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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Wednesday Aug. 21, 2013 Vol XIV, Edition 3
WALL STREET SLIDE
BUSINESS PAGE 10
PUNTER IN
QUESTION
SPORTS PAGE 11
LUNCH BOX 101:
HOWTO BUY, FILL
FOOD PAGE 19
WHY THE STOCK MARKET IS HAVING A CHILLY AUGUST
Family Owned & Operated
Established: 1949
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A $75 million remodel of the
Broadway interchange at Highway
101 in Burlingame thats been
years in the making was set into
motion by the City Council at
Monday nights meeting.
The council approved the con-
sent item allowing Mayor Ann
Keighran to execute an agreement
between the city, Caltrans and the
San Mateo County Transportation
Authority to begin construction
on the freeway interchange. The
reconstruction will replace the
existing bridge between Rollins
Road and Old Bayshore Highway,
with a new structure to simplify
the road. The structure will range
from six to eight lanes, depending
on the portion of the bridge since
some lanes drop off because of left
turn only lanes. This will be
slightly to the north of the exist-
ing structure.
Other major components of the
project include the reconstruction
of the Monte Diablo
pedestrian/bicycle overcrossing
to provide sufficient clearance
between the columns for the auxil-
iary lanes; construction of a new
Broadway pedestrian/bicycle
overcrossing south of the exist-
ing Broadway interchange; the
reconstruction of the Peninsula
Avenue overcrossing to provide
sufficient clearance between the
New Broadway interchange expected in 2016
Burlingame City Council votes to move forward with reconstruction
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Redwood City Planning
Commission Chair Ernie Schmidt
cannot list the appointed position
as his profession on the
November ballot, according to
one opponent in the City Council
race who is seeking a court order to
stop the use before the paperwork
heads to print.
Corrin Rankin, owner of a bail
bonds business, is petitioning the
San Mateo County Superior Court
to prevent City Clerk Silvia
Vonderlinden from moving ahead
with Schmidts stated occupation
as planning commissioner. A
Candidate
job listing
contested
Redwood City Council opponent files
petition; hearing set on alleged violation
ANGELA SWARTZ/DAILY JOURNAL
The new Broadway Interchange in Burlingame is expected to be completed
in the next two to three years.
See PROJECT, Page 23
Ernie Schmidt, Corrin Rankin
BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL
The Avalon Motel is under contract to be sold to a developer specializing in building market-rate inll housing.
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
An old motel east of Highway
101 in San Mateo is being looked
at for housing by City Ventures, a
company that builds high-density
housing in the area.
The Avalon Motel on North
Bayshore Road is a 2-acre lot
tucked between apartment com-
plexes and single-family resi-
dences east of the property.
City Ventures is currently under
contract to purchase the motel and
held an open house last night to
gauge community interest for the
site. The asking price is $8.5 mil-
lion.
The site can be developed into a
145-unit multi-family residential
complex or condominiums or even
a skilled-nursing or assisted-liv-
ing senior housing complex under
city zoning rules.
If City Ventures does buy and
build on the property, it will be
the rst development the company
will construct in San Mateo
County, said Phil Kerr, vice presi-
dent of development.
It has built in Morgan Hill and
Scotts Valley locally and in
Ventura, Encinitas, Carlsbad and
other Southern California cities.
The North Shoreview neighbor-
hood motel site has some chal-
lenges and Kerr said the company
is looking to see what a better use
for the site will be.
It may be another 18 months,
however, before the land deal is
nalized, Kerr said.
City Ventures specializes in
market-rate inll, Kerr said.
We need to see what works well
for the community and will talk to
the city about whats possible, he
said.
The Avalon rents rooms by the
day for $49.99 and also rents by
the week.
The North Bayshore block is
also known for drug dealing activ-
ity. Police recently responded to a
Motel may become housing
City Ventures currently under contract to purchase property; asking price $8.5M
See MOTEL, Page 23
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The San Mateo City Council
tapped San Diego-based Zucker
Systems to perform a management
audit of the Community
Development Department last night
after a lengthy interview process
that included two other rms.
The council directed City
Manager Susan Loftus to execute a
contract with Paul Zucker, who
focuses solely on Community
Development Departments, after
weighing the merits of the three
proposals.
Although all four of the coun-
cilmembers in attendance at last
City picks consultant to review CDD
See PETITION, Page 23
See AUDIT, Page 22
FOR THE RECORD 2 Wednesday Aug. 21, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
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Olympic gold
medal sprinter
Usain Bolt is 27.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1983
Philippine opposition leader
Benigno S. Aquino Jr., ending a self-
imposed exile in the United States,
was shot dead moments after stepping
off a plane at Manila International
Airport.
To know a little less and to
understand a little more: that, it
seems to me, is our greatest need.
James Ramsey Ullman, American author (1907-1971)
Actress Alicia Witt
is 38.
Actress Hayden
Panettiere is 24.
Birthdays
REUTERS
A smooth dogsh is pictured after having being swallowed by a sand tiger shark, which in turn was caught by researchers
at the University of Delawares Ocean Exploration, Remote Sensing, Biogeography (ORB) Lab.
Wednesday: Cloudy in the morning then
becoming sunny. Patchy fog in the morn-
ing. Highs in the mid 60s. South winds 5
to 15 mph...Becoming southwest 5 to 10
mph in the afternoon.
Wednesday night: Partly cloudy in the
evening then becoming cloudy. Patchy
fog after midnight. Lows in the mid 50s.
Southwest winds 5 to 10 mph...Becoming south after mid-
night.
Thursday: Cloudy in the morning then becoming sunny.
Patchy fog in the morning. Highs in the mid 60s. Southeast
winds 5 to 10 mph...Becoming west in the afternoon.
Thursday night: Partly cloudy in the evening then
becoming cloudy. Patchy fog after midnight. Lows in the
mid 50s. West winds 5 to 10 mph.
Local Weather Forecast
I n 1831, Nat Turner led a violent slave rebellion in
Virginia resulting in the deaths of at least 55 white people.
He was later executed.
I n 1858, the rst of seven debates between Illinois sena-
torial contenders Abraham Lincoln and Stephen Douglas
took place.
I n 1863, pro-Confederate raiders attacked Lawrence, Kan.,
massacring the men and destroying the towns buildings.
In 1911 , Leonardo da Vincis Mona Lisa was stolen from
the Louvre Museum in Paris. The painting was recovered two
years later in Italy.
I n 1912, the Boy Scouts of America named its rst Eagle
Scout, Arthur Rose Eldred of Troop 1 in Rockville Centre,
N.Y.
I n 1940, exiled Communist revolutionary Leon Trotsky
died in a Mexican hospital from wounds inicted by an
assassin the day before.
I n 1959, President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed an exec-
utive order making Hawaii the 50th state.
I n 1963, martial law was declared in South Vietnam as
police and army troops began a violent crackdown on
Buddhist anti-government protesters.
I n 1972, the Republican National Convention opened in
Miami Beach.
I n 1983, the musical play La Cage Aux Folles opened on
Broadway.
I n 1991, the hard-line coup against Soviet President
Mikhail S. Gorbachev collapsed in the face of a popular
uprising led by Russian Federation President Boris N.
Yeltsin.
Martial arts are forms of self-defense that
are usually weaponless. Types of martial
arts include jiu jitsu, aikido, karate, judo
and taekwondo. Kung fu is a general term
to refer to Chinese martial arts.
***
Bruce Lee (1940-1973) began his act-
ing career as the sidekick Kato in the
television series The Green Hornet
(1966-1967). The show was called The
Kato Show in Hong Kong, where Lee
is from.
***
Enter the Dragon (1973) was the last
lm that starred Bruce Lee before his
death at age 33 due to swelling of the
brain. Lee died one month before the
movies release.
***
Steve McQueen (1930-1980) was a pall-
bearer at Bruce Lees funeral. Lee was
McQueens martial arts instructor.
***
The heavy cloth draped over a cofn is
called a pall.
***
In the funeral industry, a hearse is called
a funeral coach or casket coach.
***
The OK Corral is legendary because of a
gunght. Do you know where the OK
Corral was? The year of the gunght?
How many people were killed? See
answers at end.
***
Law ofcer and saloonkeeper Wyatt
Earp (1848-1929) has been the subject
of many movies. Kurt Russell (born
1951) played Earp in Tombstone
(1993), Kevin Costner (born 1955) had
the leading role in Wyatt Earp (1994)
and Henry Fonda (1905-1982) was Earp
in My Darling Clementine (1946).
***
Goldie Hawn (born 1945) was the ditzy,
bikini clad blonde girl in the television
sketch comedy show Laugh-In (1968-
1973). She received more fan mail than
any other actor in the show.
***
Ernestine, the snorting telephone oper-
ator played by Lily Tomlin (born
1939), was a recurring character on
Laugh-In. Her punch line was We
dont care. We dont have to. Were the
phone company.
***
The rst telephone operators in the
1870s were teenage boys. Boys had
worked in telegraph ofces and they
worked for low wages. However, they
did not have the patience required for
phones. The boys were soon replaced
by young women, who also worked for
low wages and presented a more gentile
image to callers.
***
The rst female telephone operator was
Emma Nutt (1848-?). She began work-
ing for Edwin Holmes Telephone
Despatch Co. Exchange at Boston,
Mass. in 1878. She worked as an opera-
tor for 33 years.
***
AT&T rst introduced direct dialing for
long distance calls in 1951 in New
Jersey. Direct dialing became possible
throughout the country by 1959. Prior
to direct dialing, operator assistance
was required for all long distance calls.
***
The number to call for emergencies
911 was established in 1968. The
emergency number had to be three num-
bers that were not being used in any
phone number or area code in the United
States or Canada.
***
In 1876 Alexander Graham Bell (1847-
1922) led a patent for the transmis-
sion of sounds telegraphically. Ten
years later 150,000 people in the
United States owned telephones.
***
Answer: The famous gunght at the
OK Corral was on Oct. 26, 1881 in
Tombstone, Ariz. There were three
deaths in a gunght that lasted 30 sec-
onds. Allies Wyatt Earp and his broth-
ers, Morgan and Virgil (1843-1905) and
Doc Holliday (1851-1887) killed Billy
Clanton (1862-1881) and brothers
Frank McLaury (1848-1881) and Tom
McLaury (1853-1881). Today, the OK
Corral is a tourist draw with daily re-
enactments of the famous shootout.
Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
the weekend and Wednesday editions of the
Daily Journal. Questions? Comments?
Email knowitall@smdailyjournal.com or
call 344-5200 ext. 114.
(Answers tomorrow)
MODEM PRAWN GALLON ROOKIE
Yesterdays
Jumbles:
Answer: When he didnt understand what was said at the
parole hearing, the prisoner said PARDON ME
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
RUNPS
CROPH
CHATED
SIORRE
2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
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A A:
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Big Ben, No. 4,
in rst place; Gold Rush, No. 1, in second place;
and Whirl Win,No.6,in third place.The race time
was clocked at 1:49.51.
3 5 8
13 28 35 38 41 33
Mega number
Aug. 20 Mega Millions
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Powerball
Aug. 17 Powerball
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Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
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Daily Four
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Daily three evening
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Mega number
Aug. 17 Super Lotto Plus
Former football player Pete Retzlaff is 82. Actor-director
Melvin Van Peebles is 81. Playwright Mart Crowley is 78.
Singer Kenny Rogers is 75. Actor Clarence Williams III is 74.
Rock-and-roll musician James Burton is 74. Singer Harold Reid
(The Statler Brothers) is 74. Singer Jackie DeShannon is 72.
College and Pro Football Hall of Famer Willie Lanier is 68.
Actress Patty McCormack is 68. Pop singer-musician Carl
Giammarese is 66. Actress Loretta Devine is 64. NBC newsman
Harry Smith is 62. Singer Glenn Hughes is 61. Country musician
Nick Kane is 59. Actress Kim Cattrall is 57. College Football
Hall of Famer and former NFL quarterback Jim McMahon is 54.
3
Wednesday Aug. 21, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
The Golden Years are the best years!
Come interact with over 40 exhibitors from all over The Bay Area offering a host
of services, giveaways, information and more!
Free Services include*
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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
FOSTER CITY
Burglary. Someone reported their front
passenger window on their silver Toyota
Camry was smashed on Promontory Point
Lane before 9:10 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 14.
Vandal i sm. Someone reported they found
their motorcycle on the ground with dam-
age estimated at $2,000 on Plaza View Lane
before 7:38 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 14.
Vehi cl e t hef t. Someone reported her
boyfriends vehicle was stolen on Dolphin
Isle before 3:44 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 14.
Burglary. Aman was trying to break into
a home with another man on Marlin Avenue
before 2:16 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 13.
Disturbance. A land lady scratched her
tenant during an argument over being late
with the rent on Vasco Da Gama Lane before
11:05 p.m. Monday, Aug. 12.
SAN CARLOS
Burglary. Someone reported the back door
of their home was pried open but nothing
was missing on the 600 block of Joanne
Drive before 10:48 p.m. Wednesday, Aug.
14.
Suspi ci ous person. A man was beating
on a window for no reason on the 100 block
of North El Dorado Street before 10:35
p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 14.
Disturbance. A drunk man is yelling and
causing problems on the 200 block of West
39th Avenue before 8:19 a.m. Wednesday,
Aug. 14.
Burglary . A vehicles window was
smashed on the 3100 block of S. El
Camino Real before 10:50 p.m. Monday,
Aug. 12.
Police reports
Baby come back
Someone reported that her ex-boyfriend
was sending threatening texts and rid-
ing his bike near where she parks her
car on Bounty Drive in Foster City
before 11:31 p.m. Monday, Aug. 12.
By Jeff Shuttleworth
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
In addition to being safer during earth-
quakes, drivers will have a better overall
experience when they drive across the new
eastern span of the Bay Bridge when it
opens in two weeks, a bridge spokesman
said.
Andrew Gordon said, It will be a very
different experience for drivers because
traffic flow will improve, curves will be
more subtle and graceful and eastbound
drivers will have great views of the Port of
Oakland and the East Bay hills.
In fact, Gordon said the views will be so
good that bridge officials are warning driv-
ers to keep their eyes on the road and keep
the gawking for their passengers.
Thats because the new span will have
parallel side-by-side decks, in contrast to
the current bridge, which has an eastbound
lower deck and a westbound upper deck,
Gordon said.
Driving will feel more wide open, he
said.
The new span will have five lanes in each
direction, as the current span does, but
there also will be two shoulders in each
direction, which means that stalls and acci-
dents wont clog the bridge as often as they
currently do, Gordon said.
In addition, maintenance work on the
bridge can be done without closing lanes,
he said.
The main reason transportation officials
have been building the new $6.4 billion
span is that it will be seismically safer
than the existing span, which opened in
1936 and had a deck collapse in the 1989
Loma Prieta earthquake.
Transportation officials have been plan-
ning for a long time to open the new span
on Sept. 3 but that opening date was
thrown in doubt in March when it was dis-
covered that a significant number of 96
bolts that secure earthquake shock
absorbers known as shear keys to the deck
of the bridge failed when they were tight-
ened on a pier east of Yerba Buena Island.
The long-term solution to fixing the bro-
ken bolts is to cover them with an exterior
saddle and cable system that is encased in
concrete but that work isnt expected to be
completed until mid-December, Gordon
said.
However, last week transportation offi-
cials approved a short-term fix that
involved inserting large steel plates,
known as shims, into each of four bear-
ings, enhancing their ability to safely dis-
tribute energy during an earthquake.
That work was completed over the week-
end, Gordon said.
The entire Bay Bridge will be closed in
both directions from 8 p.m. on Aug. 28 to
5 a.m. on Sept. 3, the day after Labor Day,
to complete additional work that must be
completed before the new span can be
opened to the driving public. But Gordon
said none of the work will be challeng-
ing and the work will be much less com-
plicated than when the Bay Bridge was
closed for construction work during previ-
ous Labor Day weekend closures in 2006,
2007 and 2009.
The work over Labor Day weekend prima-
rily will involve paving, striping lanes
and erecting barrier rails, Gordon said.
He said most of the work on the new east-
ern span will be on its eastern side, which
is at the Oakland touchdown and the toll
plaza, and its western side, which at the
Yerba Buena Island transition structure and
the Yerba Buena Island Tunnel.
In addition, maintenance work will be
performed on the western span, such as
replacing lighting fixtures, cleaning and
painting cables and repairing finger
joints, Gordon said.
Official says driving on new Bay
Bridge will be a better experience
CALTRANS
The entire Bay Bridge will be closed in both directions from 8 p.m. on Aug. 28 to 5 a.m. on
Sept. 3, the day after Labor Day, to complete additional work that must be completed before
the new span can be opened.
4
Wednesday Aug. 21, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
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Driver arrested after
fleeing scene of crash
An 18-year-old driver was arrested
Monday after eeing the scene of a
rollover crash that seriously injured a
passenger in his car, police said.
Ofcers responded to reports of a
rollover in the 400 block of Cabot Road
at about 3:15 p.m., South San Francisco
police Sgt. Bruce McPhillips said.
Apreliminary investigation indicated
that the driver of a Toyota 4Runner
later identied as Juan Antonio Garcia,
of South San Francisco was attempt-
ing to make a U-turn when his vehicle
ipped over, McPhillips said.
Witnesses saw Garcia running away
from the scene with two of his three pas-
sengers, MchPhillips said.
Arriving ofcers found the third pas-
senger, a man in his 20s, still inside the
vehicle, McPhillips said. He had suf-
fered major head trauma and was taken to
a hospital.
Garcia and the two other passengers
were found hiding in some bushes near
the Bay, McPhillips said.
Garcia was arrested on suspicion of
felony hit-and-run and driving without a
license. He was booked into San Mateo
County Jail on $50,000 bail.
Two arrested in
e-cigarette beat down
A man was beaten and had his elec-
tronic cigarette stolen at a residence on
the 2600 block of Meath Lane Sunday
night, according to South San Francisco
police. The victim was visiting several
people at the home and was in the
garage when two of his acquaintances
started punching him in the head, caus-
ing bruising, according to police.
The victim fell to the ground and one
of the suspects took an electronic ciga-
rette from him while the other suspect
tried to take his shoes, according to
police.
The victim was able to escape and
call police from his home. The two sus-
pects were located in a nearby parking
lot and the victim positively identied
them as the suspects who robbed him.
One of the suspects was found to be in
possession of the victims stolen elec-
tronic cigarette, according to police.
The two suspects, Patrick Legaspi
and Sean Steiner, both 19, were arrest-
ed and booked into county jail without
incident, according to police.
FEDERAL GOVERNMENT
U. S. Rep. Jacki e Spei er,
D-San Mateo, will speak to
small business owners today
about health care insurance
options. This will be the rst of
a series of events that Speier
will host to help constituents
understand the process and
implications of the Affordable Care Act. Todays
event is 11:30 a.m., Sharp Park Restaurant, 2600
Francisco Blvd., Pacica.
CITY GOVERNMENT
The application deadline for the Burl i ngame
Beauti cat i on Commi ssi on is Oct. 18. There is one
open seat on the commission. The application deadline
for the Parks & Recreat i on Commi ssi on is Oct. 18
as well and there are three open seats.
Local briefs
5
Wednesday Aug. 21, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
By Paul Larson
MILLBRAE
Have you ever
attended a funeral
or memorial service
and felt ill-at-ease,
uncomfortable or
awkward when
talking to the family
of the deceased? Have you ever stumbled
through your words and condolences
because you just didnt know what to say or
how to say it? Have you even decided to not
approach the family for fear of saying the
wrong thing or making a fool of yourself? If
so you are not alone. Many people in this
situation want to provide some kind of
comfort to the immediate family, but just
dont have the verbal tools to do so in an
assuring manner.
Learning Funeral Etiquette can be
useful. Using the right words at the right
time is an appropriate way to show that you
care, and in situations like this can be of
great help when provided correctly.
Standard condolences such as I am sorry
for your loss have become routine and
generic. A personalized phrase can be
welcomed such as John touched many
lives or I will miss John. DO NOT ask
the cause of death, offer advice or make
comments that would diminish the
importance of the loss such as Oh, youre
young and can marry again.
Other ways to demonstrate your support
include: 1. Listening. The family may feel
the need to express their anxiety, and giving
them that opportunity can be therapeutic; 2.
An embrace. This can show that you care
without the need for words; 3. Offering your
services. This shows the family that you are
willing to give extra time for them: Please
let me know if there is anything I can do to
help (be prepared to act if needed).
Even if you dont feel confident in
approaching the family there are other ways
to show that you care: 1. Attending the
funeral and signing the Memorial Book will
show the family that you took the time to be
there in support; 2. Dressing appropriately
for the funeral will demonstrate your efforts
to prepare for this special occasion (dark
colors are no longer a requisite for funerals,
but dressing in a coat, tie, dress or other
attire that youd wear to any special event
are considered a way of showing you care);
3. In certain cases friends are invited to
stand up and offer BRIEF personal feelings.
Prior to the funeral write a few key notes
and reflections which will help you organize
your thoughts. Even if there is no
opportunity to speak before a group you
may have a chance to offer your thoughts to
the family following the ceremony; 4. A
personalized card or note will help you
arrange your words better and can be kept
by the family. If you dont have their
mailing address you can send your envelope
to the funeral home and they will forward it
to the next of kin; 5. Providing flowers is a
long time tradition, or making a charitable
donation in the deceaseds memory will give
the family a strong sense of your regards; 6.
If appropriate a brief phone call can show
your immediate concern, but generally this
should be avoided to give the family the
privacy they may need.
If you ever wish to discuss cremation,
funeral matters or want to make pre-
planning arrangements please feel free to
call me and my staff at the CHAPEL OF
THE HIGHLANDS in Millbrae at (650)
588-5116 and we will be happy to guide you
in a fair and helpful manner. For more info
you may also visit us on the internet at:
www.chapelofthehighlands.com.
Funeral Etiquette Advice:
Show Up, Be Brief, Listen
advertisement
Amy Brooks Colin Flynn Hal Coehlo
consultant
Al Stanley
Family Owned & Operated
Established: 1949
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A 35-year-old San Francisco
man is facing life in prison if a
jury convicts him of molesting
an 8-year-old girl in Daly City.
Omar Mejia Melendez has plead-
ed not guilty to 24 counts of lewd
acts on a child under 14, two
counts of sexual penetration with
a minor under 18 and a count of
substantial sex-
ual conduct.
Melendez faces
life in prison
because the
alleged victim
was under age
10.
Pr os ecut or s
say beginning
in January 2009
Melendez lived with the girls fami-
ly for about 18 months during which
time he repeatedly molested her
under the guise of playing games.
Melendez began an estimated
eight-day trial this week follow-
ing his last-minute request to
replace his court-appointed attor-
ney. The request was denied.
Melendez remains in custody on
$6 million bail.
Man sentenced to prison for
molesting daughter, nieces
A San Mateo man accused of
molesting his daughter and two
nieces over a four-year span was
sentenced yesterday to 16 years in
prison on three felony counts of
molestation.
The 45-year-old-man, whom the
Daily Journal is not naming as not
to identify the victims, accepted a
plea deal in April on two counts of
child molestation and one count of
committing continuous molesta-
tion. The man has credit for time
served of approximately two years
and must serve 85 percent of the
remainder. In addition to the
prison time, he will also be
required to register as a sex offend-
er for life.
The term is an excellent sen-
tence, said District Attorney
Steve Wagstaffe.
He had faced life in prison if
convicted by a jury of abusing
multiple victims.
Prosecutors say he abused his
14-year-old daughter and two
nieces, 11 and 8, in a San Mateo
duplex between 2007 and May
2011. After the girls finally
reported the molestation to the
nieces mother, her boyfriend con-
tacted San Mateo police.
Man facing life prison in molestation trial
Omar
Melendez
Local brief
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN DIEGO A family friend
who kidnapped a 16-year-old girl
had a 20-hour jump on authorities,
who discovered he used a timer to
set re to his rural home where the
girls mother and younger brother
were found dead, a San Diego
County Sheriffs Department
spokeswoman said Tuesday.
James Lee DiMaggio was spot-
ted on a Border Patrol surveillance
camera at 12:10 a.m. Aug. 4, about
20 hours before his home caught
re, said the spokeswoman, Jan
Caldwell. He is seen inside his
2013 blue Nissan Versa with 16-
year-old Hannah Anderson at a
westbound highway checkpoint.
Hannahs disappearance dis-
covered after the re triggered a
massive search for DiMaggio, 40,
that spanned much of the western
United States and parts of Canada
and Mexico. DiMaggio, who was
like an uncle to the Anderson chil-
dren and their fathers best friend,
died in a shootout with FBI agents
in the Idaho wilderness six days
after the re. Hannah was rescued
and returned to Southern
California.
The discovery that the re was
set by a timer prompted investiga-
tors to warn the public during the
manhunt that DiMaggios car
might be rigged with explosives,
Caldwell said. As it turns out, the
car wasnt rigged.
Investigators who searched
DiMaggios home found an incen-
diary device, handcuff boxes and
arson wire, according to a search
warrant. It also says they discov-
ered letters from Hannah and a
handwritten note, without elabo-
rating on the contents.
San Diego-area home timed
to set fire after kidnaping
6
Wednesday Aug. 21, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
STATE/NATION
By Michael R. Blood
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES Enrollment for
President Barack Obamas health care
reforms kicks off in October, but
many Californians have only a glanc-
ing familiarity with details of the
plan, which is intended to bring cov-
erage to millions of uninsured
Americans, according to a poll
released Tuesday.
One in four state voters knows little
or nothing about the Affordable Care
Act, while another 60 percent say they
remain only somewhat knowledge-
able about it, according to the survey
from the Field Poll.
The ndings do not isolate the unin-
sured or under-insured people who
would be pulled under the umbrella of
the new coverage. However, the poll
broadly suggests that the complex
program, which Obama signed into
law in March 2010, remains some-
thing of a mystery to many voters,
even if they support its intent.
It is so complicated even for the
experts to understand, Field Poll
Director Mark DiCamillo said. When
you think you know a little more, it
raises more questions.
In addition, the overhaul is aimed at
only a slice of residents in a state of
roughly 38 million people, so the
public is not that tuned in, DiCamillo
said.
Those who already have health
insurance through their employer will
see little if any change.
The state agency guiding Obamas
overhaul, Covered California, faces a
daunting task trying to reach millions
of people without insurance and sway
them to sign up while overcoming
geographic, language and cultural bar-
riers.
California could see more than $300
million invested in television and
online ads, billboards, door-to-door
visits and other sales pitches and pro-
motions to convince uninsured resi-
dents to enroll.
The telephone poll of about 1,200
voters, supplemented with interviews
with nearly 500 minority voters, was
conducted from June 26 to July 21. It
has a margin of error of plus or minus
2.6 percentage points.
It found a majority of Californians
continue to support the overhaul,
bucking national trends that show
most Americans oppose it, although
opinions differ sharply across party
and geographic lines in the state.
For example, Hispanics who live in
Los Angeles and vote Democratic are
likely to support the health reforms.
White Republicans living in inland
counties generally oppose them.
Poll: Many California voters in dark on Obamacare
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO San Francisco
officials are considering suing
Nevada for allegedly giving some 500
poor psychiatric patients one-way
bus tickets to California.
City Attorney Dennis Herrera
planned to send a letter containing
the allegations to Nevada Attorney
General Catherine Masto on Tuesday.
The San Francisco Chronicle
reported that a draft of the letter
threatens a class-action lawsuit
against Nevada unless it reimburses
California cities and counties for the
costs of dealing with the patients and
adopts interstate transfer rules for
patients.
The letter says the patients were
discharged from a state-run psychi-
atric hospital in Las Vegas since April
2008 and got one-way bus tickets to
California. Two dozen sent to San
Francisco were broke, homeless and
mentally ill.
Officials at Mastos office and
Nevadas health department declined
to comment to the newspaper.
Meantime, officials at University
Medical Center in Las Vegas were
questioning California health author-
ities about a woman left in the facili-
tys emergency room.
Dr. Dale Carrison, the medical cen-
ters chief of staff, said the woman
from Californias Napa State Hospital
a state mental institution
claimed a caseworker there drove her
to Las Vegas with promises of a place
to stay and a disability check, accord-
ing to the Las Vegas Review-Journal.
Officials could find no indication the
woman had any ties to Las Vegas.
I have been told by California
authorities I contacted that they are
looking into the situation, Carrison
told the newspaper.
S.F. threatens to sue over influx of Nevada patients
By Tom Murphy
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Workers saw a modest rise in the average cost of
employer-sponsored health insurance this year, but
theyre probably not overwhelmed with relief.
Coverage costs still are climbing faster than wages.
That means, in many cases, a bigger portion of the aver-
age paycheck is sliced off for insurance instead of being
deposited into employee bank accounts.
Annual premiums for employer-sponsored family cov-
erage climbed nearly 4 percent this year to top $16,000
for the rst time, according to a survey the Kaiser Family
Foundation released Tuesday.
The cost of single coverage rose almost 5 percent com-
pared with 2012. Those are smaller increases than the
spikes of 9 percent for family coverage and 8 percent for
single coverage recorded in 2011. But this years increas-
es lap a 1.8 percent rise in worker wages over the same
period.
Plus, more companies are giving their employees cov-
erage with a higher deductible, which requires a patient to
pay more out of pocket for things like blood tests or
MRIs before coverage starts. Coupled with the growing
cost of coverage, that means some employees may be
paying more for insurance that covers less.
While health care costs have generally grown more
moderately since the Great Recession eased, the average
worker still feels the pain of paying more, said Drew
Altman, CEO of the nonprot Kaiser Family Foundation,
which conducts the survey on coverage costs with the
Health Research and Educational Trust.
Their costs are going up, their cost-sharing is going
up, wages are at and ination is much lower, Altman
said.
Employer-sponsored health insurance is the most com-
mon form of coverage in the United States. Employers
typically cover most of the health insurance bill for their
workers, and the actual change a worker sees in health
insurance costs can vary greatly.
Survey: Health insurance
costs outpace wage gains
It is so complicated even for the
experts to understand. ...When you think
you know a little more, it raises more questions.
Field Poll Director Mark DiCamillo
NATION 7
Wednesday Aug. 21, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
by
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By Bill barrow and kate Brumback
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DECATUR, Ga. A man with an assault
rie and other weapons exchanged gunre
with ofcers Tuesday at an Atlanta-area ele-
mentary school before surrendering, a
police chief said, with dramatic overhead
television footage capturing the young stu-
dents racing out of the building, being
escorted by teachers and police to safety. No
one was injured.
Just a week into the new school year,
more than 800 students in pre-kindergarten
to fth grade were evacuated from Ronald E.
McNair Discovery Learning Academy in
Decatur, a few miles east of Atlanta. They sat
outside along a fence in a eld for a time
until school buses came to take them to
their waiting parents and other relatives at a
nearby Wal-Mart.
When the rst bus arrived about three
hours after the shooting, cheers erupted in
the store parking lot from relieved rela-
tives, several of them sobbing.
The suspect, identied later as 20-year-old
Michael Brandon Hill, red at least a half-
dozen shots from the rifle from inside
McNair at ofcers who were swarming the
campus outside, the chief said. Officers
returned re when the man was alone and
they had a clear shot, DeKalb County Police
Chief Cedric L. Alexander said at a news
conference. Hill surrendered shortly after
and several weapons were found, though it
wasnt clear how many, Alexander said.
Police had no motive.
Though the school has a system where
visitors must be buzzed in by staff, the gun-
man may have slipped inside behind some-
one authorized to be there, Alexander said.
The suspect, who had no clear ties to the
school, never got past the front office,
where he held one or two employees captive
for a time, the chief said. Hill is charged
with aggravated assault on a police ofcer,
terroristic threats and possession of a
rearm by a convicted felon.
A woman in the ofce called WSB-TV t o
say the gunman asked her to contact the
Atlanta station and police. WSB said during
the call, shots were heard in the back-
ground. Assignment editor Lacey Lecroy
said she spoke with the woman who said she
was alone with the man and his gun was vis-
ible.
Man charged in Georgia school shooting
REUTERS
Krystal Dorris carries her 4-year-old daughter Heaven after she was bused to a local Walmart
following a shooting incident at McNair Discovery Learning Academy in Decatur, Ga.
By Eric Tucker
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SALISBURY, Md. Two men stand anx-
iously at a classroom entrance and another
lies seriously wounded beside a wall out-
side. Dont come down here, Im telling
you Ill kill em, a man inside the class-
room shouts to ofcers snaking down the
corridor with guns drawn. Abrief attempt at
negotiations quickly zzles as the ofcers
approach the room, yell to the men inside
to get down and take out the gunman in a
swift reght .
The drill is part of a training program the
FBI is helping run for local law enforcement
agencies nationwide. Acting on a White
House directive after last Decembers
Connecticut school massacre, and partner-
ing with a Texas-based training center, the
FBI this year has been teaching best prac-
tices for responding to mass shootings.
You dont need negotiators, you dont
have time for SWAT teams, you need to get
in there as fast as possible and stop the
killing, said Chris Combs, who runs the
FBIs Strategic Information and Operations
Center, the headquarters command post for
major emergencies, and is involved in run-
ning the program.
The goal is to promote a standardized
strategy as local police departments
invariably the first officers to arrive
respond to such shootings. Besides the tac-
tical drills, conferences run by FBI eld
ofces are intended to prepare local agen-
cies for the challenges of an active shooter
emergency and to let them know that federal
help, including extra manpower to inter-
view witnesses, collect evidence and man-
age a sprawling crime scene, is available to
them.
Its not capability its capacity, said
Katherine Schweit, another FBI official
involved in organizing the program. Every
police department, sheriffs department has
the ability to do interviews and to do evi-
dence collection ... But we can bring capac-
i t y. We can bring 100 agents to a scene in a
day and do hundreds of interviews, and have
done that time and time again.
Localized training programs have prolif-
erated in recent years amid high-profile
mass shootings in places such as Tucson,
Ariz., where then-U.S. Rep. Gabrielle
Giffords was wounded by a lone gunman in
2011 while meeting with constituents, and
in Aurora, Colo., where a man killed 12 in a
movie theater.
FBI works to train police on mass killing response
Prosecutors rest in
Fort Hood shooting trial
FORT HOOD, Texas Military prosecu-
tors rested their case Tuesday against the
Army psychiatrist accused
of killing 13 people dur-
ing the 2009 shooting
rampage at Fort Hood, but
whether the soldier plans
to do anything to defend
himself remains to be
seen.
After calling nearly 90
witnesses in only 11
days, prosecutors com-
pleted their case against
Maj. Nidal Hasan. The soldier also is accused
of wounding more than 30 people at the Texas
Army post during the attack, the worst mass
shooting ever on a U.S. military base.
The judge then adjourned the trial for the
day, meaning Hasan could begin his case
Wednesday but he indicated Tuesday that he
planned to call no witnesses. When reminded
by the judge when it was time to formally
argue that prosecutors hadnt proven their
case, Hasan declined.
Afghan massacre victim
takes stand, curses gunman
JOINT BASE LEWIS-MCCHORD,
Washington An Afghan farmer shot during a
massacre in Kandahar Province last year took
the witness stand Tuesday against the U.S. sol-
dier who attacked his village, cursing him
before breaking down and pleading with the
prosecutor not to ask him any more questions.
Haji Mohammad Naim appeared Tuesday in
the courtroom at Joint Base Lewis-McChord
south of Seattle, where a sentencing hearing
began for Staff Sgt. Robert Bales in the slay-
ings of 16 civilians killed during pre-dawn
raids on two villages on March 11, 2012.
The hearing afforded some victims and rela-
tives their rst chance to confront Bales face-
to-face.
State officials cleared
in Benghazi security gaps
WASHINGTON Four State Department
ofcials have been cleared of security failures
that led to an attack last year on a diplomatic
outpost in Benghazi, Libya, that killed U.S.
Ambassador Chris Stevens, authorities said
Tuesday.
State spokeswoman Marie Harf said the
ofcials, who held senior positions at the
Bureau of Diplomatic Security and the Bureau
of Near East Affairs during the Sept. 11, 2012,
attack, will be reassigned to new jobs.
She said an internal State review concluded
there was no breach of duty by any of the
four, who have been on paid administrative
leave for months.
Around the nation
Nidal Hasan
LOCAL/NATION 8
Wednesday Aug. 21, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Pauline Fannoun
Pauline Fannoun died Tuesday, Aug. 13,
2013. She was 71.
Pauline was born Dec. 9, 1941 in Tucson,
Ariz. to Edward & Mary Louise Yturralde
(predeceased). She was a registered nurse for
36 years and longtime resident of San
Mateo.
She is survived by her beloved husband,
Samir J. Fannoun, sister Evelyn and broth-
er-in-law Pete Ochoa and many other loving
family members. She is preceded in death by
her sister, Carole Ann.
Visitation will be held
6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Friday,
Aug. 23 followed by a 7
p.m. vigil service. A
funeral mass will be 11
a.m. Saturday, Aug. 24.
Both services will be at
Immaculate Heart of Mary
Church, 1040 Alameda de
la Pulgas, Belmont.
Obituary
By Mike Householder
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DETROIT He was the master
of his genre, the Dickens of
Detroit, the Chaucer of Crime.
Every novel Elmore Leonard
wrote from the mid-1980s on was a
best-seller, and every fan of crime
stories knew his name. George
Clooney was an admirer. So were
Quentin Tarantino, Saul Bellow
and Stephen King and millions of
ordinary readers.
Leonard, who died Tuesday at age
87, helped achieve for crime writ-
ing what King did for horror and
Ray Bradbury for science ction.
He made it hip, and he made it
respectable.
When the public flocked to
watch John Travolta in the movie
version of Get Shorty in 1995,
its author became the darling of
Hollywoods hottest young direc-
tors. Book critics and literary
stars, prone to dismissing crime
novels as light entertainment,
competed for adjectives to praise
him. Last fall, he became the rst
crime writer to receive an hon-
orary National Book Award, a prize
given in the past to Philip Roth,
Norman Mailer and Arthur Miller.
Few writers so memorably trav-
eled the low road. His more than
40 novels were peopled by pathet-
ic schemers, clever conmen and
casual killers. Each was character-
ized by moral ambivalence about
crime, black humor and wickedly
acute depictions of human nature:
the greedy dreams of Armand
Degas in Killshot, the wise-
cracking cool of Chili Palmer in
Get Shorty, Jack Belmonts lust
for notoriety in The Hot Kid.
Leonards novels and short sto-
ries were turned into dozens of fea-
ture lms, TV movies and series,
including the current FX show
Justied, which stars Timothy
Olyphant as one of Leonards sig-
nature characters, the cool-under-
pressure U.S. marshal Raylan
Givens.
Critics loved Leonards awless-
ly unadorned, colloquial style, as
well as how real his characters
sounded when they spoke.
Elmore Leonard dies at 87
American author Elmore Leonard, whose ear for gritty, realistic dialogue helped bring dozens of hard-bitten
crooks, cops and cowboys to life in nearly 50 novels, died on Aug. 20.
By Lindsey Tanner
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHICAGO New research sug-
gests giving patients easier-to-
take medicine and no-copay med-
ical visits can help drive down
high blood pressure, a major con-
tributor to poor health and untime-
ly deaths nationwide.
Those efforts were part of a big
health care providers eight-year
program, involving more than
300,000 patients with high blood
pressure. At the beginning, less
than half had brought their blood
pressure under control. That
increased to a remarkable 80 per-
cent, well above the national aver-
age, the researchers said.
The research involved Kaiser
Permanente in Northern
California, a network of 21 hospi-
tals and 73 doctors ofces, which
makes coordinating treatment eas-
ier than in independent physi-
cians ofces.
The number of heart attacks and
strokes among Northern
California members fell substan-
tially during roughly the same
time as the 2001-09 study. Dr.
Marc Jaffe, the lead author and
leader of a Kaiser heart disease risk
reduction program, said its
impossible to know if the blood
pressure program can be credited
for those declines, but he thinks it
at least contributed.
Reductions continued even after
the study ended; in 2011, 87 per-
cent of roughly 350,000 Kaiser
patients had recommended blood
pressure levels.
No copays and easier pills
may reduce blood pressure
By Lauran Neergaard
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON Where you
live can affect your chances of get-
ting a liver transplant, and your
risk of dying while waiting. The
nations transplant network says
its time to make the system fairer
and it may take a cue from how
politicians redraw voting maps.
Gerrymandering for the public
good is how Johns Hopkins
University transplant surgeon Dr.
Dorry Segev describes a proposal
to change the map that governs
how donated livers are distributed
around the country.
The problem: Some areas have
fewer donated organs, and higher
demand for them, than others. The
sickest patients go to the top of
the waiting list. But the geograph-
ic variation means that someone
in California, among the toughest
places to get a new liver, waits
longer and is a lot sicker before
getting transplanted than some-
one in Ohio or Florida if they
survive long enough.
This should not be happen-
ing, Segev said.
Mapping the way to a more
fair wait for liver transplant
OPINION 9
Wednesday Aug. 21, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Central Park needs no x
Editor,
Kudos to Jon Bryant (letter to the
editor in the August 19 edition of the
Daily Journal) regarding the $300,000
planning study of San Mateos Central
Park thats not in the least broken.
Sure, you may want to refurbish the
Senior Center where the current events
class for seniors is meeting on an ad
hoc basis until the Self Help for the
Elderly class nds a better paying
tenant. But the municipal parking lot
under the tennis courts represents the
perfect land use for that area. There can
be no better use for that and most
everything else in Central Park. Mr.
Bryants suggestions are excellent.
That tennis court, which is well used,
needs new wind screening and
repaving. Lets maintain our excellent
infrastructure and not shop for things
that are not broken.
Mike Caggiano
San Mateo
San Bruno man shooting car
Editor,
In reference to (San Bruno man
pleads not guilty to shooting up
empty car in the Aug. 17 issue of the
Daily Journal), what is the relevance
of whether the alleged perpetrator had
an NRAcard? Why is that piece of
information newsworthy? The simple
answer: this is an attempt, thinly-
veiled at best, to demonize and shame
any person who might be an NRA
member. Abetter use of article space
involved discussing why, despite hav-
ing some of the strictest gun laws in
the United States, this person had
rearms to start with. He was, after all,
previously convicted of a felony,
which made him ineligible to possess
rearms and ammunition. In addition,
the recent legislative theft of DROS
(Dealer Record of Sale) funds to fund
California Department of Justice APPS
(Armed Prohibited Persons System)
raids/rearm conscations would be
something useful to explore. This gen-
tleman should have been in the APPS
system (though APPS is known to be
inaccurate and none of the DROS
money surplus is being used to actual-
ly x APPS database), so he would
have been an easy mark for local law
enforcement or California Department
of Justice Agents. I think it would be
useful to consider relevant facts,
instead of making hollow attempts to
lump criminals in with law-abiding
citizens.
Ed Mitchell
Belmont
Palo Alto housing
Editor,
I am visiting family here from
Connecticut and have followed the
Maybell Avenue housing discussion.
My regular walks in the area have
given me a good sense of the difcult
issues Palo Alto has to deal with.
Indeed the city has to provide
affordable housing to its seniors!
Indeed the city has the responsibili-
ty to safeguard its children going to
three schools in that very neighbor-
hood! The choice is between two
right things.
Should the Maybell-Clemo land be
utilized only for senior or any other
housing?
The great and afuent town of Palo
Alto has a golden opportunity to
extend the wonderful Juana Briones
Park across Clement, which in any
case is a street blocked to through
trafc. Asmall reading room or some
other public facility could be included
creatively in this space. These will
add to the beauty and quality of life of
this wonderful town. Just a sugges-
tion from a visitor.
Akram Piracha
Stamford, Conn.
Letters to the editor
Orange County Register
C
alifornia cities are coming up
with novel ways to deal with
budget shortfalls.
Richmonds City Council voted in
March to work with Mortgage
Resolution Partners of San Francisco
to seize the loans of homes that have
been under water for years. The city
would use its powers of eminent
domain, which normally allow a gov-
ernment to take property with just
compensation for public uses,
such as a school or road.
For example, a home bought with a
$450,000 loan in 2006, at the top of
the real estate market, might be worth
$200,000 today. Reported the San
Francisco Chronicle, MRP would
line up investors to lend Richmond
the money to acquire the mortgages -
at current values - and then would help
renance them into Federal Housing
Administration loans, earning a at
fee of $4,500 per mortgage.
The original lender would be paid
off for much less than the loan bal-
ance.
On Aug. 7, Wells Fargo and
Deutsche Bank sued Richmond and
MRP. John Ertman, an attorney for
the lenders, charged the city and MRP
with threatening to seriously harm
average Americans, including public
pension members, other retirees and
individual savers, through a brazen
scheme to abuse government powers
for (their) own prot.
MRP Chairman Steven Gluckstern
denied the banks accusations.
Richard Epstein, a fellow at
Stanford Universitys Hoover
Institution and one of the countrys
top property-rights legal scholars,
analyzed the dispute during a confer-
ence call with journalists.
Many of these mortgages are per-
forming; theyre not in default, he
said. Although the value of the home
is less than the mortgage value, the
owners are perfectly happy to keep
paying the higher mortgage cost. For
one thing, home prices have been
surging in California, so the home-
owners may just be waiting for the
restoration of value.
Indeed, according to Zillow.com,
home prices in Richmond have surged
about 30 percent in the past 18
months.
The Supreme Courts 2005 Kelo
decision gave governments wide lati-
tude in implementing eminent
domain. It even allowed seizures of
private property to be given to other
private parties, such as shopping
mall developers. But Mr. Epstein
pointed out that the Richmond
seizures would not involve taking
actual, physical homes, but the nan-
cial instruments used to nance the
homes.
Another problem involves the
Constitutions interstate commerce
clause, which gives the federal gov-
ernment, not the states, regulatory
control over economic matters
involving more than one state.
Although the homes are in one state,
the mortgages are held by large nan-
cial rms located in other states or
countries. In this case, its just
money, he said, not the physical
property, thats at issue.
Moreover, he said, by interfering in
the usual mortgage process, the
Richmond plan could lower the value
of other mortgages in the city, includ-
ing those held by Fannie Mae and
Freddie Mac, the taxpayer-backed fed-
eral mortgage agencies.
We asked if it would help for
Congress and the California
Legislature to ban such creative mort-
gage strategies. Yes, he replied.
This would be a good time for biparti-
san action to ban this too-clever
attack on property rights.
An inappropriate use of land-grab law Keep calm and carry on?
C
ontrary to what many people think, anger
is not something we should avoid at all
costs. It is an entirely normal part of
human experience. Its power to be harmful and destruc-
tive is completely dependent on our ability to face angry
feelings and learn to deal
with them. Eda
LeShan, When Your Child
Drives You Crazy.
Maybe I should stop
watching the television
news. Often, when I see
the faces of people like
George Zimmerman, Ariel
Castro, Anthony Weiner or
John Boehner (who repre-
sents all those
Republicans who keep
throwing monkey wrench-
es in the works), it sets me
off. Hearing about injus-
tice, the actions of any egregiously narcissistic
exploiters and the number of victims of rampant vio-
lence can turn a potentially lovely day into a gray
morass of depressing thoughts. Maybe it would be best
to avoid the television and even the radio news and only
read the newspaper where I can select which newsworthy
events to read about.
There are many other ways we may deal with anger and
the stress that results. There are unhealthy methods like
becoming physically violent, yelling, drinking, using
legal or illegal drugs and/or stuffing it inside and pre-
tending its not there or that it will go away. Many
stress reduction experts advise such things as yoga, med-
itation, physical exercise, simplifying our lives, taking
more B vitamins and breathing exercises. But theres an
important aspect to preventing anger and relieving the
accompanying stress that underlies it all that we dont
hear much about.
We need to consider our attitude toward a situation
the way we think about it and then react to it. We need to
remember that we can choose whether to get all unglued
about something potentially disturbing and decide how
to react. Its very tempting to think, Its not me. Its
those incompetents (or those jerks or mindless ones)
that need fixing. If it werent for them, Id be fine. But
if not them, it would no doubt be something else.
When something or someone irritates us, we can get
all steamed up and yell or kick the sofa or try to put the
situation in perspective when we first feel the irritation
begin or the frustration welling. Or we can say to our-
selves, Stop! and ask ourselves, Is it worth it to jeop-
ardize my health by bringing on this adrenaline rush that
can, among other things, contribute to lesions in my
arteries where cholesterol builds up, for my blood pres-
sure to rise, possibly dangerously, to possibly damage
my digestive system, to ruin my day?
It all boils down to learning to hang loose. Sorting
out what is truly important from what is not is basic.
Being able to keep from reacting angrily to many irrita-
tions (especially those we cant do anything about) can
eliminate much stress from our lives. Learning how to
let go and keep the adrenaline from surging in the first
place will do much more good. Im not suggesting that
we repress all angry feelings, but redirect them. We can
decide when our anger is useless like when having to
wait in a long line, when we drop the bowl of dog food
on the carpet, when we see that face on the screen that
stirs up hostile feelings and when it is something that
truly needs to be dealt with in a reasonable, civilized
manner.
It helps to keep reminding ourselves that all of those
irritations have much less to do with other people and
events than with our inner reactions. It helps to give up
some of our expectations about how things should be
and realize that it is not necessary to be a perfectionist
(Everything must be RIGHT or I get upset!) or so egocen-
tric (Why does everyone pick on me?). It helps to take
time to relax and put things in perspective.
Theres ANGER and theres anger. If we can use it in a
productive way like maybe joining an organization
that works for needed changes, contacting our represen-
tative in Congress, sending a letter to the editor or
maybe even writing a column about troubling issues,
hopefully we can keep it from engulfing us. What Ms
LeShan added is very true: We SHOULD be angry at
human suffering, at social inequality, at poverty, at war,
at bureaucracies that interfere with human needs and
rights. Anger turned toward a fight for liberty and justice
is what democracy needs for survival. Its just that I SO
badly want the world to be a decent place for our proge-
ny!
But when its something I can do nothing about, I must
try to more often heed my English son-in-laws advice:
Dont get your knickers in a twist.
Since 1984, Dorothy Dimitre has written more than 700
columns for various local newspapers. Her email address is
gramsd@aceweb.com.
Other voices
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BUSINESS 10
Wednesday Aug. 21, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 15,002.99 -7.75 10-Yr Bond 2.814 -0.07
Nasdaq3,613.59 +24.50 Oil (per barrel) 104.92
S&P 500 1,652.35 +6.29 Gold 1,372.50
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Tuesday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Best Buy Co. Inc., up $4.07 to 34.80
The struggling electronics retailers quarterly net income jumped after
it slashed costs and focused on improving its website.
Medtronic Inc., down $1.27 to $52.83
The medical device maker was the biggest decliner on the S&P index
after falling a little short on revenue expectations in its most recent
quarter.
The TJX Cos. Inc, up $3.49 to $54.24
Second-quarter net income at the parent company of T.J. Maxx and
Marshalls clothing stores rose 14 percent, with savvy shoppers ocking
to its stores for discounts on designer goods and other wares.
LightInTheBox Holding Co. Ltd., down $7.69 to $11.58
The newly public online retailer in China left investors disappointed with
its projections for the quarter.
Nasdaq
RigNet Inc., up $5.33 to $33.63
Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co. revealed a huge stake in the company,
which provides communications technology to remote sites in the energy
industry.
Corinthian Colleges Inc., up 25 cents to $2.40
The U.S. will not require a letter of credit from the for-prot education
company following a review of its accounting practices.
Urban Outtters Inc., up $3.27 to $43.19
The clothing and accessories retailer posted a 9 percent spike in
comparable store sales.
Electronic Arts Inc., up 18 cents to $26.75
The video game retailer expects a big boost from upcoming releases of
game consoles by Sony and Microsoft.
Big movers
By Ken Sweet
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK Its been a chilly
August for the stock market.
At the start of the month, the Dow
Jones industrial average and Standard
& Poors 500 index hit all-time highs.
Now the market is down 4 percent from
its peak, and August is on track to be
the Dows worst month since May
2012.
On Tuesday, the Dow posted in its
fth straight day of losses, the rst
time thats happened this year. While
the S&P 500 and Nasdaq composite
index did rise modestly, it was rst
time in four days those indices have
seen green.
The stock market slide in the last
couple of weeks reflects a shift in
investor strategy that began in the
bond market and spilled into stocks.
The spillover then mixed with linger-
ing concerns about the U.S. economy,
leading to the last several weeks of
volatility, market observers say.
The bond market is the catalyst for
this selloff, says Quincy Krosby,
market strategist with Prudential
Financial.
While most of the selloff occurred in
the last couple weeks, it had its origins
months ago.
Up until early June, bond funds had
been one of Wall Streets more popular
investments particularly among
average investors. More than $1.2
trillion was socked away into bond
mutual funds and bond exchange-traded
funds between 2009 and 2012, accord-
ing to TrimTabs.
People were just throwing money at
bonds, even at low rates, says Julius
Ridgway, an investment adviser with
Mississippi-based firm Medley &
Brown.
That was before Federal Reserve
Chairman Ben Bernanke said the cen-
tral bank could pull back on its $85
billion-a-month bond-purchase pro-
gram, which was designed to keep
bond yields low.
Bernanke made bond investors
nervous in mid-June by saying that
the Fed, one of the bond markets
biggest customers in the last several
years, may scale back its buying.
Investors pulled more than $65.8 bil-
lion out of bond funds in June, accord-
ing to mutual fund research firm
Lipper, the largest amount ever on a
cash basis and the second largest out-
flow in percentage terms since the
financial crisis in 2008. Investors
pulled an additional $22.5 billion out
of bond funds in July, according to
Lipper.
With so many investors exiting
bonds particularly Treasuries at
the same time, bond prices declined
sharply. The yield on the benchmark
10-year U.S. Treasury note has
climbed from 1.63 percent in early
May to as high as 2.88 percent this
week. Yields climb as prices fall.
As the 10-year yield has inched
higher, the selling has led to more
selling, Krosby said.
This exodus out of bond funds has
touched the stock market in two differ-
ent ways, investors say, starting with
dividend-paying stocks.
Shares in industries such as utilities,
pharmaceuticals and telecommunica-
tions are often purchased because they
provide a higher-than-normal divi-
dend. As Treasury yields rise, it makes
all dividend-paying stocks less attrac-
tive to investors. Thats because
Treasuries can provide a similar return
with signicantly less risk.
Dividend-paying stocks have been
hurt the past month. The S&P Utilities
index is down nearly 5 percent while
the S&P Telecommunications index is
down 4 percent. Another type of
investment that got hit in recent
weeks was real estate investment trusts
investment companies that focus
on buying and managing real estate.
An index that tracks REITs, as real
estate investment trusts are commonly
known, is down nearly 8 percent.
Investors also have broader econom-
ic concerns. It is unclear how the pos-
sible ending of the Feds bond-buying
program will affect growth.
Bernanke is going to try to make
this transition as smooth as possible,
but we just dont know how much (the
bond buying) is going to be scaled
back, Krosby says. And the biggest
enemy to the market is uncertainty.
Why the market is having a chilly August
By Derrik J. Lang
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES Twitch is another step
closer to becoming the Netflix of the
video game world.
The popular video game footage stream-
ing service will be available on Sonys
next-generation PlayStation 4 when its
released later this year. By tapping the
new share button on the PS4 controller,
users will be able to broadcast gameplay
directly to Twitch. Microsoft announced
similar Twitch integration earlier this
year for its upcoming Xbox One.
Weve been clear with all our partners
that we love gaming and the gaming
industry, and we think our reason for
being as a company is to be the ubiqui-
tous platform, said Emmett Shear, co-
founder and CEO of Twitch. For us, it was
really important to be able to work with
every platform because Twitch is some-
thing that every gamer should have access
t o.
Twitch, originally part of the streaming
video site Justin.tv, was spun off in 2011
and has become one of the most popular
ways for gamers to share footage online.
Currently, more than 600,000 broadcast-
ers ranging from everyday Minecraft
builders to professional League of
Legends players are watched by more
than 38 million viewers a month.
Over the past two years, Twitch has
become an ESPN for video games. The
sites live and recorded broadcasts include
comically narrated clips of game footage,
streamed matches from seasoned e-sports
veterans and so-called speed runs
clips of players plowing through mostly
old-school games in record time. There
are also commercials. Lots of them.
Netflix of video games: Twitch coming to PS4
By Anne DInnocenzio
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK The worst may be
over at J.C. Penney Co.
The beleaguered department store
chain on Tuesday reported its sixth
straight quarter of big losses and steep
revenue drops as it continued to face
challenges related to a botched turn-
around plan spearheaded by its ousted
CEO Ron Johnson.
But investors sent Penney shares up
6 percent to more than $14 after
having pushed the stock down nearly
70 percent in the last 18 months in
an expression of confidence that
returning CEO Mike Ullman has start-
ed to stabilize the business.
Since he retook the top job in April
after having occupied it from 2004 to
2011, Ullman has been bringing back
coupons, frequent sales events and
basic merchandise like khakis and
jeans that Johnson eliminated in a
failed attempt to attract hipper, more
affluent shoppers. The latest report
offered some encouraging signs that
the move is beginning to pay off.
Revenue improved from month-to-
month during the second quarter, and
the decline in Penneys online busi-
ness slowed signicantly in part due to
the companys move to veer from
Johnsons strategy and go back to
operating its online businesses with
its physical stores in lockstep. The
chain also said it is seeing an encour-
aging start to the back-to-school sea-
son, the second-largest selling period
behind the winter holidays.
Penneys 2Q results show some signs of life
Judge approves Kodak
plan to exit bankruptcy
NEWYORK Kodak doesnt look a
whole lot like it did when it led for
bankruptcy protection last year, but its
executives and investors are hoping for
a picture-perfect future. Many of its
products and services are gone, includ-
ing the camera-making business that
made it famous more than a century ago.
Also gone are scores of workers, manu-
facturing facilities, supply contracts
and millions of dollars in investments.
On Tuesday, U.S. Bankruptcy Judge
Allan Gropper approved the companys
plan to emerge from court oversight,
paving the way for it to recreate itself as
a new, much smaller company focused
on commercial and packaging printing.
Kodak said it hopes to emerge from
bankruptcy protection as early as Sept. 3.
They still have people with immense
skill and who know how to win, said
Mark Zupan, dean of the business
school at the University of Rochester,
near Kodaks headquarters.
Business brief
<< Denver LB to serve six-game suspension, page 14
Tour de France claims a clean race in 2013, page 13
Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2013
COUPLE TEAMS STAY ALIVE: WASHINGTON, PANAMA STAVE OFF ELIMINATION IN LITTLE LEAGUE WORLD SERIES >> PAGE 17
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTA CLARA Jon Baldwin watched
from the other sideline Friday night as Colin
Kaepernick zipped warm-up passes to his wide
receivers, then Baldwin marveled with a cou-
ple of Kansas City teammates about the do-
everything 49ers quarterback.
Fast forward four days and, by lunchtime
Tuesday, Baldwin had already caught 15 balls
from Kaepernick while
playing for his new team.
San Francisco acquired
Baldwin from the Chiefs
on Monday for fellow
underachieving former
rst-round draft pick and
wideout A.J. Jenkins.
Its kind of funny
because before the game I
was watching him in
warm-ups and I was saying,
He throws a pretty good
ball, Baldwin said of
Kaepernick. And I was
talking to some of the
other receivers about it on
our team I mean when I
was in Kansas City and
they were saying, Yeah, he did throw a pretty
Baldwin starts 49ers tenure
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND Nick Franklin homered and
drove in three runs and the Seattle Mariners
rallied from a four-run decit to beat the
Oakland Athletics 7-4 on Tuesday night.
Brad Miller and Kendrys Morales also
drove in runs for the Mariners, who won for
just the third time in 53 games when trailing
after seven innings. Franklin left the game
after the top of the eighth inning with a left
knee laceration.
Josh Donaldson and Nate Freiman both
homered for the As, who dropped 1 1/2
games behind the AL West-leading Texas
Rangers. Derek Norris also drove in a run for
the As .
Sean Doolittle (4-5) allowed hits to all
four batters he faced in the eighth.
Brandon Maurer (4-7) pitched a scoreless
seventh for the victory.
Danny Farquhar earned his eighth save in
11 chances with a scoreless ninth.
As rookie Sonny Gray threw seven solid
innings, giving up two runs and two hits.
He walked two and struck out seven.
Mariners starter Joe Saunders went six
innings, giving up four runs and 10 hits. He
struck out two and walked three.
The Mariners scored five times in the
eighth, getting RBIs from Miller, Franklin
and Morales and scoring two runs on wild
pitches.
Franklin beat the throw home on Morales
grounder and caught his left knee on Norris
cleats, tearing a hole in his pants and forc-
ing him out of the game with a laceration
that required stitches.
Norris, who stood up awkwardly arguing
the call, also left the game with an apparent
left knee injury.
The As used three pitchers, who needed 53
pitches, to get through the eighth. Doolittle
has allowed six runs over his past four
appearances, a span of 2 2-3 innings.
Seattle
beats As
By Michael Wagaman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NAPA For the rst time in more than a
decade, the Raiders head into the nal stages
of training camp uncertain who their punter
will be.
When seven-time Pro Bowl punter Shane
Lechler bolted for Houston as a free agent in
March, it created a huge void on Oaklands
roster. With less than three weeks remain-
ing before the season opener in
Indianapolis, the Raiders
arent any closer to l l-
ing it.
Marquette King, whose
booming kicks have
made him a fan favorite at
training camp, and quirky
but consistent veteran
Chris Kluwe have gone
back and forth through-
out the preseason with
neither able to gain the upper hand.
The two alternated
halves in Oaklands rst
two preseason games and
will likely share time
again Friday when the
Raiders host the Chicago
Bears.
Weve got two guys
that are NFL-caliber pun-
ters, Oakland coach
Dennis Allen said
Tuesday. Any time youre in that situation,
thats a good problem to have.
Its a problem the franchise hasnt had to
deal with since 2000 when the Raiders draft-
ed Lechler in the fth round. Over the next
13 years, Lechler broke nearly every team
punting record, and hes still the NFL career
leader with a 47.5-yard gross average.
Lechler signed with the Texans after not
receiving an offer from the Raiders. General
manager Reggie McKenzie, who has spent
Raiders still not settled on starting punter
Marquette King Chris Kluwe
See RAIDERS, Page 18
A.J. Jenkins
adjusts to
new squad
See page 13
INSIDE
In two seasons with Kansas City, receiver Jon Baldwin had 41 receptions for 579 yards and a pair of touchdowns.
Jon Baldwin
See 49ERS, Page 18
By Josh Dubow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO Brayan Villarreal
walked Marco Scutaro with the bases loaded
and two outs in the bottom of the ninth,
handing the San Francisco Giants a 3-2 vic-
tory over the Boston Red Sox on Tuesday
night.
Roger Kieschnick started the winning
rally with a one-out single off Franklin
Morales (2-1). The Giants loaded the bases
with two outs when
Morales walked Andres
Torres and hit pinch-hit-
ter Hector Sanchez with a
pitch on the left wrist.
Villarreal, acquired last
month from Detroit, then
threw four straight balls
to Scutaro in his first
appearance with the Red
Sox, giving the defending World Series
champions a rare reason to celebrate this
summer.
The Red Sox couldnt hold a 2-0 lead and
lost for the fth time in seven games to fall
percentage points behind Tampa Bay for the
lead in the AL East.
Sergio Romo (4-6) pitched a perfect ninth
for the win.
After twice failing to get a runner in from
third with no outs, the Giants nally deliv-
ered in the eighth inning to tie the game.
Scutaro reached on a one-out single and
went to third on Brandon Belts single
against Junichi Tazawa. Buster Posey then
hit a high y down the right-eld line that
Shane Victorino caught in foul territory.
Scutaro scored easily on the sacrice y but
Tazawa escaped without any further damage
to keep the score tied at 2.
Victorino helped give Boston the lead
when he hit a rare right-handed homer off a
Giants walk away with win in ninth
Mariners 7, As 4
Giants 3, Red Sox 2
Marco Scutaro
See GIANTS, Page 16
See ATHLETICS, Page 16
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By Dave Skretta
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
KANSAS CITY, Mo. A.J. Jenkins never
thought hed be back in Kansas City so
soon.
The former rst-round pick of the San
Francisco 49ers played in a preseason game
against the Chiefs on Friday night at
Arrowhead Stadium.
On Tuesday morning, he was wearing a
white shirt with that familiar arrowhead
logo while going through a walk-through
prior to practice.
Such is the way of the NFL, where life can
be turned upside down in a matter of days.
Things happen. Im looking for an
opportunity, said Jenkins, traded to the
Chiefs on Monday for Jon Baldwin in a
swap of wide receivers that have so far been
disappointments.
I mean, right now Im just looking for-
ward to coming out here and being the best
Chief I can be, Jenkins said. Its an
opportunity. I aint got a choice. Its what I
have to work with.
Jenkins was the No. 30 overall pick of the
49ers last year after a stellar senior season
at Illinois, where he played with current
Chiefs guard Jeff Allen.
But the speedy playmaker couldnt barge
his way up the depth chart in San Francisco,
failing to get on the eld
until late in the season.
Even then, Jenkins
never made a catch in the
three games in which he
played.
The Chiefs apparently
saw enough value in him,
though, to offer a fresh
start with a change of
scenery. They wound up
trading Baldwin, the No. 26 overall pick
two years ago, after struggling to nd a
place for his big, physical build in new
coach Andy Reids offensive system.
We think actually this is going to be
good for both teams, Reid said. Things
happen at different places and sometimes a
fresh start can be good for guys for whatev-
er reasons. Sometimes guys just dont t. ...
Well give him a shot and see how it goes.
Jenkins is certainly a known quantity to
the Chiefs.
Reid spent time scouting Jenkins when
he was still with the Eagles, and remembers
a guy with good hands and an ability to
stretch the eld, something Baldwin failed
to do.
Jenkins was teammates in San Francisco
with quarterback Alex Smith, whom the
Chiefs acquired for a pair of draft choices
this offseason.
Allen remembers a guy who brought a
spark to the locker room with his engaging
and often playful personality at Illinois.
Obviously I dont know what went on in
San Francisco. All I can tell you about is our
college days, Allen said. He brings a dif-
ferent element to the locker room, hes a dif-
ferent character, he brings a lot of energy. A
good guy.
None of that helped him get on the eld in
San Francisco, though. Smith thinks
Jenkins struggled to nd his place on a vet-
eran team, and when relegated to the prac-
tice squad, didnt keep improving.
It wasnt his job from the jump. He had
to come in and battle for it, Smith said. I
thought it was a deeper roster there and for
whatever reason it didnt work out. Hes a
talented kid, tons of speed, and I think the
change will do him good.
The swap of wide receivers resulted in sig-
nicant changes to Kansas Citys depth
chart.
Baldwin had been working opposite
Dwayne Bowe with the No. 1 offense
throughout training camp. Now that hes
gone, Donnie Avery has moved into the
starting lineup.
We had to feel comfortable that Donnie
was a legitimate starter, and we felt that,
Reid said. So were able to do this and feel
comfortable doing it. Donnie has tremen-
dous speed and a lot of experience, too, and
hes showing in this offense he can do some
good things.
Jenkins doesnt have a whole lot of time
to get up to speed.
He was ready for his rst full practice on
Tuesday, but only has two more days of reg-
ular work this week before the Chiefs head
to Pittsburgh for their third preseason
game. Their last tuneup is next week against
Green Bay, and then nal cuts are due for the
53-man roster.
If hes able to gasp the offense quickly
enough, Jenkins could be on the team when
it heads to Jacksonville coincidentally,
his home town for the Chiefs season
opener Sept. 8.
Actually, my mom did tell me that yes-
terday, Jenkins said. I want to contribute
as soon as possible, whether its this game
or the next game. I want to contribute as
soon as I can.
Not es : Pro Bowl RB Jamaal Charles
(right foot) practiced for the second time
after missing the 49ers game. Its still
unclear whether hell play at Pittsburgh. ...
OT Donald Stephenson (shoulder sprain),
FS Sanders Commings (broken clavicle),
CB Dunta Robinson (shoulder sprain), TE
Travis Kelce (knee bruise), FS Kendrick
Lewis (illness) and DE Mike DeVito (ill-
ness) did not practice.
Jenkins dives into life with Kansas City
A.J. Jenkins
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
AIGLE, Switzerland No riders tested
positive for doping at the Tour de France, the
International Cycling Union said Tuesday.
The testing program included 113 urine
samples tested for EPO and 15 for steroids
among the 622 samples. In blood analysis,
22 samples were tested for EPO-like sub-
stances, 18 for human growth hormone and
two for transfusions.
We dont have any adverse nding from
the Tour de France, Francesca Rossi, direc-
tor of the UCI-appointed Cycling Anti-
Doping Foundation (CADF), said at a brief-
ing.
The testing included 203 samples taken
from riders in training and 419 during the
three-week race, which was won by Chris
Froome of Britain. Atotal of 443 blood sam-
ples and 179 urine samples were taken in a
program jointly run by the UCI and the
French anti-doping agency (AFLD). Most
blood samples were used for comparisons to
the biological passport system, which
charts the blood levels of riders.
The total samples rose from 566 for the
2012 Tour, when only Frank Schleck of
Luxembourg tested positive for a banned
diuretic.
Tour riders who used banned drugs or dop-
ing methods could still be identied because
stored samples can be analyzed again in the
future using new or improved testing tech-
niques.
Rossi said the foundation could re-test
when the World Anti-Doping Agency certi-
es threshold limits for substances such as
AICAR and growth hormones.
She also expects steroid proling to be
added to the biological passport, which the
UCI has managed since 2008.
Cyclings anti-doping program is an issue
in the current UCI presidential election, with
challenger Brian Cookson pledging to create
an agency independent of the governing
body. UCI President Pat McQuaid supports
the existing structure to catch drug cheats.
However, Rossi said the CADF is working
to create an independent oversight board
starting work with us very soon. The UCI
will continue to host the foundation and fund
15 percent of its annual budget of $7.6 mil-
lion.
Tour de France reports no
riders failed doping tests
SPORTS 14
Wednesday Aug. 21, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Its All About People.
Surprised. Convenient. Reliable. These are just a few words
Be surprised.
By Eddie Pells
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ENGLEWOOD, Colo. Broncos linebacker
Von Miller received a six-game suspension
under the NFLs substance-abuse policy
Tuesday, taking away the best defensive player
from a team many expect to make a run at the
Super Bowl.
The league wanted a
longer penalty for the
third-year linebacker, but
the sides agreed to less
than half the season, a per-
son familiar with the
negotiations between the
linebacker and the NFL
told the Associated Press.
The person who spoke
to the AP did not want to
be identied because
details about the negotiations were not public.
Broncos executive vice president John
Elway said the team was frustrated with what
happened and, I think, disappointed in Von.
Well live with that decision, Elway said.
What Id like to do is try to do everything we
can to prevent any other situations.
According to the NFL, Miller is eligible to
play and practice through the last two presea-
son games. His suspension, without pay, will
begin Aug. 31, and will cost him more than
$800,000 of the nearly $2.3 million hes
scheduled to make this season.
Hell be allowed at the team facility, but not
at practice during the suspension. He can return
to the eld Oct. 14, the day after Denvers
home game against Jacksonville, and will be
eligible for an Oct. 20 contest at the
Indianapolis Colts.
After being notied of the decision, Miller
released a statement saying, although my sus-
pension doesnt result from a positive test,
there is no excuse for my violations of the
rules.
I made mistakes and my suspension has
hurt my team, Broncos fans, and myself, he
said. I am especially sorry for the effect of my
bad decisions on others. I will not make the
same mistakes about adhering to the policy in
the future.
The NFL has two drug policies one that
covers use of performance-enhancing sub-
stances and the Policy and Program for
Substances of Abuse that applied to Millers
case.
There are ways to violate the drug policy
without necessarily testing positive. They
include missing a test, refusing to test, tam-
pering with tests or giving a diluted urine sam-
ple.
The Broncos had been operating throughout
the preseason as if Miller would be with them
for their regular-season opener Sept. 5.
I dont know if that was condence as much
as it was wishful thinking, coach John Fox
said. I think we all tend to look at the glass
half full instead of half empty. But now the
reality is there and Im kind of glad weve got-
ten to where it is nalized.
It gives Fox a chance to nalize Plan B for
a team listed at most Vegas sports books as the
favorite to win the Super Bowl. Miller is the
best player on the Broncos defense the sec-
ond pick of the 2011 draft, the NFLs 2011
Defensive Rookie of the Year and runner-up
last season for the leagues Defensive Player of
the Year. He had 18 1/2 sacks last season and
30 over his two years.
Broncos LB to serve
six-game suspension
Von Miller
By Josh Dubow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO Bostons Ryan
Dempster accepted his punishment without
admitting any misdeed.
Dempster was suspended for ve games and
ned by Major League Baseball on Tuesday for
intentionally hitting New York Yankees star
Alex Rodriguez with a pitch
last weekend.
While Dempster still
maintains he was only try-
ing to establish the inside
part of the plate and wasnt
trying to hit Rodriguez on
purpose, he will not con-
test the punishment and
began serving it Tuesday.
I thought about appeal-
ing, Dempster said before
Boston played the Giants.
At the end of the day, I
think Major League
Baseball does a really good
job of thinking through
punishments before they
hand them out. I thought it
was in the best interest of
us as a team to go ahead and
serve my suspension.
MLB senior vice presi-
dent Joe Garagiola Jr. announced the penalty
two days after Dempster hit A-Rod in the second
inning at Fenway Park. Yankees manager Joe
Girardi was ned for arguing with plate umpire
Brian ONora.
Dempsters ne was $2,500 and Girardis was
$5,000, people familiar with the discipline told
the Associated Press. They spoke on condition
of anonymity because the amounts were not
announced.
Dempster was scheduled to pitch Saturday at
the Los Angeles Dodgers but now could be
pushed back to next Tuesdays homestand open-
er against Baltimore. He will throw a simulated
game on Friday.
Boston is off Thursday, and Jon Lester will be
able to pitch on regular rest Saturday in
Dempsters place. Jake Peavy is set to go
Sunday on normal four days rest.
That has nothing to do with it, Dempster
said. I think it has to do with taking my sus-
pension and put it past. Theres no point in car-
rying out an appeals process. We have other
things to worry about and thats going out and
winning a ballgame tonight against the San
Francisco Giants. Ill take my punishment.
Earlier Tuesday, Girardi insisted it would be
open season on Rodriguez if MLB failed to
suspend Dempster. Girardi had hoped for a sus-
pension long enough to make Dempster miss a
turn.
I think I made my feelings pretty clear then,
Girardi said after the suspension was announced.
Dempster threw one pitch behind A-Rods
knees and two more inside during the second
inning. Then his 3-0 pitch struck Rodriguezs
left elbow pad and ricocheted off his back.
I will never take away trying to pitch
inside, Dempster said. Thats a real important
part of pitching to any hitter, especially a big
power hitter.
Girardi sprinted onto the eld, screaming at
ONora for not ejecting the pitcher. Girardi was
tossed as the benches and bullpens emptied, and
Rodriguez homered off Dempster to spark a
sixth-inning rally that lifted New York to a 9-6
win.
That baseball is a weapon. Its not a tennis
ball. Or its not an Incrediball thats soft. Its a
weapon, and it can do a lot of damage to some-
ones life, Girardi said before a doubleheader
against Toronto. And thats why I was so upset
about it. You can express your opinion and be
upset with someone, but you just cant start
throwing baseballs at people. I mean, its
scary.
Dempster gets five-game
ban for hitting Rodriguez
Ryan Dempster
Alex Rodriguez
SPORTS 15
Wednesday Aug. 21, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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East Division
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 76 49 .608
Washington 61 64 .488 15
New York 58 66 .468 17 1/2
Philadelphia 55 70 .440 21
Miami 48 76 .387 27 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Pittsburgh 74 51 .592
St. Louis 72 53 .576 2
Cincinnati 71 55 .563 3 1/2
Milwaukee 55 71 .437 19 1/2
Chicago 54 71 .432 20
West Division
W L Pct GB
Los Angeles 73 52 .584
Arizona 65 59 .524 7 1/2
Colorado 59 68 .465 15
San Francisco 56 69 .448 17
San Diego 56 70 .444 17 1/2
TuesdaysGames
Colorado 5, Philadelphia 3
Arizona 5, Cincinnati 2
N.Y. Mets 5, Atlanta 3
L.A. Dodgers 6, Miami 4
Washington 4, Chicago Cubs 2
Milwaukee 6, St. Louis 3
Pittsburgh 8, San Diego 1
San Francisco 3, Boston 2
WednesdaysGames
Atlanta (A.Wood 2-2) at N.Y. Mets (Niese 5-6), 1:10
p.m.
St.Louis(Westbrook7-8) at Milwaukee(Gorzelanny
3-4), 11:10 a.m.
Boston (Doubront 8-6) at San Francisco (Zito 4-8),
12:45 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Cole 6-5) at San Diego (Kennedy 4-9),
3:40 p.m.
Colorado (Nicasio 7-6) at Philadelphia (Cl.Lee 10-
6), 4:05 p.m.
Arizona (McCarthy 2-7) at Cincinnati (Leake 10-5),
4:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Greinke 11-3) at Miami (Eovaldi 2-3),
4:10 p.m.
Washington (Ohlendorf 2-0) at Chicago Cubs (Ar-
rieta 1-0), 5:05 p.m.
ThursdaysGames
Arizona at Cincinnati, 9:35 a.m.
L.A. Dodgers at Miami, 9:40 a.m.
Washington at Chicago Cubs, 11:20 a.m.
Colorado at Philadelphia, 4:05 p.m.
Atlanta at St. Louis, 5:15 p.m.
Pittsburgh at San Francisco, 7:15 p.m.
East Division
W L Pct GB
Tampa Bay 72 52 .581
Boston 74 54 .578
Baltimore 67 58 .536 5 1/2
New York 66 59 .528 6 1/2
Toronto 57 69 .452 16
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 73 52 .584
Cleveland 67 58 .536 6
Kansas City 64 60 .516 8 1/2
Minnesota 55 69 .444 17 1/2
Chicago 50 74 .403 22 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 73 53 .579
Oakland 71 54 .568 1 1/2
Seattle 58 67 .464 14 1/2
Los Angeles 55 69 .444 17
Houston 41 84 .328 31 1/2
TuesdaysGames
N.Y.Yankees 8,Toronto 4, 1st game
Tampa Bay 7, Baltimore 4
N.Y.Yankees 3,Toronto 2, 2nd game
Minnesota 6, Detroit 3
Texas 4, Houston 2
Chicago White Sox 2, Kansas City 0
Seattle 7, Oakland 4
Cleveland at L.A. Angels, late
San Francisco 3, Boston 2
WednesdaysGames
Seattle (Iwakuma 11-6) at Oakland (Grifn 10-8),
3:35 p.m.
Boston (Doubront 8-6) at San Francisco (Zito 4-8),
12:45 p.m.
Cleveland (Masterson 13-9) at L.A.Angels (Williams
5-9), 4:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Hellickson 10-6) at Baltimore (W.Chen
6-6), 4:05 p.m.
Toronto (Dickey 9-11) at N.Y.Yankees (Warren 1-2),
4:05 p.m.
Minnesota (Correia 8-9) at Detroit (Ani.Sanchez 11-
7), 4:08 p.m.
Houston (Bedard 3-9) at Texas (D.Holland 9-6),5:05
p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Rienzo 0-0) at Kansas City
(Guthrie 12-9), 5:10 p.m.
ThursdaysGames
Toronto at N.Y.Yankees, 10:05 a.m.
Minnesota at Detroit, 10:08 a.m.
Chicago White Sox at Kansas City, 5:10 p.m.
AMERICAN LEAGUE NATIONAL LEAGUE
at Rockies
1:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
8/26 8/25
RedSox
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
8/20
Pirates
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
8/22
RedSox
12:45p.m.
CSN-BAY
8/21
Pirates
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
8/23
Pirates
6:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
8/24
Mariners
12:35p.m.
CSN-CA
8/21
Mariners
7:05p.m.
CSN-CA
8/20
at Orioles
4:05p.m.
CSN-CA
8/23
at Orioles
4:05p.m.
FOX
8/24
atTigers
4:08a.m.
CSN-CA
8/27
at Orioles
10:35a.m.
CSN-CA
8/25
atTigers
4:08a.m.
CSN-CA
8/26
@Dallas
6p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/24
@Galaxy
7:30p.m.
CSN-PLUS
8/31
vs.Philly
8p.m.
ESPN2
9/8
vs.Vancouver
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
9/14
Pirates
1:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
EASTERNCONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Kansas City 11 8 6 39 36 25
New York 11 8 6 39 36 31
Philadelphia 10 7 8 38 36 32
Montreal 11 7 5 38 36 35
Houston 10 7 6 36 29 23
New England 9 9 6 33 29 23
Chicago 9 10 4 31 29 34
Columbus 8 11 5 29 29 30
Toronto FC 4 12 8 20 21 33
D.C. 3 17 4 13 14 40
WESTERNCONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Real Salt Lake 12 8 5 41 41 30
Colorado 10 7 9 39 33 27
Portland 9 3 11 38 34 22
Los Angeles 11 9 4 37 39 32
Vancouver 10 8 6 36 36 32
Seattle 10 8 4 34 30 26
FC Dallas 8 7 9 33 31 35
San Jose 9 10 6 33 26 35
Chivas USA 4 13 6 18 20 40
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie.
Wednesday, Aug. 21
FC Dallas at Chivas USA, 7:30 p.m.
Real Salt Lake at Portland, 8 p.m.
Friday, Aug. 23
Sporting Kansas City at Chicago, 5:30 p.m.
Saturday, Aug. 24
Houston at Montreal, 4 p.m.
Toronto FC at D.C. United, 4 p.m.
Los Angeles at Vancouver, 6 p.m.
San Jose at FC Dallas, 6 p.m.
Columbus at Real Salt Lake, 6:30 p.m.
Sunday, Aug. 25
New York at Chivas USA, 2 p.m.
Philadelphia at New England, 4:30 p.m.
Portland at Seattle FC, 7 p.m.
MLS GLANCE
AMERICANCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
Buffalo 2 0 0 1.000 64 36
New England 2 0 0 1.000 56 43
N.Y. Jets 1 1 0 .500 54 39
Miami 1 2 0 .333 64 51
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Houston 2 0 0 1.000 51 30
Indianapolis 1 1 0 .500 40 56
Jacksonville 0 2 0 .000 16 64
Tennessee 0 2 0 .000 40 49
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Baltimore 2 0 0 1.000 71 39
Cincinnati 2 0 0 1.000 61 29
Cleveland 2 0 0 1.000 51 25
Pittsburgh 0 2 0 .000 26 42
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
Denver 1 1 0 .500 20 46
Oakland 1 1 0 .500 39 45
Kansas City 0 2 0 .000 26 32
San Diego 0 2 0 .000 38 64
NATIONALCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
Washington 2 0 0 1.000 46 34
N.Y. Giants 1 1 0 .500 30 33
Philadelphia 1 1 0 .500 36 40
Dallas 1 2 0 .333 48 51
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
New Orleans 2 0 0 1.000 45 33
Carolina 1 1 0 .500 33 31
Atlanta 0 2 0 .000 33 61
Tampa Bay 0 2 0 .000 37 69
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Chicago 1 1 0 .500 50 52
Detroit 1 1 0 .500 32 41
Green Bay 1 1 0 .500 19 24
Minnesota 0 2 0 .000 29 47
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
Arizona 2 0 0 1.000 29 7
Seattle 2 0 0 1.000 71 20
San Francisco 1 1 0 .500 21 23
St. Louis 0 2 0 .000 26 46
FridaysGames
Buffalo 20, Minnesota 16
New Orleans 28, Oakland 20
San Francisco 15, Kansas City 13
New England 25,Tampa Bay 21
SaturdaysGames
Arizona 12, Dallas 7
Cincinnati 27,Tennessee 19
N.Y. Jets 37, Jacksonville 13
Green Bay 19, St. Louis 7
Houston 24, Miami 17
NFL PRESEASON GLANCE
NFL
NFLSuspended Denver LB Von Miller six games
for violating the leagues substance-abuse policy.
ARIZONACARDINALSSigned WR Mike Thomas
to a one-year contract.
BUFFALO BILLSWaived OL Keith Williams.
SignedFSJairusByrdtoaone-year franchisetender.
CHICAGOBEARSReleased WR Jerrell Jackson.
CLEVELANDBROWNSReleasedRBBrockBolen.
Voided a trade with Seattle involving OL John Mof-
tt and DL Brian Sanford.
DENVERBRONCOSSigned LB Paris Lenon.
KANSAS CITY CHIEFSReleased LS Brad Madi-
son. Claimed G Ricky Henry off waivers from New
Orleans.
MIAMI DOLPHINSPlaced TE Dustin Keller on in-
jured reserve. Signed LB Nathan Williams.
MINNESOTAVIKINGSSigned DE Spencer Nealy.
NEW YORK GIANTSWaived WR Keith Carlos and
G Chris DeGeare.
OAKLAND RAIDERSSigned OT Tony Hills.
Claimed LB Chase Thomas off waivers from New
Orleans.
PHILADELPHIAEAGLESReleased OT Ed Wang.
SEATTLESEAHAWKSTraded OL John Moftt to
Denver for DT Sealver Siliga.
TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERSSigned DE Trevor
Scott.
BASEBALL
National League
ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKSSent 2B Willie
Bloomquist to the AZL Diamondbacks for a rehab
assignment.
NEWYORK METSOptioned C Anthony Recker
toLasVegas(PCL).AgreedtotermswithRHPsMitch
Talbert and Daryl Thompson and assigned them
to Las Vegas (PCL).
PHILADELPHIA PHILLIESOptioned LHP Raul
ValdestoLehighValley(IL).RecalledRHPTyler Cloyd
from Lehigh Valley.Sent RHPs Roy Halladay to Lake-
wood (SAL) and Jonathan Pettibone to Lehigh
Valley for rehab assignments.
PITTSBURGHPIRATESSent OF Travis Snider to
Altoona (EL) for a rehab assignment.
SAN FRANCISCO GIANTSPlaced RHP Chad
Gaudin on the 15-day DL.Designated OF Jeff Fran-
coeur for assignment. Recalled LHP Mike Kickham
and RHP Jean Machi from Fresno (PCL).
TRANSACTIONS
16
Wednesday Aug. 21, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
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REALTOR
By Tales Azzoni
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAO PAULO It was a frenzied start to
FIFAs attempt to ll the stands for next years
World Cup in Brazil as fans applied Tuesday
for more than 1 million tickets in just seven
hours.
But it will be some time before they know
whether theyll be among those lucky enough
to get seats to footballs signature event.
Applicants wont hear back until October,
after FIFAholds a random selection draw on
all the requests.
More than 163,000 people requested the
tickets online in the rst seven hours.
At the end of the rst day of sales, the web-
site of footballs governing body FIFA
showed that there were more ticket applica-
tions than the number of seats available in all
four price categories for 12 of the 64 matches,
including the opener in Sao Paulo and the
nal at Rio de Janeiros Maracana Stadium.
Demand was also high in all price cate-
gories for the seminals, and 44 matches had
too many requests at least for the cheaper cat-
egory tickets which are only available for
Brazilians.
FIFA said the highest amount of applica-
tions so far has come from Brazil, Argentina,
the U.S., Chile and England.
The respective ticket product is already
heavily oversubscribed and therefore, at that
point in time, the success of the application
appears very unlikely, FIFAsaid of the high
demand categories. There are vastly more
ticket applicants seeking tickets than there
are tickets presently available for the general
public.
Prices for the nal will go from $440-$990,
although Brazilian fans will pay $165 in the
cheaper category. Brazilians over the age of
60, local students and members of some
social programs will be allowed to pay about
$82 for a ticket. Prices for the opener in Sao
Paulo go from $220-$495, with Brazilians
paying $80 and discounted tickets costing
$40.
About 500,000 tickets in total were set
aside for the category available solely to
Brazilian citizens.
Applications quickly started pouring in
after tickets went up for grabs at 1000 GMT
Tuesday. Some fans had to be placed in a vir-
tual queue due to an exceedingly high demand
for access to the ticketing page, FIFAsaid on
its website.
FIFAs press ofce said that in the rst hour
of sales there were 14,104 requests for a total
of 81,821 tickets. Each applicant can request
for up to four tickets for a maximum of seven
matches.
The organization expects a total of nearly
3.3 million tickets to be available for the
tournament in Brazil, but only about 1 mil-
lion are offered in the rst stage of sales.
FIFAsaid before sales opened that it expect-
ed a demand for tickets similar to that seen for
the 2006 World Cup in Germany, when there
were about seven applicants for every ticket
of the monthlong tournament attended by
more than 3.3 million fans. Almost 2 million
tickets were sold to the general public for the
World Cup in South Africa in 2010, although
the number of applications during the rst
ticketing phase was signicantly lower.
Sales of leftover tickets will begin Nov. 5
on a rst-come, rst-served basis. Another
phase will begin Dec. 8 after the World Cup
draw determines where and when each nation
will play. The tournament begins June 12,
with Brazil playing in the opener.
High demand as World
Cup ticket sales begin
righty pitcher. The switch-hitting Victorino
is unable to bat left-handed because of an
injured left leg. But that did not bother him
when he led off the third inning with a drive
to left off Ryan Vogelsong that made it 2-0.
It was just the second time Victorino had
hit a right-handed homer against a righty in
his career, also doing it against knuckle-
baller R.A. Dickey on Sept. 24, 2010,
according to STATS LLC.
It looked as if that 2-0 lead would stand up
when Jake Peavy escaped jams in the fourth
and fth innings. Belt, who had three hits,
was stranded after a leadoff triple in the
fourth when Posey grounded out and Peavy
struck out Hunter Pence and Brandon
Crawford.
The Giants scored their rst run of the
series when Kieschnick led off the fth with
a single and scored on Joaquin Arias triple.
But San Francisco couldnt get the equalizer
when Vogelsong, Gregor Blanco and
Scutaro followed with groundouts.
Peavy got helped out by his defense when
second baseman Dustin Pedroia made a div-
ing stop of Vogelsongs hard grounder and
rookie Xander Bogaerts threw out Scutaro
on a high chopper to shortstop to end the
inning.
The Giants went 0 for 10 with runners in
scoring position and are 4 for 35 in those
situations the past four games. But they
scored their last two runs without a hit and
won the game.
NOTES: Bogaerts (20 years, 323 days) is
a prized prospect who is the youngest posi-
tion player to appear in a game for Boston
since Dwight Evans (20, 318) in 1972. He
went 0 for 3 and stranded ve runners. ...
San Francisco 3B Pablo Sandoval was a late
scratch because of a sore back. ... Boston
RHP Clay Buchholz (neck and shoulder)
threw 46 pitches in a simulated game and is
set to make a rehab start Sunday. Manager
John Farrell said he would like Buchholz to
get three rehab starts but he might only get
two depending on the minor league sched-
ule. ... LHP Barry Zito (4-8) makes his rst
start of the month for the Giants in the
series nale Wednesday after Chad Gaudin
was placed on the DL. Felix Doubront (8-6)
goes for Boston.
Continued from page 11
GIANTS
The As scored all their runs within the
rst ve batters of the game.
Jed Lowrie led off with a triple and scored
on Norris single. Donaldson followed with
his 18th home run. After Yoenis Cespedes
grounded out, Nate Freiman hit a solo shot.
Franklin hit a two-run home run in the
third to bring Seattle within 4-2.
Gray took care of the rest, retiring 13 of
the nal 14 batters he faced. Hes thrown at
least six innings in all three of his starts.
Gray had a 13-inning scoreless streak
snapped when Franklin homered.
Saunders gave up half of his hits in the
rst inning, settling in to keep Seattle with-
in striking distance. He got double plays in
three successive innings to keep the As off
the scoreboard.
NOTES: As OF Coco Crisp (sore left
wrist) was available off the bench, but As
manager Bob Melvin said he didnt want
him to get more than one at-bat right-hand-
ed. Hes scheduled to play Wednesday. ... As
LHP Brett Anderson is expected to throw
about 65 pitches in his rehab start Thursday
in Stockton. Melvin hinted it could be his
last rehab, though he would not commit
either way. ... Mariners interim manager
Robby Thompson said he plans to talk with
manager Eric Wedge, who plans to be at
Fridays game in Seattle, after batting prac-
tice to develop a game plan. ... Mariners
RHP Tom Wilhelmsen is expected to rejoin
the team in September. He was optioned to
Triple-ATacoma on Aug. 6.
Continued from page 11
ATHLETICS
Three teens charged
after Australian player slain
DUNCAN, Okla. Prosecutors filed
charges against three teenagers Tuesday
after police said the boys randomly targeted
an Australian baseball player as he jogged
and shot him in the back, killing him, to
avoid the boredom of an Oklahoma summer
day.
Christopher Lane, 22, of Melbourne, died
Friday along a tree-lined road on Duncans
well-to-do north side. Two teenagers, 15-
and 16-year-olds from the gritty part of the
town, were charged with rst-degree murder
and ordered held without bond.
A third, age 17, was accused of being an
accessory after the fact and with driving a
vehicle while a weapon was discharged. He
said in open court I pulled the trigger, but
the judge directed him to remain quiet and
said Tuesday was not the day to discuss the
facts of the case.
The boy cried.
His bond was set at $1 million.
Sports brief
SPORTS 17
Wednesday Aug. 21, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By John Wawrow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SOUTH WILLIAMSPORT, Pa. Manager
Rob Chandler decided a quick change of
strategy was in order after watching the rst
six Sammamish, Wash., batters strike out
ve of them looking.
Amore aggressive approach paid off.
Sammamish scored six runs during a third-
inning rally that proved to be just enough
to pull out a 6-5 win over Nashville, Tenn.,
in a Little League World Series elimination
game Tuesday night.
I didnt realize they were going to throw
80 percent rst-pitch strikes. So we had to
change our game-plan quite fast, Chandler
said. We stopped holding the bats.
Austin Oh drove in the nal two runs to
put the Northwest champions ahead 6-2.
Aguadulce, Panama, avoided elimination
with far more air, scoring four times with
two outs in the bottom of the sixth to pull
out an 8-7 win over Taoyuan, Taiwan.
Panamas winning run came home when
Jose Gonzalez was struck by a pitch with
the bases loaded.
In knocking off Taiwan, Panama (3-1)
advances to face one of the two other
remaining International Division teams
Tijuana, Mexico, or Tokyo on Thursday.
Sammamish (3-1) moves on to a matchup
Thursday against either Chula Vista, Calif.,
or Westport, Conn., in the U.S. bracket.
Ohs single to center drove in Wi l l
Armbruester and then Jack Matheson, who
scored on an errant throw by center elder
Robert Hassell.
Armbruester, Jack Carper and Dalton
Chandler each had RBI singles during the
rally. The Washington team had six of its
eight hits in the third inning, and after
Nashville pitcher Trae McLemore had struck
out the side in each of the rst two frames.
It looked like he was going to throw a
perfect game, Sammamish assistant man-
ager Matt Fitzgibbons said. And then my
son (Nathan) had a nine-pitch walk, and Im
thinking, Maybe, we can do this.
Nashville manager Chris Mercado credit-
ed Sammamish for nding its offense in the
third. At the same time, Mercado couldnt
help but note how two throwing errors led
to a pair of runs.
You cant beat yourself, Mercado said.
Thats what I told our kids that our biggest
opponent was ourselves. We let that get to
us a little bit.
Sammamishs Matheson also did a solid
job in three-plus innings in relief of starter
Jacob Dahlstrom. Matheson allowed just
one run on three hits against a Nashville
team that had scored 10 runs in each of its
past two games.
I feel like its all on my shoulders,
Matheson said. And if I can get them to put
it on the ground and get them to swing, I
feel like its all in my hands.
In the International bracket elimination
game, getting hit in the foot never felt so
good to Gonzalez.
As the inelder limped his way toward
rst base, Edgardo Rosales was celebrating
on his way home from third with the deci-
sive run for Panama, which overcame a 7-4
decit.
The only thing I was thinking was to try
to get on base one way or another,
Gonzalez said through interpreter Gilbert
Monell. And after being hit by the pitch I
felt very happy.
Jordan Agrazal had three RBIs, including
a two-run single in the sixth. And Rosales
would not have been in a position to score
had he not reached base because of a two-out
error by Yeh Tung-Jua, who bobbled a
grounder to third.
It was a difcult game. It was important
that we won, manager Luis Gonzalez said
through Monell. I congratulate all the kids
on the other team for their effort. Our team
never gave up, and that made us get the vic-
tory.
For Taiwan, it was a shocking turn of
events for the tournaments youngest team,
which includes five 11-year-olds the
most of any squad. Several Taiwan players,
including catcher Lee Chen-Hsun, broke
down in tears following the game.
Panama catcher Juan Crisp and several
teammates went over to console their oppo-
nents.
I saw a couple of players on their team
crying, and even a couple on our team,
manager Gonzalez said. It was a great
game. Theyre kids. You can expect that.
Taiwan manager Lee Kuo-Chiang provided
essentially the same answer in taking only
three questions following the game.
(I) never thought about pulling (the)
pitcher because (I) believe the player will do
his best, and the player has already learned
from the game, Kuo-Chiang said through
interpreter Lin Chia-Hsien. The players did
not give up.
Yu Teng-Yao took the loss in relief of
Tung-Jua, who was forced to leave with one
out in the fth after reaching his 85-pitch
limit.
Taiwan showed plenty of perseverance in
rallying to take the lead after giving up four
runs in the rst inning.
Lee Shu-Ming had a two-run single to cap
a six-run third inning that put Taiwan ahead
7-4. Chou Shih-Che drove in two runs on
three hits for Taiwan.
Armando Lopez hit a three-run homer in
the rst inning for Panama.
Earlier in the day, Brno, Czech Republic
(1-2), beat Grosse Pointe, Mich. (0-3), 5-3
in a consolation game, ending both teams
tournament.
Washington, Panama win LLWS elimination games
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Ten former NFL players, including ve Hall of Famers, are
asking the league and its production arm to pay up.
On Tuesday, a group that includes Curley Culp and John
Riggins led a class-action suit in U.S. District Court in New
Jersey to reclaim payment for the use of their names, images
and likenesses from lm footage they say was used on NFL
Network and to promote the league without the ex-players
consent.
The other Hall of Famers suing are Dave Casper, Tom Mack
and Ron Yary.
NFL Films has never obtained authorization from retired
players to use their images to be, as NFL Films puts it, the
backbone of the NFLNetwork, according to the 81-page l-
ing obtained by The Associated Press. NFL Films conduct
goes far beyond simply use of images without consent. It con-
tinues to this day to strike licensing business deals, in New
Jersey, afrmatively, and falsely, misrepresenting that it has
obtained all former players consent to appear in its promo-
tional materials. The NFLdoes likewise.
The complaint against the NFL and NFL Productions notes
that in 1993, all players contracts began to include clauses
that granted the NFL authority to use the names, images and
likenesses of players to publicize and promote the league.
They claim it was never included with the players in the suit.
The ling also contends that the league and NFLProductions
violated state laws regarding unfair competition and rights of
publicity, as well as a federal statute claiming the league and its
production arm were unjustly enriched by improperly using
the ex-players.
The other former players listed on the suit are Mike Bass,
Willie Buchanon, Roman Gabriel, Joe Kapp and Phil
Villapiano. It also asks that former players who have opted out
of the Dryer v. NFL lawsuit, their heirs and assigns be includ-
ed in this case.
Though there is no stated sum in the complaint, it notes that
according to published reports in 2002, NFL Films was mak-
ing $50 million per year in licensing revenue, which applied
only to third parties such as television networks.
It did not include the far greater value to NFLFilms, and the
NFL itself, to use NFL Films footage to promote the NFLs
global brand, and to form the backboneof the NFLNetwork,
the suit said.
Ex-players suing NFL Films
18
Wednesday Aug. 21, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
the last two years slashing millions of dol-
lars off Oaklands bloated payroll, gured it
would be too costly to try to re-sign Lechler
and let the veteran punter walk.
King, who spent all of 2012 on the Raiders
injured reserve list, was the logical choice to
replace Lechler but Oakland signed Kluwe in
May shortly after he was cut by Minnesota
following an eight-year stint with the
Vikings.
The two men have engaged in a friendly but
spirited competition since camp began. They
frequently talk and share tips. Mostly its
been the 31-year-old Kluwe serving as a men-
tor to his younger teammate.
You cant look at it like Im here in this
spot competing for this job. You have to look
at it like Im competing for one of 32 jobs in
the NFL, Kluwe said. Because you could
beat out the guy at your spot on your team but
if neither of you is punting better than a guy
on some other team (who is let go), theyre
going to cut both of you and bring in that
other guy. Thats how I started in this league.
Minnesota claimed me off waivers.
Statistically, there hasnt been much differ-
ence between the two punters.
Both punted four times in the rst two pre-
season games. King, the more powerful of the
two, has a 55.5-yard average with a 49.0-yard
net. Kluwe, who holds every signicant
Vikings punting record, is averaging 46.0
yards with a 37.5 net.
Im not competing against anybody but
myself, said King, who went undrafted out of
Division II Fort Valley State in 2012. True
enough, its a competition (with Kluwe) but
Im competing against myself and Im pretty
sure hes competing against himself.
King is the more outgoing of the two pun-
ters, smiling and laughing his way through
practice and interviews.
He politely thanks reporters for their ques-
tions, and after one recent meeting with the
media, the 24-year-old asked a Raiders public
relations intern if his answers were good
enough.
Kluwe is a bit more colorful.
Avery outspoken supporter of gay rights,
Kluwe wrote an open letter to Maryland dele-
gate Emmett C. Burns Jr. in 2012 after Burns
had written to Baltimore Ravens owner Steve
Bisciotti urging him to keep his team from
making comments in support of same sex
marriages.
Kluwes letter went viral on the Internet and
he became an instant celebrity on the talk
show circuit. He made an appearance on the
Conan OBrien show in June to talk about the
letters and his views on subjects such as pol-
itics and the art of swearing.
Early in camp, Kluwe wore Google Glass to
give fans a players perspective of practice.
Hes also a huge fan of the online game
Warcraft and regularly tweets about playing
it.
Like King, Kluwe downplayed talk of a
rivalry between the two.
For me its always been that Im going to
go out and do the best that I can, Kluwe said.
Thats all I know how to do. And really,
thats what coaches and player personnel
guys are looking for. Theyre looking for
somebody who isnt counting bodies next to
them, theyre going out to compete.
Continued from page 11
RAIDERS
good ball. And two or three days later, Im
here. Its kind of funny how things work out.
Its a blessing in disguise and Im looking for-
ward to this great opportunity to be here.
Baldwin passed his physical late Monday
then went to work at 7 a.m. Tuesday with
meetings and practice. He quickly made it a
point to meet Anquan Boldin, someone
Baldwin knows will be a valuable resource as
he quickly tries to grasp yet a fourth offense in
three years.
The 49ers are counting on him getting up to
speed in a hurry as the two-time defending
NFC West champions prepare for a far more
daunting schedule as they try to return to the
Super Bowl after falling three points short of
a sixth championship against Baltimore last
season.
Offensive coordinator Greg Roman said
Baldwins transition could go more smoothly
given the fact he is going from one version of
the West Coast offense to another, with simi-
lar language.
At 6-foot-4, Baldwin stood out in the locker
room Tuesday not just for being the new guy.
He certainly gives Kaepernick a tall target
more comparable to Randy Moss than the
injured Michael Crabtree or departed Jenkins,
who failed to catch one pass during a highly
scrutinized rookie season last year.
He hit the ground running this morning at
7 a.m. Hes been diving into it, Roman said
of Baldwin. Speaking of Jonathan the play-
er, size is the rst thing you notice when you
look at him. Hes got really good range, leap-
ing ability. We saw that when we studied him.
A great catch radius is always a great thing.
Theres nothing wrong with having a great
catch radius.
Baldwin has something to prove, along
with several others in the mix to make the
team and pick up some of the load left with the
absence of Crabtree, last years top receiver.
Crabtree is recovering from surgery on his
torn right Achilles tendon and is likely to be
sidelined until at least November.
Roman isnt ready to guess how the receiv-
ing corps will line up for the Sept. 8 season
opener against Green Bay at Candlestick Park.
Well see how it all shakes down. Its
heavy competition right now, Roman said.
You can see it. Its like preparing for a regular
season game. Its very evident.
Baldwin has 41 career catches in 26 games
with two touchdowns. Kansas City selected
him 26th overall in the 2011 NFL draft out of
Pittsburgh.
He didnt have a catch while being targeted
three times for Kansas City in the Chiefs 15-
13 home loss to San Francisco. Baldwin
dropped one would-be catch.
The 24-year-old Baldwin has learned to
ignore the critics, and he is welcoming this
new opportunity.
People are going to have their own reasons
for thinking that way. I cant change the way
people think. As human beings we cant make
everybody happy, Baldwin said. The only
thing I can do now is look forward to the future
and look forward to the present. ... Its a fresh
start. Ive just got to do what all these coach-
es need me to do and be real precise with
things from that standpoint, just soak all of it
in. Be around Anquan and learn a lot of things
from him. Hes been in the league for a long
time and knows all the ins and outs.
And Roman made it clear he expects his
young players to learn from the experienced
veterans.
Continued from page 11
49ERS
FOOD 19
Wednesday Aug. 21, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
S
electing lunch gear used to be sim-
ple. Stuff your lunch into a paper
bag or pick the box decorated with
whichever movie, television or toy charac-
ter your kid was most smitten with. Done.
Things are a bit more complicated today.
Lunch box styles vary from soft-sided
cooler bags to Japanese-inspired bento
boxes, even Indian tifn canisters. They
can have built-in ice packs. They can be
microwaved. They can be made from recy-
cled bisphenol-A-free, lead-free, phthalate-
free, PVC-free plastic. They can be forged
from 18-gauge stainless steel. Some adult
versions even come with their own cheese
boards and wine glasses.
So how do you choose? Much depends on
the types of foods you pack and how you
pack them, as well as when and where you
eat them. But there are some general tips
that can help you sort it all out regardless.
THE GEAR
Dishwashers rule
If it isnt dishwasher safe, dont buy it.
Even if you dont use the dishwasher, this
tells you something about the quality and
durability of a lunch box item.
Multiples matter
Get more than one of everything. This
makes life much easier on those days when
you forget or just dont have time to wash
the gear used the day before.
Lunch boxes
Soft-sided insulated cooler bags are the
way to go. They are affordable and come in
all shapes and sizes. They also are durable
and easy to clean. Look for one with two
compartments. This makes it easier to seg-
regate items, such as easily bruised fruit, or
a thermos of warm soup and a cold yogurt
cup.
Food contai ners
These are the jars, boxes and other con-
tainers the food goes in. Be sure to get a
variety of shapes and
sizes to accommodate
different foods. And at
least some should be
watertight for packing
sauces, dips, puddings
and other liquids.
For a budget option,
go with plastic food
storage containers,
which are cheaper to
replace if lost. If you
dont care for plastic,
there also are plenty of
stainless steel options. These tend to be
pricier, but are indestructible, kid-friendly
and dishwasher safe. My favorite is the
LunchBots brand, available in every con-
ceivable size and shape.
Plenty of companies also sell lunch
systems, or sets of small containers that
t together and pack easily in an insulated
bag. These sets offer less versatility than
when you assemble your own collection of
containers, but they work great. Laptop
Lunches makes a wonderful food-safe plas-
tic bento kit.
Dri nk bottl es
Even if all you ever pack is water, an
insulated drink bottle is a good idea.
Insulated bottles dont sweat. They also
give you the exibility to pack warm or
cold drinks, such as hot cocoa or smooth-
ies.
Thermoses
Its best to have two: a conventional nar-
row thermos for soups and other easily
spilled items, and a wide-mouthed jar for
larger foods, such as warm sandwich l l-
ings or meatballs.
When selecting a thermos, be sure to
check its thermal rating, which indicates
how long it will keep items hot or cold.
This is important information youll need
to keep the food you pack safe to eat.
Perishable cold foods must be kept below
40 F. Hot foods should be held at above
140 F. Once the temperatures go outside
these ranges, the food is safe for another
two hours. To use this information, gure
out what time of day the lunches you pack
will be eaten. Count back to the time of
day the lunches are packed. This is how
long you need to keep the food hot or cold.
One nal tip about thermoses. They hold
their temperatures best if you prime them
before adding food. Packing soup or anoth-
er hot item? Fill the thermos with boiling
water for a few minutes to heat it up, then
dump out the water and add the food. Filling
it with yogurt or something that needs to
stay cold? Place the empty thermos in the
freezer for a few minutes rst.
Ut ens i l s
This is not the time to break out the good
silverware. But Im also not a fan of dis-
posable plastic, which breaks easily and
has a lousy eco footprint. Instead, grab
some inexpensive stainless steel utensils
at the bargain or second hand shop.
Ice packs
Even if youre using an insulated lunch
bag, an ice pack is a good idea, especially
when packing lunches when its hot out. As
with everything else, get several so you
always have one ready to go. I prefer rigid
packs, rather than soft. The soft ones punc-
ture more easily and can freeze in odd, hard-
to-pack shapes.
THE FOOD
Easy, delicious lunch packing relies on
Lunch boxes 101: How to buy them. How to fill them
See LUNCH, Page 20
How do you choose a lunch box? Much depends on the types of foods you pack and how you
pack them,as well as when and where you eat them.But there are some general tips that can
help you sort it all out regardless.
J.M. HIRSCH
FOOD 20
Wednesday Aug. 21, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
EXPIRES: August 31, 2013
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San Bruno, CA 94066
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leftovers. This is why there are certain din-
ner foods I always make sure to cook too
much of: chicken, steak, pasta, rice, and
grilled or roasted vegetables. Theyre all
easily transformed into something fresh.
Thats why dinner is the best time to start
thinking about the next days lunch. If sup-
per leftovers could be easily repurposed,
you might as well make a little extra.
So the following dinner recipes for
America chop suey and bacon-cauliower
mac and cheese are intended to make too
much. I designed them to leave you with
ample leftovers to use for lunches.
AMERICAN CHOP SUEY
All the built-in vegetables help make
this dinner staple a true one-dish meal. And
for picky eaters (big and small), all the
robust avors help mask the fact that
youre using whole-wheat pasta. I like
pancetta because you can buy it already
diced. It also has an amazingly big, bold
avor. But you also could use chopped
bacon. Want something lighter? Substitute
nely chopped ham steak.
Because pancetta is so rich, I lighten
things up on the other end by using lean
ground bison instead of the more common
ground beef. Ground turkey also would be
great.
Start to nish: 30 minutes
Servings: 4, plus ample leftovers
1 large yellow onion, chopped
3 red bell peppers, cored and diced (about
3 cups), divided
15-ounce can tomato sauce
1 tablespoon soy sauce
2 teaspoons Italian seasoning
3-ounce package diced pancetta
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 pounds ground bison
14 1/2-ounce can diced tomatoes
2 cups beef broth
12 ounces whole-wheat elbow macaroni
Salt and ground black pepper
In a blender, combine the onion, two-
thirds of the diced bell peppers, the tomato
sauce, soy sauce and Italian seasoned. Puree
until smooth. Set aside.
In a large saucepan over medium-high
heat, brown the pancetta for 3 minutes. Add
the garlic and remaining bell pepper and
saute for 3 minutes. Add the bison and
brown, breaking up any large clumps. Add
the onion-bell pepper mixture from the
blender, the diced tomatoes, broth and
pasta.
Bring to a simmer, then cover and cook,
stirring occasionally, until the pasta is
tender, about 15 to 20 minutes. Season
with salt and pepper.
LEFTOVER LUNCH IDEAS: Dont be
afraid of carb-on-carb. Leftover American
chop suey is delicious warm or cold on a
bun (think sloppy Joes). If you want it
warm, just heat the chop suey and pack it
in a thermos (with the bun packed separate-
ly). At lunch, just spoon the chop suey
onto the bun and enjoy. Rather not bulk up
on bread? Pack a thermos of warm chop
suey with some large Boston lettuce leaves
on the side for DIYlettuce wraps!
(Recipe from J.M. Hirschs Beating the
Lunch Box Blues, Rachael Ray Books,
2013)
BACON-CAULIFLOWER
MAC AND CHEESE
The bacon and four cheeses make this
mac and cheese seriously indulgent. But the
cauliower and whole-wheat pasta make it
virtuous. For speed, you can skip the bread-
crumb and broiling step, making this an
easy stovetop meal. Im a big believer in
have-it-your-way. I like elbow pasta for
mac and cheese, but substitute whatever
you have. Ditto for my selection of
cheeses.
Start to nish: 30 minutes
Servings: 4 dinners, plus leftovers
1 pound whole-wheat elbow pasta
10 strips bacon, chopped
1/2 medium head cauliower, cored and
cut into small orets
2 cups milk
1 tablespoon garlic powder
1/2 tablespoon onion powder
1/2 tablespoon mustard powder
1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
4 ounces cream cheese, cut into chunks
1 1/2 cups (6 ounces) grated cheddar
cheese
1 1/2 cups (6 ounces) grated gruyere
cheese
1 cup grated Parmesan cheese
Kosher salt
3/4 cup panko breadcrumbs
4 tablespoons (1/2 stick) butter, melted
Heat the oven to broil.
Bring a large pot of salted water to a
boil. Add the pasta and cook al dente, about
8 minutes. Drain and set aside.
Meanwhile, in a large, deep oven-safe
saute pan over medium heat, cook the
bacon for 2 minutes. Add the cauliower
and saute until lightly browned, about 12
minutes. Add the drained pasta to the pan
and mix well. Add the milk, garlic powder,
onion powder, mustard powder, black pep-
per and cayenne. Mix well and heat until
the milk is hot.
Add the cream cheese, stirring until melt-
ed. Sprinkle in the cheddar, gruyere and
Parmesan, stirring until melted. Season
with salt. Leave the pasta in the pan.
In a small bowl, toss the breadcrumbs
with the melted butter, then scatter evenly
over the pasta. Broil for 2 minutes, or until
lightly browned.
LEFTOVER LUNCH IDEAS: Use left-
over mac and cheese as the lling for a
grilled cheese. It was my sons idea. Its a
little crazy, but its a lot delicious. Or pack
it warm in a thermos and use it as a topping
for DIYnachos. Just accompany with tor-
tilla chips and other toppings, such as
bacon or sausage chunks, salsa and a pack-
age of guacamole. At lunch, spoon the
warm mac and cheese onto the chips and
top as desired.
(Recipe from J.M. Hirschs Beating the
Lunch Box Blues, Rachael Ray Books,
2013)
Continued from page 19
LUNCH
FOOD 21
Wednesday Aug. 21, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Burlingames #1 Choice!
0reat food Hicroorews
full ar Sports TY
fool anquet facilities
family friendly ining since 1995
By J.M. Hirsch
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Have you noticed how big and
bold and robust salads have
become? Its as though salads no
longer can be content to be on the
side and complement the rest of
the meal.
Most recipes these days seem to
insist the salad be the meal.
Which can be nice, particularly in
the heat of summer. But some-
times a salad needs to play anoth-
er role. Sometimes it just needs to
help us appreciate the other
foods. This is what I was thinking
as I considered what to pair with a
recent dinner of pulled pork
bathed in a vinegary-peppery
sauce.
I didnt want a big, bold salad
that would compete with the pork.
I wanted a cool and refreshing
salad that would serve as a coun-
terpoint to the barbecue.
Id recently seen a salad of
cucumber and cold cooked chicken
bathed in sour cream. It seemed
nice and a perfect contrast to
the pork. But again, I didnt need
more protein.
So I decided to deconstruct it
back to side salad status, mostly
by removing the chicken. But I
also decided it needed a better tex-
ture. Raw cucumber straight up
tends to be watery. And water does
nasty things to thick and creamy
dressings. I needed to get rid of
the water.
To do this, I borrowed a trick
from Japanese slaws that
involves salting thinly sliced
vegetables, then gently pressing
them to remove water. Once
dressed, these pressed salads have
a more satisfying texture and
wont dilute the other avors. It
worked perfectly for this cucum-
ber salad, leaving the sour cream
dressing rich and creamy.
PRESSED CUCUMBER
SALAD WITH SOUR CREAM
The trick to this salad is slicing
everything as thinly as possible.
A mandoline is best, but a food
processor tted with the slicing
blade will work, too.
Start to nish: 15 minutes
Servings: 6
2 large English cucumbers
1 small red onion
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup sour cream
2 tablespoons chopped fresh
dill
Zest and juice of 1/2 lemon
1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
1/4 teaspoon ground black pep-
per
Slice both cucumbers and the
onion as thinly as possible, then
mix them together in a large
bowl. Sprinkle the salt over the
vegetables.
Using your hands, gently knead
and press the vegetables. Dont
crush or mash them, just gently
work the vegetables in the bowl.
After 2 to 4 minutes of knead-
ing, there should be a large
amount of water in the bowl. Pour
off and discard the water.
Stir in the sour cream, dill,
lemon zest and juice, garlic pow-
der and black pepper. The salad
can be made up to 4 hours in
advance. If so, prepare the dress-
ing separately and refrigerate in a
separate container from the
cucumbers. Just before serving,
drain the cucumbers again, then
mix in the dressing.
Asian technique produces creamy, cool salad
Most recipes these days seem to insist the salad be the meal. Which can be nice, particularly in the heat of
summer. But sometimes a salad needs to play another role.
LOCAL/NATION
22
Wednesday Aug. 21, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
nights meeting favored contracting with
Zucker, it came as a bit of a surprise to
Councilman Jack Matthews, who described
Zucker as a bit of a Lone Ranger.
I am surprised you all agreed, he said to
his colleagues. I thought Zucker was the
unlikely person to rise to the top.
Zucker was in the hunt for the contract
with San Jose-based Management Partners
and Folsom-based Citygate Associates to
conduct a review of the CDD following a
series of hiccups.
Matthews graded all three high but Zucker
earned the highest marks.
Mayor David Lim was also impressed with
how Zucker answered the councils ques-
tions compared to the others.
I was surprised how impressed I was by
Mr. Zucker. He had the thinnest packet and
he showed up by himself, Lim said.
The other groups had multiple groups
address the council.
All three rms earned praise from most on
the council and all three had previously
done consulting work for the city.
Going into last nights meeting, howev-
er, Matthews and Councilman Brandt Grotte
were not in favor of conducting an audit, or
consulting engagement as some in the pub-
lic have described it.
The department may have had some hic-
cups such as the controversial 7-Eleven
on San Mateo Drive the council ultimately
ruled was permitted to operate in error but
for the most part, Matthews said, the CDDs
work has been excellent, he told the Daily
Journal last week.
Matthews also does not like the word
audit to describe the work.
The council also discussed last night
whether it should request proposals for a
full-blown audit of the citys affairs but
decided against it.
Councilwoman Maureen Freschet was not
at last nights meeting.
Zucker will start his work in September
just as CDD Director Lisa Grote will retire
from the city.
Grote oversaw the department for the past
three years but lost two key employees in
the Planning Division, who quit their jobs
in recent months, after the idea to conduct
an audit of the department was announced.
Both were involved in the 7-Eleven deci-
sion that has landed the city in court against
the corporate giant and the company it leas-
es from Portfolio Development Partners.
Zucker said before he shows up to the city
for the rst time to start his work he must be
provided with a lot of data.
Zucker will meet with all the department
managers and then the rest of staff in sepa-
rate meetings before questioning them in
condence, he said.
Zuckers bid for the work was for $43,500
although that may go up depending on the
scope of work.
silverfarb@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106
Continued from page 1
AUDIT
By David Disheau and Pauline Jelinek
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
FORT MEADE, Md. A military judge
said shell announce on Wednesday the
sentence for Army Pfc. Bradley Manning,
who gave reams of classified information
to WikiLeaks.
Army Col. Denise Lind said Tuesday she
was still deliberating but she was confi-
dent she would have a sentence by
Wednesday morning.
At 10 a.m. tomorrow I will announce
the sentence, Lind said about 2 1/2 hours
into her deliberations.
Manning faces up to 90 years in prison
for leaking more than 700,000 Iraq and
Afghanistan battlefield reports and State
Department diplomatic cables in 2010
while working as an intelligence analyst
in Iraq. He also leaked video of an U.S.
helicopter attack in Baghdad in which at
least nine people were killed, including a
Reuters news photographer and his driver.
Prosecutors have asked for at least a 60-
year prison term. Capt. Joe Morrow said
in his closing argument
Monday that a long
prison sentence would
dissuade other soldiers
from following in
Mannings footsteps.
Theres value in
deterrence, Morrow
said.
The defense has sug-
gested a prison term of
no more than 25 years,
so that Manning, 25, could rebuild his
life. Defense attorney David Coombs
asked for a sentence that doesnt rob him
of his youth.
Prosecutors have requested a far longer
prison term than other soldiers have
received in recent decades for sharing gov-
ernment secrets.
Army Spec. Albert T. Sombolay got a
34-year-sentence in 1991 for giving a
Jordanian intelligence agent information
on the buildup for the first Iraq war, plus
other documents and samples of U.S.
Army chemical protection equipment.
Marine Sgt. Clayton Lonetree, the only
Marine ever convicted of espionage, was
given a 30-year sentence, later reduced to
15 years, for giving the Soviet KGB the
identities of U.S. CIAagents and the floor
plans of the embassies in Moscow and
Vienna in the early 1980s.
U.S. civilian courts have ordered life in
prison for spies, including Aldrich Ames,
a former CIA case officer convicted in
1994 of spying for the Soviet Union and
Russia and former FBI agent Robert
Hanssen, convicted in 2001 of spying for
Moscow.
Government transparency advocate
Steven Aftergood, of the Federation of
American Scientists, said the civilian
cases, unlike the military ones, involved
career intelligence workers who knowing-
ly supplied foreign governments with
U.S. secrets for years. Ames disclosures
caused intelligence sources to be executed.
Hanssen compromised ongoing intelli-
gence operations on a massive scale.
Duke University law Professor Scott L.
Silliman said Mannings case doesnt rise
to those levels. While Manning disclosed
a vast amount of information, I dont
think you could call Bradley Manning a
spy, he said.
Military prisoners can earn up to 120 days
a year off their sentence for good behavior
and job performance, but must serve at least
one-third of any prison sentence before they
can become eligible for parole.
Manning will get credit for about 3 1/2
years of pretrial confinement, including
112 days for being illegally punished by
harsh conditions at the Quantico, Va. ,
Marine Corps brig.
Manning was convicted last month of
20 offenses, including six Espionage Act
violations, five theft counts and computer
fraud.
Under military law, the verdict and sen-
tence must be reviewed and may be
reduced by the commander of the
Military District of Washington, currently
Maj. Gen. Jeffery S. Buchanan. Besides
the court-martial record, Mannings
defense team can submit other pieces of
information in a bid for leniency.
Judge to announce Mannings sentence Wednesday
Bradley
Manning
DATEBOOK 23
Wednesday Aug. 21, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
WEDNESDAY, AUG. 21
Arthritis/Fibromyalgia support
group. 11 a.m. to noon. Mills Health
Center, 100 S. San Mateo Drive, San
Mateo. Free. Drop-in. For more infor-
mation call 654-9966.
San Mateo Professional Alliance
Weekly Networking Lunch. Noon
to 1 p.m. Spiedo Ristorante, 223 E.
Fourth Ave., San Mateo. Free admis-
sion, but lunch is $17. For more
information call 430-6500.
Teen Gaming. 3:30 p.m. Belmont
Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. Xbox or Wii gaming for
ages 12 to 19. Free. For more infor-
mation contact conrad@smcl.org.
Mike Osbourn and the Drivers
featuring Garth Webber (Club Fox
Blues Jam). 7 p.m. Club Fox, 2209
Broadway, Redwood City. $5. For
more information (877) 435-9849 or
go to www.clubfoxrwc.com.
Alzheimers support group for
adult children of people with
Alzheimers. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Mills
Health Center, 100 S. San Mateo
Drive, San Mateo. Free. Drop-in. For
more information call 654-9966.
THURSDAY AUG. 22
Kidney Smart Class. 1 p.m. to 2:30
p.m. 100 Marshall St., Redwood City.
Classes focus on kidney health. Free.
To register for classes call (415) 990-
9671.
High School Ice Cream Social. 3:30
p.m. Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda
de las Pulgas, Belmont. Celebrate
the rst week of high school with
free ice cream. Must show student
ID. For more information contact
conrad@smcl.org.
Summer Concerts at Town Center:
The Dutch Uncles. 6:30 p.m. to 8:30
p.m. Town Center, Portola Valley.
Free. For more information go to
www.portolavalley.net.
Labor Day Festival of Theatre and
Dance. 7:30 p.m. NDNU Theatre stu-
dio stage, 1500 Ralston Ave.,
Belmont. Seventeen original, short
plays in six days, something differ-
ent each day. $10, children are $5.
For more information email
rfritz@ndnu.edu.
Photographer and Theologian
Kim Daus-Edwards to Discuss the
Cross Between Art and Faith. 7:30
p.m. Menlo Park Presbyterian
Church, Building D-11, 1111
University Drive, Menlo Park. Free.
Newcomers welcome. For more
information go to https://artsofthe-
covenant.shuttery.com.
Movies on the Square: The
Avengers. 8:45 p.m. Courthouse
Square, 2200 Broadway, Redwood
City. Free. For more information call
780-7311 or go to www.redwoodci-
ty.org/events/movies.html.
FRIDAY, AUG. 23
Food Addicts in Recovery. 8 a.m. to
9:30 a.m. Central Peninsula Church,
1005 Shell Blvd., Foster City. Weekly
anonymous group for those suffer-
ing from food obsession, overeat-
ing, under-eating or bulimia. Free.
For more information call 504-0034
or go to www.foodaddicts.org.
August Summer Fun Western
Party. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. San Bruno
Senior Center, 1555 Crystal Springs
Road. Dance lessons, music and a
barbecue lunch. Tickets at front
desk. For more information call 616-
7150.
Party, Dance and Lunch with Toni
Morris Band. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. San
Bruno Senior Center, 1555 Crystal
Springs Road, San Bruno. Tickets
available at the Senior Center. For
more information call 616-7150.
Art on the Square. 5 p.m. to 8:30
p.m. Courthouse Square, 2200
Broadway, Redwood City. Original
paintings, photography, jewelry and
more will be featured at prices for
every budget. Free. For more infor-
mation call 780-7311.
Brisbane Concerts in the Park:
Locals Night in the Park. 5:45 p.m.
to 8:30 p.m. Brisbane Community
Park Gazebo, 11 Old County Road,
Brisbane. Free. For more information
call (415) 657-4320 or go to ci.bris-
bane.ca.us.
Mural Music and Arts Project
Summer Community Celebration.
6 p.m. MMAP Headquarters, 2043
Euclid Ave., East Palo Alto. Teen
Mural Program with the unveiling of
a mural, original Hip Hop songs and
dance performances. Free. For more
information email kyle @muralmusi-
carts.org.
Music on the Square: Journey
Revisited. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Courthouse Square, 2200 Broadway,
Redwood City. Journey tribute. Free.
For more information call 780-7311.
Fifth Annual 50/50. 6 p.m. to 9:30
p.m. 1220 Linda Mar Blvd., Pacica.
$10. For more information call 355-
1894.
The Peoples Experience Jazz Trio
at Freewheel. 7 p.m. Freewheel
Brewing Co., 3736 Florence St.,
Redwood City. Ared Solomon,
Marley Edwards and Peter Johnston
perform. For more information
email aaron.solomon@comcast.net.
Redwood City Community
Theater presents Hairspray. 7
p.m. Carrington Hall, 1201 Brewster
Ave., Redwood City. A musical about
replacing racism and discrimination
with tolerance and acceptance.
General admission is $20 for adults,
$15 for seniors and students and
$10 for children under 10. For more
information go to www.rwcthe-
atre.org.
South San Francisco Open Mic. 7
p.m. to 11 p.m. 116 El Campo Drive,
South San Francisco. Free. For more
information call 451-2450.
Deliciously Reel Film Night: Eat
Drink Man Woman. 7 p.m. Belmont
Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. Free. For more information
email conrad@smcl.org.
Labor Day Festival of Theatre and
Dance. 7:30 p.m. NDNU Theatre stu-
dio stage, 1500 Ralston Ave.,
Belmont. Seventeen original, short
plays in six days, something differ-
ent each day. $10, children are $5.
For more information email
rfritz@ndnu.edu.
Eric Van James Quintet. 8:30 p.m.
Angelicas Bistro, 863 Main St.,
Redwood City. Jazz and blues. $12.
For more information call 679-8184.
SATURDAY, AUG. 24
Fifth Annual San Mateo Chili Cook
Off. 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Central Park,
downtown San Mateo. Every dollar
raised helps Local 2400 reghters
provide medical treatment and sup-
port services to individuals and
their families living with neuromus-
cular diseases in the San Mateo
County and the Greater Bay Area.
$10 per person, kids are free. For
more information call (415) 673-
7500.
Senior Showcase Information
Fair. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Little House,
800 Middle Ave., Menlo Park. The
Senior Showcase features more
than 40 exhibitors from all over the
Bay Area offering services, give-
aways, information and more.
Goody bags, refreshments, blood
pressure screening, Ask The
Pharmacist and more. Sponsored by
the Daily Journal and Health Plan of
San Mateo. Free. For information
visit smdailyjournal.com/senior
showcase or call 344-5200.
Tools for Effective Caregiving. 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. Mills Health Center,
100 S. San Mateo Drive, San Mateo.
Two-part class continued on Aug.
31. Free. To register or receive more
information call 696-3660.
Home Improvement Marketplace.
10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Industrial Road and
Brittan Avenue, San Carlos. Product
displays and demonstrations by San
Carlos businesses selling and dis-
playing items for use in remodeling
and building homes. Food trucks,
beer and wine, family activities. Free.
For more information call 593-1068
or visit www.sancarloschamber.org.
Moms Day Out. 10 a.m. to 11 a.m.
Ricochet Wearable Art, 1610 S. El
Camino Real, San Mateo. Learn how
to take better photos with your
smartphone and shop new fall
clothes for you and your little ones.
Free. Must RSVP to info@photos-
byrhonda.com or call 743-0521.
Hosted by Rhonda Gledt
Photography and Ricochet
Wearable Art.
San Carlos Good Living Home
Improvement Marketplace. 10
a.m. to 4 p.m. San Carlos Industrial
Park, 1100-1200 Industrial Road, San
Carlos. Event will feature businesses
in San Carlos that sell items for use
in building or remodeling homes.
Free. For more information go to
sancarloschamber.org.
Palo Alto Festival of the Arts. 10
a.m. to 6 p.m. University Avenue
between High and Webster streets,
Palo Alto. Continues through
Sunday, Aug. 25. Free. For more
information call 324-3121.
Take a Chance Joyfulness
Workshop with Kathleen Nelson.
1 p.m. Floreys Books, 2120 Palmetto
Ave., Pacica. Free. For more infor-
mation call 355-8811.
Labor Day Festival of Theatre and
Dance. 1 p.m. NDNU Theatre studio
stage, 1500 Ralston Ave., Belmont.
Special childrens matinee. $10, chil-
dren are $5. For more information
email rfritz@ndnu.edu.
Band Double Header with Dewey
& the Peoples and Remi Wolf and
Chloe Zilliac backed by the
Extracts. Devils Canyon Brewery,
935 Washington St., San Carlos. Both
bands will feature guitarist Jared
Soloman. At the door, tickets are $12
for adults and $10 for students.
There is a discount if you purchase
tickets in advance. For more infor-
mation email aaron.solomon@com-
cast.net.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
hearing is scheduled for Aug. 29, just
ahead of the planned printing of bal-
lots the rst week of September.
Rankin said the request is nothing
personal against Schmidt.
The laws are the laws. They are writ-
ten for a reason and I just think all the
candidates should be abiding by
them, Rankin said.
Schmidt did not return a call for com-
ment.
Vonderlinden said in a prepared
statement that she and Redwood City
will await a court decision before com-
menting on whether Schmidt violated
election law.
Since there has been long standing
acceptance in this county of accepting
ballot designations such as planning
commissioner, it will be helpful to
receive the courts guidance on
whether such designations comply
with the elections code, Vonderlinden
wrote.
Schmidt and Rankin are among six
candidates vying for three seats on the
Redwood City Council in the Nov. 5
election. The others are incumbents
Jeff Gee and John Seybert both who
list city councilmember as their des-
ignation on the Elections Ofce quali-
ed candidate roster business man-
ager James Lee Han and nurse Diane
Howard. Howard is also a former coun-
cilwoman but does not include that as
part of her description.
Election law holds that aside from
incumbents, elected officials and
judges, candidates can use no more
than three words to explain their cur-
rent professions, vocations or occu-
pations. Rankins attorney, Dennis
Scott Zell, said these must be a means
of livelihood or income meaning a
volunteer position like planning com-
missioner does not qualify.
I think the rule makes sense, other-
wise a casual voter might be confused
into believing that the volunteer is an
elected incumbent, or employee of a
government planning department,
Zell said in a prepared statement.
Rankins petition was led Aug. 19,
the end of the rst 10-day review peri-
od of candidate statements and meas-
ures led by the Aug. 9 deadline.
The county Elections Ofce declined
comment on the situation because the
city clerk is considered the primary
elections ofcial in city races.
Last year, now-county Supervisor
Warren Slocum ran into a similar snafu
over his ballot statement by writing
As your Chief Elections Ofcer and
Assessor-County Clerk-Recorder.
Slocum used the abbreviation ret. for
retired elsewhere in the statement and
later said the error was unintentional.
The Elections Office and a judge
ordered Slocum to revise his statement
and the opponent who raised the con-
cern later backed him in the run-off
election.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
Continued from page 1
PETITION
columns for the proposed auxiliary
lanes; and the construction of retain-
ing and sound walls at specic loca-
tions, LED lights, pedestrian lighting
and landscaping.
The current four-land Broadway
interchange was built in 1947, making
it the oldest intersection along the San
Mateo County Peninsula region,
according to a city staff report.
A redesign of the space has been in
the works for a number of years.
Ross Bruce, president of the
Broadway Merchants Association, is
glad the interchange is being
improved. Hes also pleased construc-
tion wont likely affect the businesses
of Broadway because the original on-
ramp will be preserved during con-
struction of the new on-ramp. The old
interchange will be removed during
one night.
The way its evolved, its not intu-
itive. Its counterintuitive, Bruce
said. For those poor souls who just
rented a Hertz car and are out sightsee-
ing, you can end up in unexpected
places while taking it.
Keighran noted people wont have
to divert to any other city to get on the
freeway during the construction.
Syed Murtuza, director of public
works, said a construction schedule
hasnt been set up yet but the project
will take about two to three years from
inception to completion.
Construction is scheduled to begin in
early summer 2014 with completion
anticipated for 2016.
For those of us that have lived here
many, many years, we understand the
interchange, said Councilman Jerry
Deal. For everyone else, its like
going through a maze. In order for us
to built more industry and businesses,
we need to improve the interchange so
people can get to the businesses.
Right now, Deal notes that the inter-
change is backlogged with trafc and
that the bridge is old and needs both
aesthetic and seismic upgrades.
Councilwoman Terry Nagel said the
remodel will allow for a much safer
intersection.
Construction costs are set at $60
million. The city of Burlingame is put-
ting $5 million into the project, while
the 1988 Measure Afunds will pay for
$32.3 million of the project. State
Transportation Improvement Program
money will provide another $19 mil-
lion in funds and federal funds from
Congestion Management & Air
Quality Program will contribute $3.6
million.
Caltrans is currently reviewing the
project design and nal approval is
anticipated by the end of fall 2013.
angela@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 1
PROJECT
call by a woman who said she and her
daughter were approached by a stranger
Aug. 4 asking if they wanted drugs,
according to a San Mateo police
report.
Its online reviews are also mostly
unfavorable.
The rooms were disgusting. Luckily
I had brought my own blankets and just
used those to lay on top of and cover
me up. I guess they try to justify their
lack of cleanliness by having a free
porn channel, one reviewer wrote on
Yelp.
Another Yelp reviewer wrote, the
maintenance budget for this place must
be zero, and I wonder if in some poetic
way, the people who run it must expect
that eventually it will decay and return
to the earth as much of human creation
eventually does. In summary, this
place is weird and creepy and smells
bad.
The motels managers would not
comment on the pending sale or the
negative online reviews when the
Daily Journal called last night.
City Ventures is known for building
homes with advanced green technolo-
gy.
The site was sought after in 2000 by
a group that wanted to tear down the
48-room motor court motel that was
built in 1936 for a Amerisuites hotel
with 194 rooms. Neighbors protested
the Planning Commissions approval
of the project, however, and it never
got constructed.
silverfarb@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106
Continued from page 1
MOTEL
Comment on
or share this story at
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COMICS/GAMES
8-21-13
mondays PUZZLE soLVEd
PrEVioUs
sUdokU
answErs
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
K
e
n
K
e
n

is
a
r
e
g
is
te
r
e
d
tr
a
d
e
m
a
r
k
o
f N
e
x
to
y
, L
L
C
.
2
0
1
3
K
e
n
K
e
n
P
u
z
z
le
L
L
C
. A
ll r
ig
h
ts
r
e
s
e
r
v
e
d
.
D
is
t. b
y
U
n
iv
e
r
s
a
l U
c
lic
k
fo
r
U
F
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, In
c
. w
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k
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.c
o
m
8
-
2
1
-
1
3
aCross
1 Adhesive
6 Ecuadors capital
11 Area
12 Trouble afoot?
13 Ford model
14 Riata
15 Vocal group
16 Keep under wraps
17 Sigh of relief
18 Remove, as branches
19 Grime
23 Barking animal
25 Video game pioneer
26 pickle
29 Buggy drivers
31 Finger count
32 Engine part
33 Broadcast medium
34 Nutritious bean
35 Recognized
37 Novelist Seton
39 Ono
40 Strong soap
41 Hindu range
45 Flashlight output
47 Coach Lombardi
48 Give some slack
51 Move unsteadily
52 Spelunkers fnd
53 Broadways Stritch
54 Pipe unclogger
55 Valuable thing
down
1 Fuzzy fruit
2 Sharp, as hearing
3 Scatters
4 Extol
5 Uh cousins
6 Courtyard
7 Riot cause
8 Sundial numeral
9 Bring halt
10 Torontos prov.
11 Pack cargo
12 Object on radar
16 Vacations
18 Tibetan monk
20 Feedbag morsels
21 Hydrox rival
22 Wee
24 Pull down
25 Crows nest cry
26 Yucky
27 iPod model
28 In a frenzy
30 Trig function
36 Go downhill
38 Japanese dogs
40 A Redgrave
42 Loosen
43 Aroma
44 Roll call reply
46 Dynamic prefx
47 Tennessee gridders
48 Arith. term
49 Rowing need
50 Eggs, in biology
51 Herbal soother
diLBErT Crossword PUZZLE
fUTUrE sHoCk
PEarLs BEforE swinE
GET fUZZy
wEdnEsday, aUGUsT 21, 2013
LEo (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Get together with people
who make you think in unusual ways. Make personal
improvements that help you focus on and improve
what you have to offer. Dont be afraid to step out on
a limb when it comes to love.
VirGo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Confusion in your
emotional relationships will surface if you
arent specifc about your likes and dislikes.
Communication will be key to keeping your options
open and your life journey on track.
LiBra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Problems getting things
accomplished will hamper your ability to deliver.
Dont promise what you cannot provide, even if it
means disappointing someone. Gauge your time
wisely.
sCorPio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Youll have the drive
to get things done, but interference may stand
between you and success. Alter your living space
to allow you to fnish projects in the comfort of your
home.
saGiTTariUs (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Its a good day
to engage in activities that require your talents,
skills and expertise. Youll impress someone who
can boost your reputation and bring some major
changes.
CaPriCorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Take a different
approach to your daily chores and you will inspire
those around you to follow suit. Money will come to
you from an unusual source.
aQUariUs (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- Partnerships will
be tense if you dont make a concerted effort to
discuss your feelings openly and honestly. You
cannot improve your life if you dont address whats
bothering you.
PisCEs (Feb. 20-March 20) -- Your unusual
approach to fnancial and personal affairs will lead
to all sorts of interesting and unique opportunities.
Expect to be very busy.
ariEs (March 21-April 19) -- Your changing mood
and unpredictable nature will cause others to
question your methods. Check to make sure you are
being practical before its too late.
TaUrUs (April 20-May 20) -- You are in a cycle
where big decisions can be made regarding how
you spend your time and whom you spend it with. A
move may be necessary -- dont fear it.
GEmini (May 21-June 20) -- Take some time to
shop and pamper yourself. Enjoy the company of
someone special and share your plans for the future.
Romance will lead to optimism.
CanCEr (June 21-July 22) -- Too much of anything
will cause problems at home and at work. Discipline
will be required to offset your desire to indulge
physically, emotionally and fnancially.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
24 Wednesday Aug. 21, 2013
THE DAILY JOURNAL
25 Wednesday Aug. 21, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
COOK -
COOK
Atria Hillsdale in San Mateo is seeking experienced
Cooks to join our food service department. Responsibil-
ities include preparing and cooking our residents meals
while following strict sanitation guidelines. You will put
on first class events for our residents, their families, po-
tential residents, and professional referral sources.
Requirements:
Knowledge of local and state health and sanitation
and safety codes.
Knowledge of food handling, preparation, cooking,
service and operation of all kitchen equipment.
New grads welcome
DRUG SCREEN AND BACKGROUND CHECK ARE
REQUIRED
We offer:
* Competitive pay and Sign On Bonus
* Excellent internal support and training;
Send resumes to
eliana.king@atriaseniorliving.com
Walk-ins welcome:
2883 S. Norfolk Street, San Mateo 94403
DELIVERY
DRIVER
PENINSULA
ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide
delivery of the Daily Journal six days per week,
Monday thru Saturday, early morning.
Experience with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be
eligible. Papers are available for pickup in down-
town San Mateo at 3:30 a.m.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday, 9am to
4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
CAREGIVER -
Novelles Developmental Services is hir-
ing staff to work with adults with physical
and developmental disabilities. Fax re-
sume to 650.692.2412 or complete an
application, Mon-Fri. at 1814 Ogden
Drive, Burlingame.
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
CAREGIVERS
NEEDED
Hourly and Live In
Sign on bonus
650-458-0356
recruiter@homecarecal.com
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS, HHA,
CNAS
needed immediately.
Please apply in person at:
15 N. Ellsworth Avenue,
Suite 201, San Mateo, CA
or call (650)206-5200
ENGINEER -
Genesys Telecommunications Labs, Da-
ly City, CA, seeks Technical Support En-
gineer (Tier 3 Support Engineer). Prov
tech supp to Genesys field eng, tech,
and product supp personnel who are di-
ag, troubleshooting, repair and debug
complex comp syst, complex software, or
networked syst. Req BS or foreign equiv.
in CS, Electrical Eng or related fields and
5 yrs of prog exp. Mail resumes to: 2001
Junipero Serra Blvd #600, ATTN: Itan
Jordan, Daly City, CA 94014. Include job
code 63494 in reply.
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
110 Employment
CUSTOMER SERVICE
YOU ARE INVITED
Are you:
Dependable
Friendly
Detail Oriented
Willing to learn new skills
Do you have:
Good English skills
A Desire for steady employment
A desire for emplployment benefits
Sewiing skills
If the above items describe you,
please call (650)342-6978.
Immediate opening available for
Customer Service/Seamstress.
Call for appointment.
Crystal Cleaning Center
San Mateo CA, 94402
DRIVERS NEEDED - Use your own 4 or
6 cylinder vehicle, FT/PT, $12-13/hr.
Paid training-800-603-1072.
110 Employment
EXPERIENCED LINE Cook, apply in
person at 1201 San Carlos Ave, San
Carlos 94070
HELP WANTED, Tennis instructor 8 to
12 hours per week (650)343-7343
HOUSECLEANING -
Merry Maids: House cleaners needed,
Need Car, CDL Ins., SM (650)572-8200
RESTAURANTS -
Servers, Bussers, Bartenders, Hostesses
wanted. Call (650)340-7684
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
RETAIL JEWELRY
SALES
Start up to $13.
Experience up to $20.
Benefits-Bonus-No Nights!
(650)367-6500 FX 367-6400
jobs@jewleryexchange.com
26 Wednesday Aug. 21, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journals readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com
110 Employment
RETAIL -
What if you found opportunity right in
your neighborhood? Choice. Ad-
vancement. Excitement. FULFILLED.
Theres a way. At Walgreens, our
stores offer you numerous and varied
career paths. From beauty advisor to
management trainee and photo tech
to opportunities in Pharmacy, we de-
pend on our team members to be the
face of Walgreens. In return, each job
offers you the potential for growth and
a clear path to advancement both
within the store environment and be-
yond. Its a diverse atmosphere in
which youll find supportive co-work-
ers, a positive environment and the
tools you need to pursue your inter-
ests and grow your skills.
We are currently hiring for part time
and full time positions for Daly City,
San Mateo, Palo Alto, Mountain View
and the general Peninsula area
stores. To apply, visit www.wal-
greens.jobs.
Walgreens is an Equal Opportunity
Employer and welcomes individuals of
diverse talent and backgrounds. Wal-
greens promotes and supports a
smoke-free and drug-free workplace.
Walgreens. Theres a way.
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
UBER AND Limo and Taxi Driver
Wanted, Living from San Mateo to San
Jose making $600 to $900 a week,
Fulltime, (650)766-9878
124 Caregivers
TOMS
COMPASSIONATE CARE
Are you in need of home
patient care?
We've got you covered.
Please call us.
You won't regret it.
650-515-0669
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 522610
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Jennifer Smith
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Jennifer Smith filed a petition
with this court for a decree changing
name as follows:
Present name: Jennifer Smith
Proposed name: Leah Levenson
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on September
6, 2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 07/18/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 07/05/2013
(Published, 07/31/13, 08/07/2013,
08/14/2013, 08/21/2013)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257037
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: A-1 Self Storage, 1337 Old
Country Rd., BELMONT, CA 94002 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: 1) Caster Belmont Storage, LP, CA,
2) Caster Family Enterprises, Inc., CA, 3)
Terrence R. Caster, 4607 Mission Gorge
Place, San Diego, CA 92120 . The busi-
ness is conducted by a Limited Partner-
ship. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
09/01/2007.
/s/ Terrence R. Caster /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/0a/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/14/13, 08/21/13, 08/29/13, 09/04/13).
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 523174
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Johnny Jia-Zhen Pan and Naing Naing
Saw
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Johnny Jia-Zhen Pan and Na-
ing Naing Saw filed a petition with this
court for a decree changing name as fol-
lows:
Present name: Hailee Hei-Man Pan
Proposed name: Hailee Hei-Man Poon
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on September
13, 2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J,
at 400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 08/02/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 08/02/2013
(Published, 08/07/13, 08/14/2013,
08/21/2013, 08/28/2013)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256810
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Aratas Maze Builders, 185
Verde Road, HALF MOON BAY, CA
94019 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owners: Chris & Sunneva Gounala-
kis, same address. The business is con-
ducted by a Married Couple. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Sunneva Gounalakis /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/17/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/31/13, 08/07/13, 08/14/13, 08/21/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256888
The following person is doing business
as: Studio Bean, 125 Laurie meadows
Dr., Apt. 185, SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Michael Molinari, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 07/17/2013.
/s/ Michael Molinari /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/23/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/31/13, 08/07/13, 08/14/13, 08/21/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256742
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Kings Mountain Designs, 1089
Tunitas Creek Road, REDWOOD CITY,
CA 94062 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owners: Sheena Mawson & Sven
Mauson, same address. The business is
conducted by a Married Couple. The reg-
istrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Sheena Mawson /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 7/11/2013. (Publish-
ed in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/31/13, 08/07/13, 08/14/13, 08/21/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257061
The following person is doing business
as: Vintagemaya.com, 50 Woodside Pla-
za, Ste. 612, REDWOOD CITY, CA
94062 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Design Dolce, LLC, CA. The
business is conducted by a Limited Lia-
bility Company. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s/ Nageen Sharma /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/02/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/07/13, 08/14/13, 08/21/13, 08/28/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256988
The following person is doing business
as: Expert Network Consultants, 1121
Lord Nelson Ln., FOSTER CITY, CA
94404 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Pro Network Tools, CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on.
/s/ John C. Brewer /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/30/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/07/13, 08/14/13, 08/21/13, 08/28/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257081
The following person is doing business
as: Bel Mateo Hauling Services, 1722 S.
Grant St. #12, SAN MATEO, CA 94402
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Michael Anthony Shaffer, same
address. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s/ Michael Anthony Shaffer /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/06/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/07/13, 08/14/13, 08/21/13, 08/28/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256991
The following person is doing business
as: Skyline Group, 1656 Skyline Dr.,
BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Irma Rief
Dynasty Trust, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Trust. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 04/19/2002.
/s/ Frank Misko /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/30/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/07/13, 08/14/13, 08/21/13, 08/28/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256932
The following person is doing business
as: Kaydee Services, 1601 Ark Street,
SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Kathryn L.
Donath, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 07/01/2013.
/s/ Kathryn L. Donath /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/14/13, 08/21/13, 08/29/13, 09/04/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257149
The following person is doing business
as: Peninsula Dental Care, 1122 Hopkins
Ave., REDWOOD CITY, CA 94062 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Ramiz R. Petros, DMD, 335 Elan Village
Ln. #209, San Jose CA 95134 The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on.
/s/ Ramiz R. Petros /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/12/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/14/13, 08/21/13, 08/29/13, 09/04/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256852
The following person is doing business
as: BWE Bay Mortgage, 1410 B Burlin-
game Ave., BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Carlos Bone, 215 Victoria Rd., BURLIN-
GAME, CA 94010 The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on.
/s/ Carlos Bone /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/19/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/14/13, 08/21/13, 08/29/13, 09/04/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256924
The following person is doing business
as: Evergreen Towing Service, 697 Va-
nessa Dr., SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Alfred Diong, 697 Vanessa Dr., SAN MA-
TEO, CA 94402. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 1998.
/s/ Alfred Diong /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/25/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/14/13, 08/21/13, 08/29/13, 09/04/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257067
The following person is doing business
as: M3G Computer Repair, 24 Sonora
Ave. SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA
94080 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Manuelito L. Aguas, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on .
/s/ Manuelito L. Aguas /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/05/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/14/13, 08/21/13, 08/29/13, 09/04/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257009
The following person is doing business
as: Musculoskeletal Medical Center,
1850 Sullivan Ave., Ste. 310, DALY
CITY, CA 94015 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Christian Bocobo
MD Professional Corporation, CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 10/20/2004.
/s/ Christian Bocobo, MD /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/31/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/14/13, 08/21/13, 08/29/13, 09/04/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257136
The following person is doing business
as: Sheryl de Luna Office Services, 901
Constitution Dr., FOSTER CITY, CA
94404 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Sheryl de Luna, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
05/01/2010.
/s/ Sheryl de Luna /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/09/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/14/13, 08/21/13, 08/29/13, 09/04/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257152
The following person is doing business
as: Pixel Perfecto Solutions, 364 Caprino
Way #1, SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Elizabeth Marinos, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 09/02/2013.
/s/ Elizabeth Marinos /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/12/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/14/13, 08/21/13, 08/29/13, 09/04/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257463
The following person is doing business
as: Eastern Health Center, 6801 Mission
St., Ste 208, DALY CITY, CA 94014 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Jie Liang, 640 Francisco St., Apt., 1114,
San Francisco, CA 94133. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Jie Liang /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/12/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/14/13, 08/21/13, 08/29/13, 09/04/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257134
The following person is doing business
as: MJP-ENZ, 117 24th Ave., Apt. 1,
SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Marian J.
Peris, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Marian J. Peris /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/09/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/21/13, 08//28/13, 09/04/13, 09/11/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257154
The following person is doing business
as: Resell It with Anna, 3221 La Mesa
Dr., SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Anna
E. LeCuyer, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on
/s/ Anna E. LeCuyer /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/13/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/21/13, 08//28/13, 09/04/13, 09/11/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257101
The following person is doing business
as: All Bay Hauling and Demolition, 708
2nd Avenue, REDWOOD CITY, CA
94063 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Hassan Mortazavi, 21 San-
born Road, Orinda, CA 94563. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on
/s/ Hassan Mortazavi /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/07/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/21/13, 08//28/13, 09/04/13, 09/11/13).
27 Wednesday Aug. 21, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256892
The following person is doing business
as: Frontline Demolition, 1131 Foster
City Blvd. Apt. #4, FOSTER CITY, CA
94404 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Kenneth Edmundo Irwin,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on N/A
/s/ Kenneth Irwin /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/23/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/25/13, 08/01/13, 08/08/13, 08/15/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257239
The following person is doing business
as: Glassvendor.com, 830 Bransten
Road, Suite L, SAN CARLOS, CA 94070
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Tony Campanile, 427 Bark Dr.,
Redwood City, CA 94065. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Tony Campanile /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/19/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/21/13, 08//28/13, 09/04/13, 09/11/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257214
The following person is doing business
as: Atlas Heating & Ventilating Co., 340
Roebling Road, SOUTH SAN FRANCIS-
CO, CA 94080 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Tuck Aire Heating &
Air Conditioning Corporation, CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 07/21/2007.
/s/ Geoffrey Tuck /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/21/13, 08//28/13, 09/04/13, 09/11/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257100
The following person is doing business
as: Lockheart Press, 407 Briarfield Way,
BELMONT, CA 94002 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Andrea
Simmons, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Andrea Simmons /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/07/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/21/13, 08//28/13, 09/04/13, 09/11/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257195
The following person is doing business
as: 1)Cosmopolitan Cafe, 2)Patio Cafe,
3)Cosmo Cafe @ MWE, 275 Middlefield
Road, #100, Menlo Park, CA 94025 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Cosmopolitan Catering LLC, CA. The
business is conducted by a Limited Lia-
bility Company. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 04/01/2010.
/s/ Joseph Schumaker /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/14/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/21/13, 08//28/13, 09/04/13, 09/11/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257197
The following person is doing business
as: Cosmopolitan Cafe @ Gopro, 300
Clearview Way, San Mateo, CA 94401
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Cosmopolitan Catering LLC, CA.
The business is conducted by a Limited
Liability Company. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 11/19/2012.
/s/ Joseph Schumaker /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/14/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/21/13, 08//28/13, 09/04/13, 09/11/13).
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
TO SELL ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES
Date of Filing Application: Aug. 14, 2013
To Whom It May Concern:
The Name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are:
FERDINAND URRUTIA FERNANDEZ,
JANE PE PARMELEE
The applicant(s) listed above are apply-
ing to Department of Alcoholic Beverage
Control to sell alcoholic beverages at:
2085 GELLERT BLVD
STE 6
DALY CITY, CA 94015-2841
Type of license applied for:
41-On-Sale Beer and Wine - Eating
Place
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
August 21, 2013
NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES
Date of Filing Application: July 10, 2013
To Whom It May Concern:
The Name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are:
John Sanchez Duenas, Delfina
Guardadosanchez
The applicant(s) listed above are apply-
ing to Department of Alcoholic Beverage
Control to sell alcoholic beverages at:
222 Lux Ave.
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080-
3731
Type of license applied for:
47-On-Sale General Eating Place
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
August 14, 21, 28, 2013
203 Public Notices
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
Peggy Ann Thrope
Case Number: 123544
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: Peggy Ann Thorpe. A
Petition for Probate has been filed by
Linda S. Thorpe and Laura K. Wilson in
the Superior Court of California, County
of San Mateo. The Petition for Probate
requests that Linda S. Thorpe and Laura
K. Wilson be appointed as personal rep-
resentative to administer the estate of
the decedent.
The petition requests authority to admin-
ster the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This au-
thority will allow the personal representa-
tive to take many actions without obtain-
ing court approval. Before taking certain
very important actions, however, the per-
sonal representative will be required to
give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to
the proposed action.) The independent
administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an ob-
jection to the petition and shows good
cause why the court should not grant the
authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: September 9, 2013
at 9:00 a.m., Dept. 28, Superior Court of
California, County of San Mateo, 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. If you object to the granting of the
petition, you should appear at the hear-
ing and state your objections or file writ-
ten objections with the court before the
hearing. Your appearance may be in
person or by your attorney. If you are a
creditor or a contingent creditor of the
decedent, you must file your claim with
the court and mail a copy to the personal
representative appointed by the court
within four months from the date of first
issuance of letters as provided in Pro-
bate Code section 9100. The time for fil-
ing claims will not expire before four
months from the hearing date noticed
above. You may examine the file kept by
the court. If you are a person interested
in the estate, you may file with the court
a Request for Special Notice (form DE-
154) of the filing of an inventory and ap-
praisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special No-
tice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
Borden D. Webb
Webb & Tapella Law Corporation
7311 Greenhaven Dr., Ste 273
SACRAMENTO, CA 95831
(916)447-1675
Dated: July 18, 2013
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on August 7, 14, 21, 2013.
210 Lost & Found
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST BLACK APPOINTMENT BOOK -
Eithe rat Stanford Shopping Center or
Downtown Menlo Park, RWC, (650)322-
6641
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shop-
ping Cente, by Lunardis market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST JORDANIAN PASSPORT AND
GREEN CARD. Lost in Daly City, If
found contact, Mohammad Al-Najjar
(415)466-5699
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
WHITE CRIB / toddler bed with mattress
excellent condition $95 (650)345-9595
296 Appliances
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
296 Appliances
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
KRUPS COFFEE maker $20,
(650)796-2326
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
PRESSURE COOKER Miromatic 4qt
needs gasket 415 333-8540 Daly City
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor,
(650)726-1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24 wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 SOLD!
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
TABLE TOP refrigerator 1.8 cubic feet
brown in color, $45, call (650)591-3313
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
298 Collectibles
"OLD" IRON COFFEE GRINDER - $75.,
(650)596-0513
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
1990S UPPER DECK LIFESIZE CUT-
OUTS - Aikman, Marino, Jordan, $20.
each, SOLD!
84 USED European (34), U.S. (50) Post-
age Stamps. Most pre-World War II. All
different, all detached from envelopes.
$4.00 all, 650-787-8600
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
$100., (650)348-6428
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
AUTOGRAPHED GUMBI collectible art
& Gloria Clokey - $35., (650)873-8167
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
CHINESE STAMPS - (90) all different,
early 20th century, $6.for all, SOLD!
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JAPANESE MOTIF end table, $99
(650)520-9366
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MENORAH - Antique Jewish tree of life,
10W x 30H, $100., (650)348-6428
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
SILVER PEACE dollar circulated $30
firm 415 333-8540 Daly City
TATTOO ARTIST - Norman Rockwell
figurine, limited addition, $90., (650)766-
3024
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
VINTAGE 1970S Grecian Made Size 6-7
Dresses $35 each, Royal Pink 1980s
Ruffled Dress size 7ish $30, 1880s Re-
production White Lace Gown $150 Size
6-7 Petite, (650)873-8167
VINTAGE BLOW torch-turner brass
work $35 (650)341-8342
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
ALL METAL TONKA Truck great cond,
$25, 650-595-3933
BARBIE BLUE CONVERTIBLE plus ac-
ccessories, excellent shape, $45.,
(650)344-6565
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertable
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18 high, $70
(650)387-4002
302 Antiques
2 SOLID wood Antique mirrors 511/2" tall
by 221/2" wide $50 for both
(650)561-3149
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14 x 21, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE OAK SCHOOL DESK - with
ink well, pencil holder and under seat
book shelf, great for a childs room or of-
fice, $48., (650)574-4439
ANTIQUE WALNUT Hall Tree, $800 obo
(650)375-8021
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72 high, 40 wide, 3 drawers, Display
case, bevelled glass, $500
(650)766-3024
303 Electronics
2 MP3 multi media player new in box
(both) for $20 (650)726-1037
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
46 MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
PHILLIPS ENERGY STAR 20 color TV
with remote. Good condition, $20
(650)888-0129
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
SAMSUNG 27" TV Less than 6 months
old, with remote. Moving must sell
$100.00 (650) 995-0012
SANYO C30 Portable BOOM BOX,
AM/FM STEREO, Dolby Metal Tape
player/recorder, Graphic Equalizer, 2/3
speakers boxes, ac/dc. $50
650-430-6046
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
1 COFFEE table - 15" high x 24" wide x
50 1/2 " long. Dk walnut with 3 sections
of glass inset. SOLD!
1940 MAHOGANY desk 34" by 72" 6
drawers center drawer locks all. with 3/8"
clear glass top $70 OBO (650)315-5902
2 END tables - 18" x 21" Dk brown wood
with glass tops & open bottoms. SOLD!
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 LAMPS. 25" high. Cream ceramic With
white shades. SOLD!
2 PLANT stands $80 for both
(650)375-8021
7 FOOT couch with recliners & massag-
ers on ends. Brown. $100., SOLD!
8 DRAWER wooden dresser $99
(650)759-4862
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
bankers rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BBQ GRILL, Ducane, propane $90
(650)591-4927
BLUE & WHITE SOFA - $300; Loveseat
$250., good condition, (650)508-0156
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CABINET BLOND Wood, 6 drawers, 31
Tall, 61 wide, 18 deep, $45
(650)592-2648
CANOPY BED cover white eyelet/tiny
embroided voile for twin/trundle bed; very
pretty; 81"long x 40"w. $25.
(650)345-3277
CHAIR (2), with arms, Italian 1988 Cha-
teau D'Ax, solid, perfect condition. $50
each or $85 for both. (650)591-0063
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
CHINESE LACQUERED cabinet with 2
shelves and doors. Beautiful. 23 width 30
height 11 depth $75 (650)591-4927
COPENHAGEN TEAK DINING TABLE
with dual 20" Dutch leaves extensions.
48/88" long x 32" wide x 30" high.
SOLD!
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36x58 with one leaf 11 1/2. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER - 6 draw dresser 61" wide,
31" high, & 18" deep $50., (650)592-
2648
DRESSER - all wood, excellent condition
$50 obo (650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLE, medium large, with marble
top. and drawer. $60 or best offer,
(650)681-7061
ORGAN BENCH $40 (650)375-8021
304 Furniture
GLASS DINING Table 41 x 45 Round-
ed rectangle clear glass top and base
$85 SOLD!
GLIDE ROCKER with foot stool. Dk
brown walnut with brown cushions. $75.,
SOLD!
GRANDMA ROCKING CHAIR - beauti-
ful white with gold trim, $100., SOLD!
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
I-JOY MASSAGE chair, exc condition
$95 (650)591-4927
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 medal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MATCHING RECLINER, SOFA & LOVE
SEAT - Light multi-colored fabric, $95.
for all, (650)286-1357
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
NATURAL WOOD table 8' by 4' $99
(650)515-2605
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO TABLE , UMBRELLA & 6
CHAIRS - metal/vinyl, $35.,
SOLD!
PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs, glass top,
good condition 41 in diameter $95
(650)591-4927
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36 Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
RECLINING CHAIR, almost new, Beige
$100 (650)624-9880
ROCKING CHAIR & HASSOCK - light
wood, gold cushions. SOLD!
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Great condition,
1970s style, dark brown, wooden, with
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR with wood carving,
armrest, rollers, and it swivels $99.,
(650)592-2648
SHELVING UNIT interior metal and
glass nice condition $70 obo
(650)589-8348
SOFA 7-1/2' $25 (650)322-2814
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
SWIVEL CHAIR - dark blue leather, very
comfortable, good condition, bought for
$900., sell for $80.obo, (650)345-5502
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TV STAND brown. $40.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent con-
dition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WICKER DRESSER, white, 3 drawers,
exc condition 31 width 32 height 21.5
depth $35 (650)591-4927
WICKER ENTERTAINMENT CABINET -
H 78 x 43 x 16, almost new, $89.,
SOLD!
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
8 PLACE setting 40 piece Stoneware
Heartland pattern never used microwave
and oven proof $50 SOLD!
BATTERY CHARGER, holds 4 AA/AAA,
Panasonic, $5, SOLD!
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
ELECTRIC MEAT slicer $30
650 315-5902
FIREPLACE SET - 3 piece fireplace set
with screen $25 (650)322-2814
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
ICE CREAM MAKER - Westbend 4 qt.
old fashion ice cream maker, brand new,
still in box, $30., (650)726-1037
JAPANESE SERVER unused in box, 2
porcelain cups and carafe for serving tea
or sake. $8.00, (650)578-9208
OSTER BREAD maker (new) $60
650 315-5902
306 Housewares
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good con-
dition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
TWO 21 quart canning pots, with lids, $5
each. (650)322-2814
VACUMN EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
VINTAGE LAZY susan collectable excel-
lent condition $25 SOLD!
VINYAL SHOWER curtain beige/coral
floral Asking $10. (650)574-3229 be-
tween 10 a.m. and 7 p.m.
VINYL SHOWER curtain, royal blue solid
with white nylon over-curtain. Asking
$10. Call (650)574-3229 between 10
a.m. and 7 p.m.
VINYL SHOWER curtains,
aqua/black/gold floral, Asking $10 each.
Call (650)574-3229 between 10 a.m.
and 7 p.m.
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436
VINTAGE COSTUME jewelry 1950,
1960, 1970 beautiful selection all for $20
(650)755-9833
WATCHES - Quicksilver (2), brand new
in box, $40. for both, (650)726-1037
308 Tools
10" MAKITA mitre saw with 100 tooth
carbon blade $60 650 315-5902
12-VOLT, 2-TON Capacity Scissor Jack
w/ Impact Wrench, New in Box, Never
Used. $85.00 (650) 270-6637 after 5pm
6-8 MISC. TOOLS - used, nail tray with
nails, $15., (650)322-2814
B & D 17" Hedge Trimmer pro model,
sharp blades, only $19, 650-595-3933
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10,
4 long x 20 wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CIRCULAR SAW-BLACK & DECKER -
2 1/8 hp. 7 1/4 inch blade. Good condi-
tion. Extra blades. $20., SOLD!
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 1 1/2 HP ROUTER & TA-
BLE - Excellent condition, case, acces-
sories & extra cutters included. $60.,
SOLD!
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 3D SANDER - Brand new
never used-still in box. Great for sanding
furniture or round surfaces. Extra sand-
ing disks. $25., SOLD!
CRAFTSMAN 3X21" BELT SANDER - 1
hp w/ dust bag. $50., SOLD!
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, SOLD!
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
DENIM JACKET, faded but in good con-
dition, man's XL, $19, 650-595-3933
ELECTRIC BLOWER. Plenty of power.
Clean your leaves. Adjustable tube
length/direction. $20 Cash 650-654-9252
ELECTRIC HEDGE trimmer good condi-
tion (Black Decker) $40 SOLD!
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
GARDEN CLAW. Excellent for tilling
you soil for planting flowers/vegetables.
$20. Cash 650-654-9252
LAWN AERATOR. Irrigate your lawn at
the roots. Hose attachment. $15 Cash.
650-654-9252
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
MAKITA 21" belt sander $35 also 10
boxes of belt make offer, 650)315-5902
NEW DRILL DRIVER - 18V + battery &
charger, $30., SOLD!
NEW NEWTONE Door Bell factory pack,
complete only $15, 650-595-3933
NEW PRO Torque Wrench 20-150 lbs,
warranty and case $29, 650-595-3933
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
ROSS ROOT feeder. Excellent for
feeding trees/shrubs. $15 Cash.
650-654-9252
RYOBI DETAIL SANDER - Pointed tip
can sand small area, good for
furniture/chairs, good condition, $25.,
SOLD!
RYOBI RECIPROCATING Saw electric
little used w/ new blade, SOLD!
TOOL BOX full of tools. Moving must
sell. $100.00 (650) 995-0012
28 Wednesday Aug. 21, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Half-__: 50-50
coffee
4 Near the back,
nautically
9 Flora and fauna
14 Poets atop
15 Root vegetable
16 Deck out
17 Routing word
18 The Meaning of
Life comedy
group
20 Ages and ages
22 Vote of
confidence
23 Events marked by
good-natured
insults
24 Occasion to pull
together?
26 Backfire noise
27 Present-day Persia
28 Statue of Liberty
supporter
32 Menace that isnt
very menacing
35 Chopper
36 Open stretches
37 Gut reaction?
38 Assemble-it-
yourself company
39 Hostel
40 Eric Carmen
power ballad
covered by Celine
Dion
44 Inanimate
carousel rider
46 Traditional
Cockney
delicacies
47 St.-Johns-__
48 Stalemate
51 Aussie gal
54 Flash drive PC
port
55 Tool holder
56 Title magical
caretaker in a
2005 film
59 Hail, to Caesar
60 Up until now
61 Gas leak
warnings
62 Contract signers
tool
63 Moon aspect
64 Use a divining rod
65 Minnesota twins?
DOWN
1 Really want
2 Facetious
sequence?
3 Fragrant flower
used in leis
4 24-hr. cash
source
5 Tending to float
6 Daisy Maes guy
7 Spanakopita
cheese
8 Give it a go
9 Sharp weapon
10 44-Across
attachments
11 Sounds of awe
12 Word after fox or
turkey
13 Raggedy dolls
19 The Devil
Wears __
21 Organizes
25 Im on my __
26 Muscular
28 Seriously look into
29 Materializes
30 Skating jump
31 Table extender
32 Bulldogs
supporters
33 Carte du jour
34 The Planets
composer
38 Mallorca y Cuba
40 Church candle
lighter
41 Former Anaheim
Stadium NFLer
42 Country club
crowd
43 Roger that
45 Twisted threads
48 1995 R&B hit
This __ We Do
It
49 Number of
consecutive
letters without 2-
Down in this
puzzles four
longest answers
50 Blissful
environs
51 Huddle
follower
52 Diner breakfast
order
53 Big name in
New Age
music
54 High style
57 Grand Banks
fish
58 Legal ending?
By Paul Hunsberger
(c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
08/21/13
08/21/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
RELEASE DATE Wednesday, August 21, 2013
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
308 Tools
TORO ELECTRIC POWER SWEEPER
blower - never used, in box, SOLD!
309 Office Equipment
COPIER - Brother BCP7040, Laser(black
& white), printer & fax machine, $35.,
(650)212-7020
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
SAFE - Sentry Fireproof, new, black,
15 x 16 x 18, capacity 1.7CF, pur-
chased for $400., will sell for $195.,
SOLD!
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
2 GALLON Sprayer sears polythene
compressed air 2 1/2 inch opening, used
once $10 San Bruno (650)588-1946
3 LARGE old brown mixing bowls $75
for all 3 (650)375-8021
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History,
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
5 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $9. for all
(650)347-5104
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
310 Misc. For Sale
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
ADULT VIDEOS - (50) for $50.,
(415)298-0645
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office, new,
$100., (650)619-9203.
ALOE VERA PLANTS - (30) medicine
plant, $3.00 each, (650)678-1989
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99., (650)580-
3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99., (650)580-
3316
ANTIQUE LANTERN - (7) Olde Brooklyn
lanterns, battery operated, safe, new in
box, $100. for all, (650)726-1037
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
ASTRONOMY BOOKS (2) Hard Cover
Cambridge Encyclopedia of Astronomy,
World of Discovery, $12., (650)578-9208
BACKPACK- Unused, blue, many pock-
ets, zippers, use handle or arm straps
$14., (650)578-9208
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BASS PRO SPOTLIGHT - (2) one mil-
lion candlelight, new in box, $100 for
both, (650)726-1037
BATHROOM VANITY light fixture - 2
frosted glass shades, brass finish, 14W
x 8.75H x 8.75D, wall mount, $40,
(650)347-5104
BAY BRIDGE Framed 50th anniversary
poster (by Bechtel corp) $50
(650)873-4030
310 Misc. For Sale
BELL COLLECTION 50 plus asking $50
for entire collection SOLD!
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BRAND NEWTarp, 7' X 5' sealed factory
package Only $9 650-595-3933
BUBBLE GUM MACHINE - Commercial,
SOLD!
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
COLEMAN ICE CHEST - 80 quart, $20.,
(650)345-3840
COPPER LIKE TUB - unused, 16 inches
long, 6 in. high, 8 inch wide, OK tabletop-
per, display, chills beverages. $10.,
(650)578-9208
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 (650)375-1550
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
310 Misc. For Sale
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
GOOD HEALTH FACT BOOK - un-
used, answers to get/stay healthy, hard
cover, 480 pages, $8., (650)578-9208
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HOT POCKET/PANINI Mkr elec. heat
top & bottom only $9 650-595-3933
HUMAN HAIR Wigs, (4) Black hair, $90
all (650)624-9880
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15., (650)345-
3840
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX - for dogs 21-55 lbs.,
repels and kills fleas and ticks. 9 months
worth, $60., (650)343-4461
KIRBY COMBO Shampooer/ Vacuum/
attachments. "Ultimate G Diamond
Model",SOLD!
KITCHENWARE, SMALL appliance,
pots, pan, dishes, coffee maker all for
$25 (650)755-9833
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9 tall, 11 diameter, great con-
dition, $10., (650)347-5104
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide in wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
LAUNDRY SORTER - on wheels, triple
section, laundry sorter - $19., SOLD!
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
MATCHING LIGHT SCONCES - style
wall mount, plug in, bronze finish, 12 L x
5W , $12. both, (650)347-5104
MEDICINE CABINET - 18 X 24, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MENS LEATHER travel bags (2), used
$25 each.(650)322-2814
MICHAEL CREIGHTON HARDBACK
BOOKS - 3 @ $3. each, (650)341-1861
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW COWBOY BOOTS - 9D, Unworn,
black, fancy, only $85., SOLD!
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
NIKE RESISTANCE ROPE - unopened
box, get in shape, medium resistance,
long length, $8., (650)578-9208
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OUTDOOR GREENHOUSE. Handmade.
Ideal for Apartment balconies. 33" wide x
20 inches deep. 64.5 " high. $70.00
SSF, (650)871-7200
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
PRINCESS CRYSTAL glasswear set
$50 (650)342-8436
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
PUZZLES - 22-1,000 pc puzzles, $2.50
each, (650)596-0513
RALPH LAUREN TWIN SIZE COM-
FORTER - sheets & bedskirt, blue/white
pattern, perfect condition, $60., SOLD!
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
310 Misc. For Sale
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICARDO LUGGAGE $35
(650)796-2326
RN NURSING TEXTBOOKS & CD un-
opened, Calculate with Confidence, 4th
edition, like new, $25., (650)345-3277
RN NURSING TEXTBOOKS - Human
Physiology Mechanisms of Disease, 6th
edition, $15., and Pathphysiology Bio-
logic Basics, 4th edition, $25., (650)345-
3277
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SAFETY SHOES - Iron Age, Mens steel
toe metatarfal work boots, brown, size 10
1/2, in box, $50., (650)594-1494
SAMSONITE LUGGAGE suit case
1950's collectibles perfect condition large
size pearl color hard surface $50
(650)755-9833
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48 x 69
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. $35.
(650)574-4439
SLIDE PROJECTOR - Airequipt Super-
ba 66A slide projector and screen.
$50.00 for all. (650)345-3840
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6,
$60., (650)294-9652
STAINED GLASS panels multi colors
beautiful work 35" long 111/2" wide $79
OBO (650)349-6059
STAINED GLASS,
28x30 Japanese geisha motif, multi
colored, beautiful. $200 SOLD!
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TOM CLANCY HARDBACK BOOKS - 7
@ $3.00 each, (650)341-1861
UP STAIRS DOWN STAIRS - first two
years, 14 videos in box, $30 for all,
(650)286-9171
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VHS MOVIES and DVD's. (20) Old to
current releases. $2 per movie. Your
choice. South San Francisco
(650) 871-7200
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VINTAGE 1950 chrome GE toaster 2
slice excellent condition collectible $50
(650)755-9833
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WEATHER STATION, temp., barometer
and humidity, only $10 SOLD!
311 Musical Instruments
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
314 Tickets
TAYLOR SWIFT 2 tix, Sec. 221 8/27
Sleep Train Arena $350/ea
(916)770-7333
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
100% COTTON New Beautiful burgundy
velvet drape 82"X52" W/6"hems: $45
(415)585-3622
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
COAT - Dressy ladies short trench coat,
red, brand new, weather proof, light-
weight, size 6/8, $25.,(650)345-3277
DINGO WESTERN BOOTS - (like new)
$60., (408)764-6142
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
GIRLS' SMOCKED dresses (3) sz.
6mo.-24mo. ,sunsuits, sweater all gently
worn; blankets like new. $30.00
(SM area.) (650)345-3277
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
INDIAN SARI $50 (650)515-2605
IONIC BREEZE quadra, Sharper Image,
3 level silent air purifier. 27h, energy
saver, original box, video. Excellent con-
dition. $77. (650)347-5104
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, beauitful color, megenta, with
shawl like new $40 obo (650)349-6059
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
WHITE LACE 1880s reproduction dress
- size 6, $100., (650)873-8167
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10. Elie Tahari
brand new, never worn for $25
(650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
150 COPPER spades for #6 strand.
Copper wire. $50.00 for all.
(650)345-3840
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3 & 4, approx.
20 of 3, 40 ft. of 4, $25.all,
(650)851-0878
ELECTRICAL MATERIAL - Connectors,
couplings, switches, rain tight flex, and
more.Call. $50.00 for all (650)345-3840
PACKAGED NUTS, Bolts and screws,
all sizes, packaged $99 (650)364-1374
PVC - 1, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
PVC SCHEDULE 80 connectors and
coupling. 100 pieces in all. $30.00 for all
(650)345-3840
STEEL MORTAR BOX - 3 x 6, used for
hand mixing concrete or cement, $35.,
(650)368-0748
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
29 Wednesday Aug. 21, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
318 Sports Equipment
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
AB-BUSTER as seen on T.V. was $100,
now $45., (650)596-0513
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18 di-
meter, Halex brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
FISHERS MENS skis $35 (650)322-2814
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16 wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF CLUB Cleveland Launcher Gold,
22 degrees, SOLD!
KELTY SUPER TIOGA BACKPACK -
$40., SOLD!
LADIES BOWLING SET- 8 lb. ball, 7 1/2
sized shoes, case, $45., (650)766-3024
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
REI 2 man tent $40 (650)552-9436
ROLLER BLADES new in box size 6
never worn California CHC Volt XT $20
(650)755-9833
ROLLER SKATES - Barely used, mens
size 13, boots attached to 8 wheels, $85.
obo, (650)223-7187
ROWING MACHINE - SOLD!
SPECIALIZED CROSSROADS bike. 20"
frame/18 speed. Needs tires.Great com-
mute bike. $99. Cash 650-654-9252.
STATIONARY EXERCISE BICYCLE -
Compact, excellent condition, $40. obo,
(650)834-2583
TENNIS RACKETS $20 (650)796-2326
TENT - one man packable tent - $20.,
SOLD!
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
THULE SKI RACK - holds 3 pairs, $85.,
(650)594-1494
TREADMILL EXERCISE- Pro Form 415
Crosswalk, very good condition $100 call
(650)266-8025
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
VOLKI SNOW SKIS - $40.,
(408)764-6142
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTMAN 5.5 HP gas lawn mower
with rear bag $55., (650)355-2996
LAWN MOWER - 48 volt Craftman elec-
tric lawn mower, SOLD!
LAWNMOWER - American made, man-
ual/push, excellent condition, $65.,
(650)342-8436
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
SHOWER CHAIR, WALKER, WHEEL-
CHAIR, POTTY - $25. each obo,
(650)766-9998
WALKER - $25., brand new, tag still on,
(650)594-1494
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journals
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650)595-0805
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
1997 BMW 540I Sedan automatic with
120k miles silver on gray leather looks
sharp and drives excellent also have a
2001 530I in stock #5044 on sale for
$5500.00 plus tax,lic.etc., (650)637-3900
1999 AUDI A6 Sedan with 116k miles
clean car fax quattro automatic lots of
nice factory options comes with 3000
miles warranty #4447 more infowww.au-
totradecentercars.com . priced at
$6995.00 plus fees, (650)637-3900
1999 PORSCHE Boxster Cabriolet
Convertible 5 Speed with 117k miles
power top and a nice sound system
sounds , looks and drives like it should
clean Car Fax with 3000 miles power
train warranty #4530 on sale for
$9995.00 plus fees, (650)637-3900
2001 AUDI A6 Avant Wagon with 79k
miles in excellent conditions fully loaded
clean Car Fax #5050 more info at
www.autotradecentercars.com we have
5 Audi's in stock. on sale for $8995.00
plus fees, (650)637-3900
2001 AUDI A6 Quattro Sedan 4.2 with
88k miles in excellent conditions and
hard to find looks and drives very nice
clean Car Fax #4433 come with 3
months free warranty power full sport se-
dan on sale for $7995.00 plus fees,
(650)637-3900
2003 JEEP Grand Cherokee Limited
4x4 Automatic with 100k miles in excel-
lent conditions one owner clean car fax
california car fully loaded looks fantastic
#4520 on sale for $8995.00 plus you nor-
mal fees, (650)637-3900
2005 TOYOTA Prius hybrid automatic
with 97k miles . Navigation , Bluetooth
,key less entry ,JBL sound system and
much more clean Car Fax and 3000
miles warranty #4537 on sale for
$9700.00 plus fees, (650)637-3900
620 Automobiles
2006 CHRYSLER PT Cruiser Touring
Convertible with 101k miles automatic
cream color with beige clean Car Fax
looks sharp and very room convertible .
must see hard to find #4540 on sale for
$6995.00 plus fees, (650)637-3900
2007 NISSAN Sentra SL Sedan with
110k miles automatic with brand new
rims and tiers come with all power pack-
age Bluetooth and more free 3 months
warranty #4533 on sale for $8995.00
plus fees, (650)637-3900
2012 TOYOTA Camry LE sedan auto-
matic with 24k miles in excellent new
conditions comes with full factory warran-
ty, black with brand new 18"black rims
and new tiers also original rims and tiers
included #4420 for $17995.plus fees,
(650)637-3900
Dont lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
ACURA 97 - 3.0 CL CP, Black, Auto-
matic, $2800., SOLD!
CHEVY 1998 Monte Carlo 59,000 Miles
$5,000, Call Glen @ (650) 583-1242
Ext. # 2
CHEVY HHR 08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD 93 $ 2,000
Good Condition (650)481-5296
FORD THUNDERBIRD 95 LX Coupe -
$2000., (650)245-1386
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
MERCEDES 06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
OLDSMOBIL79Royal Delta 88, 122k
Miles, in excellent Condition $1,500
SOLD!
625 Classic Cars
FORD 63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$7,500 obo (650)364-1374
635 Vans
67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW 03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
HARLEY DAVIDSON 01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $6,200.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
HONDA 90 - 1966 excellent, 165 mpg,
can deliver, $850., (831)462-9836
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $50. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE HELMET - New With
Tags, Modular Dual Visor M/C Helmet,
only $69., (650)595-3933
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35., (650)670-
2888
NEW MOTORCYCLE HELMET - Modu-
lar, dual visor, $69., SOLD!
645 Boats
72 18 RAYSON V Drive flat boat, 468
Chevy motor with wing custom trailer,
$20,000 obo, (650)851-0878
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4 wide, 6
1/2 long & 2 1/2 deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
2 BACKUP light 1953 Buick $40
(650)341-8342
2013 DODGE CHARGER wheels & tires,
Boss 338, 22-10, $1300 new,
(650)481-5296
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
BOX OF auto parts. Miscellaneous
items. $50.00 OBO. (650) 995-0012.
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
EDELBROCK VALVE COVERS - for a
389 engine, new in box, $100.,
(650)726-1037
FORD FOCUS steel wheels. 14in. rims.
$100. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
HONDA SPEAR tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
MECHANIC'S CREEPER - vintage,
Comet model SP, all wood with
pillow,four swivel wheels, great shape.
$40.00 (650)591-0063
670 Auto Parts
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
RADIALS - pair, PT215/60R17, $15. for
pair, SOLD!
RUBBERMAID 2 Gallon oil pan drainers
(2). Never used tags/stickers attached,
$15 ea. (650)588-1946
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Dont lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
Bath
TUBZ
Over 400 Tubs on display!
Worlds Largest Hands-On, Feet-In
Showroom
4840 Davenport Place
Fremont, CA 94538
(510)770-8686
www.tubz.net
Carpentry
D n J REMODELING
Finish Carpentry
Windows Doors
Cabinets Casing
Crown Moulding
Baseboards
Artificial Grass Gazebos
(650)291-2121
Cabinetry
Contractors
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Cleaning
Cleaning
Concrete
CHETNER CONCRETE
Lic #706952
Driveways - Walkways
- Pool Decks - Patios - Stairs
- Exposed Aggregate - Masonry
- Retaining Walls - Drainage
- Foundation/Slabs
Free Estimates
(650)271-1442 Mike
Concrete
Construction Construction
30 Wednesday Aug. 21, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed Insured Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
GENERAL
LANDSCAPE
MAINTENANCE
Commercial & Residential
Gardening
New lawn &
sprinkler installation,
Trouble shooting and repair
Work done by the hour
or contract
Free estimates
Licensed
(650)444-5887, Call/Text
glmco@aol.com
LEAK PRO
Sprinkler repair, Valves, Timers,
Heads, Broken pipes,
Wire problems, Coverage,
Same Day Service
(800)770-7778
CSL #585999
Flooring
SLATER FLOORS
. Restore old floors to new
. Dustless Sanding
. Install new custom & refinished
hardwood floors
Licensed. Bonded. Insured
www.slaterfloors.com
(650) 593-3700
Showroom by appointment
Housecleaning
MY ERRAND & HOUSE
CLEANING SERVICES
House Keeping Janitorial
Services Handyman Services
General Errands Event Help
House & Pet Sitting
Back to School Promotion
(650)918-0354
myerrandservicesca@gmail.com
Gutters
O.K.S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
RAIN GUTTERS
Gutters and downspouts,
Rain gutter repair,
Rain gutter protection (screen),
Handyman Services
Free Estimates
(650)669-6771
(650)302-7791
Lic.# 910421
Handy Help
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
Fences Decks Patios
Power Washes Concrete
Work Maintenance
Clean Ups Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)4581572
contreras1270@yahoo.com
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FERNANDOS HANDYMAN
Painting - Exterior/Interior,
Stucco, Floors, Demos,
Lawns, Pavers, etc.
Free Estimates
Senior Discounts
Lic.& Bonded
(650)834-4824
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior Roof
Repair Base Boards New Fence
Hardwood Floors Plumbing Tile
Mirrors Chain Link Fence Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
Handy Help
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
PAYLESS
HANDYMAN
Kitchen & Bath remodling, Tile
work, Roofing, And Much More!
Free Estimates
(650)771-2432
SENIOR HANDYMAN
Specializing in Any Size Projects
Painting Electrical
Carpentry Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
Refinish
High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
AAA RATED!
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$40 & UP
HAUL
Since 1988
Licensed/Insured
Free Estimates
A+ BBB Rating
(650)341-7482
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Hauling
Landscaping
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsulas Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
10% OFF
PRO PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MK PAINTING
Interior and Exterior,
Residental and commercial
Insured and bonded,
Free Estimates
Peter McKenna
(650)630-1835
Lic# 974682
Painting
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
Remodeling
HARVEST KITCHEN
& MOSAIC
Cabinets * Vanities * Tile
Flooring * Mosaics
Sinks * Faucets
Fast turnaround * Expert service
920 Center St., San Carlos
(650)620-9639
www.harvestkm.com
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
Trimming Pruning
Shaping
Large Removal
Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tree Service
Tile
BELMONT TILE &
FOLSOM LAKE TILE
Your local tile store
& contractor
Tile Mosaics
Natural Stone Countertops
Remodeling
Free Estimates
651 Harbor Blvd.
(near Old County Road)
Belmont
650.421.6508
www.belmontile.com
M-Sa 8:30 am - 5 pm
CASL# 857517
Window Coverings
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tors State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Beauty
KAYS
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
DR INSIYA SABOOWALA DDS
DECCAN DENTAL
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
Cantonese, Mandarin & Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6 M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
Food
JACKS
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
Food
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
WORLD 31
Wednesday Aug. 21, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
DENTAL
IMPLANTS
Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certied Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
PAIN & STRESS RELIEF
$29 UP
Weight loss, Migraine, Stroke,
Fatigue, Insomnia, PMS, HBP,
Cough, Allergies, Asthma,
Gastrointestinal, Diabetes
(650)580-8697
Acupuncture, Acupressure Herbs
1846 El Camino Real, Burlingame
Accept Car & work injury, PPO
Health & Medical
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you cant
Refuse!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
Insurance
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
* All commercial insurance policies
* Employee benet packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert ne watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
WATCH - INVICTA, ProDiver, new, still
in box, $100., (650)726-1037
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specic direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$45 per Hour
Present ad for special price
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post ofce)
(650)563-9771
Massage Therapy
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
SEVEN STARS
DAY SPA
615 Woodside Road Redwood City
(650)299-9332
Body Massage $60/hour
$40/half hour,
$5 off one hour w/ this ad
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By Hamza Hendawi
and Maggie Michael
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CAIRO The Muslim
Brotherhoods top leader looked
somber and fatigued after his
arrest Tuesday, his demeanor mir-
roring the Islamist movements
predicament following its stun-
ning fall from power and a deadly
government crackdown.
The Brotherhoods decision to
play hardball after the militarys
ouster of Egypts Islamist presi-
dent has backfired, leaving it
embroiled in a crisis and looking
at unattractive choices: Aligning
with hard-line groups in an insur-
gency that almost certainly will
fail or going underground in the
hope of resurfacing one day.
Regardless of which path it
chooses, the Brotherhoods grim
future will impact Islamic groups
across the Middle East and
beyond. The Egyptian organiza-
tion is something of a mother
ship that has inspired their cre-
ation and provided a role model of
the political Islam they want to
prevail.
It looks like its over for the
Brotherhood, said Sameh Eid, a
former member who has main-
tained contact with the group.
Brotherhood families are griev-
ing over their dead or busy trying
to see how they can visit loved
ones in detention or others who
are injured. The animosity on the
streets is exhausting them and
allies are abandoning them.
Founded in 1928, the group has
spent most of its 85-year exis-
tence on the sidelines, outlawed,
harshly treated and demonized by
successive regimes.
The June 2012 election of one
of its longtime leaders,
Mohammed Morsi, in Egypts
first free presidential vote was
the pinnacle of its newfound
power. With its own man in the
lands highest office and its mem-
bers dominating the legislature,
the Brotherhood looked invinci-
ble.
Egypts Brotherhood as beleaguered as its leader
By Deb Riechmann
and Bradley Klapper
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON The Obama
administration, undertaking a
major review of U.S. relations
with Egypt, edged closer to a deci-
sion Tuesday about curtailing
some of Americas $1.5 billion in
annual aid after the Egyptian mili-
tarys crackdown on supporters of
ousted President Mohammed
Morsi.
Top administration ofcials met
at the White House to review the
possibility of cutting military or
economic aid to Egypt, a longtime
U.S. ally and the most populous
nation in the Arab world. Some
cuts are forthcoming, according to
U.S. ofcials, speaking on condi-
tion of anonymity because they
werent authorized to talk publicly
about the sensitive discussions.
Tensions in Egypt have soared
since the army ousted Morsi, who
was the nations rst freely elected
president. The July 3 coup fol-
lowed days of protests by millions
of Egyptians demanding that
Morsi, who hails from the
Islamist Muslim Brotherhood,
step down. Some 1,000 people
have been killed in ensuing vio-
lence.
The U.S. is in a bind. While it
wants to continue aiding Egypt to
maintain ties with the military-run
government and assert its inu-
ence in the region, the Obama
administration and lawmakers do
not want to appear to be condon-
ing the bloody crackdown. To
express its displeasure, the U.S.
suspended the delivery of four F-
16 ghter jets to Egypt and can-
celed biennial U.S.-Egyptian mili-
tary exercises planned for next
month.
In canceling the military exer-
cises, President Barack Obama
said that Americas traditional
cooperation with Egypt cannot
continue as usual while violence
and instability deepen.
U.S. weighs pros, cons of
cutting some aid to Egypt
REUTERS
Khalid Hana, center, secretary of the Freedom and Justice Party and
member of the Muslim Brotherhood, speaks during a news conference in
Cairo, Egypt.
WORLD 32 Wednesday Aug. 21, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Pakistan court indicts Musharraf in Bhutto killing
RAWALPINDI, Pakistan In an unprecedented ruling that
tests the militarys aura of inviolability, a court indicted
former president and army chief Pervez
Musharraf Tuesday on murder charges
stemming from the 2007 assassination
of ex-Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto.
Musharraf, who became a key U.S. ally
in the wake of the Sept. 11, 2001 terror
attacks, pleaded not guilty.
The decision by the court in
Rawalpindi marked the rst time a current
or former army chief has been charged
with a crime in the country.
Musharraf, a 70-year-old former com-
mando who took power in a 1999 coup and stepped down
from ofce in disgrace nearly a decade later, now faces a
string of legal problems that in many ways challenge the
militarys sacrosanct status in Pakistani society.
The retired general was charged with murder, conspiracy to
commit murder and facilitation for murder, said prosecutor
Chaudhry Muhammed Azhar.
He did not detail the accusations against Musharraf, but
prosecutors have alleged he failed to provide enough pro-
tection to Bhutto as she led her Pakistan Peoples Party in a
parliamentary election that might have given her a third
term as prime minister. She was killed in a gun and bomb
attack at a rally in Rawalpindi, near the capital, Islamabad.
Three dead, five wounded in
shooting in southern Germany
BERLIN Agunman opened re on a meeting in a vil-
lage in south Germany on Tuesday, killing two people and
wounding ve before taking his own life, police said.
Apolice statement said the assailant had been attending
an evening meeting of a property owners association in a
restaurant in Dossenheim, a village near Heidelberg, about
273 miles southwest of Berlin.
Heated words were exchanged and the man stormed out but
returned later with a weapon and opened re on the meeting
before turning the weapon on himself, the statement said.
The ve wounded were rushed to the hospital, where one
was reported in serious condition. None of the dead or
injured were identied.
Police spokesman Tobias Keilbach said it was unclear
exactly what prompted the shooting and the precise
sequence of events is unclear.
Around the world
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