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Robert Mines #J00433763

PH 201 L Honors Lab #10: Simple Harmonic Motion

4/16/13

Introduction: In todays lab, we will attempt to verify the simple harmonic motion equations by comparing the measured and expected angular frequencies, maximum velocity amplitudes, and maximum acceleration amplitudes. Equipment: Plastic ruler (preferably clear) Lab report folder Personal Computer Sonic Motion and Photogate Stand Two 5 kg masses Set of masses Mass Hanger Spring Force Sensor Ring Stand Digital Balance Two Meter sticks Clamp and arm Science Workshop 750

Theory: Simple harmonic motion is any motion experienced by an object under the influence of a restoring force that causes it to oscillate around an equilibrium position. At the equilibrium position, the forces acting on the object are equal to zero, and increasing the displacement from equilibrium increases the restoring force. A simple example of this is a mass attached to a spring with spring constant k and mass m oscillating around the equilibrium with displacement x as depicted below.

Hookes Law states that the restoring force F experienced by a spring is proportional to the displacement from equilibrium: . Additionally, Newtons second law states that the net force experienced by an object is equal to objects acceleration a times its mass, so . However, acceleration can be expressed as the second time derivative of displacement x, so . Next, the angular frequency will be defined as

Robert Mines #J00433763

PH 201 L Honors

4/16/13

, so the second order differential equation can be rewritten as . Using the trial solution, ( ) , the equation can be rewritten as ( ) . According to Eulers formula, ( ) ( ) ( ). After applying initial conditions and using trigonometric identities to simplify the equation, it can be rewritten as ( ) ( ) where x0 is the distance the mass is displaced and represents the amplitude of the oscillations. If we take the derivative of this equation, the velocity of the oscillating system can be represented as ( ) ( ) where the maximum velocity is equal to Finally, if the second derivative of the position function is taken, the acceleration function can be represented as ( ) ( ) where the maximum acceleration is equal to . Last, the period of oscillation is equal to

References: Experiment 10: Simple Harmonic Motion. Physics Experiments for PH 201 and PH 202. 4th ed. University of South Alabama Department of Physics. Mobile, AL: Department of Physics, 2010. 94-100. Print.