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COMMUNITY NEWS, CULTURE, COMMENTARY, COMMERCE u FRIDAY, August 30, 2013 u VOLUME II, ISSUE 49 u FREE

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King Corn Page 3 Kraut Stompin’ - page 10-11
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Kraut Stompin’ - page 10-11

IT’S HARVEST TIME. More and more corn fields are cropping up. Prices are high. Mother Nature has

been mixing up the weather

What does it mean for the farmer?

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PAGE 2

the independent 08.30.13

CORRECTION:

The Blood Drive held in Valley City on Aug. 12, and coordinated by Rose Wendt was sponsored by the AmVets Ladies Auxiliary and not the VFW. This press release ran in the Aug. 23 issue of the INDY. We appreciate your response to our newspaper articles. It lets us know you read your local paper. Contact the INDY at editor@indy-bc.com or submis- sions@indy-bc.com and always find us online at www. indy-bc.com.

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ND 58011 PHONE: 701-633-5317 0729#89 THIS IS VALLEY CITY 2013-2014 V-500 Board of Directors are (back,

2013-2014 V-500 Board of Directors are (back, l-r) John Monilaws, Steve King, Tom Glandt, (middle, l-r) Kara Wiebe, Rhonda Fairfield, Dean Ped- ersen, Tommy Bergan, Katie Sather, (front, l-r) Adele Smith, Loni Trapp, Alison Kasowski and Nicole Swenson. Not pictured: Jenny Enger, Susan Jorissen, Tyler Marthaler, Mary Moore, David and Marie Piper, Ross Pow- ell, Rick Ross and Casey Stoudt Jr.

V-500 kicks off 2013-14 campaign

T he V-500 Board of

Directors met in

August at the historic

VCSU President’s House to kick off the new campaign drive. Last year, V-500 al- located over $250,000 to academic scholarships for incoming Valley City State University students. “The Board of Directors are hard-working volunteers that care about what VCSU has done for them and the community,” said Alison Ka- sowski, Assistant Director of Annual Giving. “We are looking forward to another successful campaign, which promotes strong enroll- ment.” Board members are asked to contact alumni and community members throughout the drive. They also promote fundraising events; VCSU Rendezvous (Oct. 18) and VCSU Schol- arship Auction (April 25). To contribute or to learn more about the campaign, contact a board member or the VCSU Foundation Of- fice at 845-7203.

a board member or the VCSU Foundation Of- fice at 845-7203. Weekly Wednesday Webinar series begins

Weekly Wednesday Webinar series begins

G o back to school this fall and learn something new

every Wednesday with FARRMS Weekly Wednes-

day Webinar Series. Online learning is easy and

fun and available to anyone with a computer and Internet access. FARRMS is offering a semester of classes on local foods, cooking, growing, canning and storing vegetables. Eat local all year long. Buy a single class or buy a pass for the entire semester. All sessions are recorded so if you miss one or need to review it later, it is available to you. Classes are interactive so you can ask questions of the presenters. Cost is $10 per session or $100 for all 16 weeks. Regis

WEBINARS: 19

08.30.13 the independent

PAGE 3

Factors weighing in against a good corn crop for 2013

By Jon Pike For the INDY

W hile North Dakotans may be enjoying the bout of warm weather and the lack of rain here in the waning days of summer, those are conditions

that have area corn growers concerned and anxiously waiting on developments in the weather. While corn may do well in warm weather it is also a very water intensive crop and requires a lot more rain than we are currently getting. The extension agent for Barnes County, Randy Gru- enich, said that farmers that he’s talking to are looking for three things to happen with this year’s corn crop, which got off to a late start to begin with because of the spring weather and the wetness of the ground and the coldness of the temperatures. Those factors that they need to hope for include hot weather, which the corn needs and could be getting with the hot August weather. But, corn is also a water intensive crop and the weather is not helping out the farmers in that regard. “A few places got some rain, but a lot didn’t. The places where it’s the most serious are the place with the lighter soils.” Gruenich added that the farms that have more clay in their soil retained more water and are doing better with their corn crop. Gruenich said that, “We’re seeing some severe damage

in the places with the lighter soil. Some of those places

have little chance of recovery and will see little yields, or no yields.” A lot depends on the type of soil that the indi- vidual farms have.

He said that one thing that did go right this year was that they had favorable weather during pollination. He said that if pol- lination didn’t go well, then there would not be enough kernels in the cobs. But if they get the warm weather that they need along with the rain, then they also need a late frost. So, the corn farmer is the Sheyenne Valley right now

needs a lot of things to go right in order for them to have a good crop. What’s crucial, right now, said Gruenich, is the weight of the corn. U.S. Bushel weight for corn is set at 56 pounds per bushel. Weight is an indicator of the maturity of the corn. If the corn does not get the growing conditions that it needs, then it will be underdeveloped by the time that it needs to be harvested and the farmers can have a good harvest of the corn that will be at its full weight and be ready to ship. Obviously the weight, and thus the matu- rity of the corn crop, has an impact on the value of the

farmer’s crop.

There’s another problem with low weight corn. A lot of North Dakota’s corn goes to the West Coast and from there to the overseas market. The

“If we get fifty, fifty one, fifty pound per bushel corn, then they don’t fill up barges and train cars and the transportation costs go up.”

- Randy Gruenich

problem is, said Gruenich, “If we get fifty, fifty one, fifty pound per bushel corn, then they don’t fill up barges and train cars and the transportation costs go up.” So, increased transportation costs for the overseas and West Coast markets. Gruenich said they can get by with is about 53 pounds per bushel. Right now, there are just a lot of things that have to go right in order for the North Dakota corn crop to be a good one for the farmers this year.

The price of corn could be up this year, generally speaking in the U.S. Much of the country is experiencing many of the same weather conditions that the North Dakota farmers are experiencing. That includes hot weather and below average precipitation s the calendar keeps marching on towards harvest time. That potential shortfall in production is being reflected in higher commodity prices for corn. So, we may end up seeing higher prices for corn as a result of what may go on with this year’s crop.

CORN: 22

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PAGE 4

the independent 08.30.13

COMMUNITY

C ALENDAR

ArTS n CoMMunITY n GrouPS n GoVErnMEnT n SCHooL n MuSIC

What’s Going On around the Area

List your event

We welcome all submis- sions for area events and activities that are free or low-cost and open to the public. Calendar listings in The Independent are provided at no cost as a public service to our read- ers. To have your listing published, use our easy online submissions form at www.indy-bc.com or email a complete descrip- tion well in advance to The Independent’s Cal- endar Editor at: submis- sions@indy-bc.com Include the event’s date, time, place, and other rel- evant information. Please also include a contact name and phone number and/or email address.

DEADLINE:

Calendar listings are due by noon Tuesdays for that Friday’s publication.

Better choices, better health

n Registration closes second session on October 10

Free classes for better health

through better choices are going to be held at Faith Lutheran Church, 1 to 3:30 p.m. beginning Thursday, Oct. 3. for six weeks through Nov.

7.

Are you an adult living with an on- going health problem? You will:

• Get the support you need.

• Find useful ways to deal with pain and fatigue.

• Learn about better nutrition and exercise choices.

• Learn how to talk with your doctor and your family. This will help them learn how to help you better.

• Discover other topics important to your overall health If you have health problems such as:

• Cancer

• Diabetes

• Arthritis

• High Blood Pressure

• Heart Disease

• Chronic Pain

• Anxiety

Any long-term health problems The workshop is six weeks.

Any long-term health problems The workshop is six weeks. • Each weekly session is two and

Each weekly session is two and a half hours and is interactive.

Set your own goals.

Make a step-by-step plan to im- prove your health and your life.

No charge. Registration is required:

call Sanford at toll free 877-234- 4240. Registration will close after the second session on Oct. 10.

Friday, August 30

ENROLLMENT OPEN:

Headstart in Valley City is accepting applications for fall preschool enrollment half day morning and after- noon classes.

FARMERS MARKET:

Tower city Farmers Market will meet at the city park shelter on Wednesdays from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. in August.

MUSEUM: Enderlin Mu- seum - Downtown Ender- lin: Open May through

September - Thursday and Friday from 1 to 4 p.m.; Saturday 9 to noon. Also open by appointment at

701-799-0725.

AA: Alcoholic Anonymous meet every Friday at 5:30 p.m. in the conference

room of Sheyenne Care Center, Valley City.

MUSEUM: From Monday, May 27 through Labor Day, The Midland Continental Railroad Transportation Museum will be open daily from 1 to 4 p.m.

Transportation Museum will be open daily from 1 to 4 p.m. Saturday, August 31 LIBRARY: The

Saturday, August 31

LIBRARY: The Valley City Barnes County Public Li- brary is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Call 845-3821 for more information.

FRESH FOOD FOUND HERE: Rose’s Valley City Saturday Morning Farm- ers Market will begin its season today at 10 a.m. until noon. It will continue to meet at Hinschberger Park, 606 2nd St. NE, every Saturday through the end of October, weather permitting.

POLKA TIME: Old Tyme and Country Music will be featured at the Valley City Eagles Club Aerie 2192 at the Polka Fest Saturday and Sunday.

Everyone is welcome to at- tend with a full bar service during the entire event, baskets and dessert bar both days and full dining from 5 to 9 p.m. Saturday and a Continental Break- fast 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sunday.

AA: Alcoholics Anonymous meets every Saturday at 8 p.m. at Fellowship Corner, 320 Second Ave. S.E. in Valley City. On the last Saturday of each month, the meeting is a speaker meeting - for all to attend, not just alcoholics.

JAMMING: The Whoever Can Come Band will be hosting a semi-bi-weekly Free and Open to All jam session at the Barnes County Museum from 1 to 4 p.m. All are invited to

It is remarkable how closely the history of the apple tree is connected with that of man. - Henry David Thoreau

08.30.13 the independent

PAGE 5

CoMMunITY CALEndAr

come and play along. For more information contact Wes Anderson 701-845-

0966.

Sunday, Sept. 1

MEETING: Sheyenne

Snodrifters meets the first Wednesday of each month at Dito’s in Sanborn. More info: Lynette, 701-646-

6260.

MUSEUM: Litchville Com- munity Museum is open to

visitors now until labor day weekend on Sundays 2 to

4 p.m. and daily by appt.

Call Mavis Strinden 762-

4475; Avis Nelson 762- 4482; or Eugene Olson

762-3694.

Monday, Sept. 2

LABOR DAY

LIBRARY: The Valley City Barnes County Public Li-

brary hours are 10 a.m. to

7 p.m. Call 701-845-3821 for information.

SENIORS: Buffalo Se- nior Citizens meet every Monday at the Community Center, Buffalo, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

MEETING: The Valley City City Commission meets the first and third Mondays of each month at 5 p.m. at city hall.

SENIORS: Litchville Com- munity Center. Morning Coffee Monday through Saturday 8 to 10 a.m. “”Hand and Foot”” (cards) at 7 p.m. Wednesdays.

MUSEUM: Midland Con- tinental Depot Transporta- tion Museum featuring Peggy Lee in Wimbledon, is open daily 1 to 4 p.m. Memorial Day to Labor Day. Open all other times by appointment. For more information or appoint- ment call 701-435-2333. Admission is a freewill

donation.

AA: Alcoholic Anonymous meets every Monday at 8 p.m. at Fellowship Corner, 320 Second Ave. S.E. in Valley City.

SENIORS: Buffalo Se- nior Citizens meet every Monday at the Community Center, Buffalo, from 9 a.m.

to 5 p.m.

LIBRARY: Valley City Barnes County Public Library hours: Mondays: 10 a.m. 7 p.m. open evening.

FARMERS MARKET:

Monday-Thursday Farmers Market from 4 to 6 p.m. Mondays at the Rosebud Parking Lot and Thursday at Shopko.

FRESH FOOD: Lisbon Farmer’s and Artisan’s Mar- ket from 3 to 5:30 p.m. at the parking lot north of the

Super 8 on Main Street.

Tuesday, Sept. 3

LIBRARY: Valley City Barnes County Public

Library is open Tuesday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Call 701- 845-3821 for more infor- mation.

MEETING: The Barnes County Commission meets the first and third Tuesdays of every month at 8 a.m. at the courthouse.

MEETING: The Valley City-Barnes County Public Library Board holds its regular meeting at 5:15

p.m. at the library in Valley City. More info: 701-845-

3821.

ROTARY: Valley City Rotary Club meets every Tuesday at noon at the Val- ley City VFW.

Wednesday, Sept. 4

STORYTIME: Storytime takes place at 10:30 a.m. at the Valley City-Barnes County Public Library. More info: 845-3821.

COURSE: AARP Drivers Safety Course from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Com-

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PAGE 6

the independent 08.30.13

CoMMunITY CALEndAr munity Center, Main Street, Litchville. AARP Members $12, Non members $14. OPEN MIC:
CoMMunITY CALEndAr
munity Center, Main Street,
Litchville. AARP Members
$12, Non members $14.
OPEN MIC: Open Mic-
takes place at Dutton’s
Parlour in downtown Valley
City every Wednesday from
7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Enter-
tainers (music, comedy,
poetry, etc.) and audience
members are welcome. No
cost.
Thursday, Sept. 5
Super 8 on Main Street.
FARMERS MARKET:
Sponsored by Litchville
Community Center, open
to the public. Lunch will be
served. Please call Dianna
Formosa at 701-320-1457
to register. Certificate will
be provided for your car
insurance discount. Most
insurance companies
participate. Peter Farrelly,
instructor.
Monday-Thursday Farmers
Market from 4 to 6 p.m.
Mondays at the Rosebud
Parking Lot and Thursday
at Shopko.
BLOOD DRIVE: CRE
blood drive will be held at
the Marion Community Hall
Oct. 11. Keep this date
open in your calendar. Call
Karen Formo at 701-762-
3695 with any questions.
AA: Alcoholics Anonymous
meets every Wednesday
at noon and 7:30 p.m. at
Fellowship Corner, 320
Second Ave. S.E. in Valley
City. The 7:30 p.m. meet-
ing is a new open speakers
meeting and is open to the
public.
FRESH FOOD: Lisbon
Farmer’s and Artisan’s Mar-
ket from 3 to 5:30 p.m. at
the parking lot north of the
Super 8 on Main Street.
Friday, Sept. 6
KIWANIS: Valley City
Kiwanis Club meets every
Wednesday at 12:04 p.m.
at the Valley City VFW.
CARDS: Play Racehorse
Smear every Wednesday
from 7 p.m. to close at
CM’s Place in Wimbledon.
Prizes: Hams\, bacon\,
turkeys. For people 21+.
QUILTERS: St. Catherine
Quilters makes quilts for
those in need every Thurs-
day from 1 to 4:30 p.m.
and 6:30 to 9 p.m. in the
St. Catherine School gym
basement, Valley City. Any-
one is welcome, no experi-
ence necessary. More info:
THEATRE: Valley City
State University hosts 24
Hour Theatre Extrava-
ganza, at Vangstad. 7 p.m.
Free or donations wel-
come.
BOOK CLUB: The Val-
ley City-Barnes County
Library’s book discussion
club meets at 2 p.m. in
the library’s multipurpose
room. More info: Liz, 701-
Lela Grim, 701-845-4067.
MUSEUM: Enderlin Mu-
seum - Downtown Ender-
lin: Open May through
September - Thursday and
Friday from 1 to 4 p.m.;
Saturday 9 to noon. Also
open by appointment at
MEETING: The Sanborn
City Council meets the first
Wednesday of the month
at 7 p.m. at Sanborn City
Hall.
TOASTMASTERS: Sec-
ond Crossing Toastmasters
is again meeting every
Thursday from 12 - 1 p.m.
in the Norway Room at
the VCSU Student Center.
Visitors are welcome. For
information, call Janet at
701-799-0725.
845-3294.
AA: Alcoholic Anonymous
meet every Friday at 5:30
p.m. in the conference
room of Sheyenne Care
Center, Valley City.
MEETING: The Valley
City Park Board holds its
regular meeting at 7 a.m. at
city hall. More info: 701-
845-2596.
845-3294.
TOPS: Tops Club of Ender-
lin meets every Thursday at
the Senior Center in Ender-
lin. Weigh in from 8:30 to 9
a.m.; meeting at 9.
MUSEUM: From Monday,
May 27 through Labor Day,
The Midland Continental
Railroad Transportation
Museum will be open daily
from 1 to 4 p.m.
Community At Work
STORY HOUR: Lisbon
Public Library Summer
Story Hour Wednesday’s
10 to 11 a.m. Pre-K
through 2nd Grade are
invited to attend.
Online
FRESH FOOD: Lisbon
Farmer’s and Artisan’s Mar-
ket from 3 to 5:30 p.m. at
the parking lot north of the
24/7
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Creation or evolution questions answered

Hope Lutheran Church will host Creation/Evolution, a program by Dr. Ortner and his Wonders of Science seminar. The event begins at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 11 at Enderlin City Hall. Once a staunch evolutionist, Dr. Ortner began to have unanswered questions about some of the things he took for granted from his earlier education. Having begun university studies at 15, he took his professor’s lectures as fact and assumed, as they did, that any difficult areas to explain would be handled with future discoveries. Those questions were not answered adequate- ly! In fact, more often than not there were new questions of even greater significance that had no answers through evolutionist philosophy. Ortner’s research background and relentless curiosity provided the intellectual tools to do careful investigation and ask uncomfortable questions that ultimately led to what he felt was an inescapable, though initially uncom- fortable conclusion. That process took four years. This two hour seminar will look into ten of those ques- tions and propose a reasonable suggestion from a different perspective taking into account the newest discoveries without trying to force fit the observable facts into past in- terpretations, now revised or dismissed by many of today’s evolutionists. The bottom line is, we are left with a created universe with many “fingerprints” left behind, purposely, to chal- lenge our curiosity and direct us to the source. Contact Hope Lutheran Church at 437-3777 or email Pastor Dennis Norby at thenorbys@msn.com for addi- tional information.

Give us your best shot

Send us photos of family, activities, your biggest fish, chil- dren, etc. Of course, we are offering no prizes but you will receive credit for your submissions. Don’t forget weather photos count too.

Send high resolution jpegs to editor@indy-bc.com

Don’t forget to identify the who, what, why, when and where.

0123#311
0123#311

08.30.13 the independent

PAGE 7

Your HEALTH

Tiny ticks can carry Lyme disease

By Theresa Will, R.N. City-County Health District

F or the most part, wood ticks (or American dog ticks) are rela- tively harmless, even though the

mere thought of them causes many of us to start scratching. However, ticks do carry two diseases – Lyme disease and Rocky Mountain spotted fever, both of them relatively rare in our area. Lyme disease is not carried by the American dog tick, the tick with which we are most familiar. It is car- ried by the deer tick, a smaller tick species. The deer ticks that transmit Lyme disease become infected when the tick feeds on infected field mice. People who spend time outdoors in tick-infested environments are at an increased risk of becoming infected.

Most cases have been reported during the months of May through August, but cases have been reported during every month of the year. Lyme disease cases rise during the summer months and often start as a roughly circular reddish rash around or near the site of the tick bite. The rash expands in size over a period of days or weeks. During the rash stage, or occasionally prior to the rash, other symptoms such as fever, head- ache, fatigue, stiff neck, muscle and/ or joint pain may be present. These symptoms may last for several weeks. If left untreated, within a few weeks to months after the rash appears, complications such as meningitis, pa- ralysis of facial muscles or heart prob- lems may occur. Swelling and pain in the large joints may recur over several months or years. Not everyone with

Lyme disease develops the skin rash. The disease is treated with antibiotics taken orally or by injection. Rocky Mountain spotted fever is carried by the American dog tick or other tick species. The disease is spread by the bite of an infected tick or by contamination of the skin with the tick’s body fluids or feces. The ma- jority of cases in the U.S. occur in the southeast and south central regions. In spite of its name, the disease is not common in the mountain states. Children and young adults frequently are most affected. The disease is not spread from person to person, but only by the bite of an infected tick. Certain antibiotics may be effective in treating the disease. If you are in areas where any

YOUR HEALTH: 22

Jamestown College is now University of Jamestown

J amestown College has changed its name to University of Jamestown to better reflect the breadth of its educa- tional offerings at all levels – bachelor’s, master’s, and

doctoral – and to recognize significant growth and change in its 130-year history. “As a private institution known for integrating the liberal arts and the professions, Jamestown is growing and adapting to the new higher education marketplace,” said President Robert S. Badal. With a master’s degree in education now offered fully online, an online RN to BSN program for nurses, as well as the school’s first doctoral program (which is also the first program not based in Jamestown), university status comes at a time when enrollment this fall is expected to be at a five-year high with a 19 percent increase in freshmen over last year and a 6.7 percent increase in overall headcount. The change to University of Jamestown also reflects continued outreach with partners in Africa, China, South Korea and Vietnam, as well as the goal of increasing inter- national student enrollment by five percent. The Board of Trustees voted on the name change this spring after gathering input from stakeholders. Over the past 10 years, more than $24 million has been invested in campus construction and technology projects.

FArM FrESH noW

campus construction and technology projects. FArM FrESH noW Secrets of a seasonal cook A tomato quartet

Secrets of a seasonal cook

A tomato quartet

A world without tomatoes is like a string quartet without violins,” ac- cording to the writer Laurie Colwin. Of course she was talking about backyard garden and farmers’ market tomatoes--all those luscious local tomatoes that provide a bright symphony of flavors. And now is the time to seek out every theme and variation on tomatoes: hybrids, heirlooms, cherry, pear, plum, even the diminutive currant tomatoes. The rainbow names of the heirlooms are enough to set your mouth watering: Sun Gold, Green Zebra, Pink Accordion, Prudens’ Purple, Striped Roman, Purple Calabash, Orange Ox- heart, Black Trifele, Great White, and the ever-popular Brandywines(pink, red, and yellow) - to name just a few.

An Orchestra of Flavors

Tangy, bright, and explosively ripe, an in-season tomato is any cook’s dream. You can do almost anything, or almost nothing, and either way, the result will be

mind-blowingly delicious. To celebrate the season, we propose a tomato trio, starting with a garden-fresh bloody mary, moving on to a big herbed heir- loom tomato salad, and ending with a pizza (or bread) topped with oven- roasted tomatoes.

The Melody of Summer Year Round

And after you slice ‘em, dice ‘em, sauce ‘em, salad ‘em, and slurp ’em down shame- lessly, be sure and put some up for winter. Tomatoes are one of the few vegetables that you can simply wash, cut into chunks, and slip into a zip-lock freezer bag. Nothing could be easier, or more rewarding come winter.

© The Land Connection Foundation The best way to enjoy healthy, seasonal produce is to buy it from your local community farmer. To locate the farmers’ market or CSA nearest you, or visit www.localharvest.org.Farm Fresh Now! is a project of The Land Connection, an educational nonprofit that preserves farmland, trains new farmers, and connects people with great locally-grown foods. This series is made possible with generous support from the Illinois Department of Agriculture.

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PAGE 8

the independent 08.30.13

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norTH dAKoTA ouTdoorS

Flight forecasts pique hunter interest

norTH dAKoTA ouTdoorS Flight forecasts pique hunter interest The number of ducks raised in North Dakota

The number of ducks raised in North Dakota and

heading south this fall will still be above the long-

Along the way, from crow and goose which began in mid-August to the close of turkey season in mid-January, there’ll be no shortage of questions about wildlife popula- tions.

Wildlife surveys For starters, there is a differ- ence between

term average.

H unters aren’t much differ- ent than sports fans when looking forward to upcoming

seasons and learning about expert analysis and predictions. Fall flight forecasts for waterfowl and results from upland game brood surveys will pique the interest of hunters and

wildlife managers alike.

how we try to estimate hu- man and wildlife populations. Every

10 years the United States carries out

a census during which an attempt is

made to count every person in the country. This is not the case with most wildlife surveys. For example, an accurate census or actual count of sharp-tailed grouse in North Dakota is virtually impos-

sible, due to their high numbers, broad range. Besides, it’s probably not necessary to know if we have 500,000 sharptails or 612,576. For effective wildlife manage- ment, however, it is important to know some things about

populations. Instead of an actual count, wildlife surveys typically provide a population index. For instance, the spring mule deer index is mule deer per square mile surveyed. The pheasant brood index is broods per mile of survey route. One fish population index is fish per net hour. An index is a statistically accepted method as long as the survey is similar from year to year. That’s why the spring pheasant crowing count, for example, takes place during the same time frame and along the same routes from year to year. If the routes changed from year to year, and one year surveyors started each route

from year to year, and one year surveyors started each route By Doug Leier ND OUTDOORS:

By

Doug Leier

and one year surveyors started each route By Doug Leier ND OUTDOORS: 20 MuSEuMS WITHouT WALLS

ND OUTDOORS: 20

MuSEuMS WITHouT WALLS

Lost Towns of Barnes County: Olesberg

I n the last column I reported on my visit to Wadeson Park and the Walker Dam area in the company

of Jay Cink, owner and operator of the Duck Inn in Marion. The next destination on our

of the Duck Inn in Marion. The next destination on our By Dennis Stillings history tour

By Dennis

Stillings

in Marion. The next destination on our By Dennis Stillings history tour was the site of

history tour was the site of Olsberg’s Public School. From the dam area we backtracked about a mile and took a left up the hill at the street sign, 51 st St & 119 th Ave SE. Soon the

road entered a lovely canopied glade. After a few hundred yards we came to the site of Olsberg’s

Public School monument just off the

road on the left (46º 39’ 57” N; 97º 57’ 10” W). A fine stone monument, with two engraved metal plaques listing the names of the teachers, school board, and students who worked and studied there, now stands in place of the original building The area is well groomed, with a park bench in excellent condition on which to rest and meditate in the woodland silence. The school build- ing, originally built out of commer- cial lumber, is gone from the site. It was moved to Kathryn in 1904 where

it still stands next to the St. Paul’s

Lutheran parsonage covered in bright

yellow siding. Olsberg’s Public School, District No. 31, Oakville Township, served the community from 1883 to 1904. At first I thought it had been an ordinary country school sitting by itself in an open landscape. Well, it turns out that this wasn’t quite the case After our tour, Jay and I took refreshment at the Sheyenne Saloon, Jay ordering the excellent French fries and a soft drink, while I indulged in the most delicate deep-fried chicken gizzards and a beer. A few days later I revisited the area, stopping in Kathryn to discuss local history with Charlie Olsberg, a rich

MWW: 18

08.30.13 the independent

PAGE 9

our ouTdoorS

It’s hopper time for fisherman too

W hile walking along the

stream near my house,

one thing was clear; this

summer was extremely kind to the grasshoppers. Not only are they an

increased scourge in area gardens and

a valued food source for developing

upland game birds, grasshoppers this time of year are also a prime target

to the fish in all waters, including the small flow now reduced to a trickle by the onset of late summer heat. While grassy-banked trout streams and lazy backwaters are prime areas for using grasshopper-based lures for fishing, just about any water on

a windy day is a perfect place to try

out such an offering. A strong breeze often signals to fish that it is feed- ing time in late summer. Wayward hoppers jump and are carried away

by the gusts, forced to kick their way back to shore along the surface. Oftentimes, it is a long surface swim subject to the rises of hungry

it is a long surface swim subject to the rises of hungry By Nick Simonson fish.

By Nick

Simonson

surface swim subject to the rises of hungry By Nick Simonson fish. On one occasion, I

fish. On one occasion, I watched as cattle patrolled the edge of a small farm pond, caus- ing waves of hoppers to splash down onto the water’s surface. Both bluegills and bass rose with zeal for the easy

meals. Luckily I had a hopper imitator and the fishing was

intense until the last members of the herd wandered on by.

A longtime favorite lure of mine

has been Rebel’s Crickhopper. In a

variety of colors and two sizes, this little gem is a spot-on replica of the real thing and can be fished on light

or medium-light gear with up to six-

pound test line. When cast in a way that makes it smack the surface with a resounding SPLAT, allowed to sit for a bit and

then retrieved in a slow twitching pattern, it mimics a kicking hopper

perfectly. It doesn’t take long and hungry fish are upon it. I’ve caught monster bluegills, smallmouth and largemouth bass with this simple pre- sentation on these dynamic lures. When I made the transition to the long rod, some of the earliest patterns I tied up were those that mimicked grasshoppers. From the deer-hair Madame X to a number of foam hop- per patterns, I stocked several slots in my box with patterns that I knew would trigger bites just like the Crick- hopper. I found that trout reacted to these patterns in a fashion similar to the bluegills on that little pasture pond. Casting them up toward a grassy bank and slapping them on the surface was like ringing a dinner bell. If the fish didn’t rise right away, a few quick strips giving the fly some action in the water often did. There are many materials that make effective hopper flies. Dyed deer hair

OUR OUTDOORS: 21

All good things must come to an end

The World’s End, that is

By Kayley Erlandson for the INDY

T he third and last flavor in the Cornetto Trilogy

(named for the popular English ice cream treat that

makes a cameo in each film) follows the tradition

of picking apart movie genres and adding in comedic elements. 2004’s Shaun of the Dead started the zombie/ comedy trend and Hot Fuzz tackled the buddy-cop and fish-out-of-water formulas. The World’s End examines the otherworldly by incorporating elements from 1960s sci-fi

movies (Invasion of the Body Snatchers).

Stuck in a state of perpetual adolescence and a destruc- tive cycle of drug use, middle-aged Gary King (Simon Pegg) reminisces of the “good old days” when he was

a teenager. Life never was as good as it was on a fateful

summer night in 1990, when Gary and his five best friends attempted an epic pub crawl to 12 establishments in their

hometown of Newton Haven. Alas, this “Golden Mile,” strewn with foaming pints and the carefree abandon of youth, was never completed.

MOVIE REVIEW: 12

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PAGE 10

the independent 08.30.13

P A G E 1 0 the independent 08.30.13 KATHRYN St Paul’s Lutheran Church (701) 796-8261
KATHRYN St Paul’s Lutheran Church (701) 796-8261 11546 52nd St SE BUFFALO Buffalo Lutheran Church
KATHRYN
St Paul’s Lutheran Church
(701) 796-8261
11546 52nd St SE
BUFFALO
Buffalo Lutheran Church
(701) 633-5302
505
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cbrademeyer@gmail.com
St. Thomas Church
(701) 633-5150
PO Box 78
TOWER CITY
St. Paul’s Lutheran Church
(701) 749-2309
401
Broadway St
cbrademeyer@gmail.com
ORISKA
St Bernard Catholic
Church
(701) 845-3713
606
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0320#420
1160 W. Main Valley City, ND 701-845-3786 0422#474
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CHurCH dIrECTorY

LITCHVILLE

First Lutheran Church (701) 762-4297

506

SANBORN

Sacred Heart Catholic Church (701) 646-6306

711

5th St

4th St

First Baptist Church

3511 S. Kathryn Rd.

701-845-4500

First Church of the Nazarene

913 Riverview Drive

701-845-4193

540 Third Ave. NE

701-845-0354

St. Paul’s Evangelical Lutheran Church (WELS)

202 3rd St NW

701-845-0702

Seventh Day Adventist

Trinity Lutheran Church

319 Fourth Ave.

(701) 437-2433

Hope Lutheran Church (AFLC) (meeting in the Enderlin Methodist Church) Sunday School@10 a.m. Worship Service@10 a.m.

MARION

Grace Free Lutheran Church

461

Third Ave. NE

North Marion

(AFLC)

 

701-437-3777

Reformed Church

2351

West Main St.

Sheyenne Care Center Chapel

Email Pastor Norby at

(701) 669-2557

Valley City

979

Central Ave. N.

4430

99th Ave SE, Marion

701-845-2753

701-845-8222

VALLEY CITY

Jehovah’s Witnesses,

Southwest Bible Chapel

NOME St Petri Lutheran Church

All Saints’ Episcopal Church

Valley City Kingdom

826

Fifth St. SW

12505 52nd St SE

516

Central Ave. N

529

Sixth St. SE

701-845-2792

(701) 924-8215

701-845-0819

701-845-1887

 

Calvary Baptist Church

Mercy Hospital Chapel

Trinity Lutheran Church (ELCA) 499 Fourth Ave. NW

LISBON Assembly Of God

(Independent)

570

Chautauqua Blvd.

701-845-3837

1010 Forest St.

2030

West Main St.

701-845-6400

(701) 683-5756

701-845-8774

Valley Baptist Church

New Life Assembly of God

204 5th St. NW

First Baptist Church (ABC)

Congregational United Church

520

Winter Show Rd.

701-845-6950

401

Forest St.

of Christ

701-845-2259

(701) 683-4404

217

Fourth St. NW

ENDERLIN

701-845-1977

Our Savior’s Lutheran

First Lutheran Church

138

Third St. NW

326

Bluff St

Trinity Lutheran Church

Epworth United

701-845-1328

(701) 437-3317

418

5th Ave W.

Methodist Church

Sundays at 9:30 a.m.

(701) 683-5841

680

Eighth Ave. SW

Pentecostal Church

Pastor Frank Dobos.

701-845-0340

214

Fourth Ave. NW

First Methodist Church

United Methodist

701-845-9590

228

5th Ave

(602 Forest St.

Evangelical Free Church

(701) 437-3407

701) 683-4479

1141

Ninth St. SW

River’s Edge Ministry

 

701-845-1649

(Interdenominational)

Jehovah’s Witness

St Aloysius Catholic Church

Faith Lutheran Church

348 E. Main St.

367 Oehlke Ave

102 7th Ave W.

215 Fourth St. NE

701-845-4390

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Redeemer Lutheran Church

803 Forest St.

(701) 683-5347

FINGAL Holy Trinity Catholic Church

419 1st Ave.

(701) 924-8290

LEONARD Bethel Moravian Church 15407 49th St SE (701) 645-2287

Leonard Lutheran Church PO Box 279 (701) 645-2435

St Peter’s Lutheran Church (ELCA) 4713 150th Ave SE (701) 347-4147

FORT RANSOM Standing Rock Lutheran Church,

136 Mill Rd.

(701) 973-2671

To include your church’s weekly worship schedule in this directory and/or update the listed infor- mation, please send an email with complete information to submis- sions@indy-bc.com.

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08.30.13 the independent

PAGE 11

FAITHFuLLY

Who seeks widom?

T he school year has gotten under way and the continuing task of acquiring knowledge has begun afresh for many. It is a wonderful thing

to see such a pursuit. The students might not always be so excited about the prospects and might not even agree with me, but they have a won- derful opportunity before them. They can expend time and energy and learn. What a gift. Some of us look back and remember the days in which our parents had to drag us out of bed to get ready for school and now look back

drag us out of bed to get ready for school and now look back By The

By The Rev. Dennis Norby

ready for school and now look back By The Rev. Dennis Norby with a bit of

with a bit of nostalgia wishing for days we could spend

with a bit of nostalgia wishing for days we could spend FAITHFULLY: 22 Proverbs 1:7 “The
FAITHFULLY: 22

FAITHFULLY: 22

FAITHFULLY: 22

Proverbs 1:7 “The fear of the Lord is the beginning of knowledge; fools despise wis- dom and instruction.” When

the Bible speaks about wisdom and knowledge it says that fearing the Lord is where it begins. The phrase “fear of the Lord” is used at differ-

ent places in Scripture and at the heart of it is the idea of recognizing who God is. The Bible describes God as the creator of all things who continues to sustain and preserve order. The Bible describes God as one who has handed down to us the law which we are to fol- low. Those who have broken this law should fear and tremble at this powerful God because

He has declared those who reject Him will be punished The fear of the Lord is not simply

If your pastor is interested in

writing a column for Faithfully, please email to submissions@

indy-bc.com.

gleaning knowl- edge from teachers and profes- sors who obviously have a grasp on the subject matter.

Others might not have such a rosy picture at all of school days and are glad to be over that time. Fair enough. Even out of that segment most would recognize the value of knowledge and learning. School might not be any- thing that is looked favorably upon but it is valuable and forms a foundation for what we do on a regular basis. And we note that in school we have certain foundational disciplines that are built upon as time progresses. We learn our ABCs before writing essays and we add and subtract before we try algebra.

a trembling in fear at punishment. The fear of the Lord also points to a standing in awe at who God is and what He has done for those who have sinned against Him and His law. We see that the great and mighty God is worthy of fear. We should stand back in awe that Jesus Christ was sent to the cross that we might be redeemed and forgiven. Fear in this way could also be called trust or faith. So with faith in God’s grace and mercy proclaimed in the Bible we go forward into this world. Our faith

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0320#422

Rally Day planned

St. Paul’s Lutheran in Tower City and Buffalo Lutheran in Buffalo will be having their Rally Sunday potluck Sunday, Sept 8, at the Tower City Community Center after church. Services are at 9 a.m. in Buffalo this month for both parishes. September services for both par- ishes will be at St. Paul’s.

Monday/Thursday Farmers Market to serve up kabob samples Monday, Sept. 9

Valley City’s Monday and Thurs- day Farmers Market will feature free samples of grilled vegetable kabobs and chicken kabobs on Monday, Sept. 9 from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. at the Rose- bud Visitor’s Center parking lot. The samples will be served by mem-

bers of the Barnes ON THE MOVE Partnership. Dr. James Buhr, physician at Sanford Health in Valley City will be grilling the free samples. Everyone is encouraged to come out and taste.

THIS IS VALLEY CITY

VCSU recognizes faculty, staff accomplishments

VALLEY CITY VCSU recognizes faculty, staff accomplishments VCSU faculty and staff members who were recently honored

VCSU faculty and staff members who were recently honored for receiving tenure, being promoted, and/or completing a degree include (from left to right): Rachelle Hunt, Gregory Carlson, Jennifer Jenness, and Peder Gjovik. Not pictured are David DeMuth, Jr., and Sheri Okland.

V alley City State University faculty and staff mem- bers who received tenure, were promoted, and/or completed a degree were honored at a recognition

reception with President Steven W. Shirley and Cabinet

members at the President’s House Guest Inn on Aug. 13. The honorees included:

• David Demuth, Jr., Ph.D., professor and executive

director of the Great Plains STEM Center at VCSU, who received tenure

• Jennifer Jenness, M.A./MSLS, who received tenure

and was promoted from assistant to associate professor of communication arts

• Gregory Carlson, director of institutional research and

assessment, who earned a Ph.D. in institutional analysis

from North Dakota State University

• Peder Gjovik, who earned a Ph.D. in occupational and

adult education from North Dakota State University and was promoted from instructor to assistant professor in the department of technology

HONOREES: 22

0123#312
0123#312

PAGE 12

the independent 08.30.13

0710#75

MOVIE REVIEW: from 9

Gary still believes that if he could somehow finish the crawl and reach the 12 th pub, The World’s End, he could find self-actualization. Unwilling to do the pub crawl solo, Gary convinces his high school friends—Real-estate agent, Oliver (Martin Freeman), timid car salesman, Peter (Eddie Marsan, old rival, Steven (Paddy Considine), and former- best friend, Andy (Nick Frost)—to join him in a return trip to their childhood town, down 12 pints, and gain the infamy they always wanted.

MOVIE REVIEW: more 13

gain the infamy they always wanted. MOVIE REVIEW: more 13 Family | Cosmetic | Implant |
gain the infamy they always wanted. MOVIE REVIEW: more 13 Family | Cosmetic | Implant |

Family

|

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Cosmetic

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always wanted. MOVIE REVIEW: more 13 Family | Cosmetic | Implant | Sedation Brian Bulik, DDS

Implant

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DDS 701-845-2180 or 701-845-3708 117 3 St NW Valley City, ND St. Mary’s Church, six miles

St. Mary’s Church, six miles east of Dazey, home to October’s famous sauerkraut supper.

0621#583

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From cabbage to

Story by Katie Oakes Photos by Nancy Bryn

I t all begins with the cabbage. Like Jesus feeding

the 5,000, folks from St. Mary’s Church in Dazey

took the first step of faith in preparation to feed

the multitudes at St. Mary’s Fall Supper in October. This past weekend 360 pounds of cabbage was shredded and stomped for the beginnings of the “famous” homemade kraut served with turkey and

gravy to the a traditiona The pre-d members o families wo become sau like the mir The gentl bring their passed dow

wo become sau like the mir The gentl bring their passed dow Stomping the kraut is

Stomping the kraut is a family affair with Kristi, Clara, Ll and Louis Wieland. The shredded cabbage is bruised a packed using a homemade wooden tool that has a flat h on it, or mostly the crew uses fists and flat hands to pre down. This process removes the water.

08.30.13 the independent

PAGE 13

THIS IS dAZEY

tober kraut dinner at St. Mary’s in Dazey

kraut for St. Mary’s feed

many folks who travel to the church for

l community dinner. inner cabbage stomp draws many of the

f the church and many three-generation

rked together to prepare the cabbage to erkraut – a fermentation process not un- acle of turning water into wine. emen shred the cabbage. Many of them own cabbage cutters that have been n through the family for years. The women then stomp and salt the cabbage. It is put to rest in dark cool places in the days leading up to the day before the an- nual dinner. Then, the cabbage- turned-sour is seasoned and cooked to perfection. Traditions like these don’t come easy. The first recorded St. Mary’s Fall Supper happened in 1949, and except for a brief intermission in 1973 for remod- eling, the supper continues to be a popular event. Jim Wheeland gave insight to the original dinners he attended ever since he could remember.

He said, “We used to have to carry our own water for the washing and for coffee.” A testament to how things have changed over the last 65 years. In the beginning, fried chicken was the main entrée. Chickens had been raised and cooked by the community members and the dinner was more of a potluck for the people who brought their own meals. The idea of gathering the church community socially has slowly built to a fund raiser to keep the parish alive. Sales from the dinner helped pay for a new stage in the church. Cabbage shredders and stompers explained about the varied crowd attending the supper. To-go orders were placed by wives whose husband were out com- bining. During election year the supper becomes a “stomping” ground for hopeful politicians. Muriel Wheeland said, “People who were born and raised here always like to come back.” A new and fun addition to the supper has been themed decora- tions. Instead of doing the expected fall decorations, Barbara Berge said, “Every year we take a different letter from the alphabet for a different theme.” This year’s supper is brought to you by the letter U, and umbrellas will be used to represent that letter. Everyone in the parish has a job on the day of the supper from helping in the kitchen to waiting on

KRAUT: 24

oyd

nd

ead

ss it

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0702#603

MOVIE REVIEW: from 12

The first few drinks prove uneventful, but soon the friends realize that the people in the quiet English town are behaving strangely. They don’t remember Gary’s gang, they sometimes stare creepily as the friends walk on the sidewalk, and their limbs prove removable, revealing a blue, ink-like substance. The townspeople have been replaced by robots (dubbed Blanks by the main characters), but Gary insists that if they finish the Golden Mile like nothing is wrong, they can avoid detection and sidestep getting turned into Blanks themselves. Only eight pints to go….

The writers of The World’s End took a chance when they wrote Gary King as a main character—he’s a thoroughly selfish, unlikable man who is equal parts annoy- ing, smarmy, and charismatic. Simon Pegg pulls off the role marvelously, giving one of his most nuanced performances to date. Gary’s character is tolerable only because he plays off his ensemble flawlessly. The entire cast cranks out wonderful perfor- mances with just the right balance between gratuitously over-the-top and subtle. Although the ensemble is quite large, the characters’ reactions, interactions, and relationships with one another elevate this

MOVIE REVIEW: 20

AUGUST 29, 30, 31 & SEPTEMBER 1 LEEVERS FOOD WILL BE OPEN MON,, SEPT. 2,,
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0826#665

PAGE 14

the independent 08.30.13

VALLEY CITY bArnES CounTY LIbrArY noTES

Ahhh technology, the great time eater

by Steve Hammel

H ello Barnes County. My column is a bit shorter this week. I have spent a

lot of time this week acting as our IT department. We received four refurbished computers from a local engineering company. Normally we don’t accept used computers however since these were designed for com- mercial use and used for computer

aided design they have a lot more power and durability than the average home computer. We needed to make a couple immediate upgrades to staff computers and since it will be several months before we will be (hopefully) receiving money from a state technol- ogy grant I took the gift. Hooking them up and configuring them to the network chewed up a lot of time. It’s part of the job but rather satisfying when I can get things to work like

they should. About a month ago I said we were not making any changes. We do how- ever have to make some adjustments to our circulation policy. Note: I wrote adjustments instead of changes. Yes, it’s semantics but that’s my story and I’m sticking with it. The biggest difference is we are doing away with the week grace period. Patrons and staff found it confusing which is not

LIBRARY: 21

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0827#675

LETTEr To THE EdITor

Reader finds Omdahl column degrading

From Jeanine Altringer, Valley City

I read your article in the “Independent,” a local Valley City paper entitled, “Is the Christian Church Failing It’s Mission No Longer Relying on the Bible.” Your article

was very nasty and degrading towards Christians in gen- eral and their beliefs. How would you possibly know what the majority of Christians feel – impossible? By taking a small Gallup poll? Although you have your opinions, so do I. Who are you to say Christians no longer rely on the Bible. You also said 77 percent of Americans claim to be Christians but basi- cally are hypocrites. There may be 77 percent of people who claim to be Christians but what you said afterwards was very appalling and upsetting to me. You said that Christians found the following to be mor- ally acceptable behavior (in your own words): “homo- sexuality, lesbianism, abortion, divorce, gambling having children out of marriage and having sex between unmar- ried adults and unmarried women having children.” These things do happen but it is still morally unaccept- able according to the church. Some “bad apples” spoil the bushel for all of us such as with the pedophile priests, etc. But it is not just in the Catholic church. Other faiths have had their share of problems too. It doesn’t mean all Catho- lics and Christians are that way. Sounds like you are atheistic in your way with words and you, yourself, lack morality by judging Christians this

way. There is a decline of family structure due to all of the issues stated above. There is a lack of respect and toler- ance of others, lack of traditional marriage values, lack of faith, younger people not going to church and taking their religion seriously and money and greed are also problems with society.

A lot of society’s problems are due to these things. I

don’t believe Christians (in your own words) “need to spend more time correcting their own moral values and less time condemning the rest of society.” If Christians are bringing their views to point on these issues, it is because

of their true moral beliefs against these negative things such as what was discussed earlier. I find it hard to grasp that our government and Con- gress can actually demoralize society by allowing abortion, homosexuality, lesbianism, and revamping traditional

marriage, and other bad things to be legal when our coun- try was founded on the basic principles of God, religion and kind acts towards our brethren. Christians are not (in your own words), “judging those outside the church.” Everyone has their own beliefs but it is not just Christians doing the judging; obviously you have too.

If you can take the time, read Leviticus, Chapter 18, of

the Bible which talks about homosexuality being an

LETTER TO EDITOR: 23

08.30.13 the independent

PAGE 15

oPInIon: rob PorT

The right to refuse service

W e’ve all seen those signs in res- taurants and stores. “We reserve the right to refuse service.”

That statement has interesting implica- tions in light of a state court ruling in New Mexico where judges have found that a photography company broke the state’s human rights laws by refusing to provide services at a gay wedding. Writing in con- currence with the opinion, state Supreme Court Justice

con- currence with the opinion, state Supreme Court Justice By Rob Port Richard C. Bosson wrote

By Rob

Port

with the opinion, state Supreme Court Justice By Rob Port Richard C. Bosson wrote the case

Richard C. Bosson wrote the case “provokes reflec-

tion on what this nation is all about, its promise of fairness, liberty, equality of opportunity, and justice.” In addition, Bosson claimed the case “teaches that at some point in our lives all of us must compromise, if only a little, to accommodate the contrasting values of others. A multicultural, pluralistic society, one of our nation’s strengths, demands no less.” This is a strange thing for a judge to write while upholding a law that, specifi- cally, does not accommodate contrasting views on homosexuality. Under this court’s ruling, individuals and business owners are required to provide others with their labor and/or products even when they might find it immoral. That is most certainly a compromise, though not the sort the judge wrote of. Rather, it is a compromise of our liberty. There are a lot of reasons to refuse ser- vice. Most of us would agree that refusing to serve an unruly or rude customer is ok. Laws actually provide criminal conse- quences for establishments who continue to serve alcohol to people who are inebri- ated. But refusing service to someone because of their skin color? Or religion? Or sexual orientation? Most of us would object to those sort of policies. Here’s the question, though: Regardless of whether or not we agree with the reason for refusing service, should a business or individual be required to provide that service if they don’t want to? If the law mandates that one person use their skills or labor in service of another even in instances where that person re- fuses, is that not a form of slavery? I’m afraid that it is, and I’m worried

what this precedent portends for future le- gal questions. Are banks to be required to give loans even when the borrower doesn’t qualify? Some might argue we’ve done something similar in the areas of student loans and mortgages. This reminds me of comments Senator Rand Paul made during a committee hear- ing regarding some aspect of Obamacare back in 2011. Someone testifying before the committee talked about the supposed “right” to health care. “With regard to the idea whether or not you have a right to health care you have to realize what that implies,” he said. “I am a physician. You have a right to come to my house and conscript me. It means you

believe in slavery. You are going to enslave not only me but the janitor at my hospi- tal, the person who cleans my office, the assistants, the nurses. … You are basically saying you believe in slavery.”

I don’t think anyone has the right to

demand the unwilling services of someone else, even when that unwillingness is born

of attitudes or beliefs we find objection- able.

I would criticize those refusing service

because of reasons like sexual orientation

or skin color. I would deny them my busi- ness, and implore others to do likewise. But use the law to compel their unwilling service?

PORT: 22

oPInIon: oMdAHL

Minnesota Twins end their season early

S ome observations are warranted before the Twins end their season. Actually, I’m a little late because their

season ended in April. As of this writing, they are 19 games behind Detroit in the American League Central Division. At least the attendance is encouraging. Minneapolis and St. Paul put some larger markets to shame. Even in

and St. Paul put some larger markets to shame. Even in By Lloyd Omdahl a losing

By Lloyd

Omdahl

put some larger markets to shame. Even in By Lloyd Omdahl a losing season, fans come

a losing season, fans come out. It must be the new outdoor Target Field.

doesn’t take sides. Now, Dick and Bert claim that the Twins have a great bullpen. Regardless, there is cause for fear after the sixth inning, by which time most of the starters are finished. It makes one wonder if there are any real bulls in the bullpen or its Dick & Bert bull. Bullpen pitchers expect to be pampered. If a bullpen pitcher throws over 12 balls, he puts in a claim for overtime. If they’re on the mound for more than two innings, pity flows all over the broad- cast booth.

It’s like Sioux hockey. The first Engels- tad arena seated 6,000 and it was barely full; the new Englestad seats 12,000. Sud- denly, 6,000 new folks are going to the hockey games. It’s the aura of the event. Too many Twins games were lost this year when they let runners die on the bases. Next year, they

should sign up a mortician or someone qualified give last rites. A fervent prayer wouldn’t help because God

OMDAHL: 21

Jeffrey A. Nathan Dawn J. Mathias (Licensed Directors) 251 Central Ave. S. Valley City, ND
Jeffrey A. Nathan
Dawn J. Mathias
(Licensed Directors)
251 Central Ave. S.
Valley City, ND 58072-3330
oliver-nathanchapel@csicable.net
www.oliver-nathanchapel.com
701-845-2414
0204#341
-Winston Churchill. Send your Opinion Columns or Letters to the Editor via email to editor@indy-bc.com
-Winston Churchill.
Send your
Opinion Columns
or Letters to the Editor
via email to
editor@indy-bc.com or use
our handy online form at
www.indy-bc.com
There is no such thing as public opinion. There is only published opinion. publish yours.
There is no such thing as public opinion.
There is only published opinion.
publish
yours.
be heard.

PAGE 16

the independent 08.30.13

0830

Adoption

fees:

Dogs $75

Cats $50

MEET & GREET ADOPTION CENTER

These lovable animals, available through Sheyenne Valley Friends of Animals, are hoping you’ll give them a happy new home!

All SVFA pets are up-to-date on routine shots, microchipped and spayed or neu- tured, if old enough.

NEWTON

NEWTON 1-yr-old male DSH cat. Newton loves to cuddle! He is very friendly and great with

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CUDDLES

CUDDLES Howard & Carol Oppegard have been caring for this feral, female cat for several weeks.

Howard & Carol Oppegard have been caring for this feral, female cat for several weeks. They believe she was once a house cat as she is friendly and loves attention. If interested, contact the Oppegards at 701-845-1184.

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KIKI

KIKI Kikis is a a female terrier mix, about 1-2 years old, medium size. She is

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MAGGIE

MAGGIE Meet Maggie! Maggie is a Yorkie who was surrendered along with her son Justin. She

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JUSTIN

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LENA

LENA Lena is a six-year-old grey tabby cat in need of a new home. She is

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To inquire about an adoptable pet seen here, contact SVFA (Sheyenne Valley Friends of Animals)

OR GET INVOLVED: 701-840-5047 • SPAY & NEUTER GROUP: 701-840-1334 • Email: info@svfanimals.org

08.30.13 the independent

PAGE 17

GAdFLY

Raymond wonders is America going to pot?

If we examine the history of man adequately, we would

know that he has been getting high, higher, and dead on fermented stuff and weird weeds for several million years. I have always thought the “War on Drugs” was started by elder members of a clan because they had experienced the hallucinatory effects of fermented corn, barley, green leaves, and red poppies. And they realized how much fun it was to get bombed and binged out of their skulls.

Drunk with what? With wine, with poetry, or with virtue, as you please.” When Corky and I lived in Washington during my Marine days we often visited my sister and her husband in Maryland. He worked in a top-secret job in the Pentagon and she was a secretary on Capitol Hill. Every Saturday he got a quart of high-quality local moonshine delivered to his doorstep–just like the milk man and his white quarts– so he could sing some songs in the following week. For some reason he always wanted MORE. He committed sui- cide young—before any of us could discover what MORE he wanted. Lapham: “A War On Drugs Is A War Against Human Nature” Lapham writes our pharmaceutical industries “produce

a cornucopia of prescription drugs–eye-opening, stupefy- ing, mood-swinging, game-changing, anxiety-alleviating,

performance-enhancing–currently at a global market- value of more than $300 billion.” Along with that $300 bil- lion we spend more than $1.5 trillion a year on products that change us–alcohol, cocaine and other drugs, tobacco, coffee, and sugar. These sums prove that even if churches and state and national governments have declared to sup- port the “War on Drugs,”

they have already lost the war against human nature and the stuff we use to modify it. Does chemistry always result in “Better Living?” When we tried Prohibition of alcohol we should have known that Chicago’s Al Capone would make $100

million betting on human nature. I bet Al didn’t even have to read the diary of Frederick Marryat, an 1839 traveler in this country who wrote in his diary about the drinking of the “natives”:

“If you meet, you drink. if you part, you drink; if you close a bargain, you drink; they quarrel in their drink, and they make it up with a drink. They drink because

good thing. We can’t expect a reversal of human nature, which is God’s decree and never can be reversed. Addic- tion is part of our sentence. The victims of alcohol are to be pitied and compassionated, their failings treated as a misfortune, and not as a crime or even as a disgrace.” Doesn’t that fit anything we slop down our throats, stuff up our nose, or swallow because a doctor said it would cure our ills? It’s worth a thought. What would happen if we spent that $1.5 trillion on the conditions of why we slop down booze and light up drugs, desperately looking for that song to sing before we die? We have known what these conditions are for centuries:

poverty, lack of education and opportunity, racial dis- crimination, low wages, income inequality, poor housing, urban sprawl, greed, and a thousand other qualities we tend to ignore. God’s body makes us do it The recognition that all the different wars on drugs and alcohol have failed miserably–after spending $50 billion a year and $1 trillion the last four decades on interdic- tion and punishment–should be painfully apparent. We didn’t discover why pot is so attracted to the human body

GADFLY: 18

why pot is so attracted to the human body GADFLY: 18 By Ed Raymond I’m sure

By Ed

Raymond

is so attracted to the human body GADFLY: 18 By Ed Raymond I’m sure early cave

I’m sure early cave people discovered the rhapsodies of stuff once forgotten and fermented in the back of the cave.

One of my favorite writers, Lewis Lapham, who spent decades gracing and grazing the pages of Harper’s Magazine, summarized booze and drugs beautifully in his 2012 essay “Intoxication.” Fourteen centuries before Jesus Christ intoxicated a wedding crowd by turning jugs of water into wine, Hindu priests in India mumbled their incantations through lips somewhat numbed by “soma.” Soma was probably made from marijuana plants whose magic elixir was distilled through sheep’s wool. Priests said the wise and wisdom-loving plant “makes us see far, makes us richer, better.” Greek philosophers met for discussions at “symposiums,”a word that means “drinking together.”

The Roman politician-philosopher Seneca, around the time that Jesus was doing his wedding bit, recommended that Romans endorse Bacchus, the god of wine, because wine liberated the mind “from its slavery to cares, emanci- pates it, invigorates, and emboldens it for all its undertak- ings.” I will predict the Women’s Christian Temperance Union will never put Budweiser, Jack Daniel’s and Mexican pot and poppy growers out of business

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0819#654

I think the American philosopher Henry David Tho-

reau captured in one sentence the essence of man, driving

the bunghole out of the whiskey, wine, and beer barrel, when he wrote: “Most men lead lives of quiet desperation and go to the grave with the song still in them.” Not only do we want to bury our dark side, we want to burn bright in the sun, we want to accomplish Nirvana and experience earthly paradise.We want to sing. We can’t do it bolt- ing wheels on cars, serving burgers, reconciling account ledgers, or even playing in punk rock bands. We seem to need MORE. And some of us think booze and drugs will get us over the hump.

I

tended bar for two years while working on another

it

is hot; they drink, because

education degree. I have always considered it a very

it

is cold.” Boy, did he have

valuable experience. Worth at least a psychology degree. I served scads of people who wanted MORE. Dr. Samuel Johnson, the old dictionary guy, said he only needed wine when he was alone because he did it “To get rid of myself–

us nailed. Lapham uses Abraham Lincoln’s comments to an Illinois temperance society:

to send myself away.” By the way, he often sent himself “away” when he was in the company of other drinkers. The French poet Baudelaire put it bluntly: “One should always be drunk. That’s the great thing, the only question.

“The injuries inflicted by alcohol don’t follow from the use of a bad thing, but from the abuse of a very

“What we’re doing here will send a giant ripple through the universe.” - Steve Jobs

PAGE 18

the independent 08.30.13

0729#642

GADFLY: from 17

until 1988–thousands of years after boobus erectus first

started to use “soma” to stay blissfully horizontal. Pay at- tention now. This is a science lesson on the chemistry of marijuana. Our bodies create cannabinoids on demand if we get too stressed about stuff. Cannabinoids protect the brain’s nerve cells. Our bodies also have cannabinoid receptors, ready to accept outside cannabinoids. Pot is loaded with cannabinoids. That’s what “cannabis” is all about. When we get nervous and stressed the body seeks out addi- tional cannabinoids. Alcohol somewhat serves the same purpose. Nerves and stress call for “one more for the road”

or “give me a double.”

plants can easily be “recepted” by the human cannabinoid system. End of lesson. The risk with most drugs (such as Oxycontin) is respira- tory or cardiovascular failure. Don’t sweat pot. The lethal dose for marijuana is 40,000 times greater than the pot

But cannabinoids from marijuana

that makes you mildly euphoric. The messages in Aldous Huxley’s 1932 novel “Brave New World” reflect reality If interested in the history and future of man and the use of cannabis-pot-weed-marijuana one would ben- efit greatly from reading about the use of “soma” before the discovery of the cannabinoid system 56 years later. Through quotes from the novel Huxley reveals the value of “soma-pot”:

“(Pot has) all the advantages of Christianity and alcohol; none of their defects.” *** “There is always some delicious soma, half a gramme for a half-holiday, a gramme for a weekend; two grammes for a trip to the gorgeous East, three of a dark ”

eternity on the moon *** “By this time the soma had begun to work. Eyes shone, cheeks were flushed, the inner light of universal

MORE GADFLY: 20

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Publisher’s Notice All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise ``any preference, limita- tion or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limita- tion or discrimination.’’Familial status includes chil- dren under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real es- tate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal op- portunity basis. To complain of discrimination, call North Dakota Fair Housing Council Toll-free 1-888- 265- 0907. HUD Toll free 1-800-669-9777. The toll -free telephone number for the hearing impaired is

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MWW: from 8

source of information on the subject. In the course of

our conversation he mentioned that there had, in fact, been a small pioneer settlement in the area of Olsberg’s Public School (the

first “e” in Olesberg had been dropped). In addition, he mentioned the ex- istence of another stone monument in the area, but was unable to give me the exact location or tell me what it was about. I checked in Wick’s North Da- kota Place Names

Olsberg’s Public School build- ing as it is today.

and, sure enough, Olesberg, N.D. was listed as a “farm post office” located two miles southeast of Kathryn. This would

be right about where the school monument was located. The Olesberg post office was established February 8, 1882. The postmaster was Ever O. Olesberg, who arrived in the area from Norway in 1878. The post office closed September 25, 1885, with mail going to Daily. My remaining task was to find the mystery monument to which Charlie Olsberg had referred. This turned out to be fairly difficult. I had already done a cursory search of the area in question and had found nothing. I returned again the next day and knocked on the door of Neil Tangen’s farm residence. Neil was home so we sat and talked for some time about the area and the people who had been there. The subject of the mystery monu- ment came up, and he gave me general directions as to its location. I still could not find it. Having put this much time into the search, I was not about to give up. I returned to the farmhouse and reported my failure. Neil Tangen’s daughter, Deborah Tangen, was there this time. She was confident about finding the monu- ment and was willing to go along with me on the search. It was a rough, winding, uphill road to the point near the top where we had to get out and hike. We trudged

through dense woods full of deadfall, heavy undergrowth and low overhanging dead limbs. After a couple of wrong turns we both sighted the monument near the top of the steep hillside. A hillside was the logical location, since the monument stood in the middle of the crumbled founda- tion of an old hillside granary and had been constructed from its foundation stones. The monument was well built and had two metal plaques mounted on it. The one on the front read: erect- ed and dedicated to ever o. olesberg/1848 - 1923/ june 25, 1933. On the north side of the monument was another metal plaque reading: ever o. olesberg home- steaded this/farm april 1878. he constructed his/ first house, built of logs [illegible] rods/east, 109[?] rods north from this/monument. he built his first gran-/ary 1879. the building was made of/

rock and [_on

this monument are from/this granary personally placed/in monument by his youngest son/albert h. [and?] evert o. olesberg. born/norway, june 25, 1848. he came/to america 1866. (Words in brackets are illegible or best guesses.)

1866. (Words in brackets are illegible or best guesses.) Dennis Stillings Photograph ] [t]his site. the

Dennis Stillings Photograph

] [t]his site. the rocks/used in

CLASSIFIEDS WORK, SO WORK YOUR CLASSIFIEDS

08.30.13 the independent

PAGE 19

dId You KnoW?

Box car and engine collide

A look back at early area history as

found in the archives of the Ender-

lin Historical Society and Museum.

Museum website: www.enderlinmuseum. org

This week we will look at a couple of short articles found in the December 31, 1914 issue of The Enderlin Independent. ************ BOX CAR AND ENGINE COLLIDE

------------

Tuesday morning as the switch en- gine was working in the local yards with Engineer John Douglas and Fireman A. P. Murphy in the cab, they met with an acci- dent that caused painful injuries to the lat- ter. They were backing the engine and, on looking back, Mr. Murphy saw that they would strike the corner of a box car which had been shunted onto another track. He had just time to yell “dynamite” when they struck. The collision tore the fireman’s side of the cab off and a rod from the top of the cab struck the fireman on the top of the head making an ugly wound that will lay him up for a few days. He was taken to Strong’s hospital, where it was found necessary to take several stitches to close up the cut. Mr. Murphy is

fortunate that the hurt was no more seri- ous. It might easily have been worse. ****************** A PAIR OF BLOOD HOUNDS

----------------

****************** A PAIR OF BLOOD HOUNDS ---------------- By Susan Schlecht Chief of Police Crockett is the

By Susan

Schlecht

A PAIR OF BLOOD HOUNDS ---------------- By Susan Schlecht Chief of Police Crockett is the proudest

Chief of Police Crockett is the proudest man in town. He has just received as a present from Sheriff Dwire a fine pair of blood hounds and says he would like to see any malefactor get away from him now. Contrary to the gener-

ally accepted idea of these animals, they are friendly and pleasant and while they will follow the trail of a human being of which they have a scent for days and days, yet they would not harm their quarry when found. ****

Sue’s Comments:

There are lots of in-

teresting tidbits of information in these two articles. First, where was Strong’s hospital and was that the name of a doctor in Ender- lin? We have found information on several different hospitals in town but this is the first time I recall learning of a Strong’s

DID YOU KNOW: 22

WEBINARS: from 2

tration is simple. Find the registration links at www. farrms.org . Don’t forget to listen to podcasts explain- ing what you will learn each session at www.far - rmsnews.com. Sessions are taught by experts in their fields and include:

Local foods 101 (four weeks) Sept. 4 – The actual cost of food with Annie Carl- son. Sept. 11 – How can I afford locally grown food with Annie Carlson. Sept. 18 – Shopping in season with Sue B. Balcom. Sept. 25 – Reading labels so you know what you eat with Annie Carlson. Local foods and your community (four weeks)

Oct. 2 – Social media and your community message with Katie Pinke. Oct. 9 – Starting a com- munity garden – now’s the time to begin with Sue Balcom. Oct. 16 – Farm to School in your commu- nity – FOOD DAY, Farm to School Month with Sue Balcom. Oct. 23 – Starting a farm- ers market in your commu- nity with Lori Martin. Local Foods All Year Long – how consumers “can can, freeze, dry and cook with local foods all year long (four weeks) Oct. 30 – Root cellaring – apples, pumpkins, potatoes, carrots and onions and what to use them for – TBA. Nov. 6 – Roasted vegeta-

ble recipes and techniques with Lori Martin. Nov. 13 – Freezing gardens bounty with Sue Balcom. Nov. 20 – Hot Water Bath canning for beginners – Jams and Jellies with Annie Carlson. We Grow Farmers Nov. 27 – Biodynamics – what? with Steve Dahlberg. Dec. 4 – Selecting seed for market gardens with Brian McGinness. Dec. 11 – Raising and selling eggs with Annie Carlson. Dec. 18 – Growing your own transplants with Sue Balcom. For more information or questions, call 701- 486-3569 or email info@ farrms.org. We Grow Farmers.

VIEW FroM THE STAGE

No sick days for musicians

W e are all familiar with the saying “the show must go on”; however when you are a working musi-

cian that phrase takes on a whole new meaning. In our business if you don’t play then you don’t get paid. Unfortunately there are no sick days. It’s not like you can call up a bride and groom whose wedding you are playing and tell

them, I’m really not feeling well today, let’s reschedule your wedding for tomorrow or call up a club owner or a concert promoter and tell them that you won’t be coming into work that night. It is not so bad if you play in a band. One can try to find a last minute replace- ment but that also depends on your role in the band as it is much easier to sub out the drummer at the last minute then the lead singer. When I play my solo gigs there are no subs to call. I have to be there. I have played sick on a number of occasions but I can’t recall ever cancel-

ling out of a gig at the last minute. I remember one time I was sick with a very bad cold. I was achy all over and could barely talk let alone sing. We had a wed- ding booked for a family friend and I so wanted to be able to do my best. That is how things go sometimes though. Fortunately we had a five-piece band and

even though I was the main singer everyone else in the band sang as well so we were able to cover my vocal

parts. I’ll never forget how slowly the four hours went though. The music just pounded through my head.

I was able to play my guitar

but I was just so miserable. Those four hours felt like ten. Needless to say the show went on and even more important, I got paid. Another time I had a solo gig on a Sat-

urday night. I had been battling a cold all week but was managing to get through my gigs. On Saturday though I just felt awful but didn’t want to cancel out of the club I was playing as I knew the place would be packed and all the other musicians that

I knew that could cover the gig for me

would be working anyway so I decided

cover the gig for me would be working anyway so I decided By Josheph DeMasi VIEW:

By Josheph

DeMasi

me would be working anyway so I decided By Josheph DeMasi VIEW: 22 YOUR EQUIPMENT RENTAL

VIEW: 22

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PAGE 20

the independent 08.30.13

ND OUTDOORS: from 8

at sunrise and the next year they all started their routes at noon, the results would not be comparable. Conducting surveys and compiling their related indexes is a science, but that doesn’t mean that all hunters will experience season results that are in line with survey results. After all the numbers are crunched, wildlife populations still may vary depend- ing on locale and species. Take the spring crowing counts for pheasants. The statewide index, which includes the average of all survey routes, decreased 11percent from 2012. That doesn’t mean pheasant hunters will shoot 11 percent fewer roosters this fall. Game and Fish’s summer brood survey that looks at upland game production is still in progress through August so those results are not yet known. Remember that any statewide index is an average. The big picture will also contain many other small areas where local weather conditions or habitat changes will yield a bird population – some lower, some higher – that is not in line with statewide

predictions.

Waterfowl projections Based on statistics from the Game and Fish Department’s recently completed summer duck brood survey, plus results from the spring breeding duck survey, North Dakota biologists estimate a sig- nificantly lower fall flight from the state in 2013, but the number of ducks raised in North Dakota and heading south this fall will still be above the long-term average. There may be other ducks nesting else- where that will migrate through North Da- kota, to make up for fewer birds produced in North Dakota this year. Biological surveys give us a pretty good idea of what to expect, and overall, North Dakota hunters can look forward to a good fall. But individual success, as always, de- pends on when and where and the amount of effort invested. The only way to find out is to take to the field in the coming months, and for most of us, that’s a sure thing. Leier is a biologist for the Game and Fish Department. He can be reached by email:

Send your letters to the editor at editor@indy-bc.com

Be sure and include your name, address and phone number, the INDY will not publish unsigned letters.

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GADFLY: from 18

benevolence broke out on every face in happy, friendly smiles. Even Bernard (a native) felt himself a little melted.” *** “Soma may make you lose a few years in time, the doctor went on. But think of the immeasurable durations it can give you out of time. Every soma-holiday is a bit of what our ancestors used to call eternity.” By the way, the U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that last year there were 37,000 deaths due to the use of alcohol alone. Death in acci- dents caused by alcohol were not counted in that total. The CDC also reported there was not one fatal death due to marijuana overdose–and they do not even keep a cat- egory of deaths in accidents where pot is present. Some tentative research indicates that pot users even leave larger intervals between autos on highways. Interesting. A pot of gold is still worth more than a pot of pot Gold is selling for $1704 a troy ounce today. Pot, depending upon THC qual- ity, drug cartel killings in Mexico, tunnels between border cities, rain, and a hundred other factors, sells for about $200 to $800 an ounce on average. The profits in the drug business may even equal hedge fund profits on Wall Street. Producers will do anything, regardless of costs, to deliver a good product. Pot plants growing in a southside Chicago building lot were esti- mated to be worth $5,443,000 by the Drug

Enforcement Administration. Drugs are transported to the U.S. by ship, submarine, boat, airplane, helicopter, auto, truck, rail, through tunnels, and on the backs or in the rectums of “immi- grants.” Special auto transporters designed to allow autos to drive over 16ft. border fences have been used. The latest transport device? Marijuana cannons powered by car engines and compressed air now fire shells containing up to 30 pounds of pot over 500 feet across the border. That’s up to $384,000 a shot! There’s a pile of illegal money to be made in drugs. Mexico is now in the armored car business, primarily sold to protect drug cartel executives, dealers, and the ones who have gotten rich from the drug trade. Fifty armored car com- panies employing over 5,000 now make 3,000 cars a year, roughly selling for a total of $135 million. It costs about $35,000 to armor an assembly-line car.

How do you stop people from inhaling, shooting up, and swallowing pills, booze and other junk? Education. Education. Education. Do you want to use meth after seeing a thou- sand pictures of rotting teeth, falling hair, and people who look like anorexic vam- pires? The arms with enough needle holes that would make people believe you have the measles? The people trying to breath after overdosing on Oxycontin? Nearly 48,000 women die each year from

MORE GADFLY: 21

MOVIE: from 13

movie above merely being a “spoof ” film. If I had to pick something I dislike about the movie, it would be the fight sequences between the humans and the Blanks, which exhibited a frantic energy but dragged out just a little too long for my taste. The World’s End can work as a stand- alone film, but I thought that my experi- ence would have been diminished if I had not seen the first two movies in the very loosely tied Cornetto Trilogy. It is a tril- ogy in a sense that each film builds on the experience instead of extending a specific

storyline. The humor in The World’s End is not for everyone and some of the ways the filmmakers choose to execute the story may seem strange or off-putting to those uninitiated to director Edgar Wright’s style. As with the previous Cornetto mov- ies, The World’s End does something Hollywood finds difficulty in: it offers an original script with interesting characters that had me in stitches throughout. It’s a consistently funny film with sharp, quickly spouted dialogue. For fans of Shaun of the Dead and Hot Fuzz, this wonderfully weird finale is a must-see.

and Hot Fuzz, this wonderfully weird finale is a must-see. Send your good news photos and

Send your good news photos and stories to:

editor@indy-bc.com This is your newspaper.

08.30.13 the independent

PAGE 21

OMDAHL: from 15

When I played American Legion base- ball, the pitcher stayed in for the whole game. There was no bullpen. There was no pitch count. Of course, the batters were usually swinging at everything that came

close to the plate so the count for a 7-in- ning game never got over 40.

A major problem for the Twins is the

revolving door. Except for Joe Mauer and

Justin Morneau, the whole team changes

every season. So it’s new faces and Ruth keeps asking: “Is he on our side or theirs?” Sometimes, we’re not sure. Neither is Man- ager Gardy. They keep giving away their best players. Look at Torii Hunter, for instance. Where

is Torii today? He’s playing with the Detroit

Tigers at the top of the Central Division.

He can hardly see the Twins way down there in the cellar. Every player they’ve traded is a star on some other team. The real question is whether manage- ment is in the baseball business or in human trafficking. When they get a good

offer, they trade their stars for cash plus three minor league players in 2015. Mauer, a home town St. Paul guy, will be put to the test when the Yankees offer him double his present salary – like maybe $45 million as compared to his present salary of $23 million. He’s got a perfect excuse for leaving - a wife and two kids to feed. Nobody plays for community pride. Not only is the head office ruthless in their trading but the players also dash off at the first offer of more bucks. It’s the folks in the bleachers who are the victims of this sport. Looking at next year, maybe manage- ment will find it profitable to put Gardy on first, Joe Vavra on second, Ron Coomer on third and Rick Anderson on the mound. By the end of the season, they may be 80 games behind the division leader but it doesn’t make any difference whether you are 80 games or 18 games out of first. You are out of the game in either case. Everybody would feel better if they passed that bucket of bubble gum around to the fans.

LIBRARY: from 14

a good way of going about things. Instead

we are going to a system similar to other libraries across the county. I think the new setup will be much easier for patrons to remember. The new policy is as follows:

Most items check out for 4 weeks with 20 item checkout limit. New books, bestsellers, and periodicals

will continue to checkout for 2 weeks. There is a 5 item limit for new books and bestsellers and a 10 item limit for periodi- cals. You still will not be allowed to check- out the most recent issue of a magazine. Late items are $ .10 per day with a maxi- mum fine per item of $2.00. You can renew all the above items one time. DVDs checkout for 7 days. No renewals. Limit of 3 items. Late DVDs are a $1 per day with a maxi- mum fine per item of $5.00. Reference books circulate with staff permission on a 3 day checkout. Late fees are $5 per day with a maximum fine per item of $25. The simple summary: DVD’s checkout for 1 week. New books, best sellers, and magazines checkout for 2 weeks. Every- thing else; including children’s, young adult, and audio books, checkout for 4 weeks. Most importantly, if you bring things back on time you never have to worry about the fines. I hope you will agree that this is much easier to remember.

If you have any questions about the

future of the library, or ideas for programs please feel free to call or stop in and talk with me. My door is always open, unless

it’s closed.

Items to note:

Staff has been continued busily weeding our collection. Consequently we have a lot of surplus books. Children’s staff has also started working on their collection and we have quite a few children’s books available for sale. We are continuing our fill a bag for a buck book sale. Fill up a grocery bag with as much as you can cram into it, give the staff a buck and add the new additions to your personal library. Check out our new catalog interface. You can reach it from the library’s home page

it online, renew items online, and more.

We have also added links to some of our online resources on the catalog page. Next time you come in please ask staff to check your email address, and if you text give them your cell phone number. This is

a great way to contact you about reserve

items and overdues. The library has an official Facebook page. Simply search for the “Valley City Barnes County Public Library”. You will know you have the right one if it has the library’s picture on it. We have 130 likes and I know there are a lot more people in Barnes County who use Facebook. So if you want all the most up-to-date informa- tion about the goings on at the library, give us a like. I’m going to keep putting this in here until we get 500 likes. Story hour: We will not have any story hours during the month of August. Story hour will resume Wednesday September 4 th at 10:30 AM.

OUR OUTDOORS: from 9

in yellow, or green and tying some in natural beige makes a great base, as does two millimeter foam in the same hopper colors that occur in nature. Using dry fly dubbing as an underbody allows for a contrasting color, or a white belly, better imitating some specimens. Legs can be tied with rubber sili legs, round legs or with knotted pheasant tail fibers. Wings of deer and elk hair and pheasant back feath- ers cap off a number of popular patterns

that simply catch fish this time of year. Take a stroll along any river bank or pond right now and odds are you’ll find a smor- gasbord of grasshoppers for the aquatic

denizens lurking nearby. Flip a cast in be- hind that wave of fast food, and I bet you’ll connect with your target. When there is this much food available and the heat of summer spurs on a feeding frenzy at the water’s edge, you’ll be happy to have some hopper patterns in hand and you’ll jump at

the chance to get on some fast fishing our outdoors.

in

GADFLY: from 20

prescription painkillers. This country has a major drug problem because of ignorance about both legal and illegal drugs. A tril- lion dollars has been wasted on interdic- tion and punishment. Education, rehab, and patches do work. Long mandatory jail sentences for possession of grams of cocaine, pot, and other drugs have ruined millions over lives over the decades of the “War.”

Half of all federal prisoners are serving time for drug offenses. We have arrested 45 million people for drug offenses in the last 40 years. That’s insane. With human nature what it is, New York City citizens spend $1.65 billion on pot alone. Those desires inspired Mexico drug cartels to kill 60,000

Mexicans over the last six years. Pot can be useful. It is a medicine. It can replace alcohol, a much more deadly “feel good” drug. It can save a five-year-old epileptic girl from 300 seizures a week. She now has one a week. It can make life pos- sible for a 75 year-old California woman with painful and debilitating multiple sclerosis. She legally grows her own–in an assisted living facility.

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PAGE 22

the independent 08.30.13

CORN: from 3

Also, other corn farmers around the country are going to have the same issues with low weight corn that the farmers in North Dakota and in the rest of the country are facing with this year’s corn crop. It may be a year that corn farmers would rather forget, except for the fact that they still have to get through it and see what they rest of the year brings. So, the fate of this year’s is dependent on a number of factors. When the late start due to the cold temperatures and dampness pushed the planting back, a drought settled in and that took concern away from the late start. Right now, the corn farmers are waiting for rain and hoping that they had the right type of soil to retain what water the area got. Then, they need a late frost. Even for farmers, that may be a lot to have to wait on.

PORT: from 15

That’s a sin against liberty worse than bigotry. But let’s be clear: Our right to say “no” has been serious- ly eroded. The US Supreme Court has upheld the author- ity of the government to impose punitive taxes through the Obamacare law for saying “no” to health insurance. It seems our government has gone beyond protecting our basic rights, and enforcing what contracts we may make among ourselves, to trying to impose choices on us. And perhaps the most obnoxious aspect of this trend is the defense of it in the name of tolerance. But what’s not being tolerated is our ability to make choices the powers-that-be may not like. That’s intoler- ance, my friends. We have a growing intolerance for choice in America, and it’s making us less free.

LETTER: From 14

“abomination” to God. Think about the biblical town of Sodom and Gomorrah where not one person there was without sin and the town was destroyed because of it. Thereby we get the term of “sodomy” which is a grave sin.

VIEW: from 19

to do my best and muscle through as best I could. I drove the two hours to the gig, played the four hours feeling miserable and sick and made my way home. On the two hour drive back I was so anxious to get home and get back to bed that I was motoring. Needless to say my luck ran out and I got a $150 speeding ticket. I only made $200 for the gig so by the time I paid for the ticket and my gas I was left with about $10 to show for my very painful ordeal. Sometimes it is better to just stay home in bed. One trick I have found when I am a bit under the weather or have to do an early morning gig is to tune my guitar down a half a step or just play things in a lower key so that the high notes aren’t so high. I can also turn my mic volume up and sing easier and let the mic do more of the work. Either way, I still have to sing. All in all I am generally in good health and have man- aged to stay so. I try to get plenty of rest, eat healthy and keep a positive attitude even when I am on the road, which can be a bit of a challenge. I have played with sore legs, arms, fingers and back but losing my voice is the one thing I fear the most because as they say, the show must go on. So until next time, I’ll see you from the stage.

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DID YOU KNOW: from 19

hospital. Moving on to the second article, I find it interesting that they were using blood hounds on the local police department back in 1914! Also, we learn that the Chief of Police was Mr. Crockett. Was this the son of Alvin G. Crockett, the man who, we learned in an article from 1903, died when his shotgun accidently discharged? Or was this a different Crockett? This will require further investigation!

We are still seeking music history items for the Museum music display. We would especially like to obtain photos of local bands and items from past musicals. If you have items which we can scan or copy, please let us know.

0517#39
0517#39

YOUR HEALTH: from 7

species of ticks may be present, the following precautions can reduce the risk of acquiring either of the aforemen- tioned diseases:

Wear a long-sleeved shirt, long pants and high socks with pant cuffs tucked into the socks. Light colored cloth- ing will make ticks easier to find. Walk in the center of mowed trails to avoid brushing up against vegetation. Conduct thorough “tick checks” on yourself, children and/or pets after spending time outdoors. Prompt removal of ticks, even after they have attached, can reduce the chance of disease transmission. Insect repellents containing 0.5 percent permethrin or 20-30 percent DEET have been shown to be effective in repelling ticks. Follow directions on product labels. To remove an attached tick, grasp with tweezers as close as possible to the attachment site, and pull upward and out with a firm and steady pressure. If tweezers are not available, use fingers shielded with tissue paper or rubber gloves. Do not handle ticks with bare hands. Be careful not to squeeze, crush or puncture the body of the tick, because it may contain infectious fluids. After removing the tick, thoroughly disinfect the bite site and wash your hands. Contact a healthcare provider if there is a concern about incomplete tick removal. It is important that a tick be removed as soon as it is discovered.

The YOUR HEALTH column is coordinated by Mercy Hospital. Theresa Will, RN is the director of the City County Health District.

FAITHFULLY: from 11

in Christ is a foundation not that we never use again or that we abandon as if we have moved past it. Faith is continuing trust placed in God who has revealed Himself in the Scriptures. \There is no doubt that I have not learned all I should and I might hazard a guess that you have not either. But my prayer and the call of the Scripture is that we would make our way in this often confusing world placing our faith in Jesus Christ, the Lamb of God who takes away the sins of the world.

HONOREES: from 11

• Sheri Okland, who earned a Ph.D. in education from

North Dakota State University and was promoted from

instructor to assistant professor in the department of edu- cation and graduate studies

• Rachelle Hunt, instructor in the health and physical

education department, who earned an M.Ed. in teaching and technology from VCSU.

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08.30.13 the independent

PAGE 23

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ACROSS

1 . Aladdin’s hang-out

6.

Dear one

9.

Frosh, next year

13. Single-cell protozoan

14. Similar to ostrich but in

Australia

15. Dugout vessel

16. Wealthy one who made for-

tune in Orient

17.

Dashboard acronym

18.

Bring upon oneself

19.

*Eat

pie

21.

*To kick this is to expire

23.

*Busy as a

24.

Female version of #6 Across

in England

25.

Mountain basin

28.

Forbidden fruit, e.g.

30.

Ready to be assembled

35.

*Let it down and relax

37.

Femme fatale

39.

Give a speech

40.

Beige

41.

Often goes with “flowed”

43.

This of a circle equals pi times

r squared

44.

Moved on runners

46.

Length of earth’s orbit

47.

Diagnostic test

48.

Strep throat organ

50.

Bayonet wound

52.

Typographer’s measurement

units

53.

Retained

55.

shot

57.

*Flatter someone, or

one up

60. Croquet hitter

63. Joseph Stalin’s sidekick

or one up 60. Croquet hitter 63. Joseph Stalin’s sidekick 64. *Do you have one in

64.

*Do you have one in the hole?

72. About when one will arrive

66.

Org. symbols

73. Biter in the ring

68.

Admiral’s group

69.

“You’re it” game

DOWN

70.

Grind down

1. Embargo

71.

Happy

2. Asian nurse

3. Asian domesticated ox

4. Mushroom maker

5. Rectangular groove joint

6. Arid

7. Mischief-maker

8. “Dancing with the Stars”

number

9. *It did this like a stone

10.

*Shame on you for fooling me

11.

Sad grimace

12.

Royal Highness

15.

Famous Roman orator

20.

Depart

22.

Strike caller

24.

Most foolish

25.

*Boasters beat this

26.

Mad one

27.

Rice wine

29.

*Don’t throw this out with

bathwater

31.

“-zoic” periods

32.

Travesty

33.

It included Mr. T

34.

*Spill them to reveal a secret

36.

Regrets

38.

Bog deposit

42.

*

queen

45.

Dictator’s order

49.

A Spike

joint

51.

*Bite this to endure an un-

pleasant situation

54.

Blabber

56.

*No guts, no

57.

*Saving device

58.

Carbamide

59.

*Happens to your tongue

when speechless?

60.

Huge or large

61.

The conscious mind, pl.

62.

One of many errands

63.

Roald Dahl’s “The

65.

*Tongue stealer

67.

John McCain, e.g.

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PAGE 24

the independent 08.30.13

KRAUT from 11 NEED SUMMER HELP? WE ARE HERE FOR YOU! tables. Even husbands do
KRAUT from 11
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tables. Even husbands do
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This year’s meal will be
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Just like home, diners are
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the other ingredients in
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