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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Wednesday Sept. 18, 2013 Vol XIV, Edition 27
DETAILS EMERGE
NATION PAGE 7
HILLSDALE
TOPS CATS
SPORTS PAGE 11
SQUASH BISQUE
GREAT FOR FALL
FOOD PAGE 19
NAVY YARD GUNMAN TOLD POLICE HE WAS HEARING
VOICES
More than $28M in pot eradicated
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Busy Bakers in San Bruno celebrated
its grand opening early this month at
444 San Mateo Drive with a ribbon
cutting, free demos and free cookie
decorating.
The store, which ofcially opened
Aug. 10, sells cookbooks and baking
supplies, including a wall of cupcake
liners; sprinkles; chocolate molds;
and cookie cutters. It also hosts cook-
ing classes.
I have loved baking for a long time
now, said owner Nicole Dudum. I
wanted a place locally that people
could to get everything they needed for
baking and have it be a fun place.
Dudum had the walls painted green to
reect this fun feeling. Theres also a
community board to post photos.
Weve kept prices reasonable,
Dudum said. We want to make baking
a fun project, instead of a must-do
thing since [baking] prices are so
expensive it gets to be more of a has-
sle. We have high-end brands at rea-
sonable prices; we keep prices down
by nding the manufacturers.
Its rst class was butter cream basics
Wednesday, Sept. 4, which let cus-
tomers do cake decorating and icing
making. Busy Bakers second class
was a cake decorating class Saturday,
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
About 8,100 marijuana plants with a
street value of more than $28 million
was eradicated from numerous grow
sites in the coastal mountains of San
Mateo County in late August and early
September, the height of harvest sea-
son, according to the San Mateo
County Narcotics Task Force.
The plants were in various stages of
growth and pulled from the ground
with the help of CAMP, the Campaign
Against Marijuana Planting, a multi-
agency task force managed by the state
Bureau of Narcotic Enforcement and
other local law enforcement agencies.
Along with the marijuana, approxi-
mately 4 tons of potential environ-
mentally-toxic garbage was hauled out
of the grow sites, according to a state-
ment by Cmdr. John Munsey. The
garbage consisted of camping gear,
food garbage, household garbage,
propane tanks, thousands of feet of
irrigation tubing, stoves, sleeping
bags, tarps, various fertilizers and pes-
ticides and rodent poison, Munsey
wrote in the statement.
A12-gauge shotgun was also discov-
ered that may have been used to protect
the gardens and possibly for hunting,
Munsey said.
Any suspects likely fled the area
when a CAMP helicopter searched the
mountains for the grow sites, he said.
It may be fairly difcult to nd the
suspects, he told the Daily Journal
yesterday. Some of the marijuana may
have been intended for local markets
and may have been intended to distrib-
ute elsewhere, he said.
The marijuana grow sites were situat-
ed in secluded areas. The suspects,
none of whom were located, used
sophisticated irrigation systems to tap
into available water sources and main-
tained well-supplied sources of water,
Getting busy baking
San Bruno shop offers classes, goods and a baking community feel
Narcotics task force finds 8,100 plants in coastal mountains
About 8,100 marijuana plants and 4 tons of garbage was
hauled out of grow sites in San Mateo County.
Schools to increase
training for abuse,
neglect reporting
Belmont-Redwood Shores staff would
go through training every other year
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The Belmont-Redwood Shores Elementary School
District is discussing plans to go above state-mandated staff
training for reporting suspected child abuse or neglect this
week.
The discussion comes on the heels of the arrest and con-
viction of former school custodian Andre Edwards earlier
this year for sexual misconduct with a student in 2010. He is
currently serving a nine-month jail term as part of a plea
deal. He was also alleged to have engaged in similar activi-
ty with a student in 2001, however, that case was not pros-
ecuted.
At the Board of Trustees Thursday night meeting, the
Minor league team looking
to be formed in Burlingame
Parks and Recreation Commission to hear proposal
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Whether to bring a Single-A minor league baseball team
to Burlingame will be up for consideration by the Parks and
Recreation Commission Thursday and some local communi-
ty members do not support the idea.
If commissioners approve of the idea, it must still go
before the City Council for nal approval. If that happens,
a new Pacic Coast League baseball team would begin this
coming summer with a May to August 2014 season at
DANIEL HUGHES/DAILY JOURNAL
Busy Bakers Owner Nicole Dudum stocks the shelves of her new downtown San Bruno business.
See BAKERS, Page 20
See POT, Page 18
See LEAGUE, Page 20
See TRAINING, Page 20
FOR THE RECORD 2 Wednesday Sept. 18, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
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Cyclist Lance
Armstrong is 42.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1862
President Abraham Lincoln signed a
commission naming Rabbi Jacob
Frankel of Rodeph Shalom
Congregation in Philadelphia the rst
Jewish chaplain of the U.S. Army.
We want the facts to t the preconceptions.
When they dont it is easier to ignore the facts
than to change the preconceptions.
Jessamyn West, American author (1902-1984)
Actress Jada
Pinkett Smith is 42.
Comedian Jason
Sudeikis is 38.
Birthdays
REUTERS
The capsized cruise liner Costa Concordia is seen at the end of the parbuckling operation outside Giglio harbor.
Wednesday: Sunny. Highs in the mid
60s to lower 70s. Northwest winds 5 to
10 mph.
Wednesday night: Clear. Lows in the
mid 50s. West winds 5 to 15 mph.
Thursday: Sunny. Highs in the mid 60s
to lower 70s. West winds 5 to 10 mph.
Thursday night: Clear in the evening
then becoming mostly cloudy. Lows in the mid 50s.
Northwest winds 5 to 15 mph.
Friday: Mostly cloudy. A slight chance of rain. Highs in
the upper 60s.
Friday night and Saturday: Mostly cloudy. Achance of
rain. Lows in the mid 50s. Highs in the upper 60s.
Saturday night: Partly cloudy. Lows in the mid 50s.
Sunday: Sunny. Highs in the upper 60s.
Local Weather Forecast
I n 1759, the French formally surrendered Quebec to the
British.
I n 1793, President George Washington laid the corner-
stone of the U.S. Capitol.
I n 1810, Chile made its initial declaration of independence
from Spain with the formation of a national junta.
I n 1850, Congress passed the Fugitive Slave Act, which
created a force of federal commissioners charged with return-
ing escaped slaves to their owners.
I n 1927, the Columbia Phonograph Broadcasting System
(later CBS) made its on-air debut with a basic network of 16
radio stations.
I n 1931, an explosion in the Chinese city of Mukden dam-
aged a section of Japanese-owned railway track; Japan,
blaming Chinese nationalists, invaded Manchuria the next
day.
I n 1947, the National Security Act, which created a
National Military Establishment, went into effect.
I n 1961, United Nations Secretary-General Dag
Hammarskjold was killed in a plane crash in northern
Rhodesia.
I n 1970, rock star Jimi Hendrix died in London at age 27.
I n 1975, newspaper heiress Patricia Hearst was captured by
the FBI in San Francisco, 19 months after being kidnapped
by the Symbionese Liberation Army.
I n 1981, a museum honoring former President Gerald R.
Ford was dedicated in Grand Rapids, Mich.
I n 1990, the city of Atlanta was named the site of the 1996
Summer Olympics. The organized crime drama
GoodFellas, directed by Martin Scorsese, had its U.S. pre-
miere in New York.
Will Rogers (1879-1935), the cowboy
philosopher, wrote a syndicated news-
paper column from 1922 to 1935 titled
Will Rogers Says. His humorous col-
umn had commentary on social and
political scenes.
***
Gene Autry (1907-1998) worked as a
telegraph operator in Oklahoma after
graduating high school. While sending
a telegram, Will Rogers heard Autry
playing guitar at the telegraph ofce
and suggested he look for a job in show
business.
***
Republic Pictures had huge success, and
began a new formula for movies, when
they signed Gene Autry in 1935 as the
rst singing cowboy. Autry made eight
movies per year and was paid $5,000
per movie.
***
In 1940, Gene Autry was rated the
fourth-biggest box ofce attraction,
following Mickey Rooney (born
1920), Clark Gable (1901-1960) and
Spencer Tracy (1900-1967).
***
The starring role in the 1938 movie
"Under Western Stars" was intended for
Gene Autry. However, Autry left the stu-
dio because of a contract dispute.
Newcomer Roy Rogers (1911-1998)
got the part.
***
Before Roy Rogers became a star, he
formed the cowboy singing group Sons
of the Pioneers in 1933.
***
Leonard Frank Slye and Lucille Wood
Smith, better known as Roy Rogers and
Dale Evans (1912-2001), were married
for 51 years, from 1947 until Rogers
death in 1998. It was Rogers second
marriage, and Evans fourth.
***
Dale Evans married her rst husband at
age 14. She had a child at age 15, and
was divorced at age 17.
***
The song Happy Trails To You was sung
as a duet by Roy Rogers and Dale Evans
at the end of every episode of The Roy
Rogers Show (1951-1957).
***
Roy Rogers has three stars on the
Hollywood Walk of Fame; a star each for
his contributions to the motion picture
industry, the television industry and
radio. All of the stars are on Vine Street.
***
Do you know the names of the horses of
Gene Autry, Roy Rogers and Dale
Evans? See answer at end.
***
The Lone Rangers trusty white Stallion
was named Silver. Before Silver, the
Lone Ranger rode a chestnut mare
named Dusty.
***
Sterling silver tarnishes because of its
exposure to sulfur and oxygen. If ster-
ling silver jewelry is worn regularly,
the oils in the skin will keep it from tar-
nishing.
***
The natural oil in the skin is responsi-
ble for ngerprints.
***
Fingerprint patterns are classied into
various types such as the arch, the left
loop, the right loop, the tented arch and
the whorl.
***
The rst trial which used ngerprint evi-
dence to help identify the criminal was
in India in 1898. In the United States,
the rst trial that used ngerprint evi-
dence took place in 1910.
***
The FBI maintains the Integrated
Automated Fingerprint Identication
System (IAFIS). IAFIS stores the nger-
prints and corresponding criminal his-
tory information of over 47 million
people.
***
Answer: Gene Autrys horse was named
Champion. Roy Rogers horse was
Trigger. Dale Evans horse was
Buttermilk. Trigger, a Palomino stal-
lion billed as the smartest horse in the
movies, died in 1965. Buttermilk died
in 1972. Both horses were stuffed and
put on display at the Roy Rogers-Dale
Evans Museum. The museum was origi-
nally located in Victorville, Calif. In
2003 the museum and the horses were
moved to Branson, Mo.
Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
the weekend and Wednesday editions of the
Daily Journal. Questions? Comments?
Email knowitall@smdailyjournal.com or
call 344-5200 ext. 114.
(Answers tomorrow)
RHYME ROBOT SPEEDY BANISH
Yesterdays
Jumbles:
Answer: Their hike in Alaska was going along just fine
until they ran into a BEAR-IER
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
SCUMI
DEAGA
RABLER
TEGRUT
2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
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Print your answer here:
Singer Jimmie Rodgers is 80. Actor Robert Blake is 80.
Former Sen. Robert Bennett, R-Utah, is 80. Actor Fred Willard
is 80. Actor Eddie Jones is 79. Gospel singer Bobby Jones is
75. Singer Frankie Avalon is 73. Actress Beth Grant (The
Mindy Project) is 64. Rock musician Kerry Livgren is 64.
Actress Anna Deavere Smith is 63. Basketball coach Rick
Pitino is 61. College Football Hall of Famer and retired NFL
player Billy Sims is 58. Movie director Mark Romanek is 54.
Baseball Hall of Famer Ryne Sandberg is 54. Alt-country-rock
musician Mark Olson is 52. Singer Joanne Catherall (Human
League) is 51. Actress Holly Robinson Peete is 49.
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are California
Classic, No. 5, in rst place; Winning Spirit, No. 9,
in second place; and Money Bags,No.11,in third
place.The race time was clocked at 1:46.07.
9 0 8
6 15 27 31 39 25
Mega number
Sept. 17 Mega Millions
1 17 25 37 44 20
Powerball
Sept. 14 Powerball
11 16 22 35 36
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
7 4 5 4
Daily Four
6 9 6
Daily three evening
7 15 17 33 35 22
Mega number
Sept. 14 Super Lotto Plus
3
Wednesday Sept. 18, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
BURLINGAME
Suspi ci ous acti vi ty. A strong odor of
marijuana came from a car on the 200 block
of Lorton Avenue before 11:24 p.m. Friday,
Sept. 13.
Arre s t. Two women were arrested for being
under the inuence of drugs on Bayshore
Highway and Mitten Road before 6:36 p.m.
Friday, Sept. 13.
Theft. An iPad was stolen on the 1300
block of Bayshore Highway before 3:37
p.m. Friday, Sept. 13.
Arre s t. Aman was arrested for being under
the inuence of drugs on the 2000 block of
Trousdale Drive before 11:30 a.m. Friday,
Sept. 13.
Grand theft. Acar was stolen on the 2000
block of Trousdale Drive before 11:20 a.m.
Friday, Sept. 13.
BELMONT
Arre s t. A person was arrested for public
intoxication on Ponce Avenue before 7:48
a.m. Sunday, Sept. 14.
Arre s t. Aman was arrested for driving under
the inuence on Old County Road before
12:51 a.m. Sunday, Sept. 14.
Arre s t. Aman was arrested for burglary on
Concourse Drive before 3:31 p.m. Saturday,
Sept. 14.
Reckless driver. Aperson was seen weav-
ing while driving on Ralston Avenue before
11:52 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 14.
Theft. Acredit card was stolen on Hill Street
before 12:08 p.m. Friday, Sept. 13.
St ol en vehi cl e. A vehicle was recovered
after being abandoned during a trafc acci-
dent on El Verano Way before 8:40 p.m.
Thursday, Sept. 12.
Police reports
This leaves a bad taste
A woman was seen scratching her
tongue on the 100 block of Anza
Boulevard in Burlingame before 11:15
a.m. Friday, Sept. 13.
By Chris Cooney
BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE
The San Mateo County Board of
Supervisors rejected part of a proposed
ordinance amendment Tuesday that would
have allowed the Sheriffs Office to sell
more than 700 guns.
Supervisor Don Horsley, who served as
San Mateo County sheriff for nearly 14
years, said the original intent of the ordi-
nance amendment was to allow sworn offi-
cers of the Sheriffs Office to buy their
assigned service weapons once they
become outdated and are replaced by newer
models.
When youre a peace officer and you
carry a gun, it becomes a part of you,
Horsley said.
During the coming year, the Sheriffs
Office reported that more than 300 service
weapons will be replaced as the department
purchases new Smith & Wesson guns.
As a result, the Sheriffs Office invento-
ry of 355 current duty
pistols and approximate-
ly 400 old duty firearms
will no longer be need-
ed, Sheriff Greg Munks
said in a letter to the
board.
The current ordinance,
which was adopted in
1999, prohibits the
county and county law
enforcement officials from selling any
county-owned firearm.
The proposed amendment would have
allowed the Sheriffs Office to sell its old
duty guns deemed surplus property to
sworn officers of the Sheriffs Office,
firearm manufacturers or another law
enforcement agency. The Sheriffs Office
said the sale of its old duty guns could raise
up to $150,000 for the department.
Supervisor Dave Pine said he was con-
cerned that selling old duty firearms to gun
manufacturers would risk sending more
guns into the general population.
Supervisor Adrienne Tissier said the
amendment should include language that
would only allow deputies to buy their own
service weapons, and not multiple
firearms.
I dont want anyone to be able to buy
four or five guns, Tissier said.
After a brief discussion, the board agreed
to pull the proposed amendment and
rewrite it to specify that sworn duty offi-
cers will be able to purchase their own
service weapons for a nominal fee once
they are replaced with newer models.
The new proposal will not permit the
county to sell retired weapons to gun man-
ufacturers or other agencies when it is rein-
troduced to the board at a later date.
Supervisors reject sheriffs proposal to sell old guns
Sworn deputies may be able to purchase own service weapons
Greg Munks
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO A museum pro-
posed by Star Wars creator George Lucas
to showcase visual storytelling and house
his art collection is one of three develop-
ment projects being considered for a plot
of park land at the foot of the Golden Gate
Bridge.
The Lucas museum would include the col-
lection he has amassed over more than four
decades and says includes illustrations by
Norman Rockwell and Maxfield Parrish.
Lucas intends to finance the project him-
self.
Supporters include
U.S. Sen. Dianne
Feinstein, Gov. Jerry
Brown and filmmaker
Martin Scorsese.
The finalists for the 8-
acre site facing Crissy
Field in the Presidio area
of San Francisco were
presented Monday to the
Presidio Trust, which
manages the former military base that is
now a national park.
Another proposal by the Golden Gate
National Parks Conservancy would retain
much of the sites open space and include
displays about the history of the
Presidio.
The other plan was submitted by the
architecture firm WRNS Studio and consult-
ing firm Chora. It would create a museum
combined with a science and nature center.
The Presidio Trust has not yet set a dead-
line to select the winning proposal.
Theres no question that this is one of
the most spectacular sites in the world,
said Craig Middleton, executive director
for the trust. We really need to be thought-
ful about which proposal best fits in, both
in terms of the project and the program.
Lucas museum among finalists for Golden Gate site
George Lucas
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Wednesday Sept. 18, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Albert Ramos Jr.
Albert Ramos Jr., born Aug. 9, 1941, died Sept. 13, 2013,
peacefully at home surrounded by his family.
He was a resident of South San
Francisco.
Albert was born in Brooklyn, N.Y., the
rst of four children to parents Albert and
Katherine Ramos. When he was 14, he
moved to Cocoa, Fla., where he graduat-
ed from Cocoa High School in 1960.
After graduation, he joined the Air Force
as a jet engine mechanic and was dis-
charged in 1964. He married Patricia
Lozar Nov. 16, 1974 in Las Vegas, Nev.
In his career, Al worked as a mechanic for Bendix at Edwards
Air Force base and Shade Foods where he retired in 2000
after 20 years of service. He was a reserve ofcer for the Los
Angeles County Sheriffs Ofce and, after moving to San
Bruno in 1978, for the San Bruno Police Department.
After retirement, he worked part time at Skylawn
Memorial Park until 2010. He is survived by his wife
Patricia, daughter Melissa, son Stephen and brother David.
He found enjoyment in shing, collecting, painting and old
time radio shows were a cherished pastime.
Arrangements were made by Skylawn Memorial Park. In
lieu of owers, the family requests that donations be made to
the Peninsula Humane Society or a favorite charity.
Roger Willey
A celebration of life service will be held Sept. 22 for
Roger Willey, MD, who was in family practice in Redwood
City for more than 40 years and served as chief of staff at
Sequoia Hospital from 1972-73.
Dr. Willey was 91 when he died Aug. 21.
The celebration of life is scheduled for 11:30 a.m. at
Woodside Road United Methodist Church, 2000 Woodside
Road, Redwood City. Willey, a World War II veteran of both
the cavalry and the medical corps, was a member of the
Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society.
While at the University of Iowa School of Medicine, he
met his future wife, Muriel, and they married in 1948. In
1951, they came to Redwood City where they raised three
children and Willey started family practice.
In retirement, Dr. Willey found time for many activities.
He and his wife traveled across the nation in a VWvan. They
also visited New Zealand, Australia, China and Europe. Both
belonged to a writers group at the Senior Center in
Redwood City. Dr. Willeys poem, Read to Me, Grandpa,
took rst place in a countywide poetry contest.
Mary Ophelia Lepore
Mary Ophelia Lepore died at home in Millbrae after a long
illness Sept. 14, 2013.
She was the wife of the late Arthur Lepore and is survived
by her six daughters, Sherry, Jill, Leah, Susan, Holly and
Nancy; 10 grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.
She was a native of Brown Mountain, Nev. and had lived
in Millbrae since 1960.
Family and friends are invited to attend the 2 p.m.
Memorial Mass, Saturday, Sept. 21 at St. Dunstan Catholic
Church, 1133 Broadway in Millbrae.
Those who wish may make a memorial contribution to
your favorite charity in memory of Mary Lepore.
Arrangements are under the direction of Chapel of the
Highlands in Millbrae.
Obituaries
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Common Core curriculum changes,
more district transparency, facilities
plans and grappling with new technol-
ogy are all core issues for those run-
ning for three open seats on the San
Carlos Elementary School District
Board of Trustees.
Nicole Bergeron, appointed incum-
bents Carol Elliott and Kathleen
Farley, and Sarah Stiefel are all seek-
ing office. Elliott and Farley were
appointed when Carrie Du Bois was
elected to the Sequoia Union High
School District Board of Trustees and
Mark Olbert was elected to the San
Carlos City Council in November.
Board President Beth Hunkapiller is
not running for re-election.
Interviews were held to help the
Daily Journal determine endorse-
ments. Stiefel did not attend the inter-
view, but provided written responses
to some questions. To allow each can-
didate a forum to express their opin-
ions on the issues discussed, candi-
dates were given the same questions
and asked to answer each in 50 words
or fewer. Answers are arranged alpha-
betically by the candidates last name.
Is the faci l i ti es master pl an
funded through Measure H,
Novembers $72 mi l l i on bond
measure, addres s i ng t he di s-
tri cts needs properl y?
Ni col e Bergero n : The plan is
visionary, strategic and responsive. It
is uniquely San Carlos in its 21st
century learning destination and its
chosen pathways such as Bridge
Schools, learning commons and exi-
ble design.
Carol El l i ot t: Given the con-
straints within which the district must
work, the Facilities Master Plan
appropriately addresses the districts
current and projected major facilities
needs and challenges, which include
growing enrollment, land scarcity, the
changing nature of how best to educate
students in the 21st century and fund-
ing availability.
Kathleen Farley: Yes. Guided by
the districts vision and strategic plan,
our facilities master plan outlines the
building of new schools and renova-
tion of existing schools to create ex-
ible 21st century learning environ-
ments for the districts growing
enrollment. Implementation of the
entire multi-year plan encompasses
work beyond that funded by Measure
H.
Sarah Stiefel: The facilities mas-
ter plan does address many areas of
urgent need, however, the decision to
recongure the entire district into K-3,
4-5 and 6-8 schools seems rushed and
unprecedented.
What do you think of the dis-
tri cts current rel at i onshi p wi t h
t he ci t y, and what can be done to
improve i t ?
Nicole Bergero n: This falls elec-
tion will bring fresh perspectives to
both the City Council and the school
board. Its an excellent opportunity to
build on the history of collaboration
and apply best practices from other
cities. Operationally, this cooperation
will start with new appointments to
the 2+2 Committee.
Carol El l i ot t : The city and SCSD
have developed a productive partner-
ship that better positions both agen-
cies to maximize the use of scarce pub-
lic resources to best serve San Carlos.
Open communication and strong gov-
ernance in both agencies will continue
to grow this relationship, which is
key to achieving our common goals.
Kathl een Farl ey: With better
communication and planning, the rela-
tionship between the district and the
city has greatly improved. The city is a
key partner in achieving our vision for
our students and exceptional schools
improve the quality of life for all resi-
dents. Continued partnership ensures
the best long-term decisions for San
Carlos residents.
Sarah Sti efel : The relationship
with the city appears productive yet
there is always room for improvement.
Heather Elementary Sc hool
saw a recent drop i n API of 36
points, to what do you attribute
that and is the drop a concern?
Nicole Bergero n: At this point,
Heather, and all district schools, are
preparing for a fundamental change in
how student progress is measured an
anomalous dip in a schools score
should not be overstated, especially
when the overall score is as high as
San Carlos school candidates
respond to district questions
Age: 46
Education: B.A.,
University of California,
Davis 1989, M.P.P., UC
Berkeley 1994, J.D.,
University of California,
Hastings 1995
Experience: On
Peninsula Covenant
Church board, served as
executive director of
Mid-Peninsula Citizens for Fair Housing,
volunteer for White Oaks Site Council
Family: Married, three daughters
Residence: San Carlos since 1993
Nicole Bergeron
Age: 45
Education: B.A. political
science/business,
University of California,
Los Angeles 1991,
Centre International des
Etudes Critiques (Paris) &
Universite de Pau,
France 1988-89
Experience: San Carlos
School District trustee,
Sequoia High School Education Foundation
board member
Family: Married, two children
Residence: 11 years in San Carlos
Carol Elliott
Age: 44
Education: B.A.,
Georgetown University,
M.A. in education,
Stanford University,
masters of business,
Stanford University
Experience: GM & EVP
product and marketing,
UniversityNow, Inc.
Family: Married, two
sons
Residence: Six years in San Carlos
Kathleen Farley
Age: 40
Education: J.D. from
Santa Clara University,
B.A. in
anthropology/sociology
and religion from
Lafayette College
Experience: Active
member of the
California State Bar
Family: Married, two
children
Residence: San Carlos since 2011
Sarah Stiefel
See ELECTION, Page 6
6
Wednesday Sept. 18, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/NATION
By Paul Larson
MILLBRAE
Have you ever
attended a funeral
or memorial service
and felt ill-at-ease,
uncomfortable or
awkward when
talking to the family
of the deceased? Have you ever stumbled
through your words and condolences
because you just didnt know what to say or
how to say it? Have you even decided to not
approach the family for fear of saying the
wrong thing or making a fool of yourself? If
so you are not alone. Many people in this
situation want to provide some kind of
comfort to the immediate family, but just
dont have the verbal tools to do so in an
assuring manner.
Learning Funeral Etiquette can be
useful. Using the right words at the right
time is an appropriate way to show that you
care, and in situations like this can be of
great help when provided correctly.
Standard condolences such as I am sorry
for your loss have become routine and
generic. A personalized phrase can be
welcomed such as John touched many
lives or I will miss John. DO NOT ask
the cause of death, offer advice or make
comments that would diminish the
importance of the loss such as Oh, youre
young and can marry again.
Other ways to demonstrate your support
include: 1. Listening. The family may feel
the need to express their anxiety, and giving
them that opportunity can be therapeutic; 2.
An embrace. This can show that you care
without the need for words; 3. Offering your
services. This shows the family that you are
willing to give extra time for them: Please
let me know if there is anything I can do to
help (be prepared to act if needed).
Even if you dont feel confident in
approaching the family there are other ways
to show that you care: 1. Attending the
funeral and signing the Memorial Book will
show the family that you took the time to be
there in support; 2. Dressing appropriately
for the funeral will demonstrate your efforts
to prepare for this special occasion (dark
colors are no longer a requisite for funerals,
but dressing in a coat, tie, dress or other
attire that youd wear to any special event
are considered a way of showing you care);
3. In certain cases friends are invited to
stand up and offer BRIEF personal feelings.
Prior to the funeral write a few key notes
and reflections which will help you organize
your thoughts. Even if there is no
opportunity to speak before a group you
may have a chance to offer your thoughts to
the family following the ceremony; 4. A
personalized card or note will help you
arrange your words better and can be kept
by the family. If you dont have their
mailing address you can send your envelope
to the funeral home and they will forward it
to the next of kin; 5. Providing flowers is a
long time tradition, or making a charitable
donation in the deceaseds memory will give
the family a strong sense of your regards; 6.
If appropriate a brief phone call can show
your immediate concern, but generally this
should be avoided to give the family the
privacy they may need.
If you ever wish to discuss cremation,
funeral matters or want to make pre-
planning arrangements please feel free to
call me and my staff at the CHAPEL OF
THE HIGHLANDS in Millbrae at (650)
588-5116 and we will be happy to guide you
in a fair and helpful manner. For more info
you may also visit us on the internet at:
www.chapelofthehighlands.com.
Funeral Etiquette Advice:
Show Up, Be Brief, Listen
advertisement
any of those in San Carlos.
Carol El l i ot t : API scores offer a very
limited gauge of student achievement, so we
shouldnt look at them in a vacuum from
other data. While there may be no single
factor responsible for Heathers drop, as a
matter of best practice we must leverage
subgroup data from CSTs to better inform
teaching practices district-wide.
Kathl een Farl ey: Most California
schools including those in Silicon Valley
experienced a drop in API scores. All signif-
icant score changes are examined in detail
by the district. Heathers drop indicates the
importance of a student-by-student STAR
test analysis to identify potential patterns
of missed concepts and areas for increased
focus and support.
Sarah Stiefel: My kids attend Heather
School and I am proud to be a part of the
wonderful community there. At this time, I
attribute the drop in scores to the multiple
extended staff absences in recent years,
including one critical position that was
unstaffed for half of the school year.
Is the district prepared to meet the
Common Core curriculum changes?
Nicole Bergero n: San Carlos is very
well positioned. We need to ensure that the
necessary technologies are in place, that
teachers are supported and trained for the
changes, and that parents are kept well
informed. Most importantly, we need to
ensure that the curriculum changes actually
improve learning in the classroom.
Carol El l i ot t : A pivotal element of
SCSDs strategic plan involves successful
adoption of the Common Core standards. A
robust professional development program
for teachers and staff around the new curricu-
lum and assessments will be key to a
smooth transition, and the district has
already started implementation of this
piece.
Kathleen Farley: The district incorpo-
rated the Common Core standards in its ve-
year strategic plan. Successful Common
Core implementation requires investment
in professional development to align cur-
riculum, assessments and report cards. The
Common Core aligns well with our vision
of preparing the whole child for success in
the 21st century.
Sarah Stiefel: Given the districts lack
of preparedness and compliance in other
areas, I have concerns about whether it is
prepared to meet the Common Core curricu-
lum changes.
Local Control Funding Formula is
new but will have an effect on di s-
tricts across t he st at e. What will the
i mpact be i n thi s school di stri ct?
Nicole Bergero n: San Carlos has his-
torically been underfunded compared to sur-
rounding districts and that doesnt change
with LCFF. However, LCFFs focus on exi-
bility and inclusive local planning should
allow San Carlos to shine including set-
ting a model for financial transparency,
community involvement and innovative
programs.
Carol El l i ot t : Even with LCFF,
California is still not fully funding public
education. Further, San Carlos must be con-
servative about funding projections due to
signicant uncertainty surrounding LCFF
implementation at the state and local level.
The district will need to remain judicious
with their budget and rely on local funding
to ll the gaps.
Kathleen Farley: We cannot assume
any increases in district funding with the
new Local Control Funding Formula and it
may introduce volatility and uncertainty in
school funding. We will continue our con-
servative approach to budgeting and fund-
ing. The generous support from our commu-
nity, SCEF and our PTAs will continue to be
essential.
Sarah Stiefel: The funding formula is a
step in the right direction toward increased
exibility in local control over funds. It
will present opportunities for improved
accountability, transparency and compli-
ance, which are among my highest priori-
ties.
Continued from page 5
ELECTION
By David Espo
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON Implacable Republican
opposition to Obamacare has Congress
once more veering closer to gridlock.
In the House, more than 60 conservatives
support tacking a one-year delay in imple-
menting the health care law onto a bill
needed to prevent a partial government
shutdown on Oct. 1.
Senior leaders warn the GOP could suffer
signicant political reverses if the party
goes along with the plan and President
Barack Obama and Democrats resist, as they
have made clear they will, but it is strongly
backed by senators with tea party ties and
their inuential allies outside Congress. Its
leading advocate, Rep. Tom Graves of
Georgia, said the proposal unies the rank
and le around two objectives we have,
keeping the government open and protect-
ing our constituents from the harmful
effects of Obamacare.
Across the Capitol, where energy legisla-
tion is under debate, Senate Republican
Leader Mitch McConnell is proposing to
add a one-year delay in the requirements for
individuals to purchase coverage and for
businesses to provide it to their employees.
Obama has already ordered the postpone-
ment for businesses.
Additionally, Sen. David Vitter, R-La., is
threatening to hold up passage until the
Senate agrees to vote on a proposal that
would require lawmakers, their aides and
presidential political appointees to obtain
their coverage through exchanges that
would be set up under the law beginning
Oct. 1. They would also be required to pay
the full cost of their insurance out of pock-
et, denying them the contribution that the
government currently makes as their
employer.
Senate, House ensnared
in health care controversy
U.S. builder confidence
steady, rates a concern
U.S. homebuilders confidence in the
housing market held this month at its high-
est level in nearly eight years. But builders
are starting to worry that sales may slow if
mortgage rates continue to rise.
The National Association of Home
Builders/Wells Fargo builder sentiment
index released Tuesday registered at 58 this
month. Thats unchanged from August,
which was revised down from an initial read-
ing of 59.
Readings above 50 indicate more builders
view sales conditions as good, rather than
poor.
In the latest survey, which included 264
respondents, a measure of current sales con-
ditions was unchanged, while a gauge of
trafc by prospective buyers rose one point.
Virginia company about
to make first space station run
AVirginia company is all set to make its
rst-ever supply run to the International
Space Station. On the eve of its premiere ren-
dezvous mission, Orbital Sciences Corp. said
everything looked good for Wednesdays
launch from Virginias Eastern Shore.
An unmanned Antares rocket was scheduled
to blast off from NASAs Wallops Island
Facility at 10:50 a.m. EDT, carrying 1,300
pounds of food, clothes and other items as part
of a test ight. ASunday delivery is planned.
Alaunch demo of the rocket in April went
well. If this latest mission succeeds, Orbital
Sciences will start launching more
Cygnus cargo ships under a $1.9 billion
contract with NASA.
Around the nation
LOCAL/NATION 7
Wednesday Sept. 18, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
CITY
GOVERNMENT
The
Burlingame City
Counci l voted
u n a n i m o u s l y
Monday night in
favor of requesting
to act as the agency that helps preserve
the downtown post offices historical
integrity. The 220 Park Road property,
which officially went up for sale in
August, is protected under its listing on
the Nati onal Regi ster of Hi stori c
Pl aces. The City Council authorized
Mayor Ann Keighran to send a letter to
the U. S. Postal Servi ce advising the
independent federal agency to give the
city consent to serve as the responsible
agency for monitoring and enforcing the
preservation covenant.
The Foster Ci ty Counci l voted
unanimously Monday night to approve a
more than $4 million loan to MidPen
Housi ng to build 66 affordable housing
units at the 15-acre site adjacent to Ci t y
Hal l . The council also voted unanimously
to approve the construction of a hotel at
Vintage Park, the site of the old Bl ack
Angus restaurant.
The South San Francisco City
Counci l met in closed session on
Tuesday to discuss the hiring of Jess
Armas as the new city manager, but no
action was taken. The council will next
discuss the hiring at a special meeting
6:30 p.m. Sept. 25 at another closed ses-
sion meeting.
By Eric Tucker, Jack
Gillum and Lolita C. Baldor
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON A month
before he went on the rampage that
left 13 dead,
Wa s h i n g t o n
Navy Yard gun-
man Aaron
Alexis com-
plained to
police in Rhode
Island that peo-
ple were talking
to him through
the walls and
ceilings of his hotel rooms and
sending microwave vibrations into
his body to deprive him of sleep.
The account, contained in an Aug.
7 report from Newport, R.I., police,
adds to the picture that has emerged
of an agitated and erratic gure
whose behavior and mental state
had repeatedly come to authorities
attention but didnt seem to affect
his security clearance.
Alexis, a 34-year-old informa-
tion technology employee at a
defense-related computer company,
used a valid pass Monday to get into
the Navy Yard and killed 12 people
before he was slain by police in a
shootout that lasted more than a
half-hour.
Aday after the assault, the motive
was still a mystery. U.S. law
enforcement ofcials told the
Associated Press that investigators
had found no manifesto or other
writings suggesting a political or
religious motivation.
Alexis, a former Navy reservist,
had been undergoing mental health
treatment from Veterans Affairs
since August but was not stripped of
his security clearance, according to
the law enforcement ofcials, who
spoke on condition of anonymity
because the criminal investigation
was still going on.
He had been suffering a host of
serious mental problems, including
paranoia and a sleep disorder, and
had been hearing voices in his
head, the ofcials said.
The assault is raising more ques-
tions about the adequacy of the
background checks done on con-
tract employees who hold security
clearances an issue that came up
recently with National Security
Agency leaker Edward Snowden.
Navy Secretary Ray Mabus
ordered two security reviews
Tuesday of how well the Navy pro-
tects its bases and how accurately it
screens its workers.
Similarly, President Barack
Obama has ordered the White House
budget ofce to examine security
standards for government contrac-
tors and employees across federal
agencies.
Navy Yard gunman toldpolice he was hearing voices
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWTOWN, Conn.
Relatives of victims of recent
high-prole mass shootings in
the U.S. traveled with activists to
Washington on Tuesday to lobby
again for gun control, a trip that
took on new urgency in the wake
of Mondays shooting in the cap-
ital that killed 13.
The trip by the Newtown
Action Alliance gun law advoca-
cy group was planned to mark
roughly nine months since the
Dec. 14 rampage in Newtown,
Conn., in which 20 children and
six educators were shot to death.
It now also quickly follows
Mondays killings at the
Washington Navy Yard.
Members of the group also
included those who lost family
members in the July 2012 shoot-
ing at a movie theater in Aurora,
Colo., in which 12 people were
gunned down and 70 wounded.
They also included Amardeep
Kaleka, whose father was one of
six Sikhs killed at a Wisconsin
temple in August 2012.
Kaleka said his goal is to see
Congress impose stricter back-
ground checks and close loop-
holes that enable people to buy
guns at gun shows without any
background checks. Its the same
message he has given lawmakers
before, but he said it has to be
repeated so legislators dont for-
get there are multiple sides to the
issue.
The NRA is able to lobby
them eight hours a day, ve days
a week, for months on end. We
survivors come in periodically,
only one or two times a year, he
told the Associated Press. I fear
(lawmakers) are in that position
where they think theyre going
to lose votes or money backing
them campaign-wise.
Among those traveling from
Colorado were Megan Sullivan,
whose brother Alex was killed in
the shooting, and her father,
Tom.
This is another moment where
its just surreal that Im even in
this situation and speaking with
other people who have lost their
brothers and loved ones, Megan
Sullivan told The Aurora Sentinel
on Tuesday.
Colorado and Connecticut gun
activists go to D.C.after shooting
REUTERS
Policemen string police tape outside the Brooklyn residence of Cathleen
Alexis, mother of suspected Washington Navy Yard shooter Aaron Alexis,
in New York.
Aaron Alexis
NATION/WORLD 8
Wednesday Sept. 18, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Albert Aji and Bassem Mroue
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DAMASCUS, Syria Russia insist-
ed Tuesday that a U.N. Security Council
resolution governing Syrias handling
of its chemical weapons not allow the
use of force, but it suggested that could
change if Damascus reneges on the
deal to give up its stockpile.
The main Syrian opposition coali-
tion, meanwhile, urged the interna-
tional community to take swift action
against the regime of President Bashar
Assad in response to a U.N. nding
that the nerve agent sarin was used in a
deadly attack near the capital last
month.
Russian Foreign Minister Sergey
Lavrov said his country spoke clear-
ly about rejecting the use of force
when the chemical weapons agreement
was worked out Saturday in Geneva
between Washington and Moscow. The
plan calls for an inventory of Syrias
chemical weapons within a week, with
all components of the program out of
the country or destroyed by mid-2014.
But if signs emerge that Syria is not
fullling the agreement or there are
reports of further chemical weapons
use, then the Security Council will
examine the situation, Lavrov said,
suggesting the issue could be reconsid-
ered.
U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-
moon said a resolution on the U.S.-
Russia deal must be enforceable,
telling reporters that the most effec-
tive way is under Chapter 7 of the
U.N. Charter. That deals with threats to
international peace and security and
has provisions for enforcement by
military or non-military means, such
as sanctions.
While in principle all Security
Council resolutions are legally bind-
ing, Ban said, in reality, we need clear
guidelines under Chapter 7.
Lavrov made his remarks at a news
conference in Moscow with French
Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius.
France and the U.S. say a military
option remained on the table, and they
are pushing for the U.N. resolution to
reect that.
Diplomats said the ve permanent
council members the U.S., Russia,
China, Britain and France made lit-
tle progress at a meeting Tuesday on a
draft resolution and would meet again
Wednesday.
Russia opposes use of force in Syria resolution
By David McHugh
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
FRANKFURT, Germany Car sales
in Europe are still sagging despite the
return of modest economic growth.
For the rst eight months of the year,
passenger car sales in the European
Union were off 5.2 percent to 7.84 mil-
lion compared with the same period
last year, the European Automobile
Manufacturers Association said
Tuesday. Thats the lowest January-
August gure since the group started
keeping track in 1990.
New car registrations in August fell 5
percent from a year ago to 653,872,
the association said.
The economy in the 28-country EU
grew 0.4 percent in the second quarter,
ending a recession. But the unemploy-
ment rate remains high at 11.0 percent,
making many consumers unable or
afraid to buy a new car.
Governments hit by the eurozone
debt crisis have cut back on spending
and raised taxes to try to manage over-
sized debt levels, slowing their
economies. The hardest hit countries,
such as Greece and Spain, face even
higher jobless rates that have hurt
sales of moderately priced vehicles
especially hard. Luxury carmakers are
doing better.
The August downturn was distributed
across Europes biggest markets.
Germany saw a 5.5 percent drop,
despite a stronger economy than in
other members of the 17-county euro-
zone. Registrations fell 10.5 percent
in France, 18.3 percent in Spain, and
6.6 percent in Italy.
European auto sales hit new low
Dutch king: say
goodbye to welfare state
AMSTERDAM King Willem-
Alexander delivered a message to the
Dutch people from the government
Tuesday in a nationally televised
address: the welfare state of the 20th
century is gone.
In its place a participation society
is emerging, in which people must
take responsibility for their own future
and create their own social and nan-
cial safety nets, with less help from
the national government.
The king traveled past waving fans
in an ornate horse-drawn carriage to
the 13th-century Hall of Knights in
The Hague for the monarchs tradition-
al annual address on the day the gov-
ernment presents its budget for the
coming year.
Around the world
By Bradley Klapper and Donna Cassata
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON Secretary of State John Kerry told
Congress on Tuesday that the United States will closely
monitor every step of the plan for
eliminating Syrias chemical
weapons while maintaining a credible
military threat against Bashar Assads
government.
Meeting behind closed doors, Kerry
briefed members of the Senate
Foreign Relations Committee on the
chemical weapons strategy he negoti-
ated with Russia last week in Geneva.
One of Kerrys deputies, Wendy
Sherman, spoke by telephone with House Foreign
Affairs Committee members.
He (Kerry) said that the watchwords are not trust but
verify, they are verify and verify, Sen. Dick Durbin,
D-Ill., said in summing Kerrys message at the session.
I think it reects the fact that were dealing with a war
zone, civil war under way, which makes it extremely dif-
cult and were dealing with questionable allies in this
effort. ... It is a daunting task but it will serve the world
well if we can do it and make this a safer world.
Sen. Bob Menendez of New Jersey, the committee
chairman, said senators were looking for a U.N. Security
Council resolution that makes the plan enforceable over
the coming months.
Each moment provides a test to see whether Assad is
going to comply, Menendez said.
The talks come amid continued diplomatic wrangling
over how to collect Syrias arsenal of chemical and bio-
logical agents to prevent any repeat of the Aug. 21
attack outside Damascus that, according to the U.S.,
killed more than 1,400 people, including at least 400
children.
In an interview Tuesday with the Spanish-language
network Telemundo, President Barack Obama said evi-
dence of a chemical weapons attack in Syria compiled by
U.N. investigators should sway governments that were
reluctant to hold the Assad regime accountable.
What that does, I think, is change the international
dynamic, Obama said. I think it changes international
opinion on this issue. But I am also committed to say-
ing, Can we resolve this diplomatically?
Obama seeks Congress
support for Syria plan
Barack Obama
REUTERS
Thick smoke rises out of burning vehicles at the site of a car explosion on the Syrian
border.
OPINION 9
Wednesday Sept. 18, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Plan Bay Area is a good fit
Editor,
Plan Bay Area is a wonderful exam-
ple of regional planning and a cut-
ting-edge showcase of modernity.
Developing high-density housing
near public transportation is the wave
of the future: Its here to stay. The
alternative is urban sprawl and that is
last centurys mistake. Demographic
facts demand this change. According
to the U.S. Census as analyzed by The
Bipartisan Policy Institute, house-
hold size fell 21 percent between
1960 and 1990. By the 2010 Census,
of the 117 million U.S. households,
only 23 Million, or 20 percent were
comprised of adults with children.
Aging baby boomers and young mil-
lennials desire smaller living areas
near public amenities.
The trend toward high-density, tran-
sit-oriented development is driven by
public demand and developers work-
ing to ll it. Government agencies
are devising regional planning mod-
els to accommodate this inevitable
transition. San Mateo and Santa Clara
counties residents are now more
diverse, requesting a wider variety of
housing. Fortunately, Plan Bay Area
was adopted on July 18, 2013 so we
can better meet the comprehensive
needs of todays and tomorrows citi-
zens.
Kaia Eakin
Redwood City
Burlingame grade
separation study
Editor,
I have two points that I would like
to make on the potential
Broadway/Burlingame grade separa-
tion project and the resolution
approving a study to make it happen,
as reported in the Sept. 5 Daily
Journal article Burlingame council
OKs grade separation study.
First, this overpass cannot come
soon enough. This afternoon
(Sunday, Sept. 15, 2:43 p.m.), I got
off the southbound train and noticed
shortly thereafter that the street
crossing bells went on, and the gates
went down and stayed down for a full
three minutes, well after the train had
left the station. I know because I
stayed and watched to see if another
train was approaching, which none
did. I wonder how often these ghost
trains appear. Second, in reading the
13-point, Sept. 3 City Council reso-
lution supporting the Broadway
Grade Separation Project, I noticed
one serious omission: any mention
of the need to redo the out-of-compli-
ance Broadway train station.
As reporter Angela Swartz noted,
the conguration of the train station
prevents two trains from passing
each other. I urge city leaders and
Burlingame residents to visit the new
San Bruno train station being built
now on the new Caltrain overpass at
San Bruno Avenue. The overpass,
with the southbound station being
built now on the west side of the
tracks, actually adds to the urban
ambiance of San Bruno at this partic-
ular crossing. I would hope that the
Burlingame City Council revisit the
resolution to include adding a new
Broadway train station.
Irvin Dawid
Burlingame
Letters to the editor
T
he San Carlos Elementary
School District is, like school
districts across the state, fac-
ing a number of changes to both its
curriculum and funding. With the
advent of Common Core standards,
schools must adjust to new ways of
assessing children and make sure
teachers have the right tools before
the standards are implemented. With
the advent of the Local Control
Funding Formula, there will be a wide-
spread change to how school districts
plan their budgets.
In San Carlos, the district is also
facing signicant change in how it
implements its facilities master plan,
made possible through a $72 million
bond measure, and required because of
ever-growing enrollment. Managing
this change is no small task and there
have been some bumps when it comes
to communication and implementa-
tion. However, the current board has
conducted itself well and tried to be
resolute and responsive to the com-
munity as a whole.
There are four people running for
three open seats on the Board of
Trustees. Board President Beth
Hunkapiller is not running for re-elec-
tion and appointed trustees Carol
Elliott and Kathleen Farley are run-
ning. Both Elliott and Farley were
appointed when Mark Olbert was
elected to the San Carlos City Council
and Carrie DuBois was elected to the
Sequoia Union High School District
in November. Both have come up to
speed quickly and have responsible
stewards of the community trust in
this time of signicant change. With
Common Core and its need for tech-
nology, both have an eye on ensuring
its implementation is appropriate and
has the proper level of staff develop-
ment. Both also see the need for
transparency and communication.
Joining them in the race are Nicole
Bergeron and Sarah Steifel. Bergeron
emphasizes the need for additional
forms of communication. She has
some level of concern about the
boards work in committees and,
while she understands it is an effec-
tive way to move forward on certain
decisions, would like to see the
reporting of that work be done in a
more inclusive way that involves per-
spectives from the community as a
whole. That sentiment is key when it
comes to the number of issues the
board is currently addressing and will
address in the future. Steifel has con-
cerns with how the district recong-
ured grade levels to meet enrollment
challenges. We would have liked to
have heard more from her in this cam-
paign and hope she will continue to
press the district and the board as it
makes future decisions.
With three slots available on the
board, the best choices are Bergeron,
Elliott and Farley. The latter two will
provide a sense of continuity while
still retaining their relatively fresh
points of view. Bergeron will provide
a sense of dedication while emphasiz-
ing the need for community input as
big decisions are made. The San
Carlos Elementary School District is
well run, with a wealth of educational
opportunities for its children.
Bergeron, Elliott and Farley offer the
best chance to retain that path while
the district plans for the future.
Bergeron, Elliott, Farley for San Carlos schools Growing old gracefully?
G
etting old just keeps happening. Its irri-
tating that way. I mean, five years ago I
said definitively, OK, now Im getting
old, but that didnt stop anything. Getting old just
keeps coming, a drip here, a drip there. Jon Carroll,
San Francisco Chronicle,
May 24, 2012.
Some time ago, while in
Walgreens, I walked past a
little old lady who,
while she was making
selections from the
shelves, was whistling.
Up until then, I thought I
was the only person over
60 who deviated from the
expected demeanor of the
aging by whistling in pub-
lic. I thought, Now
theres a lady who is grow-
ing old gracefully. In the
back of my mind I had always carried the idea that I
would like to do that. But it wasnt until that day that I
seriously considered just what growing older gracefully
means.
I did know that there were people I knew who had
grown old in the way I would like to emulate and others
who made me wonder if they realized that things could
have been much different. As Eda LeShan wrote in her
provocative book, Oh, to be 50 Again!: There is
nothing wonderful about getting old. No matter how
well preserved you may be, no matter how healthy and
active, no matter if we are fulfilling our dreams and are
happier than weve ever been before, the simple fact is
that we are in the last third or quarter of our lives and for
the first time we are faced with a reality that we cant
work our way out of, or buy our way out of no matter
how noble or creative or beautiful or kind we may be,
old age is the time when we begin to understand that we
each have a terminal disease. We caught it the moment
we were conceived. Ah, reality! Hits you sometimes
like a ton of brick! Bummer! At my age, Im wondering
if its best to remain in denial.
Is it possible to experience old age without succumb-
ing to despair? As with any of lifes ordeals, we want to
make the best of it by rolling with the punches if possi-
ble and continuing to grow and change. We want to con-
tinue to be respected, to feel we are making even a small
difference in the world and still have a purpose in life.
The prerequisite to all of this is our own attitude.
Barring some serious health problem, we have a choice.
We can choose to sit in our rocking chair, firmly nailed
to the past and stagnation, or actively rock in the direc-
tion of continued personal growth, and rewarding rela-
tionships.
Afriend, on her 75th birthday, when some tactless
person asked her how it felt to be old, cracked, Im not
old. Im ripe! She smoothed her shirt over her ample
bosom and laughed. Her looseness about living, her
ability to laugh at herself and the human condition have
supported her for a long time and are continuing to
serve her well into her later years. The ripe woman is
open and flexible. Her looseness about living, her abili-
ty to laugh at herself and the human condition have sup-
ported her for a long time and are continuing to serve
her well.
As the old saying goes, life can begin at 40, (or 50 or
even later). It often depends upon the choices we make.
Gail Sheehy, author of Pathfinders, in describing
aging, wrote: Like a dance of brilliant reflections on a
clear pool, well-being is a shimmer that accumulates
from many important choices made over the years by a
mind that is not often muddled by pretense or ignorance
and a heart that is open enough to sense people in their
depths and to intuit the meaning of most situations.
So now, with another birthday looming next week, I
keep trying to emulate the whistler. I certainly am ripe!
But sometimes its hard to face reality! Instead of
dwelling on Ms. LeShans predictions, Id rather go
along with Gail Sheehy and keep in mind those reflec-
tions, and, if at all possible, continue in the attempt to
ripen in a more positive way.
Afew years later, Ms. LeShan wrote in Its Better To
Be Over the Hill than Under It: Im not so crazy as to
be so accepting of aging that I might write a book
called, Oh, To Be Ninety, at Last! but I have learned to
accept exactly where I am. Good luck to all of us!
I wonder if Jon Carroll has come across Ashleigh
Brilliants quips: Inside every older person is a
younger person wondering what happened. and Enjoy
yourself while youre still old.
(This column is dedicated to all of the nice people Ive
met at San Bruno Senior Center, including the hard-
working staff, the volunteers and also other friends and
relatives who fit the category).
Since 1984, Dorothy Dimitre has written more than 700
columns for various local newspapers. Her email address
is gramsd@aceweb.com.
Editorial
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Richard Holober
Tom Mohr
Belmont-Redwood
Shores Elementary School District
Rakesh Hegde
Amy Koo
Charles Velschow
Hillsborough City
Elementary School District
Lynne Esselstein
Don Geddis
Kaarin Hardy
San Bruno Park School District
Patrick Flynn
John Marinos
Henry Sanchez
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BUSINESS 10
Wednesday Sept. 18, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 15,529.73 +34.95 10-Yr Bond 2.853 -0.021
Nasdaq 3,745.70 +27.85 Oil (per barrel) 105.50
S&P 500 1,704.76 +7.16 Gold 1,310.40
By Joshua Freed
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Stocks rose on Tuesday as investors
shrugged off worries about what the
Federal Reserve is up to.
Many expect the Fed to announce
Wednesday that it will reduce its $85
billion monthly bond-buying pro-
gram. Wall Street is hoping for a small
reduction because the bond-buying has
kept interest rates ultra-low and made
it cheaper to borrow money.
The Dow Jones industrial average
closed higher by 34.95 points, or 0.2
percent, at 15,529.73.
The Standard & Poors 500 index
rose 7.16 points, or 0.4 percent, to
1, 704. 76. The S&P 500 was five
points below its record high reached
on Aug. 2. It has risen for three trading
days in a row, and 10 of the last 11.
The Nasdaq composite was up 27.85
points, or 0.8 percent, at 3,745.70; it
had the biggest percentage gain of the
three big indexes.
Nine out of 10 industry groups in the
S&P 500 rose, led by technology. The
only declines were for materials
stocks, which include miners, industri-
al gas producers and metal reners.
Rising tech stocks included the
video game company Electronic Arts,
which is getting a solid start with this
years version of its Madden football
franchise. Electronic Arts rose 64
cents, or 2 percent, to $27.60.
Computer memory maker Micron
Technology rose 40 cents, or 2 per-
cent, to $16.84 as investors bet that
memory prices will rise after a re shut
down a competitors factory in China.
By some measures, stock market
values are as high as they were at the
end of the Internet bubble in 2000,
when compared to the size of the
nations economy, said Martin
Leclerc, a principal and chief invest-
ment ofcer at Barrack Yard Advisors
in Bryn Mawr, Pa.
Then, there was at least the justica-
tion of new technology.
Now, the only justication we have
is cheap money, Leclerc said.
Nonetheless, Leclerc said, with a
bull market underway stocks could
keep climbing regardless of valua-
tions. This thing is a powerful
beast, he said. The current bull market
is four-and-a-half years old.
Stocks higher as Fed kicks off two-day meeting
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Tuesday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Safeway Inc., up $2.95 to $30.99
The grocer adopted a plan to prevent a hostile takeover. Jana Partners
disclosed that it had amassed a 6.2 percent stake in Safeways outstanding
shares.
Aeropostale Inc., up $1.56 to $10.17
Private equity rm Sycamore Partners disclosed an 8 percent stake in
the teen retailer, making it the companys third-largest shareholder.
Huntsman Corp., up 36 cents to $19.50
The chemical maker will pay $1.1 billion to buy the performance additives
and titanium dioxide businesses from Rockwood Holdings.
3D Systems Corp., up $3.45 to $53.51
Credit Suisse initiated coverage of the 3-D printing industry, with 3D
Systems as its top pick.
Nasdaq
Werner Enterprises Inc., down $1.02 to $23.39
The transportation company issued a warning, saying its third-quarter
prots may come in below expectations due to rising costs.
Outerwall Inc., down $6.48 to $49.49
The operator of Redbox DVD rental kiosks and Coinstar coin-counting
machines cut its outlook for the current quarter and full year.
Kythera Biopharmaceuticals Inc., up $8.42 to $41.95
The company said a drug intended to treat double chins met its goals
in two late-stage clinical studies.
Microsoft Corp., up 13 cents to $32.93
The worlds largest software company announced a $40 billion stock
buyback program and a dividend hike.
Big movers
REUTERS
Michele Scannavini,CEO of Coty,prepares for an interview following his companys
IPO on the oor of the New York Stock Exchange.
Ecotality files for Chapter
11 bankruptcy protection
NEWYORK Ecotality, which makes charging systems
for electric vehicles, has led for Chapter 11 bankruptcy
protection and wants to sell its assets in an auction.
Ecotality Inc. said it made the ling Monday in Arizona.
The company had said in August that it might be forced into
a sale or bankruptcy ling after disappointing sales and a
suspension of payments from the federal government. It has
also paid $855,000 in back wages and damages to resolve
an investigation by the Department of Labor into allega-
tions that the company broke labor laws.
The San Francisco company makes charging and power-
storage systems for electric vehicles under the Blink and
Minit Charger brands, including charging stations for the
Nissan Leaf. It also does testing for government agencies,
auto makers and utilities.
Brazil looks to break from U.S.-centric Internet
RIO DE JANEIRO Brazil plans to divorce itself from
the U.S.-centric Internet over Washingtons widespread
online spying, a move that many experts fear will be a
potentially dangerous rst step toward fracturing a global
network built with minimal interference by governments.
President Dilma Rousseff ordered a series of measures
aimed at greater Brazilian online independence and security
following revelations that the U.S. National Security
Agency intercepted her communications, hacked into the
state-owned Petrobras oil companys network and spied on
Brazilians who entrusted their personal data to U.S. tech
companies such as Facebook and Google.
Slower holiday sales growth predicted for 2013
Coming off of a weak back-to-school shopping period, a
research rm expects holiday sales growth will be slower
this year during the crucial holiday season. Shoppers are
also expected to visit fewer stores as they research purchas-
es online.
Retail revenue in November and December should rise 2.4
percent during the biggest shopping period of the year,
Chicago-based research rm ShopperTrak said Tuesday. That
compares with a 3 percent increase in 2012 from 2011.
Business briefs
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK Safeway adopted a
plan to prevent a hostile takeover after
learning of a signicant accumulation
of its stock by an investor.
The announcement Tuesday sent
shares of the grocer spiking 8 percent
to a ve-year high.
So-called poison pill plans allow
existing shareholders to acquire more
stock at a discounted rate to discourage
a takeover by an outside entity. In a l-
ing with the Securities and Exchange
Commission later Tuesday, Jana
Partners disclosed that it had amassed a
6.2 percent stake in Safeways out-
standing shares.
It said it believes the shares are
undervalued and represent and attrac-
tive investment opportunity. The
hedge fund said it has held and may
continue to have talks with Safeways
management regarding strategic alter-
natives, including a review of the mar-
kets where it operates and exiting
lower-margin regions.
Safeways defensive plan becomes
exercisable if a person or group
acquires 10 percent or more of the com-
panys common stock, or 15 percent
by an institutional investor.
A representative for Safeway wasnt
immediately available for comment.
The grocer, which also operates
Vons, did point out the strategic initia-
tives it has undertaken to increase
value for shareholders, including the
recent $5.7 billion sale of its
Canadian unit and the initial public
offering of Blackhawk Network, its
gift and prepaid card unit.
Safeway adopts poison pill plan to prevent takeover
<< Niners sign former Stanford star Marecic, page 14
Local sports roundup, page 13
Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2013
OAKLAND WINS IN NINTH: AFTER A STUMBLE MONDAY, AS GET BACK TO WINNING WAYS >>PAGE 12
Giants start Big Apple swing with a win
By Mike Fitzpatrick
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK (AP) Angel Pagan home-
red, tripled and drove in three runs on a per-
fect night at the plate against his former
team, leading Yusmeiro Petit and the San
Francisco Giants past the New York Mets 8-
5 on Tuesday.
Pagan went 3 for 3 with two walks and
scored twice from the leadoff spot for the
Giants, who have won four straight and
seven of nine. His
tiebreaking homer in the
seventh inning made a
winner of Petit (4-0) in
his second start since
nearly pitching a perfect
game.
Before the game, the
Mets announced that Matt
Harvey will try to rehab
his injured right elbow without reconstruc-
tive surgery a move the All-Star ace
hopes is going to keep him on the mound
next season.
Pagan homered off Sean Henn (0-1) lead-
ing off the seventh to give the Giants a 5-4
lead. It was his rst home run since an
inside-the-park shot that ended a 6-5 victo-
ry over Colorado on May 25.
After that, Pagan missed 82 games with
an injured left hamstring that required sur-
gery. He returned on Aug. 30.
Pagan spent four seasons with the Mets
before they traded him to San Francisco in
December 2011. He helped the Giants win
the World Series last year and then re-signed
with them for $40 million over four years.
Tony Abreu added an RBI double against
Gonzalez Germen in the eighth, and Pagans
triple off the wall in right-center made it 7-
4. Hunter Pence singled home a run in the
ninth for his 20th RBI in his last seven
games.
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The good news for the Burlingame girls
volleyball team is it improved to 7-3 on the
season with a three-game sweep over visit-
ing Mercy-San Francisco Tuesday evening.
The bad news for the rest of the Peninsula
Athletic League is, the Panthers have room
to be so much better.
The biggest problem with us is overcon-
fidence, said Burlingame coach Nilo
Mauricio. We have this discussion all the
time. If [my team doesnt] think the other
team is that good, theyll play down to their
level.
While overcondence may have played
into the Panthers rather tight 25-17, 25-
17, 25-22 win over the Skippers,
Burlingame showed it has the repower to
handle a solid team like Mercy. Morgan
McKeever paced the Panthers attack with 15
kills and added a pair of aces. Bianca Alvarez
added 11 kills while Tatum Novitsky
chipped in with seven kills.
Were lucky to have a well-balanced
offense and our setter, Isabell Walker, is
amazing, Mauricio said.
Burlingame trailed only twice the entire
match when Mercy took leads of 1-0 and 2-
1 in Game 3. Other than that, the Panthers
jumped out to early leads and then held off
Skipper rallies later in the games.
In Game 1, the Panthers jumped out to a 5-
1 lead, showing how lethal their attack can
be. Four of the five points came on
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The Hillsdale boys water polo team has
been building the last couple seasons to this
year.
Coach Renato Hodzic had a super young
team two years with a large group of sopho-
mores. Those sophomores are now seniors
and if there was ever a time for the Knights to
push for a Peninsula Athletic League Ocean
Division title, this would be the year.
I have 10 seniors and one sophomore (on
this years roster), Hodzic said. It all comes
together this year.
The Knights improved to 3-0 in Ocean
Division play with an easy 19-5 win over
visiting Woodside and looked impressive
doing so. Javier Rosas led the Knights
offense with seven goals, while adding a pair
of assists. Kevin Hoffert added ve goals and
an assist. Erik Rudberg chipped in with three
goals, Thomas Durant added a pair, while
Brandon Clove, Thomas Mirt and Curtis
Cassin each had one goal apiece.
Were pretty balanced (offensively) this
year, Hodzic said. We do trust [Hoffert] a
lot, but we have a lot of good shooters from
the outside.
The Knights also have one of the best goal-
tenders in the Ocean Division as well both
defensively and offensively. Anthony Pappas
nished with 13 saves, but was equally effec-
tive triggering the Knights fastbreak as
Pappas nished with a team-leading ve
assists.
Hodzic said he has designed his defense to
funnel opposing offenses toward Pappas,
counting on him to make the block and then
serve the breakout pass that jump-starts the
Hillsdale attack.
We put a lot of trust in [Pappas] and take
advantage of his passing skill, Hodzic.
Pappas was on top of his game Tuesday as
four of his ve assists came in the rst period
as the Knights jumped out to a 7-0 lead, due
mainly to Woodsides inability to keep and
slow down the Knights fastbreak. It took
Hillsdale just over a minute to take a 1-0 lead
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The numbers and early returns suggest
that the College of San Mateo football team
is ready for primetime literally and gu-
ratively.
After downing a pair of opponents in rel-
atively effortless fashion (despite eight
turnovers in the process) the Bulldogs move
to Week 3 on the schedule on an upswing
with a duel versus Diablo Valley College
scheduled for a 7 p.m. start Friday in
Concord.
We denitely showed improvement from
Week 1 to Week 2, which is really what
youre looking for, said Tim Tulloch, CSM
defensive coordinator and co-head
coach.The good teams, they always make
strides. They identify the corrections that
need to be made, address them and then x
them. And what happens is, you really start
to see that foundation and growth as a
team.
Part of CSMs foundation this year seems
to be its depth. While turnovers and injuries
forced a couple of moves in last Saturdays
28-7 win over Chabot College, those who
came in were ready for action and the
Bulldogs didnt miss a beat.
Thats how you win games, Tulloch
said. You get 11 guys playing together on
the same page and they definitely took
another step in that direction. It wasnt a
lack of effort the guys were getting after
it.
There were plenty of examples of that
Saturday. Defensively, the Bulldogs forced
six turnovers. Offensively, George Naufahu
ran all over Chabot to the tune of 140 yards
on 20 carries. He also caught a touchdown
pass.
But the play that had the coaching staff
buzzing a couple of days later was running
back Michael Latus forced fumble and
offensive lineman Dominick Jacksons
recovery. On that play in the fourth quarter,
CSM coughed up the ball in Chabot territo-
ry and the ball was scooped up by a
Gladiator defender who started bolting
toward the Bulldog end zone. Latu got on
his horse though, and tracked him down at
around the CSM 5-yard line, punching the
ball out of the defenders hand in the
process. Jackson, who had hustled up the
eld as well, fell on the ball. In a matter of
60 yards, the CSM coaching staff had its ral-
lying point for the week leading up to DVC.
That was really symbolic because we
preach, and weve been preaching this for
years, how hard you play measures every-
thing, Tulloch said. And thats one of the
goals, to impose your will on somebody.
And you do that just down in and down out
playing extremely hard.
Knights cruise to win
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
Hillsdales KevinHoffert looks to get a shot off during the Knights 19-5 win over Woodside. See POLO, Page 14
See PANTHERS, Page 14 See CSM, Page 16
See GIANTS, Page 16
Burlingame sweeps Mercy-SF
CSM improves,
readies for DVC
Water polo drops season
opener to Delta College
Giants 8, Mets 5
Angel Pagan
SPORTS 12
Wednesday Sept. 18, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Athletics adding seating
for American League division series
OAKLAND The AL West-leading
Oakland Athletics sold out the normal
Coliseum seating for the playoffs so fast
Tuesday they have decided to open up addi-
tional seating in the third deck view level
by removing the green tarps over those sec-
tions.
With approximately 12,000 extra seats
available which includes space for over-
ow media the capacity will go from
35,067 to 48,146. That doesnt include the
highest Mt. Davis section, the fourth level
on the ballparks east side. Tickets for three
potential AL division series games to be
played next month at the Coliseum sold out
in two hours Tuesday, prompting the deci-
sion.
The rst potential home playoff game
sold out in 40 minutes. Oakland ofcials
have only made decisions about stadium
capacity for the rst round, the team said.
Barry Bonds to meet with
U.S. Probation Department
SAN FRANCISCO Barry Bonds has
been ordered to meet with U.S. Probation
Department ofcials to discuss terms of his
30-day house arrest.
Afederal judge ordered Bonds to meet with
the ofcials to work out the details of his
sentence after he lost his appeal of his
felony obstruction of justice conviction.
The order was dated Monday and made public
Tuesday.
A jury convicted Bonds in 2011 and he
was sentenced to home connement, two
years of probation and a $4,000 ne. The
sentence was put on hold while Bonds pur-
sued his appeal.
Now that he lost, Major League Baseballs
career home run leader said he would like to
immediately begin serving his sentence.
Bonds said he still plans to pursue his
appeal. He could ask the 9th U.S. Circuit
Court of Appeals to reconsider his appeal or
petition the U.S. Supreme Court.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND Josh Donaldson hit a game-
winning, bases-loaded single with two outs
in the ninth inning, lifting the Oakland
Athletics past the Los Angeles Angels 2-1
on Tuesday night as they decreased their
magic number to clinch another AL West
title to six.
Donaldson delivered his third career
game-ending hit all this season in
Oaklands eighth walkoff victory this year.
He received both a whipped cream pie from
Josh Reddick followed by a dumping from
the Gatorade bottle.
Grant Balfour (1-3) struck out the side in
order in the ninth for the win.
Alberto Callaspo singled to start the bot-
tom of the ninth against Michael Kohn (1-
3) and Jemile Weeks entered as a pinch-run-
ner. Weeks advanced on Stephen Vogts y
to left and pinch-hitter Jed Lowie was inten-
tionally walked to bring up Coco Crisp.
Crisp walked on the 10th pitch he saw to
load the bases. Daric Barton struck out with
the Angels bringing in right elder Kole
Calhoun as a fth inelder.
There had been 11 full-counts between the
teams and none of those batters reached base
until Crisps free pass.
The As lead the Rangers by 6 1-2 games.
Texas won 7-1 at Tampa Bay to snap a
seven-game losing streak.
Mike Trout hit another deep drive over the
wall in center for his second home run in as
many games, but that was all for the Angels.
Trout connected on a 1-0 pitch from
Sonny Gray with two outs in the rst to
stake the Angels to another early lead. The
Angels said Trout became the rst player in
AL history with 25 home runs, 30 stolen
bases and 100 walks.
The As tied it in the bottom half on
Brandon Moss ground-rule double.
Gray allowed one run and ve hits, struck
out five and walked one in six strong
innings but he faced six three-ball counts
and saw his pitch count climb in a hurry. He
threw 98 pitches.
Oakland reliever Ryan Cook hit consecu-
tive batters with pitches, Howie Kendrick
and Trout, to load the bases in the seventh
after J.B. Shucks two-out single. Jerry
Blevins relieved and struck out Josh
Hamilton.
Garrett Richards struck out six in seven-
plus innings, but is still winless in seven
career outings and three starts against the
As. He gave way to Buddy Boshers after
Donaldson beat out an ineld single to start
the eighth.
Boshers struck out Moss and Juan
Gutierrez relieved to record the nal two outs
in the eighth.
The Angels lost for only the third time in
their last 13 road games a day after a 12-1
win to snap the As five-game winning
streak.
This victory clinched the season series for
Oakland over the Angels for the third
straight year.
As left elder Yoenis Cespedes played
designated hitter for a second straight day as
he nurses an injured right shoulder.
Sports briefs
As bounce back
from an ugly loss
As 2, Angels 1
SPORTS 13
Wednesday Sept. 18, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Bernie Wilson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO Strong wind blow-
ing in through the Golden Gate Bridge and a
strong tide owing out to sea forced organ-
izers to postpone two Americas Cup races
Tuesday between Emirates Team Zealand and
defender Oracle Team USA.
Lighter wind is expected on San Francisco
Bay on Wednesday, when organizers hope
to complete Races 11 and 12. The schedule
is four races behind.
Team New Zealand leads 7-1 and needs two
wins to claim the Americas Cup for the sec-
ond time in 18 years. Oracle Team USA,
owned by software mogul Larry Ellison, was
penalized two points in a cheating scandal
so it needs eight more victories to keep the
Auld Mug.
The wind limit of 23 knots was reduced to
20.3 knots because of an ebb tide owing
out at 2.7 knots. Regatta director Iain
Murray said it was the strongest current day
of the summer.
The wind gusted to 25 knots.
The original wind limit of 33 knots was
reduced to 23 knots as one of 37 safety rec-
ommendations made after British double
Olympic medalist Andrew Bart Simpson
was killed on May 9 when Artemis Racings
catamaran capsized during a training run.
This is not a safe sport by denition,
said Dirk Kramers of Oracles design team.
The loss of Bart in May shook us pretty
hard as a community, as a whole industry.
Our game is usually fraught will all kinds of
self-interest maneuvers. After that event, I
think some of those self-interest arguments
were set aside and we came out collectively
with these limits. These are the rules we
play by.
You can argue that, especially after a day
like today we should revisit those, Kramers
said. But weve all set those rules and to
change those rules at this point probably
doesnt make sense. its probably not the
best thing for the spectators at the moment,
but I think for keeping the game fair and
keeping the game safe as it can be is the
right thing to do.
On Monday, Oracle Team USA ofcials
proposed increasing the wind limit from 23
to 24 knots, saying the crews were capable
of starting races in those conditions aboard
their high-performance, 72-foot catama-
rans.
Team New Zealand declined, saying it
would have considered it before racing start-
ed, but didnt feel it was appropriate to make
changes this far into the regatta.
Even if the teams agreed, Murray would
have to take the proposal to the U.S. Coast
Guard.
Were very happy with where its at,
said Team New Zealand technical director
Nick Holroyd. After the racing was can-
celed today we went through the southwest
corner Alcatraz across a shoal which was a
pretty rough piece of water. On a day like
today, Im awfully glad to see the boat back
at the dock in one piece with 11 t guys on
board. Were looking forward to some great
racing later in the week.
These boats go very quickly from being
great racing to really, survival mode.
Whether 23 knots is the exact limit for that,
is open to debate.
Murray said earlier Tuesday that the condi-
tions would be approaching what they were
the day Oracle Team USA capsized its rst
catamaran in mid-October in about 25 knots
of wind. An ebb tide swept the boat under
the Golden Gate Bridge and about four miles
out to sea. The churning waves destroyed
the 131-foot wing sail, costing the crew
four months of training time.
Pair of Americas Cup races postponed
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Burlingame head tennis coach Bill Smith
called it simple arithmetic.
And by the look of things, its the
Hillsdale tennis team that is making thing
look very simple especially on the sin-
gle side of things.
Astrong showing by the Burlingame dou-
bles was not enough as the Knights took all
four singles matches to beat the Panthers 4-
3 and stay unbeaten in Peninsula Athletic
League Bay Division play.
Burlingame falls to an even 1-1.
Burlingame senior Alex Harrigan battled
her Hillsdale counterpart, Cindy Liu, in the
closest of the four singles matches.
Eventually, Harrigan succumbed in two
hard-fought sets 6-4, 6-3.
No 3 and No. 4 singles Mariko Iinuma and
Irene Palisoc, made relatively simple work
of Sarah Sinatra and Sammy Kotmel, drop-
ping only one point in two matches that
were determined in four sets.
Natalie Spievack beat Natalie Somers 6-3,
6-0 in the other singles match.
Doubles saw the Burlingame players take
aggressive postures and after early adversi-
t y, turned up the heat even higher to even-
tually best the Hillsdale crews in all three
ladder positions.
Lisa Patel and Haley Shaffer continue
their strong start to the season. They beat
Hannah Bodin and Anne Okada 6-3, 6-2.
Sara Arfania and Lindsey Schloetter
picked up a 6-2, 6-2 win in No. 2 doubles.
And it was Madeline Somers and Christina
Monisteri victorious in No. 3 doubles.
Burlingame hosts Menlo-Atherton on
Thursday. The Bears lost in similar fashion
to Hillsdale this season. Itll be another test
of the Panthers who, according to Smith,
found out that nothing comes easy in the
PAL.
Speaking of the Bears, they breezed
through Sequoia High School in a 7-0 win.
Sami Andrew, Amelia Tiemann and Caroline
Kelly picked up 6-0, 6-0 wins, while Lindy
LaPlante dropped just a single point.
The No. 1 doubles team of Sally Carlson
and Amanda Scandalios along with No. 3
Laila Volpe and Taylor Noble also went 6-0,
6-0. Julia Chang and Camilla Calmassini
picked up a 6-0, 6-2 win.
Aragon bounced back from a loss to
Burlingame last week to beat San Mateo 6-
1. Kaede Ishikawa, Vickie Sun, Aislinn Oka
and Melissa Ma picked up singles victories.
Crystal Springs Uplands School earned a
6-1 win over Mercy-Burlingame. The win
moves the Gryphons to 2-2 on the year.
Notre Dame-Belmont dropped a tough 7-0
loss to St. Ignatius.
In girls golf news, the Tigers fell to the
same Wildcats team 212-231 while Sacred
Heart Prep was nearly 40 strokes better than
Harker High School.
Junior Jessica Koenig led the Gators with
a six-over 43.
In girls volleyball, Menlo-Atherton
took down Sacred Heart Prep in three sets,
25-18, 25-17, 25-21. Victoria Garrick did
have 17 kills for the Gators. Ara Peterson
tallied 10 while Natalie Marshall had 25
assists. Mamie Caruso added 12 digs. The
loss drops SHP to 5-2 on the year.
And nally in girls water polo action,
Half Moon Bay took down Menlo School
11-5. The win gave the Cougars an identical
3-1 record as the Knights.
Hillsdale singles tennis shines, M-A and Aragon pick up wins
Burlingame kills from four different attackers.
Novitsky, McKeever, Alvarez and Rachael
Topper all had kills in that opening run.
Burlingame eventually built a 12-7 lead
before the Skippers made their run. Mercy
won eight of the next 11 points to tie the
game at 15, but the Panthers nished with a
ourish. They scored 10 of the next 12 points
to earn the 25-17 win.
McKeever led the way in Game 1 with six
kills as six different Panthers scored at least
one point as they nished with 17 kills in the
game.
The Panthers carried that momentum into
Game 2 and were threatening to blow the
Skippers off the court as Burlingame opened
with a 10-0 run.
Following a Mercy timeout, it was the
Skippers turn to go on a run. They nally got
on the board following a serving error from
the Panthers, but Burlingame went on to win
the next three points for a 13-1 advantage.
Mercy responded by winning seven of the
next eight points and was right back in the
game, trailing 14-8. A couple of Skippers
mistakes pushed Burlingames lead to 16-8,
but ve straight points for Mercy closed the
gap to 16-13.
The teams went back and forth until
Burlingame, leading 19-17, won the nal six
points to post the 25-17 win.
We played really slow, Mauricio said. We
were up 12-2 or 3 and they (Mercy) made it
close.
The Skippers used that rally to push the
Panthers in Game 3. After the early Mercy
lead, Burlingame nally got untracked, but
could never really put the Skippers away.
There were ve ties in the early part of the
game, but only one lead change when a
Mercy hitting error gave the Panthers a 3-2
lead.
Burlingame massaged that lead throughout
the game, but never led by more than a few
points. The last tie came at 14-all and the
Panthers had just enough push at the end to
hold off the Skippers.
The Panthers had match-point, 24-19, but
Mercy did not go easily, winning the next
three points to close to 24-22 before a Mercy
serving error gave the Panthers the point they
needed to close out the match.
It sounds like Im a downer on my team, but
its stuff we need to work on, Mauricio said.
But rst and foremost, a wins a win.
as Pappas made a save and then threw a pass
three-quarters the length of the pool to
Hoffert, who had swam past the Woodside
defense, and easily put his shot away.
The two hooked up again about a 1 1/2 min-
utes later. Rudberg gave Hillsdale a 3-0 off an
assist from Rosas, who then scored his rst
goal off an assist from Durant, who recovered
a Woodside turnover near midpool and fed
Rosas for the easy goal.
Durant then scored off Pappas third assist
of the period and Rosas scored again off
another Pappas assist. Hoffert then scored his
second goal of the period off a dish from Mirt
with four seconds left in the period.
In the second period, Woodside tightened
up its defensive play and held Hillsdale to just
three goals, while scoring three itself. The
Wildcats got a pair of goals from Mitchell
Martin and one from Matt Grandov in the sec-
ond period as Woodside trailed 10-3 at half-
time.
Any thoughts of a Woodside rally were
quickly quashed in the third period as
Hillsdale scored six unanswered goals to take
a 16-3 advantage, with Rosas scoring four
straight.
Hodzic called off the dogs in the fourth peri-
od, scoring three times. Woodside added its
nal two goals over the nal seven minutes,
getting scores from Leo Franco and Grandov.
Despite having a team perceived to be ready
to win a division championship, Hodzic said
the focus in not on that.
We dont worry about wins. We tried that
last year and didnt get the results we wanted,
Hodzic said. We just try to get better every
day.
SPORTS 14
Wednesday Sept. 18, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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POLO
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PANTHERS
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
Morgan McKeever had 15 kills in the Panthers
win over Mercy-SF.
Sports brief
Marecic signs with 49ers
SANTA CLARA Owen Marecic joined
the San Francisco 49ers on Tuesday, signing
a one-year contract two weeks after being
released by the Cleveland Browns.
If San Francisco coach Jim Harbaugh had
his way, Marecic would have been with the
49ers on draft day in 2011.
Marecic wont be rushed into the starting
lineup. Bruce Miller remains the 49ers
starter at fullback. Harbaugh will nd a way
to use Marecic, perhaps in ways he used him
when they both were at Stanford.
The 49ers are looking for ways to tweak
their offense. Marecic, who also played
linebacker in college, enjoys physical con-
tact with his opponents.
Miller looks at the addition as another
competitive challenge.
Competition is always great, said
Miller, who was called for holding in the end
zone Sundays loss to Seattle, resulting in a
safety. Youre always going to compete at
that spot. Ive watched him on lm. Hes a
good football player. Im just going to
worry about me.
SPORTS 15
Wednesday Sept. 18, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 92 60 .605
Tampa Bay 82 68 .547 9
Baltimore 80 70 .533 11
New York 79 72 .523 12 1/2
Toronto 69 81 .460 22
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 88 63 .583
Cleveland 82 69 .543 6
Kansas City 79 72 .523 9
Minnesota 64 86 .427 23 1/2
Chicago 60 91 .397 28
West Division
W L Pct GB
Oakland 89 62 .589
Texas 83 68 .550 6 1/2
Los Angeles 73 78 .483 15 1/2
Seattle 66 86 .434 23
Houston 51 101 .336 38
TuesdaysGames
Toronto 2, N.Y.Yankees 0
Detroit 6, Seattle 2
Baltimore 3, Boston 2
Texas 7,Tampa Bay 1
Cincinnati 10, Houston 0
Cleveland 5, Kansas City 3
Chicago White Sox 4, Minnesota 3
Oakland 2, L.A. Angels 1
WednesdaysGames
Minnesota (Diamond 5-11) at Chicago White Sox
(Joh.Danks 4-13), 11:10 a.m.
L.A. Angels (Vargas 8-7) at Oakland (Grifn 14-9),
12:35 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees (P.Hughes 4-13) at Toronto (Happ 4-6),
4:07 p.m.
Seattle (Iwakuma 12-6) at Detroit (Verlander 13-
11), 4:08 p.m.
Baltimore(W.Chen7-7) at Boston(Peavy11-5),4:10
p.m.
Texas (D.Holland 9-9) at Tampa Bay (Archer 9-7),
4:10 p.m.
Cincinnati (G.Reynolds 1-2) at Houston (Peacock
5-5), 5:10 p.m.
Cleveland (Salazar 1-2) at Kansas City (B.Chen 7-3),
5:10 p.m.
ThursdaysGames
Seattle at Detroit, 10:08 a.m.
Houston at Cleveland,4:05 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees at Toronto, 4:07 p.m.
Baltimore at Boston, 4:10 p.m.
Texas at Tampa Bay, 4:10 p.m.
Minnesota at Oakland, 7:05 p.m.
East Division
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 89 62 .589
Washington 81 70 .536 8
Philadelphia 71 80 .470 18
New York 67 83 .447 21 1/2
Miami 55 96 .364 34
Central Division
W L Pct GB
St. Louis 88 63 .583
Pittsburgh 87 64 .576 1
Cincinnati 86 66 .566 2 1/2
Milwaukee 67 83 .447 20 1/2
Chicago 63 88 .417 25
West Division
W L Pct GB
Los Angeles 87 64 .576
Arizona 76 74 .507 10 1/2
San Diego 70 80 .467 16 1/2
San Francisco 70 81 .464 17
Colorado 69 83 .454 18 1/2
TuesdaysGames
Washington 6, Atlanta 5, 1st game
Washington 4, Atlanta 0, 2nd game
Philadelphia 6, Miami 4
San Diego 5, Pittsburgh 2
San Francisco 8, N.Y. Mets 5
Milwaukee 4, Chicago Cubs 3
Cincinnati 10, Houston 0
St. Louis 11, Colorado 4
L.A. Dodgers 9, Arizona 3
WednesdaysGames
Atlanta (A.Wood 3-3) at Washington (Ohlendorf 4-
0), 4:05 p.m.
Miami (Eovaldi 3-6) at Philadelphia(Miner 0-1),4:05
p.m.
San Diego (T.Ross 3-8) at Pittsburgh (Morton 7-4),
4:05 p.m.
San Francisco (M.Cain 8-9) at N.Y. Mets (Harang 0-
1), 4:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Rusin 2-4) at Milwaukee (Thorn-
burg 2-1), 5:10 p.m.
Cincinnati (G.Reynolds 1-2) at Houston (Peacock
5-5), 5:10 p.m.
St.Louis (Wainwright 16-9) at Colorado (Chatwood
7-4), 5:40 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Fife 4-3) at Arizona (McCarthy 4-9),
7:10 p.m.
ThursdaysGames
San Diego at Pittsburgh, 9:35 a.m.
San Francisco at N.Y. Mets, 10:10 a.m.
Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee, 11:10 a.m.
St. Louis at Colorado, 12:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at Arizona, 12:40 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE AMERICAN LEAGUE
AMERICANCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 2 0 0 1.000 36 31
Miami 2 0 0 1.000 47 30
Buffalo 1 1 0 .500 45 46
N.Y. Jets 1 1 0 .500 28 30
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Houston 2 0 0 1.000 61 52
Indianapolis 1 1 0 .500 41 41
Tennessee 1 1 0 .500 40 39
Jacksonville 0 2 0 .000 11 47
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Baltimore 1 1 0 .500 41 55
Cincinnati 1 1 0 .500 41 34
Pittsburgh 0 2 0 .000 19 36
Cleveland 0 2 0 .000 16 37
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
Kansas City 2 0 0 1.000 45 18
Denver 2 0 0 1.000 90 50
Oakland 1 1 0 .500 36 30
San Diego 1 1 0 .500 61 61
NATIONALCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
Dallas 1 1 0 .500 52 48
Philadelphia 1 1 0 .500 63 60
N.Y. Giants 0 2 0 .000 54 77
Washington 0 2 0 .000 47 71
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
New Orleans 2 0 0 1.000 39 31
Atlanta 1 1 0 .500 48 47
Tampa Bay 0 2 0 .000 31 34
Carolina 0 2 0 .000 30 36
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Chicago 2 0 0 1.000 55 51
Detroit 1 1 0 .500 55 49
Green Bay 1 1 0 .500 66 54
Minnesota 0 2 0 .000 54 65
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
Seattle 2 0 0 1.000 41 10
St. Louis 1 1 0 .500 51 55
San Francisco 1 1 0 .500 37 57
Arizona 1 1 0 .500 49 48
ThursdaysGame
New England 13, N.Y. Jets 10
SundaysGames
Kansas City 17, Dallas 16
Houston 30,Tennessee 24, OT
Green Bay 38,Washington 20
Chicago 31, Minnesota 30
Atlanta 31, St. Louis 24
San Diego 33, Philadelphia 30
Miami 24, Indianapolis 20
Baltimore 14, Cleveland 6
Buffalo 24, Carolina 23
Arizona 25, Detroit 21
NFL GLANCE
By Antonio GOnzalez
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
STANFORD Since Stanford
won the Pac-12 Conference and
the Rose Bowl last season,
momentum has been building
toward a few pivotal points on the
schedule.
One of those is now.
After victories over San Jose
State and Army, the competition is
about to get a whole lot tougher.
The fifth-ranked Cardinal (2-0)
will begin Pac-12 play against
No. 23 Arizona
State (2-0) on
Saturday at
S t a n f o r d
Stadium.
The Cardinal
also will host
No. 17
Wa s h i n g t o n ,
No. 13 UCLA
and No. 2
Oregon between away games
against Washington State, Utah
and Oregon State over the next
seven weeks.
Everybody in our conference
has a run of ve or six games in a
row that you look at and say,
Whew. Here we go, Stanford
coach David Shaw said Tuesday.
And thats to me what makes it
hard, and thats to me what makes
it special.
Just how good the Cardinal can
be is still somewhat of a mystery.
Stanford rarely routs opponents,
even those that are overmatched.
The Cardinal grind out games
behind a power running game and
an opportunistic defense, which
makes measuring progress tough
sometimes even for the coach-
es.
I feel good, not great, Shaw
said. There are some gains that we
made from Week 1 to Week 2. I
dont know that were operating
anywhere close to our capabili-
ties.
Tyler Gaffney has run for 104
and 132 yards in the rst two con-
tests. Kevin Hogan has completed
62 percent of his passes for 395
yards, five touchdowns and one
interception. And Ty Montgomery
has been every bit the No. 1 wide
receiver coaches had hoped, catch-
ing 10 passes for 211 yards and
two touchdowns.
The defense has faced two com-
pletely different opponents, from
San Jose States spread passing
attack to Armys funky triple-
option runners. Stanford has
allowed an average of 292 total
yards and 16 1/2 points in the rst
two games, smothering ball carri-
ers one minute and missing tack-
les the next.
I think everyone is comfort-
able but not satised, defensive
end Josh Mauro said. Thereve
been ashes of this team being
something special in the rst two
games, but we really have to put it
together for 60 minutes or more if
necessary.
Unlike most weeks, the Cardinal
at least have some idea of how the
Sun Devils will try to defend them.
Coaches and players watched
Arizona States controversial 32-
30 win over Wisconsin on the
ight back from West Point on
Saturday night. Stanford, which
beat Wisconsin 20-14 in the Rose
Bowl, has been a better version of
the Badgers again this season.
Its Stanfords title to defend
David Shaw
16
Wednesday Sept. 18, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
In DVC, CSM faces an opponent that is 0-
2 this season with losses against Santa
Rosa and City College of San Francisco.
Both defeats were by signicant margins.
On paper, the Vikings dont seem like much
of threat. Theyre averaging just 41 yards
rushing on offense and their 213.5 yards per
game is last in the Mid-Empire Division.
We take them one at a time, Tulloch said
of the DVC match-up. And they have a ton
of talent. Theyre loaded with weapons. And
I dont think theyve really red on all
cylinders yet. They improved from Week 1
to Week 2. Were going to have our hands
full on Friday. They do some things scheme
wise that always pose challenges. Theyre
as talented as any team on the schedule. Just
preparing for them is a challenge.
On paper, it looks like CSM will have to
prepare for the likes of Quinton Hill and
Terrence Young DVCs two main aerial
weapons.
Last season, the Vikings pushed CSM in
the fourth quarter, scoring 14 points to
make the outcome a little tighter. The
Bulldogs won 35-29.
The Vikings surely know a thing or two
about CSM especially Quincy Nelson and
Naufahu, who combined for over 100 yards
of offense in last years game.
Another interesting scenario to look out
for heading into Fridays game is who starts
at quarterback for CSM. Casey Wichman
started the rst two, but he was taken out in
Saturdays win after his third turnover. In
came former Menlo-Atherton Bear Willy
Fonua, who threw two touchdown passes
and looked pretty sharp throwing the ball.
They are really beneting from that kind
of competition, Tulloch said. Theyre in
fierce competition, but theyre also
extremely close. They both know how to
make the most out of it. Those two, theres
not one ounce of animosity. Theyre both
focused on the team which is just outstand-
ing to see.
Water polo
In the teams rst match of the season, the
Bulldogs fell to Delta College 13-8.
CSM started down and could never escape
a 5-3, rst-quarter goal decit.
This was not the start we wanted, said
CSM head coach Randy Wright. I did learn
more about this team, though, in one game
than in weeks of practice. Its time to move
forward.
Erica Staben paced the Bulldogs with
three goals. Shelby Chung and Jasmine
Zaldivar added two apiece.
CSM will play in the West Valley tourna-
ment Friday and Saturday. The Bulldogs
begin the tournament with an 11:20 a.m.
start against Modesto College.
Continued from page 11
CSM
Giants reliever Sandy Rosario issued a
leadoff walk in the ninth and left with an
apparent injury. Sergio Romo gave up an
RBI single to Daniel Murphy before retiring
Lucas Duda and pinch-hitter Andrew Brown
with the bases loaded to end it after 3 hours,
55 minutes.
Mets starter Zack Wheeler threw 107
pitches over ve innings against his former
team. The rookie walked a career-high six
four in the second inning. Seven New
York pitchers combined to issue 10 walks in
all.
Wheeler was drafted sixth overall by the
Giants out of high school in 2009. Two
years later, they traded him to the Mets in a
deal for Carlos Beltran. The 23-year-old
right-hander threw a gem in San Francisco
on July 10, allowing one run and three hits
over seven innings in his fth major league
start.
Petit, once a Mets prospect, made his sec-
ond start since coming within one strike of
a perfect game Sept. 6 against Arizona. He
nished with a one-hit shutout.
The right-hander, who beat Wheeler when
they matched up in the minors April 9, gave
up four runs and seven hits in six innings.
Jean Machi and Javier Lopez combined on
a perfect seventh to protect a one-run lead.
Wheeler walked Pence and Pablo Sandoval
to start a three-run second. One out later,
walks to Abreu and Petit forced in the rst
run. Pagan followed with an RBI single, and
another run scored Gregor Blancos ground-
out.
The Mets got on the board when Ruben
Tejada hit a leadoff double in the third and
scored on a groundout by Eric Young Jr. One
inning later, they scored three times to take
a 4-3 lead.
Petit walked the rst two batters of the
inning, and Wilmer Flores drove an RBI
double off the left-field fence. Murphy
scored after running through a stop sign.
Matt den Dekker followed with an RBI
single and stayed in a rundown long enough
to allow Flores to score.
Pagan drew his second leadoff walk from
Wheeler in the fth and scored the tying run
on an RBI groundout by Buster Posey.
NOTES: Giants 2B Marco Scutaro went
for an MRI on his ailing left pinkie. The
team was awaiting results, but its possible
Scutaro could miss the rest of the season.
For now, he is day to day. Abreu started at
2B. ... Mets rookie C Travis dArnaud left in
the fourth inning with a sore right shoulder
after he was hit by Pences foul ball in the
second. Anthony Recker replaced dArnaud,
dinged up several times in the past few
weeks. ... Mets 3B David Wright, sidelined
since Aug. 3 with a strained right ham-
string, is unlikely to return during the three-
game series. This weekend in Philadelphia
is a possibility, manager Terry Collins said.
... Jerry Seinfeld, a longtime Mets fan,
joined the teams broadcast crew for the
pregame show and the game. Seinfeld also
broadcast a Mets game against Detroit in
June 2010.
Continued from page 11
GIANTS
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BUDAPEST, Hungary Defending cham-
pion and 2012 Olympic gold-medalist
Jordan Burroughs brings a 60-match win-
ning streak to the wrestling world champi-
onships in Budapest.
The American will face Gamid Dzhalilov of
Tajikistan in Wednesdays rst round in the
163-pound freestyle category and could meet
former world junior champion Kakhaber
Khubezhty of Russia in the second round.
Burroughs said the changes made this year
to the scoring system one of the key mod-
ications credited with helping the sport
regain its place at the Olympics until at least
2024 favor his assertive style.
Im an aggressive, offensive wrestler,
Burroughs said before his weigh-in Tuesday.
It got easier for me. Im scoring twice as
many points as I was.
Among the changes, the matches feature
cumulative scoring and two, three-minute
rounds. Before, there were separate scores in
each of three, two-minute periods. Also,
more points are awarded for attacking moves,
there is no overtime period and a match can
end with time still on the clock if one of the
wrestlers achieves a seven-point advantage.
Wrestling was cut from the list of Olympic
core sports in February. However, it was
voted back into the games on Sept. 8 by the
International Olympic Committee at a meet-
ing in Buenos Aires and was guaranteed a
spot in 2020 and 2024, but not beyond. A
decision on its place after 2024 is expected
around 2017.
Leadership changes at the international
wrestling federation FILA, more wrestlers in
executive positions and a guaranteed place
for female ofcials in the sports governing
body are also expected to improve the sport.
The loss of the Olympic hallmark, even if
for just a few months, was a severe blow for
the sport.
We were a traditional Olympic sport
which lost its place because it was not doing
things well, Venezuela coach Jose Diaz said.
Without the Olympics, sponsors would not
invest money in wrestling.
Jaime Espinal of Puerto Rico, a silver
medalist at the 2012 London Olympics, said
wrestlings popularity in his homeland had
been greatly boosted by his success.
It was a glorious event for my country,
Espinal said. Many children entered the
sport in search of their own medal. If
wrestling had been excluded from the
Olympics, their dreams of a medal would
have ended, too.
American wrestler Burroughs riding winning streak
FOOD 17
Wednesday Sept. 18, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Sara Moulton
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Its apple season again, one of the few
times of the year Im sorry I live in the city,
without a car. If only I lived near an orchard,
Id pick my own apples and be happy.
I console myself with the varieties now
gracing the citys farmers markets. It used to
be that wed have to be content with a strict-
ly limited roster: Red Delicious, Golden
Delicious, Granny Smith and Macintosh.
The end. These days, thanks to adventurous
farmers and the resurgence of all kinds of
apple varieties, theres a ton of exciting
choices.
This abundance practically begs you to
assemble the lling for this baked apple
treat from a mix of different apples rather
than from a single type. Just be sure to taste
the candidates before you start cooking to
get a x on what each one will bring to the
table. Is it honey-like? Puckery-tart?
Intense? Wine-y? Once you know, you can
compose your own line-up.
Actually, if by chance you have a little
extra time, you should try cooking each vari-
ety separately, then tasting it, because the
taste and texture of a given apple can change
signicantly when cooked.
I added dried apricots to the apples for con-
trast. I love the tartness of dried apricots,
particularly California apricots. Turkish
apricots, the other choice, are quite sweet,
not as bright and sunny. Or, if youd prefer
some other kind of dried fruit cherries,
raisins, cranberries or dried plums (other-
wise known as prunes) swap out the apri-
cots for your favorite.
The only other avors in the lling are
sugar and lemon juice. You may need to
adjust the amounts of these two ingredients
slightly depending on the sweetness of the
apples.
This kind of dessert baked fruit with
some kind of crust happens to be my
favorite. But crusts can be tricky, particular-
ly pie dough. So this recipe is for the pastry-
impaired. Instead of pie dough, we use
French toast. Everyone can make French
toast, even little kids.
Testing this recipe was a real learning
experience for me. I discovered that if I did-
nt bake the apple/apricot mixture long
enough before adding the French toast top-
ping, the apples wouldnt become tender and
give up their juice. I was suddenly reminded
of cooking with mushrooms, which are so
dry that they stick to the skillet when you
rst throw them in. A couple minutes later,
though, the oodgates open and out pours
the liquid.
For this lling, then, you should test the
tenderness of the baked apples by piercing
them with a paring knife, and check to see if
theres juice in the pan. Then you can top it
off with the soaked bread.
BAKED APPLES AND APRICOTS
WITH FRENCH TOAST CRUST
Start to nish: 1 hour 25 minutes (20 min-
utes active)
Servings: 6
3 to 4 apples, peeled, cored, quartered and
sliced 1/4-inch thick (6 cups)
1/3 cup plus 1 tablespoon sugar, divided
1/2 cup dried apricots, nely chopped
1 tablespoon lemon juice
2 large eggs, lightly beaten
1/3 cup low-fat milk
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
4 slices whole-wheat bread, crusts discard-
ed, cut in half
Low-fat frozen vanilla yogurt (optional)
Heat the oven to 400 F.
In an 8-inch square baking dish, toss the
apples with 1/3 cup of the sugar, the apricots
and lemon juice. Cover with foil and bake on
Baked apple treat for the pastry-impaired
Crusts can be tricky, particularly pie dough. So this recipe is for the pastry-impaired. Instead
of pie dough, use French toast.
See APPLE, Page 18
18
Wednesday Sept. 18, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
FOOD
EXPIRES: September 30, 2013
JACKS RESTAURANT & BAR: SAN BRUNO
1050 Admiral Court, Suite A
San Bruno, CA 94066
Phone: (650) 589-2222 | Fax: (650) 589-5042
iLoveJacks.com
Peninsula Television
Serving San Mateo County since 1999
Newest Programs:
Watch PenTV: Comcast 26 Astound 27 AT&T U-verse 99
Streaming Online at www.pentv.tv
Peninsula Television is a registered 501c3 organization.
Hooked on the Niners
Join us every week as we talk about
our favorite team, locked and loaded
for another Super Bowl run.
TUE/ WED/ THU@8:30 PM
SAT / SUN@9:30AM
Schmahl Science Workshops
Dr. Ismael demonstrates several
experiments which students test out
and learn the science behind.
MON - FRI @4 PM
the ovens middle shelf for 35 minutes.
Meanwhile, in a medium bowl, whisk together the eggs,
milk and vanilla extract.
When the apples have baked, remove the foil. Dip the
bread halves in the egg mixture and arrange them in a single
layer over the apples, cutting the bread as necessary to cover
all of the apples. If there is any egg mixture left, pour it over
the bread. Sprinkle with the remaining tablespoon of sugar,
then bake for another 15 to 20 minutes.
Serve right away, topped with a small scoop of the vanilla
frozen yogurt, if desired.
Nutrition information per serving: 190 calories; 20 calo-
ries from fat (11 percent of total calories); 2.5 g fat (0.5 g
saturated; 0 g trans fats); 60 mg cholesterol; 40 g carbohy-
drate; 3 g ber; 29 g sugar; 6 g protein; 120 mg sodium
Continued from page 17
APPLE
Munsey wrote in the statement.
Much of the operation revolved around bringing back the
land to its natural state through land reclamation efforts, he
said.
It was a good year for the task force, he said.
In 2011, more than 5,000 plants were eradicated from ve
grow sites located in the San Francisco Watershed property
and the Skyline Ridge Open Space area in the county,
according to the task force.
In 2000, the task force found more than 12,000 marijuana
plants growing near the Crystal Springs Reservoir, a record
bust for the county at the time.
silverfarb@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106
Continued from page 1
POT
By Michael Hill
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CATSKILL, N.Y Locals looking
to land a buzz-worthy, foodie-friendly
restaurant in this Hudson River village
are offering the right chef a novel deal:
Come to Catskill with a killer concept
maybe farm-to-table, gastro-pub or
vegetarian and get space on Main
Street rent free for a year.
The hope is the right restaurant will
give the growing number of downriver
arrivals from New York City an attrac-
tive place to eat. And maybe it will
accelerate the kind of gentrication
that has revived other river towns.
I dont know what the actual spark
will be, but I certainly think this will
help ignite whatevers going to hap-
pen, said Nina Sklansky, who
belongs to a local group promoting
Catskill as a funky, affordable place.
If people are going to linger, theyre
going to want to eat.
Catskill, on the west bank of the
Hudson about 100 miles north of New
York City, has a movie house with a
marquee on Main Street along with a
columned courthouse and places to
window shop. With an average family
income of $55,000, the village has
kept its humble roots. But like a lot of
corners of the valley, the village of
4,000 is changing as city people
migrate north or buy second homes.
In the last year especially, local real
estate broker David King said he has
noticed more 30-something couples
with toddlers from Brooklyn.
Meanwhile, there are plans to convert
an old commercial site into a haven for
artisans.
If Catskill is showing green
shoots of gentrification, its
nowhere near the full bloom on dis-
play across the river in the city of
Hudson. The once-tumbledown city
is today is loaded with antique shops,
art spaces and, yes, the sort of restau-
rants that get described glowingly in
The New York Times as a fever dream
of luxury and rural kitsch.
God forbid if the place turns into
something like Hudson, but a little bit
of it would be nice, Sklansky said.
Sklansky, a copywriter who moved
upstate a decade ago, is working on a
privately funded marketing campaign
for the village with a group of like-
minded residents called the Catskill
Action Team. She helped cook up the
restaurant offer this summer.
Team member Andrea Lowenthal is
offering the deal on the ground oor of
a building she owns on Main Street,
the site of an old luncheonette with a
black marble service counter and art
deco fixtures. The new restaurateur
would have to pay for some capital
improvements to get the free rent.
The two women said that theyre
open to different cuisine concepts, but
that a chef with experience is neces-
sary. To get the word out, they posted
an online video promising weve got
lots of foodies hungry for something
great to eat.
Village has deal for the right chef
FOOD 19
Wednesday Sept. 18, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Burlingames #1 Choice!
0reat food Hicroorews
full ar Sports TY
fool anquet facilities
family friendly ining since 1995
By Alison Ladman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
There is something so perfect,
so satisfying about a bowl of warm
squash bisque on a cool fall
evening. And it is such a versatile
dish, it is easily doctored in so
many ways.
Using that blend of versatility
and comfort as our inspiration, we
created a fast and easy squash
bisque that becomes a base for
whatever autumn avors you are
craving. You could, of course, keep
it basic and simply top this bisque
with a dollop of sour cream. But we
also suggest six variations of top-
pings, including shrimp, bacon
and pulled pork.
You also could make the bisque
vegan by substituting vegetable
broth for the chicken broth and
almond or soy creamer for the
heavy cream.
CARAMELIZED ONION
AND SQUASH BISQUE
Start to nish: 1 hour
Servings: 8
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
2 large sweet onions, diced
2 medium shallots, chopped
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon dried Italian herbs or
herbes de Provence
2 tablespoons apple cider vine-
gar
1 1/2 pounds cubed, peeled but-
ternut squash
3 to 4 cups low-sodium chicken
broth
1 cup heavy cream
Ground black pepper
In a large saucepan over medium-
high, heat the vegetable oil. Add
the onions, shallots, salt and
herbs, then saute for 5 minutes.
Reduce the heat to medium and con-
tinue to cook, stirring often, until
the onions are soft and brown,
about another 20 minutes.
Add the vinegar and deglaze the
pan. Add the squash and 3 cups of
the broth, then bring to a simmer.
Cover and cook until the squash is
completely tender, 15 to 20 min-
utes. Working in batches, transfer
the soup to a blender and puree
until smooth. Alternatively, puree
the soup in the pot using an
immersion blender. Either way,
take care when blending hot liq-
uids.
Return the bisque to the heat and
stir in the cream. If a thinner
bisque is desired, thin the soup
with the remaining cup of broth.
Heat until just hot. Season with
salt and pepper. To serve, nish
with any of the following:
SPICED SHRIMP
AND SCALLIONS
Toss 12 ounces of small cooked
shrimp with 1 teaspoon ve-spice
powder. Top with sliced scallions.
ASIAGO AND APPLE
Stir 2 nely diced apples into the
bisque, then bring back to a sim-
mer. Top with shredded Asiago
cheese.
BARBECUE PULLED PORK
Stir together 2 cups of shred-
ded/pulled cooked pork with 1/3
cup barbecue sauce. Top the soup
rst with the pork, then a dollop of
sour cream and chopped fresh
cilantro.
TWO CORN AND HERBS
Cook 1 cup of thawed frozen
corn kernels on high in a skillet
with 1 tablespoon of oil until
lightly browned. Stir the kernels
into the bisque along with 2 table-
spoons each of chopped fresh tar-
ragon, thyme and chives. Finish
by topping the bisque with salted,
buttered popcorn.
PEPPERED JACK
Stir in 1 diced red bell pepper and
1/4 cup diced pickled jalapenos.
Top with shredded pepper jack
cheese.
MAPLE BACON BLUE
Stir in 1/2 cup crumbled crisped
bacon and 1/4 cup maple syrup.
Sprinkle with crumbled blue
cheese.
A hearty, easy, have-it-your-way squash bisque
A squash bisque can become a base for whatever autumn avors you are craving.
DATEBOOK 20
Wednesday Sept. 18, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 18
Russell Bede School tour. 9 a.m.
446 Turner Terrace, San Mateo.
Russell Bede School helps elemen-
tary-age children whose learning
decisions make mainstream schools
a challenge. Prospective parents,
therapists, pediatricians, school
directors and principals are wel-
come. Please call 579-4400 to sched-
ule a spot for the tour.
Twitter and YouTube Session.
10:30 a.m. Belmont Library, 1110
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont.
Learn about two of the most popular
social media sharing networks on
the Web. Previous Basic Computer
and Beginning Internet recom-
mended. Free. For more information
email conrad@smcl.org.
Arthritis and Fibromyalgia sup-
port group. 11 a.m. to noon. Mills
Health Center, 100 S. San Mateo
Drive, San Mateo. Free. Drop-in. For
more information call 654-9966.
San Mateo Professional Alliance
Weekly Networking Lunch. Noon
to 1 p.m. Spiedo Ristorante, 223 E.
Fourth Ave., San Mateo. Free admis-
sion, but lunch is $17. For more infor-
mation call 430-6500.
Teen Wii Gaming. 3:30 p.m. Belmont
Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. For ages 12-19. Free. For
more information email
conrad@smcl.org.
Pirate Story time and Craft. 4 p.m.
San Mateo Public Library, 55 W. Third
Ave., San Mateo. Come dressed like a
pirate, listen to pirate stories and
make your own pirate parrot to wear
on your shoulder. Meet in the Book
Bubble. Free. For more information
call 522-7838.
Working Differently: Beyond the 9
to 5. 6:30 p.m. Burlingame Public
Library Lane Community Room, 480
Primrose, Burlingame. Free. For more
information email
piche@plsinfo.org.
Alzheimers support group for
adult children of people with
Alzheimers. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Mills
Health Center, 100 S. San Mateo
Drive, San Mateo. Free. Drop-in. For
more information call 654-9966.
California Writers Club Open Mic.
7:30 p.m. Reach And Teach, 144 W.
25th Ave., San Mateo. Come and lis-
ten to local writers sharing their lat-
est work at the California Writers
Club open mic starting at 7:30 p.m.
Enjoy poetry, ction, non-ction and
more. Free. For more information
email craig@reachandteach.org.
THURSDAY, SEPT. 19
San Mateo County Supervisor
Tissier Announces Upcoming Age
Well Drive Smart Seminars. 9 a.m.
to noon. Veterans Memorial Senior
Center, 1455 Madison Ave., Redwood
City. For more information call 363-
4572.
AARP Chapter 139 Meeting. Noon.
Beresford Recreation Center, 2720
Alameda de las Pulgas, San Mateo.
Please bring the school supplies you
have been collecting. Entertainment
will be provided. For more informa-
tion call 345-5001.
Prostate cancer support group. 1
p.m. to 3 p.m. Mills Health Group, 100
S. San Mateo Drive, San Mateo. Free.
Drop-in. For more information call
654-9966.
Mission Hospice Volunteer
Informational Meeting. Noon to 1
p.m. and 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.
Mission Hospice and Home Care
Ofce, 1670 S. Amphlett Blvd., Suite
300, San Mateo. Looking for ways to
help others? No experience is neces-
sary, only the desire to serve others
at one of the most meaningful times
of life. Free. For more information call
554-1000.
Bag Building: Repurposed Covers
for DIY Bound Books. 1 p.m. to 3
p.m. College of San Mateo Library,
1700 W. Hillsdale Blvd., KCSM
Building 9, San Mateo. Learn how to
turn that old shopping bag into your
own unique stitch-bound blank
book or journal. Free. For more infor-
mation email becvark@smccd.edu.
Dancin Off the Avenue. 4 p.m. to 8
p.m. Downtown Burlingame, Park
Road at Burlingame Avenue, at the
Burlingame Farmers Market. Live
music and dancing, beer and wine
garden, pet and family friendly. Free.
For more information email
burlingamebid@gmail.com.
Dementia and Unacknowledged
Grief. 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. Silverado
Senior Living Library, 1301 Ralston
Ave., Belmont. Nina Poletika will talk
about grief and how to deal. For
more information call 654-9700.
Sal Khan, Founder of Khan
Academy. 7 p.m. Crowne Plaza
Cabana, 4290 El Camino Real, Palo
Alto. Hear about Khans plans to cre-
ate the global classroom. $20 for
non-members, $8 for students with
valid ID. For more information email
ggehue@commonwealthclub.org.
Monty Pythons Spamalot. 8 p.m.
Hillbarn Theater, 1285 E. Hillsdale
Blvd., Foster City. An irreverent paro-
dy of the legendary tale of King
Arthur and his knights. Plays until
Sept. 22. Tickets start at $23 and can
be purchased at hillbarntheater.org
or by calling 349-6411.
Movies on the Square: Lincoln.
8:45 p.m. Courthouse Square, 2200
Broadway, Redwood City. Free. For
more information call 780-7311 or
go to
www.redwoodcity.org/events/movi
es.html.
FRIDAY, SEPT. 20
Book Sale. 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. San
Mateo Main Library, Oak Meeting
Room, 55 W. Third Ave., San Mateo.
Pick from a large selection of books
at bargain prices. Bring your own
bag. Free. For more information call
522-7802.
There is a Garden in the Mind. 2
p.m. to 3 p.m. Filoli, 86 Caada Road,
Woodside. Paul Lee will lecture. $25
for members, $35 for non-members.
For non-members, the fee includes
same-day admission to Filoli on a
self-guided basis to visit the historic
house and garden, caf, garden shop
and art exhibit. Parking is free.
Register online at www.Filoli.org or
by calling 364-8300, ext. 508.
Masterpiece Gallery Grand
Opening. 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. 1335 El
Camino Real, Millbrae. Masterpiece
Gallery represents local and emerg-
ing artists in paintings, sculptures,
photography and fabric arts. The
grand opening will be represented
by the art group of Art Liaisons until
Dec. 20, 2013. For more information
call 636-4706.
Music on the Square: The Kevin
Russell Band. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Courthouse Square, 2200 Broadway,
Redwood City. Free. For more infor-
mation go to
www.redwoodcity.org/events.
Groovy Judy Spreads Peace, Love
and PositiveVibes. 6:30 p.m. to 8:30
p.m. Unity of Palo Alto, 3391
Middleeld Road, Palo Alto. All ages.
$20 donation requested. For more
information go to
www.groovyjudy.com.
South San Francisco Open Mic. 7
p.m. to 11 p.m. 116 El Campo Drive,
South San Francisco. Free. For more
information call 451-2450.
Monty Pythons Spamalot. 8 p.m.
Hillbarn Theater, 1285 E. Hillsdale
Blvd., Foster City. An irreverent paro-
dy of the legendary tale of King
Arthur and his knights. Plays until
Sept. 22. Tickets start at $23 and can
be purchased at hillbarntheater.org
or by calling 349-6411.
Coastal Repertory Theatre pres-
ents The Diary of Anne Frank. 8
p.m. Coastal Repertory Theatre, 1167
Main St., Half Moon Bay. This moving
adaptation confronts a new genera-
tion with the horrors of the
Holocaust. Tickets start at $27. For
more information or to purchase
tickets go to www.coastalrep.com or
call 569-3266.
SATURDAY, SEPT. 21
Scout Saturday and Thaddeus
Kerns Statue rededication at Hiller
Museum. 10:30 a.m. Hiller Aviation
Museum, 601 Skyway Road, San
Carlos. This past summer marked the
100th anniversary of the death of a
pioneer aviator, Thaddeus Kerns.
Eagle scout candidate Connor
McCann completed his Eagle Scout
project by creating a beautiful land-
scaped and seating area around the
statue in commemoration of the
anniversary. Boy and girl scouts of all
ages are invited to visit the museum
at no additional charge. For more
information call 654-0222.
Sixteenth Annual Mens Health
Symposium. 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Mills
Health Center, 100 S. San Mateo
Drive, San Mateo. Dont miss keynote
speaker Dean More, heart transplant
recipient and former linebacker for
the 49ers. Free. For more information
email sybilb@aachac.org.
Annual Bayfront Cleanup.
Register from 7:30 a.m. to 9 a.m.,
event from 8 a.m. to noon. Ryder
Park, 1801 J. Hart Clinton Drive, San
Mateo. Ideal opportunity for stu-
dents looking to earn community
service hours. Free.
Woodlake Flea Market 50 partici-
pants. 8 a.m.to 3 p.m. Woodlake
Association, 900 Peninsula Ave., San
Mateo. Free. For more information
email castlemgt@gmail.com.
Coastal Cleanup Day at the
Annual Fall Cleanup. 8:30 a.m.
Public Works Services, 1400
Broadway, Redwood City. Free conti-
nental breakfast and barbecue
lunch. For more information call 780-
7300.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
Washington Park.
Jim Hayes, who is retired, but works
as an independent minor league base-
ball scout, is bringing the proposal
forward to the commission. If the com-
mission doesnt approve of the plan,
Hayes said he wont proceed with the
idea since minor league schedules are
set up in October and November. This
would be the rst minor league team
Hayes has started.
The biggest obstacle was the youth
leagues because we dont want to dis-
place anybody, Hayes said. The only
opposition were getting is from the
Burlingame Youth Baseball
Association. Im willing to work with
them in any way possible. Theyre
worried we would push them off the
eld.
These eld use requirements decimate
the high school summer youth pro-
gram, said Mike Brunicardi, current
president of the Burlingame Youth
Baseball Association.
Were obviously not against base-
ball, but we cant support this,
Brunicardi said. We feel strongly that
the city needs to prioritize eld space
for the community. I know he [Hayes]
wants to change our hours of use in
Washington Park from 1 p.m.-4 p.m.,
so he can have it from 4 p.m. to the
end of day. We have coaches that have
full-time jobs and are not available
during daytime business hours. Our
players are local students and have
responsibilities: some do summer
school, internship programs, place-
ment tests for college and summer
jobs.
The recreation supervisor sent Hayes
a schedule from last summer and the
youth league used the eld 63 days last
summer, Hayes said. They would only
have to move off eld 11 out of the 63
days, all practice days, not games
theyd have to move for, he said.
I altered our schedule to accommo-
date them, said Hayes, who is also a
professional pitching coach in the
Puerto Rico Instructional Baseball
League during January and February. I
hope they [the commission] will push
this to the council. Im willing to do
whatever it takes to bring profession-
al baseball here.
The eld is the only full-sized eld in
Burlingame that can accommodate
high school kids, Brunicardi said.
If were displaced, we have nowhere
else to go, Brunicardi said. Theyd
basically take over the eld for a week
at a time. Maybe he can build a facility
on the waterfront.
He added that Hayes also wants to
serve alcohol, which he said is a hazard
since theres a parking lot next to the
eld that belongs to Burlingame High
School.
Looking in the Bay Area for a loca-
tion, Hayes also considered San
Leandro and Faireld. Tickets would be
$7 a piece and concession prices would
be lower than in the major leagues, he
said.
I would like the community to come
out and see what I have to say, Hayes
said.
The one time buy-in fee is anywhere
from $250,000 to $300,000, which
Hayes said he will pay. He would raise
money through advertising, sponsor-
ships, donations and season ticket
sales, he said.
In terms of a potential name for the
proposed team, Hayes would like to
have a contest to let the citizens send
in name ideas. The team would be inde-
pendent, meaning it would not be afl-
iated with any major league teams.
The meeting will take place 7 p.m.
on Thursday, Sept. 19 at the
Burlingame Recreation Center, 850
Burlingame Ave.
angela@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 1
LEAGUE
board will discuss extending the state
Legislatures mandated one-time
training requirement to be bi-yearly,
beginning this year. All district staff
members are mandated reporters for
suspected child abuse or neglect and
each must sign a statement prior to
employment confirming that he/she
has knowledge of his/her mandated
reporter duties.
The last couple of years have
been difficult, said Board President
Robert Tashjian. As a parent and
board member, its horrifying. One
of the basic requirements of the dis-
trict is to keep students safe. Its
imperative that all staff, not just
teachers, have training.
The district is proposing to set a
higher standard than that required by
law for mandated reporter training for
suspected child abuse or neglect,
according to a staff report, with direc-
tion from Superintendent Michael
Milliken.
Milliken said he is looking for
guidance on these practices from the
board and is open to the board formal-
izing these plans.
Its a matter of an ongoing effort
to ensure student safety, Milliken
said. Regular reminders are a better
way to institutionalize awareness.
The district is proposing to retrain
all staff this fall and to institutional-
ize retraining so staff is periodically
reminded of their responsibilities as
mandated reporters and reminded of
the warning signs for child abuse and
neglect. Currently, its plans for this
fall are to provide a one- to two-hour
training for all employees, with a
one-hour retraining conducted every
other year.
We believe that with the initial
retraining this fall, there will likely
be many questions from staff, so we
believe a longer training meeting
may be appropriate, the report stat-
ed.
The rationale for future retrainings
being approximately one hour is that
length of time is consistent with the
length of training provided by San
Mateo County Counsel, the report
stated.
Staff members who miss the in-per-
son training would be expected to
make up the session with an online
training.
The meeting is 6 p.m. Thursday,
Sept. 19 in the district office, 2960
Hallmark Drive in Belmont.
Continued from page 1
TRAINING
Sept. 7.
Dudum is from San Francisco and was
a nanny before opening the shop. She
has made cakes on the side for at least
seven years now.
Its a fun place to begin baking
adventures or let it help you keep
going and get inspired, Dudum said.
Its a fun place to go.
September promotions at the new
business include getting a free reusable
tote bag with a purchase of $50 or
more, getting free mystery cupcake
liners when you spend $20 or more and
signing up for a class with a friend and
both getting $5 off the class fee.
The stores hours are Tuesday to
Saturday 9 a.m.-7 p.m. and Sunday and
Monday 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Upcoming
events include a Mommy & Me class
for $35 on Tuesday, Sept. 17.
It will also host a Halloween party
on Oct. 27, 1 p.m.-4 p.m., have spe-
cial Halloween sale going on that day,
free kids project and free adult demo.
For more information visit busybak-
erssupplies.com.
angela@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 1
BAKERS
COMICS/GAMES
9-18-13
tuesdays PuZZLe sOLVed
PreViOus
sudOku
answers
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 La times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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3
aCrOss
1 Molten rock
6 Eccentric
11 Buffalo pucksters
12 Father of geometry
13 Leave on a trip
14 Drowses off
15 Overhead
16 Take a tumble
17 By heart
18 de cologne
19 Skip past
23 Parliament member
25 Iffy attempts
26 PIN prompter
29 Booster rocket
31 Friendly advice
32 Moo companion
33 Wanders
34 Dangerous curve
35 Tests
37 Hoe
39 Kind of bean
40 Candle material
41 Major
45 Command to a dog
47 Uses a crowbar
48 Perfumed bag
51 Con-descends
52 Consecrate
53 Hemingway
54 Went off course
55 Army trumpet
dOwn
1 Rumba relative
2 Monks superior
3 Driveway topping
4 Only
5 Question
6 Slow time
7 Wild feline
8 Bullfght cheer
9 Pinch
10 NFL gains
11 Burn
12 Hairy twin
16 Gradually disappear
(2 wds.)
18 Thus
20 Partner
21 Heron kin
22 Baking meas.
24 Boathouse items
25 RSVP enclosure
26 Cains brother
27 Urban transport
28 Sirs companion
30 Okla. neighbor
36 Golfers iron
38 While
40 Light bulb measure
42 Star in Orion
43 Intuit
44 Secy
46 Take care of
47 Andean nation
48 Remark
49 Santa winds
50 Milk source
51 New socialite
diLBert CrOsswOrd PuZZLe
future sHOCk
PearLs BefOre swine
Get fuZZy
wednesday, sePteMBer 18, 2013
VirGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Focus on your
relationships with others today. Discussions will
lead to satisfying settlements in a partnership
situation. Dont lend or borrow money or
possessions for the time being.
LiBra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Add structure to your
life to help you reach your career goals. Peace of
mind comes at a cost, but you must be prepared to
pay the price if you hope to get anywhere.
sCOrPiO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Follow your dreams
and focus on your talents. Dont be afraid to do
things differently. Your tactics will draw positive
attention and help you get ahead. Love is in the
stars.
saGittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Be honest
when it comes to sensitive situations. A no-
nonsense approach will ensure that you dont face
costly or hostile interference. Listen to others and
respond with reason.
CaPriCOrn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Speak up and
share your thoughts, but dont meddle in other
peoples affairs. Put your time and effort into career
advancement, not into changing others.
aQuarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Your ideas may
seem a little avant-garde. Keep your plans a secret
until you are satisfied that you will get the results
you are looking for. Protect your assets.
PisCes (Feb. 20-March 20) Discuss money
matters openly and consider the best way to get the
most for your dollar. An unusual investment will be
enticing, but pursuing your own plan will net higher
returns.
aries (March 21-April 19) Inconsistency will
not help you gain the confidence of others. If you
make your plans carefully and then stick to them,
Dame Fortune will be in your corner.
taurus (April 20-May 20) Getting to know
your co-workers better will help you get the results
you are looking for. Strive for perfection and
completion in a group project. Leave time for love
and romance.
GeMini (May 21-June 20) Fix up your place
or do what you can to improve a situation that
concerns you. Call in favors if it will help you reach
your destination. Dont be fooled by someones sob
story.
CanCer (June 21-July 22) Enjoy friends, family
and outings that will inspire you to do something
creative. Make it a point to stick to basics and to
incorporate your own unique footprint in whatever
you do.
LeO (July 23-Aug. 22) Size up whatever
situation you face and react quickly once you have
all the facts. Taking control before someone else
does will help establish your position.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Wednesday Sept. 18, 2013 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Wednesday Sept. 18, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS, HHA, CNAS
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
15 N. Ellsworth Avenue, Ste. 201
San Mateo, CA 94401
PLEASE CALL
650-206-5200
Please apply in person from Monday to Friday
(Between 10:00am to 4:00pm)
You can also call for an appointment or
apply online at
www.assistainhomecare.com
ASSISTA
IN-HOME CARE
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
110 Employment
ASSISTANT MANAGER,
SPORT CLUB
STUDENT UNION, INC. -
SJSU
FT-EXC. BENEFITS
$3800-$5500
PLEASE APPLY AT
www.applitrack.com/sjsu/onlineapp
AA/EOE/ADA EMPLOYER
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
CASHIER - PT/FT, will train. Apply at
AM/PM @ 470 Ralston Ave., Belmont.
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
GUTTER/WINDOW CLEANER -
Experienced. Excellent English, reliable
transportation and cell phone. Start
ASAP. (650)340-8315.
110 Employment
CUSTOMER SERVICE
YOU ARE INVITED
Are you:
Dependable
Friendly
Detail Oriented
Willing to learn new skills
Do you have:
Good English skills
A Desire for steady employment
A desire for emplployment benefits
Sewiing skills
If the above items describe you,
please call (650)342-6978.
Immediate opening available for
Customer Service/Seamstress.
Call for appointment.
Crystal Cleaning Center
San Mateo CA, 94402
DRIVER -
Uber and Limo and Taxi Driver Wanted,
Driving from San Mateo to San Jose
making $600 to $900 a week, Fulltime,
(650)766-9878
DRIVERS NEEDED - Use your own 4 or
6 cylinder vehicle, FT/PT, $12-13/hr.
Paid training-800-603-1072.
RETAIL JEWELRY
SALES
Start up to $13.
Experience up to $20.
Benefits-Bonus-No Nights!
(650)367-6500 FX 367-6400
jobs@jewleryexchange.com
TAXI DRIVER
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
Clean DMV and background. $2000
Guaranteed a Month. Call (650)703-8654
110 Employment
SEAMSTRESS NEEDED. Experience
required. Part Time, $10 - $14 per hour.
(650)572-1199.
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256775
The following person is doing business
as: Aqua-Care USA, 1838 El Camino
Real, #207, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Modern Technology Resources, Inc., CA
The business is conducted by a Corpora-
tion. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Igor Kleyner /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/28/13, 09/04/13, 09/11/13, 09/18/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257369
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: 1)Pure Mist, 2)Pure Mist E-Cig-
arettes, 3)Pure Mist E-Juice, 230 South
Spruce Ave., SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO,
CA 94080 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owners: Dave Gaufo, 485 Cy-
press Ave., San Bruno, CA 94066 and
Maria Cristine Madjus, 402 Campbell
Ave., San Francisco, CA 94134. The
business is conducted by a General Part-
nership. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Dave Gaufo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/28/13, 09/04/13, 09/11/13, 09/18/13).
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 522906
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Jon Snitow and Melissa Eitzel
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Jon Snitow and Melissa Eitzel
filed a petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
a.Present name: Jonathan Craig Snitow,
aka Jonathan Snitow, Jonathan C. Sni-
tow, Jon Snitow
a.Proposed name: Jonathan Craig Sni-
tow Solera
b.Present name: Melissa Viola Eitzel
aka Melissa V. Eitzel, Melissa Eitzel
b.Proposed name: Melissa Viola Eitzel
Solera
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on October 3,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 08/21/ 2013
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 08/06/2013
(Published, 08/28/13, 09/04/2013,
09/11/2013, 09/18/2013)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257353
The following person is doing business
as: 1)Nexus Loans, 2)Galaxy Loans,
3)GMCC, 1350 Bayshore Highway, Suite
740, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Gener-
al Mortgage Capital Corporation, CA.
The business is conducted by a Corpora-
tion. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
08/28/2013.
/s/ Raymond Chou /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/28/13, 09/04/13, 09/11/13, 09/18/13).
23 Wednesday Sept. 18, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 523196
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Huei I. Lin
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Huei I. Linl filed a petition with
this court for a decree changing name as
follows:
Present name: Huei I. Lin, aka Stella
Huei I. Lin
Proposed name: Stella Huei I. Lin
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on October 10,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 08/22/ 2013
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 08/13/2013
(Published, 08/28/13, 09/04/2013,
09/11/2013, 09/18/2013)
CASE# CIV 523460
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
In Kyu Yom
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, In kyu Yom filed a petition with
this court for a decree changing name as
follows:
Present name: In Kyu Yom
Proposed name: Peter Kyu Yom
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on October 24,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 09/12/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 09/10/2013
(Published, 09/18/13, 09/25/2013,
10/02/2013, 10/09/2013)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257371
The following person is doing business
as: Nutricion Activa, 346 N. Ellsworth
Ave., SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Ru-
malda Rios, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on
/s/ Rumalda Rios /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/28/13, 09/04/13, 09/11/13, 09/18/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257119
The following person is doing business
as: Polka Dot Gorilla, 1419 Oak Grove
Ave., #203, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Lauren B. Haule, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on August 6,
2013.
/s/ Lauren B. Haule /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/07/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/28/13, 09/04/13, 09/11/13, 09/18/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257319
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Matchcmo, 930 Edgecliff Way,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94061 is hereby
registered by the following owners: Louis
& Jane Lalonde, same address. The
business is conducted by a Married Cou-
ple. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
/s/ Louis Lalonde /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/22/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/28/13, 09/04/13, 09/11/13, 09/18/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257435
The following person is doing business
as: Miki-Ya, 1180 Vermont Way, SAN
BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Miyuki Tandy,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 08/13/2013.
/s / Miyuki Tandy /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/30/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/04/13, 09/11/13, 09/18/13, 09/25/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257452
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Pacific Heights Financial, 2) Finan-
cisco 1838 El Camino Real, #180H,
BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Softeri-
nox, Inc, CA. The business is conducted
by a Corporation. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s / Valeriy Krysov /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/04/13, 09/11/13, 09/18/13, 09/25/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257554
The following person is doing business
as: Action Broadcasting Services, 10
Rollins Rd., Ste. 209, MILLBRAE, CA
94030 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Geoffrey William Kuchlenz,
1000 Davit Ln, #118, Redwood City, CA
94065. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
11/08/1991.
/s/ Geoffrey Kuchlenz /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/10/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/11/13, 09/18/13, 09/25/13, 10/02/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257479
The following person is doing business
as: A & E Limousine Service, 833 Fallon
Ave., SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Arnold
Balotro, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Arnold Balotro /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/11/13, 09/18/13, 09/25/13, 10/02/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257473
The following person is doing business
as: Goodwin Properties, 4370 Alpine
Rd., PORTOLA VALLEY, CA 94028 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Gary Ahern. The business is conducted
by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 08/01/2013.
/s/ Arnold Balotro /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/11/13, 09/18/13, 09/25/13, 10/02/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257446
The following person is doing business
as: Sichuan Chong Ding Cuisine, 211 S.
San Mateo Dr., SAN MATEO, CA 94401
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Xue Shu Zhang, 86 Santa Cruz
Ave., San Francisco, CA 94112. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Xue Shu Zhang /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/30/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/18/13, 09/25/13, 10/02/13, 10/09/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257641
The following person is doing business
as: Heritage Design, 529 Warren Rd.,
SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Judith Ann
Sobolik and Jessica Sobolik Willey,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by a Joint Venture. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 01/27/2004.
/s/ Judith Ann Sobolik /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/17/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/18/13, 09/25/13, 10/02/13, 10/09/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257471
The following person is doing business
as: Claudias Pastes and Empanadas,
608 E. Third Ave., SAN MATEO, CA
94401 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Claudias Perez, 2278 Los Pa-
dres Blvd., #3, Santa Clara, CA 95050.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on July 1,
2013.
/s/ Claudias Perez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/18/13, 09/25/13, 10/02/13, 10/09/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257451
The following person is doing business
as: Sushi Sada, 1861 El Camino Real,
BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Sushi Sa-
da, LLC, CA. The business is conducted
by a Limited Liability Company. The reg-
istrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Yong Lee /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/18/13, 09/25/13, 10/02/13, 10/09/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257576
The following person is doing business
as: Bay Hill Financial Services, 3363 El
Sorbrante St., SAN MATEO, CA 94403
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Kurt Harrison, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on .
/s/ Kurt Harrison/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/11/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/18/13, 09/25/13, 10/02/13, 10/09/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257562
The following person is doing business
as: TS Consulting, 2005 Seabrook Ct.,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94065 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Timo-
thy Joel Summers, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 08/29/2013.
/s/ Timothy Joel Summers /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/10/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/18/13, 09/25/13, 10/02/13, 10/09/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257646
The following person is doing business
as: Bay Area Piano Storage, 1185 Chess
Dr., #8, SAN MATEO, CA 94404 is here-
by registered by the following owner: Mi-
chael McGee, 866 Lurline Dr. Foster
City, CA 94404. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on .
/s/ Michael McGee /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/17/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/18/13, 09/25/13, 10/02/13, 10/09/13).
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
Arlis E. Coleman
Case Number: 123713
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: Arlis E, Coleman. A Peti-
tion for Probate has been filed by Anne
E. Takemura in the Superior Court of
California, County of San Mateo. The
Petition for Probate requests that Anne
E. Takemura be appointed as personal
representative to administer the estate of
the decedent.
The petition requests the decedents will
and codicils, if any, be admitted to pro-
bate. The will and any codicils are availa-
ble for examination in the file kept by the
court.
The petition requests authority to admin-
ster the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This au-
thority will allow the personal representa-
tive to take many actions without obtain-
ing court approval. Before taking certain
very important actions, however, the per-
sonal representative will be required to
give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to
the proposed action.) The independent
administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an ob-
jection to the petition and shows good
cause why the court should not grant the
authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: October 08, 2013 at
9:00 a.m., Dept. 28, Superior Court of
California, County of San Mateo, 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063.
If you object to the granting of the peti-
tion, you should appear at the hearing
and state your objections or file written
objections with the court before the hear-
ing. Your appearance may be in person
or by your attorney.
If you are a creditor or a contingent cred-
itor of the decedent, you must file your
claim with the court and mail a copy to
the personal representative appointed by
the court within the later of either (1) four
months from the date of first issuance of
letters to a general personal representa-
tive, as defined in section 58(b) of the
California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days
from the date of mailing or personal de-
livery to you of a notice under section
9052 of the California Probate Code.
Other California statutes and legal qutho-
ity may affect your rights as a creditor.
You may want to consult with an attorney
knowledgeable in California law.
You may examine the file kept by the
court. If you are a person interested in
the estate, you may file with the court a
Request for Special Notice (form DE-
154) of the filing of an inventory and ap-
praisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special No-
tice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
John P. Breckenridge, SBN: 104244
2901 Moorpark Ave., #175
SAN JOSE, CA 95128
(408)243-3242
Dated: September 9, 2013
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on September 11, 18, 25, 2013.
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
Dora Maritza Aberouette, aka Maritza
Aberouette
Case Number: 123714
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: Dora Maritza Aberou-
ette, aka Maritza Aberouette. A Petition
for Probate has been filed by Gene Felix
Aberouette in the Superior Court of Cali-
fornia, County of San Mateo. The Peti-
tion for Probate requests that Gene Felix
Aberouette be appointed as personal
representative to administer the estate of
the decedent.
The petition requests the decedents will
and codicils, if any, be admitted to pro-
bate. The will and any codicils are availa-
ble for examination in the file kept by the
court.
The petition requests authority to admin-
ster the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This au-
thority will allow the personal representa-
tive to take many actions without obtain-
ing court approval. Before taking certain
very important actions, however, the per-
sonal representative will be required to
give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to
the proposed action.) The independent
administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an ob-
jection to the petition and shows good
cause why the court should not grant the
authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: October 02, 2013 at
9:00 a.m., Dept. 28, Superior Court of
California, County of San Mateo, 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063.
If you object to the granting of the peti-
tion, you should appear at the hearing
and state your objections or file written
objections with the court before the hear-
ing. Your appearance may be in person
203 Public Notices
or by your attorney.
If you are a creditor or a contingent cred-
itor of the decedent, you must file your
claim with the court and mail a copy to
the personal representative appointed by
the court within the later of either (1) four
months from the date of first issuance of
letters to a general personal representa-
tive, as defined in section 58(b) of the
California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days
from the date of mailing or personal de-
livery to you of a notice under section
9052 of the California Probate Code.
Other California statutes and legal qutho-
ity may affect your rights as a creditor.
You may want to consult with an attorney
knowledgeable in California law.
You may examine the file kept by the
court. If you are a person interested in
the estate, you may file with the court a
Request for Special Notice (form DE-
154) of the filing of an inventory and ap-
praisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special No-
tice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
Karl R. Vorsatz, Esq., SBN: 85702
1601 Bayshore Highway, Ste. 350
BURLINGAME, CA 94010
(650)697-9591
Dated: September 9, 2013
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on September 11, 18, 25, 2013.
210 Lost & Found
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST BLACK APPOINTMENT BOOK -
Eithe rat Stanford Shopping Center or
Downtown Menlo Park, RWC, (650)322-
6641
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shop-
ping Cente, by Lunardis market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST JORDANIAN PASSPORT AND
GREEN CARD. Lost in Daly City, If
found contact, Mohammad Al-Najjar
(415)466-5699
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
294 Business Equipment
PROFESSIONALLY SET UP
DRAPERY WORKROOM Perfect for
home based business, all machines
and equipment for sale ASAP, original
cost over $25,000, Price $7,000 obo,
(415)587-1457, or email:
bharuchiltd@sbcglobal.net
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
WHITE CRIB / toddler bed with mattress
excellent condition $95 (650)345-9595
295 Art
ART PAPER, various size sheets, 10
sheets, $20. (650)591-6596
RUB DOWN TYPE (Lettraset), hundreds
to choose from. 10 sheets for $10.
(650)591-6596
296 Appliances
AMANA HTM outdoor furnace heat ex-
changer,new motor, pump, electronics.
Model ERGW0012. 80,000 BTU $50.
(650)342-7933
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
ELECTRIC DRYER (Kenmore) asking
$95, good condition! (650)579-7924
GAS STOVE (Magic Chef) asking $95,
good condition! (650)579-7924
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
KRUPS COFFEE maker $20,
(650)796-2326
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
PRESSURE COOKER Miromatic 4qt
needs gasket 415 333-8540 Daly City
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor,
(650)726-1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24 wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
TABLE TOP refrigerator 1.8 cubic feet
brown in color, $45, call SOLD!
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
298 Collectibles
"OLD" IRON COFFEE GRINDER - $75.,
(650)596-0513
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
84 USED European (34), U.S. (50) Post-
age Stamps. Most pre-World War II. All
different, all detached from envelopes.
$4.00 all, 650-787-8600
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
$100., (650)348-6428
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
AUTOGRAPHED GUMBI collectible art
& Gloria Clokey - $35., (650)873-8167
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JAPANESE MOTIF end table, $99
(650)520-9366
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
JOE MONTANA, Jerry Rice & Ronnie
Lott separate action figures. Original box-
never displayed.. $49 for all three fig-
ures. Cash. SOLD!
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
SIGNED MARK MCGWIER BASEBALL
- 70th Home Run, $30., (650)595-3933
SILVER PIECE dollar circulated $30 firm
415 333-8540 Daly City
TATTOO ARTIST - Norman Rockwell
figurine, limited addition, $90., (650)766-
3024
24
Wednesday Sept. 18, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
298 Collectibles
STERLING SILVER Cigarette Case.
Made by silversmith E.A. Bliss circa
1910. Excellent condition. $99 firm.
Cash. SOLD!
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
VINTAGE BLOW torch-turner brass
work $35 (650)341-8342
WORLD WAR II US Army Combat field
backpack from 1944 $99 (650)341-8342
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
ALL METAL TONKA TRUCK -great
condition, $25., 650-595-3933
BARBIE BLUE CONVERTIBLE plus ac-
ccessories, excellent shape, $45.,
(650)344-6565
LEGO, UNOPENED, 299 pieces Mon-
ster Truck Transporter, 3 projects to build
, 3 action figures, tools, 5-12, $27.00
(650)578-9208
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertable
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
2 SOLID wood Antique mirrors 511/2" tall
by 221/2" wide $50 for both
(650)561-3149
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14 x 21, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18 high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE OAK SCHOOL DESK - with
ink well, pencil holder and under seat
book shelf, great for a childs room or of-
fice, $48., (650)574-4439
ANTIQUE WALNUT Hall Tree, $800 obo
(650)375-8021
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72 high, 40 wide, 3 drawers, Display
case, bevelled glass, $500
(650)766-3024
303 Electronics
2 MP3 multi media player new in box
(both) for $20 (650)726-1037
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
27SONY TRINITRON TV - great condi-
tion, rarely used, includes remote, not flat
screen, $65., (650)357-7484
46 MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
HP PHOTOSMART Printer, mint condi-
tion, 2 sided, view & print color & black,
multi-functions, includes 2 unopened car-
tridges $45.00 (650)578-9208
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
PHILLIPS ENERGY STAR 20 color TV
with remote. Good condition, $20
(650)888-0129
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
SAMSUNG 27" TV Less than 6 months
old, with remote. Moving must sell
$100.00 (650) 995-0012
SANYO C30 Portable BOOM BOX,
AM/FM STEREO, Dolby Metal Tape
player/recorder, Graphic Equalizer, 2/3
speakers boxes, ac/dc. $50
650-430-6046
SET OF 3 wireless phones all for $50
(650)342-8436
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
1940 MAHOGANY desk 34" by 72" 6
drawers center drawer locks all. with 3/8"
clear glass top $70 OBO (650)315-5902
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 PLANT stands $80 for both
(650)375-8021
3 DRAWER PLATFORM BED Real
wood (light pine, Varathane finish). Twin
size. $50 (650)637-1907
8 DRAWER wooden dresser $99
(650)759-4862
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
304 Furniture
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
bankers rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BBQ GRILL, Ducane, propane $90
(650)591-4927
BLUE & WHITE SOFA - $300; Loveseat
$250., good condition, (650)508-0156
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CABINET BLOND Wood, 6 drawers, 31
Tall, 61 wide, 18 deep, $45
(650)592-2648
CANOPY BED cover white eyelet/tiny
embroided voile for twin/trundle bed; very
pretty; 81"long x 40"w. $25.
(650)345-3277
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
CHINESE LACQUERED cabinet with 2
shelves and doors. Beautiful. 23 width 30
height 11 depth $75 (650)591-4927
CURIO CABINET 55" by 21" by 12"
Glass sides, door & shelfs plus drawers
$95 OBO (650)368-6271
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36x58 with one leaf 11 1/2. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER - 6 draw dresser 61" wide,
31" high, & 18" deep $50., (650)592-
2648
DRESSER - all wood, excellent condition
$50 obo (650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLE, medium large, with marble
top. and drawer. $60 or best offer,
(650)681-7061
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
I-JOY MASSAGE chair, exc condition
$95 (650)591-4927
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 medal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MATCHING RECLINER, SOFA & LOVE
SEAT - Light multi-colored fabric, $95.
for all, (650)286-1357
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
NATURAL WOOD table 8' by 4' $99
(650)515-2605
OAK END table 2' by 2' by 2' $25
(650)594-1149
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
ORGAN BENCH $40 (650)375-8021
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs, glass top,
good condition 41 in diameter $95
(650)591-4927
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36 Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
PRIDE MECHANICAL Lift Chair, Infinite
postion. Excellent condition, owners
manuel included. $575 cash only,
(650)544-6169
RECLINING CHAIR, almost new, Beige
$100 (650)624-9880
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Great condition,
1970s style, dark brown, wooden, with
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR with wood carving,
armrest, rollers, and it swivels $99.,
(650)592-2648
SHELVING UNIT interior metal and
glass nice condition $70 obo
(650)589-8348
SOFA 7-1/2' $25 (650)322-2814
SOFA SECTIONAL RECLINER - 3
piece, $75., (650)591-2720
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
SWIVEL CHAIR - dark blue leather, very
comfortable, good condition, bought for
$900., sell for $80.obo, SOLD!
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TV STAND brown. $40.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent con-
dition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
304 Furniture
WICKER DRESSER, white, 3 drawers,
exc condition 31 width 32 height 21.5
depth $35 (650)591-4927
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
FIREPLACE SET - 3 piece fireplace set
with screen $25 (650)322-2814
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
ICE CREAM MAKER - Westbend 4 qt.
old fashion ice cream maker, brand new,
still in box, $30., (650)726-1037
JAPANESE SERVER unused in box, 2
porcelain cups and carafe for serving tea
or sake. $8.00, SOLD!
KIRBY VACUUM cleaner good condition
with extras $90 OBO (650)345-5502
KITCHEN POTS - (3) stainless steel
with black handles - 21/2 gal., 4 gal., 5
gal. Asking $10 all. Will sell separately,
(650)574-3229 (Foster City) between 10
a.m. and 7 p.m.
OSTER BREAD maker (new) $45.,
650 315-5902
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good con-
dition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
STANDARD BATHROOM SET - lid
cover and mat, beige. Asking $10. Call
(650)574-3229 (Foster City) between 10
a.m. and 7 p.m.
TWO 21 quart canning pots, with lids, $5
each. (650)322-2814
VACUMN EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
VINYL SHOWER CURTAINS (3) one is
beige/coral floral; one is aqua/black/
gold floral, and one is royal blue solid
with white nylon over-curtain. Asking
$10 each. Call (650)574-3229 (Foster
City) between 10 a.m. and 7 p.m.
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436
VINTAGE COSTUME jewelry 1950,
1960, 1970 beautiful selection all for $20
(650)755-9833
WATCH - INVICTA, ProDiver, new, still
in box, $100., (650)726-1037
WATCHES - Quicksilver (2), brand new
in box, $40. for both, (650)726-1037
308 Tools
10" MAKITA mitre saw with 100 tooth
carbon blade $60 650 315-5902
12-VOLT, 2-TON Capacity Scissor Jack
w/ Impact Wrench, New in Box, Never
Used. $85.00 (650) 270-6637 after 5pm
6-8 MISC. TOOLS - used, nail tray with
nails, $15., (650)322-2814
B & D 17" HEDGE TRIMMER - pro mod-
el, sharp blades, only $19, 650-595-3933
BLACK AND Decker electric 18" blade
lawn mower, rated at 4 HP,
$45.(650)367-8146
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10,
4 long x 20 wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
MAKITA 21" belt sander $35 also 10
boxes of belt make offer, SOLD!
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)851-0878
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
TOOL BOX full of tools. Moving must
sell. $100.00 (650) 995-0012
309 Office Equipment
COPIER - Brother BCP7040, Laser(black
& white), printer & fax machine, $35.,
SOLD!
309 Office Equipment
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
10" STERLING silver loving cup circa
with walnut base 1912 $65
(650)315-5902
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
2 GALLON Sprayer sears polythene
compressed air 2 1/2 inch opening, used
once $10 San Bruno (650)588-1946
3 LARGE old brown mixing bowls $75
for all 3 (650)375-8021
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History,
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
ADULT VIDEOS - (50) for $50., SOLD!
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office, new,
$100., (650)619-9203.
ALOE VERA PLANTS - (30) medicine
plant, $3.00 each, SOLD!
ALUMINUM WALKER, Foldable with
wheels. $15 (650)756-7878
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99., (650)580-
3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE LANTERN - (7) Olde Brooklyn
lanterns, battery operated, safe, new in
box, $100. for all, (650)726-1037
ARTIFICIAL FICUS TREE 6 ft. life like,
full branches. in basket $55. (650)269-
3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BACKPACK- Unused, blue, many pock-
ets, zippers, use handle or arm straps
$14., (650)578-9208
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BASS PRO SPOTLIGHT - (2) one mil-
lion candlelight, new in box, $100 for
both, (650)726-1037
BATHROOM VANITY light fixture - 2
frosted glass shades, brass finish, 14W
x 8.75H x 8.75D, wall mount, $40,
(650)347-5104
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BRAND NEW TARP - 7' X 5' sealed fac-
tory package, Only $9., 650-595-3933
BRIEFCASE 100% black leather
excellent condition $75 (650)888-0129
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
BULOVA ANNIVERSARY CLOCK -
model #38640, lead drisel dome, 44 car-
ot plated, $45., (650)315-5902
COLEMAN CAMPING equipment
12'X12' tent, lantern, & stove all for $60.
SOLD!
COLEMAN ICE CHEST - 80 quart, $20.,
(650)345-3840
COPPER LIKE TUB - unused, 16 inches
long, 6 in. high, 8 inch wide, OK tabletop-
per, display, chills beverages. $10.,
(650)578-9208
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 (650)375-1550
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
310 Misc. For Sale
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HOT POCKET/PANINI MAKER - elec-
tric, heat top & bottom only, $9., 650-
595-3933
HUMAN HAIR Wigs, (4) Black hair, $90
all (650)624-9880
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15., (650)345-
3840
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX - for dogs 21-55 lbs.,
repels and kills fleas and ticks. 9 months
worth, $60., (650)343-4461
KITCHENWARE, SMALL appliance,
pots, pan, dishes, coffee maker all for
$25 (650)755-9833
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9 tall, 11 diameter, great con-
dition, $10., (650)347-5104
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide in wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LOW RIDER magazines 80 late 1999 all
for $80 (650)873-4030
MANUAL LAWN mower ( by Scott Turf )
never used $65 (650)756-7878
MATCHING LIGHT SCONCES - style
wall mount, plug in, bronze finish, 12 L x
5W , $12. both, (650)347-5104
MEDICINE CABINET - 18 X 24, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MENS LEATHER travel bags (2), used
$25 each.(650)322-2814
MICHAEL CREIGHTON HARDBACK
BOOKS - 3 @ $3. each, (650)341-1861
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
NEW NEWTONE DOOR BELL -factory
pack, complete only $15, 650-595-3933
NIKE RESISTANCE ROPE - unopened
box, get in shape, medium resistance,
long length, $8., (650)578-9208
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
ONE 3-PCE. Martex towel set(bath,
hand, face), clay colored. Asking $15.
Call (650) 574-3229 (Foster City) be-
tween 10 a.m. and 7 p.m.
ONE 3-PCE. Martex towel set(bath,
hand, face), gold colored. Asking $15.
Call (650) 574-3229 (Foster City) be-
tween 10 a.m. and 7 p.m.
OUTDOOR GREENHOUSE. Handmade.
Ideal for Apartment balconies. 33" wide x
20 inches deep. 64.5 " high. $70.00
SSF, (650)871-7200
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
PRINCESS CRYSTAL glasswear set
$50 SOLD!
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
PUZZLES - 22-1,000 pc puzzles, $2.50
each, (650)596-0513
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICARDO LUGGAGE $35
(650)796-2326
RN NURSING TEXTBOOKS & CD un-
opened, Calculate with Confidence, 4th
edition, like new, $25., (650)345-3277
RN NURSING TEXTBOOKS - Human
Physiology Mechanisms of Disease, 6th
edition, $15., and Pathphysiology Bio-
logic Basics, 4th edition, $25.,
(650)345-3277
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SAFETY SHOES - Iron Age, Mens steel
toe metatarfal work boots, brown, size 10
1/2, in box, $50., (650)594-1494
SAMSONITE LUGGAGE suit case
1950's collectibles perfect condition large
size pearl color hard surface $50
(650)755-9833
SCARY DVD movies, (7) in cases, Zom-
bies, Date Movie, Labyrinth, in original
boxes. $10.00 all. (650)578-9208
SET OF 11 Thomas registers 1976 mint
condition $25 (415)346-6038
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48 x 69
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. $35.
(650)574-4439
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6,
$60., (650)294-9652
STAINED GLASS panels multi colors
beautiful work 35" long 111/2" wide $79
OBO (650)349-6059
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
SUMMER READING, 100 paperbacks
and hard cover, popular authors, Cuss-
ler, Patterson, Brown, Steele, more.
$30.00 all obo (650)578-9208
TOM CLANCY HARDBACK BOOKS - 7
@ $3.00 each, (650)341-1861
310 Misc. For Sale
TRIVIAL PURSUIT - Master Game/Ge-
nus Edition. Has all cards. Mint condi-
tion. Asking $10., Call (650)574-3229
(Foster City) between 10 am - 7 pm.
UP STAIRS DOWN STAIRS- first two
years, 14 videos in box, $30 for all,
(650)286-9171
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VHS MOVIES and DVD's. (20) Old to
current releases. $2 per movie. Your
choice. South San Francisco
(650) 871-7200
VHS MOVIES, variety comedy, hitch-
cock,animated,misc. san mateo area
25@$2.00 each (650)345-3277
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VINTAGE 1950 chrome GE toaster 2
slice excellent condition collectible $50
(650)755-9833
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
SOLD!
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WEBER BARBEQUE - 28, limited edi-
tion with Coca-Cola logo, $45., (650)315-
5902
WHEEL CHAIR (Invacare) 18" seat with
foot rest $99 (650)594-1149
311 Musical Instruments
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
LAGUNA ELECTRIC 6 string LE 122
Guitar with soft case and strap $75.
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
100% COTTON New Beautiful burgundy
velvet drape 82"X52" W/6"hems: $45
(415)585-3622
ALPINESTAR MOTORCYCLE JEANS
Twin Stitched Seams. Internal Knee
Protection. New, Tags Attached. Mens
Sz 34 Grey/Blue Denim $50.00
(650)357-7484
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
COAT - Dressy ladies short trench coat,
red, brand new, weather proof, light-
weight, size 6/8, $25.,(650)345-3277
COWBOY BOOTS brown leather size 9
perfect condition $50 (650)341-1628
DENIM JACKET - faded but in good
condition, man's XL, $19., 650-595-3933
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
GIRLS' SMOCKED dresses (3) sz.
6mo.-24mo. ,sunsuits, sweater all gently
worn; blankets like new. $30.00
(SM area.) (650)345-3277
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
INDIAN SARI $50 (650)515-2605
IONIC BREEZE quadra, Sharper Image,
3 level silent air purifier. 27h, energy
saver, original box, video. Excellent con-
dition. $77. (650)347-5104
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKET Classic Biker Style.
Zippered Pockets. Sturdy. Excellent Con-
dition. Mens Sz XL Black Leather $50.00
(650)357-7484
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
25 Wednesday Sept. 18, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Nation between
Togo and Nigeria
6 Look over here!
10 CSNY member
14 Private line?
15 Elevator man
16 Its clear now
17 *Edward Cullens
rival for Bellas
hand, in the
Twilight series
19 Genghis __
20 The Plains of
Passage author
21 Former SSR
22 Pharmaceutical
reps samples
23 *She played
Michelle on Full
House
26 Dogpatch creator
31 Alley cats, e.g.
33 Some crowns
34 Desert tableland
35 Blue bird
37 Looking for a fight
38 Suffix with infer
39 Cook, in a way
41 Bar bowl item
42 Dont tell me!
44 2007 American
Idol winner
Sparks
45 *Brother of Helen
of Troy, some say
47 Fails to
pronounce
48 Image to identify
on a drivers
license exam
51 Drifters
53 Diarist Anas
54 Neighbor of a
Cambodian
58 Short race, briefly
59 *Beach Boys title
girl
62 Ruse
63 Duel tool
64 Target Field
team, and each
pair of
intersecting
names in the
answers to
starred clues
65 Funny Dame
66 Bombs
67 Narrow piece, as
of cloth
DOWN
1 __ California
2 *Biblical birthright
seller
3 Great shot!
4 Teen Vogue
subject
5 Lincolns st.
6 Beer garden
music
7 Super Bowl I and
II MVP
8 [Not my error]
9 That wasnt nice
10 Former Soviet
leader
Khrushchev
11 *High Crimes
actress
12 Corporate
emblem
13 Egg sources
18 Bruises partner
22 Shade provider
24 North Sea feeder
25 Naut. speed units
26 Env. router
27 Stay awake in
bed
28 *Source of an
age-old medicinal
oil
29 Part of MOMA
30 Promotional
bribes
32 Composer Erik
34 Cattle call
36 Hankerings
38 Need You
Tonight band
40 First name in
shipping
43 1963
Newman/Neal
film
44 *Today
correspondent __
Bush Hager
46 Start of a show-off
kids cry
49 How traditional
Chinese brides
dress
50 Taunts
51 Garden waterer
52 Burned, in a high-
tech way
54 I __ I taw ...
55 It may have
highlights
56 Years, to
Caesar
57 Clouseaus rank:
Abbr.
59 Place to sleep
60 Barts Squishee
provider
61 ACLU concerns
By C.C. Burnikel
(c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
09/18/13
09/18/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
316 Clothes
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, beauitful color, megenta, with
shawl like new $40 obo (650)349-6059
SILK SCARF, Versace, South Beach
pattern 100% silk, 24.5x34.5 made in
Italy, $75. $(650)591-6596
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
WHITE LACE 1880s reproduction dress
- size 6, $100., (650)873-8167
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10. Elie Tahari
new, never worn $25 (650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
150 COPPER spades for #6 strand.
Copper wire. $50.00 for all.
(650)345-3840
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3 & 4, approx.
20 of 3, 40 ft. of 4, $25.all,
(650)851-0878
ELECTRICAL MATERIAL - Connectors,
couplings, switches, rain tight flex, and
more.Call. $50.00 for all (650)345-3840
PACKAGED NUTS, Bolts and screws,
all sizes, packaged $99 (650)364-1374
PVC - 1, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
PVC SCHEDULE 80 connectors and
coupling. 100 pieces in all. $30.00 for all
(650)345-3840
STEEL MORTAR BOX - 3 x 6, used for
hand mixing concrete or cement, $35.,
(650)368-0748
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
318 Sports Equipment
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
AB-BUSTER as seen on T.V. was $100,
now $45., (650)596-0513
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18 di-
meter, Halex brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
FISHERS MENS skis $35 (650)322-2814
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16 wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF BALLS - $.25 each, or all for
$100., (650)921-6741
KIDS 20" mongoose mountain bike 6
speeds front wheel shock good condition
asking $65 (650)574-7743
LADIES BOWLING SET- 8 lb. ball, 7 1/2
sized shoes, case, $45., (650)766-3024
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
MENS ROLLER Blades size 101/2 never
used $25 (650)315-5902
RED HAWK Ruger .44 Mag Revolver
with leather holster & belt 3 boxes of
shells, $1000 best offer, (650)591-0419
REI 2 man tent $40 (650)552-9436
ROLLER BLADES new in box size 6
never worn California CHC Volt XT $20
(650)755-9833
SALMON FISHING weights 21/2 pound
canon balls $25 (650)756-7878
Say Goodbye To The 'Stick In
Style & Gear Up For a Super
Season!
49er Swag at Lowest Prices
Niner Empire
957C Industrial Rd. San Carlos
T-F 10-6; Sa 10 -4
ninerempire.com
(415)370-7725
TENNIS RACKETS $20 (650)796-2326
318 Sports Equipment
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
THULE SKI RACK - holds 3 pairs, $85.,
(650)594-1494
TRAINING BASEBALLS - Soft center
(3) $2. each and Regular Softballs (2)
$3. each, (650)595-3933
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTSMAN 5.5 HP gas lawn mower
with rear bag $55., (650)355-2996
LAWNMOWER - American made, man-
ual/push, excellent condition, $50.,
(650)342-8436
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
NIKON FG 35mm SLR all black body.
Vivitar 550FD flash. Excellent condition.
Original owner. $99. Cash
(650)654-9252
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
TRIPOD. PROFESSIONAL grade. Ad-
justs from 23"-64". Very sturdy. Quick
release post. $50 Cash. (650)654-9252
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
VIVITAR ZOOM lens-28mm70mm. Filter
and lens cap. Original owner. $50. Cash
(650)654-9252
VIVITAR ZOOM lens. 28mm-210mm. Fil-
ter and lens cap. Original owner. $99.
Cash. (650)654-9252
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
WALKER - $25., brand new, tag still on,
(650)594-1494
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journals
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650)595-0805
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
001 BMW 530I Sedan with 121k miles
automatic looks and drives very nice
clean Car Fax and everything is working
comes with 3000 miles free
warranty #4529 on sale for $7995.00,
(650)637-3900
2001 AUDI A4 Avanti Wagon Quattro
with 127k miles in excellent conditions
and fully optioned .ready for everyday
driving or weekend clean Car
Fax.www.autotradecentercars.com
#4441 on sale for $6995.00 plus fees,
(650)637-3900
2001 MBZ ML 320 SUV with 133 k miles
mid size all wheel drive SUV comes with
third row seating and lots of nice factory
options and winter package.# 4430 on
sale for $6995.00 plus fees, (650)637-
3900
2001 NISSAN Xterra XE-V6, 4x4 228k
miles. Runs good, needs minor exhaust
work, $2300, (650) 255-9866
2001 PORSCHE 911 Carrera 4 cabriolet
automatic steptronic with 90k miles come
with new soft top and a hard top naviga-
tions and much more.# 5033 on sale for
$26995.00 plus fees, (650)637-3900
2002 MBZ CLK Cabriolet with only 80k
miles automatic clean Car Fax free 3000
miles warranty. runs great come with
powertop.www.autotradecentercars.com.
new tiers #4439 on sale for $9995.00
plus fees, (650)637-3900
2002 PT Cruiser Limited automatic with
121k miles come with all power package
and 3 months warranty in excellent con-
ditions#4515 on sale for 4995.00 plus
fees, (650)637-3900
2002 SUBARU Outback Wagon LL Bean
automatic with 158k miles one owner
clean Car Fax automatic in excellent
conditions all power package leather
moon roof and more. #4538 on sale for
$5950.00 plus fees, (650)637-3900
2004 FORD Explorer Eddie Bauer SUV
with 146k miles all options and third row
seating. www.autotradecentercars.com
#4330 come with warranty please call for
more info on sale for $7995.00,
(650)637-3900
2005 TOYOTA Prius package 4 with 97k
miles loaded with navi key less , JBL and
much more.
www.autotradecentercars.com.
#4537 with clean car fax and free war-
ranty on sale for $9700.00 plus fees,
(650)637-3900
620 Automobiles
Dont lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY 1998 Monte Carlo 59,000 Miles
$5,000, Call Glen @ (650) 583-1242
Ext. # 2
CHEVY HHR 08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD 93 $ 3,500/offer. Good
Condition (650)481-5296
FORD THUNDERBIRD 95 LX Coupe -
$1800., (650)245-1386
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
MERCEDES 06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
FORD 63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$7,500 obo (650)364-1374
630 Trucks & SUVs
2000 TOYOTA Tacoma P.U. with 143k
miles regular cab short bed with 5 speed
manual transmission cold air conditions
clean Car Fax and 3000 miles free war-
ranty. #4527 on sale for $6995.00 plus
fees, (650)637-3900
635 Vans
67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW 03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON 01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $6,200.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $35. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE HELMET - New With
Tags, Modular Dual Visor M/C Helmet,
only $69., (650)595-3933
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35.,
(650)670-2888
645 Boats
72 18 RAYSON V Drive flat boat, 468
Chevy motor with wing custom trailer,
$20,000 obo, (650)851-0878
FREE 14' boat with trailer (650)851-0878
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4 wide, 6
1/2 long & 2 1/2 deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
2 BACKUP light 1953 Buick $40
(650)341-8342
670 Auto Parts
2013 DODGE CHARGER wheels & tires,
Boss 338, 22-10, $1300 new,
(650)481-5296
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
BOX OF auto parts. Miscellaneous
items. $50.00 OBO. (650) 995-0012.
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
EDELBROCK VALVE COVERS - for a
389 engine, new in box, $100.,
(650)726-1037
FORD FOCUS steel wheels. 14in. rims.
$100. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
MECHANIC'S CREEPER - vintage,
Comet model SP, all wood with
pillow,four swivel wheels, great shape.
$40.00 (650)591-0063
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
RUBBERMAID 2 Gallon oil pan drainers
(2). Never used tags/stickers attached,
$15 ea. (650)588-1946
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Dont lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
26
Wednesday Sept. 18, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Asphalt/Paving
NORTHWEST
ASPHALT REPAIR
Driveways, Parking Lots
Asphalt/Concrete
Repair Installation
Free Estimate
(650)213-2648
Lic. #935122
Carpentry
D n J REMODELING
Finish Carpentry
Windows Doors
Cabinets Casing
Crown Moulding
Baseboards
Artificial Grass Gazebos
(650)291-2121
Cabinetry
Contractors
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Cleaning
ANGELICAS HOUSE
CLEANING & ERRAND
SERVICES
House Cleaning Move In/Out
Cleaning Janitorial Services
Handyman Services
General Errands Event Help
New Client Promotion
(650)918-0354
myerrandservicesca@gmail.com
Cleaning
Neat Nits
Natural
Home
Cleaning
Te peninsulas genuinely all natural
cleaning company, using all natural,
non-toxic cleaning agents.
Chemical free! Ideal for those with
small children and pets.
We have your good health in mind!
Mention this ad for a 15% discount
on your frst two cleanings!
800.339.6020
www.neatnit.com
-Interior Residential
- Oce
- Move Ins/Move Outs
- Friendly & Ecient Sta
- Licensed/Insured/Bonded
- FREE Estimates
Concrete
Construction
OSULLIVAN
CONSTRUCTION
(650)589-0372
New Construction, Remodeling,
Kitchen/Bathrooms,
Decks/ Fences
Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596
Construction
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed Insured Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
Gardening
GENERAL
LANDSCAPE
MAINTENANCE
Commercial & Residential
Gardening
New lawn &
sprinkler installation,
Trouble shooting and repair
Work done by the hour
or contract
Free estimates
Licensed
(650)444-5887, Call/Text
glmco@aol.com
LEAK PRO
Sprinkler repair, Valves, Timers,
Heads, Broken pipes,
Wire problems, Coverage,
Same Day Service
(800)770-7778
CSL #585999
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGOS FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
SLATER FLOORS
. Restore old floors to new
. Dustless Sanding
. Install new custom & refinished
hardwood floors
Licensed. Bonded. Insured
www.slaterfloors.com
(650) 593-3700
Showroom by appointment
Gutters
O.K.S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
RAIN GUTTERS
Gutters and downspouts,
Rain gutter repair,
Rain gutter protection (screen),
Handyman Services
Free Estimates
(650)669-6771
(650)302-7791
Lic.# 910421
Handy Help
AAA HANDYMAN
& MORE
Repairs Maintenance Painting
Carpentry Plumbing Electrical
Contractor Lic. 468963 Since 1976
Bonded and Insured
All Work Guaranteed
(650) 995-4385
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
Fences Decks Patios
Power Washes Concrete
Work Maintenance
Clean Ups Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)4581572
contreras1270@yahoo.com
Handy Help
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & ExteriorRoof
Repair Base Boards New Fence
Hardwood Floors Plumbing Tile
Mirrors Chain Link Fence Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
Refinish
High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Hauling
Landscaping
by Greenstarr
t $PNQMFUF MBOETDBQF
NBJOUFOBODF BOE SFNPWBM
t 'VMM USFF DBSF JODMVEJOH
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USJNNJOH TIBQJOH
SFNPWBM BOE TUVNQ
HSJOEJOH
t 3FUBJOJOH XBMMT
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t 4XJNNJOH QPPM SFNPWBM
Tom 650. 355. 3500
Licensed Bonded and Insured
www.yardboss.net
Since 1985 License # 752250
Painting
BEST RATES
10% OFF
PRO PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MK PAINTING
Interior and Exterior,
Residental and commercial
Insured and bonded,
Free Estimates
Peter McKenna
(650)630-1835
Lic# 974682
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
27 Wednesday Sept. 18, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Painting
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
Plumbing
$89 TO CLEAN
ANY CLOGGED DRAIN!
Installation of Trenchless Pipes,
Water Heaters & Faucets,
Carpet, Tile
(650)461-0326
Lic# 983312
Plumbing Remodeling
HARVEST KITCHEN
& MOSAIC
Cabinets * Vanities * Tile
Flooring * Mosaics
Sinks * Faucets
Fast turnaround * Expert service
920 Center St., San Carlos
(650)620-9639
www.harvestkm.com
Tree Service
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
Trimming Pruning
Shaping
Large Removal
Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tile
BELMONT TILE &
FOLSOM LAKE TILE
Your local tile store
& contractor
Tile Mosaics
Natural Stone Countertops
Remodeling
Free Estimates
651 Harbor Blvd.
(near Old County Road)
Belmont
650.421.6508
www.belmontile.com
M-Sa 8:30 am - 5 pm
CASL# 857517
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tors State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Dental Services
DR. NANJAPA DDS
DR. SABOOWALA DDS
DR. VIRAPARIA DDS
DECCAN DENTAL
Family Dentistry &
Cantonese, Mandarin & Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
We Moved:
1528 S. El Camino Real, #408,
San Mateo 94402
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACKS
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
Food
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Guns
PENINSULA GUNS
(650) 588-8886
Handguns.Shotguns.Rifles
Tactical and
Hunting Accessories
Buy.Sell.Trade
360 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
DENTAL
IMPLANTS
Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
Health & Medical
PAIN & STRESS RELIEF
$29 UP
Weight loss, Migraine, Stroke,
Fatigue, Insomnia, PMS, HBP,
Cough, Allergies, Asthma,
Gastrointestinal, Diabetes
(650)580-8697
Acupuncture, Acupressure Herbs
1846 El Camino Real, Burlingame
Accept Car & work injury, PPO
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you cant
Refuse!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
Insurance
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
* All commercial insurance policies
* Employee benefit packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$45 per Hour
Present ad for special price
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
Massage Therapy
UNION SPA
Grand Opening
Open Daily
Full Massage and
Brazilian Wax
(650)755-2823
7345 Mission St., Daly City
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes Multi-family
Mixed-Use Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
Massage Therapy
SEVEN STARS
DAY SPA
615 Woodside Road Redwood City
(650)299-9332
Body Massage $60/hour
$40/half hour,
$5 off one hour w/ this ad
Open Daily 9:30 AM to 9:30 PM
Seniors
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
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!CCREDITEDBY%MERE-EDICAL0ROFESSIONAL#ORPORATIONs$R-ITCHELLsEMERECOM
PAIN RELIEF
650-458-4248
JOINT PAIN
DOESNT HAVE TO
MEAN SURGERY