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English Homework Where Sweatshops are a dream 1.

Costas Paschalides 6D

The writer would like to offer Obama and his team a tour of the garbage dump in Phnom

Pehn so that they are virtually aware of the situation before they talk about labour standards. Specifically, the writer wants to portray the real miserable and disappointing living and working conditions of the people in the dump and hint at the way those people think of sweatshops, particularly because Obama and his team are about to ban them. He wants to let Obama know that a 10-year-old, for example, lives in the smokes and desperately seeks a piece of plastic in an attempt to reward five cents. The point he is trying to make is that before they talk and take their decisions, they should be aware of the real filthy conditions in the garbage dump; and that before they start fighting sweatshops, they should know that in these poor countries the real problem with sweatshops is not that people are being maltreated, but that they dont employ enough. Therefore, he is indirectly trying to make Obama realize that sweatshops are a dream for these people and that if he fights against them, he literally kills their dreams and freedom. 2. Mr. Obama and the Democrats, who favour labour standards and enhance their improvement,

intend to fight against oppressive sweatshops abroad and close them down, in order to stop the inhumane exploitation of the workers and protect their rights. 3. The writer came to have such a view on sweatshops by years of residence in East Asia and particularly in his wifes village, in southern Asia, where he observed standards of living being improved as people began working in sweatshops. Therefore, after having experienced those people and their lives, he came to the conclusion that sweatshops are a way of alleviating poverty in undeveloped countries, like Cambodia. 4. The writer supports his point of view by mentioning upsetting real-life examples by women and young girls in Cambodia. Firstly, he uses the example of Pim Srey Rath, a 19-year-old girl, who looks for plastic in the dump and wishes that someday shed work in a factory, where she wouldnt have to work under the oppressive heat of the sun for long hours. The writer sympathises with the young woman and agrees with her, implying that sweatshops are far better than working in the garbage dump. Furthermore, the writer gives another example of a frightened woman, Vath Sam Oeun, praying that her 10-year-old boy will someday find a work in a factory, where its more engaging and safe, compared to the dump. By also mentioning that her little boy has never visited a doctor or a dentist, or that he hasnt bathed for eight years, he makes his viewpoint even stronger, solider and backs his statement up; he gives a preview of what living in the dump is like. Hence, he strengthens his opinion and leaves an impression on the reader. Lastly, his point of view is also strengthened by 13-year-old Neuo Chanthou, who is concerned about her sister, whos dramatically lost part of her hand as she was run over a truck in the garbage dump. Apart from that, she cries that its hot and smelly in the dump, and the writer uses this as proof to support the development of manufacturing industries and the promotion of factory jobs in poor countries. Overall, his viewpoint

English Homework Where Sweatshops are a dream

Costas Paschalides 6D

is strongly founded and also based on personal experience, as he has witnessed this kind of situation in East Asia, and also logically explains that he wouldnt want to work in a sweatshop, but he would definitely not want to work in the garbage dump! 5. In accordance with the writer, improving labour standards and wages is not a viable solution because what this really means is factories in poorer countries closing down. Sweatshops are undoubtedly not the best preferable place to work, yet in such poor countries, they are not the bottom. In fact, they are a chance to escape from poverty. So, by improving labour standards and wages, factories shut down as they are not able to cover the high production costs and compete with other factories around the world. The increased production costs puzzle companies, as it is something they always try to curtail. As a result, factories basing their production on machines instead of labour force operate in more economically developed countries, like Malaysia, contrary to factories, whose production is based on the labour force, operating in less developed countries, like Cambodia and Ghana. The writer supports his point of view by referring to an experimental research in Cambodia, about high labour standards and wages. This research has shown that in order to get a job in a factory, one may be forced to sacrifice a months salary, and this is where exploitation comes in so as to cover the high production costs. The outcome is that factories close down and people must, therefore, return to the dump; back to poverty again. So, the writer strongly supports his belief and implies that worldwide endeavor is needed to enhance manufacturing in poorer countries and promote their products. 6. While Obama and the Democrats are in a continuous endeavor to improve and tighten labour

standards and fight against sweatshops, the writer, supporting thousands of people living under disgraceful conditions, fight for the survival of sweatshops and their promotion; the way of walking out of poverty, out of the dump nightmare. The writer supports that sweatshops should not be banned and labour standards should be kept as they are, otherwise factories will face difficulties and eventually close down, leaving hundreds of people unemployed and hopelessly driving them back to the dump. The writer vividly enhances the necessity of sweatshops promotion through real-life examples of despair and fatigue and expressionless people pleading to get a proper factory job. References to wretched women working under the tireless sun,Here is where its hot! Its dirty, hot and smelly here, experimental researches and encouragement programs convincingly provide satisfactory and grave evidence that these people actually suffer, and that our contribution in helping them get along with their problems is vital. Agreeing with the writer, I believe that manufacturing development in poor countries and support of African imports will make a tremendous difference in the current situation. Notwithstanding, sweatshops are a living paradigm of human exploitation. Endless working hours, tiny, invisible payment and inappropriate working conditions. I know that Americans have a hard time accepting that sweatshops can help people. Agreeing with the Americans, the production of

English Homework Where Sweatshops are a dream

Costas Paschalides 6D

these factories should not be supported and there should be no imports made by unpaid, exploited workers working in reckless factories. Its a shame to work in such places and sometime, human rights must be recognized and appreciated. Overall, the writer convincingly supports his viewpoint and implies that sweatshops are a mean of relieving poverty in such undeveloped countries. They are a better choice and life for these people. What is, perhaps, worthwhile to consider is whether these people should have the choice to leave the garbage dump and get a better and more decent job in a factory. Whether they have the right to decide for their lives and whether they will be content with a sweatshop job.