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antage

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C O N T E N T S F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 3
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ad antage v February 2013 3
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REGULARS
COVER
This months cover was conceived by new creative agency,
Conversation LAB and illustrated by Olivia Villet. We see Harold,
a hapless businessman who cant see what Durban has to ofer.
Right behind him Durban lies bursting at the seams with business
opportunities. Hes blinded by his entrenched attitudes, which tell
him Durban is a backwater, not ft for serious business
COMMENT
Editor Danette Breitenbach comments on the contentious FNB saga
TALENT
Rising stars in the media and advertising industry
THE LAST WORD
Rob Van Royen recommends one should be wary of anyone that
uses the word, content marketing
08
10
IMBIZO
THE BIG PICTURE
Our world in pictures courtesy Gallo Images
NEWS
Oresti Patricios salutes SA advertising and AdVantage on its 20th birthday.
Magdel Louw takes a look at online website JustPlay. For every business
there is an equally important brand related role, Dion Chang explains why
social marketing is an essential cyber tool. Daniel Schefer asks if your brand
measures up. The territorial nature of trademark protection is discussed by
Andrew Papadopoulos. Odette van den Haar feels its time for business to be
creative. Danette Breitenbach speaks to Thembi Msibi about the important
role the ASA plays ensuring advertising remains honest, truthful and legal
FOTACTIV APP BRINGS OUR FRONT COVERS TO LIFE!
This months front cover heralds the start of an exciting new association between
AdVantage and and its new Fotoactiv app. From now By placing your Apple or Android
smartphone over our front cover youll literally bring this formally static image to life,
courtesy of TLC Unlimited (a division of Primedia Unlimited)
The Fotoactiv app can be downloaded for free from the iTunes Store or Google Play.
It bypasses the need for barcodes, tags or RFID and the Fotoactiv platform is able
to make its surrounding environment fully interactive, including content videos,
animations, interactions and web pages.
For more information, visit www.tlc-media.co.za, www.fotoactiv.co.za,
https://www.facebook.com/TLC.SA or www.twitter.com/TLCinSA.
THINK BIG! MEDIA | MARKETING | ADVERTISING
'YWXSQ
Copyright AdVantage Magazine 2013
EDITOR
Danette Breitenbach
danette.breitenbach@media24.com
PRODUCTION EDITOR
Gill Abrahams
SENIOR JOURNALIST
Magdel Louw
ART DIRECTOR
David Kyslinger
CONTRIBUTORS
Adele Paulsen, Andre Le Roux, Alastair Haarhoff, Daniel
Scheffler, Dion Chang, Dr Antony Michail, Jean-Louis
Acafrao, Kasia Kiell, Mary Papayya, Odette van den
Haar, Pierre van der Hoven, Rob Van Royen, Andrew
Papadopaulos, Craig Page-Lee, Aaron van Schalk

FEATURE WRITERS
Danette Breitenbach, Magdel Fourie
ADVERTISING
ADVERTISING EXECUTIVE
Sherrie Weir
Tel: 082 373 6149
Email: mediasales@iafrica.com
MEDIA24 MAGAZINES BUSINESS
& CUSTOM
GM MEDIA24 MAGAZINES
BUSINESS & CUSTOM
Dev Naidoo
PRODUCTION MANGER
Angela Silver
SUBSCRIPTIONS
SUBSCRIPTIONS MANAGER
Petro van As
Tel: (011) 217 3222
subscriptions@advantagemagazine.co.za
FINANCIAL QUERIES
FINANCIAL LIASON
Samanthia Radcliff
ACCOUNTS MANAGER
Meda Fisher
Tel: (011) 217 3203
meda.fisher@media24.com
FOR ALL EMAIL CONTRIBUTIONS
NEWS
news@advantagemagazine.co.za
ADVERTISING
mediasales@iafrica.com
POSTAL ADDRESS
PO Box 784698, Sandton, 2146
PHYSICAL ADDRESS
Media24 Magazines Business & Custom
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Phone: (011) 217 3210
Fax: 086 271 4275
MEDIA 24
CEO MEDIA24 MAGAZINES John Relihan
CFO MEDIA24 MAGAZINES Raj Lalbahadur
FINANCIAL MANAGER Jameelah Conway

The views expressed in this publication
arent necessarily those of the publisher or
its agents. While every effort has been
made to ensure the accuracy of its con-
tents, neither the editor nor the publisher
can be held responsible for any omissions
or errors. Reproduction in whole or part of
any contents of AdVantage without prior
permission is strictly prohibited.
AdVantage magazine. All rights reserved.
Requests to lift material should be made to
the editor-in-chief.

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www.advantagemagazine.co.za
Printed and Bound by Paarlmedia
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ad antage v February 2013
C O N T E N T S I I F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 3
KZN REPORT
An extensive report on the advertising and media industry in KwaZulu-Natal
Competition among the media of KZN is hectic. Magdel Louw fnds out just
how vibrant the market is
Zulu Cool has taken on a life of its own in KNZ. Magdel Louw tells us all
about it
Danette Breitenbach fnds out why KZN is the place to be
AIRPORT MEDIA
Craig Page-Lee gives his take on airport media. Dave McKenzie talks about
the new innovations BOO! is planning, and Mze Deliwe is optimistic about
airport.tv
TELEVISION REVIEW
Why has SAs digital TV switch-on been delayed yet again? Magdel Louw
fnds out why and takes an in-depth look at the industry as a whole
SKILLS SURVEY
Theres a shortage of young copywriters in SA. Danette Breitenbach
looks into this concerning situation
AGENCY AGENDA
Denford Magora and Graham Warsop chatted to Danette
Breitenbach about the their partnership
Alastair Haarhof discusses the merits of working with a
design specialist
MARKETING MATTERS
Magdel Louw examines audiences and consumer behaviour and
fnds out from Bryan Melmed why big data is so huge these days
MEDIA DIRECTION
Adding value to your
companys bottom line
is so important Adele
Paulsen tells us why
BRAND
DIALOGUE
Andre Le Roux helps
brands to write better
success stories
DIGITAL
DEBATE
Aaron Van Schalk
explains the world of
remarketing
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INDEPTH
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INFOCUS
CONTRIBUTORS
Adele Paulsen is the
executive director at the Public
Relations Institute of Southern
Africa. In 1997 Paulsen
accepted a position at the
PRISA Education and Training
Centre. In 2006 Adele moved over to PRISA where she
has risen through the ranks. Her driving force is her
passion for the industry. Page 27
Oresti Patricios is the CEO of
OrnicoGroup, a supplier of advertising
visual references in SA. He established
Ornico in 1984 with Spero Patricios. He
has an MBA from the Gordon Institute
of Business Science (GIBS) and huge
knowledge and experience, which he
brings to the brand intelligence offered by the OrnicoGroup.
Page 10
Andre Le Roux has worked
in the advertising and branding
Industry for close to 10 years He is
the founder of Mercury 1 Strategic
Consultancy. His passion is brand
intelligence as well as brand identity
development and nding new ways
of helping brands to more effectively engage
with consumers. Page 28
COMMENT
NOT EVEN two months into the year and the
proverbial has already hit the fan. You probably
know what I am going to talk about: the
contentious FNB ads. Actually thats not quite
correct, I thought there was nothing wrong with
the FNB ads and that it addressed an issue in our
society that is extremely pertinent. For me the ads
were in line with the brand and what it stands for.
So what was disturbing about it then? Its just an ad
campaign. The disturbing part was the
reaction of our Government and their
supporters, who branded the ads as a
treacherous attack.
The ANCs spokesman, Jackson Mthembu,
said: The ANC is appalled by the FNB
advertisements in which the ANC, its
leadership and government (are) under
attack on a commercial masqueraded
as youth views.
The ANC Youth League said it was an
obviously lame attempt to recreate an Arab Spring
while the ANC Womens League called them
oensive and politically biased advertisements. The
SACP said it was incensed by the advertisements.
This has to worry you if you are a citizen of this
country. Why did an ad on television garner more
response than the riots and protests that were
occurring at the same time in Zamdela,
Sasolburg? If this is an indication of governments
response to what it perceives as
criticism we are in for a long and
bumpy ride this year.
On a happier note its our 20th
birthday. Thank you for the birthday
wishes we have received so far
heres a taste:
Twitter: @danettefrog44
An ad is just an ad.
Or is it?
6

ad antage v February 2013
A VETERAN AD MAN warned us, You either stay in
Durban and get out of advertising or you stay in advertising
and get out of Durban. So we decided to start an agency
approximately 4 000 miles wide, with a height just shy of
6 000 miles, its just that our operations are centred in
Umhlanga.
Surely that veterans notions of centralisation are redundant with
globalisation and modern communications? Centralisation is
unnecessary and does nothing to improve anybodys quality
of life, anywhere. Why should Durbanites swap their pleasant
quality of life? Albeit one that has earned them a reputation of
having an easy-going attitude that borders on laziness. With
over 320 days of sunshine per year, warm seas and sandy
beaches, KZN attracts 15 million holidaymakers every year.
They seem to have acquired a taste for that easy-going way
of life too.
All this belies the fact that Durban is a commercial hub with an
enterprising vibrancy that attracts, and is home to world-class
business. Dont take our word for it, ask Mr Price, Unilever,
SPAR, Dunlop, aQuell, Trellidor, GAME, Beier, Bata, Rainbow
Chicken, Beaver Canoe, Marriott, Aspen Pharmaceuticals,
Compendium Insurance or The Lion Match Company theyll
all say the same.
Oh, and lets not forget that Durban is home to Africas largest
port, the 9th largest in the world.
And yes, its a city of contrasts! Outside that awesomely
large world-renowned icon, Moses Mabhida stadium,
youll nd small businesses and crafts people selling
their wares at I Heart Market.
So what have we got? A city thats a global player with an
entrepreneurial culture. And a communications capability
that transports our creative director from Brighton, UK
to our ofce just right of the sugarcane elds. And an
attitude that says theres nothing much to KZN apart from
beaches, pleasant climate and slothful oblivion.
In a nutshell, those were our insights to crack our concept
for AdVantages February cover design.
Our rst idea was to have a sketch in which Durban wanted to
keep all its best stuff secret, however Durban with its glorious
beaches made those saucy postcards of Donald McGill an
irresistible reference. We discussed the concept with Olivia
Villet, an illustrator who has a world-wide reputation as a
Childrens Book illustrator. We felt her use of at colour and
strong line would be perfect for a modern take on McGills
work. She agreed.
Finally, we took a little of the sauce out and settled on Harold,
a hapless businessman, who stares at some minnows
in a search for business opportunities in Durban. Behind
him lies a city of opportunity, a thriving beach and a shark
that menacingly approaches Harold. Maybe the shark is
going to take a bite of Harolds rear, maybe he realises
Harold isnt very good at business, on the other hand its
possible that Harold supports the Lions. Whatever! Watch
out Harold!
Strategy: Tamerin Borland, head of Strategy and
Analytics, Conversation LAB
Copy and art Direction: Christian Anstice, creative
director, Conversation LAB
Illustration: Olivia Villet, illustrator, Conversation LAB
For more information, visit www.tlc-media.co.za, www.fotoactiv.
co.za, https://www.facebook.com/TLC.SA or www.twitter.com/
TLCinSA.
COVER DESIGN
THIS MONTHS COVER WAS CONCEPTUALISED AND
DESIGNED BY CONVERSATION LAB
Mabel Mamabolo 011 280 5997
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IMBIZO
20
1993 WAS A YEAR of high tension and drama
for SA. It was two years after FW de Klerk
committed to ending apartheid and creating a
new multi-racial constitution. It was the year after
de Klerk and Mandela were jointly awarded the
Felix Houphouet-Boigny Peace Prize at the Unesco
headquarters in Paris. During a time of hope and
anticipation, the unspeakable happened Chris
Hani, general secretary of the South African
Communist Party, was assassinated taking SA to the
brink of violent insurrection.
The country would be pulled back from a potential
abyss by Mandela, who wisely reacted to the crisis
by saying: Tonight I am reaching out to every
single South African, black and white, from the very
depths of my being. A white man, full of prejudice
and hate, came to our country and committed a
deed so foul that our whole nation now teeters on
the brink of disaster. A white woman, of Afrikaner
origin, risked her life so that we may know, and
bring to justice, this
assassin. The
cold-blooded
murder of Chris Hani
has sent shock waves
throughout the
country and the
world. Now is the
time for all South
Africans to stand
together against
those who, from any
quarter, wish to
destroy what Chris
Hani gave his life for
the freedom of all of us.
A NEW ERA
AdVantage Magazine was born into that era which
was marked by Mandelas generosity and his desire
to unite and grow the country. Trade sanctions that
had been imposed during apartheid were lifted,
and this saw a decline in ination. The advertising
business-to-business magazines rst years were at
the dawn of democracy when the Mandela
government restrained from resorting to economic
populism, and foreign capital was owing into this
country.
In terms of advertising, it was a period where brands
were investing strongly in advertising and in some
cases taking risks to build their brands. Who can
forget the Classic
Continental Rooftop
Ad that had us all at
the edge of our seats
in cinemas? The ad
was shot on the
roof of a building in
downtown
Johannesburg,
Oresti Patricios takes a look back at the dawn
of SAs democracy and the commercials and
advertising people who were a part of our lives
10

ad antage v February 2013
- a salute
By Oresti Patricios
YEARS
2
IMBIZO
and had the city (and
country abuzz). The
ad opens on a shot of
a wheel with a
Continental tyre,
which hurtles into
action as a white
Opel ramps over a
hump, and veers
dangerously close to
the edge of the high
rise. Then skids.
Brakes squeal. But the
vehicle is safe, albeit
millimetres from the
edge, thanks to (you
guessed it) the
Continental tyres.
In 1993 Hunt Lascaris
[now TBWA\Hunt\Lascaris] had been going for 10
years. They were founded under the mantra of
lifes too short to be mediocre by John Hunt and
Reg Lascaris who did their rst client presentation
out of the boot of a Toyota. Their second client was
Nashua that realised the birth of that legendary
Orson Welles payo line: Saving you time, saving
you money, putting you rst. But the voice over
was no Welles, but a local imitator the duo used.
In 1993 a former UK barrister was into his fourth year
as the creative head of a new ad agency called The
Jupiter Drawing Room. That was none other than
Graham Warsop who would go on to become the
most awarded creative director in the history of
local advertising as measured by the number of
Creative Circle creativity points awarded to him.
Warsop went into business with Renee Silverstone
in 1987, and the two subsequently became
advertising legends.
This means that Warsop
celebrates a quarter of
a century in the
industry this year, the
same year that
AdVantage turns 20.
A CAN OF THE BEST
At the time that AdVantage was created, the company
that became known as Ornico was
close on 10 years old. From a
humble start-up situated in
Sandtons twin towers, Ornico has
grown its product oering to
become one a leading
advertising and reputation
research companies in Africa.
Today, Ornico employs close on
a hundred people and has
oces in Johannesburg,
Durban, Cape Town and Lagos,
and enjoys representation in a
number of other African
countries. We started our
business a couple of years
before the inimitable Castrol ads staring Boet (Ian
Roberts) and Swaer (Norman Anstey) were created,
and which so many locals fell in love with because
of the humour the ads contained.
I cannot express in words
what a privilege it
has been for Ornico
to grow up
alongside the local
advertising industry,
from the unbanning
of the ANC and
release of Mandela, to
the rst democratic
elections; through the
creation of a vibrant
economy; to witness
the birth of the digital
era; and to see local
start-ups and agency
founders become
international giants.
A TOAST
The great tragedy, of
course, is that the opinionated
octogenarian John Farquhar is no longer
with us to raise a glass to toast AdVantage.
Farquhar adored advertising, lived for it,
fought for it, screamed for it, while he
courted and cajoled agencies to do better
work. And Farquhar did so much to make
AdVantage the magazine it is today.
So as we toast AdVantage for its premium
content, exclusive analysis and thought
leadership, lets remember Farquhar and all
he did to bring insight, innovation and
excellence to the industry.
Salute AdVantage! Heres to
another 20 years.
ad antage v February 2013 11
ADVANTAGE MAGAZINE WAS BORN INTO
THAT ERA WHICH WAS MARKED BY
MANDELAS GENEROSITY AND HIS DESIRE TO
UNITE AND GROW THE COUNTRY
to South African advertising
John Hunt receiving the lifetime achiever award at the 2012 Loerie Awards
12

ad antage v February 2013
ITS THE culture of South African consumers, they
love competitions. Theyre just generally very sensitive to
good deals and prizes.
Which is why JustPlay, who now gives away a prize a week, is
such an effective platform for attracting potential customers
to engage with brands, reckons Gidon Alter, CEO.
The way it works is members of JustPlay visit the site to choose
from a variety of possible prizes theyd like to win (anything
from a Luis Vuitton handbag to a trip around the world) by
lling out a questionnaire related to a particular brand. The
users are then entered into the
competition, irrespective of the
answers they supply. The product or
service that the questionnaire is based
on is also unrelated to the prize on
offer. This then ensures an indepen-
dent objective response enabling
JustPlay to present said brands with a
database of potential and qualied
clients that showed denite interest in
their product, he explains.
And its working. After only four years in
the business, JustPlay now has over
450 000 registered users, is among
the top 50 biggest websites in SA and
the 2nd biggest entertainment
website in the country. And by the
end of this year they want to reach
the one and a half million mark.
Theres no other website exactly like
ours in the world. The whole process is innova-
tive. But whats especially unique is that visitors
can opt out at any time if they dont want to
continue engaging with the brand, but are still
eligible for the prize. In fact, we actually go a step
further by really trying to push a person off a
questionnaire in order to double qualify
customers and so ensure that the visitor is really
interested in the product.
NO LOSERS
According to Alter at any given time, 30 to 40 brands are
active on JustPlay. We welcome any brand with mass
appeal, with banks and insurance brokers usually being
the biggest.
Yet interestingly enough as a performance based online
marketing platform, JustPlay only charges advertisers
based on objectives achieved. Therefore only once a
user opts in, the brand gets charged by JustPlay, he
points out.
Questionnaires are not issued randomly either, but are
prioritised based on a balance of how much mass appeal a
product has and how much the brand is willing to pay for
the spot. Over 20 000 questionnaires
are answered daily (half a million per
month) resulting in around 1 500
leads generally being generated per
day (over 30 000 a month). And,
depending on the size of a brands
budget, between 10% to 25% of
leads are converted into customers,
depending on the industry.
JustPlay further generates about
900 new signups (over 20 000 a
month) and around 5 000 unique
visitors per day and seeing as
each member must be registered to
play, the data compiled is consid-
ered good data, he remarks.
However, JustPlay is not just applied
for customer acquisition, but
research, creating awareness and
engagement as well. He stresses the
conversational approach of the questionnaires is designed
to ensure its not just blatant advertising. To set up the
right questionnaire, we work with the brand on what they
want to achieve. For only research purposes for example,
we also throw in questions that dont necessarily qualify
the customer.
On the other hand, Alter says, from JustPlays side they
spend a fortune on search marketing and generating
newsletters to keep people engaged. Theyre also active
on their mobisite, Facebook and MXit, to offer different
touchpoints where users can play.
Plus all the prizes you see are our overheads, which is our
marketing expense.
They also regularly give back by running questionnaires for
charities such as Johannesburg Child Welfare for
whom they had generated R5 000 through donations in
just one week. So yes, the package is working. Our
sales team is following up with advertisers and the
appeal from advertisers is fantastic.
A WIN-WIN
SITUATION
THE JUSTPLAY
AUDIENCE
By Magdel Louw
FEMALE
MALE
between the ages of 18 and 35
between LSM 6 8
between LSM 9 10
64%
36%
60%
51%
45%
Online lead generation website JustPlay has found a way of marketing
a brand and leaving consumers smiling at the same time
IMBIZO
IMBIZO
ad antage v February 2013 13
For more info contact Michael Codd | 011 280 3000 | michaelec@gallo.co.za
Gallo Music Publishers is proud to
celebrate the success of Cape Towns
hottest new composer, Bruce Retief.
Fresh from Hollywood, Bruce has
recently been recognized as one
of the worlds leading composers
and orchestrators, after having just
completed the score for the new
animated movie Adventures In
Zambezia.
Locally produced, Adventures In
Zambezia is South Africas most
successful film to date. Although still a
new release, it has secured distribution
in over 60 territories worldwide and had
its score recorded by the Hollywood
Symphony Orchestra in LA.
Use music in new ways
Gallo Music Publishers: Representing some of the biggest International Publishers in Africa,
including Warner/Chappell, Walt Disney, Pig Factory, Spirit Music, Shapiro Bernstein, Bicycle Music
and Sugar Music, as well as well known composers such as Joseph Shabalala, Dorothy Masuku,
Caiphus Semenya, Sipho Mabuse, Don Laka, Ringo Madlingozi, Lucky Dube and many more.
Bruce Retief is proud to have been part
of this project. Previously a school
teacher, this classical and orchestral
musician found his passion late in
life and has subsequently become
of the most sought-after feature film
score composers in the country. He is
currently working on his second feature
film Khumba.
Bruce has been nominated for Best
Score in an Animated Feature at the
most prestigious award ceremony in the
animation sphere The Annie Awards.
He is up against big-gun productions
such as Brave, Rise Of The Guardians,
Ice Age 4, The Lorax and others - a huge
accolade for this homegrown talent.

OUT OF HOME
THE NEW PLANS for 2013 will bring the association closer to
becoming strongly recognised in the minds of the OOH
advertising industry, as well as other types.
To show its salt, OHMSA puts forward two primary goals as part of its
re-engineering and development programme:
t Assist with the growth of market share for the OOH sector from
4.59% to 6.0% in 24 months
t Grow membership to levels that will see the association represent at
least 75% of the OOH spend
Essentially this means that OHMSA will become a marketing
organisation for the OOH sector. A set of OHMSA sub-brands will be
rolled out during 2013, providing much improved benets for
members and are designed to create new revenue and income
opportunities for the association. Some of these brands already exist
such as:
t OH! Connect networking days
t OH! Awards
t OH! News Daily (launched 1 November 2012)
OHMSA has launched OH! Classieds, an exciting brand extension,
where OOH media players have the opportunity to advertise their
businesses for only R100 a month on its website. The following
categories of advertising are available: Printing and production,
ighting, manufacturing, media sales and media ownership
We receive many enquiries each month from media owners looking for
information on various subjects. So we are encouraging suppliers to
list their companies under our categories. Also, media owners and
media agents can list their companies and have the opportunity to
connect with each other.
Some of the other sub-brands to be rolled out are:
t OH! Awards Monthly
t OH! Conference
t OH! Online
t OH! Digital
t OH! Members Dedicated Portal
t OH! Resources (Research and data)
t OH! Recruitment/Jobs
Emphasis will be placed on providing services and information digitally
to members and the industry moving the association from being
irrelevant to being e-relevant.

2013 LOOKS BRIGHT
For too long, Out of Home Media of South Africa
(OHMSA) has been scorned by other media owner
associations as irrelevant and not truly representative
of the Out of Home (OOH) advertising sector.
Hopefully, this perception will be replaced by
something more positive and reective as OHMSA
executes its growth plans for 2013 says Sarel du
Plessis, executive director, OHMSA
ACCORDING TO the Sunday Times (January 27) a furious ANC delegation accused
Michael Jordaan, CEO First National Bank, of insulting the government and feeding into the
opposition narrative by portraying the party and government in a bad light.
The Sunday Times story went on to say, The ANC team reminded the banks bosses that FNB
held the lions share of government accounts.
The ad features a young high school student giving a speech at the historical Naledi High School
in Soweto. She shares the thoughts of young South Africans and talks about their prospects
for the future, their concerns for the present and the challenges they will face.
ADVANTAGE SCANNED THE SOCIAL MEDIA AND NEWS
FEED REACTIONS:
I HAVE to say that I really liked the First National Bank (FNB) campaign that the ANC hated so
much. I liked it because it is always refreshing to see a commercial corporation having the
balls to stand up and speak out against what it sees as social injustice. Chris Moerdyk
There is little that amazes and even less that shocks me in politics. But I have to say that the
ANCs disquieting and dishonest accusations against a top South African bank this week
reaches that threshold. Mzwandile Jacks
Absolutely ridiculous. Saw the AD on youtube. Very inspiring and not sure why the ANC wanted
it pulled. Its a cry for us all to work together. AdVantage Facebook post. Renier Lombard
At the end of January FNB executives were dragged
over the coals in a meeting with the ANC
A STORM IN A TEA CUP
14

ad antage v February 2013
IMBIZO
FROM BROAD managers, to fancy
strategists, to PR bewitches, to engirdled
ambassadors, to everyone-is-doing-it-
so-I-can-too designers. Their roles, albeit
technically different, has a similar tenor to
save the face of the brand, to duck from
ying debris and if it hits to wipe the egg
off its glower. All of these brand roles
invaluable to the business that forge
them, priceless to the clients they so
humbly serve and dedicate their awards
to and of course this all offers a revived
spectrum of bumptiousness. But in this
jot of quality, who is truly the janitor of it?
MY NAME IS BILLY
Quality control, the process of reviewing all
factors involved in a process, is about
inspection: a scrutiny of value, and
delivery of promises. Different from
quality assurance that makes sure the
right things are done in the right ways
and attempts to approve the processes
to avoid any problems along the line. The
control places its emphasis on
uncovering defects and reporting to a
higher power if something is not up to,
lets call it, scratch. So looking at both
control and assurance who quanties
and qualies this exact science within a
business? The brand name of course.
Buyers pay premium for products or
services that bear a brand name,
sometimes even for an indistinguishably
different product or service that
carries the right epithet. Benjamin
Klein (a professor emeritus of
economics at UCLA) relates how in
the Communist revolution of 1917
all brand names on goods in the
Soviet Union were banished as the
numero unos believed that the
extra cost for a product
that was merely
promoted was
imprudent. But the demise was swift,
consumers had no idea how to
differentiate between products using
past experience: so bad products could
not be condemned and good experiences
could not be vaunted.
FLYING IS FLYING?
The incentive for a brand (with a brand
name) is greater as the surety of quality
is implied, and a premium is paid for this
added assurance. So even when it
comes to something as congested as the
airline industry where so many brands
exist and compete the quality controls
(whether to do with experience or
security) takes precedence over price
now that low cost airlines have
disappointed around the world with their
lack of quality and snarky tune ups.
Flying is ying, but what quality gets
associated with the brand is what directs
consumers from one airline to another,
again and again. Take the aspirin
example (highlighted by Prof. Klein): a
standardised product where the basic
ingredient is acetylsalicylic acid but the
consumer is willing to pay more for the
brand name
Disprin as he
knows what
hes getting.
So simply the
brand directly
reects the
quality.
Virgin Atlantic,
the pioneers
that they are,
took quality
into a new
realm and
handed over
the reigns to Billy Yeomans, age 10, from
Chichester in the UK. Little Billy was
appointed to test and approve the
airlines newly refurbished 747 eet as
the Junior Approvals Manager. This
Virgin Atlantic retting of the entire
leisure eet of 747s cost the business
well over 50 million and so nding
quality measures was high on the list of
priorities.
So Billy, although it was one small part of
the brands once-over, could report
back on everything he experienced from
food, to entertainment, to service etc. He
will also be consulted for future on-board
improvements and specically for
child-focused developments undertaken
by the airline. So plug the proverbial
Billy into every department, area,
division and see whats truly happening
under the hood. Sir Richard Branson, the
father of the maverick brand Virgin, has
outdone himself this time: nding new
ways to see where the brand can
improve on their quality and adding in an
element of fun.
LEG ROOM
The potential lesson here, to brands and
agencies, is that quality is not only seen
or experienced by the obvious roles
designated to nding gaps and coups
and the usual customer services with
report backs. But more importantly by
giving the right person just enough
access, and leg room, to thoroughly
consider and evaluate the brand within
parameters that can be controlled and
reported on, might just be the way to
ensure quality and distinction tomorrow,
and the next day.
Lets see whos next to upheave in the
revolution of quality. <
THE MEASURE OF EXCELLENCE
Daniel Scheer is the owner of The Idea Consultancy. He studied at VEGA, B Comm Marketing/Communication and
B Honours Branding. His focus now is on management consulting, idea generation and strategic planning.
BRANDING By Daniel Scheffer (@danielscheffer)
For every idea in a business there is an equally important
and formidable brand related role, a role engineered to
uphold the expected and desired quality of both the brand and all its tendrils
THE INCENTIVE FOR A BRAND (WITH A BRAND NAME) IS GREATER AS THE SURETY OF
QUALITY IS IMPLIED, AND A PREMIUM IS PAID FOR THIS ADDED ASSURANCE
SOCIAL MARKETING IS NOT
A PASSIVE ACTIVITY
ad antage v February 2013 15
ITS INTERESTING to see how
technology keeps driving change
across all industries, and just as
interesting to see how some trend
cycles simply repeat themselves. In
many cases the principles remain the
same, but the platforms shift. Take the
current obsession with social
marketing. A year ago there was a
collective knee jerk reaction to include
a social media campaign to any
marketing strategy usually without
considering how relevant it was to the
brand or its core customers. As a
result, the road to the elusive social
media sweet spot is now littered with
pointless Facebook pages, dead-end
Twitter accounts, abandoned blogs
and awkward cyber conversations, as
stilted as those on a blind date.
In the past year weve learnt a lot of
lessons, some as expensive as they
were ineffective, and yet most brands
still go through the motions of what
they think social marketing is, without
actually understanding the beast. And what a
beast it is.
Its a bit like a dog chasing after a car. Theres a lot of
barking and bravado, but not much clarity and
foresight for the day when it actually catches up
with the car. Social marketing is much the same.
There is an understanding that it is all about
engaging with your customer and starting that
all-important conversation or multiple conversa-
tions, as is usually the case. However, no one ever
seems to consider how to carry on with that
conversation, and more importantly, that youve in
essence started a conversation with a chatterbox
who just wont stop.
Social marketing is not a passive activity. Once you
embark on it, its like a treadmill with no off
button. Youve started a relationship with a
consumer who is (lets be frank here) a bit needy,
who also wants content to be fed intravenously,
which by the way, had also better be good.
Weve reached the same crossroads that websites
arrived at in the last decade. Today, hosting a
website that is simply a passive information depot
is laughable. Similarly, any social marketing
platform needs to evolve, constantly. And if
launching your own app is the next step (actually
not if, but when), then this mantra becomes even
more crucial.
If youre already a user of apps, youll know how often
there are new software updates, not to mention the
constant expectation of fresh content. Social
marketing is therefore a bit like a devils pact: great
rewards, but you can never, ever, get off the treadmill.
Be careful what you wish for. <
SOCIAL MARKETING:
the endurance marathon
Social marketing has moved from a snappy new
buzzword to an essential cyber tool that
sharpens the competitive edge for any brand.
But, asks Dion Chang, do you have what it takes
to go the distance, once you discover that its
an endless loop?
TRENDS By Dion Chang, @dionchang
Dion Chang is a South African corporate trend analyst and design consultant, freelance journalist, columnist
and social commentator. He is the founder of Flux Trends: www.uxtrends.com
By Andrew Papadopoulos ADJUDICATE
SALES FOR YOUR latest
branded service or product have
now exploded. Now it is time to
expand the business to countries
outside SA, be it to our African
neighbours or further abroad to
the US, Europe or Australia.
If you have been following this
legal column over the past two
years, you would have, no doubt,
taken the free legal advice
(which is rarely oered in this
industry) and ensured that you
have followed the necessary
steps to protect your brands with
the Trademarks Oce. However,
which Trademark Oce did you
seek protection with?
Trademark protection is territorial
and therefore protection is
required in each and every country
where there is active business, or
an intention to conduct business,
relating to the particular brand.
Put simply, if you are selling or
intend selling a product in
Mozambique, the product
trademark / brand will need to be
registered in Mozambique. There
are certain countries that have
signed treaties, allowing an
applicant to claim protection in a
number of countries through a
single trademark application. The
most popular of these, which can
be eectively used by South
Africans in Africa, is the African
Intellectual Property Organization
(OAPI) being the organisation that
ensures the protection of
intellectual property rights in most
African French-speaking countries.
Currently, a single OAPI registration
grants protection to 16 African
member countries. If your focus is
further abroad, another eective
registration is a Community Trade
Mark (CTM). Here one registration
extends protection to 27 European
member countries.
Although there is an eort to
harmonise the
trademark laws in
each country, these
laws do dier.
Furthermore,
protection
strategies also
dier from
country to
country. For
example,
certain
countries oer a
rst to le policy,
meaning that prior user rights
are not honoured. The danger
here is that you may have been
selling a particular product in a
country for some time but if the
trademark was never registered
and a third party subsequently
registers it, that third party may be
able to prevent you from continu-
ing to sell that branded product in
that country unless you are in a
position (usually at prohibitive cost
and delay) to prove that your
brand was well-known in that
country prior to the other parties
application to register it. In such
countries, we recommend that
clients do not delay in seeking
trademark protection.
Another peculiar risk to brand
integrity includes the common
practice in certain African
countries for infringers to copy a
product label instead of the
particular product name. This is
especially true when it comes to
beverages. In these instances,
clients are advised to seek
protection for the product get-up
(i.e. the overall look and feel of the
product), in addition to the
product name.
A further consider-
ation is that in most
African countries,
anti-counterfeit
protection is
only granted to
products for
which the
trademarks
have been
registered.
Therefore, if the
risk of counterfeit-
ing is high in respect of
a particular business or product,
clients are encouraged to seek
trademark protection without
delay.
Certain African government oces
have a reputation for prolic
delays in their service delivery and
the trademarks oces in these
territories are no dierent. You
should therefore be aware of the
particular time line involved in the
trademark registration process.
However, as long as a pre-ling
search reveals that there are no
conicting marks, there is little risk
of an issue arising if you immedi-
ately commence using your brand
and couple this with an applica-
tion to register it.
Therefore, if you intend on expand-
ing your business past our
borders, due consideration
should be given to protection in
such territories. DM Kisch can
assist in formulating the best
protection strategy for your
business as well as seeking such
protection, in the relevant
countries, on your behalf. <
LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION
The territorial nature of trademark protection
Andrew Papadopoulos is a
Trademark director at DM KISCH INC
Email: andrewp@dmkisch.com
16

ad antage v February 2013
IMBIZO
TRADEMARK
PROTECTION IS
TERRITORIAL
AND THEREFORE
PROTECTION IS
REQUIRED IN
EACH AND EVERY
COUNTRY WHERE
THERE IS ACTIVE
BUSINESS, OR
AN INTENTION
TO CONDUCT
BUSINESS
IMBIZO
INDUSTRY ISSUES

NOW IS THE TIME FOR BUSINESS TO BE CREATIVE, APPLY OUT-OF-THE BOX
THINKING AND STEER CLEAR OF PROJECT-BASED INITIATIVES THAT LACK
INTEGRATION DUE TO BUDGET CUTS AS THESE DO MORE HARM THAN GOOD
WHY ADVERTISING? That will
be a strong theme that the ACA
expects to address in 2013. And
the answer is simple. Advertise
because advertising is eective.
Why advertising because
eective advertising can assist in
growing and sustaining a business
particularly in a recessed economy.
It is no secret that the economy
has created a lack of buoyancy
in business lately and in SA, this
downward sentiment is being
further fuelled by the lack of large
international events such as the
2010 FIFA World Cup that generated
a slight boost in the economy and
to an extent, shielded SA from the
realities of the world economic
crises at the time.
Why is it that when an economy
goes into recession the rst or
second budget line to be hacked
is the advertising, marketing and
communications budget? During
times like these, shouldnt marketers
leverage those competitors who
mistakenly are cutting budgets
and gain market share particularly
because there are three things
that the advertising sector in SA is
brilliant at: Creativity, adaptability
and eectiveness all the essential
qualities required to adapt to new
ways of doing business.
Now is the time for business to be
creative, apply out-of-the box
thinking and steer clear of project-
based initiatives that lack integration
due to budget cuts as these do
more harm than good. They cause
confusion in the minds of consumers
and leave existing and potential
consumers feeling insecure and
abandoned towards the brand.
Consumers associate the brands
that cut back on advertising with
a lack of staying power, stability,
continuity and ultimately loyalty
during tough times. This creates
an ideal opportunity for forward
thinking competitors of the
brand who will no doubt
leverage the opportunity and
win over customers.
Historically, companies such
as General Electric, Disney,
Proctor and Gamble,
Hewlett Packard and
Microsoft understood
the principle that consumers
dont stop spending during a
recession; they merely turn a dime,
look for better oers or value-
for-money. They met consumers
demands during some of the
most turbulent of economic times
and not only survived, but grew
to become some of the most
successful companies today.
What the recession requires is
eective creativity in advertising.
In an article published last year,
Dominic Twose, global head of
Knowledge Management at the
international division of sponsors
Millward Brown explored what
creativity means and how it linked
to eectiveness. His answer was
simple and perhaps, it would do us
well to remember this
now more than ever.
Creativity, he said, can make people
stop what theyre doing and pay
attention.
Our analysis indicates the most
memorable ads are one or more of
the following: exciting, intriguing,
funny, sexy, surprising, thought-
provoking, dierent, enjoyable, or
eye-catching.
When these creative qualities are
harnessed eectively to a brand,
consumers are left with enduring
associations, such as the link
between cute puppies and toilet
tissue, he concluded.
The fact of the matter is that the
business of advertising is to nd
creative solutions to complex
business problems and in so
doing, stabilise, grow and
sustain a business. The more
complex the problem or as
it stands, the economy, the
more creative the solutions
need to be. Who better than
the creative geniuses of the
advertising profession to
do the job!?
Amid the urry and the fuss of new
ways of doing business, new
business models, fragmenting
mediums, etc. we should not lose
sight of what makes advertising
work eective creativity, which is
the same as it was 50 years ago and
ultimately makes business succeed.
This is the time for advertisers and their
agency partners to work together.
This is the time for increased
and responsible investment in
advertising and communications.
This is the time for agency partners
to prove their worth, value and
contribution to their clients
businesses by creating meaningful,
eective campaigns that not only
resonate in the minds of consumers,
but ring cash registers too.
Odette van den Haar is
the CEO of the Association for
Communication and Advertising.
WHY ADVERTISE?
ad antage v February 2013 17
By Odette van den Haar @odette_roper
APEX AWARDS 2013
For those agencies that are already
delivering efective advertising for their
clients, its the time to enter the 2013
APEX awards where their campaigns
will be adjudicated and recognised for
its efectiveness. For more information
about the APEX awards go to
www.acasa.co.za/apex.aspx
18

ad antage v February 2013
IMBIZO
U
UNDERSTANDING GOVERNMENT
When I frst came back to SA in 1995 I
worked at the SABC in the legal division. I
was the frst black person in the department.
Having come from LA where she worked at a law
frm and then a lobbying frm, she found this
quite amusing.
She was only with the SABC for 18 months before
her move into government. I wanted to work in
government, because I wanted to understand
what government was about.
She worked in the Department of Transport as
the head of legal. Her mother was the ANC
chief whip in Sweden and during the Struggle
years she also worked in London and Thembi
worked with her. So I understood the work of
government and the protocols.
Her experience led her to the Department of Public
Enterprises where she set up an international
division for them. At that time there was a lot of
interest in public enterprises and the division
held talks on issues such as energy and
privatisation.
She was then approached to head up the
Mpumalanga Department of Transport, which
she accepted. Msibi moved to the province and
worked there for two years. People would ask
me why I made the move and the truth was
twofold: I was looking for change and for private
family reasons.
But what she thought would be a short stint in the
public sector, became 10 years. I never
intended to be with government for such a long
time, but I worked on such interesting projects
and I was lucky that I always had bosses who
allowed me to be creative and innovative. They
encouraged me to run with my projects. I
always enjoyed my work. I also liked working in
government because if you worked hard you
would see the impact of your work.
Her government work included negotiations with
various parties and here her stint at the lobbying
frm proved invaluable. Many people view
lobbying with a jaundice eye, but it is important
to understand the environment, the client and
what is possible when lobbying. All
environments have their norms and values. You
have to work out how to achieve your goal and
also address concerns. Lobbying is about
understanding what can be achieved in a point
in time. You must know how and when to
negotiate, and agree to disagree. This experience
assisted me then, as it does now at the ASA,
particularly this year.
PRECEDENTS AND CODES
In the six years she has worked at the ASA the
number of complaints have remained about
the same at around 1 900 a year. She explains
that when the ASA receives a compliant there
is a 30-day turnaround, but there are
exceptions depending on the response time of
the other party.
We receive complaints in writing which we then
assess. If we believe there is cause for complaint
we inform the respondent and give them time to
respond. Sometimes the response is quick;
sometimes the issue is more complex and
requires more time.
It is often the cases that appear simple that are
the most complex, she says. Some of the legal
aspects are interesting, and those are the ones
that often look straightforward to start with.
Some of the interesting ones we have dealt with
this year include the Nandos diversity ad, the
Red Bull walking on water ad and the Axe
angels ad.
The ASA is a self-regulating body and rulings are
made using a set of precedents set by previous
cases that the ASA has built up over the years
These are published every two years. Our Code
of Advertising Practice (the Code) is created by
the industry for the industry and is our guiding
document. Its main goals are to protect the
consumer and to ensure professionalism among
advertisers and works within existing
legislation.
She explains that the Nandos diversity ad did not
breach the Code, and so the decision to run the
ad or not was left up to the various
communication mediums themselves. The ASA
Code does not specify the medium an ad
appears on. This is the opposite in the UK, and as
a result, each time a new medium appears, they
have to develop a code for it. Our Code is
pertinent to any medium.
Of course there are practical considerations. For
example, a printed pamphlet takes longer and
is harder to remove from the market than a
SEE NO EVIL,
HEAR NO EVIL
As consumers become more aware of their rights, bodies such as the Advertising
Standards Authority (ASA) will become more and more relevant. Danette Breitenbach
spoke to Thembi Msibi, who has been the bodys CEO for the last six years
THE INTERVIEW
television ad. We also work only in the
public domain, for example television and
the main electronic platforms.
Theoretically, if there is a complaint about
something that has appeared on Twitter or
Facebook we could investigate it, but it
would be difcult in reality. Both Twitter
and Facebook are platforms you are invited
to, so you choose the right to be there or
to remove yourself. This is very diferent
from public platforms I have mentioned
and has very diferent dynamics.
BEING ACCREDITED
The recognition of self-regulation is
imperative especially with SA moving
towards the protection of the consumer to a
greater degree, she says and the Consumer
Protection Act (CPA) introduced last year
only serves to strengthen the position of a
self-regulatory body.
Sections in the CPA relate to advertising and
marketing and Section 82 recognises the
existence of industry codes and ombuds.
The ASA is obligated to apply for
accreditation for both its own Code as well
as an ofcial accredited body.
This means that the ASA will be the
recognised body to deal with any
advertising consumer complaints. At this
point in time, while the ASA has requested a
meeting with the National Commissioner,
there is an acting National Commissioner
and this has delayed meeting with them.
In the meeting we have requested we
address some issues. Firstly, will all
industry bodies be treated the same? I
believe that diferent industries need to
be handled diferently.
The other issue is what does accreditation
mean? Does it mean your body is
recognised or is it now part of
government? Part of accreditation is
your code and while we review our code
yearly, this will now be the governments
responsibility to update it.
These are some of the concerns we want to
address with the National Commissioner.
She concludes: We believe we have delivered
a good service to the industry to date and
that after over 40 years of existence, the
ASA continues to have an important role to
play in ensuring that advertising is honest,
decent, truthful and legal.
IMBIZO
ad antage v February 2013 19
The Advertising Standards Authority of SA is an
independent body set up and paid for by the marketing
communications industry. It aims to ensure that its ecient
system of self-regulation results in the best possible
protection both of the consumer and of the industry.
LAW IS BASED ON PROOF NOT ASSUMPTIONS,
BUT IT IS HUMAN NATURE TO ASSUME
INFOCUS
20

ad antage v February 2013
Its spring and Im blind
By Danette Breitenbach
Youve probably heard the David Ogilvy story about the copywriter who walks to work every day and
passes a blind beggar. The beggars sign reads: Im blind, please help. However, no one pays much
attention. One day the copywriter stops and writes on the beggars sign: Its Spring and Im blind please
help. After that the beggar is no longer ignored and his cup is full of money
A professional writer is an
amateur who didnt quit.
Richard Bach
Half of my life is an act of
revision.
John Irving
The secret of becoming
a writer is to write, write
and keep on writing.
Ken MacLeod
If you can't explain it simply,
you don't understand it well
enough.
Richard Feynman (probably)
THE POINT OF THE STORY is
that people need to connect and relate. And
for years and years that is what copywriters
have been doing, connecting a brand or
product with consumers.
So what if the world suddenly ran out of
copywriters? According to AAA School
of Advertising, principal and MD, Dr Ludi
Koekemoer, copywriting is the backbone
of award-winning advertising. However,
he is deeply concerned about the state of
copywriting in the country.
Copywriting brings award-winning advertising
alive. It is a specic skill that requires a
specic talent. And in SA, its dying despite
the fact that weve always enjoyed deep
pools of copywriting talent.
He does specify that is true not only for
vernacular and Afrikaans, but English
copywriting as well.
In the past we have always had a full
complement of copywriting students for
our AAA course. Then in 2009 we noticed
a drop when we only received seven
applications, while all our other courses
were still full. We did a radio campaign but
this only brought the numbers to nine.
Koekemoer contacted Gordon Cook, a co-
founder and School Navigator for the Vega
School of Brand Leadership. Cook had only
two copywriting applications for that year.
Suddenly all three schools had no copywriting
students. Last year, we again put in a
special effort to get the numbers up but
they only went up slightly. In 2012 we had
seven copywriting students in rst year and
13 in second year. There is just no new
blood coming through.
Koekemoer did a presentation to industry
to make them aware of this crisis. We
also discovered that the average age of a
copywriter in the industry is between 45
and 50 upwards and that a huge gap exists
between the seasoned copywriters and any
new copywriter coming into the industry.
Another trend we discovered was that the
new copywriters were not staying in the
industry but leaving it after a few years.
He also says that technology is forcing people
to use SMS language. The quality of
education in schools has
meant that language
skills have deteriorated.
And because young
people are not procient
in language they are not
interested in copywriting
as a career. While you
can make good money
as a copywriter, the fact
remains that to be a
copywriter you have to
love words.
Alex Sudheim is the
copywriter lecturer at
Vega, Cape Town and
he agrees that there
is a low awareness of
what copywriting is. If
you are good at drawing
at school, you are told
to become a graphic
designer, if you are good
with words, a lawyer or
journalist, but no child
is encouraged to be
a copywriter because
people do not understand
what it is.
Vega Cape Towns
copywriting numbers are
small when compared
to graphic design. Our
rst year students
are exposed to all the
disciplines. In their
second year they chose their majors and the
split is generally visual, multimedia design
and then copywriting, says Sudheim.
We have 12 copywriting students in third year
and there is a great demand for them. In
fact there are too many internships vs. the
number of students. It is not only so-called
traditional agencies that need copywriters
but digital agencies are screaming for
copywriters too. The new frontier for
copywriters is online, says Sudheim.
The bottom line is you cannot produce
advertising without copywriting. The majority
of creative directors were copywriters.
Copywriting defined
Copywriting is writing with a
practical purpose. The
copywriter aims to inform the
reader, persuade them to change
their view or encourage them to
take action.
Most copywriters write for
commercial purposes to
encourage readers to make a
purchase or try a product.
WHY?
Copywriters provide the content
for advertisements (broadcast
and print), slogans and taglines,
websites, brochures, leaflets,
direct mail, marketing emails,
articles, user guides, video
scripts and more.
Some people use the word
copywriter to refer specifically
to those who create concepts
and content for advertisements.
WHAT?
Because copywriters deal in
ideas, they are best involved
early on. They can identify the
concepts, themes, topics,
phrases that form the foundation
of a project. However, a
copywriter can also add a lot of
value by taking a fresh look at
content that has already been
created.
WHEN?
The tools of the copywriters
trade are simple: computer and
word-processing software for
longer pieces, and perhaps
pencil and paper for slogans and
ideas.
Most copywriters work
iteratively, revising their work
several times in response to
client comments, and also on
their own initiative as they aim to
refine and improve their work.
HOW?
There is no official qualification
to be a copywriter. Anyone who
can write, and meet the needs of
their employer or client, can be a
copywriter.
Every copywriter is different. But
many good copywriters are
literate, creative, reflective and
disciplined. They are curious
like detectives, their job is to
know a little about a lot.
Some copywriters have a
specialisation, based on their
experience. Others are happy to
write anything.
WHO?
In corporate and agency
settings, copywriters work in
partnership graphic and web
designers, web developers,
account executives, marketing
managers and others. As
freelancers, they work directly
with clients and also through
agencies.
Copywriters naturally congregate
in areas with strong creative
industries. But, in theory, a
copywriter can work from
anywhere.
WHERE?
START MIDDLE END
Copywriting defned
Copywriting infographic sourced from www.abccopywriting.com
Visit www.advantagemagazine.co.za/pullouts/ for our full salary survey tables.
ad antage v February 2013 21
SKILLSSURVEY
Q: You are
leaving behind a
successful career
spanning 14 years
in the advertising
industry and the
MD position at
Acceleration Media.
What was your
motivation to move
into the educational
sector?
A: I have always had a passion
for education, mentoring and
helping people grow. I helped
develop a digital course for
the Red & Yellow School that
I have been running for them.
I love being involved with
the school and the students and seeing the students
grow. They are so hungry for information.
The School has an amazing environment and I would
like to continue with the growth path the school is on.
With the merger with Quirk and various discussions
with the school, the timing was right for me to make
this move.
I have been in the industry for 14 years, with the last
six and half focusing on digital. Previous years were
focused on traditional marketing. While this will be
different, I will bring with me the business principles
of running an agency, which I believe ts in with the
philosophy of the school to create students that are
business ready. I want to ensure we produce students
that are relevant to the industry.
Q: Apart from business principles
what do you think you bring to the
School?
A: Coming from industry is a big plus. I know what
industry is like and what its needs are. The response
from industry to my appointment have been great. For
example many people are offering to participate in
think tanks. Industry knows we need to develop skills
for the future. I have seen how in the digital industry
a lack of skilled people has led to headhunting and
poaching with not enough development-taking place.
This appointment will give me the opportunity to lter
and feed into the industry.
Q: What do
institutions like the
Red & Yellow School
need to do to ensure
they stay relevant
and even ahead of
the trends?
A: Marketing has broadened
so much that the marketing/
advertising environment
is vastly different to when
I started in the industry. It
requires so many skills sets
and it is up to us to ensure
that students get as much
exposure to the various
marketing opportunities.
I believe in collaboration
and the way our industry
has evolved, it is all about collaboration and thats
how you create great work, strategy and thinking.
Thats the kind of thinking I want to take into Red &
Yellow School for our students. What is important
to the industry? Lets lift that base. Relevancy is so
important. When you graduate you must be relevant,
no matter what segment of the market you choose.
This is the strategy I need to build with my team at the
Red & Yellow School. Im very excited.
Q: Copywriting is in a state of crisis.
What will you be doing to tackle this
issue?
A: We are on a big recruitment drive to get more people
involved and it is one of the issues I am engaging
with industry on through a think tank. Our marketing
course was oversubscribed by November last year
already, but not the copywriting course. Industry also
boasts people who stand out and are seen as thought
leaders and inspire people to follow them. We need
this for copywriting as well.
The industry has seen many changes, one of which
is that content, good content is becoming more
valuable. How do we equip people to become good
content providers? Digital agencies are crying out for
people with these skills. We have to make copywriting
appealing and to do that we need to change the
message of what it means to be a copywriter. Too few
young people understand what an opportunity it is.
Diane Charton recently took up the role of MD at the Red & Yellow School of
Advertising in Cape Town. Danette Breitenbach caught up with her
Taking up the challenge
Slogans
Slogans are one-line promises of value. The value might be boldly
stated or subtly shaded, but it has to be both clear and believable.
When used as headlines, slogans should grab attention, establish the
theme and set the tone for what follows. When used as signoffs, they
should strengthen, confirm or enrich what has gone before. In some
advertisements, the slogan may be the only content.
Slogans should talk to their visual context. Copy and design should
come together to form a sum greater than their parts. Neither should
try to say something that would be better said by the other.
The art of writing a great slogan cant be reduced to a formula, but
there are some recognisable types. Here are a few of them.
Grab their interest
No interest, no readers! Here are the three main ways of cultivating
interest. Benefits are by far the most powerful. News and curiosity
may grab interest, but only benefits will sustain it.
Know your benefits
Benefits command attention and, ultimately, close
sales. Benefits need not be unique, but they must
be compelling.
Turn features into benefits
All features of a product or service must be turned outwards
and expressed as benefits. Using the word you is an excellent
way to make a benefit feel directly relevant to the reader.
Persuade the reader
These four principles of persuasion have been proven
to influence people. Select the ones that will work best
in context, and use respected third-party information
and sources to back up your position.
The task of a writer consists
of being able to make
something out of an idea.
Thomas Mann
A writer is someone who
can make a riddle out of
an answer.
Karl Kraus
You turn the handle the
way it goes, not the way
it ought to go.
Confucius
It is do, or do not.
There is no try.
Yoda
Calls to action guide the audience towards a real-world
action. They set a boundary on readers information
gathering experience, encouraging them to move into
the doing phase.
(DCR = Desired Customer Reaction.)
Calls to action
No other battery looks like it
or lasts like it
Duracell
1,000 songs in your pocket
iPod
Just do it
Nike
As chosen by David Ogilvy in 1963 and L.M Boyd in 1970, and
ascribed (wrongly) to several US universities. Possibly mythical.
Use at your own risk.
The most persuasive words
you
new
now
love quick
easy
offer
hurry
health
results
money
save
proven
safety
suddenly
announcing
introducing
guarantee improvement
amazing
sensational
discovery
remarkable
revolutionary
startling
miracle
magic
wanted
challenge
compare
bargain
G
Graham Warsop believes this success is due to
Jupiters business approach when expanding
into the continent, which is to partner
with local, creative enterprises that have an
entrepreneurial outlook.
It was Magora, who owns Jericho, a local
adverting agency in Zimbabwe, who
approached Jupiter. We did a lot of homework
following that; we examined his work and met
with his team. We asked questions. Was this a
good t? Do we see ourselves being in business
for the long term? says Warsop
He calls Magora a leader, an entrepreneur and a
visionary. He is innovative and passionate
about ideas and what he does every day. His
philosophy is one of leading, not managing.
Magora entered the advertising industry straight
after college and worked for agencies in
Zimbabwe, Namibia and SA before joining
Leo Burnett in London, after which he returned
to Harare. The goal for me was always putting
Zimbabwe on the worldwide creative map. SA
did it and I see no reason why Zimbabwe cant.
AN ECONOMIC REVIVAL
He explains that after the hyperination and
an economic downturn, most agencies fell on
hard times with many of the international
ones leaving or drastically reducing their
numbers. But the Zimbabwean advertising
and communication market is worth about
US$100 million and we have some prominent
international brands active in our market.
Realising this potential became possible when
the dollar was introduced as a currency. This
has helped the wheels of the economy to roll
again. With a population of about 14 million
people in Zimbabwe, there is a market here
that has needs and wants.
The other effect of the decade long hyper-
ination period was that businesses realised
they had to move quickly. We had to do
everything rapidly, or we would lose more
money. This had a big impact on the people of
Zimbabwe and has given us a different outlook
to more chilled societies. The African clich of
there is no rush in Africa no longer holds true
for Zimbabwe. We have to catch up on 10 years
of growth we have missed out on and we are in
a hurry to get there.
An example of how the rapidly the economy is
moving to catch up is a client of Magoras in
the our industry. The growth over the past
two years has been such that they cannot
keep up with demand. Many companies in the
country are growing rapidly and they have
not yet reached their maximum capacity. I
would say the country is operating at 60% of
its potential manufacturing ability. And thats
just internal demand and supply; we have not
started exporting yet.
And there are many other brands doing very
well in the country, for example Old Mutual
Zimbabwe and Toyota. These are also two of
Magoras clients. We also have a large number
of local clients within the agency, many of
which are blue chip companies, including,
Zimplats, Nandos, Schweppes, CBZ bank and
Delta Beverages (SABMiller Zimbabwe), Western
Union and South African Airways.
ACCOUNTABLE ADVERTISING
Advertising is one of the few industries where
you get tangible results for your work says
Magora. The focus for me is on results. I still
cannot believe I get paid to do this every day.
It is my greatest joy to see how a brand grows;
there are very few things you can correlate like
this. There is no cheating because the results
are either there or they are not. Advertising
makes you accountable.
In Zimbabwe print is big, especially newspapers
and then to a lesser extent magazines, with
radio and outdoor also ourishing. Television,
however, is pretty dead.
The majority of our work is in print, with radio
second. In print newspaper is rst and then
magazines. Zimbabwe is a very big reading
market. The Financial Mail is own in every
Friday and by Tuesday every single one is sold
out. The Sunday Times is sold out by three on a
Sunday.
Digital is being discussed by us and our clients,
but we need more research in this area. Our
local newspapers also have websites and in
a month these average 55 million hits. He
says this has to do with the large number of
Zimbabweans that live abroad. At the same
time in the country itself, more and more
people are going on line and advertising space
online is becoming popular. Mobile websites
are slow to take off in a society of 14 million
people, only 600 000 people are using smart
phones.
LOCAL IS KEY
The key to their success he says lies in their
knowledge of their market. We must take
heed not to be like the Americans and view
Africa as one country. A single approach or
solution will never work across the continent.
Local knowledge is key. We are proof that in
advertising you must speak the language of
the market you are operating in if you want to
be successful.
The model Jupiter has adopted allows for this
important factor: local relevance. As Magora
The Jupiter Drawing Room (Zimbabwe) & partners opened its doors in February last year after
Denford Magora, its CEO, partnered with the Lionheart Brand holding company, which owns and
manages the Jupiter Drawing Room brand. In under a year the agency has become the largest
agency group in Zimbabwe and one of the most creative. Danette Breitenbach spoke to Magora
and Graham Warsop, founder and chairman, The Jupiter Drawing Room SA
22

ad antage v February 2013
Iocal knowlcdgc.
local succcss
AGENCYAGENDA Ic ls lnnovatlvc and passlonatc about
cvcry day. Ils phllosophy ls onc ol
explains: SA is not the same as Zimbabwe;
just as Nigeria is not the same as Zimbabwe.
Local entrepreneurs have insight into their
markets that outsiders do not have. There
are so many cultural and social insights in
these markets and this is a critical factor in
establishing an agency that is striving to be
world class, but with local relevance.
For example, Magora explains that Zimbabwean
society draws clear distinctions between the
north and south of the country. Regardless of
the fact that they speak different languages,
there is a difference of culture as well. For
example in the north labola is the norm, but
in the south it doesnt exist. The southern
part of the country is very beef orientated,
and its people are predominantly beef eaters.
The strategy going forward is to keep the
momentum going and achieve even stronger
growth. In a year we grew revenue by
over 200% and are approaching an annual
turnover of over R30 million without
borrowing a single cent. But as the economy
gears up, we want to make sure we are
positioned correctly to meet the advertising
needs of our clients.
Says Warsop: This network we are growing in
Africa allows us to offer resources to clients
that want to go beyond our borders. We
want to amplify the Zimbabwean model with
strong Jupiter Drawing Room agencies across
the continent. It also allows us to empower
talented and passionate entrepreneurs that
share our vision. When we entered the
partnership with Magora we looked at it as
an experiment, and it has worked so well we
believe it is a recipe for success. So much so
Magora is currently looking into rolling out
into other markets in Africa.
ad antage v February 2013 23
AGENCYAGENDA
Graham Warsop, founder and chairman, The Jupiter
Drawing Room SA and Denford Magora, CEO, The
Jupiter Drawing Room (Zimbabwe) & partners
ldcas and what hc docs
lcadlng. not managlng
The Jupiter Drawing Room Zimbabwe campaign: Non-
genuine parts will come back and bite you the idea to
explain that counterfeit parts are poisonous to vehicles.
Denford Magora
founder of Jerico
has established a
blue chip client base.
Nando humour has
been adapted to
speak the language
of the Zimbabwe
market.
24

ad antage v February 2013
AGENCYAGENDA
The merits of working with a
DESIGN SPECIALIST
NOW LETS CONSIDER the specialist
design agency in the same light as the talented small
producer scenario.
Being creative determines the livelihood of many
individuals. Its essential for creatives to know what
their specialty is. When a design agency identies
its creative strengths, this ultimately leads to a best
outcome for clients. Although pursuing multiple
interests and developing a range of skills does
contribute to a creative teams experience, I should
add that it wouldnt, however, necessarily determine
their success.
Graphic artists, web developers, brand designers
and copy editors all fall under the umbrella of the
discipline of design. Each individual specialises in
some aspect of the total product. Although a single
person would be able to do the job of two, in this day
and age such efforts will rarely match the quality of
work done by dedicated specialists.

GENERALIST VS. SPECIALIST
Specialists are able to provide their clients with
unbiased advice. They are removed from the red
tape associated with general agencies. Armed with
focused experience and cutting edge knowledge,
specialised agencies provide their clients with
invaluable expertise and can consequently cater
exactly to their needs.
The war between the generalist and specialist is ever
present, especially with current cost cutting. Clients
want the same results at half the price and in a moment
of poor judgment, being promised full service and a
total return on investment, they risk jeopardising quality
for quantity. At what cost? Seen sensibly, it would be
better to assemble a team of diverse specialists rather
than try to nd all of their talents in one person.
Yet becoming a specialist or expert is not merely
a label. To be respected as the specialist, the
discipline must truly be mastered. Most people dont
make it to that level of super competence because
they desire instant success, thinking (incorrectly)
that they can forfeit the long hours required to learn
and master a trade.
THE DEVIL IS IN THE DETAIL
The experience, level of understanding and knowledge
found in a specialised agency provides clients with
the reassurance that they are in the best hands. The
opposite is reected when dealing with a general
agency. Designers know that the devil is in the
detail. Dividing attention with regard to different
activities translates into less time for devoting to
learning the intricacies of clients brands, resulting
in a disconnect or lack of understanding of the brand
and its needs.
All business owners realise that being close to ones
client is crucial to the success of the campaign.
Specialist agencies are experienced in a particular
eld, liaising directly with clients and offering
services that will specically and benecially impact
their clients brand. This targeted approach allows
for the delivery of effective results on a tactical
level, eliminating the likelihood of errors and
miscommunication between client and supplier.
Some argue that specialists have no back-up or ller
services to pick up slack when the demand for
specialist assignments dries up, compromising
regular income and the ability to expand business.
However, specialists handle their clients with more
than just a lick and a promise. Their work speaks
for itself. This prestige alone ensures that business
will be regular. Clients know what results may be
expected. With the track record of in-depth expertise
and the demonstrated ability to deliver, why would
clients wish to switch loyalty to another agency?
Specialists even bring other outsourced specialists
on board, where necessary, in order to offer clients a
collaborative variety of super skilled services with a
specialised twist.
Todays economic climate is breeding increasingly stiff
competition and many agencies are nding it difcult
to maintain their competitive edge. Thats precisely
what distinguishes a leading agency and sets it apart
from its competitors its specialist focus on niche
markets in order to serve clients better. And savvy
clients never seek the services of a generalist if they
want specialised results.
By Alastair Haarhoff, MD and owner, Just Design
Alastair Haarho works from the winelands town of Stellenbosch
and is the MD and owner of brand design agency Just Design
Everyone, regardless of age, is a consumer. We seek out the unique coupled with good value. Consumers
typically rush to purchase products when dealing directly with the smaller producer of one of a kind items,
at a reasonable price, as opposed to mass-produced options from larger general manufacturers
26

ad antage v February 2013
MARKETINGMATTERS
Go big,
BE CAREFUL HOW you
dene success, Melmed advised.
Firstly, one must remember that
whats measurable is not always
meaningful. To illustrate he points
out that the rst automobiles
had just one gauge: an ammeter,
measuring electrical current, to show
if the battery was being charged or
depleted. There was no speedometer
to indicate how fast you were going
but there was no speed limit either,
because cars couldnt go that fast
to begin with. Thus exact speed
was measurable (you could buy a
speedometer if you wanted) but
not meaningful.
Today every car has a speedometer
front and centre, and knowing how
fast you are going has become
very important. On the other hand
almost no car today has an ammeter,
because batteries and alternators
are so reliable one doesnt have to
worry about them. To extend the
automobile example those gauges
on the dashboard are designed to
help you drive, not to evaluate your
journey. It would be meaningless
to say, I drove at 80 kph or even
I went 100 kph without explaining
where you went, how you got there,
and what trafc you endured along
the way. Marketers are making the
same mistake when they evaluate
a campaign on click-through rates,
likes, and page views. Thats
dashboard stuff. The real story is
much more meaningful.
In fact he labelled cost-per-click
(CPC) campaigns as downright
troublesome, because when
assigning value to when a user clicks
on an ad, one must bear in mind that
the people who click are rarely the
people who an advertiser is trying
to reach. Users with time to click
and divert their journey are not in
a hurry to get anywhere. Clickers
are usually retired and have limited
income. If a marketing campaign
is designed to maximise clicks,
it reaches out to the wrong
audience in the wrong context.
We nd that brand lift how
favourably consumers feel about
a company actually declines
when campaigns are optimised
towards clicks.
Although useful in situations where
insight or information is limited,
models are equally troublesome.
Theyre not perfect just
approximations, he points out.
With a model you are limiting
the factors that inuence an
outcome to the variables you
included in the model. This is
why models work best when
they are describing a simple,
predictable pattern. Using
models for online marketing can
be helpful in situations where
data is limited, but they are poor
approximations at best. They
rely on a limited set of factors
(variables) that dont come close
to capturing all the inuences
that affect a user journey. And
the models themselves are
used with a narrow set of data,
because no company can track
all the inuences on a consumer
journey. Marketers may have
to use models because there is
no better option for them yet,
but they shouldnt become too
comfortable doing so.
Which is where big data comes in.
Until recently, he states online
marketing has been a process
of trial and error which is a
wasteful approach. But there
has been no alternative. Now
we are coming into a world of
big data where one can predict
how a campaign will perform
even before it launches, he
remarks. Big data means
enough information to predict
user behaviour with statistical
certainty. And big data means
we dont need a model, but
instead take advantage of any
correlation or pattern within the
data that proves to be useful. I
dont need to understand why
mothers are increasingly likely
to watch shows about vampires
and keep in mind, a model
would have missed this if no
one had predicted it. With big
data, if Im marketing a show
about vampires, I know to target
moms. If I need to reach moms,
Ill use vampires. Understanding
correlation is much easier than
understanding causation.
Therefore the best way to
understand ones audience
is to use big data. Having
entrenched themselves in
this approach, Insights from
Exponential for example, tracks
everything customers are doing
on their network what they
are interested in, concerned
about, evaluating and buying.
Increasingly, theyre bringing
in ofine data as well. That
gives us a big picture view.
We collect volumes of data
anonymously, respecting
peoples privacy. And of
course, most of the data isnt
even relevant. The intelligence
is being able to cut through
the noise to identify real
patterns, and then using these
patterns to predict who your
next customer will be. Thats
the most effective approach
you can take, to maximise the
impact of your campaign.
*eXponential owns global online
advertising provider Tribal Fusion,
who opened their rst ofce in SA
two years ago.
At the recent IMC Conference in Johannesburg, Bryan Melmed,
director of insights strategy at Exponential, explained why when trying
to understand audiences and consumer behaviour, big data is so
huge these days. Magdel Louw reports
USERS WITH TIME TO CLICK AND DIVERT THEIR JOURNEY
ARE NOT IN A HURRY TO GET ANYWHERE. CLICKERS ARE
USUALLY RETIRED AND HAVE LIMITED INCOME
or go home

ad antage v February 2013 27
MEDIADIRECTION
SIMILAR SENTIMENTS were
expressed during the height of xenophobia
in 2008, when the authorities were caught
by surprise and were ill-prepared to introduce
measures to nd communication solutions for crisis
management. Indeed, labour specialists and human
resources professionals have a specic role to play,
however they are not necessarily academically t to
deal with perception surgery.
NICE TO HAVE?
Against this background one needs to assess whether
or not executives engage PR or communication
experts as a nice to have, or if they really appreciate
the role they can play to change perceptions
and enhance strategic relationships between
an organisation and its internal and external
stakeholders. Senior executives need to move
closer to the purpose of PR and gain a more
professional understanding of how they can utilise
PRISA registered members; consultants or In-house
communicators, especially during crisis situations.
A crisis management communication strategy must
be a permanent priority, and be adjusted regularly
according to changing market conditions taking
account of economic, social and political situations.
Such a plan is not only relevant to the mining and
manufacturing sectors, cutting across every type of
business as they may all face a crisis in one form or
another. Executives need to review the qualities of
their communicators and perhaps consider having
job descriptions revised or reviewed to take account
of our changing society and organisational needs.
Communication professionals must work hand-in-
hand with top executives to remain informed and
prepared for prospective crisis situations.
A HOLISTIC VIEW
When faced with a decision to appoint a consultancy,
or to replace the current service provider with
another, business executives are well advised to
secure the services of Accredited in Public Relations
Practitioners (APR), or Chartered Practitioners
(CPRP). As in the case of other service sectors such
as nance, legal or accountancy, PRISA members
subscribe to the Code of Ethics and Professional
Standards of the Public Relations Institute. Their
services can
be engaged
for a myriad of
communication
services, including
intervention of
an organisations
marketing plan and
development of
a communication
strategy that takes
account of the
implementation of
any publicity that
may be deemed
necessary for the
task at hand.
While advertising
agencies have a
specic function
in terms of
client strategy
development and creative implementation,
communication consultants take a more holistic
view on the eects of the total communication
value chain on external markets as well as on
employees. In other words, well-roundedness of
practice. As they have more frequent access to
executive opinion, and as a consequence, more
responsibility to develop executive messages for
both external and internal consumption, they could
be charged with the responsibility to manage the
clients advertising agency, to advance synergies in
the total communication programme and ensure
that the knock-on eect is properly managed.
Several communication consultancies (still referred
to by some as PR agencies) which are members
of PRISA, engage marketing, creative, design,
branding and web professionals to ensure a more
direct, expedient and complete client service, the
lack of which has led to much frustration in the
client/consultancy relationship. The outsourcing
of services to multiple venders creates disjointed
communication programmes and additional
costs. The transformation of the face and purpose
of PR is evident in the fact that the sector has
been accommodated in the Loerie Awards, in
addition to the Institutes own public relations and
communication awards, the PRISM awards.
THERE TO CHERRY PICK
Instant messaging is a requirement of most
practitioners, and as the communication consultant
has the media contacts, he or she is the inuencer,
yet again conrming the necessity for proximity
or partnership with the client and then to direct
downstream service providers for further action in
other forms of communication activities.
Taking account of all PR practitioners, from the
Government Communication and Information
System (GCIS) with which PRISA has a strong
association including directing member knowledge,
to consultancies and company in-house employees,
the sector boasts several thousand academically
qualied workers, contributing towards a multi-
billion rand communication industry.
The resources are there for executives to cherry pick
and to transform their actions and perceptions,
but ultimately a better understanding of and
appreciation for how public relations and
communication experts can elevate your companys
brand is imperative.
With the recent unrest in the mining and manufacturing sectors, and the extended discussions to nd
solutions for labour demands, the role of the public relations (PR) practitioner or the in-house communication
specialist needs to be pulled closer to the environment of executive decision making
By Adele Paulsen, chief executive Public Relations and
Communication Management Southern Africa (PRISA)
adding value to your companys bottom line
Adele Paulsen
CEO PRISA
Helping brands write better
success stories
WE HAVE BEEN personifying brands for
years. We have used constructs such personality
traits, identity, purpose and values to describe
brands. My question is then, what makes a brand
human? Is it the mere fact that we have ascribed
a handful of randomly picked human traits to it,
or is there something more behind this concept of
humanising brands?
Is our current marketing and branding theory
as well as literature capable of helping us
successfully humanise brands? In a category that
is infamous for jargon, double speak and as a
result total confusion and loss of credibility, how
can we help brands become more human? All of
this without making the brand strategy process
more complex and as a result further losing face
and credibility with clients. Lets face it; the
truth is that brand strategy is daunting to the
best of us, and it is becoming more daunting
due to the increasing pressure and scrutiny the
advertising industry currently faces.
It is this conundrum that inspired me and my
colleague and co-author, Thys de Beer to go on
a three year odyssey into the world of branding,
psychology, sociology and even history. At the
end of this journey, we have emerged with a few
very simple rudimentary truths:
ILe fuLuie of biand sLiaLegy is veiy Luman
ILe mosL successful biands in LLe woild aie LLe
brands that emulate human behaviour to a tee
Peisonifying biands is noL enougL, Lumanising
a brand is total commitment and a complete
immersive process
People do foim veiy 'Luman' ielaLionsLips wiLL
brands, but only the brands that have gotten
it right and have moved beyond being merely a
wannebee personied product
Bumanising biands is as mucL a mind-seL and a
way of looking at brands and their subsequent
growth as it is a process that one undergoes
After three years we have developed a complete
Brand Success System called The Human Brand
Theory. Far beyond nding a new way of creating
brand jargon and personifying brands, the Human
Brand Theory was born and conceptualised from
the dream to both simplify brand strategy, and
also to make the brand strategy process and
methodology more effective and predictable. It is
impossible to condense and squeeze three years of
research into a short article and hope that a time
pressed reader would actually take in what he or
she is reading. So in light of this, I will strive to
give you the brutal highlights.
IT IS ABOUT THE BRANDING OF AN IDEA
JusL like LLe BigLei Puipose oi ideal concepL
that Millward Brown preaches in their
research reports, the rst critical parameter
in successfully creating a human brand is
the understanding that you are not branding
a product, service or company. You are in
fact creating a human face, experience and
relationship around a powerful higher ideal.
This is nothing new; everyone has heard of the
concept called Brand Essence. The kicker is that
this development of the essence or purpose
will have to be far more deeply rooted in the
psyche of your consumer than ever before.
Saying that your brands essence is Innovation
is simply not enough. Understanding that there
is a powerful correlation between Nikes drive to
inspire excellence and the concept of wisdom and
intellectual emancipation that underpinned the
renaissance. Both are powerful higher ideals that
resonate with people on a higher emotive level.
IT IS TURNING INTO A SCIENCE
I can just see how all the old school guys are pulling
a very sour face here, but the brutal truth that we
are going to have to accept is that the process of
creating a truly human brand is far more scientic
than the haphazard fuzzy logic that we have been
using up until now. Human brands develop and
grow in the same way human beings do; slowly,
over time, methodically and systematically.
However, this is good news for an industry that is
under pressure. The more scientic we can make
it, the better for us and our credibility.
IT IS FAR BEYOND PERSONIFICATION
As human beings we are far more than just an
identity or a personality, we are complex and
multi layered, yet we expect our brands to be
one or two-dimensional at best. The brutal truth
is that human brands are multi layered and
complex. This ensures that they are truly unique
and authentic. This means that when developing
a human brand, we need to look beyond identity
archetypes, models and traits. Again, this can
only count in the favour of the brand as the brand
environment is lling up with more and more
competitor offerings. More layers, creates more
differentiation and more points of connection and
relevance.
BRANDDIALOGUE
By Andre Le Roux, Brand Strategist at Mercury 1
One of the hottest topics in branding at present is the drive to humanise brands, branding and the brand
experience. All of this is of course done in the hope that the brand will be far more engaging, relevant and
authentic to consumers, who will hopefully form a lasting and passionate bond with the brand in question
28

ad antage v February 2013
Andr le Roux
TRANSCENDING
Human brands strive to transcend. That means
that these brands strive to become more than
brands, but instead they become a face and
spokesperson for a powerful ideal or idea. They
stop being about a mere product and a service,
they become something more and an integral
part in the life of its consumers / friends. Take a
look at Apple, Nike and IBM, for example.
RELATIONSHIPS
Various research studies now empirically
conrm that consumers form very human
relationships with brands, from relationship
denition to how they think about the
role of the brand in their lives. But,
relationship building takes time. It does not
happen overnight, or through a television
commercial, but rather through a complete
and consistent brand dialogue and interaction
design to instil trust and reciprocity.
Accordingly, when human brands make a
mistake, they need to apologise and act just
like us mere mortals.
TELL STORIES
This dialogue that human brands have with human
beings is more than a dialogue, it is a story that
they tell and share with us. Human brands do not
communicate they tell stories. This is something
that is quintessentially human; we tell stories to
engage, relate, share and create compassion
human brands are the same and as a result,
communication is becoming more complex but also
more effective. The only catch is that as with the
higher purpose, the stories need to be rooted in
the psychology and sociology of powerful ideas and
people. Stories need to engage on a higher level.
THE HUMAN BRAND THEORY
So what is the Human Brand Theory? Apart from
being a labour of love, it is a complete brand
methodology that strives to build powerful
human brands that are more engaging, more
authentic and that resonate with people on a
higher level. It encompasses all of the principles
that I have shared with you into one systemic
thought process. The Human Brand Theory is
more than a piece of literature; it is a way of
looking at brand growth and development. From
the testing that we have done over the past two
years, we have achieved great successes utilising
components of the methodology as we have
moulded and shaped the theory and application.
Rooted in branding, consumer behaviour,
psychology and sociology, the Human Brand
Theory and theoretical constructs is going to be
the future of brand strategy. Accordingly, it can
help us to stop throwing spaghetti and meatballs
at walls and to become truly scientic and more
effective in the way we build brands and engage
with consumers.
Together with de Beer, we have created a new
strategic brand success system that is called
The Human Brand Theory. It is a Methodology
specically developed to create better brands.
Brands that are more human, more principled,
more purpose driven, more engaging, more stable,
more relevant, more human needs focused and
that is aimed on building healthier commitment
lead relationships! Our entire goal is to create
a holistic system for consistent brand success
creation to build brands with integrity.
ad antage v February 2013 29
BRANDDIALOGUE
ur
brandlng
stratcgy
nccds to
bccomc morc
sclcntlhc
ln ordcr
to cnsurc
succcss
Martin Lindtstrom, Buy-ology
DIGITALDEBATE
30

ad antage v February 2013
uhL 3uLP
1LLPhuLuG9 I3
RLhnRlL1IhG...
Its not exactly a new trend, but its still
a buzz word among many digital media
specialists worldwide. It was rst applied
in 2010 by Google AdWords and has
since changed the way advertisers speak
to customers online. What remarketing
fundamentally means is to give advertisers
the power to re-market products and
services to people who have previously
visited a site, but left without making any
purchases and by showing them relevant
ads when they visit other sites on an Ad
Network. This then helps to connect with
potential customers while they browse
other websites.
Remarketing has proven its success for
Lighthouse Digital in a campaign for a long-
standing client, Air France. The aim was to
boost its online sales and further grow the
brand. The campaign was aimed to increase
awareness of Air France and its online
reservation service, to boost sales and to
position it as an economical alternative
to other international carriers, resulting in
more than 5.2 million potential travellers
interacting with the brand.
Remarketing is already a huge success
internationally and remains a powerful way
to stay engaged with the target audience.
So far the campaign has exceeded our
clients expectations with exceptionally
high numbers of ights being booked. Its
reassuring to see a massive corporation
like Air France making digital such a huge
priority, continues Van Schaik.
Since the launch of remarketing there has
been a certain amount of speculation
around privacy issues of users and the
effect on Return on Investment (ROI).
However, for many digital media agencies
like Lighthouse Digital, these concerns are
both unfounded and exaggerated.
PRIVACY MATTERS
The technology is only able to trace a
particular website users have viewed. No
personal identication can be tracked.
International organisations have stepped
up to try to provide some necessary
education to consumers and advertisers
about remarketing and its privacy issues.
For example, the Interactive Advertising
Bureau (or IAB), an advertising business
organisation that develops industry
standards, conducts research, and
provides legal support for the online
advertising industry, created the Privacy
Matters campaign to educate consumers
on targeted ads and squash the fears of
privacy groups that have misunderstood the
methods behind ad targeting.
Because remarketing is a powerful way to
stay engaged with your target audience,
presenting them with highly relevant ads
and offers across the Web makes sure a
brand is top of mind when the consumer is
ready to buy. For clients this is good news
as its been proven that remarketing can
radically improve ROI. Its also possible
to achieve even higher conversions by
combining other targeting methods, such
as interest categories, demographics, or
keyword campaigns.
REMARKETING IS
OFTEN CONFUSED WITH
BEHAVIOURAL TARGETING.
WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE?
Remarketing is a more general term and
exists in many forms. It uses a companys
rst-party data about consumer intent
whereas behavioural targeting uses third-
party data from external cookies and
database appends.
The way in which most companies determine
their consumer interest is through purchase
behaviour and browse behaviour.
In purchase behaviour one looks at a clients
previous purchases to determine what they
are likely to be interested in purchasing
in the future. This form of remarketing
allows companies to present personalised
promotions and messages to a consumer.
Browse-based remarketing measures
the consumer interest through website
engagement, such as the pages and
content a visitor viewed on a website.
WHY NOW?
Why its taken so long for South African
digital media advertisers to make use
of the technology and the exceptional
benets that it come with? It boils down to
there not being enough people accessing
the internet to track accurately. Fortunately
for advertisers this is no longer the case
with many South Africans now making
digital a priority for all their news and
information. The volumes have thus
increased and so has the ability to track
users online habits.
Remarketing is an essential tool for any
business to have if they hope to maximise
their advertising investment in digital.
By Aaron Van Schalk
1PL uIGI1nL hLuIn 3PPLRL I3 nuunhLIhG n1 3uLP n RnPIu PnLL uI1P
hLu 1LLPhuLuG9 nhu 1RLhu3 1Pn1 nRL in31 LLLLuIhG LPLL1n1Iuh3
ui hnh9 u3LR3 nhu nuuLR1I3LR3. 31n9IhG nPLnu I3 L33Lh1InL iuR nh9
uIGI1nL hLuIn nGLhL9 PuPIhG 1u 1PRIuL Ih 1PI3 u9hnhIL LhuIRuhhLh1
What
remarketing
fundamentally
means is
to give
advertisers
the power
to re-market
products
and services
to people
who have
previously
visited a site
Lighthouse Digital was established in 2009 and is the brainchild of MD, Aaron Van
Schaik whose extensive background in the media industry, practical business savvy
and keen sense of emerging trends within the digital media sector have contributed
to the companys growing success.
Lindsay Leppan MD
At Y&R Durban were a
bunch of devoted sleeve
rollers who also believe
in keeping things local.
Utilising our hometowns
talent and adding to
its valuable growth.
And because were part
of a global network, we
apply knowledge relevant
in all markets to your
local brand and elevate
it to a level unmatched
before. So dial the 031
area code, followed by
566 4178. Our sleeves are
rolled up and ready to
make resisting the usual
standard every day.
whyweare.co.za
contact: lindsay_leppan@za.yr.com
INDEPTH
32

ad antage v February 2013
KEVIN POWER, MD
AND CO-FOUNDER,
CONVERSATION LAB
Leading the charge is Kevin Power, MD and
co-founder of Conversation LAB, a creative
agency established last year. Power and his co-
founders, Tamerin Borland and Jonathan Oliff
(who, with Kevin, all come from TBWA\Hunt\
Lascaris) and London creative director Christian
Anstice, believe that a new type of agency is
needed in todays world.
Power has stated: The advertising industry is at an inexion point some agencies are
embracing change but many are not. He says this is the age of conversations. There has
been a lot of talking for a need for change, about ATL struggling, and the death of the 30
second ad. Conversation is happening. It was trend forecast ve years ago and now it is
here. Therefore agencies need to change and adapt or struggle and die, he says.
Agencies need to offer more than advertising. Gone are the days of one audience, one
execution. In todays world we have to create products or make stuff. Thats how the Nike
Plus running tool was created by an agency. And thats the exciting thing and once it
was created, advertising was created to spotlight it. Its the opposite to starting with a
television ad.
The place to do this locally, he says, is Durban. There are great opportunities in Durban, and
there are great brands Unilever, Mr Price and Spar. Durban is literally a stone throw from
Johannesburg. Logistically it is easy to travel with the airport on our doorstep.
How is Durban unique? I dont know. For us it is an area to operate out of. Durban does not
approach things differently to other agencies in other provinces. Our way of doing business
is different, maybe. To me we are not a Durban agency serving SA, but South African
agency from Durban. Durban is just the place you operate from.
JUSTIN MCCARTHY, GROUP
MD,TBWA
Justin McCarthy, TBWA, left Johannesburg three years ago and
headed to Durban. He has also worked in London and the
Middle East. McCarthy says the question of whether Durban
agencies are experiencing a revival presupposes that there
was a high point in the past. I dont recall in the past 19
years Durban setting the world alight. Instead my perception
is that it has been quietly going about its own business very contently.
His attitude to this, and his intention, is to change this and put Durban on the map. We are
the biggest player in the region and we have a responsibility therefore to raise the game.
This vision is being driven rstly from within. We are driving the point within our structure
through a ve year business plan that will put us on the map.
From the infrastructure side there is movement in the province, for example the promenade
upgrade, and the new stadium and airport. There is much rejuvenation in the province.
What is lacking, and this is especially so if you compare Durban to a city such as
Cape Town, is the development of commercial business. The local Chamber of Commerce
and other business interest groups are static. There is no commercial plan for Durban.
Over the years many businesses have also left the province. Some still have manufacturing
capacity here, but their head ofces now sit in Johannesburg. Therefore the local market
has shrunk in the past decade and is still shrinking.
This is an issue. You cannot revive downstream industries without investment to bring
manufacturing back to the province. What is left in Durban is retail, for example Spar,
Unilever and Mr Price, and Government i.e. a portion of Transnet (the Ports Authority).
This means we have to go elsewhere if we are to grow, and if we go outside of the province
it creates an opportunity for conict with other agencies. But I dont see how we have any
other choice. If you tread water long enough you will die. This is the biggest challenge the
local industry faces.
An independent agency established 30 years ago, Whalley and
Associatess MD, Dereck Whalleys has spent most of his life in
Durban. He says there was nothing strategic about starting the
business in Durban I was just here.
In the beginning, he says, Durban was served by multi-national
agencies that handled the majority of the work with smaller
agencies doing the rest. However, in the 70s and 80s, companies
disappeared from Durban moving to Johannesburg. If we talk
about a resurgence in Durban today I am not sure. I will say
there is a strong entrepreneurial spirit in KZN and this has led
to the growth of medium sized agencies and a plethora of small
businesses. If we are talking about Durban itself, then I would
say there has been signicant growth in the last few years, with a
new town centre developing.
The majority of their work, 60%, is outside of KZN with the remaining percentage in the
province and a small bit, which is not signicant, is international. It was not always like
this, but as we developed a name and reputation we grew outside of the provinces borders.
Naturally, for any agency, the hunting ground is Johannesburg, but we also service the
Eastern Cape, with a fair amount of work in Port Elizabeth, East London and further west, in
Cape Town. Over half of our work is in this area with the rest in Johannesburg.
Durban is very nicely situated. Maputo, which is developing very nicely, is round the corner.
We have a port, which brings materials for packaging and printing making the city a
print and Point of Sale (POS) product hub. And of course Johannesburg is easy to get to.
Geographically it is also as easy to get to other places from Durban.
The costing model is below the other provinces so we can offer more bang for your buck. I also
think we have a better turnaround time which is why we have Johannesburg clients. Another
benet of working with a Durban agency is that the client interfaces with the top people in
the agency, which gives a higher level of interpretation and service.
Going forward, business is tough generally and Durban is as well positioned as any other South
African company. We have certainly not been left behind; technology has put us in touch with
the world. Today, any agency anywhere can have a client anywhere in the world, so providing
a service nationally can hardly be a challenge.
KZN is probably demographically the most representative of all the provinces in SA. It is a
microcosm of the South African population and local agencies are exposed to it and have grown
up with this multi-cultural nation, so much so that KZN is a mulit-cultural society already and as
the LSMs continue to shift up they take us and our clients with them.
KWAZULU-NATAL
With so many new developments taking place in KwaZulu-Natal (KZN)
Danette Breitenbach asked a number of agencies in the province if there was
a revival in in advertising as well as why they love working and living in KZN
DERECK WHALLEYS, MD, WHALLEYS AND ASSOCIATES
Inset: Christian Anstice, Creative Director, UK.
Back left to right: Jon Oliff, Head of Innovation,
Simphiwe Mathunjwa, Account Executive.
Seated: Kevin Power, MD, Tamerin Borland,
Head of Strategy and Analytics
ad antage v February 2013 33
KZNFEATURE
CLIVE MCMURRAY,
CHAIRMAN, DRAFTFCB
DURBAN
According to him, the traditional agencies in
Johannesburg and Cape Town now have to
reinvent themselves as media-neutral entities,
whereas it has been business as usual for most
Durban agencies. Durban agencies have never
really had the luxury of only thinking TV when
it comes to creative solutions, so this inherent
diversity of thought stands us in good stead for
the way the media landscape has evolved in
recent years.
Its much more results driven than ever before,
with communication having to work harder to be
heard. Were seeing much more collaboration
between the bigger and more specialist smaller agencies, with clients
benetting from this best of breed mentality in achieving the best possible
creative outcome. In addition, the city boasts a number of returnees from
Johannesburg and Cape Town who have moved here to take advantage of the
attractive lifestyle only Durban can offer. This has had a positive impact on the
creative talent pool.
Durban agencies, with a few exceptions, are used to working with substantially
smaller budgets than their Johannesburg counterparts. The creative
solutions, in whatever form, have simply had to work harder to produce
bottom line results for clients. Those agencies that have been able to
achieve these kind of results on a consistent basis have built long lasting
relationships with their clients, making it very difcult for start up and/or
competing agencies to snatch work away from them. Client/Agency loyalty is
a big thing in Durban, a situation that is precious and ercely protected!
Durban agencies are able to offer quicker, more efcient turnaround times
by virtue of their size. This is largely due to the more hands-on approach to
creative and strategic solutions. Of course, this quick turnaround shouldnt
ever be at the expense of creativity and this approach is evident in Draftfcb
Durban being ranked number four nationally, in the small agency category,
on the Creative Circles ranking table released in 2012.
It is also a fact that some clients need to have their agencies on their doorstep.
They want constant face-to-face contact, often at short notice. The formal
brief and extended deadlines are also few and far between. Many jobs/
projects are generated by getting close to a clients business and seizing
the opportunity to provide a business/marketing/communication solution.
It is also a breeding ground for innovation (even the bunny chow was invented
here). Add to this a beautiful landscape from the sea to the berg, and
you have a good idea of why Durban is the ideal place for an ambitious
advertising agency.
While there is a lot of development taking place in Durban,
and an inux of people into the province, I am not sure this is
fuelling the advertising industry here, says Leppan.
So when one talks about a revival in advertising in KZN,
she says this needs to be quantied: If it means Durban
agencies are coming to the forefront with others sitting up
and taking notice, then the answer has to be no. If you are
talking about revival in the sense that we are re-inventing
ourselves, then yes.
From a business perspective we do need to work together as
an industry to retain our young talent, and keep our business
local. We have denitely not kept our heads buried in the
sand and have stepped up in meeting the needs of businesses in the province.
Leppan is passionate about this region and the industry. I know the agency industry
here is as good as any other in the country, and so it is a source
of irritation to me that this is not always acknowledged. But I
know that this situation is also up to us locals to change.
I believe that the industry needs to install some kind of creativity
into the province and a great way to do this would be to build on
the already many creative and production houses based here. It
would draw revenue into the province. We have the intellectual
capital and competitive price propositions to offer great ROI.
And KZN has the landscape to make this work. The culture,
people and the local environment that we live in with its
diversity means this is a unique province, and if you can crack
an ad here you can crack it anywhere.
2013 will be a challenging year for us and the key to success is to ensure we
an deliver.
DALE
TOMLINSON,MD,
& GEOFF PATON,
EXECUTIVE
CREATIVE
DIRECTOR, HARDY
BOYS
Tomlinson, MD of HardyBoys, does
not view their business as a
Durban one. Thirty per cent
of our business comes from
Johannesburg, another 30%
from Cape Town and another
30% from Africa. For example
we are briefed out of London,
work on Unilever products
across Africa as well as New
York, London and Singapore.
The agency also does lots of
local work. We are a business
located in Durban, he says,
like Barrows, who work all over
the world. It is where we chose to live and work.
Paton describes Durban as the Detroit of SA. Not as sexy as Cape Town or
Johannesburg, but with the recent infrastructure which is still on-going, this
is changing.
A concern for them is talent. We experienced the same brain drain as the rest of
the country as people left for the UK and Australia, but quite a few have returned
and are coming back to their roots. This is often KZN, and because many of them
are older now, with children, they want the lifestyle that Durban offers. Socially it
is more family orientated, says Paton.
But Durban suffers from a perception problem. For example when BMW did a
launch recently they launched in Cape Town, Johannesburg and Bloemfontein.
No-one ever launches in Durban. There is a strange perception that nothing
happens in Durban. I think as an industry we could bang our drum a bit more.
With developments such as the Gateway and Balito, the province is nally exing its
muscles and showing its character. I dont think we have found our identity yet
Cape Town has design and that has dened its identity and we need to dene ourselves.
Perhaps it is the province that is the gateway to Africa. We understand more about
Africa than any other city. Our ability to connect with Africa has made a huge
difference to our business, but I am not sure if this is true for the Durban ad
industry as a whole.
It is a good place to set up business especially manufacturing as it is close to a
good labour source and to the harbour. We believe this will have a spin off for the
local advertising industry.
THE COSTING MODEL IS BELOW THE OTHER PROVINCES SO
WE CAN OFFER MORE BANG FOR YOUR BUCK. I ALSO THINK
WE HAVE A BETTER TURNAROUND TIME WHICH IS WHY WE
HAVE JOHANNESBURG CLIENTS
Dale Tomlinson
Geoff Paton
LINDSAY LEPPAN, MD, Y&R
KZNFEATURE
34

ad antage v February 2013
I
IN KZN THEYRE experiencing the same as
everyone else disruption caused by technology and
new media, says Maggie Wittstock, marketing services
manager at Independent Newspapers KZN. Throw
into the mix a growing middle class and increasing
connectivity between rural and metro areas, and they
have a vastly different province and market from 10
years ago.
Within this changing market the biggest battleground
might very well be the newspapers the fiercest fight is
still between the Zulu language titles that have
generally seen huge growth in comparison to the rest
of the newspaper titles in the country. There is little
evidence of the newcomers cannibalising the existing
English-language titles though, as theyve tapped into
new and growing markets, remarks Alan Dunn, senior
editor KZN.
In fact, last year was another record-breaking year for
Zulu title Isolezwe, says Sazi Hadebe, editor. The main
and weekend editions have all grown in circulation
and advertising revenues. Weve been consistently
above 100 000 since October 2010 (the most recent
third quarter ABCs are at 107 628). After 10 years in
the market, there were concerns that we had reached
our peak, but Isolezwe continues to buck the trend and
surprise us all.
In the second quarter, Isolezwe ngeSontos average
rose above 90 000 to record its highest ABCs since
launching in March 2008, while the one-year-old
Isolezwe ngoMgqibelos sales have already gone from
zero to 73 187 (ABC July September2012).
Theyve also had good advertising support which fuelled
their growth and the size of their papers some days
their daily runs to 60 or even 70 pages.
But he too agrees that the Zulu space has got a bit more
crowded over the past year. It seems some people
have interpreted their success as a call to publish in
Zulu and the readers will come, he quips. Its a bit
confusing out there, but our market positioning is
well-established and weve built up credibility and
loyalty over the years.
Their biggest competitor, ILANGA, has lost some ground
their latest ABC circulation figures showing a drop
from 135 706 to 124 200 (July to September) which
Eric Ndiyane, news director, ascribes to the economic
climate. Nonetheless he reports that in terms of
advertisers, ILANGA has had a very good year,
seeing growth in both direct retail advertising
and national brand.
They had a rough end to the year when over 20 ILANGA
journalists were dismissed in November after they
downed tools to demand the reinstatement of a shop
steward who was dismissed for leading a salary strike
earlier in the year. Soon after, the paper had received
more than 50 new job applications, and gave the
assurance that it ll continue to publish.
Another player entering the field was the
Sunday Times Zulu edition launched over two years
ago. According to the editor, Thulani Mbatha, while
the take-off was quite promising the graph tapered
of a little after a year. Theyre happy though that the
majority of readers sampling the product, stayed. Its
a huge vote of confidence for a publication that has
a unique formula as ours. We have, however,
begun to climb again and this growth feels
more sustainable. The vernacular market in KZN
has massive potential and we believe that good
planning, patience and hard work will yield good
long-term results.
TERRITORIAL ADVANCES
Another contest is between The Mercury and the
Witness, with The Mercury expanding its reach into
The Witness territory of PieLeimaiiLzbuig and the
Midlands. Yet Angela Quintal, the former Mercury
editor who in 2011 took over at the Witness, nds
her new babys current circulation gures a bit
depressing. While they held steady for the 4
th
quarter
in 2011 as well as the rst quarter last year, their
circulation took a knock in the second quarter. Their
most recent ABC gures (July to September) also show
a drop from 19 546 to 18 374. She admits theyve been
too slow in advertising the changes and now theyve
upped their game. Given our small circulation any
decrease hurts and we need to turn that around.
On a more positive note though, after much waiting
the Media24 merger was recently approved by the
Competition Tribunal. This means we can go into 2013
looking forward to some investment in editorial, which
was lacking over the past few years.
Furthermore theyve recently launched the Zululand
replate edition of the Witness and have (nally) found
staff to assist with their South Coast replate edition,
which has received a new injection of life. Slowly
but surely, we are moving to other areas of KZN, and
ieadeis will no longei view us as a PieLeimaiiLzbuigJ
Midlands newspaper only.
On the other hand, having turned 160 years old in
November, The Mercury is holding up well in a very
tough, competitive market, which is likely to just
geL LougLei in LLe new yeai and beyond, says PLilani
Mgwaba, editor. Its latest third quarter ABC circulation
is at a stable 30 040. We have worked hard to keep
our bedrock happy while also trying to attract new
readers, especially from the growing African middle
class. This readership represents the most exciting
prospect for future growth and stability for the title,
she remarks. The priority area now is to work on
changing perceptions. We have come a long way in
terms of our content mix to make the newspaper
appeal to a thinking and aspirational audience
regardless of race.
By Magdel Louw
Gloves off
Competition amongst media in KZN is neck and neck, bearing
evidence of a vibrant market still offering loads of opportunity
IT SEEMS SOME PEOPLE HAVE INTERPRETED
THEIR SUCCESS AS A CALL TO PUBLISH IN
ZULU AND THE READERS WILL COME
in
KZN
Eric Ndiyane Sazi Hadebe
SM COFFEE GUIDE
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D
URBAN investor Glenn Molloy is recovering in an Underberg rehabilitation centre after apparently rying to take his life last week when a R40 million property deal went sour. The mired real estate venture, which saw Molloy unable to reclaim R40m loaned to an associate, has left his creditors, many of who are pen- sioners, high and dry. His clientele also included South African sporting personalities. Molloy owns GM Investments, based in the Fairways Business Park in Mt Edgecombe, which specialises in micro-lending and bridging finance, providing funds immediately on the strength of monies owed to an individual. As a side enterprise, the ex- banker is believed to have invested money on behalf of many of his close friends and others in a closed network, successfully delivering a 17.5% return. Molloy is thought to have pro- vided the R40m capital for a bid to buy the Sardinia Bay Golf Estate near Port Elizabeth in the Eastern Cape. The nine-hole course is girthed by the estate, which is still under development. It is flanked by the Sardinia Bay beach. A source close to Molloy, who would not be named, said the deal was brokered in 2010 but had begun to unravel this year. When the funds could not be repaid, a cash-strapped GM was unable to pay creditors their accrued interest or pay out their capital. In the wake of this, Molloy allegedly tried to take his own life following a nervous breakdown as a result of mounting pressure from his creditors. He is nowin a rehabilitation cen- tre in Underberg. The manner in which he appar- ently tried to kill himself could not be confirmed. Molloy yesterday declined to
I don t want to talk to anyone about what happened with my hus- band, she said. I was not involved in his busi- ness at all so I really can t comment on what went wrong. My husband is an honest man who had one deal turn sour, she added vehemently. Brian Wilke, a creditor of GM, said he stood to lose R2.2m after his investment capital was utilised by Molloy in a property venture. A lot of the creditors who stand to lose a lot of money are pension- ers, the situation really is dire. I have had to put my house up for sale because of this issue, he said. Wilke said Molloy had a close net- work of creditors and his business had been a success for many years. Glenn Molloy was a close friend of many of his creditors and since his business opened its core focus was micro-lending and bridging finance. He said the creditors had held a meeting at the Beachwood Estate on Tuesday to map the way forward and try to get their capital back. As it stands there is not enough capital for GM to pay the interest due to creditors, or pay out their capital if they want to pull out. The thought is that it can still operate doing micro-lending and ll h
nvestors, including sports
stars and pensioners, left
desperate, writes Jeff Wicks
ZOHRA MOHAMED TEKE
ETHEKWINI municipality s head of water and sanitation, Neil Macleod, should answer to a prima facie case of bribery and corruption. This is the finding of a city inves- tigation that has been rejected by McLeod and his boss, city manager S bu Sithole. A report from the city ombuds- man s office, which was leaked to the Sunday Tribune last week, calls for Macleod to be criminally charg- ed amid allegations that he was
involved in tender scams, bribery and corruption over a payment for his wife s British visa, as well as a string of other illegal activities. But Macleod described these alle- gations as part of a dirty tricks campaign to have him removed from office because he had uncov- ered fraud and corruption amount- ing to R25m in his department. In his findings, Acting Ombuds- man and Head of Investigations Nhlanhla Mthethwa accused Mac- leod of failing to report fraudulent and corrupt activities, saying he
had also accepted a bribe. Neil has failed to perform the function of his office in good faith, diligently, honestly and in a trans- parent manner, and a criminal case of corruption against Neil should be reported to the SAPS, he said. Macleod vehemently denied all the allegations, claiming they were as a result of him exposing fraud and corruption in his department. The claims against me are rub- bish and without foundation at all. The truth of the matter is that I have terminated a number of contracts
due to non-delivery of services and discovered a scam where certain se- nior staff in my office were conduct- ing a sophisticated operation where they set up bogus companies or firms that were being paid for serv- ices that were never carried out. I suspended a number of offi- cials in my office and we have insti- tuted criminal proceedings against several of them to recover the loss to the city, which runs into millions of rand as a result of their fraud.
VIVIAN ATTWOOD ication of the Sydenham police. R i Hill b i n On Thursday morning Nair s wife Cynthia went outside for her A flurry of phone calls followed, first to the police and then neigh
Well-known businessman Glenn Molloy
TO PAGE 4
Feathers fly as parrot thief comes a cropper
City official rejects bribery allegation
Jailbird killers
cushy life behind
bars
NOVEMBER 11 2012
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Sharks powerhouse flank Willem Alberts muscles his way upfield for the Springboks, despite the best efforts of Ireland lock Donnacha Ryan, during the Boks first match of their end-of- year tour to the British Isles at the Aviva Stadium in Dublin yesterday. After a disappointing first half, the Boks kicked off their tour with a 16-12 win.FULL STORY: PAGE 28
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TOO YOUNG TO DIE
Tragedy as Haylee, 3, joins the sad drowning statistics
VIASEN SOOBRAMONEY
WHAT was to have been an exciting holi- day for a Durban family turned to tragedy when their toddler drowned in a pool at a
He said they would speak to the media once they had more information. Haylee s mother was not available for comment. The funeral took place on Sun- day
Diwalis
failed miracle
CELEBRATING
1860
SEE PAGE 4
DURBAN
DIWALI
MOMENTS PAGES 9
FIRECRACKER
CASUALTY
AVOCA GRAN
SEE PAGE 3 SEE PAGE 3
MURDERED
We knew our time
with him was limited
but this did not stop
us from praying . . .
CHARLENE SOMDUTH
O
N MONDAY night as Asheen Maharaj s condition took a turn for the worst, his ex- tended family prayed for a miracle. But the 15-year-old from Pietermaritzburg was brain dead and on life support. He died hours later during the early hours of Diwali a day Hindus believe is auspicious. Although his family are struggling to come to terms with the death of his parents and sis- ter in a car accident last Saturday, they are com- forted knowing Asheen is reunited with them. In the early hours of yesterday (Tuesday), doctors at the Inkosi Albert Luthuli Central Hospital broke the news of Asheen s death. He was the sole survivor of a horrific crash, which claimed the lives of his dad Ashwin, 41, mum Ashnie, 39, and sister Ashina, 19, on the N3 near Pinetown. The once vibrant teenager, of Newholmes, sustained severe head and spinal injuries as well as lung damage. The Grade 10 pupil at Raisethorpe Sec- ondary lay in a hospital bed for almost 11 days on life support.
This week doctors gave him until the end of the week to recover. If his condition failed to improve, family were told he would be taken off life support. Asheen s paternal aunt, Anusha Maharaj, said: We knew our time with him was limited but this did not stop us from praying for a mir- acle. We often sat by his bedside and reminded him how much we loved and needed him in our lives. But it seems he was wanted more else- where.
Recited mantras
She said on Monday night the family stayed at his bedside, once again, where they prayed and recited mantras (devotional hymns). We left him at around 8pm assuring him we would be back to visit for Diwali. We were in- stead called in the early hours of the morning and told he had passed away. Although these are trying times for us, we will pull together as we
know all four of them are reunited. She said her nephew was her only link to her brother, sister-in-law and niece. It is going to be difficult to get over all their deaths. The period of Diwali will never be the same for us again. Asheen s cousin, Roshnie Ramsamjuh, said: A week ago we cremated his parents and sister and we are now making arrangements for his funeral. Ramsamjuh said they were receiving coun- selling from Swami Sri MK Anjagan of the Vedanta Institute of South Africa and from their pundit Nishaan Sewpersadh. She added although they were hurting, Asheen and his family would always be remem- bered as the light of their lives. The extended family conducted a prayer yes- terday (Tuesday) to ensure Asheen s soul trav- elled safely into the after-life. Asheen s principal, Indran Pillay, of Raisethorpe Secondary School, said he con-
tacted staff members with the news yesterday morning. We are all in shock. We were certain he would pull through.
Held vigils
Pillay said since the accident, fellow teachers and pupils held vigils for Asheen. Dr Jay Matthew, head of the emergency de- partment at Medi-Clinic in Pietermarizburg, said there was no strict criteria in determining whether a patient should be taken off life sup- port. Matthew, who was not part of Asheen s med- ical team, said doctors assessed each case indi- vidually and a mutual decision was made with the family. Asheen will be cremated later this week at the Clare Estate Crematorium. The last rites will be conducted by his uncle, Ashley Maharaj.
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LYSE COMINS
TOO little too late. That is the reaction of one of the victims of socialite Sifiso Zulu who this week tearfully confessed to killing two people while driving while drunk. Dudu Ngema, who has been left permanently disabled and hobbling along with a stick, said she did not buy his confession to the crash four years ago when Zulu drove his BMW X5 through a red traffic light in Durban and collided with a bakkie carrying 12 congregants from the Soul s Harbour Ministries Church, resulting in the deaths of two passengers and injuries to 10 others. W h i l e some other victims of his crime have ac- cepted his confession
and reconciliatory move, Ngema, 33, believes his sudden remorse is noth- ing but a ploy for pity from the parole board to get out of jail quicker. South Africans Against Drunk Dri- ving (SADD) agree with her. SADD has called for him to be re- tried, dealt a harsher sentence for his crimes and be charged with perjury. Zulu, who this week made a tearful public confession at a Department of Correctional Services KZN Vic- tim-Offender Dialogue in Richards Bay, throughout his trial denied that he was responsible for the horrific accident in 2008. Third year civil engineering student Sdumisile Mncube and an- other student Hlengiwe Dlamini were killed in the accident, and the 10 other bakkie passen- gers were in- jured. Zulu had claimed a friend was the driver. TO PAGE 2
THE
Draw & payouts: Page 4
Zuma
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Then &
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CHRISTMAS Box or not? That s the
KwaZulu-Natal Department of Transport spokesman Kwanele Ncalane discouraged road traffic
Cops on patrol for
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Golfers
pitch in to
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Kates nurse kills herself
ABOVE: Prince William and Catherine, Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, leave the King Edward VII Hospital this week. LEFT: John Lofthouse, chief executive of the hospital, speaks about the death of Jacintha Saldanha. PICTURE: REUTERS
DAILY MAIL AND STAFF REPORTERS
T
HE WORLD reacted with shock and anger last night after a nurse who trans- ferred a prank phone call from two Australian radio presen- ters about the Duchess of Cam- bridge died in a suspected suicide two days after being duped. Mother-of-two Jacintha Sal- danha, who was working on the switchboard when 2DayFM ob- tained intimate details about Kate, was found dead near London s King Edward VII Hospital yesterday. The Duke and Duchess of Cam- bridge are deeply saddened by the tragedy and a Palace spokesman said the couple had not made a com- plaint about the prank call. Their thoughts and prayers are with Jacintha Saldanha s family, friends and colleagues at this very sad time, a statement said. When asked if they had ex- pressed concern, the spokesman added: On the contrary we offered our full and heartfelt support to the nurses involved and hospital staff at all times. The Palace declined to say whether the Duchess had met Sal- danha but it was very possible. The Duchess was suffering from acute morning sickness at the London hospital and was discharged on Thursday after three nights. In a brief statement, Saldanha s family said: We as a family are deeply saddened by the loss of our beloved Jacintha. We would ask that the media respect our privacy at this difficult time. Last night the owners of the ra- dio station which employed Mel
Greig and Christian Michael an- nounced that they would not return to their show until further notice. The station said: Southern Cross Austereo (SCA) and 2Day FM are deeply saddened by the tragic news of the death of the nurse, Jacintha Saldanha, from King Ed- ward V11 Hospital and we extend our deepest sympathies to her fam- ily, and all that have been affected by this situation around the world. CEO Rhys Holleran has spoken with the presenters, they are both deeply shocked, and at this time we have agreed that they not comment about the circumstances. SCA and the hosts have decided that they will not return to their ra- dio show, until further notice out of respect for what can only be de- scribed as a tragedy. The following is a small sample of the furious reactions on Twitter. Don t fk with the royal family. You ll just end up killing yourself out of your love for queen and country Trig I feel so bad that 2 kids in the UK have to now live with no mother all because of 2 idiotic pranksters in Australia Laura Oliver Oh that poor nurse with the prank!! So sad wubnet Literally cannot believe that poor nurse committed suicide :( nikkk Tragic how them making that hoax call has lead to the nurse who took it kill herself Brian Fantana So sorry Jacintha Saldanha, con- scientious nurse, wife & mother whose life ended due to hoax call RIP Michael Lee
TO PAGE 4
Royal shock at death
of radio prank victim I killed them,
Sifiso admits
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weight racket
YOGAS NAIR
T
WELVE check-in counter officials at King Shaka In- ternational Airport al- leged to be behind a bribery and corruption racket have been bust after a covert oper- ation by the police crime intelli- gence unit. The alleged criminal activity was discovered after a disgruntled passenger travelling to England to see her grandchild on October 26 was deceived into believing that her luggage was 8kg over the al- lowed weight. She paid R2 000 reduced from R4 800 to an attendant at the check-in desk, but her husband be- came suspicious and had the bags weighed in England, only to find they had been duped. The BidAir employees, who have since been fired, had been sub- jected to a polygraph test. Those who failed the test blew the whistle on the others allegedly involved in the bribery and corruption racket. BidAir is a passenger handling company contracted by the airlines. The passenger s husband, who did not want to be named, told the Daily News his wife was a diabetic and became stressed when she was told her luggage was over the weight limit and there was a prospect of her missing her flight, on Emirates via Dubai. I weighed her bags at home and it was about 30.8kg. At the airport, the man at the check-in counter told her the bags were over the weight by 8kg. He said she was the last person in the check-in queue and feared she was not going to make her flight. I tried unsuccessfully to inter- vene. During this time, the check-in attendant told my wife the penalty was R4 800. He then made a call to another attendant about two coun- ters away before disappearing for a few minutes. Excess On his return, he asked my wife what she thought she should f h l k d
were facing bribery and corruption charges. They were expected to ap- pear in the Verulam Magistrate s Court this week. Naidoo said while this was an isolated incident, some staff had been under observation for a while. We are committed to rooting out any criminal activities, he said. It is also very encouraging to know that the passenger who felt deceived took the matter up and we applaud her. Another source, who wanted to remain anonymous, said the staff had been running the racket for a while. They tamper with the scales and lie to passengers that their lug- gage is over the weight [limit]. They then negotiate a bribe amount to let the excess baggage pass through without detection. Money is often exchanged in private. Police know of one incident, but if they dig deeper they will find many more. Sensitive BidAir s forensic investigator, Connie Viljoen, refused to divulge any information but said investiga- tions were at a sensitive stage. BidAir spokesman, Bob Gurr, did not respond to messages. Naidoo said security at King Shaka International Airport was paramount. He said all staff were scrutinised for any criminal records before they were employed at the airport. We have intensified this process. There is now an increased supervision by the handling com- pany and the airline with added monitoring by airport security agencies. He said Acsa viewed the alleged criminal behaviour of these em- ployees in a very serious light. We believe that the pilferage i d
Cousins die in old car
wreck in scorching heat
BOTHO MOLOSANKWE
TWO CHILDREN suffocated while playing in an old unused car in Zeerust, North West. With the doors locked and the car windows shut in the 36C heat, there was no ventilation for Char- lene and Neo Wilskut, cousins aged two and three.
where the children were, the woman apparently told her that she had last seen them playing next to the yard. She searched everywhere, but could not find them. Some children playing next to the old car in the yard noticed that the girls were inside and told the mother.
on the girls in the hope of waking them up because they thought they had only fainted. The girls, however, did not stir. The girls are believed to have got into the car at about 12.30pm and we got the call at about 2.30pm. When they were found, their skin was badly damaged due to the extreme sunburn they had suf-
City of angels
Page 6
KNOWLER
Page 3
SPORT
PAGES
7
The Durban City Hall saw a unique blizzard on Saturday night as a spectacular high-wire act, featuring daredevils dressed as angels, dropped millions of white feathers on a delighted crowd that had gathered to see it. Spotlighted acrobats of the Studios des Cirque staged Place des Anges (Place of Angels), the closing show of the French Season in South Africa, enchanting hundreds of spectators below from cables spanning the tops of neighbouring buildings and the city hall dome. PICTURE: SHELLEY KJONSTAD
READERSHIP
342 000
CIRCULATION: 31 698
Gugu Mbonambi gugu.mbonambi@inl.co.za
D
URBAN has done an about-face and will be try- ing to get some of its beaches accredited again with the internationally approved Blue Flag beach grading pro- gramme next year. There was controversy four years ago when the city pulled out of the programme. City manager S bu Sithole told The Mercury in an interview that the municipality was reviewing its position onBlue Flags after consult- ing stakeholders in the tourism in- dustry. Blue Flag status is awarded to beaches that meet international standards of excellence in safety and security, cleanliness, water quality, environmental information and management. Durban withdrew from the Blue Flag programme in 2008, after the municipal manager of the time, Michael Sutcliffe, criticised the in- consistent application of standards and what he said was inconclusive research on the use of Blue Flag water quality measures in subtrop- ical waters. He claimed that certain bacteria were likely to survive longer in the warmer Indian Ocean tempera- tures off Durban compared with the cooler seas in the Cape and that this was skewing the results. The decision generated wide- spread comment, including criti- cism that the municipality was in- capable of maintaining clean seas because of frequent sewer and stormwater contamination. Last week Ted Knott, the Wildlife and Environment Society of South Africa s national coastal project manager and co-ordinator, said the international Blue Flag testing stan- dards were beyond reproach. He said eThekwini s argument i i d d th
Blue Flag International about the concerns eThekwini had raised. We are aligned with the World Health Organisation and we abide by its criteria. They have not recog- nised any difference between cold and warm waters as far as micro- biological indicators are con- cerned, he said. Knott added that beaches on the Hibiscus Coast were accredited and there was not much difference be- tween the weather conditions in eThekwini and the south coast. After pulling out of the Blue Flag programme, eThekwini imple- mented its own water quality stan- dard which does not appear to con- form to World Health Organisation guidelines. The city s water and sanitation head, Neil Macleod, has previously said the city s laboratory is accred- ited by the South African National Accreditation System and runs stringent quality tests that check the quality of water for drinking. Macleod could not be reached for comment. Sithole said although reapplying for the programme could cost a bit more, after careful consideration he was convinced that it was some- thi th it d dt d
reason why we shouldn t. After speaking to people in the tourism sector it s clear to me that it is some- thing people want, he said. There are eight Blue Flag beach- es in KwaZulu-Natal, seven on the Hibiscus Coast and Alkantstrand in Richards Bay. KwaZulu-Natal Economic Deve- lopment and Tourism MEC Mike Mabuyakhulu announced last year that the province should adopt and pilot one common beach manage- ment classification system that was internationally accredited. Mabuyakhulu first tabled the proposal in April saying that, once a fully fledged policy was in place, all KwaZulu-Natal municipalities with beaches would have to adhere to the system. Mabuyakhulu s spokesman, Bheko Madlala, said the policy was in place and he advocated the estab- lishment of a committee compris- ing all coastal municipalities to en- sure that KwaZulu-Natal s beaches conformed to Blue Flag standards. He pointed out that the Blue Flag programme was voluntary. Howev- er, the department was in the process of establishing a Provincial Beach Tourism Management Com- ittee to oversee the implementa
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Durbans popular North Beach, which was packed with bathers yesterday, could be one of the many beaches to be accredited with the internationally approved Blue Flag grading programme next year. PICTURE: JACQUES NAUDE
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FAIREST OF THEM ALL
Red wine IS good for you
Mercury Correspondent
RED wine quaffers take note: there is more to that goblet of vino than generating a feeling of well-being. New research suggests that red wine can halve the rate of bowel cancer, and may also help prevent heart disease and diabetes. The secret is a substance called resveratrol, a compound found in the skin of red grapes. University of Leicester researchers said in anEurekAlert! statement that the health benefits of resveratrol have been known, but it had not been proved that it could be effective in humans, nor what the best dose was. After using laboratory models, theyhave foundthat a daily
stage by carrying out clinical trials to find out the optimum level of resveratrol in humans. Researcher Karen Brown said a lot of people took resveratrol as a supplement, but it was not known how it worked or on whom it could work. At the University of Leicester we want to see how resveratrol might work to prevent cancer in humans. Having shown in our lab experiments that it can reduce tumour development, we are now concentrating on identifying the mechanisms of how resveratrol works in human cells. We don t even know the best dose you should take. It has been shown that high doses of resvera- trol maypotentiallyinterfere with
Marilyn Ramos, centre, from North West, was crowned Miss South Africa at a glittering ceremony at the Sun City Superbowl last night. She is flanked by first princess Stacey Webb, from Cape Town, left, and second princess Pearl Nxele, from Mandeni in KwaZulu-Natal. The crown has passed from Melinda Bam, who was not present in Sun City owing to her commitments in the Miss Universe pageant. PICTURE: DUMISANI SIBEKO
CIRCULATION: 30 040
READERSHIP
237 000
KZNFEATURE
36

ad antage v February 2013
TAKING AIM
Daily Sun KZN has started to make
inroads into the province about a
year ago with its 2012 circulation
gures at around 25 000, says
regional editor Thobile Nxumalo
at 36 one of the youngest editors
in the country. But its still not
an easy market as her vision is to
grow its circulation to 40 000 by
the middle of this year. Sounds
daunting. Yet she insists she has a plan. I am
working at synergies and better deals that could see
the Daily Sun partnering with other media platforms,
especially broadcast platforms like radio, to enhance
visibility and drive awareness campaigns up a notch
or two.
Dunn, Daily News editor, remarks that although sales
of the 134 year old Daily News are not where they
want them to be, they have quality buyers as well
as a deeply loyal base. Their latest ABC circulation
(July-September) is at 31 698, down from 33 214 the
previous year. But we have 342 000 readers, making
it the best read English
language
daily by far in
the province,
he points out.
They also boast
a committed
subscriber base
of more than
half their sales.
Sunday Tribune
editor, Jovial
Rantao, remarks
that this weekend read has
also managed to retain a
loyal core of readers, its
40 000 subscriber base
remaining consistent
over the last ve years. It
remains the biggest selling
English Sunday title in KZN with its third quarter
ABC circulation at 74 856, down from 82 477 the
year before. In addition the Sunday Tribunes latest
offering KZN Business is hugely popular with
readers, entrepreneurs and advertisers too. Our readers
are inspired by deals, successes and entrepreneurship
nearer home.
Most positive though is the Durban based weekly, POST,
aimed at the Indian community. This publication has
shown year-on-year growth for thethird consecutive
quarter according to the July-September ABCs. These
latest gures indicate its circulation is up 2.7% year on
year, from 43 413 to 44 585. Aakash Bramdeo, editor,
says eacL issue is also available in PPI foimaL online, Lo
interact with readers outside of the normal distribution
network of Durban and Johannesburg. He points out
that a decreasing proportion of their market is living
in KZN. According to the 2011 Census, 59% of the
1.3 million Indian/Asian population resides in KZN
down from 72% in 2001. These electronic extensions
make it far easier for them to reach these readers.
Reecting on the future of KZN
newspapers as a whole, Dunn points
out that as the internet audience
grows in sophistication, understanding
that what theyre reading is often
neither ltered, nor balanced, they
search for an article carrying all points
of view in one instead of jumping
from one site to the next in the hunt
for balance. This is why established
newspapers websites attract such
trafc. Its about trust.
GROUND FORCES
When it comes to the boxing ring of the local newspapers,
JoLan PieLoiius, gioup ediLoi of Ievei PublicaLions, a
subsidiary of the Natal Witness Group, has no doubt
that KZN is one of the most competitive newspaper
environments in SA, and readers are absolutely spoilt
for choice. Added to that the entire local newspaper
sector in KZN is growing as consumers have shown
a positive disposition towards free sheets that are
delivered to their doors. These give them a good
dose of what is happening in the
immediate vicinity around them,
as well as providing advertising
from local stores.
In fact 19 of their free local
newspaper titles under the
umbrella of the Natal Witness
Group, are based in KZN. In the
past year the Fever has also
opened new titles in Hillcrest,
Durban North and Ballito that
were identied as growth areas.
Our local newspaper titles have
shown good growth gures despite
the national economic downturn,
he states.
Caxton Newspapers has also
invested heavily in KZN over
the last two years with the
introduction of eight isiZulu
publications, bringing their total to nine covering
the major commercial areas of the province, says
Brian Letsogo from the Newspaper Advertising Bureau
(NAB.) The most recent launch is the Eyethu papers
in townships, bringing the number of free isiZulu
newspapers (branded Eyethu in their geographic areas)
distributed by Caxton on a weekly basis to 265 000.
On the other hand their sold titles are also quite stable.
The most recent ABC circulation gures (July to
September) for the Zululand Observer is 8 464, the
weekend edition being at 14 022, while the South
Coast Herald is at 15 155 and the Newcastle Advertiser
at 9 813.
In contrast to their former Gauteng titles, Famous
PublisLing's communiLy magazines aie especially
strong in KZN too. While The Ridge, The Crest and
Business in Durban declined in ad revenue up to the
middle of the year, this has steadily been growing
again. Currently theyre developing a completely new
community integration portal. Its something I have
not seen anywhere before and I think it has massive
potential, comments
Tim Lombard, MD.
AIR COMBAT
KZN radio too, has been
exing its muscles.
Having revamped
the station and
changed presenters
and shows, East Coast Radios
latest RAMS gures are now at over 1.6 million
listeners. Maintaining their position as the number
one independent commercial radio station in the
country, their average day listenership is stable at
913 000 listeners per day, says Naveen Singh,
programming manager. We are the 8th favourite radio
station in the country and once again, the number
one regional station in the country. Their website, at
the core of their digital strategy, is also consistently
the most visited radio website in the country. I think
after being a bit stagnant over the last few years,
radio in KZN has re-invented itself with community
radio becoming more relevant, newer stations like
Vuma opening and the current stations all becoming
more proactive in entertaining audiences, adding value
to them on a daily basis, she reects.
A new authentically isiZulu 24-hour commercial radio
station, Vuma 103 FM, went live in November. It
ieacLes gieaLei Puiban, beyond PieLeimaiiLzbuig,
Greytown, Ballito on the North Coast and Scottburgh
on the South Coast. As the stations main shareholders
are KNI and One Gospel TV Channel, it features
popular inspirational and gospel music, both local and
inLeinaLional, sLaLes sLaLion managei, PLindi 0ule.
Gagasi 99.5FMs programme manager, Vukile Zondi,
remarks that although theyve seen a slight decrease
in their latest diary, at 1.78 million listeners, they are
still the second largest regional commercial station in
the land.
Mu Ngcolosi, marketing manager of the SABCs agship,
Ukhozi FM, adds that their numbers have actually
grown by just under a million listeners on last years
gures, their latest RAMS gures being
7.3 million still the countrys largest listenership.
PLakamani HkLwanazi, piogiamme managei foi
community station Radio Khwezi, reports its audience
too has grown signicantly over the past year from
128 000 in August 2011 to 191 000 in August last year
(RAMS August 2012). Yet the highlight of the year is
the four MTN Radio Awards they won. Many stations
in in KZN have seen a growth in listenership. There
are at least three new stations that have gone on air
recently too.
Reecting on the state of radio in in KZN, Zondi
points out that KZN radio still has the potential
to grow immensely. New kid on the block, Vuma,
will be entering the contest for KZNs black adults.
We also have a few community stations in this
region such as Vibe FM, Inanda FM, Izwi Lomzansi,
amongst others, who serve their community of
interest in a meaningful and unique way. The KZN
radio scene is very exciting at the moment, as
competition is getting stronger by the day, which is
good for the industry.
Angela Quintal
What is Zulu cool exactly?
Zulu cool can be quite a broad term. The Zulu nation
has always prided itself on its heritage, and so the
existence of Isolezwe has by and large created a
platform to express this. This Zulu coolness is to be
found in many kwaito/hip hop songs that are laced
with Zulu lyrics. Theres also the long running 99%
Zulu Comedy. It is important to note that there are
no other indigenous South African languages that
have events like Zulu Comedy. Many youngsters,
the so-called bornfrees, are to be seen shopping
malls in trendy T-shirts that have Zulu idioms and
some have the clan names of their surnames. Weve
seen a revival of maskandi music and it is attracting
a lot of youngsters.
Too cool for school
The concept of Zulu cool has taken on a life of its own in KZN. Expert
Sandile Mdadane, Isolezwe weekend editor, tells Magdel Louw all about it
Whats your view of this phenomenon?
It is a good thing because it shows that youngsters
are very much in touch with their heritage. Were
talking of urban Zulu people here, who are
vigorously expressing their cultural heritage in
ways that weve never seen before.
Is Zulu cool growing?
Gradually, yes. When you look at social networking
sites, like Twitter and Facebook, Zulu is quite
dominant compared to other indigenous
languages. On Facebook for instance, the
cyberspeak like LOL (laugh out loud), LMAO
(laugh my a**of), has its own Zulu versions
like GBPY (Gilikidi bhu phansi yinsini), loosely
translated means rolling on the foor with
laughter. No other indigenous language has that.
How has Isolezwe gone about
incorporating the notion of Zulu cool?
Isolezwe IS Zulu cool. When it was launched, the
paper set out to capture urban readers who are
cool with taking their families out for dinner at
the Spur on weekdays and then on weekends
head to the rural areas to slaughter a cow or a
sheep. That is our kind of reader. The Saturday
edition for instance has the popular social picture spread, where we splash photos of festivities
that our readers engage in. The most constant
ones are traditional ones and they come from the
townships, the suburbs and the rural areas. So we
appeal to all these people. Cause even if a Zulu
person stays in a leafy suburb, ensconced in air-
conditioned rooms they are still in tune with
their tradition.
Where else is Zulu cools inuence and
presence seen?
Apart from the example of 99% Zulu Comedy and
maskandi music, theres also a huge revival of
poetry by young people who are proud of their
heritage. And the underground hip-hop scene
is awash with Zulu emcees. There are those who
have become popular and got national recording
deals like rapper actor Zuluboy, Zakwe and
Abdus. These guys strictly rap in Zulu. What can
defne Zulu cool more than a mixture of hip-hop
and Zulu?
Sandile Mdadane
ad antage v February 2013 37
Gilikidi bhu phansi yinsini
KZNFEATURE
KZNFEATURE
KZN FACTS
92 100 square km - size of the province
20.7% - of the national poplaution of working age
live in KZN
51.4% - of the population are economically active
50% - of the population are considered to live
in poverty
This hasnt changed the day to day operation, or
our intensity. What we do and how we do it goes on.
The people in our company remain as dedicated
as ever and were all watching the sale with great
interest. There is some uncertainty but its part of the
game, were in a dynamic industry. So I dont sense
it is hurting us at all.
Alan Dunn, senior editor KZN and Daily
News editor, gives his take on the possible
sale of Independent Newspapers
Grow your
business with
the countrys
leading isiZulu
newspaper.
All three Isolezwe
titles INCREASED in
circulation year-on-year.
Readership: AMPS 2012A | Circulation: ABC July-September 2012.
Durban: 031 308 2588,
Cape Town: 021 422 1094,
JHB: 011 639 7100.
KZNFEATURE
AS MOST OF THEIR buyers are
commuters, they try to be wherever they are, be it at
the stations, ranks or street corners. Yet, it got tricky
for their busy sellers carrying a lot of Isolezwe copies
to move around when the morning rush is over, says
Sazi Hadebe, editor. So our distribution guys designed
a tricycle that can carry a few hundred copies and,
being mobile, the vendor can move when the foot trafc
changes. Weve got ve mobile sellers now and theyre
selling an average of 1000 copies a day.
Their events and promotions are also a further extension of
their involvement with readers, he adds. Entries pour in
for home appliances, cars, cash and kitchen makeovers.
For our Sunday edition, weve also partnered with
a retailer for a trolley dash where a lucky Isolezwe
ngeSonto buyer gets 60 seconds to shop for free.
One of their competitions over the festive season even
saw a reader winning a cow (for the rst time ever) and
grocery vouchers. For many of our readers, the holidays
are a chance to get together with family and friends and
host a traditional feast which will include the slaughtering
of a cow, a sheep and catering for what can be a
large party. With a cow going for around R10 000, its
something many of us enjoy but it can be a costly affair.
Innovative thinking around distribution and promotion adds much to Isolezwes success
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GAUTENG EDITION R3.00 VAT INCLUDED UMSOMBULUKO, DISEMBA 3, 2012
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KZNFEATURE
40

ad antage v February 2013
The big 160
Independent Newspapers The Mercury celebrated
its 160th birthday in November last year. Having
started in 1852 with a print run of just 300 copies,
it now delivers national and local news to 237 000
readers daily. Here are some snapshots of how it
changed over the years
IN A PROVINCE WHERE vernacular
media is known to be the most talked about
phenomenon, the challenges for the bottom line
in radio, print and on-line are the same as that
in any other major centre of SA. Sales agents
across all sectors of the media in the region will
tell you that budgets are shrinking and clients
want more for less.
But thats not all clients depend on the individual
sales agent to deliver the goods and make good
on their word. Here relationships are everything.
It is therefore no surprise to understand why
certain clients will stick with the same agent for
years on end. The end result is doors will open if
the person is trusted.
While the relationship is crucial in the equation of
the bottom-line, it is without doubt that those
with the smarter approaches and the creative
pitches will always get the nod. Sales agents
and media planners with a savvy approach to
consistently reviving, reviewing and reinventing
their pitches, are able to attract the ad-spend.
The overhaul of the sales pitch to a more creative
and holistic mix to target the non-traditional
media spend is the way to go. But the latest
trend in this formidable approach is that sales
agents with direct links to the client appear to
have the upper hand. But the media agent who
knows what the client wants and merges this
with what the consumer wants is best able to
serve both masters and is the ultimate winner!
In a province where politics, economics, social
challenges and culture dominate, sales
executives on the media shop oor much like
their editorial counterparts are forced to maintain
the edge. This means staying alert keeping
ones eyes and ears open, providing the best
products and opportunities and sometimes
taking risks, to make certain that the client and
consumers of media reap the rewards. In the
current local market, its not just whom you
know, but what you know and what you do with
that which you know.
The region is a viable trade hub where the business
of tourism, big and small business, big industry,
the education sector, and the work of government
at local and provincial levels dominate. Social
challenges such as HIV/Aids, unemployment and
other critical challenges prevail with special event
platforms happening every day. Successful sales
agents in the media understand this powerful
combination and how to leverage off it in a pro-
active and responsible manner.
Another key challenge to the media bottom
line in the region is the consolidation of the
advertising budget in some sectors. This
means that media planners are prone to
splitting the traditional advertising budget in
favour of lucrative online opportunities. Media
entities not able to add value with the online
opportunity stand little or no chance.
At a recent discussion with leading media experts
it was again abundantly clear that, despite the
recent drop in the census data in the province,
the KZN media industry is a dynamic entity
and while ad spend is generically driven by
the LSM and audience numbers, locally the
advertising spend is also determined by the
brand, content and quality of product. The
more relevant and creative the content, the
more likely the ad spend both traditional and
non-traditional.
For media owners, the province provides valuable
lessons in how to do media and do it well. It
provides a range of unique market dynamics and
socio-economic challenges that call for improved
business models and content positioning.
Traditional partnerships and synergies, especially
across print and radio, continue to provide
add-value opportunities for both the clients and
consumers in a region where credibility, brand
dominance and content are king.
Understanding the KZN landscape
By Mary Papayya, AVUSA Media KZN regional GM
According to Census 2011, more than 100 000 people migrated out of KZN. Gauteng attracted 188 000
KwaZulu-Natalians and the Western Cape 22 000, while the majority of migrants into KZN came from the
Eastern Cape (75 000) and Gauteng (55 000)
Maggie Wittstock, marketing services manager, Independent Newspapers KZN
A picture of the rst-ever
edition of The Natal Mercury
and Commercial and Shipping
Gazette, one of 300 copies
published at the time that is
on display at The Mercurys
current ofces in Greyville
Durban.
The Anglo Boer War in 1900
made headlines in The Natal Mercury.
Here Nellie Somers from the Killie
Campbell Library compares a recent
copy of The Mercury, foreground,
to the 112-year-old copy of the
newspaper that was given to her for
safekeeping. Picture: Gcina Ndwalane
Loyal reader of The
Mercury, Roy Wood, with his
rare copy of a coronation
special carried in
The Natal Mercury, as
The Mercury was then
known, commemorating
Queen Elizabeth IIs
coronation. Last
year, The Mercury published another royal
special souvenir for the queens diamond
jubilee. Picture: Colleen Dardagan
The Mercurys special edition for
the kick-off of the 2010 Fifa World Cup.
During the tournament, The Mercury
twinned with newspapers from nations
that played matches in Durban to offer
a page of news in languages such as
Portuguese, Spanish and German.
THE DAILY SUNS KZN
market is that of a spoilt child.
For over a hundred years, it has
had the option of getting news
in a mother-tongue, isiZulu,
Nxumalo remarks. On top of
this, the KZN market is quite
traditional and conservative, a
geographical fact rooted in the
provinces cultural and rural
position. Therefore it needs
a different approach, a totally
different outlook because what
would not be a major story in provinces like Gauteng like a
traditional wedding celebration, a coming-of-age ceremony,
a sangoma initiation or even the Reed dance event would
denitely be front page material in KZN with pictures
portraying the feel of the provinces life.
Furthermore KZN insists that for any English newspaper editor
who hopes to make it and convince the reader to choose their
product over Zulu publications, needs to be smart enough
to include and adopt an although we give you the news in
English we swear we are serving you approach to news
content, she points outs. Her experience with KZN readers
is that yes, a newspaper in vernacular is probably preferred
because it will easily pass from one family member to the next
as opposed to the English one. The ip side is what readers
want is consistency and emphasis as to who you are trying
to serve. For instance we have created a clear cut with
the developmental content that serves to give a platform to
upcoming and struggling artists who would not necessarily
make it to the so-called mainstream KZN media. This is but
one of the examples of how we pitch ourselves as the voice
and friend of the underdog, the uncelebrated effort-making
street vendor, the forgotten and the abandoned while our
rivals cruise on with politicised everything.
This year they also plan to roll-out their content focus strategy
in phases as they realise they need to do more to reect the
cultural air of the peoples, tapping more into what makes
people of the province tick, the fact that the province has
grown to be the second hub of entertainment and showbiz
life in the past two or three years and the provinces efforts
to shed off the violent stigma that it has been known for, for
so many years. And as indicated above, we want to be in-
your-face and contribute positively to peoples daily struggle
while punching the peoples politics, which is what we are
known for anyway. We also are looking to introduce new
columns, just to look through their lenses as to how they see
life every day whether it is a know-it-all guy from kasi or
an uptight granny from Nongoma in the rural north coast of
the province.
Finding that
pulse
At the helm of the Daily Sun KZN is one
of the youngest editors in the country,
Thobile Nxumalo. She told Magdel Louw
about the challenges of winning over the
KZN market
Where did your career in
journalism start and where
has it taken you up to now?
I started on the alternative
isiZulu newspaper,
UmAfrika in 1997. From
there I moved to the
isiZulu bi-weekly
where I launched its
entertainment and
lifestyle supplement
and was later involved
with the development
of the frst isiZulu
Sunday newspaper.
I joined Isolezwe in
March 2008 as news
editor for the Sunday
edition. In mid-2012,
Slindile Khanyile was
promoted to Isolezwe deputy editor and I
was appointed weekend editor.

What are your


immediate goals
in your new
position?
Id like to see both
titles grow and
not just in terms of
sales. Our readers
are in a dynamic
space and our
reportage needs
to refect that. You
must remember
that Isolezwe was
launched 10 years
ago. Most readers who
started reading it back
then, have changed.
Theyve grown. We
need to capture our
markets current and
developing interests. We cant aford to play
catch up in terms of their interests and what
tickles their fancy.
Are you happy with the
quality of isiZulu
journalism?
Yes I am. When Isolezwe
was launched there
were many sceptics
who thought it couldnt
be done. And six years
later Isolezwe ngeSonto
was born. Last year we
launched the Saturday
edition in the face of
sceptics who thought our
ideal readers would be
too busy with shopping,
weddings, funerals and
other social engagements
to bother buying a copy. But
were sitting at above 70 000
sales and 430 000 readers
every Saturday. Thats before
we target Gauteng. And we are only a year old.
The numbers answer the question.
People wouldnt bother with
buying our titles if we produced
something sub-standard.

The Isolezwe titles keep


moving upwards. Why do
think this is?
We have a relatively young
team in our newsroom. If you
want to see a typical Isolezwe
reader, take a look at our staf.
Most of these people are
urban dwellers who have
rural backgrounds. They have
embraced the city life, but
havent forgotten where
they come from. So we get
the best of both worlds.
We appeal to urban folk
as much as we do with
our out-of-town readers. And I think people have
been dying to consume news in a language that
they speak at home. isiZulu is the most spoken
language in South African households.
The Zulu weekend
As Isolezwe weekend editor since last year, Sandile Mdadane,
36, edits the Sunday Isolezwe ngeSonto, and Saturday
Isolezwe ngoMgqibelo editions of the popular daily, Isolezwe.
He offers his thoughts on the title and its future
KZNFEATURE
42

ad antage v February 2013
ad antage v February 2013 43
KZNFEATURE
\
VELTI EVENTS IS A Durban-based eventing
company that operates nationally. The
company HP, Paul VelLman is oiiginally fiom
the UK. When he was 13 the family relocated
to Melbourne, Australia, and it was here he
got his first taste of eventing. For my 14th
birthday, I had a party and got my dad to pay
for 350 people, but I also charged everyone an
entry fee. Once I realised you could profit from
putting on a party I was hooked.
After three years in Australia he moved to SA,
where his dad was based. After school he set
off for London to learn the basics. It was fun,
but I wanted to be serious. This was just before
the credit crunch, and I decided it was time to
branch out on my own. It was either Australia
or SA. I chose SA.
He chose to set up shop in Durban. I based
myself in Durban, not Johannesburg, purely
because I had a big network in Durban. It
meant I could build the business and then
expand into other provinces.
With different laws and culture in SA to what he
knew, he set about building his business. I
decided to build the brand first, so I used my
capital to build a website.
He says KZN is a cost-effective place to set up a
business and Durban is at the point where it
is starting to boom. It began last year. Four
retailers moved into the province. Just look
at the Gateway area and how it has grown.
Fifteen years ago there was no Gateway, no
stadium and Balito was a well-kept secret.
And his business is also proof, hosting big
corporate clients events in Durban. Clients
include FNB, MTN and Old Mutual.
Durban offers so much in terms of eventing, he
says. More and more companies that wanted
events in Cape Town and Johannesburg now
want events in KZN. There is no particular
reason for this. Granted the weather is a
factor, but I think another reason is that KZN
gives companies a change of scenery. As a
result KZN is showing what it is made of. When
planning an event, I cannot imagine why a
company wouldnt consider Durban.
A big turning point for his business was when
he won the pitch for the Mtv event at the
Durban July. Mtv is viewed as an American
channel and was not very well known in KZN.
ILe evenL LLey puL LogeLLei was HLv Pimp
my Crown and the theme was Royal Affair.
The event really worked well and paid off for
us as an eventing company. It also won best
marquee and best venue of 2011.
The company also hosted 30 press delegates
fiom Iudou.com wLen C0P17 Look place aL LLe
Durban ICC.
MOVING TO KZN
When of age KZN youngsters tend to go overseas,
to Cape Town or Johannesburg. When they get
a bit older, they start to come back. And they
are coming back and bringing with them a
change in fashion. Durban was never fashion
conscious, now thats changing. There are new
stores and with social media everyone can
keep up with trends. In business, technology
has also helped make a global difference
The place to be
KwaZulu-Natal (KZN) has it all mountain ranges, beaches,
and game farms, quality of life as well as great weather. Are
marketers aware of this? Danette Breitenbach found out
I SAY IF YOU CAN MAKE IT IN KZN YOU CAN MAKE IT
ANYWHERE, BECAUSE THIS IS A DIFFICULT TRAINING
GROUND AND DIFFICULT MARKET
KZNFEATURE
44

ad antage v February 2013
because you can reach everyone almost
anywhere. So its easy to run a business from
KZN, he says.
Durban and KZN is also the logical place to step
up into Africa and we are seeing this happen
this year we are handling a big conference
in Kenya. There is more and more demand for
events in Nigeria with growth also coming
from Mauritius and Angola. Further afield we
have had enquiries from Thailand.
I say if you can make it in KZN you can make it
anywhere, because this is a difficult training
ground and difficult market.
A REVIVAL
Ieanne PecLey, HP, BoL SLuff HaikeLing, was
previously a teacher and then worked for
a youth agency before starting her own
business. Hot Stuff Marketing has offices in
Cape Town and Johannesburg, but Durban is its
head office. We have grown so much that we
are moving to bigger premises which will allow
us to have our offices and warehouse in the
same place.
Clients of the business include Sasko flour
and Nivea. We have worked with Nivea for
10 years and have grown with that brand.
Recently the company also worked on one of
Unilevers products.
We do experiential marketing, from the
concept to the full house experience. More
and more this is including the digital side so
that the conversation keeps going after the
event has finished.
The company works closely with Durban-
based agencies such as the Hardy Boys,
PaLon Iuppei and IBUAJBunL Iascaiis. In
Johannesburg we work with Draftfcb. We
also work with Habari Media. It is all about
finding the right partners.
She says besides the lifestyle, what Durban
offers is that day-to-day contact with the
clients. We are closer to our market and it
is easy to jump on a plane to meet with our
clients in Johannesburg.
Like everywhere else the economic downturn
also affected business in Durban. Clients,
just like anywhere else, want more bang for
their buck. Agencies have to be more creative
and make sure they are giving clients value
for money.
She believes there is a revival in KZN. The
Top Gear event is just one of a number of
great events that is having a beneficial
spin off into our industry. The Durban July
remains a firm favourite. All events and
conferences at the Durban ICC also have a
spin off, not only for our industry, but the
city and province.
This should not be surprising according to her.
We have great weather and this is attractive
to people who want to put on events.
Locally there has been growth. Unilever,
especially placing themselves on the Ridge,
provides a lot of business in my market and
the spend is quite large. Traditionally Durban
has been the poor cousin to Johannesburg
and then Cape Town, but now I have a more
optimistic feeling about the city. It feels like
there is more money coming into Durban. We
are seeing more flashy cars.
An important part of this revival and growth
is the young black professionals who have
emerged in the province and this has led to a
whole different market. They have disposable
income and they want brands and this means
we can market to them.
A great example of this is Max lifestyles in
Umlazi township. What started out as an
informal back yard butchery and carwash
almost five years ago is now a two storey
Tuscan styled building that now houses a pub,
a dance floor as well as restaurant and it is the
place to be.
It started off as a little car wash but today it is
a gathering point. On a Sunday it is one of the
most exclusive places to be. Everyone is going
for the experience. This is a great example of
how KZN does business in a very different way
and how entrepreneurial the province is.
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AIRPORTMEDIA
CRAIG PAGE-LEE, MD, SOUTH
AFRICA, POSTERSCOPE
GIVES HIS TAKE ON AIRPORT
MARKETING
I have waited a long time to contribute to this topic, not
just as a representative of Posterscope South Africa,
but as a former architect and retail designer that
understands space utilisation and the impact that all
layers of media, messaging, signage, digital screens
and the myriad of other ambient and subliminal
elements within the built environment have on
consumers or unsuspecting travellers.
The topic warrants two responses, the rst being that I
somewhat disagree with the statement that the airport
is where the passengers journey begins, and the
second being that to a large degree, the exploitation
of every single available surface, whether walls, oor,
ceiling, columns, air-conditioning ducts, escalators,
treads and risers to stairways, restaurant tables, trays,
plates, cutlery bands, toilet walls, urinals, mirrors,
shoe-polish personnel and the myriad of kiosks and
pop-up stores, to name but a few, is a total sensory
overload for users of the environment, whether
they are travellers or staff working within these
environments.
On point one, Ill keep it simple; the travellers journey
begins in their mind the minute the decision to
travel has been considered. The journey continues
through the various levels of consideration regarding
destination, airline, airport, date, time, how to get
there, what to do at the other end, car hire, public
transport, hotel or other accommodation, activities,
meetings, lunch, shopping and so on.
Each and every one of these thoughts and questions can
be answered, or create even more confusion, through
the different entry points used to make the decision
and to close the loop on that decision, as well from the
myriad of other media messages that consumers are
exposed to every day.
The airport is probably the most important touch-point
in a travellers journey and it is the place where
brands either build or destroy their reputation with
consumers or travellers alike. In many instances, it is
not the brand that has failed in its promise, but the
inability of the brand to stand out from the clutter and
visual noise that is so synonymous with the airport
environments in SA.
Understanding consumer behavior prior to and during
travel is vitally important to ensure that any message
delivery or brand experience is not one of annoyance,
irritation, negative disruption or just getting lost in the
clutter, but rather one of informing, calming, caring
and adding value, thereby making the entire journey
a pleasurable experience, from initial consideration,
through to nal destination.
STRESSED OUT
As a specialist Out-of-Home (OOH) communications
agency providing strategy, planning and buying services
for brands within the airport environment, it is essential
that Posterscope understand the entire consumer /
traveller journey, and that when at the airport a
multitude of other factors come to play and inuence
the strategic recommendations presented to clients.
Recent documented research proves that stress levels rise,
as do anticipation and excitement levels on arrival at the
airport message delivery is either lost to travellers,
or is seen as a negative disruption and irritation in this
regard, unless it comes with some form of value-added
content that will improve the remainder of the journey.
We also note that stress levels dip slightly after check-in,
but then rise sharply while going through security and
passport control and eventually subside once on airside
where the journey slows down specically when using
the services of the airport business lounges. The focus
The airport is where a passengers journey begins and its a place that has the
power to create a travelers rst and lasting impression of any destination. With
air travel so accessible, and people travelling more, the airport has become an
important marketing destination for brands
Leaving on a jet plane
46

ad antage v February 2013
ad antage v February 2013 47
AIRPORTMEDIA
during the pre-ight period on airside is on shopping
and eating and this is where brands should maximise
the media opportunities for message delivery, especially
since anticipation and excitement levels are at their
highest in the travellers journey.
The research suggests that stress levels rise again at
boarding time and continue to rise during ight time,
through arrivals at the end destination and only subside
after the collection of baggage. Message delivery
is either lost to travellers, or is seen as a negative
disruption and irritation in this regard, unless it comes
with some form of value-added content that will
improve the remainder of the journey.
Fortunately, anticipation and excitement levels remain
relatively high at the end destination (much higher
than the stress levels at the end destination), thereby
presenting an ideal opportunity to serve relevant,
informative and value-adding messaging to travellers
once landside again at the end destination.
Factors driving strategic recommendations on
media within the airport environment include,
but are not limited to the following:
Jcu||e] |c ||e a||pc|| - ||e ||||cdu:||c| c| ||e
Gautrain in JHB has fundamentally changed the
way travellers access the airport and eliminating
the need for travellers to drive to the airport. Much
of the OOH media lining the roads and national
motorways leading to the airport loses relevance to
these travellers. That said, a new network of media
touch-points along the Gautrain rail route has been
rolled-out and a different way of communicating with
travellers is evolving. We are not only seeing more
targeted static broadcast medium on platforms at
each station, but the introduction of sophisticated
digital networks which allow a very different kind of
message delivery and the opportunity to serve real
time, value-adding information to travellers prior to
arrival at the airport.
At the airport we are seeing:
T|e |c||-cu| c| d|||a| |e|Wc|| (a||pc||.|., c|
landside, through check-in procedures and on airside.
Another opportunity to serve real-time, value-adding
information to travellers
T|e|e a|e rc|e a|d rc|e pcp-up ||c| c||e|||
specialist services on both landside and airside
T|e |c||-cu| c| |||e|a:||.e d|||a| Wa]-||d|| a|d
information management networks on landside.
Another opportunity to serve real-time, value-adding
information to travellers prior to departure.
T|e ||||cdu:||c| c| |eW |c|ra| a|d u|ued ou||d||
elements being turned into media touch-points in and
around food courts and along walkways to and from
check-in counters (airside)
T|e ||||cdu:||c| c| a ru||||ude c| |a|da|c|e e|ere||
in the form of charging stations for mobile phones and
electronic equipment. A real value-add to travellers, but
an opportunity missed to serve real-time, value-adding
information to travellers, or to providing free Wi-Fi
access while waiting prior to boarding
Critical success factors in dening, creating
and managing media effectively within
the airports of South Africa (airport
management companies and their respective
intermediaries, media owners, media
agencies, creative agencies, clients and brand
owners alike) can be dened as follows:
E||a|:|| ||e a||pc|| e|.||c|re|| a|d ||e ||a.e||e|
experience through the media networks available
and through the advertising on offer not creating
bewilderment and confusion
A||pc|| ra|aere|| :crpa|] |c :|ea|e a 'wc||d C|a'
experience this is seriously lacking
A||pc|| ra|aere|| :crpa|] |c |a:||||a|e ||e
development of interconnected communications platforms
for advertisers to reach their target audience digital,
promotions, media and for multiple media
concessionaires to allow cross-platform integrated
campaigns
A||pc|| ra|aere|| :crpa||e |c de.e|cp :crre|:|a||]
viable contracts with media concessionaires that
encourage new developments and innovation
P|c.||c| c| upda|ed a|d |e|e.a|| |eea|:| |c ||e
media agencies something that is sorely lacking
Ue c| |e:||c|c] (App e|:., |c :c||e:| o|a|d W|||
travellers
Ue c| c:|a| red|a :|a||e| |c upda|e ||a.e||e| a|d
provide additional self-help options such as check-in, bag-
drop, e-gates etc. Connectivity is essential in this regard
U|de||a|d|| W|a| W||| a|||a:| a|d e|ae ||e
traveller intelligently in this new world
P|c.|d|| a::u|a|e a|d |e|e.a|| |ea|-||re da|a |c a||
travellers when on the move
B| o|a|d |ee| - dcr||a|e red|a p|a||c|r a|d e|u|e
that the message carries through from pre-journey,
to airport, through landside, through airside and to
destination arrival if at all possible
SA is fortunate to have some of the best airports on the
continent. Lets not destroy the aesthetic appeal and
experience due to a lack of shared vision between
airport operators and media concessionaires. Lets
respect the built environment and ensure that we
uphold the aesthetic intent of the original building
design, in the same way that any brand would want
to uphold its own brand integrity. Advertisers are
the ones that lose in this regard and the entire media
and communications industry is dependent on their
continuous support of the medium.
48

ad antage v February 2013
AIRPORTMEDIA
MCKENZIE
EXPLAINS that in 2008
Avusa, now Times Media,
acquired 80% of Airport Media
with the then joint MDs retaining
20%. In 2011 the joint MDs then
sold the remaining 20%, giving
Times Media 100%. The joint MDs
management contract expired
in March 2012 and BOO! was
then appointed as the managing
company for Airport Media.
He likens the principle of selling
in the airport space to selling in
malls, which BOO! has been doing
for years. There is a landlord and there are areas on
the property that are sensitive. So the transition for
us into the airport space was not difcult. However,
our rst task was to undertake a full audit of the
business. This resulted in changes in management
and essentially Airport Media is a new company
with new management in place. Among some of the
heavyweights working at the company, is Anthony
Evlambiou, who is the commercial director for
the business.
The rst big decision the company made was to secure
the largest internal display at OR Tambo for the next
ve years. We have manufactured a new trivision
structure at OR Tambo and it has just been installed.
You can see it on all three oors and it displays three
ads while rotating. This was a bullish decision to
invest in new capex and we believe
it shows out commitment to the
airport space.
The challenge, he maintains, is to
become micro media strategists
within the airport environment. A big
advantage that we have is that we are
the only company that has ofces on
the premises at OR Tambo.
A GREAT SPACE
The airport space has always been
sought after he says. Everyone
wants to target the business decision
maker and it is the business traveller
who translates into your business decision maker.
Based on the rate per square metre vs. traditional
billboards on Highways the world over, airports in
the Out of Home (OOH) space have always traded
as premium inventory. Advertisers are reaching a
targeted decision maker and so it has always been
priced at a premium.
In SA the World Cup created an interesting dimension
to the airport space. With the World Cup the ACSA
properties were in high demand and there was a
convergence on the airport. Outside of the stadiums
the airports were the place to be. However this
created a false economy inside airports. They were
booming in a recession. Post-World Cup the impact
of the recession led to some challenges in the
airport space.
NEW TOUCHPOINTS
What is new in airports is how we are expanding and
developing the touch points within the environment,
explains McKenzie. New formats, such as LED in
airports, which limped along over the years, have seen
an improved adoption. Innovation is key to this space
as it has always been in the OOH industry.
BOO! has always positioned itself as an innovative
company, innovation is a part of our DNA, and this
must follow into this space. This approach can be
seen in how we operate in the BA Slow lounges and
Bidvest Business lounges. The brand management
of the Slow brand is exceptional. It is carefully
thought through and so our approach here has seen
more of a strategic partner approach than a third
party approach. Therefore the kind of clients we
have in Slow lounges are ones that must enhance
the experience of the customer. The brand of the
client is immersed into the environment through
subtle touch points. For example a branded tray,
newspaper sleeve, to the books in the book case.
This creates the sense that that brand is a partner
with Slow and it is. For example the customer gets
extended free Wi-Fi due to the brands presence.
We are looking at a number of other touch points to
expand this experience.
Outside of the lounges we have already launched a rst,
staircase advertising, in Durban, Johannesburg and
Cape Town airports. This is just the beginning, we are
bringing new innovations into all the airports. We have
another two new big projects in the pipeline.
BOO! is the only operator in SA that has the exclusive advertising rights to Bidvest Premier
lounges and more recently the BA Slow lounges. Late last year, the company was awarded a
long term management agreement to take over the running of the company Airport Media.
Danette Breitenbach spoke to Dave McKenzie, MD of BOO!
An innovative space
BASED ON THE RATE PER SQUARE METRE VS. TRADITIONAL BILLBOARDS
ON HIGHWAYS THE WORLD OVER, AIRPORTS IN THE OUT OF HOME (OOH)
SPACE HAVE ALWAYS TRADED AS PREMIUM INVENTORY
50

ad antage v February 2013
AIRPORTMEDIA
THE AIRPORT ADS division
consists of the airport.tv, Airport static
billboards, and Airport Activations. Deliwe
started his working career at Nestle and
then Nike before taking up the position of
ABSA general manager. He then spread
his wings to Indiza Media, a subsidiary of
Primedia, in which he owned a stake. Later,
he sold this stake and began consulting for
various companies including ACSA, where
he was exposed to the OOH business on
their properties.
Q: What has occurred in the airport
space recently that has changed it?
A: There has been a change in advertising
in airports. Previously there was a lot of
clutter. At ACSA various companies owned
the rights to different screens so the
offering was fragmented. The screens also
only looped ads with no other content. It
was decided to consolidate the screens,
providing a fully-edged TV network across
all nine airports Cape Town, OR Tambo,
King Shaka, George, PE, EL, Kimberley,
Bloemfontein and Upington. Provantage
was appointed to manage the screens
as airport.tv. The ACSA consolidation
has reduced the clutter and as a result
advertisers are coming back to the airports.
Q: How has consumer travel changed?
A: Travellers are on time and dont take
chances that might lead to them missing
their ights. On the international travel side,
families and friends still come to meet and
greet family members and friends.
Q: What is airport.tv and what does it
provide that is different?
A: The traveller is generally in the LSM 7-10.
The business traveller has no time for
mainstream TV; he is too busy, but with
airport.tv he has to watch. It is a captive
audience. There are four areas where
passengers dwell: Meet and greet areas,
security, departure hall and luggage
collection. airport.tv caters for all travellers
through its presence in these areas.
We supply travellers with relevant and valuable
information. airport.tv linked up with News24
and various other content providers to
supply content on four different segments:
news, lifestyle, business and sport. The
current ratio is 45% content and 55%
advertising.
Q: airport.tv only started in June 2012.
How has it progressed?
A: It is a combination of OOH and TV and
therefore is a rst in SA. It has been
happening overseas for some time and last
year the time was right to launch it here. It
is still early days but it is going very well.
airport.tv is supported by key brands, of
which many have never advertised in this
environment before. Brands who advertised
before the consolidation and launch of
airport.tv and were not happy with the result
have also come back and are now very
happy with the product and the results it is
giving them.
We have also ensured that almost all brands
can advertise in airports with various
packages and sponsorships tailored for
individual clients. We can even make a
television programme for you to ight on
airport.tv.
Recently Johnnie Walker Platinum launched on
airport.tv at the same time that it launched
on mainstream television.
On average there are two million passengers
who travel through the nine airports each
month and so two million consumers look at
our screens in a month.
The next step is to roll out into the international
terminals. After that, who knows, theres a
whole world out there.
Q: How are you providing innovation in
the airport space?
A: South African airports are well developed
vs. global airports in terms of advertising. As
a country we generate more income than
most airports in the world per travellers. The
trick is to continue offering the passenger
value without devaluing the offering at the
airports and ensuring clutter does not come
about. Innovation and innovation and more
innovation is going to be the key to this.
Provantage is very serious about the airport
space. Digital innovation is key not only
in this space, but also in the OOH space
generally. We are constantly searching
for the unique for advertisers and what
is entertaining for passengers. The space
is continuously evolving. We are currently
looking at new segments, for example
fun elements, themes and so on that will
keep viewership high. airport.tv is a golden
opportunity to launch some of these
innovations to the benet of advertisers
and travellers.
The aim is to develop the model to be more
interactive with mobile phones. Already
we have carried out a number of SMS
competitions which were very successful.
We want to develop the product to cater for
the needs of brands and travellers. The next
phase is denitely more interactive.
Another innovation is activations. We offer
these in key zones in the airport. Obviously
there are permits and restrictions as airports
are sensitive areas. However, offering
activations means we give the advertiser a
360 degree solution. From the activations
we have run previously, we have had many
queries. In terms of the traveller, activations
must be thought through. You cannot just
attack a traveller and shove a coupon in his/
her hand. Travellers need to get on planes,
so certain products cannot be given out
in this environment. The airport also has
restrictions on some products, for example
no sprays can be carried on a plane and
this must be kept in mind. But these are not
obstacles, but rather an incentive to think
out of the box.
These days, while travelling through any of SAs
nine domestic air terminals, passengers are kept up
to date with breaking news, sports and the weather. This
is all due to innovative airport.tv. Danette Breitenbach spoke to
Mze Deliwe, MD, Airport Ads, a division of Provantage who
manages airport.tv
F
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h
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IN LIGHT OF THE International
Telecommunication Unions (ITU) deadline
of June 2015 for complete migration from
analogue to digital terrestrial television (DTT),
the South African government set the deadline
of December 2013 for all local analogue terrestrial
broadcasts to be completely switched o.
Originally the start of the migration was set to take
place in November 2011, but was delayed due to
debate on what standard for digital broadcasts
should be adopted.
Once that was resolved, Pule again moved the digital TV
switch-on date from April to September last year.
The Department of Communications (DOC) proof-of-
concept launch in the Northern Cape early October
last year was nally meant to signal the start of the
dual-illumination period, but instead ended in her
announcement of another shift in deadline to the end
of last year. However it is now February 2013, and
although the nal DTT regulations were published in
the Government Gazette on 14 December*, the
country has still not fully embarked on the dual
illumination period which is when digital television
signals have been launched, but the analogue
television signal is running simultaneously. In this
period the monumental task of converting all
analogue television households to digital set-top
boxes (STB) has to be completed, before the analogue
signal is turned o for good.
In the meantime e.tv. had taken Pule to court regarding
the control of the conditional access in the state-
subsidised STBs, with the judge only making a ruling
in the broadcasters favour late December. In January
the department lodged an appeal, with e.tv again
indicating itll oppose it possibly delaying the entire
migration process even further.
Siyabulela Qoza, ministry spokesman, told AdVantage
the department has decided to engage the
broadcasters and ICASA to look at the implications
of implementing the court decision, inviting the
industry to make recommendations on the best way
to proceed.
The government is still committed to meeting the ITU
deadline of June 2015, he stated.
COURT BATTLE
Last year e.tv led papers against Pule because she
selected Sentech to handle conditional access
controls for STBs. The hearing that took place in
October was around e.tvs bid to overturn Pules
decision and have STB controls rest in the hands
of the SABC and e.tv, as originally agreed. The
judge then ruled that Pules decision to assign the
responsibility to Sentech was unlawful, and again
declared it lies in the hands of SABC, e.tv and other
free-to-air digital broadcasters after which the
appeal process got underway.
Some say the outcome of this court case and possible
ensuing dispute over set-top box controls, could
delay switch-on by another two years. Yusuf Nabee,
project manager: television at Kagiso Media,
explains that without this decision being made clear,
manufacturers cannot manufacture STBs as they will
not be conformant with the STB control system that
will be selected. This court case has also delayed the
nalisation of a government tender for the STBs that
will be subsidised by government, which will serve
close to half of the population that cannot aord the
STB. This means that there are no STBs ready to retail.
There will probably be a three to four month process
from the time the decision is taken on the STB control
system before STBs will be available for retail.
Lara Kantor, group executive for Regulatory Aairs at
e.tv, adds: e.tv is anxious for DTT to start and is very
concerned about the on-going delays. We would
ideally like to start in mid 2013.
Apart from the court case, she says theyre worried that
the needs of free-to-air (FTA) television are not being
given sucient priority by ICASA, and that theres also
a lack of eective coordination of the project from
governments side. We are also concerned that if the
Sentech taris are not claried and set at a reasonable
rate, further delays will follow.
STILL-TO-DO LIST
Kagiso Media has indicated that theyd also like to
launch both subscription and FTA television, but only
if ICASAs DTT regulations create an environment
conducive to newcomers. Thus they have been
eagerly awaiting the nal regulations that have
provided for the allocations of capacity during digital
migration, clarifying whether ICASA will licence new
players during digital migration, and the conditions
under which new channels will be authorised on DTT
during digital migration.
Patricia van Rooyen, M-Net CEO, says according
to ICASA, once these DTT regulations had been
published, the digital switch on and analogue
switch o dates should be published too, so existing
broadcasters can apply to ICASA to authorise
additional digital channels for the DTT platform.
A DVB-T2 broadcast network that covers a reasonable part
of the population then also needs to be in place, Nabee
points out. Sentech has been developing this network
on two multiplexes over the past two years and over
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52

ad antage v February 2013
TELEVISIONREVIEW
1PL 3Luu hIGRn1Iuh
ad antage v February 2013 53
TELEVISIONREVIEW
THE LONGER DTT IS DELAYED, THE LONGER IT WILL TAKE TO
LICENSE NEW TERRESTRIAL TV PLAYERS IN THE MARKET
Yusuf Nabee Patricia van Rooyen Lara Kantor Frans Lindeque
P
i
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:

D
i
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o

C
o
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e
v
i
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a
50% of the population will be covered if the signal was
switched on today. This is therefore ready for a switch-on,
and technical tests by Sentech and the broadcasters have
been promised in terms of signal quality, etc.
Then there is the issue of a clear, coordinated and
sustained marketing campaign to inform the public
prior to the commercial launch of DTT, and then
through the digital migration and in preparation for
switch o too. This should ideally start at least six
months prior to switch on, he says.
There also needs to be a clear funding plan in place.
To date, Treasury has not conrmed if the funding
allocation required will be made available, he states.
But of course then there needs to be content. Broadcasters
have plans to launch new channels, with M-Net most
likely the best prepared. Also, the SABC faces nancial
diculties, and has made several submissions to
request additional funding to rollout DTT channels,
none of which has been committed by Treasury.
Without sucient levels of new content, the public will
not be incentivised to make the move to digital.
Thus, Nabee concludes, the real commercial move to
DTT can only happen once the above are aligned.
This suggests that it will be at least three to ve
months before anything commercial can happen,
assuming that some of these matters had been
resolved by early this year.
ADDED WORRIES
In the meantime, the longer the switch on to DTT
is delayed, the more people switch to DStv, he
points out. DStv Compact continues to grow every
month, with no real alternative that the free-to-air
broadcasters can oer in terms of viewing choice and
variety. This also means that they now become much
smaller sh in a much bigger pond. As the Pay TV
audience grows, there is a shift of advertising money
to where the audience are, and this has impact on the
FTA market as a whole.
In addition the longer DTT is delayed, the longer it will
take to license new terrestrial TV players in the market.
The spectrum needs to be released to make way for
new players in the FTA and terrestrial Pay TV space.
If ICASA decides to delay the licensing of FTA, then
the delays in launching DTT could mean that a new
commercial FTA broadcaster may only be licensed
and operational by 2016 or 2017 at the earliest. By then
the market would have changed, and existing players
would be entrenched.
Then there is the added worry that DTT will start to
become irrelevant as new technologies emerge.
We started out with DVB-T and by the time we were
ready to start the migration, DVB-T2 emerged as a
new standard. Today there is are already new and
evolved standards being developed and consumers
are starting to look at other technologies to consume
content such as internet-based services, the likes of
Netix and others. In ve years time, when we are
trying to complete migration, DTT may become
increasingly irrelevant (at least to the middle and
upper end of the market) as they migrate to satellite
based Pay TV services or even to internet based
services, he points out.
TICKING CLOCK
However, all in all the main challenge is still time. Due to
all these unresolved issues M-Net and TopTV reckon
the soonest there might be a signicant roll-out of
DTT is the middle of this year.
Nabee too insists its going to be very dicult to
complete the migration by the ITU deadline of June
2015. If migration starts in June this year, this means
two years to migrate in the region of seven million
households (excluding DStv households), or an
average of 292 000 per month. Most other countries
(developed countries) have taken in excess of ve
years to achieve the same feat, he remarks.
ONCE DTT IS LAUNCHED
From the point of view of the satellite DTH operators
like TopTV, the DTT delay wont have much impact for
some time. In fact, TopTVs chief technology ocer,
Frans Lindeque, points out its quite the contrary,
as it will ensure less competition for the duration of
the delay. But DTT will denitely oer its share of
competition in the market once launched.
He points out that once DTT is implemented, most
PayTV operators will oer value added services such as
multiscreen TV, VOD (video on demand), OTT, (over the
top TV), catchup TV as well as IP TV streaming. This is
a major advantage as all of these value added services
can be controlled and linked to the linear PayTV
services as bundled packages etc. The DTT oering
initially will be very limited in terms of its oering. In
the case of the SABC they will mainly focus on linear
TV as we know it in a multi-channel environment
but with very little if any other value added services.
After digital migration the broadcast environment will
change signicantly with more players in the market,
especially PayTV operators.
Having applied for a Pay TV license under ITA issued by
ICASA last year, Kagiso hopes to launch Pay TV services
on DTT as soon as possible (ideally at the same time
as M-Net). However, weve also indicated to ICASA
that certain conditions need to be prevalent in the
market place to make it viable and sustainable for
a new player to enter the market. Yet delays in the
rollout of DTT and licensing, as well as the level of
inter-operability in the STB to enable easy access to
Pay TV services on the DTT STB, will aect their ability
to execute this plan. In the medium term they would
also like to look at the FTA opportunity when the
digital migration is underway or complete, depending
on ICASAs position.
According to Kantor, e.tv will be oering a bouquet
of new channels once DTT is launched. These will
allow us to better serve our audiences and will oer
additional entertainment for our viewers. All our
channels will be free.
Van Rooyen explains that M-Net, as another licensee
operating on the terrestrial platform, will be
required to switch over subscribers to the M-Net
terrestrial and CSN channels from analogue to
digital transmissions during the dual illumination
period. Over this period M-Net will be introducing
new digital channels in addition to the two existing
channels on the terrestrial platform. However the
only STB decoders that will require replacement
are the existing M-Net analogue STB decoders for
the terrestrial platform. DStv STB decoders used to
receive satellite transmissions are already digital and
will not be aected by the digital migration.
Now that the DTT regulations are in place M-Net will
make an application to ICASA to authorise new digital
incentive channels in addition to the two existing
analogue channels on the capacity that will be
allocated to it on the second DTT multiplex.
M-Net is prepared for the migration from analogue
transmission to digital transmission and has been
trialling the DVB-T2 technology in Soweto since
2010. If the regulatory prerequisites for a commercial
launch this year are in place it will be exciting year
for South African television viewers, as the terrestrial
platform begins to oer a multichannel environment
that previously could only be experienced by those
persons with access to satellite platforms.
* See Digital Migration Regulations at www.icasa.org.za
ALREADY SCREENED in
over 20 countries, Comedy Centrals
approach right from the start was to rst
become part of the local scene in SA. Tasked
to launch the channel, Evert van der Veer,
head of Comedy Central Africa, regarded it as
critical to localise the comedy content for the
SA market.
We wanted local stand-up talent on air, and
wanted it to be the platform comedians go
to. We also wanted to grow talent, so that
those that open for the headliners, headline
themselves too.
Only available to
DStv Premium
subscribers,
Comedy Central
Africa is a 24-
hour channel with
shows that include
US comedy series
such as South
Park and The
Daily Show (with
Jon Stewart), stand-up and sketch comedy,
satire, offbeat TV series and classic comedy
sitcoms. By now Comedy Central has a 3%
to 5% share of the DStv premium bouquet,
he says.
So Van der Veers localised strategy is clearly
paying off. The local content is very popular
in fact, when it airs, its often in the top three
programmes on the channel.
But nothing could have prepared them for the
success of last years Roast with Steve Hofmeyr.
For one, PR spend went off the roof intending to
spend R10 million they ended up splurging R30
million. Plus, with a rating of 22%, its audience
at the end amounted to over 400 000. That
means one in every four people that subscribe
to the premium bouquet, watched the show
that night. We expected half of that.
THE LIGHTER SIDE OF LIFE
Comedy in SA is a really big market, he reects.
They were fortunate that when they started
zoning in on the country, no other entity had
claimed it yet. As big and healthy as the SA
comedy scene was when Comedy Central
rst arrived here, it has grown even more
since, evidenced by the growing number of
comedians approaching
them lately, he says.
And theyre not too
shabby at that. In his
view, SA is home to
a lot of really good
comedians. I wouldnt
invest in SA if I didnt
feel the comedians
were good enough.
Even the supporting
acts are really, really
good. I actually believe weve only reached the
tip of the iceberg.
Comedy puts things in perspective, big or small
just like with stand-up, which opens the door
for people to talk about things they usually
dont want to talk about, he muses. And with
SAs variety of cultures it brings a lot of colour
onto the stage for which something like the
Roast is the perfect platform.
I think everybody needs comedy, because for me
it makes life bearable. It makes people look
in the mirror. Yes, SA does have a lot of need
for it, because of the many thorny issues like
poverty and racism. But not really any more
than other countries do.
Comedy Central reaches almost half a million people on
average per day
ln September the channel's rating against its target
audience (Premium 20-49s) was 0.29 (beating BBC
Entertainment, Series and SET) [0600-2559]
According to TAMS, Comedy Central's highest ratings are
achieved by comedy specials such as Roasts, stand up
specials, followed by key comedy sitcoms like Big Bang
Theory, etc.
Local stand up shows such as Comedy Central Presents Loyisa
Gola Live at Parkers (TX: 13 July 2012) rate relatively well, with
the premiere broadcast reaching 84 018 people
OPEN MIC
54

ad antage v February 2013
TELEVISIONREVIEW
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JOE PARKER
Whats your take on the comedy industry in SA?
The comedy industry has seen some serious growth in the past 10 to 12
years. I also believe weve seen a signicant improvement in the overall
standard of stand-up in SA owing to growing competition between comics
for paid spots and the increasing stage time that is now available to
comedians country-wide.
Comedy is getting greater exposure on SA television. What do you
think about that?
I think that TV is and will be a massive part of the promotion, growth and
maturing process that our industry needs to undergo before we are able to
produce more comics able to work in other countries as Trevor Noah and
John Vlismas have done successfully.
JOHN VLISMAS
Your view on the comedy industry in SA?
Comedy is exploding locally there has been huge growth in and demand
for high quality stand-up. One reason is that the SA comedy audience is
growing at a furious rate. Digital access to global comedy has created a
far more discerning market and our difcult past has bred a real appetite
for comedy.
Whats the easiest thing for a comedian in SA?
Finding material. Our policy makers write us material 24/7.
TUMI MORAKE
Whats your take on the comedy industry in SA?
Comedy and the comedians in this country are growing. People have
realised that you can make a living with comedy. The quality of comedy has
improved with an audience that is hungry for great comedy that is worth
paying for. Also, guys who ordinarily wouldnt get laid improve their chances
by looking as though they meant to be awkward and out of place.
Does SA need comedy?
Ive always said we are a country in desperate need of mass therapy and
comedy is exactly that. We have such a hectic, violent past that suddenly
screeched to a PC halt and so comedy heals those septic wounds that are
hiding under the rainbow plaster.
Whats the most difcult
thing for a comedian in
SA?
Deciding who to pick on rst.
Whats the easiest thing
for a comedian in SA?
Finding an audience that
identies with you. We have
a common Sefrican identity
that becomes so obvious when
we laugh at the same stuff for
the same reasons.
THE INDUSTRY
HAS SEEN
DISRUPTIVE
CHANGE TIME AND
AGAIN:
||ee |e||e|||a| TV Wa jc||ed o]
Pay TV over cable and satellite
and channels proliferated
A|a|cue ||a| We|e |ep|a:ed
by digital a process that
continues today in many markets
PVR, |c| a|||:|pa|ed |c |ead ||e
death-bell of linear TV, are now
mainstream and are co-habiting
in living rooms aound the world
A new era of television consump-
tion is also being ushered in
across Central Eastern Europe,
Middle East and Africa
(CEEMEA). Supercharged by the
digital age, audiences led by young and early
adopters show an increasing appetite for new TV services
and these will complement existing viewing behaviours so
that conventional linear TV will continue to remain the
central part of media consumption.
We believe consumers want great content rst and foremost
which is why we continue to invest over $1 billion in our
programmes each year; and only secondarily, technology
as a means to access it at more convenient times.
I believe that broadcasters that succeed in reaching
and engaging their viewers through great content,
portability, availability, and extended social experiences
will not only retain their relevance but if they are smart,
adaptive and creative increase it.
LINEAR RULES!
Firstly, youve heard it before, but its
worth repeating: people are watching
more linear TV than ever before. In the
last decade, the average amount of linear
TV viewing per day has risen every year in
both the US and Europe two of the most
connected regions in the world. Whats
more, linear TV still dwarfs on-demand
viewing. Here in SA, TV viewers watch
almost more hours of TV than any other
market in our region with an average of
4.5 hours per day.
Secondly, the on-demand viewing thats
taking place is dominated by catch-up
viewing of traditional linear channels
which is a critical point in the on-going
call for the death of linear TV. However
in catch-up style services measurement
is still relevant allowing advertisers and
broadcasters to maintain their current
value exchange thus while its a change, its not a
complete distortion.
Finally, looking at markets around the world, its clear we
arent there yet with the technological infrastructure:
limited broadband penetration and speeds create
difculties for new services. So due to technology
constraints, we are still a long way from connected devices
being preferential to traditional linear channels across large
parts of the world.
BACK TO BASICS
We must remember, regardless of the display medium, there
are three fundamental things that comprise the foundation
of a human entertainment experience: content that is high
quality and engaging, easily ndable and makes you want
to talk about it.
Such content is vital to the survival of the TV ecosystem
whether in a linear or non-linear form. Traditional channels
are the investors and creative forces behind content. As
long as they continue to play this role they will continue to
be relevant.
Consumers also have a need for curation: the channel
provides a signpost for viewers to signal not just quality,
but relevance and interest for the viewer.
There will be without doubt a rise in search and tools for
social and intelligent recommendations and for sure they
will play some role. Yet one day young viewers too will
nd that they just wont have the time to curate their own
contentthey simply want to be entertained.
Traditional channels with strong and differentiated brands
will win out, signalling both quality and relevance and
playing a major role in framing the consumers TV viewing
experience.
SHARING IS CARING
Humans also have an innate desire to share their experiences,
which leads me to social media. We shouldnt fall into the
trap of thinking that all disruption is necessarily bad and
equals the demise of traditional channels.
Its interesting that we talk about a shift from linear to non-
linear viewing, but one of the largest and most exciting
uses of social media is the rise of social television.
Something that is actually driving people to watch at a
common time in a linear fashion.
We have all seen this effect in sports and live event
television (like the X Factor or Idols) but this is also
true in scripted and factual television where compelling
narratives and innovative viewer engagement have created
real appointment to view television. Social media means
that the channels that truly have TV to talk about will
thrive. They operate in something of a virtuous circle
of reinforcement: investing and creating compelling TV
content, helping guide the viewer to that content, who,
delighted by the experience, demands more content,
leading to further investment and creation.
ONWARDS AND UPWARDS
Therefore successful broadcasters will need to adapt and,
in order to continue to be relevant, will need to invest in
content, extend their reach and engage viewers across
multiple platforms in challenging and exciting ways.
Broadcasters need to ensure that services have these
four features at their core: original, compelling and
owned content exclusive and truly differentiated; total
portability; accessibility and catch up; and extended and
social experiences.
The television industry, as it has shown throughout its
long history has the necessary desire to adopt new
technologies, the need to adapt to new business models
and the will to thrive.
By Kasia Kieli, president and MD at Discovery Networks CEEMEA
PEOPLE ARE WATCHING MORE LINEAR TV THAN EVER BEFORE
LIhLnR
1u
RuLL3
ad antage v February 2013 55
TELEVISIONREVIEW
Linear TV is where a viewer has to
watch a scheduled programme at a
certain time and on a particular channel.
56

ad antage v February 2013
TELEVISIONREVIEW
THE TRADITIONAL way of
watching TV being bound to the schedules
of a linear TV broadcaster is crumbling in
favour of a world that demands anytime, anywhere
entertainment, on a range of devices.
In essence, watching TV is being distilled down into
the very essence of entertainment, which is the
video content itself the reason we watch TV in
the rst place.
How this video is delivered can, however, vary,
whether its a standalone paid-for product, an
advertiser-funded or freemium service, or a value-
added service on top of existing subscriptions, as is
the case with DStv On Demand.
So called over the top services arent new in SA.
But its only recently, with the lowering of barriers
to entry and the associated costs of broadband,
and a growing awareness of international
video providers, that people are realising the
convenience and choice that video on demand
( VOD) services offer.
LAYING THE FOUNDATIONS
With pioneers such as MWEB having launched the
rst truly uncapped ADSL product kick-starting a
price war amongst SAs most established internet
service providers its a lot cheaper to consume
huge amounts of video today than it was two
years ago.
With the mobile networks aggressively
rolling out new LTE networks that promise
4G performance (up to 300Mbps), and
the hundreds of kilometres of bre
optic cabling being placed into
our sidewalks, the overall
user experience of
streaming video
over the internet
will in time improve
exponentially.
But the broadband
market in SA still
requires a lot
more industry
and regulatory
attention: access
prices need to be
further reduced,
line speeds
need to increase
dramatically, and
there needs to be
a much greater
emphasis on net
neutrality, to democratise content regardless of
which network or service provider you use to
access it.
Regardless, DStv has started rolling out its
multiplatform video on demand services to make
a wider variety of content available to both DStv
subscribers and non-DStv subscribers.
SUSTAINABILITY
Making VOD services sustainable by building business
models that deliver a ROI are key for everyone
involved in creating, consuming, distributing and
advertising around video content, particularly in a
unique African context where business models that
are tried and tested in the US and Europe do not
always succeed.
Audiences eyes are being drawn away from the TV
and onto a myriad of tablets, smartphones and
personal computers, which presents a whole new
way of approaching the advertiser-funded video
model. Its a world that wants content delivered on
demand to multiple devices, and which requires
a new level of sophistication amongst advertisers
and content providers alike.
MAKE IT SO
The future of internet-based video is
denitely an exciting one. Theres
a lot happening in the US and in
Europe that we here in SA can
learn from and innovate upon.
We will, doubtless, see the much-
needed increases in connection
speed and downward
price pressure on
data and access
bundles, which
will serve to
unlock video
on demand in
a meaningful
way for a
much wider
African
audience.
Many people
would
argue that
the growth
of the internet
could mean the
end of TV. We
say, its only the
beginning.
THE FUTURE
is all about mobile.
While in Africa the
digital divide has
prevented most
of the people on
the continent in
participating in
technological
advances, this is
changing radically,
and the driver of
this process is the
penetration of the
smartphone.
Internet connectivity
in Africa is dominated by mobile, and already mobile
phones in Africa are used for research, to purchase
products or for banking. In SA over 95% have used their
phones for mobile content or banking. In Africa data is
projected to make up the majority of the mobile trac
worth over US$18.5 billion by 2016.
In addition visual communication (video) is emerging as the
preferred form of communication.
And the rate of change is set to increase even faster,
especially in Africa, as the costs for data and smartphones
are decreasing rapidly. And the impact on the TV industry?
People are increasingly using mobile devices (second
screen) while watching TV.
Watching TV on mobile devices (phones and tablets) is
another area set for explosive growth once current
technological hurdles have been overcome. The main
reason people watch TV on mobile devices is convenience
and keeping up to date. But other reasons like power
failures (Nigeria) and censorship (China) has also driven
mobile TV. In Africa, mobile video usage has been low due
to a bad user experience and high costs, the main issue
being technical problems on mobile networks, as well as
limited 3G reach.
However, the CSIR has developed technology that enables
watching video content or TV on devices anywhere even
in rural areas. The technology is perfectly suited for the South
African and African environment. Users can use existing
devices Android smart phones and / or tablets as well
as existing cell phone networks. The technology works
on 3G and EDGE (low bandwidth), which is the dominant
system used in rural areas in SA, Africa and other developing
countries. And Tuluntulu is commercialising the technology.
Thus the future in Africa looks exciting. African visual content
(and advertising) will be viewed on many more devices
within Africa and from anywhere in the world. The
opportunities for small business and entrepreneurs have
never been better. Africas time has come one smart
phone at a time!
Ih1LRhL1 1u: 1PLh,
huu, nhu huu huu
By Pierre van der Hoven, founder
and CEO Of Tuluntulu, a digital
communications company
By Jean-Louis Acafrao, GM: VOD - BoxOffce
and DStv On Demand
The stage is set for
the second screen
IN ESSENCE, WATCHING TV IS BEING DISTILLED DOWN INTO THE VERY
ESSENCE OF ENTERTAINMENT, WHICH IS THE VIDEO CONTENT ITSELF
TALENT
RISING STARS
CHANTELLE MUTESWA
Senior account executive
human.kind Advertising
NEIL DAVIES
Chief nancial ofcer
Kansai Plascon
LEON MOODLEY
Creative director
Y&R Johannesburg
DAVID BUCHANAN
National sales manager
Savino Del Bene
KENNEDY MOSALA
Strategy intern
Y&R Johannesburg
JAMES CHARTER
Marketing services executive
NAB
SHARON PRESTON
Editor
Prestige Magazine
AADIL DHALECH
Copywriter
Y&R Cape Town
JUDY SIBANDA
Account manager
Y&R Johannesburg
NAUMAN MALIK
Chief executive ofcer
Kansai Plascon
WILISE LAURENT
Buying manager
Aegis Media
KINGSLEY POTTER
MD
Y&R Johannesburg
BEN VINK
Intern
Y&R Cape Town
JULIE NTOKOZO MKHONTA
Sales and marketing executive
Primedia Africa
LISA BONHOMME
Marketing assistant
Musgrave Centre (Primedia)
JUSTIN JOSHUA
Creative group head
Y&R Cape Town
SUZAN VAN ASWEGEN
Senior sales consultant
Ride magazine
RAYMOND WALDECK
MD
Antalis Southern Africa
GERRIT VISSER
Trading director
Aegis Media
DEV NAIDOO
GM
Media24
Business & Custom Magazines
CATRI DIXON
Head of digital
OwenKessel
MEGAN DE KOCK
Sales consultant
RamsayMedia Research
Solutions
FRANCOIS BASTIAN
GIS analyst
NAB
ad antage v February 2013 57
VICKI STEENKAMP
Channel manager Food24,
Women24, Channel24
The SpaceStation
J
ust hearing the words puts a chill
up my spine (and here I thought
the word strategy gets abused). I
suppose where the confusion comes
in, is how one defnes content marketing.
Originally used in the digital world to
describe on-line / social media strategy,
it is now being used in a broader context,
in an attempt to pull all communication
together - which in truth does not work. I
think what sparked my original interest was
the statement in a recent Forbes article,
marketers need to become publishers,
and goes on to talk about how brands
need to evolve into content providers for
their customers.
Needless to say in a digital context this
makes perfect sense, in a physical world,
not so much. There are loads of people
out there trying to defne content strategy
and differentiate it from traditional
marketing, content marketing, digital
marketing, social media and search engine
optimisation. But in reality this may be just
another new buzz word to describe a very
old marketing concept. Almost 50 years
ago, Gallup (USA) released research that
said delivering news is the most efective
way to attract people to your business. In
essence, providing your customers with
added value services, that deliver real
value to their lives, makes them more likely
to do business with you. Simple. And that
is the long and short of it.
There are brands that are doing it very
successfully. But I suppose it does come
down to channel selection i.e. which
channels will deliver content that helps
(adds value) to you customers. Wikipedia
defnes content marketing as all marketing
formats that involve the creation and
sharing of content in order to attract,
acquire and engage clearly defned
and understood current and potential
consumer bases with the objective of
driving proftable customer action.
Proftable customer action! The most
important factor that seems to have been
overlooked in this whole debate. It is all
good and well to make your customers
lives better, but what is the point if there is
no beneft to the bottom line?
I think a great example of this is American
Express Open Forum, a web based forum
that helps small businesses establish and
grow their business by providing them
with: guidance, discussions, case studies,
news, all pertaining to getting more out
of a small business. What theyve done
brilliantly is the seamless integration of
AMEX products / benefts and the ofering
they provide. A great digital example.
Where the problem comes in, is when
people try to relate this (for example) to the
customers in-store experience. Why? Why
make it more complicated? Surely the
consumer wants quick, efcient ways to
help them select a product? I think it does
go back to understanding the channel and
the customers needs. Too many people
are using the content strategy in an
attempt to create buzz around their ageing
communication oferings. Ive seen these
exact words used in: a packaging proposal,
a CI design and a ATL campaign. What?
How? Where? Drives me mad.
I really do believe in content marketing IN A
DIGITAL SPACE, nowhere else. You have to
be a content provider (content channel) to
be able to ofer a content strategy. Again,
simple. So yes, there are examples, for
instance in-mall interactive stations, that
help customers fnd: store locations, special
ofers, product info, etc. but it is a content
channel. The rule of thumb should be if it is
a channel where consumers seek-out info,
the chances are there is an opportunity
to create a content strategy: mobile, web,
social media, interactive innovations, etc.
In closing, be wary of anyone that uses the
word content marketing. Start by asking
them what their defnition of it is and how
they are going to use it.
CONTENT MARKETING:
Buzz or BS.
by Rob Van Royen
58

ad antage v February 2013
Keep your future looking rosy.
When you work in advertising, media or marketing, life cant help but look rosy.
After all, youre young, talented and the future looks bright with Loeries to be won,
trips to Cannes to be made and unforgettable parties to be had. But what if life
takes a dark turn? What if that account youve been busting a gut on decides to
move to another agency or cuts its budget? What if you get retrenched? Would
you still be able to pay for that trendy apartment youve committed half your
salary to?
Thats when you need the ABF and the vital support it oers people in South
Africas advertising, marketing and media industry. Between 1969 and 2000, the
ABF has paid out almost R5.5 million in assistance, taking care of people who have
served in these sectors but, for whatever reason, have fallen on hard times.
The ABF is a charitable fund dependent on donations. Help us continue our good
work by supporting our events and by becoming a member today. For the very
small annual fee of just R310 (R28.50 per month by debit order) members receive
a wealth of benets - from free 24/7 lifeline counselling to a host of discounts on
everything from owers to air tickets.
Por more lnformatlon emall Sharlene at sharleneQabf.co.za - www.abf.co.za - www.facebook.com/A8PSA - www.twltter.com/A8PSA
Keep your future in the pink. Make a donation today.

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