Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 1

SOME ASPECTS OF CONNECTED SPEECH

Connected  Speech is an expression used to refer to spoken language when analysed as a continuous sequence, as in utterances and conversations 
spoken at natural speed in everyday situations of life. 
 
ELISION: When a sound is elided it is omitted
1.Elision of /t/ and /d/ When they are at the end of a word (in the last   She wants ten pounds of butter
syllable) and between two other consonants.

2. Elision of identical sounds When a word ending in a consonant sound is  lamp post     six students       lettuce 


followed by another word starting with that  salad   
sound.
3. Elision of similar sounds Similar place of articulation fried chicken
4. Elision of initial sounds in pronouns Weak pronouns I saw him half an hour ago.

ASSIMILATION: This means…
a)… that a sound changes to be more like the following sound.
b)… that two sounds join together to become another sound.
This makes articulation easier. But notice that the change from one consonant sound to another should not interfere seriously with comprehension 
because the resulting sounds are quite similar to the original ones.
a) Anticipatory assimilation of place of articulation
The alveolar consonants /n/ /t/ /d/ /s/ and /z/ can change to become more like the following sound. It is a question of making things easier for the 
speaker. For instance, if you are going to close your lips for /p/, then it is easier to close them for the preceding nasal /n/, so /n/ assimilates into /
m/.
Assimilation of  before bilabial  becomes bilabial Examples
/n/ /m/ Susan played tennis last Monday
/t/ /p/ That boy
/d/   /p/  or /b/  /b/ Third person
  
Assimilation of  before velar  becomes velar Examples
/n/ / / Ten girls
   /k/   or /g/ 
/t/ / k/ That girl
/d/ /g/ Third girl
  
Assimilation of  before  becomes  Examples
palato­alveolar  palato­  alveolar
/s/  / / / / This shop; this chapter; this judge
/ /
/z/ / / Cheese shop; those churches; has she?
/ /

b) Coalescent assimilation
Examples
1. If a word ends in /t/ and the following word begins with /j/, both sounds may coalesce to become / / Can’t you
2. /d/  +  /j/ =  / / Could you
3. /s/  + /j/  =  / / Is this yours?
4. /z/  + /j/  =  / / He’s your brother

ELISION GIVING RISE TO ASSIMILATION
In certain utterances, assimilation takes place because elision has already occurred.
 Example s  : Tim and Patricia; I can’t pay

LIASION   is the insertion of an extra phoneme in order to facilitate articulation.                       
1.  Linking / r/ 
The /r/ sound is heard connecting two words when there is an R in the spelling and there is a following vowel sound.
Examples: Peter and Tom; far away, more ice
2.  Intrusive /r/ 
In many words ending with the written consonant R, the final vowel sound is one of the following: 
/ / teacher, harbour, actor           / / four, door              / / car, far
No doubt, as a result of this, there is a tendency to insert an intrusive / r / when a word ends in one of these vowels, even when no written R  
exists. Many people consider that intrusive / r / is sub­standard, and certainly not to be imitated.
Examples: America and Asia; Asia and America; law and order; vainilla ice­cream; I saw it 

Bibliography:
Gimson, A.C. and Alan Cruttenden. Gimson’s Pronunciation of English.
Humphries, Shellene. Connected Speech. http://www.britishcouncil.org/vietnam­english­selection­of­4th­workshop­papers.htm
Kelly, Gerald. How to Teach Pronunciation. Longman. 2000.
Rhymes and Rhythm.
Roach, Peter. English Phonetics and Phonology. CUP. 1993