBO (cash talks). Call or text: 701-490-0914. 2007 Scion tC (Toyota) $9500 obo, Flint Mica Exterior, black interior, 93k mile. Can provide pictures by email if requested. Chris: 701840-9218

NICE VAN

Buying Farm Scrap & Car Bodies. Rock & gravel sales available. Tandem truck to haul. Will trade barn cleaning for scrap. Will pick up car bodies in town and rural. Call Elroy Patzner, Jamestown, 701-2522533 or 701-320-2239 (cell). 100% WOOD HEAT, no worries. Keep your family safe and warm with an OUTDOOR WOOD FURNACE from Central Boiler. RLH Enterprises 701-412-3143

ATTENTION FARMERS

for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination, call North Dakota Fair Housing Council Tollfree 1-888-265-0907. HUD Toll free 1-800669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

EMPLOYMENT

LIKE NEW

FOR RENT
FOR RENT: 2-bedroom apartments for rent in Litchville, utilities included, laundry facilities are available. Income determines amount of rent. Parklane Homes, Inc., Litchville. Sandy Sandness, Mgr, 701-7624496. Parklane Homes, Inc., temporarily rents apartments to all persons without regard to income restrictions.
This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employer.

NEWLY REMODELED

GUNS
WANTED TO BUY. Gun collector wants to buy old Winchesters and other antique guns. Fair prices paid. Call 605-352-7078. Want to buy: Winchester 1894s most any year, also firearms of most any type. Also Kawasaki 3 cylinder 2 stroke motorcycles. Call 701-845-5196. Santa fe deluxe mauser in 30/06, drilled for scope and has sling mounts, monte carlo stock. $275. Call 701845-5196.

Old 10 Saloon Bar & Grill, recently remodeled and expanded, needs a cook, wait staff and bartender. Flexible hours - days, evenings. Wages depending on experience. Call Harry, 701-633-5317 or stop in at 407 Main St., Buffalo, N.D. Help Wanted: Bartender Cook for Weekends - Friday, Saturday, Sunday, at the Fish Tank, in Sibley. Work is May through November. Call 733-2405, ask for Diana or Bonnie.

COOK, BAR HELP WANTED

GREAT RESULTS!
Call LORI FROEMKE: 701-320-0780

GREAT ADS GET

Place Yours.

HELP WANTED

RUBBER MATS

ANTIQUE PEWS

SERVICES
Litscher Training Stables is a full service training facility with Indoor-Outdoor arenas. Offering training, lessons, showing, sales, and more. Contact Jenna for more information and to reserve your spot for this spring. Hurry! Stalls are filling up fast. 701-830-

HORSES TRAINED

LIKE NEW

USED TIRES

Ag & Equipment
16-foot bumper hitch stock trailer for sale.

Publishers Notice All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise ``any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising

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the independent PAGE 11


BIG SCREEN: From 16 e Barnes County Historical Society Lecture Series side, shown when he cooks Season 14 will present Sharon Buhr: Food Staples Around Stephanie breakfast. And the World at 7 p.m. ursday, Feb. 16, at the Barnes she may be falling for him. County Museum in downtown Valley City. Again. During the early months of the year, Hollywood generally gives the moviegoing public a rest from the big movies, saving the real money-making releases for the Christmas and summer seasons. One for the Money may have the same title as Janet Evanovichs best-selling book from her Stephanie Plum series, but whatever appeal the novel had was lost in translation. Heigl, also a producer, is sadly miscast as feisty Italian Stephanie Plum, complete with thick Joisey accent. One for the Money exempli es the latest in Heigls poor decision-making process for the parts she accepts, insisting on starring in as many completely forgettable, sappy romantic comedies as she can. Apart from some other Tuesday, Feb 14 casting aws, the movie exudes an overt sexist attitude. I dont make that Eagles Aerie 2192 claim lightly, especially since six women are cred345 12th Ave. N.E. ited with writing, producValley City, N.D. ing and directing One for the Money, enforcing the very stereotypes the movie Kayley Erlandson is a student at Valley City State University. claims to ght. Stephanies weapon PIZZA OF THE WEEK of choice Visit our Full Service TAK N is pepper Print Shop I E E Ou spray, and DIN T when she isnt hitFull Color Digital ting bad Printing Now Available guys with WINTER her purse, Banners & Posters HOURS Custom Forms fumbling MON-FRI: Marketing Materials 11 AM - 1 AM around Letterhead/Envelopes SATURDAY: or getting Business Cards NOON - 1 AM rescued Flyers/Newsletters $1 OFF MEDIuM Much More . . . by men, $2 OFF LArgE the entire with VCSu Student ID script exists Our PIZZA MENu - WITH FLAVOrS FrOM ArOuND THE WOrLD - juST CANT bE bEAT! Valley purely to In the Wagon Wheel Officeworks 351 Central Ave N ll the time Inn - Valley City, ND PO Box 964 Valley City, ND 58072-0964 between the 845-2525 encounters 701-845-5222 Office Supplies 701-845-1833 Printing between www.valleyofficeworks.com Stephanie A smoke-free So Your Office Works and Morelli, establishment taking on characteristics of a red-hot read in Cosmopolitan magazine. e irtatious dialogue in One for the Money shi s from groan-inducing to positively cringe-worthy, (Were ancient history, like the pyramids, baby!) e females in this movie are at the mercy of their male counterparts, getting pushed around and messing things up for the more capable men around them. e chauvinistic surrender of the movie peppers the lm, and fails to deliver the promised premise of female empowerment. Besides the indisputable similarities to e Bounty Hunter, the 2010 Jennifer Aniston/Gerard Butler movie, One for the Money is a sloppy lm. In a movie that takes turns being a romance, comedy and thriller, the transitions between the genres must be seamless. It felt like I was watching three di erent movies at once, all of which were poorly imagined. is is just another excuse for Hollywood to make a quick buck. One for the Money isnt just the title, its the text Katherine Heigls agent sent her when he asked her to star in this movie.

Buhr to speak on Food Staples on 2/16

is presentation will take a walk around the world to look at the abundance and scarcity of food on our planet and will compare how much Americans spend on food to people in other countries. In the U.S. our staples tend to be wheat in the form of bread and pasta, along with potatoes. Other countries have staples that range from the familiar maize to cassava and taro root.

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for Valentines Day Dinner


14oz Prime Rib - 14oz Calgary Ribeye 14oz New York Strip Seafood Stuffed Shrimp Savannah Chicken Fresh Honey Parmesan Salmon Fresh Chilean Sea Bass Seafood Medley Pasta Chicken & Wild Rice - Cucumber Mango & Pomegranate Mediterranean Olive Tabbouleh - Greek Pomegrante Salsa Fresh Fruit

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Chicken Alfredo - $10.95 Eagle Steak - $8.25

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For Reservations, Call 845-2192

MAKE RESERVATIONS CALL 845-0274

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See Dr. Stavenger at Sanford Health Valley City Clinic (701) 845-6000 or read his bio at sanfordhealth.org

ONLINE ALL THE TIME www.indy-bc.com

900-99000-0392 Rev 1/12

the independent PAGE 12

E E FR vate Pri arty s P Ad e n i L

WITHIN TWO WEEKS I GOT THE SALES THAT I SOUGHT. THANK YOU! Sharon Clancy

ADVERTISING IN THE INDY OF BC WORKS.

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ON THE BIG SCREEN

Com

mer

34th ANNUAL BARNES COUNTY SPELLING BEE

One for the Money fails on all levels


Pictured above are the winners of the 34th Annual Barnes County Spelling Bee, held Feb. 6 in two divisions. Division III winners (left) and Division II winners (right). (Photos submitted/ Toni Legler-Haglund)

Olauson takes top spot in county spelling bee A

Valley City Junior High student captured top honors at the 34th Annual Barnes County Spelling Bee held Feb. 6 at Valley City State University. Chelsea Olauson took rst place Overall and rst place in Division III spelling competition, which included students in seventh and eighth-grade. Taking the number two spot was Alex Jorgensen, of Maple Valley Junior High, who earned second place Overall as well as second place in Pictured above are all of the competitors in the 34th Annual Barnes County Spelling Bee. (Photo submitted/ Toni LeglerDivision III. Haglund) Olausons and Jorgensens wins at the county level allow them to represent Barnes Coun- Dietrich of St. Catherines Catholic School, h place; and Celeste Piatz ty in the North Dakota State Spelling Bee, scheduled for March 23 in of Barnes County North - East Campus, sixth place. Announcer of the Spelling Bee was Jennifer Glasheen of the South East Bismarck. Other Division III winners were: Laura Limesand of Barnes Education Cooperative. Judges were Cindy Zahn, prrofessor at Valley County North - East Campus, third place; and David Fletcher, Barnes City State University; Toni Legler-Haglund of the Valley City Area TeachCounty North - West Campus, fourth place. er Center; Kristi Shanenko of Valley City Schools; and Sandy Zahn of the In Division II competition, which included each county schools top Valley City Area Teacher Center. spellers from h and sixth grades, place winners were: Ashley Tahran of e Barnes County Spelling Bee is coordinated through the Valley City Washington Elementary, rst place; Cara Van Bruggen of Litchville, secArea Teacher Center and sponsored by the participating schools. ond place; Olivia Fehr of Barnes Count North - West Campus, third place; Alexa Zinke of Maple Valley Elementary Oriska, fourth place; Dawson

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