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NEWS, DATA, ANALYSIS AND STRATEGIC INSIGHTS FOR ARCHITECTS IN THE GCC

SEPTEMBER 2011 / VOLUME 5 / ISSUE 9 An ITP Business Publication


FEATURE
How to pick up valuable points in
green building rating systems
INTERVIEW
Rob Watson, founder of LEED, on
sustainability in the modern world
STANDARD BEARER
LEED Platinum-rated Taipei 101 ofers lessons for the Gulf
CASE STUDY
Istanbul prepares for chiselled
eco-tower by FXFOWLE
GREEN
SPECIAL
ISSUE
NEWS, DATA, ANALYSIS AND STRATEGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGIICCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC ICCCCCCCCC IICCCCCC ICCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC IICCCC ICCCC IIC CCCCCCCCCC ICC IC ICCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC IICCCCCCC IIIICCCCC IIICCCCCCCCCC IICCC IC CCCCC IIIIC IC CCCCCCCCCCCC IIICCCC IIIICCCCCCCC IIIICCC IC CCCCCCCCCC IIICCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIINNNS NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN IGHTS FOR ARCHITECTS IN THE GCC
SEPTEMBER 2011 / VOLUME 5 / / ISSUE 9 / An ITP Business Publication
SEPTEMBER | CONTENTS
www.designmena.com | 09.11 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT 1
2
WHATS ON THE WEB
Take a look at
designMENA.com,
our new website for the
regions architects and
interior designers
6
14
SNAPSHOT
This months top stories
from the region, including the
unveiling of Kingdom Tower
16
ANALYSIS
Assessing the many
challenges behind building a
1km-tall tower
22
WORK IN PROGRESS
A site visit to the CMA Tower
in KAFD, set to be the tallest
green building in KSA
28
INTERVIEW
Rob Watson, founder
of LEED, speaks of
unsustainable activities in
the building industry
32
COVER STORY
62
THE WORK
A detailed reference section
covering all of the projects
MEA has looked at in recent
months
68
CULTURE
A snapshot of sustainable
furniture, lighting, apps and
other eco-friendly products
in the market
72
THE LAST WORD
Richard Marshall from
Woods Bagot discusses the
Emirates green credentials
40
FEATURE
A look at a range of
sustainable products, from
ceilings to cisterns, that can
help to gain LEED points
50
Discovering whether the
LEED retrot on Taipei 101
ofers any lessons for Middle
East towers
CASE STUDIES
HDRs DuBiotech research
lab, FXFOWLEs Istanbul
high-rise and a Doha twin
tower scheme
WHAT
d
our n
regi
SEPTEMBER 2011 VOLUME 5 ISSUE 9
OPINION
Georgina Chakar asserts
that sustainable cities need
to embrace technology
MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 09.11 | www.designmena.com
ONLINE | SEPTEMBER
2
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FXFOWLES KSA MOSQUE
PICKS UP AWARD
New York rm wins archi-
tecture prize for KAFD
mosque in Saudi Arabia.
AUSTRIA CHURCH BY COOP
HIMMELB(L)AU
Stunning image gallery
of a sculptural church in
small-town Austria.
LONDONS V&A MUSEUM
TO TURN BACK TIME
Refurbishment set to
embrace original 1900
architecture.
WOODS BAGOT FOLLOWS
THE WAY OF THE DRAGON
Spectacular Chinese-
themed museum set for
Australian city.
WHATS ON DESIGNMENA.COM
Take a look at our new website for architects, interiors
and industrial design, covering the latest news and hot
topics in the region. The site is updated constantly, to
make sure designers stay on the ball.
WWW.DESIGNMENA.COM
ONLINE
COLUMNS & FEATURES
EDITORS CHOICE
In Pictures: Adrian
Smith towers
Case study:
Sowwah Square
Top of the Blocks
Genslers oating
park
In Pictures: the
Tree Hotel
FOR THE LATEST
NEWS, ANALYSIS, INTER-
VIEWS AND PROJECT
CASE STUDIES, LOG ON
TO: DESIGNMENA.COM
MOST POPULAR
Sandcrawler receives
award
Design for Kingdom
Tower unveiled
Lifetime achievement
for Adrian Smith
25 essential iPad apps
Floating stadium pro-
posed for World Cup
BBR Design com-
pletes its rst design
READERS
COMMENTS
Architect claims Dubai
failed by trying to recre-
ate Tokyo skyscrapers
Mr. Architect, I know
what youre talking
about and I agree
with you.
Posted by Radomir
Barta
There are some very
good examples of ap-
propriate site-specic
constructs here in
Dubai which have in-
taken inspiration from
the local culture.
Posted by Darrell
Maclean
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MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 09.11 | www.designmena.com
COMMENT | EDITORS LETTER
4
W
ithout doubt, last
months biggest
news in the re-
gional architec-
ture market was the unveiling of the
Kingdom Tower design.
Standing at 1,000 metres, the
cloud-piercing structure was de-
scribed the most beautiful building
in the world of any height by Talal
Al Maiman of developer JEC. Yet for
all the assertive talk of magnicence,
there was little conviction behind
any mention of sustainability.
Smith + Gill is a world class
practice with huge experience in tall
buildings, and Kingdom Tower may
prove to contain many inherit sus-
tainable qualities that are not neces-
sarily requested by the developer.
Kingdom Tower could learn a thing or two from its green-
minded predecessor, the 509-metre Taipei 101 in Taiwan.
EDITORS LETTER
But from the evidence so far, it seems
that the clients emphasis is well and
truly on prestige and prot.
Its not as though its impossible, or
even uneconomical, to build sustain-
able tall buildings. Kingdom Tower
could learn a thing or two from a
green-minded predecessor, Taipei
101, which was the worlds tallest
from 2004 to 2010.
As reported in this months cover
story, the 509-metre tower was ret-
rotted to achieve LEED Platinum
status. The investment has already
been recouped thanks to the result-
ing energy savings, and the tower
will save US$1.2 million per year.
LEED-certied high rises are also
taking shape closer to home; Istan-
buls Renaissance Tower is gunning
HIGH HOPES
for Platinum status while the CMA
Tower in Riyadh is going for Gold.
From a marketing perspective,
every tower needs a hook, whether
its green or luxury or height. Its
probable that the developers feel
that Kingdom Towers unparalleled
dimensions are enough to secure
tenants, and that a green tag is not
needed to make money.
This months guest columnist,
Romi Sebastian, asserts that green
rating systems can often encourage
the ticking of boxes that dont really
make a huge diference. But, Id say
that the requirements they set on
energy and water usage are crucial.
If a building such as Kingdom Tower
- which will house the population
of a small city - adopts a laid-back
approach to consumption, then it
will end up with a carbon footprint of
dinosaur proportions.
However, there is one area of
sustainability that the tower does
already touch on at this early stage,
and thats recyclability. The towers
tapering icicle form and three-petal
footprint bears an uncanny resem-
blance to Burj Khalifa, also designed
by Adrian Smith when at Skidmore
Owings and Merrill (SOM). By using
a tried and tested formula, I estimate
that the reduced paper usage in
Smiths studio will be enough to save
at least one tree.
Will Kingdom Tower have green attributes?
GOT A
COMMENT?
If you have any
comments to
make on this
months issue,
please e-mail
oliver.
ephgrave
@itp.com
So far, Kingdom Towers emphasis
appears to be on prestige and prot.
Correction: the article Art Attack in
the August 2011 issue incorrectly stated
that Frank Gehry is a consultant for the
Qasr Al Hosn Cultural Quarter in Abu
Dhabi by Austin-Smith: Lord
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MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 09.11 | www.designmena.com
COMMENT | GEORGINA CHAKAR
6
U
ndoubtedly, cities are the
primary aggregate cause
of global climate change.
To prevent or slow the
predicted environmental catastrophe,
we must change the way cities are built
and operated. But rst of all, we must
change the way they are designed.
The fact that our cities are pushing
the earths ecosystems to the brink
is surely reason enough to question
the ruling urban design paradigm.
Contemporary cities are largely based
on the mechanistic engineering para-
digms of the 19th and 20th centuries.
Unsustainable cities throughout the
globe are a culmination of outdated
design principles and technologies.
The idea of the sustainable urban
centre in the 21st century needs to
The idea of the sustainable urban centre in the 21st century
needs to include the concept of articial intelligence to
look towards a futuristic eco-tech city.
OPINION
include the concept of articial intel-
ligence to look towards a futuristic
eco-tech city. It would be more sen-
sible to employ the full power of the
advanced information and communi-
cation technology (ICT) in all kinds of
sustainable applications.
Undoubtedly the task will not be
easy due to the complexity of designing
a green and smart city. An intelligent
conglomerate of landscape architec-
ture, urban design and town planning is
the work of a large team of creators of
the human environment. At the same
time the physical component of the
space that needs to be treated with ICT
is a challenge we must take on.
Populations are growing fast. The
prospect of an additional three to four
billion people on top of the current six
billion in the next few decades is more
than enough reason to turn our cities
in eco-tech environments and limit the
damage to our natural resources.
Urban designers, planners and
engineers must adopt the idea that
cities are articial ecosystems that
are able to mimic natural systems and
organisms. Smart design can encom-
pass many functional outcomes, not
necessarily environmental, as long as
it uses computer technology to provide
an adaptable version of that outcome.
For decades we have been witness-
ing simple, efective and ef cient
operation as a result of smart ITC
design, such as the operation of the ir-
rigation system. Similarly, solar panels
were invented one hundred years ago
and yet their form has not changed
much in decades. But bearing in mind
that a simple calculator about 35 years
ago was the size of the iPad today, the
development of smart technology is
inarguably disproportional.
As a matter of fact, the operation
of diferent devices has been based on
sensors for a long time. Yet we still use
umbrellas to protect from the Middle
East sun, instead of being protected
by awnings equipped with ventilators
operated on sensors. The street-light-
ing poles are still made of aluminum
or steel that absorbs heat during the
day and emit it at night, instead of the
upper part being made of photovoltaic
elements that capture energy.
Today, it is imperative to embrace
technologically-assisted sustainability
while simultaneously preserving and
enhancing the beauty of cities.
Sustainable cities need to embrace
articial intelligence
SMART THINKING
Georgina
Chakar is an
Australian
architect and a
Master of Urban
Planning. She
works in Abu
Dhabi.
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MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 09.11 | www.designmena.com
COMMENT | HISHAM YOUSSEF
8
I
n sustainable building develop-
ment, the US-created LEED
has become the de facto
standard for ranking the sus-
tainable attributes of a project. Yet
several other standards have been
developed to ofer more relevant
responses to local and regional
climatic conditions and natural
resource availability.
In the Middle East, the UAE has a
fairly sophisticated system called Es-
tidama, with its voluntary Pearl Rat-
ing System, and upcoming standards
include Egypts Green Pyramid Rat-
ing System and the Qatar Sustain-
ability Assessment System.
Internationally, BREEAM and
LEED were developed in 1990 and
I would suggest that monitoring a projects metrics over a
ve to 10-year period would be a relevant next step in the
evolution of green building rating systems.
OPINION
1998 respectively. Notably, how-
ever, there is a relative newcomer
to the sustainable rating systems.
Developed in China, the Three Star
rating system was conceived in 2006,
and implemented in the last few
years. It is largely based on LEED
but with three rankings, hence the
name. The primary diference is the
fact that certication of a project
is not achieved until one year after
the project has been operational,
and metrics have been tracked to
conrm the success of the design and
implementation of the green build-
ing strategies.
This would appear to be a more
sound approach to certifying a
project. After all, it is the savings in
operating costs, reduction in emis-
sions, and overall sustainable viabil-
ity of a project that are the ultimate
goals. But while many professionals
concur, some have suggested that
this may dampen a developers claim
about a projects sustainability and
would hence impact the sale or lease
of properties given that certication
would not be available for a year.
Perhaps there could be a combined
approach of achieving both LEED
and the Three Star certication.
In the long run, the market and
the development community might
benet from developing a double-
pronged approach and a further
evolution of the rating systems. For
example, the rst goal would be to
achieve certication for the imple-
mentation of green design strate-
gies, while the second milestone is
achieving further certication that
conrms the viability of those design
strategies after a year in operation.
I would further suggest that moni-
toring a projects metrics over a ve
to 10-year period would be a relevant
next step in the evolution of green
building rating systems. This should
come as no surprise to us architects.
As professionals, we achieve our
license, but in order to maintain our
license to perform our services we
have to constantly prove - through
achieving continuing education cred-
its - that we remain accredited and
viable professionals.
Whatever the approach, it is clear
that projects have no choice but to be
sustainable.
Chinas rating system could work with LEED
HYBRID THEORY
Chinese cities such as Shanghai have
recently implemented the Three Star system.
Hisham Youssef
AIA, is project
director at
Gensler and a
founding board
member of
the American
Institute of
Architects Middle
East Chapter.
MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 09.11 | www.designmena.com
COMMENT | ROMI SEBASTIAN
10
C
ities are becoming choked
with a jungle a jungle of
concrete, steel and glass.
Architecture here is in-
uenced needlessly by concepts from
predominantly the Western world.
We must remember that most of the
iconic designs have been developed by
expatriates. One of the most dif cult
problems for expatriates in the Middle
East is their relative lack of experience
of the public realm.
I often wonder why is any element
of existing heritage of the Middle East,
be it cultural or spiritual, is always
identied with the past, while the
image of progress is always borrowed
from elsewhere. This process of disas-
sociating from ones own heritage is a
very harmful one.
Traditional Islamic architecture included many innovative,
functional and ecological design principles, but none of them
have been perpetuated by the new generation of architects.
OPINION
In the past few years, the expatri-
ate idea of building green has been
brought in, but the word is misun-
derstood by most of the engineering
fraternity. However, when a denition
becomes so overarching, it loses all sig-
nicance. Architects are now neglect-
ing basic building design principles.
It is unfortunate that rating systems
like LEED and BREEAM Gulf have
converted architecture into an ac-
counting exercise. This has digressed
completely from what could have been
a healthy exercise in producing truly
good architecture. It is unfortunate
that we are missing an opportunity to
produce good architecture by allowing
these accounting or statistical proce-
dures to dominate our logical thinking
and creativity.
Advocating bicycle racks or trying to
invest in a rainwater harvesting system
in the Middle East is another perfect
example. While it may fetch you extra
points in a LEED rating, the whole
initiative, if analysed, is a wasteful
one. The use of glass is still celebrated.
There is no account of the money
spent on the pointless additional cool-
ing required and superuous cleaning
of all the buildings dust-laden faades.
I urge clients and developers to
be open-minded in terms of LEED.
There is no point in accommodat-
ing green ideas and techniques and
ultimately landing up with a building
that is not comfortable to live or work
in. Commonsense is the key element.
Traditional architecture in the region
included many innovative, functional
and ecological design principles, but
none of them have been perpetuated
by the new generation of architects.
The world needs green buildings
a lot more than green buildings need
LEED certication. If certications
such as LEED and BREEAM Gulf
continue to cost too much money, time
and efort, we will not necessarily stop
building green projects, we will just
stop certifying them.
As architects, we have to convince
Middle Eastern elites and ourselves
that the optimistic concept of import-
ing ideas of progress will only kill
the character of a place and its public
realm. The future of architecture in the
Middle East desperately lies in logical
design, controlled urban growth and
in the acceptance of ones own cultural
roots. I remain hopeful.
Targeting LEED in the GCC requires
a commonsense approach
LEEDING NOWHERE
Romi Sebastian
is a project
architect with
AECOM in Doha.
The regions traditional architecture
is based on environmental principles.
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MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 09.11 | www.designmena.com
SNAPSHOT | SEPTEMBER
14
JEDDAH
PREPARES FOR
1KM TOWER
Design of worlds tallest building unveiled by Adrian
Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture
Last month Adrian Smith + Gordon
Gill Architecture nally revealed its
design of the much-anticipated King-
dom Tower in Jeddah, set to become
the worlds tallest building.
With a height of over
1,000 metres and a
total construc-
tion area of
530,000m
2
,
Kingdom
Tower will be
the center-
piece and rst
construction
phase of the
Kingdom City
development on
a 5.3 million m
2
site
in north Jeddah, over-
looking the Red Sea.
Developer Jeddah Economic
Company (JEC) selected AS + GGs
scheme after a lengthy competition
process with submissions from Foster
+ Partners, Pickard Chilton, Kohn
Pederson Fox and Pelli Clarke Pelli.
The towers height will be at least
173 metres taller than the worlds
current tallest building, Dubais
828-metre-tall Burj Khalifa, which
was designed by Adrian Smith
while at Skidmore, Owings
& Merrill.
Kingdom Tower will
feature a Four Seasons
hotel and serviced apart-
ments, Class A of ce
space, luxury condomini-
ums and the worlds highest
observation deck.
The tower will cost approximately
US$1.2 billion to construct, while the
cost of the entire Kingdom City project
is anticipated to be US$20 billion.
With design development underway
since May 2009, schematic design
is complete and detailed design has
begun. The tower will be constructed
by Saudi Binladin while Thornton
Tomasetti is the structural engineer.
Our vision for Kingdom Tower is
one that represents the spirit of Saudi
Arabia. It also represents new growth
and high-performance technology
fused into one powerful iconic form,
said Adrian Smith, in a statement.
The tower will feature a three-petal
footprint, with tapered wings intended
to reduce structural loading, due to
wind vortex shedding.
The result is a design described as
cost-ef cient and constructible, which
will look to take advantage of innova-
tive technology, building materials
and energy conservation. An example
given by the architects is the projects
exterior wall system, which is intended
to minimise energy consumption by
reducing thermal loads.
Talal Al Maiman, a board member
of JEC, said: Prince Alwaleed, Mr.
Bakhsh, Mr. Sharbatly and I were im-
pressed by the boldness and simplicity
of the AS+GG design.
Kingdom Towers height is remark-
able, obviously, but the buildings
iconic status will not depend solely
on that aspect. Its form is brilliantly
sculpted, making it quite simply the
most beautiful building in the world of
any height.
$1.2
BILLION
ESTIMATED COST OF
CONSTRUCTION
SEPTEMBER | SNAPSHOT
www.designmena.com | 09.11 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT 15
Broadway Malyan has delivered
the concept masterplan for a multi-
billion dollar scheme involving an
extension of Sadr City and the cre-
ation of New Sadr City in Iraq. The
project is named 1010 because of
its predicted $10 billion dollar value
and 10-year delivery timeframe. As
one of the largest projects in Iraq, it
is central to the reconstruction of the
war-torn country.
IN BRIEF
Gensler has won a design and
planning competition for Istanbul
Theme Park, a mixed-use develop-
ment in Turkeys largest city. MESA
Housing Industries will develop the
150ha site with a range of residen-
tial, of ce, retail, and hospitality
facilities, including 150 acres of open
spaces and the regions rst theme
park. The architect said the plan
keeps the old and new in mind.
The 113-metre-
Hotel Porta Fira in
Barcelona has won this
years Emporis Skyscraper
Award for completed buildings over
100m, at the expense of second place
Burj Khalifa. The eye-catching red
design was provided by Japanese
rm Toyo Ito & Associates and
Spanish practice b720 Fermn
Vzquez Arquitectos.
Real estate developers Qatari
Diar and Delancey have been
conrmed as the future owners of
the Olympic Village in east London
in a US$908 million deal. Due for
completion in early 2012, the village
will deliver 2,818 homes. Qatari Diar
is involved in other London projects
such as the US embassy building
in Grosvenor Square and the Shell
Centre on the South Bank.
The lengthy development time of
Abu Dhabis zero-carbon Masdar
City is due to its innovative nature,
according to Siemens head of build-
ing automation. Siemens has a coop-
eration agreement with Masdar City
and is focusing on the integration of
renewable energy into a building au-
tomation system. Speaking to Middle
East Architect, Siemens Dr Hubert
Keiber, said: The speed [of devising
the] original plans of Masdar and the
speed of implementing the ideas is
completely diferent. The process is
slower than expected.
He continued: However, Im
convinced they have the ideas, they
have the money and they have the op-
portunity to test and implement new
things. We have opened a centre of
excellence and we have a small team
in Masdar working together with the
institute on research.
113
METRES
HEIGHT OF THE
HOTEL PORTA
FIRA
The Olympic
Village takes
shape in Lon-
dons East End.
SEPTEM
MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 09.11 | www.designmena.com 16
NEWS ANALYSIS | BUILDING TALL
ANALYSIS
TALL ORDER
Oliver Ephgrave discovers the numerous design and structural
challenges behind the delivery of the 1km-high Kingdom Tower
www.designmena.com | 09.11 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT 17
BUILDING TALL | NEWS ANALYSIS
K
ingdom Tower may
have been described as
highly constructible
by AS+GG partner Gor-
don Gill, but the design and build of a
1km-tall tower is far from simple.
One of the main issues is wind load,
which increases with height. Com-
menting on Kingdom Tower, Gill said:
The three-petal footprint is ideal
for residential units, and the tapering
wings produce an aerodynamic shape
that helps reduce structural loading
due to wind vortex shedding.
A top engineer behind the project,
Bob Sinn, principal at Thornton
Tomasetti, states that the wind load
solution was one of the main struc-
tural challenges. All tall buildings
are dominated by wind loads, and
the reduction of this force was one
of the big challenges early on. All of
the structural elements were sized
for strength, without the need for ad-
ditional materials.
Bart Leclercq, head of structures
for WSP Middle East, believes that
the design of Kingdom Tower pro-
vides a sound aerodynamic solution.
The shape of the building is quite
stif in itself - its a similar footprint
to Burj Khalifa. The taper reduces
the wind load at the top. Because it
changes shape every few oors, the
wind loads go round the building and
wont be as extreme as on a re-
ally solid block. There will
be local disturbances, so
its a really good design
from an aerodynamic
perspective.
Sinn adds: I dont
know if its an ideal, but Id
say that the tapered form is an
excellent solution in dealing with the
wind load. It turned out to be very
benecial to us.
As well as solidity, a supertall
tower also requires rigidity. Leclercq
elaborates: You have to make sure
a tower is not too exible and people
arent getting nauseous in high winds.
You have to put enough stifening
elements in your
building. For example,
sheer walls in combina-
tion with concrete cores in
the case of a concrete building. Its
the same thing for a steel building -
you have to provide really solid struc-
tural walls that take care of the wind
load. The building may be strong
enough, but if it is not stif enough
then people will get nauseas.
However, Leclercq is quick to point
out that this should not be an issue on
Kingdom Tower. A good structural
engineer will take care of that move-
ment. I really dont think that this will
be a problem.
Steve Kelshaw, managing director
of Dubai-based DSA Architects In-
ternational, believes that the tapering
form is the best model for a tower of
this height, despite the aesthetic limi-
tations. I dont think you could do it
any other way - if you built a square
design up to that height, I dont know
how it would work, he says.
Kingdom Tower
will trump the
Burj Khalifa
by almost 200
metres.
$1.2
BILLION
ESTIMATED
CONSTRUCTION
COST OF KINGDOM
TOWER
MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 09.11 | www.designmena.com 18
NEWS ANALYSIS | BUILDING TALL
Yet there are other options, other
than the taper, according to Sinn.
Anything that changes shape is best.
For instance, it could be sloping, step-
ping or have holes in it. Id say that the
worst shape, aerodynamically speak-
ing, is the prism. The old World Trade
Centre in New York is a textbook
example of the worst shape.
Leclercq adds that the architects
treatment of facade may provide
the tower will a distinct identity.
Although it uses a similar footprint
to Burj Khalifa, the designers can be
really playful with the facade. The
facade of Burj Khalifa is quite aston-
ishing and the Kingdom Tower might
look completely difer-
ent from Burj Khalifa.
A big challenge for
supertall buildings is verti-
cal transportation, which includes
elevators and re escapes. Leclercq
explains: When you work on a
building of that height you nd that a
large area of the oor plate has to be
occupied by vertical transportation.
This means that you have large areas
that are unlettable.
He refers to the unbuilt 1.4km-high
Nakheel Tower in Dubai, for which
WSP provided structural design.
The Nakheel Tower design had 47
lifts, just to get people up and down,
so you can imagine the
enormous amount of
space that this required.
The lettable area is reduced the
higher you go, and thats a problem.
According to AS+GG, Kingdom
Tower will contain one of the most
sophisticated elevator systems in the
world, with an estimated 59 elevators
in total. This will include 54 single-
deck and ve double-deck elevators,
in addition to 12 escalators. Elevators
serving the observatory will travel at
a rate of 10 metres per second.
A 1km-tall tower may seem
staggering, but is this the buildable
limit? Most probably not, according
to the chairman of the Council on
Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat,
Dr Sang Dae Kim. We now have a
design thats 1km tall. Later, someone
will push for 1 mile, and then 2km.
Kim believes that, technically
speaking, a 2km-tall tower might be
possible at the current time. He con-
tinues: At this point in time we can
build a tower that is 1km, maybe 2km.
When you work on a building of that height you nd
that a large area of the oor plate has to be occupied by
vertical transportation. This means that you have large
areas that are unlettable.
Bart Leclercq, head of structures for WSP Middle East
Kingdom
Towers three
petal footprint is
similar to that of
the Burj Khalifa.
500,000
METRES
2
TOTAL AREA
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MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 09.11 | www.designmena.com
NEWS ANALYSIS | BUILDING TALL
20
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Any higher than that and we will have
to do a lot of homework.
Thornton Tomasettis Sinn also
believes that 2km is an achievable
height. Kingdom Tower is certainly
feasible. Its not a structural chal-
lenge. Technically I think a 2km-tall
tower could be done, but I dont think
it will be done anytime soon. Such
as building will have more architec-
tural and practical constraints than
structural issues. There have been
very strong advances in reinforced
concrete in the last 20 years, he adds.
Yet Kim believes that there will be
structural challenges for a 2km-tall
tower. There might be constraints
for the structural engineering we
dont know many things. When you
go up to two kilometres, we dont have
much information surrounding the
conditions. Kim also notes that there
may be issues with oor lean due to
the shortening of columns over time.
He also agrees that it is highly im-
practical to build a 2km-high tower,
and adds: We dont need to built at
2km, but someone with a lot of money
might still want to do it.
For Leclercq, the technical limit
at the current time is 1 mile. I truly
believe that this is within range. Over
that, it may be possible if there are
improvements in concrete quality.
But 2km is too big a gure - its just a
step too far at the moment.
Kelshaw also states that extremely
tall towers may struggle to attract
tenants. Is the market there?
Personally I would feel uneasy. Get-
ting people to work and live in such
a tower will be a challenge, he argues.
Yet Leclercq asserts that there
will be always be an appeal to build
and occupy the tallest building in the
world. Is there such as thing as too
high? I think mankind is always going
to be challenged by nding the next
frontier. Theres also a market; people
will always want to be in the worlds
tallest tower, he concludes.
At this point in time we can build a tower that is 1km, maybe 2km.
Any higher than that and we will have to do a lot of homework.
Dr Sang Dae Kim, chairman of the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat
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MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 09.11 | www.designmena.com 22
WIP | CMA TOWER
WORK IN PROGRESS
Ben Roberts visits the CMA Tower
in Riyadhs KAFD, set to be the
tallest LEED-certied building in
Saudi Arabia
GOING
FOR
GOLD
A
lthough it will be com-
pletely dwarfed by Jed-
dahs gigantic Kingdom
Tower, the 385m CMA
Tower in Riyadhs King Abdullah
Financial District will be Saudi
Arabias tallest green building due
to its target of LEED Gold.
Designed by HOK and Omrania &
Associates, the striking tower with a
geometric glass faade will house the
Capital Markets Authority(CMA),
Saudis chief nancial regulator.
The towers inner total oor area is
185,000m
2
and will contain com-
mercial and corporate of ces, a 450-
seat auditorium, dining areas, leisure
facilities, with the CMA occupying
28,000m
2
in the top section.
Built with no piles or dampers,
project manager Cyril Sweett spoke
of the challenge of building four
basement levels in the solid rock
excavation. After that there was the
challenge of dewatering with the
foundation level being the lowest in
Riyadh, approximately 11,000m
3
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CMA TOWER | WIP
www.designmena.com | 09.11 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT 23
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The CMA Tower will have an
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MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 09.11 | www.designmena.com 24
WIP | CMA TOWER
day owed into the area. Further-
more, CMA Towers construction
contained the biggest raft pour ever
in the Middle East, with Saudi Bin-
ladin pouring 13,000m
3
of concrete
over a 36-hour period last October.
Texas-based Walter P Moore, the
structural engineering rm for the
tower project, carefully considered
the materials needed for the struc-
tural system, and conducted
a carbon emissions study
to help the building to
achieve its target of a
LEED Gold. Despite
the huge order for steel,
the company calculated
that this choice would
cut the amount of concrete
needed in the composite structure
by 40%, reducing emissions by 30%.
The inner structure of the build-
ing is perhaps the most substantially
diferent element, and combines
many engineering feats to be able to
securely support the lofty build-
ing above. Dotted around the core
wall are six columns separate to
the main structure,
built from the bottom
of the foundations up
to ground level. These
concrete columns will stop
at ground level, as a platform for
further columns. Three of the six
emerging columns will split into two
at a 45 angle up the rst four levels.
These steel columns will all feed
into the fth oor, which is a hori-
zontal matrix of steel bars to hold
the weight of every oor above it.
None of the columns are verti-
cal, which is all part of Walter P
Moores theme of integration. The
sloping braces and columns are fully
integrated with the faade which
maximises the oor area available
to let, and minimises the amount of
structural materials.
Photovoltaic panels will adorn
the top of the structure as a further
measure to help the tower achieve
its lofty ambition of LEED Gold
certication.
385
METRES
EXPECTED HEIGHT
OF THE CMA
TOWER
The tower is one
of ve towers
within the
Financial Plaza
of KAFD.
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MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 09.11 | www.constructionweekonline.com
INTERVIEW | ROB WATSON
28
CAPTAIN PLANET
THE INTERVIEW
Green certication programmes are like martial arts. At the
end of the day they are pretty much the same.
Rob Watson, the founding father of the LEED rating system, discusses the modern
worlds environmentally-unfriendly direction with Oliver Ephgrave
D
ubbed as one of the
best environmental
minds in America by a
columnist for The New
York Times, Rob Watsons aura of
condence and authority makes for
a rather intimidating interview. Yet
thankfully the founder of the LEED
rating system is more than happy to
divulge his strong views on buildings
and the environment, a subject that
has dened his career.
With talk of the violence and
implacability of nature, Watsons
comments veer from doom-laden
predictions to witty one-liners.
Green certication programmes are
like martial arts. At the end of the day
they are pretty much the same, he
says, with a wry smile.
Yet behind this humour is a sense of
pride in creating the most successful
rating system of the pack. LEED
really is an international standard
like no other, he states. There are
over 800 million m
2
of built area in
the certication programme. There
are projects that are either registered
or certied in 120 diferent countries.
Its amazing to me that a system cre-
ated in America actually has build-
ings in Yemen, and other places that I
would not imagine them to be in.
Chicago-born Watson was LEED
founding chairman until 2006, after
spearheading the launch of the rating
system by the US Green Building
Council in 1993. In 2007 he launched
EcoTech International Group (ETI)
to take advantage of green building
technologies and services in China,
Russia, India and the United States.
Prior to setting up ETI, Watson was
a scientist with the US Natural Re-
sources Defense Council for 20 years,
and this background accounts for his
authoritative words on natures laws.
Watson demonstrates his scien-
tic knowhow when asked whether
photovoltaics are underutilised.
He replies: People ask me about
nuclear power and Im a fan. Fusion
is my favourite. The nice thing is that
we already have the perfect fusion
reactor, and its a safe distance from
the planet. The sun provides 2000
times more energy than all human
uses combined. In other words, 15
minutes of sunlight on land is equal
to a years worth of human energy
consumption.
He continues: Theres no energy
crisis on this planet. The crisis lies in
the economic system. Something that
is objectively superior from a species
survival perspective is somehow
more expensive than something that
is demonstrably harmful to our con-
tinued existence on the planet. That
is just stupid. At some point we will
somehow change the way we think.
Remember that there is nothing
inherent in the way we value things -
this is a choice that we can change.
We need to align our economic
system with the laws of the planet
which are chemistry, biology and
physics. Unless human law is aligned
with natural law, we are doomed.
There isnt a single policy out there,
under the antiquated Adam Smith
model, that will save us.
Watson believes that a combination
of regulatory push with market pull
is the most efective way to promote
change. He adds: You can probably
get three times the impact by coor-
dination between public and private
sector eforts than either purely rais-
ing the price [of energy] and letting
the market respond or forcing people
through regulations. The synergy
between the two is very important.
Most countries do one or the other
reasonably well.
When asked to pinpoint the most
green-orientated built environments,
Watson states: Europe clearly has
the best buildings in the world in
terms of energy consumption. But
many of them still allow smoking,
so from a human health perspective
they are not so great. California has a
fairly coordinated set of energy regu-
lations and incentive programmes.
Even though prices have gone up, the
bills and the energy use per capita
have stayed more or less the same for
ROB WATSON | INTERVIEW
www.constructionweekonline.com | 09.11 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT 29
MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 09.11 | www.constructionweekonline.com
INTERVIEW | ROB WATSON
30
almost 20 years. I would say that was
a pretty good success.
He says that more developers
would jump on the bandwagon if they
understood that green buildings are
cost efective in the long term. The
problem is we have an 18th century
economic concept that is completely
unsuited for understanding and ap-
preciating how green buildings are in
fact cost efective.
The reality is that its possible to
build any building in the world cheap-
er. But price is not the only thing
people are concerned about - theyre
also looking for return on investment.
Honestly, with green, you get out way
more than what you put in. Green may
not be the cheapest by square metre,
but certainly it has the highest return
on investment.
Watson stresses the marketability
of a green building. I think if people
understood that they could make
more money, then they would easily
invest whats necessary. Nobody
spends $5,000 on a Rolex watch
because it tells better time. You need
to understand the market which you
are building in. My feeling is that if
you cant make more money with a
green building then you need a new
marketing department.
Cost issues only arise if green is
simply an add-on, he asserts. If you
design a brown branch and hang
green ornaments on it, its naturally
going to cost more. Designing a green
branch does not cost any more than
a brown branch but you have to start
at the beginning with green in mind.
Technology is often used to overcome
bad design decisions like big glass
boxes in the hottest region in the
world. If you want to make those big
glass boxes more ef cient you have to
spend a lot of money on better win-
dows and better equipment, etc.
As some parting words of wisdom
for designers in the Middle East, he
highlights the inherent sustainability
of the vernacular architecture in
dealing with the heat. The indig-
enous architecture has more mass,
with deep and narrow plans, and
people were comfortable without
excess energy for centuries before the
modern day. Theres a lot of wisdom
in those practices that can be updated
and modernised to create sustainable
architecture, both economically and
environmentally.
If you cant make more money with a green building then
you need a new marketing department.
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MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 09.11 | www.designmena.com 32
COVER STORY | TAIPEI 101
Oliver Ephgrave visits Taipei 101 to discover whether the worlds tallest
green building can offer any lessons for the Middle East
www.designmena.com | 09.11 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT 33
TAIPEI 101 | COVER STORY
MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 08.11 | www.designmena.com 34
COVER STORY | TAIPEI 101
rom the swarm of journal-
ists, local celebrities and
jubilant politicians that
gathered for the ceremony
in Taipei 101s gargan-
tuan atrium, it was clear
that the towers new tag
of LEED Platinum is a
big deal for Taiwan. Yet pride in the
worlds second tallest tower - now the
worlds tallest green building - was
not just limited to the natives. During
the ceremony, the chairman of the US
Green Building Council, Mark Mac-
Cracken, declared: The impact that
this building is going to have on the
existing building market, I honestly
feel this is a monumental event.
Completed in 2004, the 509-metre
tower utterly dominates the mid-rise
skyline of Taipei, a at city sur-
rounded by lush green mountains.
Resembling a giant Chinese pagoda,
the quirky design by C.Y. Lee archi-
tects is steeped in superstition. Due to
the fact the number eight is consid-
ered to be lucky while four is unlucky,
the building is divided into eight
segments and there is no fourth oor.
The blue-green glass resembles jade,
a stone of royalty, while the interior
is plastered with a swirly motif which
stands for dreams coming true.
In addition to this fastidious
symbolism, the building was designed
with the environment in mind. Cathy
Yang, vice president, Tower Division,
Taipei 101, explains: In the very
early stages of our development, we
had already put environment as one
of our characteristics. The curtain
wall was built with Low-E glass to
save energy - we
always knew
the impor-
tance of
having
a good
building
envelope.
We also
had a water
harvesting
system
In the early stages of our development, we had already put
environment as one of our characteristics. The reason we hadnt
applied for LEED was because we didnt know about it.
Cathy Yang, Taipei 101
The 509-metre
tall tower utterly
dominates the
mid-rise skyline
of Taipei.
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COVER STORY | TAIPEI 101
36
in place to collect the rain water. The
reason we hadnt applied for LEED
was because we didnt know about it.
The decision to apply for LEED
in 2009 was prompted by a direct
approach from a team comprising
electronics giant Siemens, green
consultant EcoTech and interior
design rm Steven Leach, who had all
previous worked for the client.
LEED Gold was the initial target
set by Taipei 101 chairman Harace
Hong-Min Lin, yet during an evalua-
tion in 2010 it was clear that Platinum
status was in reach. Determined to
excel, the client invested more money
to attain the highest rank.
Peter Halliday, vice president,
Building Technologies Division, Sie-
mens Taiwan, adds: The partnership
helped to sell the idea to the owner
and it also gave us an excellent plat-
form to work as engineers and consul-
tants. I honestly believe that without
this team approach we wouldnt have
achieved Platinum status.
The building achieved the maxi-
mum number of points in the catego-
ries Indoor Environmental Quality
and Energy & Atmosphere. Siemens
Energy Monitoring and Control Sys-
tem was instrumental in ne-tuning
the buildings energy performance, as
was a series of energy audits and the
installation of additional sensors.
Yang elaborated on additional mea-
sures that helped to reduce energy
usage. Lighting accounts for around
15% of the energy consumption, so
we literally walked through all of the
areas - including the back of house,
machine rooms, corridors - to see
where we could take out tubes. We
also changed the lights from halogen
to T5 tubes. I think that the architects
put too many lights in the space.
Another large component of the
retrot was recycling. Before we
applied for LEED we had a recycled
rate of 55% and now its 65%. There
are several cutting stations and a
compactor to further reduce the size
of the waste, added Yang.
At US$2 million, the total cost of
the retrot may not seem cheap. Yet
Yang states that this cost has already
been recouped in energy savings.
Our energy bill was about US$7 mil-
lion a year. Every year from now, we
will be saving US$1.2 million a year.
This is a very good payback period.
The client also believes that the
tower is more marketable, even
though the rent levels are not directly
afected by LEED. Chairman Lin
adds: The rent is down to supply and
demand, so we dont think its directly
linked to our LEED certication. But
as we can provide a very good indoor
environment quality, where peoples
work ef ciency will be increased, we
believe that the boss of each organ-
isation will be happy to move their
company into our building.
In order to avoid causing disrup-
tion to the 10,000 occupants of the
tower, the retrotting measures were
mainly undertaken at night. Lin
continues: There was not really any
disruption from the tenants - they
are all very happy to cooperate with
us. For the work we had to do, I dont
think there were any interruptions.
Rather than causing friction, the
tenant relationship has in fact been
improved by the retrot, according
to Rob Watson, CEO of EcoTech and
founder of LEED. The building now
has a better indoor air quality and a
better temperature control through
the Siemens technology. The fact
that the relationships between the
tenants and the management has also
strengthened during this process will
pay back many times over the savings
in the operations.
Yang adds: I think it will
be hard for tenants to
move out because they
will nd all the other
buildings inferior.
The rating process
also required that tenants
were educated about green
operations. Yang explains: We
have posters and stickers next to the
I think this building
takes the excuses away,
especially in the Middle
East. Many of those
countries have money
and want to do the
right thing. If we look
at Masdar its clear that
people are focused on
the new construction
side, but weve got to
go after the existing
buildings.
Mark MacCracken,
US Green Building Council
509
METRES
TOTAL HEIGHT
OF TAIPEI 101
TAIPEI 101 | COVER STORY
www.designmena.com | 09.11 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT 37
The complex
comprises a
shopping mall
(left) and a
huge atrium
containing
displays on the
towers green
achievements.
MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 09.11 | www.designmena.com
COVER STORY | TAIPEI 101
38
AC switch and washroom, as well
as a green corner in the lobby with a
touchscreen to show how we made
the building green. We held green
lectures for our tenants so they un-
derstand what we are doing.
According to Siemens Halliday, the
LEED retrot has also inspired other
developers in Taiwan to go green.
Since 101 has applied for LEED
certication there has been a ground-
swell of developers saying whats
LEED all about? With our partners
EcoTech and Steven Leach, we are
now working on several projects
including Taipei American School.
As well as having a local impact,
Watson believes that the retrot will
garner attention in other regions.
Taipei 101 is forcing us to think
about what we mean by sustain-
able. In terms of material density
per square foot of land, high rise
buildings are very intensive. But
Im hoping that this project can
help people understand the innate
resources in a tall building, whether
its daylight or ef cient use of land.
85% of the people in this tower dont
use a vehicle.
Yet he notes that there is still room
for improvement. Next steps will
be integrating gardens and expand-
ing the ability to capture and re-use
rainwater. I think 101 is interested in
taking its successes and then making
improvements. I expect well see
some very interesting ideas in the
years to come.
USGBCs MacCracken agrees
that the tower will have an impact on
high rises throughout the world. I
think this building takes the excuses
away, especially in the Middle East.
Many of those countries have money
and want to do the right thing. If we
look at Masdar its clear that people
are focused on new construction, but
weve got to go after the exist-
ing buildings. Taipei 101 is
a stake in the sand that
shows it can be done.
But is it possible to retrot an
average tower that was not designed
with sustainability in mind? Siemens
Halliday ofers some words of caution
for would-be retrotters. We were
very lucky that Taipei 101 actually
had environmental aspects in the
initial design and build stage. It would
have made things a lot harder if it was
just an average building.
Yet MacCracken believes it is
possible, although the higher ranks
may be out of reach. In the case
of an average tower on, say, Sheikh
Zayed Road, I think you could get it
LEED certied. You might even be
able to get to Silver level. A lot of it
has to do with what you are bringing
into the building, how you deal with
reconstruction and what do you do
with your waste. You need a certain
amount of energy performance but
its not a spectacularly high
level. I think that LEED
retrots in the UAE are
denitely doable.
Siemens EMCS
was instrumental
in ne-tuning the
buildings energy
performance.
$2
MILLION
TOTAL COST OF
THE RETROFIT
FEATURE | SUSTAINABLE PRODUCTS
MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 09.11 | www.designmena.com 40
SUSTAINABLE PRODUCTS | FEATURE
www.designmena.com | 09.11 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT 41
MEA looks at ways to earn valuable credits in the LEED programme for
New Construction and Major Renovations
T
he US Green Building
Councils LEED system
- like all green building
rating programmes - is a
numbers game. In the latest version
of LEED for New Construction
and Major Renovations, projects
have to pick up at least 40 points to
become certied, while the highest
rank, Platinum, is reserved for those
that achieved 80 points and above.
Points can be won across seven topics:
Sustainable Sites, Water Ef ciency,
Energy and Atmosphere, Materials
P CK NG UP
TH PO NT
and Resources, Indoor Environmen-
tal Quality, Innovation in Design and
Regional Priority. Projects that are
targetting certication, particularly
the higher ranks, require a careful se-
lection of materials and products that
adhere to the programme guidelines.
1 1
t
3
i i h
1
f
5
MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 09.11 | www.designmena.com 42
FEATURE | SUSTAINABLE PRODUCTS
PRODUCT FOCUS
METAL CEILINGS, SAS INTERNATIONAL
SAS International says it can achieve a minimum of
30% recycled content on all its metal ceilings, which
are available in a variety of nishes. The steel it uses
has a minimum 25-year product lifecycle and is 100%
recyclable into new steel after paint removal. Andrew
Jackson, director, adds: Product choice no longer
relies on the initial purchase price diference between
materials; it is factors such as life cycle costs and ex-
ibility of product to meet the demands of occupants,
that are coming to the fore.
RECYCLED CONTENT
Topic: Materials and Resources, Credit 4
12 POINTS
WHAT LEED IS LOOKING FOR
LEED calls for building products that incorporate
recycled content materials, thereby reducing impacts
resulting from extraction and processing of virgin materi-
als. The guidelines add that projects should use materials
with recycled content such that the sum of postconsumer
recycled content plus half of the pre consumer content
constitutes at least 10% or 20% based on cost of the total
value of the materials in the project. The recycled content
value of a material assembly is determined by weight; the
recycled fraction of the assembly is then multiplied by the
cost of assembly to determine the recycled content value.
3LHFHRI
DUW
*HEHULW0RQROLWK
Geberit Mono|ith combines proven qua|ity with pure design. The cistern is c|ever|y concea|ed behind g|ass,
creating a smooth, stream|ined and attractive overa|| |ook. The innovative Geberit Mono|ith can be used
in combination with a|| standard WC ceramic units. Not on|y does it stand out with its purist aesthetic and high
functiona|ity, but its design has a|so won numerous awards a|| over the wor|d. Find out more about Geberit
Mono|ith at www.geberit.ae
MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 09.11 | www.designmena.com
FEATURE | SUSTAINABLE PRODUCTS
44
WHAT LEED IS LOOKING FOR
Up to two points are awarded for the use of building ma-
terials and products that are extracted and manufactured
within the region, thereby supporting the use of indig-
enous resources and reducing the environmental impacts
resulting from transportation. Projects should source
materials or products that have been extracted, harvested
or recovered, as well as manufactured, within 500 miles
of the project site. The guidelines add: If only a fraction of
a product or material is locally, source then only that per-
centage (by weight) can contribute to the regional value.
PRODUCT FOCUS
TOPCEM PRONTO BY MAPEI
This normal-setting, fast-hydrating, pre-bagged screed
from Mapei is manufactured in the UAE with over 90%
of the raw materials sourced locally. This fast track
product allows a reduction in construction time, en-
ergy and resources, and is able to receive subsequent
nishes from one to four days.
WHAT LEED IS LOOKING FOR
To gain one point for Low-Emitting Materials, all
adhesives and sealants used on the interior of the building
(inside the weatherproong system and applied on-site)
must comply with LEED requirements. The guidelines
state that projects should specify low-VOC materials in
construction documents and ensure that VOC limits are
clearly stated in each section of the specications where
adhesives and sealants are addressed.
PRODUCT FOCUS
WATERPROOFING MEMBRANE BY LATICRETE
LATICRETE International, Inc. produces an assort-
ment of portland cement and epoxy-based setting
and grouting materials. The supplier ofers a number
of locally-manufactured and low VOC products that
comply with the stringent LEED requirements. The
pictured product is LATICRETE 9235 Waterproong
Membrane (tested per EPA Method 24), which has a
VOC content of just 0.02 lb /gal (2.39 g/L).
REGIONAL MATERIALS
Topic: Materials and Resources, Credit 5
1-2 POINTS
LOW-EMITTING MATERIALS -
ADHESIVES AND SEALANTS
Topic: Indoor Environmental Quality,
Credit 4.1
1 POINT
MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 09.11 | www.designmena.com 46
FEATURE | SUSTAINABLE PRODUCTS
WHAT LEED IS LOOKING FOR
Water use reduction is a prerequisite for LEED. The idea
is to increase water ef ciency within buildings to reduce
the burden on municipal water supply and wastewater sys-
tems. Buildings must employ strategies that, in aggregate,
use 20% less water than the water-use baseline calculated
for the building (not including irrigation). Calculations
are based on estimated occupant usage and must only
include water closets, urinals, lavatory faucets, showers,
kitchen sink faucets and pre-rinse spray valves.
PRODUCT FOCUS
CISTERNS BY GEBERIT
Geberit helps reduce water consumption through the
advanced development of its ush systems. In 2010,
the entire ush-stop and dual ush cistern eet en-
abled water savings of 1,500 million m
3
. The Concealed
Cistern (top) is blow-moulded in one piece, while
Monolith (right) contains a hidden integrated cistern.
WATER USE REDUCTION
(Prerequisite)
Topic: Water Ef ciency
NO POINTS
lighting architectural landmarks
The world of architecture is constantly blurring the boundaries between art and design while the concept
of illumination in architecture is simultaneously re-inventing in the ways to provide comprehensive lighting
design, taking into account the amount of functional light to be provided, the energy consumed as well as
the aesthetic impact supplied by the lighting system.
Scientechnic believes in scaling the pinnacle of architectural brilliance. With a history close to 40 years
and the strength of the visionary Easa Saleh Al Gurg Group, Scientechnic naturally is the rst choice
of reputed developers for ve star hotels, malls, executive environments, villas or medium to high end
residential projects.
w w w . s c i e n t e c h n i c . c o m
p.o.box 325, Dubai, United Arab Emirates, tel. +971 4 203 5777, fax +971 4 266 6176
p.o.box 4938, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, tel. +971 2 650 7835, fax +971 2 671 8987
DUBAI INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL CENTRE
YAS ISLAND, ABU DHABI
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MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 09.11 | www.designmena.com
ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE | VIMAR
48
F
ollowing the recent launch
of its Middle Eastern opera-
tions in Dubai, Vimar, the
Italian manufacturer of wiring ac-
cessories and automation systems,
plans to consolidate its position in
the region as part of its expansion
strategy in international markets.
Established in Marostica in
Italy in 1945 and employing today
more than 1,000 people across 7
major branches around the world,
the company has accumulated
more than 60 years of experience
and has since become one of the
worlds leading manufacturers be-
ing often the choice of architects,
consultants and contractors in their
prestigious projects.
The rm offers a number
of Made in Italy products that
combine technological innovation,
quality and design. These include
Eikon and Plana, two series
of cover plates, switches and
sockets, offered in a wide variety
of combinations in terms of design,
materials and type of controls,
which can be used either as stand-
alone pieces or in conjunction with
Vimars By-me or Well-contact Plus
automation systems.
Both Eikon and Plana series are
available in the British Standard ver-
sion specially designed to meet BS
requirements in accordance with
the companys philosophy of com-
bining the air of Italian design with
needed technological standards.
By-me home automation system,
aesthetically coordinated with the
rened design of Eikon or with the
minimalist elegance of Plana, allows
users to automate their homes and
manage their climate, security and
comfort in an integrated manner,
ensuring wellbeing and a reduction
in energy usage.
The system is designed to be
compatible with every type of home
and lifestyle, ensures users the free-
dom to program it to coordinate and
manage, from a single supervision
point, functions that are traditionally
controlled using separated conven-
tional devices such as switches,
dimmers, timer-thermostats, video
door entry units and so on, thereby
allowing for extremely effective reg-
ulation and control.
With By-me, users can integrate
all their devices into one centralised
system that allows for them to en-
hance the comfort and effectively
control their energy usage. With
more than 32 different tempera-
ture, lighting, curtains, security and
comfort scenes, congured ac-
cording to daily needs, users have
a wide range of exibility for their
optimum settings. This reliable and
automatic system communicates
also via mobile phone. Everything
can be monitored, as well, via the
Internet using a next generation
smartphone or tablet.
Moreover, By-me can be further
enhanced by integrating a users
sound system with it, thus allowing
the creation of a bespoke system
that can simultaneously distribute
to as many as four different audio
sources. Users can control the sys-
tem, characterized by its hi- repro-
duction of signals, through the dedi-
cated controls or the touch screen
that provides a single interface for
managing every room.
For the advanced tertiary sec-
tor, Vimar has also developed the
Well-contact Plus, a building au-
tomation system designed for the
management of hotels and hos-
pitality facilities. The system pro-
vides computer management of
lights, curtains, temperature, se-
curity, energy and access, offering
functionality and comfort.
Well-contact Plus building auto-
mation system is aesthetically co-
ordinated with the design of Eikon
or Plana wiring accessories series,
exactly like it happens for By-me
home automation.
Based on KNX technology and
international standard, the Well-
contact Plus is a exible system that
can be expanded to add additional
devices. This KNX interoperable
system can interact with other prod-
ucts that are designed to the KNX
standard as well as with systems
that operate using other protocols
just adding, in this event, suitably
congured KNX gateways.
Vimars automation systems are aesthetically coordinated with the rened
design of Eikon or with the minimalist elegance of Plana wiring accessories.
Vimar lights up wiring
accessories and automation
Italian firm looks to expand operations in MENA region following Dubai launch
Vimar SpA, Italy
www.vimar.eu
Vimar Middle East
Dubai, UAE
Tel. +971 4 6091 848
vimarme@vimarme.ae
www.designmena.com | 09.11 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT 49
MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 09.11 | www.designmena.com 64
PRO
JECT U
PDATE | TH
E W
O
RK
DOHA STADIUM
Architect:
Aedas/Populous
Location:
Doha
A design collaboration between
Aedas and Populous, this stadium
addresses the requirements for
the 2022 World Cup and provides
multiple future uses. As a World
Cup venue, the fully air-conditioned
stadium will provide 46,000 seats
with state-of-the-art broadcast
and media facilities, luxurious VIP
areas and a retractable roof. The
exible design will allow the pitch
and areas of seating to be moveable.
WADI RESORT
Architect:
Oppenheim
Architecture +
Design
Location:
Wadi Rum,
Jordan
Taking cues from nearby Petra, the
ambitious Wadi Resort in Jordan
will feature 47 desert lodges and
villas carved into sandstone clifs.
Designed by USA-based Oppenheim
Architecture + Design, the resort
is set to open in 2014. It will cover
almost 7500m2 in Wadi Rum, a
spectacular valley cut into sandstone
and granite. The rock will create the
exterior facade and also parts of the
interior and furniture.
MUSEUM
OF BUILT
ENVIRONMENT
Architect:
FXFowle
Location:
King Abdullah
Financial
District,
Saudi Arabia
One of the stand-out buildings in the
King Abdullah Financial District,
the glistening Museum of Built Envi-
ronment has been designed by New
York-based rm FXFowle. Due to
the fast-track construction schedule,
the architects are currently working
on detailed design, while site excava-
tion is underway and completion
is slated for November 2012. The
museum will focus on education with
four sub-categories.
METROPOL
PARASOL
Architect:
Jurgen Mayer H.
Location:
Seville, Spain
Proudly holding at least one record
ahead of Dubai, the Metropol
Parasol is the worlds biggest build-
ing to be held together by glue. The
28.5-metre high structure contains
four oors with a market, shops and
a podium for concerts and events.
The basement accommodates Ro-
man ruins while the roof houses a
restaurant, viewing gallery and an
undulating walkway with vistas over
central Seville.
7,432
METRES
2
TOTAL AREA OF
WADI RUM
RESORT
18,000
METRES
2
TOTAL AREA OF
THE PARASOL
62
PRO
JECT U
PDATE | TH
E W
O
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SOWWAH
SQUARE
Architect:
Goettsch
Partners
Location:
Abu Dhabi
Pitching for LEED Silver status,
Sowwah Square will provide the
new headquarters for the Abu Dhabi
Securities Exchange and comprises
four of ce towers overlooking
water. The complex contains over
290,000m2 of of ce space and in-
tegrates two levels of retail and two
parking structures. The centerpiece
of the developments rst phase is
the business centre, which includes a
22,670m2 stock exchange building.
TRA
HEADQUARTERS
Architect:
HDR
Location:
Dubai
In December 2007, the UAEs
Telecommunications Regulatory
Authority (TRA) commissioned ar-
chitect HDR to design its headquar-
ters for both Abu Dhabi and Dubai.
The Dubai project is located in a
neighbourhood of low rise residential
and cultural buildings and is looking
to attain LEEDSilver Rating. The
facility will be of cially opened in
October 2011 while the Abu Dhabi
project will be completed next year.
AL FATTAN
HOUSE
Architect:
DSA Architects
International
Location:
Dubai
Al Fattan House is the third building
by developer Al Fattan Properties in
Dubai Marina. The client wanted to
complement the existing Al Fattan
residential and hotel towers develop-
ment with a commercial building
and chose architects DSA to design
the scheme. The striking project is a
prominent landmark, despite being
dwarfed by the glassy Al Fattan
towers and the soaring concrete
cityscape of Dubai Marina.
THE
WORK
PROJECT UPDATE
290,000
METRES
2
TOTAL AREA OF
OFFICE SPACE
31,000
METRES
2
TOTAL FLOOR AREA
OF THE COMPLEX
MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 09.11 | www.designmena.com
MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 09.11 | www.designmena.com 62 63
CU
LTU
RE | LIKE W
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EEDLIKE W
A
N
T N
EED | CU
LTU
RE CU
LTU
RE | LIKE W
A
N
T N
EED
LIKE
WANT
NEED
CULTURE
FLOORING
PURE
Desso
Recycling is a key component of
sustainability, and European carpet
manufacturer Desso recycles various
items - including its own tiles and
its competitors products - to create
brand new carpet tiles with a subtle
rib-effect. Items that contain PVC
are not recycled. Pure is available in
various shades of neutral brown, beige
and grey, as well as more vivid colours
such as red, purple and blue.
LIKE W
A
N
T N
EED | CU
LTU
RE
FURNISHING
NESTREST
Dedon
Dedons Nestrest hanging lounger
won the 2011 Good Design Green
Product Award for innovative and
ecologically-minded design concepts.
Created by two of Frances young
talents, Fred Frety and Daniel Pouzet,
Nestrest is a teardrop-shaped hanging
pod made with a special new weave of
super-sized Dedon fibre.
AUTOMATION
MICROMASTER
VDA
VDAs new Micromaster system
guestroom automation helps to lower
a hotels energy consumption and
carbon footprint. The system features a
sculpted touch-control screen - similar
to an iPad - that allows guests to adapt
their lighting and temperature levels for
optimum comfort. It relays real-time
updates, based upon actual occupancy
levels, to the Building Managent System
(BMS) so that the hotel can fine-tune
its energy usage.
APP
SUSTAINABLE ARCHITECTURE
Robert Hotten
Created by Robert Hotten, a
teaching fellow at the University of
Auckland, this app contains hints on
sustainable development processes
and practices. It provides information
about natural buildings, environmental
design and how to follow principles of
environmental, social and economic
sustainability.
www.designmena.com| 09.11 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT
BOOK
ARCHITECTURAL LIGHTING
Herve Descottes and Cecilia Ramos
This critical text is a conceptual
framework for understanding
the application of lighting in the
built environment. The important
considerations of lighting design are
described with accompanying diagrams,
while six case studies explain how the
principles are applied. Short essays by
architect Steven Holl, artist Sylvain
Dubuisson, and landscape architect
James Corner are also included.
51
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TW
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W
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D
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TW
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DOHA TWIN TOWERS
Architect: GHD Global
Location: Lusail, Qatar
CASE STUDY
www.designmena.com| 09.11 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT
THE PROJECT
This billowing twin tower project
in Qatar was designed by GHD
Global and is currently awaiting
the go-ahead from an unnamed
local developer. The scheme was
designed to meet the clients target
net oor area ratio of 398%.
Overall water consumption will
be reduced by 40% though the use
of native plantation, water reducing
xtures, storm water re-use and
grey water treatment strategies.
The building also aims to produce
5% of its energy from renewable
sources, such as photovoltaics, that
are built into the shading system on
the faade.
THE SITE
The scheme is located in Lusail,
a new city that is being constructed
15km north of Doha city centre.
Situated at the rst main street
junction in the marina district, the
project will occupy one of the most
prominent sites in Lusail.
Ashading system, based
on the Arabic mashrabi-
ya, was devised through
an analysis of shading
patterns. This study
also led to the provision
of pedestrian connections
with the marina boardwalk
in order to animate the site.
80%
USABLE SPACES
WITH DAYLIGHT
PRO
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WADI RESO
Architect
Oppenh
Archi
Des
L
7,4322
METREES
2
TOTAL AREA OOF
WADI RUM
RESORT
DSilver status,
will provide the
62/66
THE WORK
MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 09.11 | www.designm 62
FLOORING
PURE
Desso
Recycling is a key component of
sustainability, and European carpet
manufacturer Desso recycles various
items - including its own tiles and
its competitors products - to create
brand new carpet tiles with a subtle
rib-effect. Items that contain PVC
are not recycled. Pure is available in
various shades of neutral brown, beige
and grey, as well as more vivid colours
such as red, purple and blue.
MIDDLE E MMIDDLE EAS MIDDLE ID IDDLE EAST ARCHITECT MIDDLE MIDDLE E DDLE EAST ARCHITECT EA MIDDLE EAST ARCHITEC AS DLE EAST ARCHITEC ST ARC EAST ARCHITEC EAST ARCHITECT IDDLE EAST ARCH MIDDLE EAST A MIDDLE EAST ARRCHIT MIDDLE EAST ARCHI AST ARC DLE EAST ARCHITEC AST ARCH MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT DLE EAST ARCHITECT ARCHITECT DLE EAST ARCHITECT MIDDLE EA DDLE EAST ARCHITECT DDLE EAST ARCHITECT DDLE EAST A A DDLE EAST ARCHITEC CHITEC MIDDLE EAST ARCHITE RCHITECT LE DDLE EAST ARCHITEC IDDLLE EAST ARCHITEC E EAST E EAST ARCH T MIDDLE EAST A CHHITECT TTEC |||| 09 009 1 99 1 9 11 11 09.11 09.11 09. 09.11 09.1 09.11 09.1 .1 09.1111 ||| www.des ww.des ww.de d www.desi www.des .de www.desi www.des ww www.desi ww.desi www. www.des d www.de www ww.dd i www w.de de d w.desi 50 550 50 50 50 0 50
50/60
CASE
STUDIES
68/70
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DOHA TWIN TOWERS
Architect: GHD Global
Location: Lusail, Qatar
CASE STUDY
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THE PROJECT
This billowing twin tower project
in Qatar was designed by GHD
Global and is currently awaiting
the go-ahead from an unnamed
local developer. The scheme was
designed to meet the clients target
net oor area ratio of 398%.
Overall water consumption will
be reduced by 40% though the use
of native plantation, water reducing
xtures, storm water re-use and
grey water treatment strategies.
The building also aims to produce
5% of its energy from renewable
sources, such as photovoltaics, that
are built into the shading system on
the faade.
THE SITE
The scheme is located in Lusail,
a new city that is being constructed
15km north of Doha city centre.
Situated at the rst main street
junction in the marina district, the
project will occupy one of the most
prominent sites in Lusail.
A shading system, based
on the Arabic mashrabi-
ya, was devised through
an analysis of shading
patterns. This study
also led to the provision
of pedestrian connections
with the marina boardwalk
in order to animate the site.
80%
USABLE SPACES
WITH DAYLIGHT
MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 09.11 | www.designmena.com 52
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Further sustainable solutions
include carefully angled glazing to
minimize direct solar radiation,
as well as a composite sun shading
handrail system. These shading
strategies are said to reduce direct
incident solar radiation on the
facades by 70%.
THE DETAILS
Sky gardens are located across the
main faade of each tower, ofering
communal spaces. A series of verti-
cal shading elements follow the solar
radiation pattern by progressively
changing their angle and exposing
more of the west faade.
THE CONCEPT
The massing concept of the towers
and podium is based on a series
of dhows on choppy waters. The
podium is designed to resemble
sea waves, with two sloping ribbed
forms reecting water ripples, and
will contain commercial and retail
spaces. Commenting on project chal-
lenges, Brendan Texeira, concept
architect, added: We were faced
with stringent urban planning guide-
lines which limited not only the
tower footprint, but also
the podium and tower
heights. The challenge
was daunting. 398%
TARGET NET
FLOOR AREA
RATIO
In partnership with
Building Future Education MENA is a 2 day free-to-attend international exhibition and conference focused on education
design and build in the Middle East and North Africa. BFE MENA will cover all tiers of education including early years,
schools, higher education, research, vocational education and training centres and special needs.
25 26 October 2011
Abu Dhabi National Exhibition Centre
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DUBIOTECH
RESEARCH
LABORATORY
Architect: HDR
Location: Dubai
CASE STUDY
55 www.designmena.com | 09.11 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT
THE PROJECT
This US$25m complex in Dubai
was the rst research facility to be
completed in DuBiotech, a huge
freezone dedicated to the life sci-
ence industry. Architect HDR
was also responsible for the
freezone masterplan, as well
THE SITE
Located on a site adjacent to
Dubailand, the footprint features
long blocks radiating from a central
core along the east-west axis to
minimise solar gain and maximise
views. Louvers are located on the
northern face of the building
to catch the predominant
winds.Views from future
high-rise developments
will benet from the
projects minimal use of
rooftop mechanisms and
the landscaping strategy
respects the surrounding
desert environment.
as a headquarters building which is
under construction.
A common requirement for
the facilities in DuBiotech is
the achievement of LEED
certication, and HDRs
32,500m
2
research
laboratory received Silver status at
the end of 2010.
The buildings faades allude to
biotechnology research; some of the
windows and louvers mimic the im-
ages on a southern blot, a method
used in molecular biology.
2.8M
METRES
2
TOTAL BUILT UP AREA
OF DUBIOTECH
WHEN COMPLETE
ife sci
DR
e
ell
the facilities in DuB
the achievemen
certicati
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THE CONCEPT
The classical elements of re, wa-
ter, earth and air formed the basis of
the architects design. The orienta-
tion and choice of materials are said
to address the heat or re, while
the use of louvres was a solution for
the air. The at, sandy site - the
earth - was sculpted into dunes and
valleys. Together with the reective
pool in the lobby, these landscaping
features give the allusion of an oasis
in the desert. The last remaining
element - a scarce natural resource
in Dubai - is addressed by the grey
water principles in the xtures to
minimise water consumption.
$25M
VALUE OF THE
RESEARCH
LABORATORY
PROJECT
THE DETAILS
Responding to the heat, the
facades were clad in an absorptive
material, predominantly local sand-
stone veneer panels on a reinforced
concrete structure. The south
faade contains high-performance
glazing and solar shading devices,
while the north faade
opens up to allow the pas-
sage of natural light and views
through vision glass.
The solid east and west-facing
short end walls of the bars are
also clad in sandstone to mitigate
the direct solar gain
during the morning and
afternoon. The buildings roof
features an array of photovoltaic
panels on a high-albedo membrane
material to take advantage of sun-
light as an additional energy source.
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RENAISSANCE
TOWER
Architect: FXFOWLE
Location: Istanbul, Turkey
CASE STUDY
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www.designmena.com | 09.11 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT
THE PROJECT
Designed by New York-based
architecture rm FXFOWLE, Re-
naissance Tower is the headquarters
for a construction and development
company in Instanbul, Turkeys larg-
est city. With sustainability well and
THE SITE
Occupying a prominent site at the
intersection of two major highways,
the tower is said to function like an
obelisk marking the end of a
long vista and signifying
the entrance to the city
from the east.
Standing at 185 metres,
the Renaissance
Tower will be the tallest
building on the Anatolian
(Asian) side of Istanbul upon
completion next year.
The building is orientated to maxi-
mise solar ef ciency and minimise
East - West solar gain.
truly on the agenda, the tower has an
ambitious target of LEED Platinum -
the highest rank in the international
rating system.
Rooted in the particular spirit of
Istanbul, the tower ofers an antidote
to the universal application of
conventions without regard to locale,
which has unfortunately become
the norm in many emerging global
cities, adds Dan Kaplan, senior
partner at FXFOWLE.
33
TOWER ROTATION
FOR OPTIMUM
SOLAR CONTROL
MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 09.11 | www.designmena.com 60
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The base features a water garden
reecting the tower and sky, a step
garden allowing access to a pavilion
roof, and a social piazza. These
green spaces temper the insistent
vertical stacking and hermetic
environments so often found in high-
rise design, adds Kaplan.
THE DETAILS
Three groupings of two-storey-
high sky gardens are placed at key
exposures. As well as acting as a
thermal bufer between the exterior
and interior, the gardens provide
access to fresh air and ofer a break
area for of ce workers. A larger
exterior garden crowns
the tower and contains a
wood conference pod.
Other green measures
include heat recovery
via heat exchanging
wheels, blackwater treat-
ment, low-ow xtures and
the use of recycled materials.
THE CONCEPT
The design is said to be guided
by a combination of cultural
responses and sustainable innova-
tion. The chiseled massing takes
cues from Ottoman geometric
motifs and local landforms while
also adhering to the municipal
envelope restrictions.
The tower is rotated 33 degrees
for optimum solar control as de-
termined through isolation model-
ing. A stippled golden scrim, var-
ied in density according to solar
orientation, further reduces heat
load. These measures validate the
use of oor-to-ceiling glass.
185
METRES
EXPECTED HEIGHT OF
THE RENAISSANCE
TOWER
www.lightME.net
The Middle Easts Premier Conference and Exhibition
for Lighting Design and Technology
12 14 September, 2011
Dubai International Convention and Exhibition Centre, UAE
Whats unique about Light Middle East?
One of the 6 global exhibitions in the portfolio of Light+Building Exhibitions.
The only dedicated lighting platform in the region.
Attended by architects, lighting designers, specifiers and other industry
professionals from across the GCC.
Over 200 exhibitors from 20 countries will be a part of the 2011 show.
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Pre-register online at www.lightME.net/visit
Enter VP Code LTAD060 when registering online
62

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SOWWAH
SQUARE
Architect:
Goettsch
Partners
Location:
Abu Dhabi
Pitching for LEED Silver status,
Sowwah Square will provide the
new headquarters for the Abu Dhabi
Securities Exchange and comprises
four of ce towers overlooking
water. The complex contains over
290,000m
2
of of ce space and in-
tegrates two levels of retail and two
parking structures. The centerpiece
of the developments rst phase is
the business centre, which includes a
22,670m
2
stock exchange building.
TRA
HEADQUARTERS
Architect:
HDR
Location:
Dubai
In December 2007, the UAEs
Telecommunications Regulatory
Authority (TRA) commissioned ar-
chitect HDR to design its headquar-
ters for both Abu Dhabi and Dubai.
The Dubai project is located in a
neighbourhood of low rise residential
and cultural buildings and is looking
to attain LEED Silver Rating. The
facility will be of cially opened in
October 2011 while the Abu Dhabi
project will be completed next year.
AL FATTAN
HOUSE
Architect:
DSA Architects
International
Location:
Dubai
Al Fattan House is the third building
by developer Al Fattan Properties in
Dubai Marina. The client wanted to
complement the existing Al Fattan
residential and hotel towers develop-
ment with a commercial building
and chose architects DSA to design
the scheme. The striking project is a
prominent landmark, despite being
dwarfed by the glassy Al Fattan
towers and the soaring concrete
cityscape of Dubai Marina.
THE
WORK
PROJECT UPDATE
290,000
METRES
2
TOTAL AREA OF
OFFICE SPACE
31,000
METRES
2
TOTAL FLOOR AREA
OF THE COMPLEX
MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 09.11 | www.designmena.com
22 - 25 October 2011 | Halls 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, Rashid Hall and Maktoum Hall | Dubai World Trade Centre, UAE
Opening Hours: 11:00 19:00 daily. No children under 18 years of age permitted to the exhibition.
WHERE INSPIRATION THRIVES
www. i ndexexhi bi ti on. com
it just takes a special eye to see it.
THIS IS A CHANDELIER
The most innovative design starts with a designers vision.
Visitors to INDEX understand that great design is much more than
simply assembling, arranging or editing, it is something that is felt!

Showcasing products and services that range from traditional to
quirky, opulent to minimalist, INDEX provides all the creativity and
inspiration you need for your next design project.

To nd out more and to register online, visit:
www.indexexhibition.com/attend
Scan the QR code
and become part of
the INDEX evolution
MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 09.11 | www.designmena.com 64

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DOHA STADIUM
Architect:
Aedas/Populous
Location:
Doha
A design collaboration between
Aedas and Populous, this stadium
addresses the requirements for
the 2022 World Cup and provides
multiple future uses. As a World
Cup venue, the fully air-conditioned
stadium will provide 46,000 seats
with state-of-the-art broadcast
and media facilities, luxurious VIP
areas and a retractable roof. The
exible design will allow the pitch
and areas of seating to be moveable.
WADI RESORT
Architect:
Oppenheim
Architecture +
Design
Location:
Wadi Rum,
Jordan
Taking cues from nearby Petra, the
ambitious Wadi Resort in Jordan
will feature 47 desert lodges and
villas carved into sandstone clifs.
Designed by USA-based Oppenheim
Architecture + Design, the resort
is set to open in 2014. It will cover
almost 7500m
2
in Wadi Rum, a
spectacular valley cut into sandstone
and granite. The rock will create the
exterior facade and also parts of the
interior and furniture.
MUSEUM
OF BUILT
ENVIRONMENT
Architect:
FXFowle
Location:
King Abdullah
Financial
District,
Saudi Arabia
One of the stand-out buildings in the
King Abdullah Financial District,
the glistening Museum of Built Envi-
ronment has been designed by New
York-based rm FXFowle. Due to
the fast-track construction schedule,
the architects are currently working
on detailed design, while site excava-
tion is underway and completion
is slated for November 2012. The
museum will focus on education with
four sub-categories.
METROPOL
PARASOL
Architect:
Jurgen Mayer H.
Location:
Seville, Spain
Proudly holding at least one record
ahead of Dubai, the Metropol
Parasol is the worlds biggest build-
ing to be held together by glue. The
28.5-metre high structure contains
four oors with a market, shops and
a podium for concerts and events.
The basement accommodates Ro-
man ruins while the roof houses a
restaurant, viewing gallery and an
undulating walkway with vistas over
central Seville.
7,432
METRES
2
TOTAL AREA OF
WADI RUM
RESORT
18,000
METRES
2
TOTAL AREA OF
THE PARASOL
21 24 November 2011
Dubai International Exhibition &
Convention Centre
www.thebig5.ae/arc2
Online registration is now open. To register free of charge visit
www.thebig5.ae/arc2 or for more information call +971 4 438 0355.
The Big 5 is the largest showcase of new & unique
construction products in the Middle East where you can:

Source thousands of products ranging from fit-out to heavy construction
Discover the latest global technologies all under one roof
Choose from over 2,500 global suppliers from 75 countries
Compare certied sustainable products from the dedicated Green Zone
Maximize your time onsite via the online interactive oor planner
FIND INSPIRATIONAL
PRODUCTS AT THE BIG 5
MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 09.11 | www.designmena.com 66

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EMIRATES
GOLF CLUB
Architect:
Brewer Smith
Brewer Gulf
Location:
Dubai
This is a revamp of Dubais Emirates
Golf Club by Brewer Smith Brewer
Gulf (BSBG), the rm that originally
designed the facility some 23 years
ago. The club house was designed to
look like a cluster of Bedouin tents,
and has since become one of the most
recognisable icons on the interna-
tional golf circuit. Asset management
rm Wasl, which manage the facility,
wanted BSBG to modernise the club
facility but retain its iconic structure.
THE GEM
Architect:
Henning Larsen
Location:
Riyadh
This project is one of eight that
architecture rm Henning Larsen
has designed at the King Abdullah
Financial District (KAFD). The
Gem consists of three separate
buildings one residential, one of ce
and a multi-purpose podium over-
looking a garden, which is linked to
the green pedestrian thoroughfare of
the district. Designed for client Saudi
Bin Laden, the 33,500m
2
project is
due to be completed in 2013.
BMW BRAND
SHOWROOMS
Architect:
Diar Consult
Location:
Abu Dhabi
Planned in three phases, this
35,000m
2
project involves the
redevelopment of the showrooms
and workshop facilities of the
BMW brand, on its existing site
by the Al Maqta bridge in Abu
Dhabi. Designed by Diar Consult,
phase one was opened at the end
of March 2011 and delivered the
Middle Easts largest Rolls Royce
showroom as well as a Mini
Cooper showroom.
35,000
METRES
2
TOTAL AREA
ONE & ONLY
THE PALM
Architect: DSA
International
Location:
Dubai
This ve star hotel on the furthest
frond of Dubais Palm Jumeirah was
picked up by DSA International in
2006, which opted to change most
of the original design. The hotel was
nally completed in 2010, and has
been operating at 85% capacity since
opening. The project has 100 rooms,
split between individual villas,
mansions and a manor house, and
overlooks the Royal Mirages other
beachfront hotel.
23
YEARS SINCE
ORIGINAL
DESIGN
MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 09.11 | www.designmena.com 68
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LIKE
WANT
NEED
CULTURE
FLOORING
PURE
Desso
Recycling is a key component of
sustainability, and European carpet
manufacturer Desso recycles various
items - including its own tiles and
its competitors products - to create
brand new carpet tiles with a subtle
rib-effect. Items that contain PVC
are not recycled. Pure is available in
various shades of neutral brown, beige
and grey, as well as more vivid colours
such as red, purple and blue.
BOOK
ARCHITECTURAL LIGHTING
Herve Descottes and Cecilia Ramos
This critical text is a conceptual
framework for understanding
the application of lighting in the
built environment. The important
considerations of lighting design are
described with accompanying diagrams,
while six case studies explain how the
principles are applied. Short essays by
architect Steven Holl, artist Sylvain
Dubuisson, and landscape architect
James Corner are also included.
69
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FURNISHING
NESTREST
Dedon
Dedons Nestrest hanging lounger
won the 2011 Good Design Green
Product Award for innovative and
ecologically-minded design concepts.
Created by two of Frances young
talents, Fred Frety and Daniel Pouzet,
Nestrest is a teardrop-shaped hanging
pod made with a special new weave of
super-sized Dedon fibre.
AUTOMATION
MICROMASTER
VDA
VDAs new Micromaster system
guestroom automation helps to lower
a hotels energy consumption and
carbon footprint. The system features a
sculpted touch-control screen - similar
to an iPad - that allows guests to adapt
their lighting and temperature levels for
optimum comfort. It relays real-time
updates, based upon actual occupancy
levels, to the Building Managent System
(BMS) so that the hotel can fine-tune
its energy usage.
APP
SUSTAINABLE ARCHITECTURE
Robert Hotten
Created by Robert Hotten, a
teaching fellow at the University of
Auckland, this app contains hints on
sustainable development processes
and practices. It provides information
about natural buildings, environmental
design and how to follow principles of
environmental, social and economic
sustainability.
www.designmena.com | 09.11 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT
LAST WORD | RICHARD MARSHALL
MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 09.11 | www.designmena.com 72
Richard Marshall, joint CEO of Woods Bagot,
describes the UAEs green credentials
THE LAST WORD
ECO
EMIRATES
Our clients are suddenly becoming a lot more interested
in sustainability. They are actually making sure that projects
will stack up nancially.
Before the crisis it was very much lip service. People were
interested in getting assets they could sell rather than keeping
assets they could manage through the lifecycle of a normal project.
The mentally of the developer was not geared to the performance of
the building in 15 or 30 years time.
I think any government policy will always lag behind
design technology and innovation. While LEED, Estidama,
and the Green Building Council is a step in the right direction, I
dont think it will be enough to drive a diferent way of thinking.
I believe that Estidama hasnt completely considered
the embedded cost on the developer. Until you get a
number of projects going through that system it will be very
dif cult to see if there is any interest from the developer
community, which is already struggling to sell products.
Its often very fundamental things that make the
largest gains. A lot has to do with a buildings orientation.
My experience in Australia and China would suggest
that sustainability is actually driven by the tenants. They
demand a certain specication for what they want to occupy, and
developers have to deliver those specications. I think it can be
led by the government, but ultimately it has to be driven by the
societys wants and needs.
I think the Dubai Metro needs to be expanded to where
people live and work. Its a test programme - it doesnt capture
any major population centres to full a broad sustainability
agenda. In a disaggregated urban fabric that is Dubai, its very
dif cult to get those kinds of ef ciencies.
Cambriog msh
installs unor tnsion
with lgant attachmnts
pr-nginro to minimiz
structural connctions
ano maximiz covrag.
EcIipse" Tensioned
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