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Investigators were on site Tuesday morning at the old Paulding County Jail seeking evidence

in the Nancy Eagleson case. A shoe, a piece of cloth and an old license plate were unearthed
approximately two weeks ago by owners of the old jail, Jeff and Cassie Hollis. The Hollises
were in the process of restoring the old building when they discovered the items.
INSIDE:
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nLook inside!
Special sales
events from ...
Chief, Menards,
Rural King
Around
Paulding
County
After-game teen
party to be held
PAULDING A Fifth
Quarter party for teens
will be held Friday, Oct.
18, after the Paulding foot-
ball game in the parking
lot of the First
Presbyterian Church.
Everyone is welcome to
enjoy free pizza, pop,
Christian music, games
and more, following the
football game.
The church parking lot
is located at the corner of
Williams and Caroline
streets.
Return to
Neverland
on Oct. 22
PAULDING Paulding
County Carnegie Library
will host a Return to
Neverland fall extrava-
ganza event on Tuesday,
Oct. 22. Everyone is wel-
come to attend between
the hours of 6-8 p.m..
Thanks to you ...
Wed like to thank
Jacob Manz of Payne for
subscribing to the
Progress!
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VOL. 139 NO. 8 PAULDING, OHIO 419-399-4015 www.progressnewspaper.org WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2013 ONE DOLLAR USPS 423620
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See EAGLESON, page 2A
Hollis got the shoe out for this reporter to
look at; even though it is deteriorated, one can
tell it was a black shoe, high heeled and a small
size.
Could this be Nancy Eaglesons shoe?
After discussing the find, he asked that the
Progress contact the Eagleson family about
what was found and ask if they wanted to see it.
The Eagleson family was contacted and
asked what color and size Nancys shoe was.
They then were told a shoe similar to that of
Nancys had been found. The goal was not to
raise their hopes, but to let them know some-
thing had been discovered.
The Eagleson family then contacted the
Hollises and made an appointment to go see the
evidence on Friday. The mother of Nancy
Eagleson, Bettie, remained in the car for health
reasons, but her daughters Sheryl and Merrill
asked her to describe the shoe prior to showing
it to her.
The shoe was placed in a plastic bag and was
taken out to Bettie to see if it was indeed
Nancys shoe. Bettie identified the shoe as
being like the ones Nancy had been wearing.
Paulding County Sheriff Jason Landers was
then notified. Sheriff Landers took the shoe and
cloth as evidence and told the Hollises not to let
anyone near where the items had been re-
moved.
Landers said he would call the officials from
the National Center for Missing and Exploited
Children to get instructions on how to handle
the find. This organization was in Paulding
County two years ago and investigated the case.
A spokesman for NCMEC said Friday after-
noon that it had been made aware of the find.
By NANCY WHITAKER
Progress Staff Writer
PAULDING A small-size ladies black shoe
has been uncovered at the old Paulding County
Jail site. Could it be missing evidence from the
unsolved Nancy Eagleson murder case, sup-
posedly stored in the old jail?
A shoe, along with the slain teens dress,
scarf, purse and her personal belongings, disap-
peared after her November 1960 death and
have not been found.
Recently, the owners of All Trades
Restoration Company, Jeff and Cassie Hollis,
have been working on restoring the old jail,
which they purchased from the county earlier
this year. Plans were under way for some tours
and overnight paranormal investigations.
When speaking with Hollis about their plans
for haunted jail tours for Halloween, Hollis re-
vealed some of the things he had unearthed in
the basement. The Hollises had heard some
things about the Nancy Eagleson case, but
thought the evidence just consisted of paper-
work.
This reporter spoke to Jeff about the missing
belongings of Nancy Eagleson and told him
what some of the items were, including a shoe.
He then said, You wont believe this, but I
found a shoe.
In the process of restoration, a crew working
in the basement last week had knocked out
parts of a wall underneath a vent. Behind the
wall was a narrow passageway between stone
walls. They began leveling the dirt on the floor
and uncovered an old shoe, a piece of material
and an old license plate. They also found nu-
merous bones, which turned out to be animal
remains. At that point, they had stopped dig-
ging.
Could shoe found at
old jail be missing
Eagleson evidence?
See ANTWERP, page 2A
Staff Photo/Paulding County Progress
The sisters of slain teen Nancy Eagleson, Sheryl and Merrill, look at the ladies shoe recently
uncovered at the old Paulding Jail.
By JOE SHOUSE
Correspondent
ANTWERP When it
comes to change, Antwerp
Schools have made the awe-
some advancement in the
area of multimedia for their
students. Today, staff and
students are on the cutting
edge of developing multime-
dia technology and at the
same time offering students
the opportunity to receive
valuable experience in front
of as well as behind the cam-
era.
At Antwerp, it is no longer
the old-fashioned way when
3, 2, 1 ... Antwerp
School is on the
air each morning
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PAULDING Authorities
are searching for an area
man who has been indicted
in connection with last
weeks robbery at a Grover
Hill gas station.
Due to the overwhelm-
ing amount of tips called or
e-mailed into the sheriffs
office, deputies were able to
aggressively investigate the
Rosss Gas Station robbery,
which occurred Oct. 4, ac-
cording to Sheriff Jason
Landers. To date, the inves-
tigation has resulted in an in-
dictment for one of the indi-
viduals whom authorities
believe is responsible for the
crime.
On Oct. 10, deputies pre-
sented this case to the grand
jury, which returned an in-
dictment for the arrest of 34-
year-old James Robert
Reynolds of Fort Jennings.
Reynolds was indicted on
one count of aggravated rob-
bery, a felony of the second
degree.
We know there is a sec-
ond white male still uniden-
tified at this time, according
to Landers. We will follow
leads as they continue to
come in. Our information
tells us Reynolds is on the
run. We will need the pub-
lics help to locate him. I am
grateful for all the tips we
are receiving in this case. A
lot of our success to get
Reynolds indicted came
from a joint effort involving
the Putnam County Sheriffs
Office, Van Wert County
Sheriffs Office and the
Adult Parole Authority. This
is another fine example of
multiple agencies working
together to resolve a horrible
crime.
If anyone has information
regarding this robbery or the
whereabouts of the suspects,
please contact the sheriffs
office in Paulding at 419-
399-3791.
Individuals can also leave
information via Facebook by
s e a r c h i n g
Facebook/Paulding County
Sheriffs Office. View the
website at www.pauldin-
gohsheriff.com and leave an
email for the sheriff. Leave
an anonymous tip via the
website by scrolling to the
bottom of any page and
clicking on Send us an
anonymous tip.
James Reynolds, pic-
tured here in a 2008 booking
photo, is being sought by
authorities.
Man indicted for
gas station robbery
We need the publics help to locate him
Erik Miesle/Antwerp School
Sophomore Emily Derck (left) and sophomore Annie
Miesle (right) doing the news for the day.
2A - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, October 16, 2013
n ANTWERP
Continued from Page 1A
n EAGLESON
Continued from Page 1A
Cable service
looks to end
Dec. 1 in Payne
By JOE SHOUSE
PAYNE The Payne Village
Council learned its cable TV
service will terminate Dec. 1.
Mayor Terry Smith reported
a letter was received by all
Newwave Communication
customers announcing service
would terminate Dec. 1.
For economic reasons the
company will cease operation
in Payne, but in the meantime
will actively pursue new own-
ership. There are other options
that we will explore in order to
keep cable service in our com-
munity, said Smith.
opportunity to be in front of
the camera, but have enjoyed
learning from behind the
scenes. Provines admits she
doesnt like watching herself
on television, but feels it will
be beneficial in the future.
She is one of those stu-
dents who is a natural when
doing the announcements,
said Bagley.
Conley, a senior cheer-
leader, plans to become a trav-
eling nurse.
Being in front of the cam-
era makes me nervous, but I
think it will help me when I
have to deal with people as a
nurse later on in life, she
said.
Clara Simoncelli, a foreign
exchange student from
Germany, is excited about the
opportunity to be a part of the
class. Simoncelli had her turn
to co-anchor a couple of
weeks ago, and, according to
Bagley did a great job.
Everything I do is helping
my English skills. Its a nice
start to the day to come to
school and write these stories
and articles. This has been a
great help for me, said
Simoncelli.
Teamwork is the key to
having this type of produc-
tion. Bagley is thankful to the
school board and superintend-
ent Pat Ross for recognizing
the importance of this pro-
gram.
It is exciting having the
districts support the students
and adults who see how
worthwhile this form of com-
munication can be for the stu-
dents, she said.
But the kids are the driving
force and they are motivated
to learn and to improve their
communication skills in a way
that may not is not offered at
many other schools.
the principal used to share the
announcements for the day
over the speaker. Under the
leadership of teacher and head
librarian, Kayla Bagley, the
students have embraced the
idea of developing the entire
10-minute segment that is
broadcast live each morning
on televisions located in each
classroom.
In addition to the normal
school announcements is the
pledge to the American flag,
the daily cafeteria menu,
sports news, special an-
nouncements featuring stu-
dents and teachers as well as a
weather report offered by a
fourth grader.
On the day I attended, the
production was presented by
co-anchors Emily Derck and
Annie Miesle, both sopho-
mores, with Morgan Knicely
offering the weather.
Tucked away in a small
room located near the library
is a series of computers used
by the tech crew. A small plat-
form is centered in the room
for the anchors to stand and a
camera is placed in an area
suitable for shooting the re-
port. Located on the wall be-
hind the anchor duo is a green
screen in order to have the
proper background for broad-
casting.
Known as Student
Technology Service, or tech
crew for short, is a group of
volunteers who come in prior
to going on the air at 7:50 a.m.
to make sure everything is
ready for broadcast. The four
who were in the control area
were freshman Derek Reeb,
junior Jacob ODonnell, jun-
ior Kayla Burns and sopho-
more Erik Buchan.
Also, as a part of the crew
and working behind the
scenes were Aaron ODonnell
and Matt Dooley.
This group will rotate their
jobs from time to time, but
Jacob (ODonnell) is usually
the one we look to when prob-
lems come up. He is very gift-
ed in what he does, said
Bagley.
In order to be prepared for
the broadcast the following
day, Bagleys broadcast jour-
nalism class is responsible for
getting everything ready and
in order including announce-
ments, birthday recognitions,
and feature stories.
The members of the jour-
nalism class, Samantha
Provines, Clara Simoncelli,
and Dayna Conley, also have
Authorities planned to contin-
ue to dig in the jail basement
to see if any other items are
still buried.
Late Friday, two vans from
the states Bureau of Criminal
Investigation (BCI) were on
scene.
Landers said that nothing
new was found Friday.
Digging was suspended for
the weekend and Mondays
Columbus Day holiday, but
resumed Tuesday morning.
Could this be a long-await-
ed break in this over 50-year-
old murder case? If it is not
Eaglesons shoe, whose is it?
And why was it buried in a
walled-up tunnel deep under-
neath the historical structure?
Additional reporting by
Progress editor Melinda
Krick.
Jail tours may be
offered later
PAULDING Jeff and
Cassie Hollis of All Trades
Restoration are the owners of
the old Paulding County Jail.
The couple had plans to offer
haunted jail tours for
Halloween, plus overnight in-
vestigations with paranormal
groups. Those plans have had
to be placed on hold until the
investigation is completed on
items that were recently un-
earthed in the basement and
could be potential evidence.
(See related story.)
It has been repeatedly said
the old building is haunted
with spirits that roam the halls
and rooms. Jeff and Cassie
said tours may be offered at a
later date.
Erik Miesle/Antwerp School
Matt Dooley looks over the shoulder of tech crew members Derek Reeb and Jacob ODonnell
as they check the teleprompter.
Erik Miesle/Antwerp School
Fourth grader Morgan Knicely (right) practices before giving the morning weather report.
Behind her, second graders Reid Lichty and Falynn McAlexander get ready to lead the Pledge
of Allegiance for that day.
Levy passage important to PEVS bottom line
By JOE SHOUSE
Correspondent
PAULDING In the Nov. 5
election, Paulding Exempted
Village School District will be
seeking the renewal of the op-
erating expense levy that has
been in place since 1981.
If passed, the 2.36 mills will
generate $418,250 each year
for five years beginning in
2014 through 2018.
The original levy, when
passed in 1981, was consid-
ered an emergency levy and
according to district treasurer
Maria Rellinger, that same ver-
biage must be used for the re-
newal.
The first time the levy was
placed on the ballot it was an
emergency levy for 8.0 mills.
This is the seventh time we
have placed the emergency
levy on the ballot and each
time the millage has been re-
duced, said Rellinger.
Paulding Schools has the
reputation of providing quality
educational opportunities for
its students, and with the pass-
ing of the levy, that tradition
will continue. Paulding has re-
ceived an excellent rating the
last three years and in order to
continue offering students the
necessary educational tools,
the funding of this levy is para-
mount.
The bottom line is that the
levy is going to help our stu-
dents and it will allow us the
opportunity to remain a school
with an excellent status in the
years to come, said superin-
tendent William Hanak.
Due to the financial chal-
lenges all school districts are
facing, Paulding is on the cut-
ting edge of seeking ways to
curb expenses without harm-
ing the students education.
The district looks at ways
to curtail expenses and keep
costs low. We look at our needs
and we make necessary adjust-
ments. For example, two years
ago, we went from double
routes to a single route with
our busing and we have saved
$150,000 each year, said
Rellinger.
Cost-cutting measures are
considered as a result of moni-
toring the staff-student ratio.
The school board and staff
works at meeting the needs of
all students. However, for ex-
ample, one area of importance
is in the special education de-
partment where personnel are
determined by the numbers of
special education students with
particular needs. When school
enrollment changes, so will
faculty numbers.
Another area where cutting
costs are important is in the
various lease agreements as
well as everyday purchases.
Those making such decisions
on various purchases are al-
ways looking for the most cost
effective way to save dollars
within the district.
According to Rellinger, who
has been the district treasurer
since 2009, three areas help
determine how funding is dis-
tributed.
We have to consider infla-
tion, special education needs,
and technology. Also, in the
society we live in today, we
have seen a greater need for se-
curity. We continue to make
necessary upgrades on our se-
curity in such a way to make
our campus as safe as possible
for our students, said
Rellinger.
With the fluctuation of state
funding from year to year, the
five-year renewal levy enables
Paulding Schools to prepare
for change.
We must be ready when
change comes and state money
may not be what we anticipat-
ed. The passing of this renew-
al will encourage the staff to
work hard at being a part of an
excellent school district. We
must do our part to spend
wisely and in the best interest
of our students, said Hanak.
Staff Photo/Paulding County Progress
Paulding County Sheriff
Jason Landers is shown ex-
plaining his steps in how the
shoe will be handled.
Staff Photo/Paulding County Progress
A small-size ladies black shoe was found in one of the jail
passageways, about seven or eight feet back from where a
bricked-up wall was removed. Also uncovered were a piece of
fabric and an old license plate.
copyright 2013 Published weekly by
The Paulding County Progress, Inc. P.O.
Box 180, 113 S. Williams St., Paulding,
Ohio 45879 Phone 419-399-4015
Fax: 419-399-4030;
website: www.progressnewspaper.org
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subscription@progressnewspaper.org
USPS 423620
Entered at the Post Office in Paulding,
Ohio, as 2nd class matter. Subscription
rates: $38 per year for mailing addresses
in Defiance, Van Wert Putnam and Paulding
counties. $46 per year outside these coun-
ties; local rate for Military
personnel and students.
Deadline for display adver-
tising 3 p.m. Monday.
News deadline 3 p.m.
Thursday.
Paulding County Progress
Reduction sought for E911 levy renewal
By DENISE GEBERS
Progress Staff Writer
Local voters will consider a re-
placement levy for the countys
Enhanced 911 (E911) system this
November. It will be for just a portion
of the current 1.2 mills, at 1.074 mills.
This is a reduction of 0.126 mills or
10.5 percent.
Lt. Brion Hanenkratt, E911 coordi-
nator at the Paulding County Sheriffs
Office said this change is being
sought for practical reasons.
That reason is that the current levy
is based on 1999 assessments, which
are far different from todays levels.
If we had kept a straight replace-
ment at 1.2 mills, that would have
generated too much money, said
Hanenkratt. In 2018, our carryover
would be between $400,000-500,000.
We just dont need that.
Although he said a carryover is
necessary in case of equipment fail-
ure, that degree is not fiscally respon-
sible to the countys residents.
We are projecting over the course
of the five-year levy a carryover be-
tween $300,000-350,000. That would
be a cushion in case a major catastro-
phe comes up.
This is not unreasonable. Last
years June derecho caused serious
damage to other counties equipment
which resulted in their radios being
down for extended periods of time.
We were lucky we didnt have to
repair/replace our tower. In 2010, we
spent around $150,000 to upgrade
and purchase that tower. Just an ex-
ample of things we cant plan for.
noted Lt. Hanenkratt.
Another example of expenses that
would come out of a carryover was
the update from wide-band to narrow-
band radio frequencies was required
by the FCC by the first of this year.
These things we have no control
over, but must become compliant or
be fined, said Lt. Hanenkratt.
He also noted that as a renewal
(versus the replacement) the assessed
values would have remained the
same. This would have come close to
putting the E911 system in the hole
during the levys lifetime.
We want to keep the phones
manned and be responsible to the tax
payers, Hanenkratt said. In the case
of equipment failure we need to get it
repaired as soon as possible and that
doesnt come cheap.
Planning for the future is important,
but the major percentage of money
generated by the E911 levy goes to-
ward paying dispatchers wages and
related expenses.
When fully staffed, the E911 com-
munications center has five full-time
dispatchers plus four part-time dis-
patchers. Currently there are four full-
time communications officers putting
in overtime hours with the part-timers
filling in as needed to cover vacations,
sick days, etc. of the regular staff.
Wed like to get up to full
staffing, said Hanenkratt. I want
people to understand that this money
is for when you call 911 in the middle
of the night someone is there is to an-
swer your call.
Communications officers not only
answer 911 calls and regular incom-
ing calls, but also dispatch all county
law enforcement personnel, EMS and
fire units on a continual basis.
Equipment that falls in the E911
funding area includes the radio tower,
computer servers, telephones with
recording system, monitors, the radio
base unit, repeaters with their back-
ups, the network backup and a tempo-
rary offsite dispatching terminal in
case of emergencies.
If passed, the replacement reduc-
tion would begin next year and
wouldnt be collected until 2015.
Passage would generate around
$400,000 annually. This years budg-
et for the communications center was
$344,000.
Currently, the 1.2 mill levy which
passed in 2008, generates $297,196
annually. This years carryover is pro-
jected to be $88,000. Specific figures
can be seen at the sheriffs office dur-
ing normal business hours.
Lt. Hanenkratt, who has been the
911 coordinator since January, and
Sheriff Jason Landers have been and
will continue to address meetings of
township trustees, village councils
and organizations about the impor-
tance of this levy.
Anyone who would like one of
them to address their organizations
gathering should contact the sheriffs
office at 419-399-3791.
Paulding Countys E-911
Committee was approved by the
county commissioners in June. It is
governed by Ohio Revised Code
guidelines. Members include the sher-
iff, Lt. Hanenkratt, Commissioner
Fred Pieper, Paulding Mayor Greg
White, Paulding Township Trustee
Jay Dangler, Oakwood Police Chief
Mark Figert, Paulding Fire Chief
Todd Weidenhamer, Oakwood EMS
representative Pam Erford and private
citizen Kim Sutton.
These people may also be able to
answer questions about the levy.
I would like to thank the folks that
serve on the E911 Advisory
Committee, said Sheriff
Landers. They spent time going over
figures to ensure our communications
center can operate for the five year pe-
riod of the levy.
A renewal would not have made it
five years, and a standard replacement
simply generated too much carryover
after five years. This replacement
with reduction gives us enough
money to operate at full staff and a
reasonable amount of projected carry-
over in the event we experience
equipment failure or some other un-
foreseen expense.
grandchildren; and 14 great-
grandchildren.
She was preceded in death
by her parents.
Funeral services were con-
ducted Saturday, Oct. 12 at
St. Paul Evangelical Lutheran
Church, Paulding, with the
Rev. Karen Stetins officiat-
ing. Burial was in Wiltsie
Cemetery, Payne. Den Herder
Funeral Home, Paulding, was
in charge of arrangements.
Donations may be made to
St. Paul Evangelical Lutheran
Church.
Online condolences may be
sent to www.denherderfh.com.
DONNA HAHN
1909-2013
ANTWERP Donna Hahn,
103, of Antwerp, died Sunday,
Oct. 13 at Vancrest of Antwerp.
Her service will be at 10 a.m.
Thursday, Oct. 17, with visita-
tion one hour prior at Mount
Calvary Lutheran Church of
Antwerp.
Visitation will be from 2-4
and 6-8 p.m. Wednesday, Oct.
16 at Dooley Funeral Home,
Antwerp.
DELNA YOH
1940-2013
PAULDING Delna Rae
Yoh, 73, of Paulding, died at
6:46 p.m. Monday, Oct. 7 at
Lima Memorial Hospital.
RITA LAMBERT
1926-2013
ANTWERP Rita Lam-
bert, 87, of Antwerp, passed
away Tuesday, Oct. 8 at The
Gardens of Paulding.
EVA SESLAR
1926-2013
ANTWERP Eva Maxine
(Morris) Seslar, age 87,
passed away Tuesday, Oct. 8
at Hickory Creek Nursing
Home, Hicksville.
JOAN BURTCH
1930-2013
PAULDING M. Joan
Burtch, age 83, died Wednes-
day, Oct. 9 at CHP Hospice,
Defiance.
She was born April 11,
1930 in St. Marys, the daugh-
ter of Edward and Iris (Hen-
schen) Kuns. On Aug. 28,
1949, she married Karl
Wednesday, October 16, 2013 Paulding County Progress - 3A
Obituaries
Updated weekdays at www.progressnewspaper.org
The Amish Cook
By: Lovina Eicher
2 tsp. baking powder
2 tsp. cinnamon or pumpkin
pie spice
Preheat oven to 350 In a
large bowl, mix all ingredi-
ents together and pour into a
sheet cake pan. Bake at 350
for 20 to 25 minutes. Let cake
cool and then add frosting.
Frosting Recipe:
1 8-ounce package cream
cheese
2 sticks of softened butter
1/2 c. chopped nuts
Box of powder sugar
Mix well and spread on
cake after it is cool.
Since this is pumpkin sea-
son, the column is devoted to
two reader favorite recipes
this week involving this tasty
autumn garden goodie. There
will be more about the hap-
penings in the Eicher house-
hold next week.
PUMPKIN SHEETCAKE
2 cups sugar
4 eggs
1 cup vegetable oil
2 cups flour
1 cup chopped nuts
2 cups fresh pumpkin or 1 can
1/2 tsp. salt
1 tsp. baking soda
PUMPKIN PIE
1 cup sugar
1 tablespoon flour
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon pumpkin pie
spice
1 teaspoon salt
2 eggs, separated
1 cup pumpkin
1 cup milk
Combine dry ingredients.
Add egg yolks, milk and
pumpkin. Fold in beaten egg
whites. Bake at 400 for 35-
45 minutes or until toothpick
comes out clean. Makes 1 9-
inch pie.
Burtch, who survives. She
was a member of St. Paul
Evangelical Lutheran
Church, where she was
church organist for over 60
years. She was a piano/organ
teacher, teaching many of
Pauldings musicians from
the 1950s through the 1980s.
She attended nursing school
at age 52 and was employed
by the Paulding County Hos-
pital for 12 years as an LPN.
Paulding Business and Pro-
fessional Womens Associa-
tion named Joan Woman of
the Year in 1984.
She is survived by her hus-
band, Karl Burtch, Paulding;
four sons, David Burtch of
Woodland Hills, Calif., Mike
(Mary) Burtch of Houston,
Doug (Nancy) Burtch of
Paulding and Bill Burtch of
Memphis, Tenn.; two daugh-
ters, Karla (Mike Griggs)
Burtch of Cincinnati and
Joanie (Steve) Goyings,
Paulding; a brother, Bill
(Nancy) Kuns, Memphis; two
sisters, Janice Fernow of
Clearwater, Fla. and Sally
Harper, LaJunta, Colo.; 13
HEITMEYER
FUNERAL HOME
610 Walnut Street
Oakwood, Ohio
419-594-3660
Full Service Funeral Home
Pre-Arrangement Specialists
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Call us at 419-399-3887
Toll Free
1-800-784-5321
To soften the sorrow,
To comfort the living,
Flowers say it
best!
OFFICE & DISPLAY
14793 Road 138
Paulding, OH 45879
(Charloe Trail)
WE DO LASER
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We specialize in
unique and
personalized
monuments.
Call anytime - Day or Night
Frenchie Britt 419-769-2962
For Woodburn or Antwerp
Call Mike Rohrs 419-506-1024
The Church Corner
Wednesday, Oct. 16
Singers needed
VAN WERT An open
call is extended to all singers,
age high school through
adults, to participate in Van
Werts First Presbyterian
Church 2013 Christmas Can-
tata, A City Of The King by
Jack Coleman.
The cantata will be pre-
sented at 10 a.m. Sunday,
Dec. 8.
Rehearsals begin at 8 p.m.
today, Oct. 16 in the sanctu-
ary and will run every
Wednesday night through
Dec. 4. For additional infor-
mation call 419-363-2235.
Saturday, Oct. 19
Praise Team
PAYNE The Payne St.
Paul United Methodist
Church is hosting an evening
of praise music at 7 p.m., Sat-
urday, Oct. 19. Featured
singers will be the Edgerton
Wesleyan Praise Team.
This event is open to the
public and a free will offering
will be accepted.
The church is located on
the corner of Townline and
Main in Payne.
Church Corner listings
are free. If your church is
having any special services
or programs, please call the
Paulding County Progress at
419-399-4015 or email us
your information at
progress@progressnewspa-
per.org
THE PAULDING COUNTY PROGRESS GOES TO LONDON Regina Lucas and her daughter,
Cyndi Hancock, recently enjoyed six days touring London, England. Visiting Buckingham Palace
and enjoying a dinner cruise on the Thames River were highlights of the trip. Cyndi is employed
by McKesson Pharmaceutical in Lakeland, Fla. The trip was given as an award to her as a com-
pany 2013 Presidential Club recipient. Their source for exclusive Paulding County news? The
Paulding County Progress! Are you headed to some distant, exotic destination? Take the
Progress along with your camera and send a photo and a little information about your trip to
progress@progressnewspaper.org.
Your County. Your Newspaper.
Paulding County Progress
Paulding County Progress
Exclusive Paulding County News











HOMESPUN
By
JIM LANGHAM
Someday youll understand
whistling through a paper,
playing a toy piano and Kirsten
dancing with sunglasses on and
banging on imaginary drums.
One of the mysteries of
childhood is how children pick
up on certain people, places or
things and bring them by os-
mosis into their own world.
Somewhere, Kirsten saw the
picture of an artistically beau-
tiful temple in Chicago. During
her first visit there to see her
Aunt Sandi, she wanted to see
the magnificent structure.
Fortunately, it was open, so
they were actually able to go
inside and walk around. When
they got into the spacious sanc-
tuary, she pointed toward the
ceiling, void of any pictures,
and said, Look, theres Jesus,
Hes up there at the top.
Now, when anyone asks her
where Jesus is, she says, Hes
in that temple in Chicago.
In fact, she loves to recreate
the temple when she and Aunt
Julie sit on the floor and build
entire cities of structures with
building blocks and imagina-
tion.
The biggest thing going on
in her life right now is potty
training. It was happening a
couple of weeks ago when we
She calls me Booger, and
laughs the moment I walk into
the room.
Grandpas funny, she said
last weekend as we sat in the
backseat together on our way
to a lunch on Saturday. Of
course, we had just broken a
rice cake together, our own lit-
tle special, breaking of the
bread.
The joy of hearing her say, I
like Grandpas food, was a
moment of ecstasy, an
epiphany of the heart as three
generations of memories con-
verged on my mind at the same
time. I recalled how I used to
stand beside my Grandpa
Langhams pipe stand in
Woodburn and threaten to stick
my hand down into it.
Oh, you dont want to do
that, he would say. Theres
alligators down there.
Forward to the next genera-
tion. I will never forget the mo-
ments when my parents would
watch our three children while
Joyce and I would go away for
a couple of days.
Theyre all yours, my dad
would say. I have them
spoiled, now you can figure out
how you want to deal with it.
As quick as the song, Sun-
rise, Sunset, from Fiddler on
the Roof, states, the next gen-
eration passes and there I am
with our granddaughter,
Kirsten, sitting on my lap as we
pretend that we are sneezing
and our nose goes flying across
the room.
What a hilarious time it was
at our sons a couple of weeks
ago when he recorded our fam-
ily band, each member con-
tributing an instrument such as
clapping blocks of wood,
took her to Wrigley Field to a
baseball game. In fact, she en-
joyed the praise so much for
telling us that she had to go,
that she would even have to
go many times when the trip
wasnt necessary.
Such was the case, her dad
thought, in the seventh inning
when once again she said, I
have to go potty. To that he
replied, Kirsten, youve al-
ready gone 10 times during the
game. You dont have to go
again.
Within seconds he jumped
up and said, We have to go.
He was soaked, she was
soaked, this wasnt a wolf
cry. It was the real deal, a
unique memory from her first
major league baseball game!
This past Saturday, it hap-
pened again, in another sense.
We were sitting in Ruby Tues-
day enjoying the salad bar
when daughter Sandi went to
the bathroom.
Kirsten, of course, wanted to
go with her. When Sandi re-
turned, she was laughing hys-
terically and reported that
Kirsten had wadded up a huge
piece of toilet paper, handed it
to Sandi and said, Dont for-
get the paper.
From mealtime prayers, to
rock band drummer, to seeing
her nose go flying across the
room, to seeing her cuddle up
in her grandmas arms to listen
to a story (many stories when
its time to stall at bedtime),
shes quite a bundle of joy, a
loving gift from Heaven that
gives meaning to my dads
statement one time when he
had three grandchildren piled
on his lap, Someday youll
understand.
CMH to present free
program on colon
cancer prevention
HICKSVILLE Michael Kooistra Jr., MD will present
Colon Health as part of the Lunch & Learn Series at 11
a.m. Oct. 30 at Community Memorial Hospital in
Hicksville. The presentation will be held in Community
Rooms 1 & 2.
According to a Centers for Disease Control and Preven-
tion (CDC) publication in July of this year, colon cancer is
the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United
States. Each year, approximately 140,000 Americans are di-
agnosed with cancer in the colon or rectum and 50,000 die
from it. This presentation will discuss how to prevent colon
cancer and how to identify the symptoms.
Dr. Kooistra did his undergraduate work at Taylor Uni-
versity and earned his medical degree from Indiana Univer-
sity School of Medicine. He is a member of the American
Academy of Family Physicians and the Christian Medical
and Dental Association.
This lunch and learn educational session is geared to-
wards senior citizens, but anyone is welcome to attend.
There is no charge to attend this event, and a complimentary
brunch is provided by the hospital. A nurse will also be on
hand to take and record blood pressure measurements.
Reservations are required and can be made by contacting
Lori at 419-542-5560.
Business News
New service manager named
OTTAWA Archbold Equipment Company announces
Michael Erford as the new service manager at the Ottawa
location. Erford joins a staff of over 12 employees and will
be supervising the service technicians.
He graduated from Patrick Henry High School and has been
active in agriculture for over 41 years. Erford is at home in
Malinta, and loves tractor pulling, camping and spending time
with his children and grandchildren.
Archbold Equipment Company has six locations, including
four in Ohio. For more information, visit www.archboldequip-
mentco.com.
4A - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, October 16, 2013
For the Record
It is the policy of the
Paulding County Progress to
publish public records as they
are reported or released by
various agencies. Names ap-
pearing in For the Record
are published without excep-
tion, to preserve the fairness
and impartiality of the
Progress and as a news serv-
ice to our readers.
Property Transfers
Susan Pieper was the speaker at the Paulding Kiwanis Club
meeting. Pieper, director of the Paulding County Carnegie Li-
brary, spoke about the continuing library levy to be on the ballot
on Nov. 5. She said that the state has cut back funds again and
as a result the levy is of more importance. Nico Stahl was a guest
at the meeting.
Sheriffs Report
FORUM Readers Opinion
Express your opinion
The Paulding County Progress pro-
vides a public forum through FORUM
Reader Opinion Letters to the Editor
for area residents to express their opin-
ions and exchange ideas on any topic
of public interest.
All letters submitted are subject to
the Publishers approval, and MUST in-
clude an original signature and daytime
telephone number for verification. We
wont print unsigned letters.
Letters should be brief and concise.
Letters must also conform to libel law
and be in good taste. Please limit let-
ters to no more than 500 words. We re-
serve the right to edit and to correct
grammatical errors. We also reserve the
right to verify statements or facts pre-
sented in the letters.
The opinions stated are those of the
writer, and do not necessarily reflect
that of the newspaper.
Where to write: Letters to the Editor,
Paulding County Progress, P.O. Box
180, Paulding OH 45879; or drop
them off at the office, 113 S. Williams
St. The deadline is noon Thursday the
week prior to publication.
penses over the next five
years.
We discussed the standard
replacement option, but felt
that the current 1.2 millage
on the new property values
would simply generate too
much money and result in a
carryover that would not be
responsible to the citizens of
Paulding County.
Therefore, it was the rec-
ommendation of the com-
mittee to the commissioners
to ask voters to approve a re-
placement with reduction
levy. The total millage of
1.074 is a reduction of 10.5
percent from the current 1.2-
mill levy.
The Paulding County
Sheriffs office has the spe-
cific figures available for re-
viewing during their normal
business hours.
Paulding Countys E-911
service is a necessary service
to ensure prompt emergency
service for citizens through
the appropriate dispatch of
fire, medical, law enforce-
ment and rescue units with
the least possible delay. Your
support is needed and appre-
ciated.
Kim K. Sutton
Paulding
Wounded Warrior
donations are
appreciated
Dear Editor,
The businesses in our
community are constantly
called upon for donations by
schools and event coordina-
tors. I have become even
more aware of the impor-
tance of these donations as I
work with the Paulding
County United Way.
Last spring, I led a cam-
paign for a cause that is
meaningful to me, the
Wounded Warrior Project. I
sent postcards to close to
200 Paulding County busi-
nesses asking for small do-
nations of $5-$10 to donate
to this effort. I was able to
send a sizable donation to
the Wounded Warrior Project
because of the generosity of
the following who con-
tributed to this campaign:
A Plus Propane, American
Legion Post 297, Antwerp
Pharmacy/Hardware, Bypass
Agronomy, Cooper Farms
Hatchery, Dave Alt, Den
Herder Funeral Home,
Don & Perrys Furniture,
Dooley Funeral Home,
Ebels Butcher Shop, Ellen
Williams, First Federal
Bank, Attorney Floyd A.
Ramsier, H&H Cleaners,
Haviland Drainage,
Joseph M. Kuhn D.O.,
Krouse Chiropractic, Paul
W. Harr D.D.S. Inc., Pleas-
ant Valley Golf Course, Ris-
ter Law Office, Riverside
Hardware, Scott Equity Ex-
change Co.,
Shirley Flores, St. John
Tire Service, Stoller and
Sons, Taz Construction, True
Vine Tree Service, Waters
Insurance Agency, Wen-
ninger Seed Service.
I am thankful and appre-
ciative for the support of all
our local businesses to my
cause and to those of the
many others when they are
asked for help.
Jake Gerber
Payne
Health dept.
services protect
entire county
Dear Editor,
This Nov. 5, the Paulding
County Health Department
will be asking for a renewal
of an existing 10-year levy
that helps fund their opera-
tions and services provided
the Paulding County resi-
dents. This is not a new levy
and is the same two-tenths
(0.2) millage voters ap-
proved in 2003.
The Paulding County
Health Department is de-
voted to protecting the
health of the entire popula-
tion of the county through
education, promotion of
health lifestyles, and re-
search for disease and injury
prevention. Their goal is to
prevent problems from hap-
pening or reoccurring.
You may not think you are
a consumer of the Paulding
County Health Departments
services; however, their
services touch all our lives
from birth to death by:
Providing birth and
death records
Inspecting restaurants
and food service providers to
make sure food is safe
Making sure that water
and sewage systems are safe
Keeping the community
free from infectious diseases
Making home visits to
address concerns about fam-
ily health and public nui-
sances
Giving immunizations
for all ages to prevent illness
Inspecting public swim-
ming pools.
These and many other
services are provided to
make Paulding County a
safer and healthier place to
live. Support our county
health department this Nov.
5 at the polls.
Paulding County
Commissioners
Fred Pieper
Tony Zartman
Roy Klopfenstein
Vote YES for
continued service
Dear Editor,
The Paulding County
Health Department is seek-
ing a yes vote for the re-
newal of a health levy.
Do you know what the
health department offers to
Dept. makes
health, safety
a priority
Dear Editor,
As we approach the elec-
tion in November, it is time
to remember the assets of
our community. The Pauld-
ing County Health Depart-
ment is on the ballot in
November for a renewal of
its levy. We are all served in
some way by the health de-
partment. From health in-
spections to birth and death
records, we benefit from
their work. Even with state-
mandated increases, the
Paulding County Health De-
partment has kept birth and
death record fees lower than
surrounding counties. They
work tirelessly to make us
aware of the importance of
vaccinations and to make
sure that our health risks are
diminished through inspec-
tions. It is important to think
positively in November for
the people that make our
health and safety a priority.
Shawn Dooley
Antwerp
Maintain our
essential county
health services
Dear Editor,
In November, voters of
Paulding County will have
an opportunity to vote to
maintain essential health
services for themselves, par-
ents, children, grandparents
... you get the idea.
The Paulding County
Health District will have a
renewal levy on the ballot.
The levy will work to pre-
serve the most basic of serv-
ices and mandated by the
State of Ohio.
The health department af-
fects peoples lives every
day, they just dont know it.
Among district services
are restaurant inspections,
immunizations, birth and
death certificates, travel vac-
cines, school inspections,
smoking ban enforcement
and nuisance inspections.
I ask everyone to consider
getting out there to vote, and
cast their vote in support of
the levy for your health and
that of your neighbor.
Mike Winans
Payne
E-911 levy is a
replacement
with reduction
Dear Editor,
I serve on the Paulding
County E-911 Advisory
Committee in a non-voting
capacity. This fall, the E-911
levy will appear on the bal-
lot. When discussing this
levy, the committee deter-
mined that the renewal of
the current 1.2-mill levy
would not generate enough
revenue to cover the ex-
our county?
Women and infant chil-
dren receive help in those
early years of development
for a healthy child through
the WIC program.
The nurses help to coordi-
nate the Bureau for Children
for Medical Handicap pro-
gram to help children with
special health care needs.
Doctors send their patients
to the health department for
shots such as tetanus.
Babies get their needed
shots as well as boosters for
the later years, including
teens, young adults, and sen-
ior citizens if needed. Going
on a trip and need shots, the
health department can pro-
vide some of these.
Birth and death certifi-
cates are kept at the health
department.
Surveillance, prevention
and education of communi-
cable disease such as pertus-
sis, meningitis, childhood
diseases, sexually transmit-
ted disease and food poison-
ing are a part of the health
department.
The health department
works on a daily basis to
keep the food in our commu-
nities safe by going around
to the restaurants, groceries,
and meat markets. Every day
on the news we hear of food
poisoning. Our health de-
partment watches for this
very thing.
The food stands at the re-
cent fall festival had to apply
for a permit. Sometime dur-
ing the day someone from
the health department
checked the temperature of
the food so that it would be
safe to consume.
The health department
works to help maintain safe
and functional well and sep-
tic systems in the county.
As in all businesses the
health department is also af-
fected with cut backs, so a
YES for the renewal will
help to provide continued
service to our county.
Eileen Kochensparger
Paulding
Weather report weekly summary as recorded at Paulding Villages water treat-
ment plant
Observations recorded for the 24 hours ending at 7:30 a.m. on the morning of:
DATE HIGH LOW PRECIPITATION
Oct. 8 61 42 -0-
Oct. 9 72 42 -0-
Oct. 10 73 43 -0-
Oct. 11 76 43 -0-
Oct. 12 80 45 -0-
Oct. 13 80 45 -0-
Oct. 14 73 41 -0-
ELECT
DAN OLWIN
for
Harrison Township
Trustee
Paid for by Ann Olwin, Treasurer, 5361 Rd. 94, Payne, OH 45880
8p4
The term et al. refers to and others; et vir., and husband; et ux., and
wife.
Benton Township
U.S. Bank N.A. to Angela M. Stabler; Sec. 3, Lots 20 and
21, Mooney Meadows, 0.599 acre. Judgment entry.
Lori Davis to Greg and Lori Davis; Sec. 34, 2 acres. War-
ranty deed.
Carryall Township
Keating-Keating LLC to James R. and Lisa K. Mortorff;
Sec. 24, 1.78 acres. Warranty deed.
Scott A. and Jodi Bland to James R. and Lisa K. Mortorff;
Sec. 24, 1 acre. Warranty deed.
Harrison Township
Grace M. Gibson to Jayson Brock, trustee; Sec. 10, 1 acre.
Quit claim deed.
Eula M. Marhenke, dec., et al. to Connie R. Suter, et al.; Sec.
32, 78.389 acres. Certificate of transfer.
Latty Township
Kyle E. Ladd to Wayne W. Jr. and Hope L. Boden; Sec. 14,
8.025 acres. Warranty deed.
Washington Township
Marva E. Caywood, trustee, dec. to Lisa Lynne McClendon;
Sec. 15, 55 acres; Sec. 16, 60 acres and Sec. 27, 20 acres. Af-
fidavit.
Antwerp Village
Federal Home Loan Corp. to Fred B. and Kelly J. Mansfield;
Lot 8, Block F, 0.523 acre. Warranty deed.
Latty Village
Betty E. Rowe to Tammy J. Lusk and Bradley L. Moore; Lot
76, Wrexam North, 0.2 acre. Warranty deed.
Paulding Village
Lawrence J. and Donna C. Yeich to Robert Hobart; Lots 3
and 4, Oakwood Park Addition, 0.102 acre. Quit claim.
ACCIDENT REPORTS:
Friday, Oct. 4
3:22 p.m. Michael R. Kelley,
24, of Fort Wayne, was cited
for failure of control after a sin-
gle-car accident on US 24 at
Road 115 in Emerald Town-
ship. He was driving east in a
2004 Audi A6 when he lost
control, went off the left side
striking two signs before com-
ing to rest in the median. Dam-
age was functional and the car
was towed. Kelley was not
hurt. Paulding fire and EMS
assisted at the scene.
INCIDENT REPORTS:
Friday, Oct. 4
9:49 a.m. Dog complaint
came in from Tom Tim Drive
in Paulding.
10:28 a.m. A resident of
Road 230 in Crane Township
called in a dog complaint.
10:48 a.m. A woman in Scott
told deputies she was cornered
by a dog.
1:09 p.m. Medication was
dropped off for disposal.
2:42 p.m. Report of a suspi-
cious package on a porch and
also harassment came in from
Road 424 in Crane Township.
3:57 p.m. Medication was
dropped off for disposal.
4:12 p.m. Medication was
dropped off for disposal.
5:04 p.m. Deputies arrested
a subject, who was not identi-
fied.
6:14 p.m. Deputies docu-
mented a jackknifed semi on
Road 8 in Emerald Township.
11:34 p.m. A Scott resident
told deputies someone was in
their house.
Saturday, Oct. 5
8:28 a.m. An alleged assault
of a minor was reported from
Melrose.
4:25 p.m. Report of a win-
dow shot out of a garage was
made from Road 205 in Brown
Township.
4:55 p.m. Possible scam was
handled on Road 125 in Jack-
son Township.
5:22 p.m. Paulding EMS
was called to East Wayne
Street for a man who had fallen
off a four-wheeler.
Sunday, Oct. 6
1:30 a.m. A suspicious sub-
ject was seen messing around a
garage in Haviland.
11:26 a.m. Deputies assisted
Oakwood police by entering a
stolen gun into the computer
system.
4:18 p.m. People in a truck
with a trailer were seen taking
field signs.
10:25 p.m. Paulding resident
told deputies they were being
harassed by texts from a Payne
area resident.
Monday, Oct. 7
8:58 a.m. Picnic tables in
Grover Hill were discovered
to have been damaged.
9:38 a.m. Medication was
dropped off for disposal.
11:53 a.m. An Oakwood
resident reported an instance
of explosives.
12:30 p.m. Van Wert
County Sheriffs office noti-
fied deputies a man fell from
a propane tank on Road 48 in
Blue Creek Township. Scott
EMS was encoded.
12:59 p.m. Melrose resi-
dent lodged a dog complaint.
1:06 p.m. Theft of a dog
from Ohio 637 in Auglaize
Township was reported.
2:37 p.m. Dawn Averesh
was arrested for Defiance
County.
3:27 p.m. Breaking and en-
tering was investigated on
Road 82 in Blue Creek Town-
ship.
3:33 p.m. Dog complaint
came in from West Harrison
Street in Paulding.
5:39 p.m. Telephone ha-
rassment was investigated on
Ohio 111 in Auglaize Town-
ship.
9:29 p.m. Deputies docu-
mented a car/deer collision on
US 24 in Crane Township.
10:08 p.m. Vandalism to a
vehicle was investigated on
US 127 in Paulding Town-
ship.
10:20 p.m. Post 81 handled
a car/deer accident on Road
424 in Crane Township.
Paulding EMS made a run.
Paulding and Cecil/Crane fire
units assisted at the scene.
Tuesday, Oct. 8
7:33 a.m. Deputies assisted
American Township Police
Department by delivering a
message on Road 179.
7:52 a.m. A Paulding resi-
dent told deputies someone
set up a fake account on the
Internet.
9:32 a.m. Medications
were dropped off for disposal.
10:59 a.m. Dog complaint
came in from Ohio 111 in
Emerald Township.
1:35 p.m. Search of a resi-
dence on Road 180 in Crane
Township was made regard-
ing a pickup order.
6:51 p.m. Three Grover
Hill fire units and the EMS
responded to a combine fire
on Road 16 in Latty Town-
ship. They were there over an
hour.
9:20 p.m. Juvenile matter
was handled on US 127 in
Paulding Township.
10:18 p.m. Deputies met a
Putnam County Sheriffs
deputy at the county line to
transfer a subject.
10:53 p.m. A vehicle was
seen at an abandoned house
on Road 424 in Crane Town-
ship.
Wednesday, Oct. 9
9:14 a.m. Grover Hill resi-
dent lodged a dog complaint.
12:32 p.m. Possible scam
was reported from Ohio 111
in Auglaize Township.
5:24 p.m. Telephone ha-
rassment was noted on Road
154 in Jackson Township.
6:46 p.m. Two units of
Cecil/Crane Fire Department
responded to a fire. They
were on the scene more than
30 minutes.
11:34 p.m. Chickens were
being attacked on Ohio 114 in
Latty Township.
Thursday, Oct. 10
10:04 a.m. Assistance was
given Paulding police by en-
tering a gun as stolen.
12:42 p.m. Medication was
dropped off for disposal.
12:57 p.m. Paulding EMS
made a run to an Auglaize
Township business.
2:36 p.m. A car was broken
into in Grover Hill.
3:57 p.m. Scam by mail
was reported from Road 171
in Brown Township.
5 p.m. Antwerp Police De-
partment made a dog com-
plaint, but the owner came
and got the dog.
5:23 p.m. An Oakwood res-
ident called deputies regard-
ing pictures on Facebook.
Poll results
Results from last weeks poll
question on our web site
www.progressnewspaper.org:
Will you sign up for health in-
surance under Obamacare
(The Affordable Care Act)?
54.3% No
20.0% I would, but I al-
ready have insurance
14.3% Yes
11.4% I dont know
enough about it yet
0% I dont need health
insurance
Visit our web site and cast
your vote in this weeks poll
question.
Wednesday, October 16, 2013 Paulding County Progress - 5A
See COMMON PLEAS, page 6A
Common Pleas
Police Report
See COUNTY COURT, page 6A
County Court
Shutting down?
I dont know how you feel about the government shut
down, but I am tired of hearing about it. I suppose by the
time this gets in the paper it could be all over. Fortunately I
am not so sure it has affected me all that much. Time will
tell. However, I was thinking of some shut downs that would
immediately affect me if they
took place.
For example: What would
I do if the bank shut down?
Where would I go to get my
free 2014 calendar? What if
Hardees or McDonalds shut
down? Where would I get
my senior coffee every morn-
ing? What if the gas station shut down? Where would I get
$40 worth of gas just to watch the needle slowly move to
half full (or is it half empty) mark? What if the school shut
down? Where would I go to get my Friday night sports fix?
What if Wal Mart shut down and I could no longer stop in to
pick up milk and bananas only to exit the check out after
spending $27 on items Im not sure I need? What if my tele-
vision service shut down? How would I hear the latest on
Miley Cyrus or Obamacare? It just seems to me that some
shut downs are more important than others.
While thinking about the shut down the other day it made
me consider just shutting down myself. After all, I really
dont need to write this opinion that most people will read
and decide it doesnt make much sense anyway. I dont need
to sit out in the rain and endure a football game only to write
about it later when you already know the outcome. I dont
need to write about the importance of levies when you have
probably decided how you will vote. So, I might as well shut
down. After all, if its good enough for Washington, it is
good enough for me. But then, I figured out why I really do
this kind of work. Its not that I am necessarily good at it, but
I simply enjoy writing. Oh, there is another reason, I get
paid.
Now we know our friends in Washington are going to pay
themselves during the shut down. Good for them. But what I
want to know is if they really enjoy what they do? Or in this
case do they truly enjoy what they are not doing? I cant help
but think there is someone back home who can do a better
job, and more than that, they would probably even like doing
the job. I am not so sure that is the case today in Washington.
Just wondering when is the next election?
Joe Shouse is a correspondent for the Paulding County
Progress.
The opinions stated are those of the writer, and do not nec-
essarily reflect that of the newspaper.
In My Opinion
In My
Opinion
Joe
Shouse
ACCIDENT REPORTS
Monday, Oct. 7
10:57 a.m. Richard English, 45, of
Paulding, was cited for a turning infrac-
tion following a two-vehicle accident in-
volving a Paulding school bus. Richard
Altheide Jr., 69, of Oakwood, was
stopped in the school bus on Hoover Av-
enue at Garfield Avenue. Reports say
English made a turn in a 1998 Chevy Sil-
verado and struck the bus, inflicting
minor damage to it. The truck was dis-
abled and towed. Neither driver was
hurt, nor were any of the seven child on
the bus.
Tuesday, Oct. 8
10:50 a.m. Bonnie M. Coughlin, 86, of
Antwerp, was cited for improper backing
following a fender-bender in the 400
block of North Cherry Street. Reports
say she was backing from a drive in a
2009 Buick when she struck a 2003 Sil-
verado pickup truck belonging to Tim
Bakle that was parked across the street.
Damage was minor. No one was hurt.
INCIDENT REPORTS
Thursday, Oct. 3
4:50 p.m. A backing accident was doc-
umented on Tom Tim Drive.
6:24 p.m. Neighbor problems were
looked into on North Main Street. Sub-
jects were told to have no contact.
10:30 p.m. Officers assisted the Payne
police by delivering a message on East
Perry Street.
Friday, Oct. 4
4:10 p.m. A North Williams Street
business reported a deposit bag missing.
Case is under investigation.
Saturday, Oct. 5
5:28 p.m. Hit/skip accident on North
Walnut Street was looked into.
8:15 p.m. A suspicious subject was
seen at an East Perry Street business.
9:10 p.m. A woman was bit by a dog
while walking along West Wall Street.
Case is under investigation.
Sunday, Oct. 6
12:45 a.m. A West Perry Street busi-
ness reported an unwanted subject. The
person was the subject of a traffic stop,
assisted by the OSHP.
1:30 a.m. Officers assisted OSHP with
a BMV form process.
2:57 a.m. Officers were called for a
fight on North Williams Street. They
were unable to locate it.
12:52 p.m. Two subjects were on sta-
tion reference an alleged assault at Whis-
pering Pines.
10:46 p.m. Family disturbance on
Johnson Road was handled.
Monday, Oct. 7
10:24 a.m. Someone attempted to gain
entry to Western Buckeye office on
North Cherry Street.
2:10 p.m. A backing mishap in an East
Perry Street business lot was docu-
mented.
7:13 p.m. Assistance was given Payne
police by delivering a message on East
Perry Street.
Tuesday, Oct. 8
11:38 a.m. Ohio Division of Liquor
Control notified the department that
Three Brothers had applied for a liquor
license transfer.
4:20 p.m. A woman walking along
East Baldwin Street said she was rushed
by a dog that acted like it would bite her,
but the owner grabbed it.
5:34 p.m. A subject came on station to
report the violation of a no contact order.
6:42 p.m. Threats and harassment
were reported by a West Harrison Street
resident.
9:17 p.m. A family disturbance was
handled on North Main Street.
Wednesday, Oct. 9
1:53 p.m. Officers cited Zachary T.
Schlegel into court for fictitious plates.
8:14 a.m. Officers were requested at
Paulding Middle School to talk to a stu-
dent.
6:35 p.m. Four-wheeler complaint on
Nancy Street was handled. The driver
was warned.
8:10 p.m. A Payne resident said he was
threatened after leaving a West Perry
Street business.
9:34 p.m. North Water Street resident
reported a handgun stolen. It was entered
as stolen and remains under investiga-
tion.
Thursday, Oct. 10
4:18 p.m. A Main Street business re-
ported a suspicious vehicle in the park-
ing lot.
Friday, Oct. 11
11:25 a.m. Harassment by texts was
reported by a Helen Street resident.
5:45 p.m. A family disturbance on
West Caroline Street was investigated.
Saturday, Oct. 12
1 a.m. Officers assisted OSHP with a
BAC test.
6:13 a.m. Paulding County Hospital
ER called for an assault victim.
6:17 a.m. Subjects with flashlights
were seen on North Cherry Street look-
ing in vehicles. They were gone when
officers arrived.
7:26 a.m. Possible probation violation
was reported.
9:21 a.m. Theft from a vehicle on Cen-
terfield Drive was investigated.
3:41 p.m. Officers assisted OSHP with
a BAC refusal.
11:58 p.m. A West Harrison Street res-
ident found an unknown vehicle parked
in their yard.
Sunday, Oct. 13
2:40 a.m. Complaint of an assault at a
West Perry Street business was un-
founded.
1:25 p.m. A North Walnut Street resi-
dent told officers their vehicle had been
keyed.
5:28 p.m. Medication and a charger
were reported missing from North Wal-
nut Street.
8:32 p.m. Officers assisted OSHP with
a disorderly subject on North Williams
Street.
9:29 p.m. Gun shots were heard on
West Perry Street.
9:45 p.m. Gun shots were heard on
South Williams Street.
10:45 p.m. Gun shots were heard on
North Williams Street.
Civil Docket:
Midland Funding LLC, San
Diego vs. Denise Getzel,
Antwerp. Money only, dis-
missed.
Asset Acceptance LLC,
Warren, Mich. vs. Angela M.
Peffley, Antwerp. Other action,
dismissed.
Paulding Collection Serv-
ices, Paulding vs. Ron Cupp,
Defiance. Small claims, satis-
fied.
Sarah J. Mowery DDS Inc.,
Antwerp vs. Keenan Spencer,
Paulding and Billie J. Wendt,
Paulding. Small claims, judg-
ment for the plaintiff in the sum
of $173.
William S. Bricker DDS
Inc., Antwerp vs. Steven Clark,
Paulding. Small claims, judg-
ment for the plaintiff in the sum
of $2,435.
Terry L. Corwin, Paulding
vs. Diane Juarez, Defiance.
Small claims, judgment for the
plaintiff in the sum of $222.99.
William S. Bricker DDS
Inc., Antwerp vs. Stephanie
Gonzalez, Paulding and
Thomas Wolfenbarger, Pauld-
ing. Small claims, judgment for
the plaintiff in the sum of
$117.80.
Greg Gorman, dba Gor-
mans Fix-It, Paulding vs.
Michelle Moreno, Paulding.
Small claims, dismissed.
William S. Bricker DDS
Inc., Antwerp vs. Mary A.
Porter, Paulding. Small claims,
judgment for the plaintiff in the
sum of $50.
William S. Bricker DDS
Inc., Antwerp vs. Todd Praul,
Payne and Melinda Praul,
Payne. Small claims, judgment
for the plaintiff in the sum of
$30.
William S. Bricker DDS
Inc., Antwerp vs. Joshua Ban-
nister, Paulding. Small claims,
judgment for the plaintiff in the
sum of $152.
Pete Schlegel, Defiance vs.
Donna Coleman, Defiance.
Evictions, judgment for the
plaintiff in the sum of $890.
The State Bank & Trust
Company, Defiance vs. Merei-
dith M. Davis, Paulding. Small
claims, satisfied.
Credit Adjustments Inc., De-
fiance vs. Christina M. Steele,
Paulding. Small claims, judg-
ment in the sum of $638.77.
Credit Adjustments Inc., De-
fiance vs. Casey Etter, Cecil
and Thor Etter, Cecil. Small
claims, dismissed.
Capital One Bank (USA)
N.A., Glen Allen, Va. vs.
Robert A. Iler, Defiance. Other
action, judgment for the plain-
tiff in the sum of $1,218.16.
Birdstone Inc., Paulding vs.
Mike Lane, Defiance. Evic-
tions, dismissed.
Paulding County Board of
Health, Paulding vs. Suzanne
Bauer, Defiance and Robert L.
Bauer, Defiance. Other action,
dismissed.
Criminal Docket:
Brandon Rober, Pioneer,
nonsupport of dependents;
$163 costs, pay by Nov. 12 or
appear in court, review hear-
ing set for same date; proba-
tion ordered, seek employ-
ment, sign up at Job Center,
provide proof of resumes sub-
mitted for employment.
Allen C. Mosier, Bryan,
underage consumption; $200
fine, $184.50 costs; probation
ordered, 20 hours community
service, complete Thinking
for a Change program and
Third Millennium class.
Claralyn McClain,
Napoleon, deposit litter; dis-
missed.
Claralyn McClain,
Napoleon, littering; $75 fine,
$87 costs.
James L. England, Defi-
ance, disorderly conduct;
$150 fine, $116 costs; pay
monthly or case will be sent to
collections.
Charles I. Perry, Paulding;
rape; preliminary hearing
waived, case bound over to
Common Pleas Court.
Charles I. Perry, Paulding,
two counts gross sexual impo-
sition; both bound over to
Common Pleas court.
David J. Ward, Ney, con-
tributing to delinquency of a
minor; $350 fine, $118.50
costs, pay costs and work off
fine with community service
by Oct. 22, 180 days jail.
Eric Hart, Antwerp, zoning
violation; $50 fine, $126 costs,
pay by Dec. 11 or appear.
Eric Hart, Antwerp, zoning
violation; $50 fine.
Eric Hart, Antwerp, two
more counts zoning violation;
both dismissed.
Leonard J. Feeney III, Oak-
wood, felonious assault; pre-
liminary hearing waived, case
bound over to Common Pleas
Court.
Theodore A. Howlett II, In-
dianapolis, littering; $25 fine,
$87 costs.
Eric J. Catlow, Indianapolis,
open container; $68 fine, $77
costs.
Traffic Docket:
Courtney M. Stevens, Ash-
land, 67/55 speed; $48 fine,
$85 costs.
Terrance Johnson, Winston,
Ga., 77/65 speed; $33 fine, $85
costs.
John J. Leininger, Archbold,
brake equipment; $150 fine,
$77 costs.
Thomas H. Hooper, Cam-
bridge, 64/55 speed; $33 fine,
$80 costs.
Nada Naohiro, Indianapolis,
78/65 speed; $33 fine, $77
costs.
David Ross, Canton, Mich.,
80/65 speed; $43 fine, $77
costs.
Elcin Haskollar, Jersey City,
N.J., 80/65 speed; $43 fine,
$80 costs.
Steven E. Meyer,
Spencerville, Ohio, 72/55
speed; $63 fine, $77 costs.
Gordon D. Barnes, Fort
Wayne, stop sign; $53 fine,
$77 costs.
Timothy D. Blackmore,
Paulding, 67/55 speed; $33
fine, $77 costs.
Lester J. Shelton, Paulding,
seat belt; $30 fine, $47 costs.
Kevin J. Wolfe, Defiance,
66/55 speed; $33 fine, $80
costs.
Michael T. Cazee, Fre-
mont, Ohio, 65/55 speed; $33
fine, $77 costs.
Jaquelyn K. Lynch, Toledo,
failure to yield to public vehi-
cle; $68 fine, $82 costs.
Sukhpreet Singh Gill,
Brampton, Ont., 66/55 speed;
$33 fine, $80 costs.
Abigail M. Klima, Osce-
ola, Ind., 82/65 speed; $43
fine, $77 costs.
Seth M. Buhrer, Oakwood,
stop sign; $53 fine, $77 costs.
Kaya E. Garcia,
Strongsville, 83/65 speed;
$43 fine, $80 costs.
Rose Melissa Chesney,
Macomb, Mich., 83/65 speed;
$43 fine, $80 costs.
Jorddan Stanton Childs,
Payne, seat belt; $30 fine, $47
costs.
Chandra Sekhar Alokam,
Indianapolis, 85/65 speed;
$43 fine, $80 costs.
Matthew T. Simon, Toledo,
80/65 speed; $43 fine, $80
costs.
Kelsey A. Robertson,
Cleveland, 83/65 speed; $43
fine, $77 costs.
Wade R. Haller, Antwerp,
assured clear distance; $68
fine, $77 costs.
Michael S. Boyer, Anna,
seat belt; $30 fine, $55 costs.
Jacinta M. Fernung, El-
wood, Ind., 75/65 speed; $33
fine, $85 costs.
Katie Marie Bird, Adrian,
Mich., 80/65 speed; $43 fine,
$80 costs.
Daniel R. Premeaux,
Kirklin, Ind., 65/55 speed;
$33 fine, $80 costs.
Udham Singh Brar, Bramp-
ton, Ont., 65/55 speed; $33
fine, $80 costs.
Jamie A. Merriman, Oak-
wood, 73/55 speed; $43 fine,
$77 costs.
Jaison Levert Smith, De-
troit, 89/65 speed; $43 fine,
$80 costs.
Joseph R. Marchinchin,
Willowick, 70/55 speed; $63
fine, $77 costs.
Matthew C. Shepherd,
Middle Point, seat belt; $30
fine, $50 costs.
Michael P. Morgan, Fish-
ers, Ind., 81/65 speed; State
failed to meet its burden of
establishing the necessary el-
ements to convict the defen-
dant of speeding; costs
waived.
Bronson E. Bartley, Oak-
wood, FRA suspension; $25
fine, $87 costs, pay by March
28 or appear.
Bronson E. Bartley, Oak-
wood, 78/55 speed; $43 fine,
pay by March 28 or appear.
Mark A. Phillips, Sher-
wood, DUS/child support;
$50 fine, $87 costs.
Troy H. Parks, Kokomo,
Ind., 65/55 speed; $33 fine,
$85 costs.
Wayne J. Emmons,
Lafleche, Sk., 77/65 speed;
$33 fine, $85 costs.
Civil Docket
The term et al. refers to and others; et vir., and hus-
band; et ux., and wife.
The Huntington National Bank, Columbus vs.
Charles S. Adkins, Oakwood and Deanna K. Ad-
kins, Oakwood and The State Bank and Trust
Company, Defiance and Paulding County Treas-
urer, Paulding. Foreclosures.
Kevin W. Moore, Oakwood vs. Christina R.
Moore, Blountville, Tenn. Divorce.
Fifth Third Bank, Cincinnati vs. Matthew S.
Kelly, Paulding and Beth A. Kelly, Paulding and
Ohio Department of Taxation, Columbus and
Paulding County Treasurer, Paulding. Foreclo-
sures.
Vera L. Miller, Antwerp vs. Alan D. Miller,
Defiance. Divorce.
Capital One Bank (USA) N.A., Columbus vs.
Brenda S. Miller, Payne. Money only.
In regards 2007 Tank motor scooter by David
J. Rohrer, Payne. Petition for certificate of title.
Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Fort Mill, S.C. vs.
Angela J. Knepper and her unknown spouse if
any, Payne and Terry E. Knepper and his un-
known spouse if any, Payne and Ohio Bureau of
Workers Compensation, Columbus and USA
Office of the Treasury in care of the US Attorney
General, Washington, D.C. and Ohio Depart-
ment of Taxation, Columbus and Paulding
County Treasurer, Paulding. Foreclosures.
Civil Docket Concluded
Dennis R. Mullins Jr., Antwerp vs. Tracy A.
Mullins, Ottawa. Divorce granted.
Jason C. Kreischer, Scott vs. Amanda J. Kreis-
cher, Middle Point. Divorce granted.
Crissy F. Sigg, Antwerp vs. Thomas L. Sigg,
Antwerp. Divorce granted.
In the matter of: Robert G. Borland, Paulding
and Jamie S. Fry, Paulding. Dissolution of mar-
riage granted.
In the matter of: Robert A. Bidlack, Paulding
and Joy K. Bidlack, Cecil. Dissolution of mar-
riage granted.
In the matter of: Shannon K. Foltz, Grover
Hill and David E. Foltz, Paulding. Dissolution
of marriage granted.
In the matter of: Amanda E. Weible, Defiance
and Jeffery D. Weible, Oakwood. Dissolution of
marriage granted.
JPMC Specialty Mortgage LLC, Jacksonville,
Fla. vs. Beth A. Davenport and her unknown
spouse if any, Payne and Larry K. Davenport Jr.
and his unknown spouse if any, Paulding and
Carma J. Doctor, Payne and Rural Opportunities
Inc., Liberty Center and Credit Adjustments Inc.,
Defiance and Paulding County Treasurer, Pauld-
ing. Foreclosures, dismissed for lack of prosecu-
tion.
US Bank N.A., Fort Mill, S.C. vs. Mary Jane
Clark and her unknown spouse if any, Paulding.
Foreclosures, dismissed for lack of prosecution.
Ag Credit ACA, Fostoria vs. David A. Meyer,
Bluffton, Ohio and Heather Meyers, Bluffton,
Ohio and Meyer Hauling LLC, Ottawa and
Allen County Treasurer, Lima and Paulding
County Treasurer, Paulding and Ohio Bureau of
Workers Compensation, Columbus and Glan-
dorf Warehouse Inc., Ottawa and Tracy War-
necke, Ottawa. Foreclosures, dismissed for lack
of prosecution.
The Huntington National Bank, Columbus vs.
Christina Landrum and her unknown spouse if
any, Paulding and Cashland Financial Services
Inc., Cleveland and Ohio Receivables LLC,
Columbus and Ohio Department of Taxation,
Columbus and Paulding County Treasurer,
Paulding. Foreclosures, dismissed without prej-
udice.
First Federal Bank of the Midwest, Defiance
vs. William Moore, Payne and Shandonn Moore,
Payne. Foreclosures, dismissed without preju-
dice.
Flagstar Bank FSB, Troy, Mich. vs. James
Molter and his unknown spouse if any, Payne.
Foreclosures, dismissed without prejudice.
Bank of America N.A., Plano, Texas vs.
Ernest C. Crutchfield and his unknown spouse
if any, Latty and Hilco Receivables, LLC, Buf-
falo Grove, Ill. and Ohio Department of Taxa-
tion, Columbus and Great Seneca Financial
Corp., Rockville, Md. and The State Bank and
Trust Co., Defiance. Foreclosures, sheriffs sale
confirmed and proceeds distributed.
The Huntington National Bank, Columbus vs.
Robert R. Perkins Jr. and his unknown spouse if
any, Cecil and Mortgage Electronic Registration
Systems Inc., Saint Paul, Minn. and County of
Defiance, Defiance and Village of Hicksville,
Hicksville and Ohio Department of Taxation,
Columbus and Paulding County Treasurer,
Paulding. Foreclosures, sheriffs sale confirmed
and proceeds distributed.
The Huntington National Bank, Columbus vs.
Aaron Powell and his unknown spouse if any,
Paulding and Thomas H. Powell, Paulding and
Paulding County Treasurer, Paulding. Foreclo-
sures, sheriffs sale confirmed and proceeds dis-
tributed.
Paulding County Treasurer, Paulding vs.
Aaron T. Powell and his unknown spouse if any,
Defiance and Tom Powell, Defiance and Jackie
Powell, Defiance and Defiance County Child
Support Enforcement Agency, Defiance. Fore-
closure of real property tax, no bidders, property
forfeited to the Village of Cecil.
Bank of America N.A., Plano, Texas vs. Stella
J. Jones and her unknown spouse if any, Pauld-
ing. Foreclosures, sheriffs sale confirmed and
proceeds distributed.
Nationstar Mortgage LLC, Lewisville, Texas
vs. Richard F. Pack and his unknown spouse if
any, Antwerp and Kimberly M. Dangler and her
unknown spouse if any, Antwerp and Ohio De-
partment of Taxation, Columbus and Paulding
County Treasurer, Paulding. Foreclosures, sher-
iffs sale confirmed and proceeds distributed.
M&T Bank, Buffalo, N.Y. vs. Milton Cowans
Sr. and unknown spouse if any, Paulding and
Debra Jean Cowans, Paulding and Gloria Ran-
som, possible heir to estate of Milton Cowans
Jr., and her unknown spouse if any, Fort Wayne
and unknown heirs, devisees, legatees, assigns,
etc. of Milton Cowans Jr., names and addresses
unknown and Michael M. Mott DDS Ltd.,
Paulding and Capital One Bank (USA) N.A.,
Glen Allen, Va. and Charter One Credit Corpo-
ration, Providence, R.I. and Paulding County
Treasurer, Paulding. Foreclosures, sheriffs sale
confirmed and proceeds distributed.
Marriage Licenses
Travis Wayne Bidlack, 34, Oakwood, laborer
and Tonja Renee Parks, 32, Oakwood, home-
maker. Parents are Richard Bidlack and Ruth
Ann Sheets; and Jerry Rucker and Cheryl A.
Gallion.
Administration Docket
In the Estate of Cletus H. Coomer, application
to administer file.
In the Estate of Kathryn G. Shrider, applica-
tion to administer file.
In the Estate of Eunice Bradford, last will and
testament filed.
Criminal Docket
Adam J. Payne, 21, of Oakwood, had his com-
munity control sanctions revoked and his prison
term of 18 months with the Ohio Department of
Rehabilitation and Correction reinstated for
grand theft (F3) recently. He is to receive 171
days credit for time served. Sentence is to be
served consecutively with that from another
case.
Julian M. Zamora, 62, of Antwerp, was
granted judicial release from prison recently and
the remainder of his 17-month term was sus-
The Progress ...
is Paulding Countys
newspaper of record.
6A - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, October 16, 2013
Birthdays
Anniversaries
Oct. 19 Shaun and Coleen Fulk.
Oct. 20 Randy and Linda McNamara, Gene and Mildred
Mick Schoenauer, Kenneth Dutch and Madonna Donnie
Wonderly.
Oct. 21 Craig and Jennifer Lloyd, Nolan and Gerri Mobley,
William Junior and Janet Ross.
Oct. 23 David and Carie Riggenbach, Jack and Violet
Vance.
Oct. 24 Antonio Jr. and Christina Gonzales, Orval and
Luella Mullen.
(The Paulding Progress maintains
a file of birthdays and anniversaries. To
make any changes, please call our of-
fice at 419-399-4015 during business
hours, email to progress@progress -
newspaper.org, or drop us a note to
P.O. Box 180, Paulding.)
Oct. 19 Phyllis Baxter,
Phyllis Bidlack, Mike Cooper,
Carter Evans, Bill Hofacker,
Mary Klopfenstein, Kierstin
Mitchell, Terry Pastor Jr.,
Shane Roberts, Fred Wiswell.
Oct. 20 Evelyn Goings,
Nathan Holtsberry, George
Kelly, Taegan Manz, Wilbur
Miller, Daniel Smith.
Oct. 21 Jack Colwell, Sara
McIntosh, Joy Moran, Cody
Roberts, Wyatt Schlatter, Jack
Wiswell.
Oct. 22 Hunter Bauer,
Tiffany Butler, Carlin Hatley,
Jason Klingler, Barbara Rhoad,
Leonard Smith, Carol Sulfridge,
Jill Welch.
Oct. 23 Grace M. Craw-
ford, Melissa J. Deming, Ashley
Flynn, Devin Gordon, Justine
Holtsberry, Louise Johnson,
Bryce Manz, Cindy Rahrig,
Matt Snider, Noah Stoller, Mike
Weller, Alexis Wharry.
Oct. 24 Tyler Arend,
Ophelia Gonzales, Dolores
Grant, Maggie Groh, Robert
Scott Habern, Penny Kidd,
Bob Kyser, Elizabeth Sarah
Mansfield, So phia Martinez,
Sophia Mobley, Ashley
Switzer, Gwen Walters, Donna
Wannemacher.
Oct. 25 Allen Beamer,
Harold Bell, Alden Deemer,
Robert Ellis, Wanda Miller,
Trent Thornell.
n COMMON PLEAS
Continued from Page 5A
n COUNTY COURT
Continued from Page 5A
Let us fix your dinner
tonight!
Friday, October 25 at PARC Lane School
Barbecue Chicken
$8.00 per meal
includes BBQ chicken half, green beans,
potato, roll, & cookie
Serving 4:00 p.m. until 6:00 p.m
Just drive through to pick up!
Pre-sale tickets available by stopping by the
PARC Lane School or PC Workshop, Inc.
Proceeds to PCBDD Levy Committee
900 Fairground Drive Paulding, OH
Michael L. Arend, Treasurer
419-399-4800 (School) or 419-399-4805 (Workshop)
8c1
To volunteer, contact Matt Saylor
@ 419/786-9342
8c2
Oct. 29 6:30 P.M.
Paulding County Extension Bldg
All Cancer Survivors Welcome -
For Reservations Please Call -
Cindy Kauser Karen Saxton
419/399-2955 419/594-2636
A Celebration Of Hope
American Cancer Society
S U R V I V O R DI N N E R
8p1
8p1
ank
everyone
who
came and
sent cards for our
70th anniversary.
Paul & Shirley
Bidlack
8p1
We want to thank
the people of Paulding
for their kindness,
support and concern
for Gary during the
time he needed it most.
May God bless each
and everyone of you.
Greatfully yours,
Mildred Anspach Hoschak
CHICAGO
Downtown - Holiday Tour
Saturday, Nov. 2nd - $60
Only One Bus! Make Reser vations ASAP
Sue Beck 419-399-3806
Also - Brown Co. l Oct. 19th l $68
8p1
Engagement
ALLISON VANCE
and
BRANT ZUBER
Bill and Patty Vance of
Paulding wish to announce the
engagement and forthcoming
marriage of their daughter Alli-
son, to Brant Zuber, Payne.
Brant is the son of Larry Zuber,
Antwerp and Wendy Zuber,
Payne.
Allison is a 2002 graduate of
Paulding High School and a
2011 graduate of Ivy Tech, Fort
Wayne. She is employed as a
medical assistant at Commu-
nity Memorial Hospital,
Hicksville.
Brant is a 1996 graduate of
Antwerp High School and is
employed at Midwest Tile,
Woodburn.
The couple will exchange
vows Oct. 26, 2013 at St. Paul
United Methodist Church, De-
fiance.
Mickey Clay Adams, Ypsilanti, Mich.,
86/65 speed; $43 fine, $80 costs.
Marderika S. Davis, Detroit, 78/65 speed;
$33 fine, $80 costs.
Michael A. Jett II, N. Augusta, S.C., seat
belt; $30 fine, $50 costs.
Rickey L. Wheeler, Latty, seat belt; $30
fine, $47 costs.
Misheca T. Lunn, Woodhaven, Mich., 78/65
speed; $33 fine, $80 costs.
Lance M. Randall, Evansville, Ind., 77/55
speed; $43 fine, $80 costs.
Jimmy L. Shaffer, Oakwood, failure to con-
trol; $87 costs.
Michael R. Brown, Defiance, 67/55 speed;
$33 fine, $77 costs.
Sara Jean McVey, Antwerp, 68/55 speed;
$33 fine, $80 costs.
Julia J. Snyder, Payne, stopped school bus;
$68 fine, $77 costs.
Douglas C. Baird, Avada, 67/55 speed; $33
fine, $80 costs.
Donald Clark Frisbie Jr., Potterville, Mich.,
65/55 speed; $33 fine, $80 costs.
David D. Gribble, Paulding, seat belt; $20
fine, $47 costs.
Orrin T. Hancock, Chino Hills, Calif., 80/65
speed; $43 fine, $80 costs.
Matthew M. Krill, Paulding, driving under
FRA suspension; $50 fine, $87 costs, pay all
by Dec. 11 or appear, proof of financial re-
sponsibility provided.
Matthew M. Krill, Paulding, seat belt; $30
fine, pay by Dec. 11 or appear.
Matthew D. Ulrey, Van Wert, 72/55 speed;
$63 fine, $80 costs.
Chad Everet Saxton, Van Wert, seat belt;
$30 fine, $47 costs.
Tamera R. Anderson, Paulding, 71/55
speed; $63 fine, $77 costs.
Rodney L. Remley, Leipsic, 80/55 speed;
$43 fine, $77 costs.
Domonick M. Peck, Columbus, driving
under suspension; $50 fine, $87 costs.
Nathan Meglich, Antwerp, 67/55 speed; $33
fine, $82 costs.
Donald R. Baker Jr., Wauseon, 70/55 speed;
$125 fine, $95 costs.
Kenneth W. Lewis Jr., Harlan, Ind., 66/55
speed; $33 fine, $77 costs.
Ronald J. McJannet, Kichener, Ont., 85/65
speed; $43 fine, $77 costs.
Cleon West, Detroit, 73/55 speed; $43 fine,
$77 costs.
Douglas Gorby, Chelsea, Mich., 80/65
speed; $43 fine, $77 costs.
Simon Ujeniuc, Belleville, Mich., 65/55
speed; $33 fine, $77 costs.
Albert Houston, Euclid, 76/65 speed; $33
fine, $80 costs.
Kayleigh Rose Clark, Hicksville, 65/55
speed; $33 fine, $77 costs.
Johnny L. Morton, Jackson, Mich., 70/55
speed; $43 fine, $80 costs.
Kaleb D. Plotts, Paulding, seat belt; $30
fine, $47 costs.
Kyle P. Church, Bluffton, Ind., 70/65 speed;
$33 fine, $77 costs.
Michael Robert Graham, Redondo Beach,
Calif., 85/65 speed; $43 fine, $80 costs.
Free early childhood screening
A free developmental
screening for children from
birth to age 5 will be held
Friday, Oct. 25.
The event will be held
from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. at
Payne Elementary.
In case school is delayed
or canceled, the screening
will be held Nov. 8.
The early childhood years
from birth to the start of
kindergarten are an impor-
tant time of rapid learning
and growth. Early screening
is a quick and simple way to
identify, at an early stage,
possible learning or health
concerns so that children
can get needed help before
starting school.
This screening will be
used for checking age-ap-
propriate development in
the areas of communication,
motor, cognitive, social and
adaptive behaviors. The
event is coordinated by
Help Me Grow, Depart-
ments of Education, Pauld-
ing County Hospital, Ohio
Department of Health,
NOCAC, Paulding County
EI/DD, Family and Chil-
dren First Council, Antwerp
Local Schools, Paulding Ex-
empted Village Schools and
Wayne Trace Local Schools.
Appointments are pre-
ferred, but walk-ins will be
accepted. Call 419-399-
4620 or 1-877-473-8166
Ext. 41 for registration in-
formation.
The next developmental
screening will be Jan. 17 at
Paulding and Oakwood ele-
mentaries.
pended. He is to complete four years community
control sanctions. He had been sentenced to
prison in June for domestic violence (F4).
Parker S. Mansfield, 27, address unavailable,
was arraigned recently for violation of sex of-
fender registration (F4) and escape (F3). Not
guilty pleas were entered for each charge. An
Oct. 17 pretrial conference was scheduled. His
bond was set at $50,000 with the 10 percent priv-
ilege allowed.
Kenneth D. Potter, 34, of Ottawa, was sen-
tenced recently after pleading guilty to an
amended charge of illegal assembly or posses-
sion of chemicals for the manufacture of drugs
(F3). Charges of illegal manufacture of drugs
(F1) and child endangerment (F3) were dis-
missed. He was ordered to serve a stated prison
term of 36 months with credit for 169 days
served, six-month license suspension, pay costs.
A mandatory fine was waived due to indigence.
Ricky A. Girod Jr., 25, of Oakwood, was sen-
tenced to intervention in lieu of conviction re-
cently for illegal assembly or possession of
chemicals for the manufacture of drugs (F3). He
was ordered two years intervention on the stan-
dard conditions of community control sanctions
plus drug and alcohol restrictions, follow the in-
tervention plan of Recovery Services of North
West Ohio Inc., submit to random tests, 20 hours
community service and pay $620 costs. A second
charge, illegal processing of drugs (F2), was dis-
missed. All evidence collected by the sheriffs
office in this case was ordered destroyed.
Jacob K. Roughton, 22, of Oakwood, was sen-
tenced to 10 months in the ODR&C after being
found guilty of forgery (F5). Credit was allowed
for 107 days served. This sentence is to run con-
secutively with another 10-month sentence. Two
counts theft (F5) and a second forgery count
were all dismissed.
Chadd C. Ratliff, 39, of Cecil, entered guilty
pleas to four counts gross sexual imposition (F3).
Two of the counts had been amended from rape
(F1) while a third rape charge was dismissed. He
will be sentenced Nov. 4.
Ryan L. Fraley, 18, of Melrose, had his trial
date rescheduled regarding his indictment on
three counts grand theft (F4) and arson (F4). It
was changed from Nov. 5 to Jan. 14.
Robert A. Iler, age and address unavailable,
had a Bill of Information filed against him Oct.
3 alleging theft (F5). At arraignment he waived
counsel and indictment and entered a guilty plea.
He also waived extradition and was released on
his own recognizance on the conditions of no ar-
rests. Sentencing was set for Dec. 9.
Articles needed for
Oakwood memory book
By BILL SHERRY
Correspondent
OAKWOOD The ques-
tion, Do you remember,
was a question asked several
times in Oakwood during the
Homecoming, the alumni
banquet and the cemetery
walk which took place more
than a month ago.
The Oakwood Library As-
sociation decided to try and
prevent the loss of those re-
membrances by publishing a
book of Oakwood memories.
They began asking for sto-
ries, pictures, and articles of
importance. The leaders of
the association envisioned
that the Oakwood book
should consist of articles,
long and short, along with
some that have been written
about past and present mem-
bers of the Oakwood commu-
nity and the surrounding area.
The association is currently
requesting people to write
about their parents, grandpar-
ents, neighbors and friends.
Writers can write as little or
as much as they choose. Sub-
missions may be handwritten
on paper, typed or done elec-
tronically.
They will be collected and
compiled into a book and
sold as a fundraiser for the as-
sociation. When the book is
published, it will be available
to the general public . The
proceeds will go to the asso-
ciation.
Jeanne Calvert, who is
helping collect and compile
the book, indicated things are
on track for the book to be
completed in time to be pur-
chased for Christmas.
Calvert stated that they are
off to a good start, but mate-
rial is still needed. She com-
mented that each story will
list the name of the contribu-
tor. Up to two pictures may
be included with each story
and photos can be scanned at
the Cooper Community Li-
brary. Contributors can also
scan them and e-mail them to
the Oakwood Library Associ-
ation or to Calvert at sky-
dancr@tds.net.
The deadline for articles to
be submitted is Nov. 15. En-
tries may be dropped off at
the Cooper Community Li-
brary or mailed to Sue
Thomas, P.O. Box 348, Oak-
wood OH 45873.
Each submission must be
accompanied by the follow-
ing statement, I hereby give
the Oakwood Library Associ-
ation permission to copy, re-
produce, publish, and sell the
books containing my written
sketch or photo.
Wednesday, October 16, 2013 Paulding County Progress - 7A
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A Penny For
Your Thoughts....
By: Nancy Whitaker
GOOD NEWS OR BAD?
Everyone should get a little
good news, not just today, but
every day. Sometimes the
news and headlines make us
feel insecure, sad, out of
touch and even depressed.
I am constantly listening to
and reading news reports.
Making the news this week
was the government shut-
down, shootings, plane
crashes, automobile wrecks,
rapes and murder, just to
name a few.
Bad things happen to good
people everyday. I have re-
cently heard someone say, I
dont even watch news re-
ports, because it is always
bad. However, there is good
news out there. Here are a
few good things that hap-
pened recently.
One good news story that
came out of the Boston
Marathon bombings was about
a runner, Jeff Bauman. Bau-
man, 27, lost most of both of
his legs in the April 15 bomb-
ing. He was recently inter-
viewed on television by
newscaster Brian Williams. He
stated that he is stronger, way
stronger, than hes ever been
and that he has a lot to live for.
On Sunday, the New York
Times ran a profile of Bau-
man showing pictures of him
taking his first steps since the
amputations.
Another feel good news
item is one of a random act of
kindness. A lady inadver-
tently drove off leaving her
coffee cup on the back
bumper. Fortunately for the
driver, a trailing motorcycle
rider took it upon himself to
return the coffee cup, yes
while he was moving. The
motorcyclist saved the cup,
then sped up to catch the
ladys attention, so he could
return the full coffee mug on
the fly.
Staff Sgt. Kevin Brady, a
32-year-old National Guards-
man from California, was re-
united with a dog that had he
met in Afghanistan last fall.
When he returned home in
May without the dog, he was
heartbroken. He reached out
to an organization which
helped raise $5,000 to have
the pup vaccinated and flown
from Afghanistan to New
York. What good news it was
to that veteran.
A lot of times we dont
hear a lot about the little good
news stories that encompass
us locally.
In last weeks Paulding
County Progress, a lot of
good, positive news was
shared with our readers.
Kudos to our law enforce-
ment for doing a great job
with drug busts and fighting
crime; Sarah Noggle is our
countys new Extension di-
rector; farmers are expecting
a bumper crop of corn; Pauld-
ing Countys 4-H Robotics
Team won at a National En-
gineering event; three couples
got engaged; the PCH 5-K
event raised $3,000; our li-
brary is set to host an open
house and silent auction; Op-
eration Christmas Child is
about to kickoff; Representa-
tive Tony Burkley testified
for a bill to support to assist
fire and police; Payne is host-
ing their fall festival; Wayne
Trace football team now has
a record of 13-0; and Jerika
Bland wrapped up her high
school golf career and per-
haps her golf career will re-
sume when she is in college.
Sometimes, it is so much
easier to look at the negative
side of the news and over
look the good things happen-
ing right around here.
What good news have you
heard or read recently? Do
you think we let the bad news
overshadow the good things?
Has anything good happened
to you this week? Let me
know and Ill give you a
Penny for Your Thoughts.
Tree care tips for fall
By Mark Holtsberry
Education specialist
Paulding SWCD
When it comes to the trees in your yard, fall
is not just a time of transition in color from
green leaves to red, orange and yellow leaves,
its also a time to make sure your trees are pre-
pared for winter. Due to the forecast of some
sever weather we may be getting this winter,
here are some great tips which could help keep
your trees healthy going into winter months.
Water your trees. This is especially if your
trees are showing brown or signs of drought.
While many trees have roots which are deep
and dont require watering, trees used in patio
landscapes and those with small root balls
may require an additional drink of water.
Prune trees for safety and accessibility.
Most tree trimming landscapers suggest limb
up a tree to make it easier to walk by on an
adjacent sidewalk or path and also suggests
pruning away any dead or weak wood. This
years apple crop made us all aware of how we
neglected pruning in the past.
Hire a professional to prune large trees.
Large trees with a dense crown, a very narrow
or very wide crotch between limbs dead or
weakened wood or a cavity in the trunk of a
tree should be pruned by a tree care profes-
sional. Which, by the way, we have some in
the local area. Be safe and be aware of power
lines and your neighbors house.
Remove leaf detritus. Be sure to clean up
around the base of your trees after the leaves
fall so that the trees can get the adequate
amount of water and sunlight they need to
thrive through fall and winter months.
Hopefully these tips will help your trees
thrive and continue to bloom in the spring.
Money is still being raised for the paving
project and any donation would be appreci-
ated.
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Sherwood Haunted
Walk....
Through Sherwood Forest
October 19th Dusk till 11:00 pm
October 20th Dusk till 10:00 pm
Hotdogs, Cookies and Drinks Available
Located at Crystal Fountain Auditorium
All Proceeds Benefit Sherwood Parks
Not Recommended for children under 12
Witches, Ghosts, Aliens,
Werewolves plus Much More!
8c1
Halloween parade, contest
planned Oct. 26 in Paulding
PAULDING The Pauld-
ing Lions Club will be host-
ing the annual Halloween
parade and costume contest
on Saturday, Oct. 26. Also
participating are the United
Way of Paulding County and
the Eagles Lodge. The event
will include entertainment,
food and a costume contest.
The day will begin with a
parade. Participants are asked
to assemble in front of the
Paulding County Carnegie
Library between 1-1:15 p.m.,
with the parade beginning at
1:30 p.m. Contestants will
march around the square up
to the gazebo on the court-
house lawn where costume
judging will take place. In in-
clement weather, the costume
judging will take place at the
Paulding Eagles.
People of all ages are in-
vited to be part of the Hal-
loween parade and costume
contest. The 10 costume cat-
egories are:
Infants under 12 months
Ages 1 to 2
Clowns and tramps
Witches
Things, objects, and
plants
Animals and creatures
Movie, TV, fairy tale
characters
Vampires, ghosts and
goblins
Ages 13 and over
Miscellaneous
All participants will re-
ceive a reward for their in-
volvement. Plus, special
prizes will be given to the
grand prize winner and the
first, second, and third place
winners in each category.
The Paulding High School
band will lead the parade, and
the cheerleaders will be the
judges of the costume con-
test.
The Halloween parade is
made possible by donations
and/or assistance from local
businesses.
Trophies will be awarded
to the winners of our Hal-
loween costume contest for
both kids and adults, stated
Sarah Sajuan, a UWPC activ-
ity committee member.
From 2-4 p.m., fingerprint-
ing will be done by Sheriff
Jason Landers of the Paulding
County Sheriffs Office who
will be assisting United Way
volunteers in providing fin-
gerprinting ID kits for kids.
Landers recommends that
parents update the photos of
their kids at least once a year.
This ID card will not be
kept in the hands of law en-
forcement. It will, in fact, be
handed back to the parents to
retain and produce in the
event the finger prints are
needed, said Sheriff Lan-
ders.
From 5-7 p.m., a steak din-
ner will be held at the Eagles
Lodge in Paulding. The steak
dinner includes baked potato
and a side salad and will be
available to adults for $12.
Kids can eat a hot dog and
chips free of charge.
The Memory Lane Band
will be playing from 8-11
p.m.
Those in attendance may
also purchase raffle tickets
for the top prize, which is a
Thanksgiving dinner basket
of goodies for the winner to
prepare. There will also be a
50/50 raffle drawing. Raffle
tickets are $1 each or six for
$5 and may be purchased in
advance or throughout the
evening. Participants do not
need to be present to win.
United Way partners with
organizations that share the
view that the way to improve
lives is by mobilizing the car-
ing power of communities.
The United Way slogan
Give. Advocate. Volunteer.
Live United promotes peo-
ple working together to create
a brighter future in their com-
munity, said Pam Miller,
United Way board member.
The money raised in Pauld-
ing County stays in our
county to help our neigh-
bors.
Those interested in the Hal-
loween party or in donating to
the United Way campaign are
encouraged to call the United
Way office at 419-399-8240
or visit their website at
http://unitedwayofpaulding-
county.org, or like them on
Facebook.
Halloween events
slated at Grover Hill
GROVER HILL The
Grover Hill Fire and EMS de-
partments will be sponsoring
the Grover Hill Community
Halloween festivities on Sat-
urday, Oct. 26.
Trick-or-Treat will be from
5-6:30 p.m. Face painters as
well as TNT the clown will
be performing in front of the
fire station from 5:30-7:30
p.m.
The Grover Hill Welcome
Park boosters will be serving
a meal at the VFW from 4-8
p.m. with all proceeds bene-
fitting Welcome Park im-
provements.
The parade will begin at
7:30 p.m. Anyone interested
in participating in the parade
can contact Dave Volk at 419-
587-3700 or email
dvolk@tds.net. Parade lineup
will form at the Grover Hill
Elementary School.
Costume judging will take
place at 6:45 p.m. at the main
stage in front of the fire sta-
tion. This year, the costume
participants will then lead the
parade.
Kids games in the street
will immediately follow the
parade. The Grover Hill Fire
and EMS will also be con-
ducting a silent auction at the
fire station beginning at 5
p.m. and concluding 30 min-
utes after the parade conclu-
sion.
Sheriff discusses E-911 levy
at Oakwood Council meeting
By BILL SHERRY
Correspondent
OAKWOOD Oakwood Village Council met
Monday, Oct. 14 and heard comments from
Sheriff Jason Landers concerning the E-911 sys-
tem levy for Paulding County.
Landers also advised council that Oct. 26 is
National Drug Take Back Day. Any old or no
longer needed drugs will be accepted from 10
a.m.-2 p.m. Oct. 26 at any one of the three col-
lection sites that have been established: the sher-
iffs office and the Oakwood and Antwerp police
stations.
It was commented that this is a much more ac-
ceptable way of disposing of unwanted drugs
than flushing them down the toilet or burying
them in a landfill. Sheriff Landers commented
that he has already received a couple of gallon-
size plastic bags with bottles of unneeded drugs
in them.
At the last council meeting in September,
council voted to set up Oct. 12 for the village fall
clean-up day. Village administrator John Keyes
contacted the Oakwood Scouts and found that
they had a scheduling conflict, so cleanup day
has been rescheduled to 9 a.m.-1 p.m. on Satur-
day, Oct. 19.
Fire Chief Kenny Thomas told council that the
newly acquired fire truck is back from the repair
shop, but is still not officially in service until the
Jaws of Life have been inspected/ and installed
in the truck.
Mayor Erhard Bud Henke and Fiscal Offi-
cer Susan Barron signed a new contract with
State Bank and Trust for the loan on the new
Oakwood Fire/EMS Station.
State Bank representative Bud Williams pre-
sented the village this new loan agreement,
which includes a reduction of interest from 4.72
percent down to 2.14 percent for a five-year con-
tract.
Williams commented, The Village of Oak-
wood has done a tremendous job of paying this
loan down.
Mayor Henke announced that he and Council
President Todd Dangler will be working on get-
ting new water and sewer rates established, but
do not plan to implement them until January.
There was some discussion at tonights meet-
ing concerning:
Changes in the HSA, life insurance and med-
ical coverage for village employees.
Training procedures for new EMS recruits.
Problems with street light brightness (two
complaints).
Repair of a water leak at town hall.
The celebration of Halloween for Oakwood is
to take place from 5:30-7:30 p.m. on Oct. 31.
The next regular meeting is scheduled for 6:30
p.m. Oct. 28.
8A - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, October 16, 2013
David A. & Harvey D.
Hyman and Families
Compliments of
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Tile Company
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The Antwerp
Exchange
Bank Company
Stabler Steam Carpet
Cleaning Service
Payne 419-263-2211
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Scott Variety Shop
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If you would be interested
in helping to sponsor our
church directory, please
call us at the
Paulding County Progress
at 419-399-4015. This
directory is made possible
by our advertisers!
Mara Mart
Paulding
Member FDIC
The Church Directory Is Proudly Sponsored By The Following Businesses:
Paulding County Church Directory
399-3525, Rev. Monte Moore, Sunday worship at 10:30 a.m.
Paulding United Methodist Church, 321 North Williams Street,
Paulding, church telephone number is 399-3591, Rev. Ben Lowell, Wor-
ship service at 9:45 a.m.; Sunday School, 11:15 a.m.; Wed. worship at
6:00pm. Our church office is located at 308 N. Main St.
Pentecostal Church of God, 601 W. Caroline St., Paulding, Elder
George Robinson, Sunday school at 10 a.m., worship service at noon,
prayer services Monday at 6 p.m. and Thursday at noon, Bible study
at 6 p.m. Tuesday.
Pioneer Christian Ministries, County Road 108 and Ohio 637, Paulding,
Rev. Chuck Oliver, Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday worship at 10:30
a.m., and Wednesday evening at 7:00 p.m. including a youth service on at
least three Wednesday evenings.
Rose Hill Church of God, corner of SR 637 and Charloe Trail, Paulding,
399-3113, Pastor Ron Hofacker, Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday wor-
ship at 10:30 a.m., Wednesday service from 7-8 p.m. with childrens hour.
St. John Lutheran ChurchELCA, 7611 Road 87, Briceton, Pastor
Karen Stetins, church telephone number is 419-399-4962 or 419-399-2320.
Sunday worship at 8:30 a.m., Sunday school at 9:30 a.m.
St. Paul Evangelical Lutheran Church, 601 Flat Rock Drive (P.O. Box
156), Paulding, Pastor Kare Stetins, church telephone number is 399-2320,
Sunday Worship at 10:15 a.m., Sunday school at 9 a.m.
PAYNE AND OUTLYING AREAS
Divine Mercy Catholic Parish, 203 W. Townline, Payne, 399-2576, Pas-
tor Very Rev. G. Allan Fillman, Masses: Saturday at 4:00 p.m.
Edgerton Wesleyan Church, 1717 Bertha St., Woodburn, (Edgerton)
Ind. 46797, Pastor Dave Dignal, church telephone number is 260-632-
4008, Sunday school at 9 a.m., childrens church at 10 a.m., worship at 10
a.m., home groups at 6 p.m., Wednesday evening services at 6:30 p.m.
(Indiana time).
Living Water Ministries, Contemporary worship service Sunday nights
at 10 a.m. & 6:30 p.m., The Well church for kids, Sunday mornings from
10-11:30 a.m. The church is currently in the process of relocating. For lo-
cation information, contact Pastor Rich Phelan, 419-263-2728.
Payne Church of Christ, 220 West Merrin Street, Payne, Pastor Mikeal
George. Sunday worship at 9:30 am. 419-263-2092; 419-574-2150 (cell).
Payne Church of the Nazarene, 509 E. Orchard St. (Ohio 500) Payne,
Pastor Mike Harper, 263-2422, Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday wor-
ship at 10:30 a.m. Sunday night service at 6:30 p.m., Wednesday prayer
meeting at 7:30 p.m.
St. Jacob United Church of Christ, southwest corner of Oak and Hyman
streets, Payne, Rev. Jim Langham, 263-2763. Sunday School-9:00 am,
Church service-10:00 am.
St. James Lutheran Church NALC, West Townline Street (P.O. Box
42), Payne, 263-2129, Pastor Fred Meuter, 260-492-2581. Sunday School
at 9:00 a.m., Sunday worship at 10:00 a.m.
St. Paul United Methodist Church, (P.O. Box 154) 312 South Main
Street, Payne, Rev. David Rohrer, church telephone number is 263-2418,
parsonage telephone number is 263-2017, Sunday school at 9 a.m., Sun-
day worship at 8 a.m. and 10 a.m.
Editors Note: If your church doesnt have service times listed, please
contact the Paulding County Progress office to notify of Sunday service
times.
Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday worship at 10:30 a.m., evening worship
at 6 p.m., Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m.
PAULDING AND OUTLYING
Bethel United Methodist, Forders Bridge, Cecil, Pastor Kevin Doseck
(419) 899-4153, worship service at 10:30 a.m., Sunday school at 9:30 a.m.
Bethlehem Temple Pentecostal, 818 West Jackson Street, Paulding,
399-3770, Rev. Burpo, Sunday school at 10 a.m., Sunday worship at 12
p.m.
Calvary Bible Church, Ohio 111 West across from Paulding County Hos-
pital, 399-4919, elders John Mohr, 260-632-4356, Bob Fessel 419-399-
3398, Brad Sisson 419-263-3108, Don Baer 419-399-5805. Sunday school
at 9 a.m., morning worship at 10:15 a.m., Bible Study at 7 p.m. Wed.
Cecil Community Church, 203 S. Main St., Cecil. Pastor Ted Ramey.
Sun. school 10:00 am, Worship service 11:00 am, Sun. eve. 6:00 pm,
Wed. eve. 6:00 pm.
Cecil First Presbyterian Church, Main Street, Cecil, Sunday worship
at 8 a.m., Sunday school at 9 a.m.
Christian Fellowship Church, Paulding High School Auditeria, 10
a.m. Sunday. Pastor Greg Cramer.
Divine Mercy Catholic Parish, 417 N. Main, Paulding, 399-2576,
Pastor Very Rev. G. Allan Fillman, Masses: Saturday at 6 p.m.; Sunday
at 10:30 a.m.
Emmanuel Baptist Church, 1275 Emerald Road, Paulding, 419-399-
5061, Sunday School at 9:30 a.m., worship services at 10:45 a.m. and
6 p.m. Sunday and 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. Pastor Drew Gardner.
First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), 1233 Emerald Road,
Paulding, 419-399-4576, Sunday school 9:00 a.m., Worship service
10:00 a.m. Interim pastor is Rev. Dr. Paul Biery.
First Presbyterian Church, 114 West Caroline Street, Paulding, 399-
2438, Rev. David Meriwether, 9:00am Sunday school (youth and adult),
10:15 a.m. praise singing, 10:30 a.m. Sunday worship. Communion 1st
Sunday each month.
House of Love Ministries, 220 N. Williams St., Paulding. Pastor Pre-
dest (Dwayne) Richardson or Sister Brenda Richardson, 419-399-9205
or 419-796-8718, Sunday worship at 3:00 p.m. Jail Ministry, Food Min-
istry, Outreach Ministry. Overcomer Outreach - a Christian 12-steap
meeting, Sundays at 5:00 p.m.
New Beginnings Church (Church of God), Cecil, Pastor Roy Burk,
399-5041, Sunday worship at 11 a.m.
Paulding Church of Christ, East Perry Street, Paulding, Minister
Christopher Reno, 419-399-4761. Bible school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday
worship at 10:30 a.m.
Paulding Church of the Nazarene, 210 Dooley Dr., Paulding, 399-
3932, Revs. Kim and Cindy Semran, Sunday school at 9:15 a.m., Sun-
day worship at 10:30 a.m., Sunday evening at 6:00 p.m.: Kids Summer
Jam (ages 4-4th grade), Preteen class (5th-6th grade), Teen group (7th-
12th grade), and adult service. Wednesday at 7:00 p.m.: Teen group
(7th-12th grade), adult bible study and prayer. Nursery available for all
services.
Paulding Family Worship Center, 501 West Perry Street, Paulding,
Grover Hill Church of the Nazarene, Maple and East Jackson streets,
Pastor Jonathan L. Hoagland, 587-3376, Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., Morn-
ing worship at 10:30 a.m., Sunday evening gospel hour at 6 p.m., Wednes-
day evening service at 7 p.m.
Grover Hill Zion United Methodist Church, corner of First and Harrison,
587-3941; Pastor Mike Waldron, 419-238-1493 or 419-233-2241 (cell). Sun-
day school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday worship at 10:20 a.m., nursery available
during all services.
Mandale Church of Christ in Christian Union, Ohio 66, Pastor Justin
Sterrett, 419-786-9878, Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday worship at
10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m., Wednesday prayer meeting at 7 p.m.
Middle Creek United Methodist Church, County Road 24, Grover Hill,
Pastor William Sherry, Sunday worship at 9 a.m., Sunday school at 10:15
a.m., Sunday evening Bible study at 7 p.m.
Mt. Zion United Methodist Church, Grover Hill, County Road 151, Sun-
day school at 9:30 a.m., Pastor David Prior, Sunday worship at 10:30 a.m.,
Wednesday evening prayer meeting at 7:30 p.m.
Roselms Christian Church, Ohio 114, Pastor Gary Church, 594-2445,
Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday worship at 10:30 a.m.
HAVILAND/LATTY/SCOTT
Apostolic Christian Church, 12867 Road 82, Haviland, 399-5220, wor-
ship service at 10:30 a.m.
Country Chapel United Methodist Church, Haviland, 419-622-5746,
Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday worship at 10:15 a.m.
Latty Zion Baptist Church, Latty, Pastor Levi Collins Jr., 399-2748, Sun-
day school at 10 a.m., worship service at 11:15 a.m.
Harvest Field Pentecostal Church of God, 13625 Road 12, Scott, Pastor
Terry Martin, 419-622-2026, Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday morning
worship at 10:30 a.m., Sunday Evening worship at 6:00 pm, Wednesday
evening worship at 7:00 pm, Wednesday Youth Group at 7:00 pm.
Friends United Methodist Church, Latty, Pastor Ron Johnson. Sunday
worship at 9 a.m., Wednesday Bible Study at 7 p.m.
OAKWOOD/MELROSE AREAS
Auglaize Chapel Church of God, rural Oakwood, 3 miles south and half
mile west on County Road 60, Pastor Stan Harmon, 594-2248, Sunday
worship at 9:00 a.m. Sunday school at 10:30 a.m., Wednesday services for
children, youth and adults at 7:00 p.m.
Melrose United Methodist Church, Melrose, 594-2076, Pastor Eileen
Kochensparger 399-5818; Sunday school 9:30 a.m., Sunday worship at
10:30 a.m., Wednesday Bible study and prayer at 7:00 p.m.
Twin Oaks United Methodist Church, corner of Harmon and Second
streets, Oakwood, Pastor Eric Dailey. 419-594-2992. Sunday worship at
9:30 a.m., Sunday school at 10:45 a.m., Bible Study Wednesdays at 10:00
a.m.
Prairie Chapel Bible Church, one mile east and a half-mile north of Oak-
wood on the corner of roads 104 and 209, Pastor Earl Chapman, 594-2057,
ANTWERP AND SURROUNDING
Antwerp Community Church, 704 S. Erie St., SR 49, Antwerp; Pastor
Ricky L. Grimes 419-258-2069. Bible Study Fellowship 9:30 am; Contem-
porary Worship 10:30 am, Wednesday Discipleship Study, 7:00 pm
Antwerp United Methodist Church, East River Street, Rev. Pastor Mike
Schneider, church telephone number is 258-4901, Comtemporaty service
Sunday 8:30a.m., Sunday school 9:30a.m., Traditional Service 10:30a.m.
Divine Mercy Catholic Parish, 303 S. Monroe, Antwerp. Office: 417 N.
Main, Paulding, 399-2576, Pastor Very Rev. G. Allan Fillman, Masses: Sun-
day at 8:30am.
First Baptist Church, 5482 CR 424, Pastor Todd Murray, 258-2056, Sun-
day school at 9 a.m., Sunday worship 10 a.m.; evening service 6 p.m.,
Wednesday Bible Study 6:30 p.m.
First Presbyterian Church, 126 W. River St., Pastor Mike Pennington,
258-2864, Sunday school at 9:15 a.m., Sunday worship at 10:35 a.m.
Kingdom Hall of Jehovahs Witnesses, 2937 US 24, 258-2290. Public
talk 10 a.m. Sunday, Congregation Bible Study, Theocratic Ministry School
& Service Meeting, Theocratic school 7:30 p.m. Thursday.
Mt. Calvary Lutheran Church, Pastor Robert Becker. Sunday school at
9 a.m., Sunday worship at 10 a.m.
Riverside Christian Church, 15413 St. Rt. 49, (corner Ohio 49 and Road
192), Antwerp. 258-3895, Pastor Regan Clem.
ARTHUR/FIVE SPAN AREA
Apostolic Christian Church, 13562 Road 147, Defiance (Junction), 399-
3121, William Schlatter, Elder, Sunday services at 10:15 a.m. and 12:30
p.m., Sunday school at 1 p.m., Wednesday services at 8 p.m.
Bethel Christian Church, Ohio 66, Defiance (Arthur), Pastor Christopher
Baker, Sunday worship at 10:30 a.m.
Church of Christ, corner of County Roads 166 and 191, Evangelist Lon-
nie Lambert, 399-5022, Sunday worship at 10:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m., Bible
study at 9:30 a.m. Sunday.
Junction Bible Christian Church, County Road 111, Defiance (Junction),
393-2671 or JunctionBible@copper.net, Rev. C. Joseph Fifer, Sunday
school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday worship follows at 10:30 a.m & Bible Study on
Wed. at 7pm.
Pleasantview Missionary Baptist Church, County Road 180, Defiance
(Junction), Rev. Alan Ray Newsome, Sunday worship at 11 a.m., evening
service at 6 p.m.; Wednesday evening services at 7 p.m.
Rock Church, SR 637, Five Span-Arthur area, Pastor Bobby Branham
393-2924, Sunday school at 10 a.m., Sunday worship at 10:45 a.m., Sunday
evening worship at 7 p.m., Wednesday evening worship at 7 p.m., Youth
Service Wednesday at 7 p.m.
GROVER HILL AND OUTLYING
Bible Baptist Church, corner of Cleveland and Perry streets, Grover Hill,
Pastor Pat Holt, 587-4021, Sunday school at 10 a.m., Sunday worship at
11 a.m., Sunday evening worship at 6 p.m.; Wednesday prayer meeting at
7 p.m.
C &Y Oil
Company
Payne
The Paulding Progress &
Weekly Reminder
www.progressnewspaper.org
866-636-7260
scottwagnerplumbing-heating.com
scottwagnerph@gmail.com
5538 Road 13, Ottawa
419-876-3199
Paulding, OH 45879
419-399-3855
13055 Dohoney Road, Deance
419-782-1834

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NEW BUSINESS HOLDS RIBBON CUTTING CEREMONY Pams Cutting Edge Salon held a ribbon cutting ceremony Oct. 8 in
downtown Paulding. From left are Paulding Chamber director Erika Willitzer, owner Pam Gray, stylist Jessica Verfaillie and Mayor
Greg White. Pam Gray, along with family and friends, renovated the building to create a quaint yet elegant space. The mission at
Pams Cutting Edge Salon is to delight guests every time they come in. If you are looking a new style or haircut, make sure to call
the salon at 419-399-9292. The salon is located at 104 E. Jackson St., Paulding.
Representatives from Paulding County Carnegie Library and All Trades Historical Restoration
LLC accepted a state award recently for library renovation and restoration work.

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Historic Preservation Office honors outstanding preservation efforts
COLUMBUS Outstanding
historic preservation achieve-
ments in communities through-
out Ohio were honored with the
2013 Ohio Historic Preserva-
tion Office Awards on Saturday,
Sept. 28.
Ohio Historical Society exec-
utive director and state historic
preservation officer Burt Logan
honored recipients with awards
in two categories Public Edu-
cation and Awareness and
Preservation Merit during a
luncheon at the German Village
Meeting Haus in Columbus.
This years honors went to 16
recipients from 14 communi-
ties, including a Preservation
Merit Award to Paulding
County Carnegie Library and
All Trades Historical Restora-
tion LLC for preservation and
rehabilitation of the Paulding
County Library at 205 S. Main
St. in Paulding.
The Paulding County
Carnegie Library was the first
county library in the U.S. to
be funded by Andrew Carnegie.
The library was built between
1914 and 1916 using French
gray pressed brick with match-
ing Bedford, Ind. stone decora-
tion.
It was designed by Howard
and Merriam of Columbus, who
also designed the Rutherford B.
Hayes Presidential Library. The
restrained neoclassical style is a
good example of the Carnegie
design guidelines that focused
on function over ostentation.
In spite of regular mainte-
nance over the lifetime of the Li-
brary, including repair to the
exterior masonry, when All
Trades Historic Restoration was
contracted for the most recent
round of tuck pointing and wa-
terproofing they discovered that
a serious breach in the integrity
of the building had developed.
Substantial settling of the
large keystones over major win-
dows resulted in the brickwork
above to pull out of line with the
wall. On the south side of the li-
brary, a crack developed from
this shifting that followed a line
up to the roof.
All Trades further found that
these breaches allowed moisture
to enter the building behind the
walls, causing damage to the in-
terior walls.
In response to this discovery,
All Trades conducted a compre-
hensive assessment of the faade
and developed a thorough pro-
gram of restoration and repair
for the exterior of the historic li-
brary.
The keystones were re-
moved, reset and secured, the
effected bricks were reset in
their original locations, old mor-
tar was replaced, and all exterior
windows were repaired.
This project exemplifies the
goals of the Secretary of the In-
teriors Standards for Historic
Preservation not only by the
way these specific repairs retain
and preserve the original fea-
tures of the library, but also
through the philosophy of
guardianship that led to the dis-
covery and resolution of these is-
sues.
This well-managed and exe-
cuted project allows the Paulding
County Carnegie Library to
begin its centennial celebrations,
confident that it can serve the
community for the next 100
years.
The Paulding County
Carnegie Library and the Friends
of the Library are hosting an open
house and silent art auction from
5-8 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 17.
Guests can view the refurbished
interior.
Celebrating 30 years of recog-
nizing outstanding accomplish-
ments in historic preservation, the
Ohio Historic Preservation Office
Awards have been presented an-
nually since 1983 on the basis of
nominations submitted from
throughout the state.
The Preservation Merit
Award is for preserving Ohios
prehistory, history, architecture
or culture. Eligible activities in-
clude, but are not limited to,
restoring, rehabilitating or other-
wise preserving an important
building or site, longtime stew-
ardship of a property, promoting
protective legislation, funding
preservation projects, offering
leadership, support or service
and furthering preservation at
the local, regional or state level.
Grand jury indicts 10
A Paulding County grand jury returned indictments against
10 persons on Thursday.
The individuals will be arraigned in Paulding County Com-
mon Pleas Court. Those indicted were:
Jason L. VanCleve, 32, Paulding, one count illegal manu-
facture of drugs, felony of the first degree; one count illegal
assembly or possession of chemicals for the manufacture of
drugs, second-degree felony; one count endangering children,
third-degree felony.
James R. Reynolds, age 34, address unavailable, one count
robbery, felony of the second degree.
Dennis R. Mullins Jr., 38, Antwerp, one count pandering
obscenity involving a minor, second-degree felony.
Brandon L. Saylor, age 27, address unavailable, one count
sexual offender registration, third-degree felony.
Kacy N. Wagner, 30, of Oakwood, one count aggravated
vehicular assault, third-degree felony.
Timothy S. Fitzsimmons, 55, Van Wert, one count driving
while intoxicated, third-degree felony.
Charles I. Perry, 49, Paulding, four counts gross sexual
imposition, third-degree felony.
Kasey L. Zartman, 26, of Paulding, one count theft, felony
of the fourth degree.
Nickolas P. Sandoval, 34, address unavailable, one count
forgery, fifth-degree felony.
Brian L. Saylor, 49, Melrose, one count vandalism, felony
of the fifth degree.
Wednesday, October 16, 2013 Paulding County Progress - 9A
By
Kylee Baumle
In The
Garden
Plants do the strangest things
nut. Some common plants
that dont do well under wal-
nuts are petunias, lilies, hy-
drangeas, peonies and mums.
Consider those big, fat
hornworms you get on your
tomatoes. It turns out that
tomatoes send out an alarm of
some sort whenever theyre
under attack by them. Re-
search suggests that tomatoes
can detect certain things in
the hornworms saliva and the
plant will send out a chemical
signal that attracts the horn-
worms natural predator, the
braconid wasp.
You may have seen the
wasp larvae hanging in num-
bers on the body of the horn-
worm. They feed on its
bodily juices and will eventu-
ally kill it. Depending on the
severity of the hornworm in-
festation, this might not be
enough to keep them from ru-
ining your tomato crop. How-
ever, the whole process is
pretty cool, dont you think?
This is just the tip of the
iceberg as to what awesome-
ness is going on in your gar-
den. Ill be back next week
with more fun and games you
never knew your plants were
playing.
Read Kylees blog, Our Lit-
tle Acre, at www.ourlit-
tleacre.com and on Facebook
at www.facebook.com/OurLit-
tleAcre. Contact her at Pauld-
ingProgressGardener@gmail.
com.
Plants sometimes do things
that are harmful to other
plants, too. If youve ever
tried to grow flowers or some
vegetables (such as tomatoes)
under a black walnut tree,
you know that it can be pretty
darn difficult. Walnut trees, as
well as hickory and pecan,
produce a chemical known as
juglone, which inhibits
growth of certain other plants
by suppressing their respira-
tion. In effect, it tries to
smother them.
Black walnuts produce the
highest level of juglone,
which is released by the
roots, flower buds, and nut
hulls, so the larger the tree,
the larger the area affected by
it will be.
The number of plants that
are super sensitive to juglone
is fewer than those that arent,
so you have many to choose
from if youre trying to grow
in the vicinity of a black wal-
Plants are like people. They
come in all shapes and sizes
and colors and while they all
share some basic similarities,
their personalities are just as
diverse. There are plants that
make the world a better place
for their fellow rootmates just
by being in it and there are
those that, well, frankly, the
world could probably do
without.
Poison ivy, for example.
We all know what its claim to
fame is and that fact alone is
enough for me to vote it off
the island. In all fairness
though, its a vine that helps
prevent erosion and its berries
provide food for wildlife. But
there are plenty of other
plants that do those things
and could take up the slack if
poison ivy were to disappear
forever. Good riddance, I say!
There are other plants that
are selfless, giving at least as
much as they get. Plants
known collectively as
legumes do the coolest thing
with their roots. While most
plants take from the soil,
these also give back. Simply
put, the plants form visible
nodules on their roots which
convert specific bacteria into
ammonia, a form of nitrogen
that improves plant health.
This is released into the soil
when the plant dies. Peas,
beans, clover, alfalfa, and
peanuts are some of the crops
that do this.

NWlIIlums
PuuIdlngOH
*To receive the Iree Ilu shot voucher, veterans must show prooI oI
honorable discharge at the Paulding Co. Veterans Service OIIice,
127 South, (next to the health department). Hours: Tuesday - Friday
9:30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. For more inIormation call 419-399-8285
419-399-4080 ~ 800-741-1743
www. pauI di ngcount yhospi taI . com
Public
Flu Shot Clinic
Paulding County Hospital
Home Health Office
(located at)



No appointment needed
Oct. 10 thru 18 (weekdays only)
8:00 a.m. to Noon
Free Veterans Flu Shot - Voucher must be present-
ed at time of Service
x Covered by Medicare Part B (must have your card
with you)
x For all others (18 and older) $20 at time of service
Public Notice To Delinquent
Manufactured Home Taxpayers
PUBLIC NOTICE
TO TAXPAYERS OF PAULDING COUNTY, OHIO
DELINQUENT MANUFACTURED HOME TAX LIST
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
Under Section 4503.06 of the Ohio Revised Code, it is mandatory
upon the County Auditor to cause a list of all manufactured homes
upon which the taxes and assessments (including penalties) be-
come delinquent as shown on the Treasurers books to be pub-
lished after the August settlement each year.
A list of delinquent taxpayers for manufactured homes will be pub-
lished on November 6 and November 13, 2013.
In order to have names stricken from the published list, payment
must be paid in full at least 7 days (1 week) before the date of
the FIRST publication. Names will NOT be removed after this date
or between publications.
Any taxpayer who is currently in arrears on tax payments or who
has not entered into an agreement under the provision of Section
323.31; Revised Code of Ohio, is regarded as delinquent under
the law, and is subject to publication.
Notice is hereby given that an interest charge will accrue on ac-
counts remaining unpaid after the last day of November unless
the taxpayer enters into a written agreement to pay such taxes
with the County Treasurer.
Persons owing manufactured home taxes, who have not received
a bill through the mail, should inquire in the County Treasurer's
Office.
The County Treasurer's tax books will be open for payment of man-
ufactured home taxes from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday
through Friday.
Claudia J. Fickel
Paulding County Auditor
8c2
Kylee Baumle/Paulding County Progress
Larvae of the parasitic braconid wasp will eventually cause the death of this hornworm.
THE PAULDING COUNTY PROGRESS GOES TO BOLIVIA Recently, Derrick Baksa traveled
with a group of 14 other students from Bluffton University for a Cross Cultural Class. Here, he
stands in front of the Catholic Basilica of St. Lawrence built in 1600s in Santa Cruz, Bolivia. During
the 19 days spent there, the group did some volunteer work at multiple schools and after-school
programs as well as see some sights and experience Bolivian culture. The group visited some
religious outreach organizations in the city of La Paz, hiked to early Incan ruins on the Isla del
Sol, and visited pre-Incan ruins of the Tiahuanacu civilization around the city of Santa Cruz. His
source for exclusive Paulding County news? The Paulding County Progress! Are you headed to
some distant, exotic destination? Take the Progress along with your camera and send a photo
and a little information about your trip to progress@progressnewspaper.org.
Halloween events in Antwerp
ANTWERP The
Antwerp Halloween events
will be held Saturday, Oct.
26.
A parade will be held at
3 p.m. and participants can
line up at 2:45 p.m. on
Archer Drive, east of Ohio
49. The parade will pro-
ceed down Main Street and
end at the fire hall.
The firefighters auxil-
iary will be serving food
during the judging of cos-
tumed entrants. There will
be hot dogs, hamburgers
and drinks available. The
judging will be by entrant
ages with prizes awarded
to first, second and third
place as well as an overall
winner.
The Antwerp Chamber
of Commerce encourages
the community to partici-
pate in the parade by dec-
orating a unit to enter.
These will not be judged,
but just for fun.
Antwerp Trick-or-Treat-
ing will be from 5-6:30
p.m. and will be sponsored
by the town council.
Learn about starting a business
at annual entrepreneurship fair
VAN WERT The 5th An-
nual Van Wert County Entre-
preneurship Fair will be held
on Saturday, Nov. 9 at Vantage
Career Center, located at 818
N. Franklin St. in Van Wert.
Organizers include represen-
tatives from the OSU Exten-
sion Van Wert County
Economic Development Of-
fice, Van Wert Area Chamber
of Commerce, Main Street Van
Wert, the Community Im-
provement Corporation and the
Wright State University Lake
Campus Business Enterprise
Center. Everyone who dreams
of starting a business is encour-
aged to attend this free event.
Registration will begin at
7:45 a.m. with a panel of local
entrepreneurs scheduled to
share their journey at 8 a.m.
This event will also serve as
the kickoff to the third area
Business Plan Challenge.
This free fair offers a wide
variety of assistance, counsel-
ing and information to budding
entrepreneurs and emerging
new businesses. There will be
speakers on topics including:
The First Steps, Financing and
Incentives, and an Ask the Ex-
perts session where area pro-
fessionals will do a Q&A with
the audience.
A special element to the fair
is the announcement of the
Business Plan Challenge where
individuals looking to begin a
business in Van Wert County
can create, submit and present
a business plan to a panel of
judges for the chance to win up
to $2,500 in business develop-
ment funds. The award will be
presented in February.
If you are looking for a
chance to start your own busi-
ness, take advantage of this ex-
cellent opportunity on Nov. 9
from 8 a.m.-noon at the Van-
tage Career Center.
Western Buckeye board okays personnel items
PAULDING The West-
ern Buckeye ESC Govern-
ing Board held its regular
monthly board meeting
Wednesday, Oct. 9 at the
Paulding ESC office.
Superintendent Brian
Gerber updated the board on
Obamacare, personnel
items, and ESC activities.
In consent items, the
board approved:
a one-year part-time lim-
ited contract to Jill Weirrick
as a paraprofessional at
Payne Elementary, effective
Sept. 30 for the 2013-14
school year, two days per
week.
a one-year part-time
COTA services from
Kristina Figgins for the
2013-14 school year, effec-
tive Sept. 9.
increasing work days for
Rebecca Mayer and
Michelle Davis (Help Me
Grow) from 169 to 205 for
the 2013-14 school year due
to an increase in available
Help Me Grow funding.
the retirement resigna-
tion of Pam Zartman, para-
professional at Antwerp, ef-
fective Oct. 11.
employing Laura Boesch
as one-on-one aide at
Antwerp for the 2013-14
school year effective Oct. 14.
Position pending receipt of
current ODE Aide certificate.
The next regular meeting
will be at 6 p.m. Wednesday,
Nov. 13 in the Van Wert
ESC office.
10A - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, October 16, 2013
Matt and Alyssa Saylor, operators of the House of Payne. The haunted house will be open Oct.
25-26 in downtown Payne.
Enjoy a spooktacular good
time at House of Payne
PAYNE Paynes House of Payne, located
above the Payne Banking Center, will once again
be open for business on Halloween weekend,
Oct. 25 and 26.
This years event, chaired by chamber mem-
bers Matt and Alyssa Saylor is sure to provide
thrill seekers of all ages an opportunity to be en-
tertained in a safe, yet exciting and scary way.
The $6 fee per individual donation will be
used to purchase new American flags for the
downtown streets and sidewalks in 2014.
The Payne Chamber has proudly sponsored
haunted houses and haunted cornfields as
fundraisers, without incident, for the commu-
nitys enjoyment for decades. The officers and
members encourage everyone in the Paulding
County and surrounding communities to come
and enjoy this spooktacular good time.
Thrills begin at 7 p.m. both nights and run
until 11 p.m. For questions and/or additional
information, contact Matt Saylor at 419-786-
9342.
Free industrial training information
session planned Oct. 18 in Van Wert
VAN WERT The Van Wert County Eco-
nomic Development Group is hosting a free in-
formation session on Friday, Oct. 18 at the
Marsh Foundation in the administration building
auditorium, located at 1229 Lincoln Highway,
Van Wert from 9-10:30 a.m. for all companies in
the area who are interested in learning more
about local industrial training programs.
The session will begin immediately following
the monthly Van Wert County Economic Devel-
opment Advisory Group meeting scheduled for
8-9 a.m.
The information session will be hosted by
Cindy Leis, Van Wert County Economic Devel-
opment director, and presented by local educa-
tional partners from Northwest State
Community College, Rhodes State College,
Vantage Career Center and Wright State Univer-
sity Lake Campus. Each educational partner
will present outlines of their respective indus-
trial training programs available to individuals
and companies.
The purpose of the event is to inform attendees
about local training programs available to meet
both immediate and future needs for a higher
skilled workforce. As companies in the area plan
for future growth and advancements in technol-
ogy, a higher skilled workforce is and will be in
high demand.
Mark your calendar to attend this information
session and meet representatives from local uni-
versities, colleges and career centers. The public
is welcome. Please call Darlene Myers at the Van
Wert County Economic Development office at
419-238-2999 or email myers.688@osu.edu to
reserve a seat.
Sherwood to host harvest
homecoming, haunted walk
SHERWOOD A Harvest
Homecoming and Sherwood
Forest Haunted Walk will be
held Oct. 19-20 in Sherwood.
All money raised during the
event weekend will go back
into the Sherwood Parks. Last
years homecoming funds
went toward purchasing a new
merry-go-round and mulch for
Moats Park. To start off
the day on Saturday, Oct. 19,
the Sherwood Library will
have its open house and dedi-
cation of the new addition from
10 a.m.-3:30 pm. The dedica-
tion ceremony will take place
at 1 p.m.
At 3:30 p.m., the park
board will take over with the
Harvest Homecoming events.
A costume parade will com-
mence at 3:30 with line up
beginning at 3 p.m. in the
parking lot of the Little
Reservation Station Play-
ground. Everyone is welcome
to participate with floats also.
The first 50 kids in costume
will receive a gold dollar,
sponsored by the Sherwood
State Bank.
This year, the parade will
start at the playground and
end at Moats Dealership, and
will NOT be crossing the rail-
road tracks.
Sassie the Clown will then
be judging costumes at Crys-
tal Fountain Auditorium with
prize categories from toddler
to age 8. Grand marshal will
be Jim Timbrook, who has
spent many years developing
the ball fields at Moats Park.
From 4-6 p.m., food will be
served at Crystal Fountain
Auditorium. Robyn Crites
will be preparing a delicious
meal to include beef and
creamed chicken sandwiches,
hot dogs, noodles, baked
beans, homemade pies, coffee
and punch. Everyone can
come down and have a good
meal and a friendly conversa-
tion with your neighbors and
friends.
New this year will be the
Sherwood Forest Haunted
Walk, a 20-minute guided
stroll through the woods be-
hind the auditorium. The
walk will be held from dusk
until 11 p.m. Saturday, Oct.
19 and from dusk until 10
p.m. Sunday, Oct. 20. The
cost is $7 per person. Tickets
can be purchased inside the
Crystal Fountain Auditorium.
This walk is not recom-
mended for children under 13
years of age.
Organizers say they have
seen many spirits in the
woods left from years ago
and they can hear the sounds
of hungry animals throughout
the trees. They guarantee vis-
itors cannot get out of the
woods without their heart
skipping a beat or two, if they
manage to get out at all.
During the evening of both
nights, the kitchen will be
open serving hotdogs, cook-
ies, hot chocolate, coffee and
cider.
This is the first year that or-
ganizers have tried to bring the
spirit of Halloween back to
Sherwood since the end of
Haunted Hollow Hayride in
1999. If all works out this year,
they would like to make it an
annual event stretching
throughout the month of Octo-
ber.
Volunteers and bakers are
still needed,. Contact Lynn
Wonderly, park board president
at 419-899-2069 or go to the
web site at http://www.perfect-
potluck.com/meals.php?t=PR
LQ4527 to sign up.
Relay team to
hold craft show
PAULDING A craft-vendor show will be
held from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 9 at the
Paulding Church of the Nazarene, 210 Dooley
Drive in Paulding.
This is a fundraiser event for the Country Inn
Living Centers Relay For Life team for the
American Cancer Society.
For booth information, contact 419-605-5600.
Annual Strides for Scholarships winners named
PAULDING The Paulding
County Hospital Foundation
held its Fourth Annual Strides
for Scholarships a 5K/Kids
Race on Sept. 21.
The 5K race started at Pauld-
ing County Hospital and had a
new route this year that seemed
to be well received by the partic-
ipants.
For the first time, cash awards
were given out to the top three
places for males and females
plus awards were given to eight
different age groups each for
males and females.
The overall and male winner
was Landry Williams, with a
time of 16:54 minutes, and the
overall female winner was
Karen Killion with a time of
19:26 minutes.
The kids race winners were
Eli Moore and Shanda Bigger.
Rachel Stoller won the girls
bike and Ezra Sinn won the
boys bike.
Platinum sponsor for the
2013 race was Parkview
Physicians Group, Cardiol-
ogy. Other sponsors included
Parkview Health System, Dr.
Kate Gilreath, Baughman
Tile, PCH Auxiliary and
Liechty Farm Equipment of
Paulding.
Once again, there was a
friendly competition between
the three county school dis-
tricts. The school district with
the most participation of stu-
dents and staff will be
awarded an additional $500
scholarship in spring 2014.
Wayne Trace Schools won
this competition for the third
year in a row.
Since its inception in 2000,
The Paulding County Hospi-
tal Foundation is responsible
for awarding 46 scholarships
to Paulding County students
who have chosen to pursue
healthcare careers.
On Sept. 21, the annual Paulding County Hospital Foundation Strides for Scholarships 5K run was held to raise money for
healthcare career scholarships. Among the participants were more than two dozen youngsters (above) who ran a special kids
race.
Jim Langham/Paulding County Progress
Employees from PolyOne in Paulding have generated over $10,000 to date for the United Way
of Paulding County. From left are Michelle Gawronski, operations; Chelsa Smith, quality inspec-
tion; Sonya Herber, United Way executive director; Sue Thompson, quality assurance manager;
company official Brad Bair; and plant manager Jeff Dye.
By JIM LANGHAM
Feature Writer
PAULDING Even as
we speak, the amount con-
tinues to grow, says Poly-
One quality assurance
executive Sue Thompson
concerning that companys
donation toward the United
Way of Paulding County
campaign.
As of late last week, com-
pany donations had reached
$10,622.40 and were con-
tinuing to grow. Donations
had been accrued from
United Way pledges of over
$9,000, United Way indi-
vidual donation, buttons to
dress for United Way, raffle
tickets, hat wars and coffee
donations.
In addition, employees
are collecting groceries to
be donated to food banks in
Paulding and Melrose. The
side goal of workers is to
completely stack the office
of executive Brad Bair,
scheduling and material
manager, concerning gro-
ceries for the drive.
Bair said that employees
have changed him from a
skeptic into a believer in
connection with their gen-
erous donation to United
Way.
I am very pleased to see
everyone come together for
this good cause, said Bair.
I was a little skeptical at
first, but they have shown
me on a daily basis how
generous they are in giving.
They have really come
together. They are very
competitive for the good of
the cause when it comes to
something like this, Bair
said. We were big into it
before when we were
Spartech, but the entire
company is enthusiastic as
part of the PolyOne drive.
Thompson said that Poly-
Ones national theme is
Live United, A Million
Resources to Give, defin-
ing the fact that national
company officials have a
goal of raising $1 million
for United Way as a corpo-
ration.
Two popular facets of the
fundraiser in the Paulding
plant has been a raffle and a
hat wearing contest.
Local businesses donated
such items as a Ninja
blender, electronic dart
board, Ohio State bag,
PolyOne employees come together for generous United Way donation
Michigan All-Time greats
plaque, large cordless drill
holster, seven pocket nail and
tool bag, $20 gift certificate to
Signature Embroidery, $10
gift certificate to Chief Super-
market, two gift cards to
Morning Star and Emerald
Forest Pottery by Gloria
Craig.
In addition, employees
who purchased United Way
dress buttons have the option
of wearing casual dress rather
than Cintas Uniform or office
attire. Buttons, which cost
$10, are good for one day.
We are excited, it is so
much fun, said Thompson.
Everybody is participating,
everybody is having a good
time. We have close-knit,
family-oriented employees.
Company officials love to see
what we do in a small town.
We may all need help
some day, continued
Thompson. We have 90-plus
employees giving enough to
help all that we can. We want
to send the message to our
community that help is there.
We want help there for our
kids and grandkids as they
grow up.
Sonya Herber, local United
Way executive director, said
that she has been over-
whelmed by the overall dedi-
cation to United Way in the
local community.
This county is very car-
ing, Herber said. I am ex-
cited about all of the people
who are pulling together in
this program. We know we
are going to have need this
winter. NOCAC, one of our
partner agencies, is already
receiving requests for assis-
tance with winter heating.
United Way of Paulding
County is working with agen-
cies to identify and address
the underlying causes that
contribute to an individual or
family who is suffering crisis.
Our mission is to improve
lives by mobilizing the caring
power of the community.
The end result will benefit
everyone in Paulding
County, said Herber.
Service Technician
Archbold Equipment Co. has an opening for
a full-time Service Technician at our Ottawa
and Sherwood Stores. Person will be re-
sponsible for service, repair, recondition
and assembling customer new or used
equipment. Knowledge of farm equipment
preferred and must have own tools. We
offer competitive salary and benefits. Send
resume to Archbold Equipment Co., Box
181, Archbold OH 43502 or e-mail to
denny.shannon@archboldequipmentco.com.
8c2
S & S SANITATION
Serving Northwest Ohio
Roll-off containers available, Commercial
and Residential Clean-up
1-888-596-3805
6c5
Paulding County Hospital
1035 W. Wayne Street
Paulding, OH 45879
Email: pchhr@saa.net
JOB OPPORTUNITIES
RN PRN
as needed, in both the ER Department and on the
Medical Floor. RN must be able to quickly assess
a patients condition, and initiate nursing care to
patients. Must have a current State of Ohio RN
License. Prior experience on a Med/Surg unit or
ER department is preferred.
Coder Codes each patient record for the index-
ing operations, diagnoses, physicians and sur-
geons planning reports, and any other coding as
needed. Performs any other tasks needed in the
Medical Records department. Must have com-
pleted formal courses in Health Information Man-
agement or have equivalent experience and
knowledge of classification and nomenclature,
anatomy, medical terminology, and medical
records procedures and practices. Understanding
of ICD-9, ICD-10, and CPT-4. College degree in
Health Information Management and RHIT or
RHIA certification preferred. Must have prior
ER Physician coding experience.
Paulding County Hospital offers an excellent com-
pensation and benefits package to full time and part
time employees based on hours worked, which in-
cludes Medical, Dental, Vision, Life Insurance,
State of Ohio PERS retirement and much more.
To apply, go online at www.pauldingcountyhospi-
tal.com, or by email to: pchhr@saa.net, or in per-
son at 1035 W. Wayne Street, Paulding, OH 45879.
8c1
VAN WERT MEDICAL SERVICES
VAN WERT, OHIO
MEDICAL ASSISTANT
Fulltime (benefits eligible) and on-call as needed
(not eligible for benefits) positions are available
with VWMS. Hours are typically 8am-5pm, Mon-
day through Friday. Some evenings until 7pm
required. Some Saturdays required. Qualified
candidates must have detailed knowledge of
medical terminology, pharmaceuticals, and must
be able to communicate medical information to
clients. Other skills such as phone operation,
scheduling, filing and use of office equipment are
necessary. Graduate of a medical assistant
training program or graduate of a similar training
program. Work experience in patient care,
preferably in a medical group setting is strongly
preferred. Qualified candidates are encouraged
to submit a resume/application to:
Human Resources
Van Wert County Hospital
1250 S. Washington St.
Van Wert, Ohio 45891
Fax: 419-238-9390
E-mail: hr@vanwerthospital.org
Visit our website at: www.vanwerthospital.org
8c1
EOE
ABSOLUTE TRACTOR AUCTION
9 AM-SATURDAY-OCT. 19
LOCATION: Vantage Career Center, 818 North Franklin
Street, Van Wert, Ohio 45891
TRACTORS & ACCESSORIES & FORKLIFT
Ford Tractor; Model DD5141; Case/IH Tractor; Model 695;
IH Tractor; Model 656; IH Tractor; Model 2404; JD Trac-
tor; Model 2020; Woods mower; Model RM306D; New
Idea Snow Blower; Model 517; Ford Blade; Model 786A;
Rockwell/Delta 3 phase radial arm saw; Condiment
stands; Metal tables; Kennedy tool cart; Troy Bilt Horse
tiller; NEW 48 NG SouthBend Flat Top Grill; Filing cabi-
nets; Chairs; Shelving; The Boss snow plow; Generators;
Spreader/Seeder; Washer/Dryer
*** PLEASE ARRIVE PROMPTLY ***
See www.StraleyRealty.com
SELLER: Vantage Career Center Board of Education
TERMS: Cash/Proper Check; Removal day of auction/call
Auction Manager; Tow Motor available Day of Sale ONLY;
5% Buyers Premium
AUCTIONEER: Chester M. Straley, Sale Manager;
Call 419-605-8410
ROCKWELL TABLE SAW & FLAT TOP GRILL
419 W Ervin
Van Wert, OH
419-238-9733
800-727-2021
EVERYTHING WE TOUCHTURNS TO SOLD
Pet Grooming
Large & Small
We do them all
Cats &
Dogs
*Bathing, Nails,
Glands & Grooming
Phone: 419-399-3389
M.L. Zehr Construction
The quality of our work speaks for itself and
will remain long after.
Metal Frame Buildings
Pole Barns
Commercial & Residential,
30+ years experience
Free Estimates
25720 Notestine Rd., Woodburn, IN 46797
(260) 433-5628 Mon.-Fri. 6:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
PER
MO.
WHY BUY USED
WHEN YOU CAN
DRIVENEW
FOR LESS
2014 SILVERADO
$
269
1500Dbl Cab,36mo.,12KM/yr,0secdpst,+tax,
title&fees$3499Dn,Seedealerfordetails
SNYDER
CHEVROLET
524NPERRYST,
NAPOLEON,OH
800.811.9414
SNYDERAUTOGROUP.COM
EW
WHY BUY ED S U
EN H W U YO N CA
E IV R D W E NEW
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s l ai tta de et rr o f fo aler r de ee e S ,, n D 99 9 4 3 $ ss e e f fe & &f ee tl i t
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9 6 2
$
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4 1 94 . 1 1 8 . 0 80
M O C . UP O R G O T U A R E D Y N S
PER
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WHY BUY USED
WHEN YOU CAN
DRIVENEW
FOR LESS
2013 TERRAINFWDSLE
$
189
0secdpst,10KM/yr,24mos,$1690Dn,+Tax,Title
&Fees,Seedealerfordetails
SNYDER
GMCBUICKCADILLAC
1421NSCOTTST,
NAPOLEON,OH
800.811.9414
SNYDERAUTOGROUP.COM
EW
WHY BUY ED S U
EN H W U YO N CA
E IV R D W E NEW
D
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PER
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WHY BUY USED
WHEN YOU CAN
DRIVENEW
FOR LESS
2014 CRUZE
$
139
1LT,nautotrans,36mo,,12kM/yr,0secdpst&1stmo
pmt,_tax,title&fees,$2499Dn,Seedealerfordetails
SNYDER
CHEVROLET
524NPERRYST,
NAPOLEON,OH
800.811.9414
SNYDERAUTOGROUP.COM
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WHY Y BU ED S U
EN H W U YO N CA
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$
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PER
MO.
WHY BUY USED
WHEN YOU CAN
DRIVENEW
FOR LESS
2014 VERANO
$
189
0Secdpst,39mos,12KM/yr,$2690Dn,+Tax,Title
&Fees,Seedealerfordetails
SNYDER
GMCBUICKCADILLAC
1421NSCOTTST,
NAPOLEON,OH
800.811.9414
SNYDERAUTOGROUP.COM
EW
WHY BUY ED S U
EN H W U YO N CA
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PER
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WHY BUY USED
WHEN YOU CAN
DRIVENEW
FOR LESS
2014 EQUINOXFWDLS
$
199
0 sec dep. 12K M/yr, 0 sec dpst, + tax title fees,
$3249Dn,Seedealerfordetails
SNYDER
CHEVROLET
524NPERRYST,
NAPOLEON,OH
800.811.9414
SNYDERAUTOGROUP.COM
EW
WHY BUY ED S U
EN H W U YO N CA
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M O C . UP O R G O T U A R E D Y N S
PER
MO.
WHY BUY USED
WHEN YOU CAN
DRIVENEW
FOR LESS
2014 ATS 2.0 T
$
289
0secdpst,10KM/yr,36mos,$3749Dn+Tax,Title
&Fees,Seedealerfordetails
SNYDER
GMCBUICKCADILLAC
1421NSCOTTST,
NAPOLEON,OH
800.811.9414
SNYDERAUTOGROUP.COM
EW
WHY BUY ED S U
EN H W U YO N CA
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FOLTZ REALTY
Donald K. Foltz, II - Broker: 106 N. Williams St. Paulding
www.foltzrealty.com 419-399-2347
REALTORS: Tim Boss 419-769-0823, Maurie Wannemacher 419-769-9090
#2840 209 N. Williams St. Paulding:
OWN YOUR OWN BUSINESS!!
Turn Key operation. Real Estate,
Restaurant Equipment, Inventory
and D1-D2 Liquor License. Don't
miss this opportunity to be your own
boss. Building has been recently re-
modeled. See our website for inte-
rior pics. $119,900 Call Don
#2846 NEW LISTING! 214 W.
George St. Paulding: Move in
ready 3 Bedroom home offering
new roof, new flooring, newer win-
dows and freshly painted interior.
$69,900....Call Don
CHECK OUR NEW WEBSITE @ foltzrealty.com
#2827 495 E. Perry St. Paulding:
3.04 acre lot on 127S. City water
& sewer tap available. $49,000
Call Tim
#2835 Make Offer!! 15953 SR.
111 Paulding: Beautiful lot, 4 BR.,
1 3/4 Ba. Home with 2 car at-
tached & 2 car detached garage.
Nice wooded area for enjoying na-
ture. Call Maurie $119,900
Wooded - Recreational - Farm Land
Sat., Oct. 26 @ 9:00 A.M.
(Auglaize & Brown Twp.) Paulding Co., OH
Offered In 9 Parcels with sizes From 6 to 98 acres
Auction Parcels 1 - 5 are 261+- contiguous acres in five parcels
from 6 acres to 98 acres in and adjacent to Charloe 7 mi east of
Paulding on Rd. C-138 (Charloe Trail) Auction Parcel 6
is 66 acres of tillable, brush & CRP located at the southwest side of
Junction on CR 111 (7 mi. south of Defiance / 6 mi NE of Paulding)
. Auction Parcels 7, 8 & 9 are 167+- mostly contiguous
acres 2 mi. south of Junction or 3 mi. north of Charloe on Rd. 163
(Miami / Erie canal road) - 8 mi south of Defiance 6 mi east of
Paulding in 3 parcels from 10 acres of wooded creek frontage to 85
acres of tillable, CRP, recreational with creek frontage and newer
home, barn and related - Come to the open inspections at Parcel
9 for surveys, FSA information, and information for all Parcels
Parcel 9 Open Inspections -
Thurs., Oct. 17 - 3 P.M. to 5 P.M.
Sat., Oct. 19 1 P.M. to 3 P.M.
Auction Parcel 9---- 85+- acres 13346 Rd. 163, Defiance, OH --
lays north of Rd. 156 & east of Rd. 163 -------- 4,140+- sq. ft. 2
story home with custom made hardwood trim & cabinets, great
room with wood burning fireplace open to the second floor, 4 or 5
bedrooms, 3 baths, office, den / gun room, SS appliances This
is one of those properties with multiple potential uses --- Auction
Procedure & Terms: Multi Parcel Bidding with closing on or be-
fore Nov. 26, 2013 (complete terms in brochure) Auction Loca-
tion: Gorrell Bros. Auction Facility - 1201 N. Williams St.,
Paulding, OH- free refreshments. Seller: Ryan P. Cunningham,
Trustee .. Troth Law Office, LLC - Glenn H. Troth, Attorney
for Seller . Gorrell Bros. Auctioneers; Don Gorrell, Sale
Mgr; Larry D. Gorrell, Broker; Sandra Mickelson - Stephen
Sprow - Joe Barker - Aaron Timm - Nolan Shisler - Auctioneers
Auction
500 Acres
Large
Auction
Sat, Oct. 19 @ 10:00 A.M.
LOCATION: Gorrell Bros. Auction Facility - 1201 N. Williams St., Paulding, OH
Antiques - Glassware - Toys
Clean Household - Tools
Enclosed Trailer - Fishing Boat
Antiques, Collectables & Toys including 6 Section Oak Barrister Book Case...Oak Dis-
play Cabinet...Oak Glass Foot Parlor Stand...Kitchen Cabinets...Rocking
Chairs...Buffet...Ash Commode Roos Cedar...Chest & Other Wood Chest...Large Heavy
Butcher Block Table - top is approx 30" x 40" x 16" thick (marked Master Built Wood
Welded - Petosky, Mich / probably from former Middlepoint Butcher Shop)...Parlor
Table & 4 Chairs...3 Oak Wall Telephones...Dressers...Coffee Grinder...Apple
Peeler...Stereo Viewer...Sad Iron...Painted China Bowls...Pattern Glass...Vases...Fenton
Glass ... China Music Boxes ... Ruby Flash Glass ... Cups & Saucers ...Figurines...Bot-
tles...Amber Lightning Fruit Jar...Souvenir Plates...Crock Jugs...Hall China...Old pictures
& frames...Wooden Shoe Bookcase...Mirrors...Van Wert Globe Dairy & Other Milk Bot-
tles...Tins...Hens on Nest...Pitcher & Glasses...Hat Pins & Holder...Skaters
Lantern...NYCS RR Can...Kerosene Lamps...RR Lantern...Oil Lamps...Native American
Figurines...Brass Jelly Kettle...Wooden Canteen (appears old)...Lots of Books Including
Van Wert History Books, Old Peony Festival Programs & Many Other Old Paper Items
.... Old Sheet Music...Dolls including Skookum Indian, Madame Alexander, Rakes, Bar-
bies, Etc...Old Doll House & Plastic Doll House & Furniture & Accessories including
clothes...Games...Puzzles...Toys...Old Marx Tin Service Station...Old Structo Toy Dump
Truck...Gunsmoke Lunch Box...Disney Lunch Boxes...Erector Set in Wood Box...Ex-
calibur Yearbooks...Table Clothes...Linens...Wallace Sterling Silverware (12 Forks,
Spoons & Knives)...Sterling Souvenir Spoons Marbles...6 Quilts...Very Partial List-
ing...Furniture & Household including King Size Bed...2 Full Size Beds...Twin
Bed...Gun Cabinet...Grandmother Clock...Stands...Lamps...Sewing Machine in Cabi-
net...Dresser...3 Sets Tables & Chairs...Pictures & Frames...Air Hockey Table...Gas Fire-
place Insert...Gas Fireplace...Meilink Safe (approx 24" wide, 20" deep, 41"
high)...Galileo Visions FS-90 Telescope, multiple ocular holder...Magnus Organ...Chest
& Upright Freezers...Portable Whirlpool Dishwasher...Frigidaire
Range...Whirlpool...Stainless Steele Mounted Microwave...Picnic Table...Small Amount
Of Misc. Stainless Steel & Other Restaurant Equipment...2008 Cargo Express CE61XL
Enclosed Trailer, 6 ft. x 10 ft. box, single axle, looks sharp ....... Fishing Boat, 12ft.
Blue Fin, 4HP Mercury Motor & Shore Land'r Trailer...File Cabinets...3+ Flatbed Wag-
ons of small household and related including Baskets, Many Nice Xmas items & other
seasonal holiday items, towels, bedding and related...Assortment of Collegiate Sheppard
Hooks, Lawn Spreader,Tricycles and other outdoor items...2 Flatbed Wagons of Tools
and Related including Insulation Blower, Plastic Tool Box for Truck, New in Box 1/3
HP Column Sump Pump, Ladders, Shovels, Rakes, Hoes, Ax, Craftsman Electric Hedge
Trimmer, Kerosene Heater, Fuel Cans, Parts Bin. Heavy Duty Drop Cord, Wheelbarrow,
Delta chop saw, chains, binders, Craftsman tools and related items...Many more items
- 2 auction rings...Call for brochure or visit our web site...Inspection: Fri. Oct. 18 from
2:00 P.M. to 5 P.M. and beginning at 8:30 A.M. on the day of the auction.... Terms:
Cash, approved check, VISA, Master Card or Discover Card...Sellers: Phil & Susan
Mohr and other consignors .... Gorrell Bros. Auctioneers - Don Gorrell, Larry Gorrell,
Matthew Bowers, Aaron Timm, Sandra Mickelson, Nolan Shisler
TOUR OF
HOMES
1:00 -1:45 PM....780 Third St. in Latty (Corner of Lewis & Third)3 Bdrm, lg.
covered patio & concrete drive; Corner 1 acre lot w/trees;new bath, basement w/finished
rec room & Murphy bed; finished. 2-Car garage, 6 panel doors, Andersen windows
.......................................................................................................................................$59,900
1:00 -1:45 PM....7328 Rd 87, Paulding (Briceton) - Newer roof, siding, windows,
& furnace! Coy pond, heated outbuilding & new live-stock barn. Mature trees &
landscaping, and much more................................................................... $145,000
2:00 - 2:45 PM....312 S. Laura St. in Payne - 3 BR home w/newer roof, siding, gutters
& windows; nice heated detached garage; Affordably priced at..........................$42,500
2:00 - 2:45 PM....1244 Emerald Rd., Paulding - 3 Bdrm, 2 Bath, Modern decor
w/cathedral ceiling, open kitchen/dining with slider door to rear patio & fenced backyard.
New shingles & siding; 2-Car garage w/pull-down stair to overhead storage......$96,000
2:00 - 2:45 PM....624 Dix (take Baldwin W. from SR 127 to Dix) - 4 Bdrm, 2 Bath,
(Split bdrm design for privacy); lg. master bdrm has 2 closets & adjoining bath; living
room & eat-in kitchen, 12 X 16 enclosed 3-season room. REDUCED to ...........$54,900
2:00 - 3:00 PM....825 Greenbriar (SR 127 to Gasser Rd. to Countryside Est.) - NEW
CONSTRUCTION! - 3 Bdrm, 2 Bath; the master suite has a separate tub, shower &
walk-in closet; Great Room; Utility room; in Countryside Estates II................$144,000
DON GORRELL, SANDRA MICKELSON & TAMYRA HUMES,
and AARON TIMM
GORRELL BROS, LARRY D GORRELL, BROKER -
1201 N. Williams, Paulding, OH
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2013
100 East Jackson St., Paulding, Ohio
419-399-4444
www.straleyrealestateinc.com
STRALEY REAL ESTATE
PLEASE CALL
Carolyn Straley @ 419-769-1352 or 419-399-3721,
Matt Straley @ 419-785-5161 or Rudy Straley @ 419-769-8996
for information concerning buying, qualifying for loan or selling
BUI LDI NG SI TE (108 x
132) on the NE Corner of
Perry and Coupland Streets
in Paulding. #350
3 BEDROOM one story home
and attached garage, located
on Helen Street in Paulding.
#330
3 BEDROOM, ranch style
home having central air, large
living dining room combina-
tion, separate laundry and a 2
car garage located on a cor-
ner lot in Paulding. #354
3 BEDROOM, 1 1/2 bath
home, fireplace, attached
garage and a 16x24' storage
building, all on 1.5 shaded
acres. Location is west of
Antwerp. #325
REDUCED LISTI NG PRICE!
NOW LI STED AT $59, 900.
Large, spacious home with 3,
maybe a 4th bedroom or use
the room as an all-purose. The
home has a family room with
fireplace, living room, dining
room, two baths, basement,
and can be heated either by
natural gas or wood heat, as
theres a furnace for each. At
the rear of the corner lot is a
big 30 x 63 garage. Located in
Paulding. #339
2 BUI LDI NG SITES; a 2.296
acre parcel and a 1.928 acre
parcel near the Paulding
Hospital. #348 & #349
3 BEDROOM, 1 1/2 baths,
attached garage and a stor-
age shed out back located in
Paulding. #347
3 BEDROOM 1.5 bath home
basement, attached 24 x 28
garage and a 12x12 storage
building. Location is in
Paulding on West Perry St.
#351
QUALITY CONSTRUCTED BY
JOHN HERZIG. 11833 Road
132 near the Paulding
Hospital. The 2800 sq. ft. 3
bedroom, 3 bath home and a
1200+ sq. ft. attached garage
for vehicle and storage space
has many features for those
who appreciate quality. The lot
measures 2.555 acres with a
pond that's behind the home.
Also, there's more acreage
available. Listing #344
1131 EMERALD ROAD,
Paulding- 3 bedroom 2 bath
home 13 years of age with
1500 feet of living area,
equipped kitchen and central
air. #316
10+ ACRES: 3 bedroom 2 bath
home with a 3rd bath space in the
full basement thats studded, insu-
lated and ready to finish. The great
room has a fireplace and large win-
dows overlooking the pond.
Theres also central heat and air,
extra electric service for future uses and more for you to see.
Located on Road 176 in the Antwerp School District. #353
ANTICIPATION OF
THE ISSUANCE OF
BONDS FOR THE
PURPOSE OF AC-
QUIRING AND IM-
PROVING REAL
PROPERTY AND IN-
TERESTS THEREIN
FOR USE BY THE
VILLAGE'S STREET
DEPARTMENT, TO-
GETHER WITH ALL
NECESSARY AP-
P URT E NANCE S
THERETO, AND DE-
CLARING AN
EMERGENCY.
Copies of the full text
of this legislation may
be obtained at the Fi-
nance Director's Of-
fice, 116 South Main
Street, between the
hours of 8:00 a.m, and
5:00 p.m. Monday
tlirough Friday.
Melissa S. Tope,
Finance Director 8c2
LEGALS
ADVERTISEMENT
FOR BIDS
Paulding County Hospi-
tal will accept sealed
bids for: Electronic
Health Record, until
2:30 p.m. EDST on Oc-
tober 24, 2013 at the of-
fice of the Hospital
CFO, 1035 West Wayne
Street, Paulding, Ohio
45879. Detailed specifi-
cations may be obtained
from Robert Goshia,
CFO, at 419-399-1106.
Bids must include cur-
rent user listing, system
build, onsite compo-
nents, software, licenses,
hosting if applicable, on-
site staff training, go live
support, ongoing sup-
port, freight costs, all in-
stallation costs, detailed
product and warranty in-
formation, proposed de-
livery and installation
time frames and pay-
ment terms to include
outright purchase and/or
a 5 year lease. A bond or
certified check equal to
5% of the amount bid
must accompany all
bids. Bids will be
opened at 2:35 p.m. on
October 24, 2013 at the
office of the Chief Fi-
nancial Officer, and will
be reviewed by the
Board of Trustees on or
before November 7,
2013. Paulding County
Hospital reserves the
right to reject any and
all bids. By order of the
Board of Trustees,
Gary W. Adkins 7c2
Chief Executive Officer
RESOLUTION
1464-13
Resolution 1464-13
was passed by Pauld-
ing Village Council on
October 7, 2013, and
goes into effect and
shall be in force imme-
diately. The summary
of this legislation is as
follows:
AN ORDINANCE TO
PROVIDE FOR THE
ISSUANCE OF NOT
TO EXCEED
$110,000 NOTES IN
Wednesday, October 16, 2013 Paulding County Progress - 11A
PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD
QUICKLY...EASILY...
JUST PHONE 419-399-4015
2002 CHRYSLER TOWN
AND COUNTRY 182243
miles. Runs well, needs brake
work. Asking $500. Call 419-
399-3570, leave message. 8p1
1994 CLUB CAR GOLF
CART - gas-powered, hinged
windshield with hard top
canopy, vinyl rain guard enclo-
sure, 4-seater, headlight and
tail lights. Asking $3,000. Call
260-705-3928 7c2
NEED A UNIQUE GIFT for a
birthday, anniversary, retire-
ment or other occasion? Get a
Progress photo of family,
friends, sports, scenes and
special events professionally
enlarged or printed on a T-shirt,
mug or mouse pad. Delivered
to your door in a couple of
days. Visit www.progressnews-
paper.org and click the big blue
button to view our photo gal-
leries and get started! ctf
$125 QUEEN PILLOWTOP
MATTRESS SET. New in
plastic, can deliver 260-493-
0805. 5p4
YEARS AGO ANTIQUE
MALL, 108 W. Main Street,
Van Wert (419) 238-3362,
30+ Dealers. Closed Tues-
days. Buy & Sell. 27ctf
MANZ HEATING AC &
PLUMBING- Free Estimates.
419-786-8752.
Kevi n.Manz@Yahoo.com
46ctf
AL GRIFFITHS CON-
STRUCTION: Windows, light
electrical, drywall, siding,
doors and more. Call Al for
your repair or construction
needs. 419-506-2102 51ctf
$450 MO./$450 SECURITY
DEPOSIT; 3 bdrm, 1 car
garage or lease with option to
purchase, $1,800 down/$400
mo. 520-395-880 8p3
SPACIOUS, OPEN, 2 BDRM
UPSTAIRS, ANTWERP
COUNTRY APARTMENT.
$450/mo. plus deposit. NO
PETS. Water & garbage pro-
vided, electric & propane NOT
included. 419-258-0230 7c2
2 BDRM GROUND FLOOR
APT in Paulding. 419-399-
7181. 6ctf
2 BDRM APT. IN PAYNE- first
month rent plus deposit. 419-
263-4700 or 419-263-8304 6c3
NORTH GARDEN PLACE
APTS. located on N. Main
St. in Antwerp, OH. has
apartments available. Rent is
based on income. Rental As-
sistance may be available.
For more information please
call (419) 258-2603. This in-
stitution is an equal opportu-
nity provider, and employer.
Handicap accessible - Equal
Housing Opportunity. 6c3
NOW LEASING: ONE &
TWO BEDROOM APART-
MENTS. Deposit, lease, ref-
erences, credit, and
background check required.
No pets allowed. Please call
Straley Apts. at 419-399-
4444 or 419-399-3721 for
more information 2ctf
2 BDRM. APARTMENTS
FOR RENT in Paulding and
Defiance. Please call Jodi at
419-399-2419 for more de-
tails. 43ctf
IN PAULDING - Whispering
Pines - 2 bdrm. Call 419-670-
4655 or 419-399-2419
47ctf
PAULDING STORAGE CEN-
TER: Now renting storage
units. Different sizes available.
Call 419-399-2419 for info.
18ctf
3 BDRM HOUSE FOR RENT
in Grover Hill with garage. Call
419-438-5850. 8c2
PAULDING MINI STORAGE
UNITS. Located at south side
of Paulding on US 127. Vari-
ous sizes. Please call 419-
399-4444 or 419-399-3721
20ctf
AMERICARE HOME
HEALTH OF DEFIANCE is
seeking to fill an RN position.
We serve Defiance, Putnam,
Henry and Paulding counties.
Interested applicants please
send your resume to
hr@americare-health.com or
fill out an application at our of-
fice at 1132 E. Second St. in
Defiance. EOE 8c2
IMMEDIATE OPENINGS
FOR TRUCK DRIVERS. The
persons applying must have a
class A CDL with clean driving
record. We offer 36.5 cents
per mile loaded or empty, drop
and pickup pay, home nightly.
Apply in person at Haviland
Drainage Products, 100 West
Main St., Haviland, OH
45851. 8c2
OWNER OPERATORS:
100% No-Touch! Dedicated
Loads. 2000 or newer tractor,
CDL-A, 12mo exp. Tabitha:
800-325-7884 x4 7p2
R&R EMPLOYMENT & R&R
MEDICAL STAFFING. Sani-
tation, Maintenance, Produc-
tion Workers, PRN, LPN, RN,
House Keeping, and Dietary.
Accepting applicaitons for
CNA classes starting Novem-
ber! Apply online www.rrem-
ployment.com or call
419-232-2008. 7c2
CDL CLASS A OTR
DRIVER - professional driver
wanted for local trucking firm.
Home most nights. 2 yrs.
OTR exp. Clean MVR. Ben-
efits available. Call 260-639-
7346 7c2
OCT. 16 & 17; 9 TO 5. 305
S. ERIE ST., ANTWERP.
Camera equipment, electric
typewriter, linens & much
misc. 8p1
NEW LISTING - BEAUTI-
FUL 3 BDRM, 1 1 /2 BATH
RANCH HOME. Great loca-
tion, 735 Tom Tim Dr., near
school & park. Lg. backyard
overlooking pond & forest.
Home includes lg. eat-in
kitchen, lg. family room, liv-
ing room & den. $130,000.
Call 419-576-7758 to tour.
51ktf
WAYNE TRACE SCHOOL
DISTRICT - 1-1/2 story, 3
bdrm, 2 bath. Above ground
pool optional. 15917 Rd 48,
Haviland. 419-587-3516 8p3
Fisher Price bouncy seat
with vibrator. $10; Fisher
Price jumping bouncer $25;
Small pet carrier 22.5 w. by
15 length $10. Call 419-263-
0134. 8??
If interested in a FREE KJV
Bible or childrens story
Bible, please contact 419-
786-9309. We welcome loca-
tions interested in helping to
distribute Bibles. 8c1
Compound bow case $8;
Accoustic Guitar Case $25
419-258-0064. 8k1
NOTICE (TIME CHANGE).
The Antwerp Local School
Board of Education regular
October meeting will begin at
5:00 p.m. on October 17,
2013 in the Board of Educa-
tion Room. 8c1
GREAT PAULDING LOCA-
TION, near shopping and
restaurants, 3 bdrm, 2 bath,
family, living, and sun rooms,
abundant storage, Brick
home, beautiful trees and
landscaping, $125,000,
12605 Maple, 419-399-5427
to view. 8p1
MISSING FROM PAULDING
COUNTY HOSPITAL FROM
OUTSIDE THE EXERCISE
AREA: pink, zip-front
hooded sweatshirt. Please
return to PCH front desk. 8k2
FOR SALE
SERVICES
ANTIQUES
FOR RENT
HELP WANTED
HOME FOR SALE
FREE ZONE
DRIVERS WANTED
NOTICE
FOR SALE BY OWNER
GARAGE SALES
LOST
TRAVEL
CLASSIFIEDS
CLASSIFIEDS
Multiple Family
Garage Sale
When: Fri. Oct 18, 8-4 and
Sat. Oct 19, 8-2
Where: 12320 Maple Avenue,
Paulding
Why: We have too much stuff! We
are down-sizing and cleaning out
every nook and cranny to bring you
great deals on great stuff!
What: Books, Movies, Large Men's
Clothes, Women's Clothes, House-
hold Items, Knick-Knacks, Glass
Vases, and More!
8p1
Harris/Leslie
Huge Garage Sale
13483 Kay St.
October 16-18
Wed., 9-5, Thurs. 9-?, Fri. 9-?
Fall/Winter clothing, name
brand & new clothes, 4T-6X
girls, boys 6-10, girls 10-18,
juniors, adults L-XXXL, mens
L-XXL, holiday clothes,
shoes of all sizes, home
decor, kitchen items, light-
weight stroller, sports cleats8p1
If its time to
get rid of it...
sell it
quick with
& WEEKLY REMINDER
P PROGRESS ROGRESS
P PAULDING AULDING C COUNTY OUNTY
CLASSIFIEDS
reaching up to
10,500 homes
every week
TO PLACE
YOUR AD,
CALL US AT
419-399-4015
CHARTER BUS TOURS
DEC. 6-8NASHVILLE COUNTRY CHRISTMAS--$699;
DEC. 27-29GALT HOUSE @ CHRISTMAS
LOUISVILLE,KY. $399; JAN. 8-262014FT. MYER
BEACH, FL.--$2,699; Call for exciting detailed fliers!! Eve-
lyns Excursions 877-771-4401, 419-737-2055; Ivah
Lothamer419-399-2386
LEGALS
See LEGALS page 13A
ORDINANCE
1462-13
Ordinance 1462-13
was passed by Pauld-
ing Village Council on
October 7, 2013, and
goes into effect from
and after the earliest
period allowed by law.
The summary of this
legislation is as fol-
lows:
AN ORDINANCE
RESTRICTING THE
OPERATION OF
SNOWMOBI LES,
OFF-HIGHWAY MO-
TORCYCLES, AND
ALL-PURPOSE VE-
HICLES WITHIN
THE VILLAGE OF
PAULDING, OHIO,
AND REPEALING
ORDINANCE NO.
1268-02 IN ITS EN-
TIRETY.
Copies of the full text of
this legislation may be
obtained at the Finance
Director's Office, 116
South Main Street, be-
tween the hours of 8:00
a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
Monday through Friday
Melissa S. Tope,
Finance Director 8c2
IN THE COURT OF
COMMON PLEAS
OF PAULDING
COUNTY, OHIO
Harbour Portfolio
VI, LP Plaintiff
vs.
Wesley Bell, et al.
Defendants
Case No. CI-13-163
JUDGE: Tiffany
Righter-Beckman
LEGAL NOTICE
FOR SERVICE BY
PUBLICATIONS
To: Wesley Bell whose
last known address is:
P.O. Box 566, Antwerp,
OH 45813 and Chastity
Lafountain whose last
known address is: P.O.
Box 566, Antwerp, OH
45813, each of you will
take notice that on the
22nd day of August,
2013, Plaintiff, filed a
Complaint for Forfei-
ture of Land Installment
Contract in the Paulding
County Court of Com-
mon Pleas, being Case
No. CI 13 163, alleging
that the Defendant
failed to make the pay-
ments to the Plaintiff on
said Land Installment
Contract.
In compliance with
R.C. 5313.06, on or
about May 21, 2013,
Plaintiff caused a notice
to be delivered to the
Premises, advising that
the past due amount
must be paid within 10
days of delivery of said
notice or legal action
may be commenced for
eviction and forfeiture
of said Land Installment
Contract. Pursuant to
R.C. 5313.08, service
of said notice consti-
tutes compliance with
the notice requirement
of R.C. 1923.04(A).
Said past due amount
was not paid within said
time period. There re-
mains due and owing
on said Land Install-
ment Contract the prin-
cipal sum of
$27,415.97, plus inter-
est.
Plaintiff prays that the
Defendant named
above be required to an-
swer. Because less than
five years has elapsed
from the date of the first
payment on said Land
Installment Contract,
and the Defendant has
paid less than 20%
thereof, Plaintiff is enti-
tled to an order of for-
feiture of said Land
Installment Contract
pursuant to R.C. Sec-
tions 5313.07 and
5313.08.
Said Defendant is re-
quired to file an Answer
on or before the 18th
day of December, 2013.
By Benjamin N. Hoen
Attorney for Plaintiff
Harbour Portfolio VI,
LP c/o Weltman, Wein-
berg & Reis Co., L.P.A.
323 West Lakeside Av-
enue, Suite 200 8c6
Cleveland, OH 44113
IN THE COURT OF
COMMON PLEAS
OF PAULDING
COUNTY, OHIO
Midwest Community
Federal Credit Union
08770 State Route 66
North Defiance, Ohio
43512, Plaintiff,
vs.
Ashley Messmann
(fka Ashley Gardner),
etc., etal., Defendants
Case No. CI-13-173
JUDGE: Tiffany
Righter-Beckman
LEGAL NOTICE
Michael C. Wahl
(0086911), of Clemens,
Korhn, Liming &
Warncke, Ltd. Block
Six Business Center
419 Fifth Street, Suite
2000 Defiance, Ohio
43512 Telephone: 419-
782-6055 Facsimile:
419-782-3227 Email:
MWahl(5)cklwlaw.com
Attorneys for Plaintiff
The unknown heirs, de-
visees, legatees, execu-
tors, administrators,
creditors and assigns of
Ashley Messmann (fka
Ashley Gardner), de-
ceased, and the un-
known spouses, if any,
of the same; the un-
known guardians of
minor and/or incompe-
tent spouses, heirs, de-
visees, legatees or
assigns of Ashley Mess-
mann (fka Ashley
Gardner); and whose
places of residence can-
not be ascertained, shall
take notice that on Sep-
tember 13, 2013, Mid-
west Community
Federal Credit Union
filed a Complaint in
Foreclosure of Mort-
gage in the above-cap-
tioned action in the
Court of Common
Pleas of Paulding
County, Ohio, Court-
house, 115 North
Williams Street, Pauld-
ing, Ohio 45879. The
object of the Complaint
is to foreclose the lien
of Plaintiff's mortgage
recorded upon the fol-
lowing described real
estate in which Plaintiff
alleges that the forego-
ing Defendants have or
may claim to have an
interest in the subject
real estate. Pursuant to
R.C. 2703.141, the
complete street address
for the subject real es-
tate is 13213 Helen
Street, Paulding, Ohio
45879, and the parcel
number is 23-51B-060-
00. You are further ad-
vised that the complete
legal description of the
parcel may be obtained
from the county auditor.
Defendants are required
to answer within
twenty-eight (28) days
of the last publication of
this Legal Notice and to
serve a copy of their
Answer upon Plaintiff's
attorney who is Michael
C. Wahl, P.O. Box 787,
Defiance, Ohio 43512-
0787, or default judg-
ment may be granted
against them, forever
barring assertion of
their claims. 8c3
NOTICE OF ELEC-
TION ON TAX
LEVY IN EXCESS
OF THE TEN MILL
LIMITATION
R.C. 3501.11(G),
5705.19, 5705.25
Notice is hereby given
that in pursuance of a
Resolution of the
Board of County Com-
missioners of the
County of Paulding,
Ohio, passed on the 17th
day of July, 2013, there
will be submitted to a
vote of the people at the
GENERAL Election to
be held at the regular
places of voting on
Tuesday, the 5th day of
November, 2013, the
question of levying a
tax, in excess of the ten
mill limitation, for the
benefit of Paulding
County for the purpose
of providing sufficient
funds to carry out the
health programs of the
general health district.
Tax being a renewal of
an existing tax of 0.2
mill at a rate not exceed-
ing 0.2 mill for each one
dollar of valuation,
which amounts to $0.02
for each one hundred
dollars of valuation, for
10 years, commencing
in 2014, first due in cal-
endar year 2015.
The polls for the election
will open at 6:30 a.m.
and remain open until
7:30 p.m. on election
day.
By order of the Board of
Elections, of Paulding
County, Ohio
David H. Cline, Chair
Brenda J. Crawford, Di-
rector
Dated October 4, 2013
NOTICE OF ELEC-
TION ON TAX
LEVY IN EXCESS
OF THE TEN MILL
LIMITATION
R.C. 3501.11(G),
5705.19, 5705.25
Notice is hereby given
that in pursuance of a
Resolution of the
Board of County Com-
missioners of the
County of Paulding,
Ohio, passed on the 24th
day of June, 2013, there
will be submitted to a
vote of the people at the
GENERAL Election to
be held at the regular
places of voting on
Tuesday, the 5th day of
November, 2013, the
question of levying a
tax, in excess of the ten
mill limitation, for the
benefit of Paulding
County for the purpose
of current operating ex-
penses for the Paulding
County Carnegie Li-
brary.
Tax being a renewal of
an existing tax of 2.17
mills at a rate not ex-
ceeding 2.17 mills for
each one dollar of valu-
ation, which amounts to
$0.217 for each one
hundred dollars of valu-
ation, for a continuing
period of time, com-
mencing in 2014, first
due in calendar year
2015. The polls for the
election will open at
6:30 a.m. and remain
open until 7:30 p.m. on
election day.
By order of the Board of
Elections, of Paulding
County, Ohio
David H. Cline, Chair
Brenda J. Crawford, Di-
rector
Dated October 4, 2013
NOTICE OF ELEC-
TION ON TAX
LEVY IN EXCESS
OF THE TEN MILL
LIMITATION
R.C. 3501.11(G),
5705.19. 5705.25
Notice is hereby given
that in pursuance of a
Resolution of the Board
of County Commission-
ers of the County of
Paulding, Ohio, passed
on the 24th day of July,
2013, there will be sub-
mitted to a vote of the
people at the GEN-
ERAL Election to be
held at the regular places
of voting on Tuesday,
the 5th day of Novem-
ber, 2013, the question
of levying a tax, in ex-
cess of the ten mill limi-
tation, for the benefit of
Paulding County for the
purpose of operating and
maintaining an en-
hanced 9-1-1 system.
Tax being a replacement
of a portion of an exist-
ing levy, being a reduc-
tion of 0.126 mill to
constitute a tax of 1.074
mills at a rate not ex-
ceeding 1.074 mills for
each one dollar of valu-
ation, which amounts to
$0.1074 for each one
hundred dollars of valu-
ation, for 5 years, com-
mencing in 2014, first
due in calendar year
2015.
The polls for the election
will open at 6:30 a.m.
and remain open until
7:30 p.m. on election
day.
By order of the Board of
Elections, of Paulding
County, Ohio
David H. Cline, Chair
Brenda J. Crawford,
Director
Dated October 4, 2013
NOTICE OF ELEC-
TION ON TAX
LEVY IN EXCESS
OF THE TEN MILL
LIMITATION
R.C. 3501.11(G),
5705.19, 5705.25
Notice is hereby given
that in pursuance of a
Resolution of the Coun-
cil of the Village of
Antwerp, Ohio, passed
on the 15th day of July,
2013, there will be sub-
mitted to a vote of the
people at the GEN-
ERAL Election to be
held at the regular places
of voting on Tuesday,
the 5th day of Novem-
ber, 2013, the question
of levying a tax, in ex-
cess of the ten mill limi-
tation, for the benefit of
Antwerp Village for the
purpose of providing
and maintaining motor
vehicles, communica-
tions and other equip-
ment used directly in the
operation of a police de-
partment and payment
of salaries of police per-
sonnel.
Tax being a renewal of
an existing tax of 2 mills
at a rate not exceeding 2
mills for each one dollar
of valuation, which
amounts to $0.20 for
each one hundred dol-
lars of valuation, for 5
years, commencing in
2014, first due in calen-
dar year 2015.
The polls for the election
will open at 6:30 a.m.
and remain open until
7:30 p.m. on election
day.
By order of the Board of
Elections, of Paulding
County, Ohio
David M. Cline, Chair
Brenda J. Crawford,
Director
Dated October 4, 2013
NOTICE OF ELEC-
TION ON TAX
LEVY IN EXCESS
OF THE TEN MILL
LIMITATION
R.C. 3501.11(G),
5705.19, 5705.25
Notice is hereby given
that in pursuance of a
Resolution of the Coun-
cil of the Village of
Grover Hill, Ohio,
passed on the 15th day
of July, 2013, there will
be submitted to a vote of
the people at the GEN-
ERAL Election to be
held at the regular places
of voting on Tuesday,
the 5th day of Novem-
ber, 2013, the question
of levying a tax, in ex-
cess of the ten mill limi-
tation, for the benefit of
Grover Hill Village for
the purpose of current
expenses.
Tax being a renewal of
an existing tax of 7 mills
at a rate not exceeding 7
mills for each one dollar
of valuation, which
amounts to $0.70 for
each one hundred dol-
lars of valuation, for 5
years, commencing in
2013, first due in calen-
dar year 2014.
The polls for the election
will open at 6:30 a.m.
and remain open until
7:30 p.m. on election
day.
By order of the Board of
Elections, of Paulding
County, Ohio
David H. Cline, Chair
Brenda J. Crawford,
Director
Dated October 4, 2013
NOTICE OF ELEC-
TION ON TAX
LEVY IN EXCESS
OF THE TEN MILL
LIMITATION
R.C. 3501.11(G),
5705.19, 5705.25
Notice is hereby given
that in pursuance of a
Resolution of the Coun-
cil of the Village of
Latty, Ohio, passed on
the 11th day of March,
2013, there will be sub-
mitted to a vote of the
people at the GEN-
ERAL Election to be
held at the regular places
of voting on Tuesday,
the 5th day of Novem-
ber, 2013, the question
of levying a tax, in ex-
cess of the ten mill limi-
tation, for the benefit of
Latty Village for the pur-
pose of current ex-
penses.
Tax being a replacement
of a tax of 2 mills at a
rate not exceeding 2
mills for each one dollar
of valuation, which
amounts to $0.20 for
each one hundred dol-
lars of valuation, for 5
years, commencing in
2014, first due in calen-
dar year 2015.
The polls for the election
will open at 6:30 a.m.
and remain open until
7:30 p.m. on election
day.
By order of the Board of
Elections, of Paulding
County, Ohio
David H. Cline, Chair
Brenda J. Crawford,
Director
Dated October 4, 2013
NOTICE OF ELEC-
TION ON TAX
LEVY IN EXCESS
OF THE TEN MILL
LIMITATION
R.C. 3501.11(G),
5705.19, 5705.25
Notice is hereby given
that in pursuance of a
Resolution of the Coun-
cil of the Village of Mel-
rose, Ohio, passed on
the 20th day of May,
2013, there will be sub-
mitted to a vote of the
people at the GEN-
ERAL Election to be
held at the regular places
of voting on Tuesday,
the 5th day of Novem-
ber, 2013, the question
of levying a tax, in ex-
cess of the ten mill limi-
tation, for the benefit of
Melrose Village for the
purpose of current ex-
penses.
Tax being a renewal of
an existing tax of 2 mills
at a rate not exceeding 2
mills for each one dollar
of valuation, wrhich
amounts to $0.20 for
each one hundred dol-
lars of valuation, for 5
years, commencing in
2013, first due in calen-
dar year 2014.
The polls for the election
will open at 6:30 a.m.
and remain open until
7:30 p.m. on election
day.
By order of the Board of
Elections, of Paulding
County, Ohio
David H. Cline, Chair
Brenda J. Crawford,
Director
Dated October 4, 2013
NOTICE OF ELEC-
TION ON TAX
LEVY IN EXCESS
OF THE TEN MILL
LIMITATION
R.C. 3501.11(G).
5705.19, 5705.25
Notice is hereby given
that in pursuance of a
Resolution of the Coun-
cil of the Village of Oak-
wood. Ohio, passed on
the 8th day of July,
2013, there will be sub-
mitted to a vote of the
people at the GEN-
ERAL Election to be
held at the regular places
of voting on Tuesday,
the 5th day of Novem-
ber, 2013, the question
of levying a tax, in ex-
cess of the ten mill limi-
tation, for the benefit of
Oakwood Village for the
purpose of providing
emergency medical
services. Tax being a re-
newal of an existing tax
of 1 mill at a rate not ex-
ceeding 1 mill for each
one dollar of valuation,
which amounts to $0.10
for each one hundred
dollars of valuation, for
5 years, commencing in
2013, first due in calen-
dar year 2014.
The polls for the election
will open at 6:30 a.m.
and remain open until
7:30 p.m. on election
day.
By order of the Board of
Elections, of Paulding
County, Ohio
David H. Cline, Chair
Brenda J. Crawford,
Director
Dated October 4, 2013
NOTICE OF ELEC-
TION ON TAX
LEVY IN EXCESS
OF THE TEN MILL
LIMITATION
R.C. 3501.11(G),
5705.19, 5705.25
Notice is hereby given
that in pursuance of a
Resolution of the Coun-
cil of the Village of
Paulding, Ohio, passed
on the 17th day of June,
2013, there will be sub-
mitted to a vote of the
people at the GEN-
ERAL Election to be
held at the regular places
of voting on Tuesday,
the 5th day of Novem-
ber, 2013, the question
of levying a tax, in ex-
cess of the ten mill limi-
tation, for the benefit of
Paulding Village for the
purpose of fire protec-
tion.
Tax being a renewal of
an existing tax of 1 mill
at a rate not exceeding 1
mill for each one dollar
of valuation, which
amounts to $0.10 for
each one hundred dol-
lars of valuation, for 5
years, commencing in
2014, first due in calen-
dar year 2015.
The polls for the election
will open at 6:30 a.m.
and remain open until
7:30 p.m. on election
day.
By order of the Board of
Elections, of Paulding
County, Ohio
David H. Cline, Chair
Brenda J. Crawford,
Director
Dated October 4, 2013
NOTICE OF ELEC-
TION ON TAX
LEVY IN EXCESS
OF THE TEN MILL
LIMITATION
R.C. 3501.11(G),
5705.19, 5705.25
Notice is hereby given
that in pursuance of a
Resolution of the Coun-
cil of the Village of
Paulding, Ohio, passed
on the 17th day of June,
2013, there will be sub-
mitted to a vote of the
people at the GEN-
ERAL Election to be
held at the regular places
of voting on Tuesday,
the 5th day of Novem-
ber, 2013, the question
of levying a tax, in ex-
cess of the ten mill limi-
tation, for the benefit of
Paulding Village for the
purpose of recreation.
Tax being a renewal of
an existing tax of 1 mill
at a rate not exceeding 1
mill for each one dollar
of valuation, which
amounts to $0.10 for
each one hundred dol-
lars of valuation, for 5
years, commencing in
2014, first due in calen-
dar year 2015.
The polls for the election
will open at 6:30 a.m.
and remain open until
7:30 p.m. on election
day.
By order of the Board of
Elections, of Paulding
County, Ohio
David H. Cline, Chair
Brenda J. Crawford,
Director
Dated October 4, 2013
NOTICE OF ELEC-
TION ON TAX
LEVY IN EXCESS
OF THE TEN MILL
LIMITATION
R.C. 3501.11(G),
5705.19, 5705.25
Notice is hereby given
that in pursuance of a
Resolution of the Coun-
cil of the Village of
Paulding, Ohio, passed
on the 17th day of June,
2013, there will be sub-
mitted to a vote of the
people at the GEN-
ERAL Election to be
held at the regular places
of voting on Tuesday,
the 5th day of Novem-
ber, 2013, the question
of levying a tax, in ex-
cess of the ten mill limi-
tation, for the benefit of
Paulding Village for the
purpose of providing
current expenses.
Tax being a renewal of
an existing tax of 2 mills
at a rate not exceeding 2
mills for each one dollar
of valuation, which
amounts to $0.20 for
each one hundred dol-
lars of valuation, for 5
years, commencing in
2014, first due in calen-
dar year 2015.
The polls for the election
will open at 6:30 a.m.
and remain open until
7:30 p.m. on election
day.
By order of the Board of
Elections, of Paulding
County, Ohio
David H. Cline, Chair
Brenda J. Crawford,
Director
Dated October 4, 2013
NOTICE OF ELEC-
TION ON TAX
LEVY IN EXCESS
OF THE TEN MILL
LIMITATION
R.C. 3501.11(G),
5705.19, 5705.25
Notice is hereby given
that in pursuance of a
Resolution of the Coun-
cil of the Village of
Payne, Ohio, passed on
the 24th day of June,
2013, there will be sub-
mitted to a vote of the
people at the GEN-
ERAL Election to be
held at the regular places
of voting on Tuesday,
the 5th day of Novem-
ber, 2013, the question
of levying a tax, in ex-
cess of the ten mill limi-
tation, for the benefit of
Payne Village for the
purpose of providing
and maintaining motor
vehicles, communica-
tions, other equipment,
buildings, and sites for
such buildings used di-
12A - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, October 16, 2013
www.progressnewspaper.org
419-399-4015
CARRYING ON
A TRADITION
OF EXCELLENCE
The Paulding County
Progress &
Weekly Reminder
continued frompage 12A
LEGALS
rectly in the operation of
a police department, or
the payment of salaries
of permanent police per-
sonnel, including the
payment of the police
officer employers' con-
tribution required under
section 742.33 of the
Revised Code.
Tax being a renewal of
an existing tax of 1 mill
at a rate not exceeding 1
mill for each one dollar
of valuation, which
amounts to $0.10 for
each one hundred dol-
lars of valuation, for 5
years, commencing in
2013, first due in calen-
dar year 2014.
The polls for the election
will open at 6:30 a.m.
and remain open until
7:30 p.m. on election
day.
By order of the Board of
Elections, of Paulding
County, Ohio
David H. Cline, Chair
Brenda J. Crawford,
Director
Dated October 4, 2013
NOTICE OF ELEC-
TION ON TAX
LEVY IN EXCESS
OF THE TEN MILL
LIMITATION R.C.
3501.11(G), 5705.19,
5705.25
Notice is hereby given
that in pursuance of a
Resolution of the Coun-
cil of the Village of
Payne, Ohio, passed on
the 24th day of June,
2013, there will be sub-
mitted to a vote of the
people at the GEN-
ERAL Election to be
held at the regular places
of voting on Tuesday,
the 5th day of Novem-
ber, 2013, the question
of levying a tax, in ex-
cess of the ten mill limi-
tation, for the benefit of
Payne Village for the
purpose of providing
fire protection.
Tax being a renewal of
an existing tax of 1.7
mills at a rate not ex-
ceeding 1.7 mills for
each one dollar of valu-
ation, which amounts to
$0.17 for each one hun-
dred dollars of valua-
tion, for 5 years,
commencing in 2014,
first due in calendar year
2015.
The polls for the election
will open at 6:30 a.m.
and remain open until
7:30 p.m. on election
day.
By order of the Board of
Elections, of Paulding
County, Ohio
David H. Cline, Chair
Brenda J. Crawford,
Director Dated
October 4, 2013
NOTICE OF ELEC-
TION ON TAX
LEVY IN EXCESS
OF THE TEN MILL
LIMITATION
R.C. 3501.11(G),
5705.19, 5705.25
Notice is hereby given
that in pursuance of a
Resolution of the
Trustees of the Town-
ship of Auglaize, Ohio,
passed on the 20th day
of May, 2013, there will
be submitted to a vote of
the people at the GEN-
ERAL Election to be
held at the regular places
of voting on Tuesday,
the 5th day of Novem-
ber, 2013, the question
of levying a tax, in ex-
cess of the ten mill limi-
tation, for the benefit of
Auglaize Township for
the purpose of providing
and maintaining fire ap-
paratus, appliances,
buildings, or sites there-
for, or sources of water
supply and materials
therefor, or the establish-
ment and maintenance
of lines of fire alarm
telegraph, or the pay-
ment of firefighting
companies or perma-
nent, part-time, or vol-
unteer firefighting,
emergency medical
service, administrative,
or communications per-
sonnel to operate the
same, including the pay-
ment of any employer
contributions required
for such personnel under
section 145.48 or 742.34
of the Revised Code, or
the purchase of ambu-
lance equipment, or the
provision of ambulance,
paramedic, or other
emergency medical
services operated by a
fire department or fire-
fighting company.
Tax being an additional
tax of 1.42 mills at a rate
not exceeding 1.42 mills
for each one dollar of
valuation, which
amounts to $0.142 for
each one hundred dol-
lars of valuation, for 5
years, commencing in
2013, first due in calen-
dar year 2014.
The polls for the election
will open at 6:30 a.m.
and remain open until
7:30 p.m. on election
day.
By order of the Board of
Elections, of Paulding
County, Ohio
David H. Cline, Chair
Brenda J. Crawford,
Director
Dated October 4, 2013
NOTICE OF ELEC-
TION ON TAX
LEVY IN EXCESS
OF THE TEN MILL
LIMITATION
R.C. 3501.11(G),
5705.19, 5705.25
Notice is hereby given
that in pursuance of a
Resolution of the
Trustees of the Town-
ship of Emerald, Ohio,
passed on the 23rd day
of July, 2013, there will
be submitted to a vote of
the people at the GEN-
ERAL Election to be
held at the regular places
of voting on Tuesday,
the 5th day of Novem-
ber, 2013, the question
of levying a tax, in ex-
cess of the ten mill limi-
tation, for the benefit of
Emerald Township for
the purpose of ambu-
lance service and emer-
gency
medical service.
Tax being an additional
tax 0.25 mill at a rate not
exceeding 0.25 mill for
each one dollar of valu-
ation, which amounts
to $0.025 for each one
hundred dollars of val-
uation, for a continuing
period of time, com-
mencing in 2013, first
due in calendar year
2014.
The polls for the election
will open at 6:30 a.m.
and remain open until
7:30 p.m. on election
day.
By order of the Board of
Elections, of Paulding
County, Ohio
David H. Cline, Chair
Brenda J. Crawford,
Director
Dated October 4, 2013
NOTICE OF ELEC-
TION ON TAX
LEVY IN EXCESS
OF THE TEN MILL
LIMITATION
R.C. 3501.11(G),
5705.19, 5705.25
Notice is hereby given
that in pursuance of a
Resolution of the
Trustees of the Town-
ship of Harrison, Ohio,
passed on the 10th day
of June, 2013, there will
be submitted to a vote of
the people at the GEN-
ERAL Election to be
held at the regular places
of voting on Tuesday,
the 5th day of Novem-
ber, 2013, the question
of levying a tax, in ex-
cess of the ten mill limi-
tation, for the benefit of
Harrison Township for
the purpose of providing
fire services.
Tax being a replacement
of a tax of 1 mill at a rate
not exceeding 1 mill for
each one dollar of valua-
tion, which amounts to
$0.10 for each one hun-
dred dollars of valuation,
for 5years, commencing
in 2014, first due in cal-
endar year 2015.
The polls for the election
will open at 6:30 a.m.
and remain open until
7:30 p.m. on election
day.
By order of the Board of
Elections, of Paulding
County, Ohio
David H. Cline, Chair
Brenda J. Crawford,
Director
Dated October 4, 2013
NOTICE OF ELEC-
TION ON TAX
LEVY IN EXCESS
OF THE TEN MILL
LIMITATION
R.C. 3501.11(G),
5705.19, 5705.25
Notice is hereby given
that in pursuance of a
Resolution of the
Trustees of the Town-
ship of Jackson, Ohio,
passed on the 24th day
of July, 2013, there will
be submitted to a vote of
the people at the GEN-
ERAL Election to be
held at the regular places
of voting on Tuesday,
the 5th day of Novem-
ber, 2013, the question
of levying a tax, in ex-
cess of the ten mill limi-
tation, for the benefit of
Jackson Township for
the purpose of emer-
gency medical service.
Tax being a renewal of a
tax of 0.5 mill and an in-
crease of 0.5 mill to con-
stitute a tax of 1 mill at a
rate not exceeding 1 mill
for each one dollar of
valuation, which
amounts to $0.10 for
each one hundred dol-
lars of valuation, for 5
years, commencing in
2014, first due in calen-
dar year 2015.
The polls for the election
will open at 6:30 a.m.
and remain open until
7:30 p.m. on election
day.
By order of the Board of
Elections, of Paulding
County, Ohio
David H. Cline, Chair
Brenda J. Crawford,
Director
Dated October 4, 2013
NOTICE OF ELEC-
TION ON TAX
LEVY IN EXCESS
OF THE TEN MILL
LIMITATION
R.C. 3501.11(G),
5705.19, 5705.25
Notice is hereby given
that in pursuance of a
Resolution of the
Trustees of the Town-
ship of Latty, Ohio,
passed on the 31n day of
July, 2013, there will be
submitted to a vote of the
people at the GEN-
ERAL Election to be
held at the regular places
of voting on Tuesday, the
5th day of November,
2013, the question of
levying a tax, in excess
of the ten mill limitation,
for the benefit of Latty
Township for the pur-
pose of providing pro-
tection against fire and
providing and maintain-
ing fire apparatus and
appliances.
Tax being a renewal of a
tax of 1.25 mills at a rate
not exceeding 1.25 mills
for each one dollar of
valuation, which
amounts to $0.125 for
each one hundred dollars
of valuation, for 5 years,
commencing in 2014,
first due in calendar year
2015.
The polls for the election
will open at 6:30 a.m.
and remain open until
7:30 p.m. on election
day.
By order of the Board of
Elections, of Paulding
County, Ohio
David H. Cline, Chair
Brenda J. Crawford,
Director
Dated October 4, 2013
NOTICE OF ELEC-
TION ON TAX
LEVY IN EXCESS
OF THE TEN MILL
LIMITATION
R.C. 3501.11(G),
5705.19, 5705.25
Notice is hereby given
that in pursuance of a
Resolution of the Board
of Education of the
Paulding Exempted Vil-
lage School District,
Ohio, passed on the 21st
day of May, 2013, there
will be submitted to a
vote of the people at the
GENERAL Election to
be held at the regular
places of voting on Tues-
day, the 5th day of No-
vember, 2013, the
question of levying a tax,
in excess of the ten mill
limitation, for the benefit
of Paulding Exempted
Village School District
for the purpose of pro-
viding for the emergency
requirements of the
School District.
Tax being a renewal of a
tax to average 2.36 mills
at a rate not exceeding
2.36 mills for each one
dollar of valuation,
which amounts to
$0.236 for each one hun-
dred dollars of valuation,
for 5 years, commencing
in 2014, first due in cal-
endar year 2015.
The polls for the election
will open at 6:30 a.m.
and remain open until
7:30 p.m. on election
day.
By order of the Board of
Elections, of Paulding
County, Ohio
David H. Clinc. Chair
Brcnda J. Crawford,
Director 8c2
Dated October 4, 2013
Parcel Number Owner Name Amount
01 - AUGLAIZE TWP
01-01A-005-00 MILLER DORAL W MILLER CONNIE S 886.48
01-02S-003-00 THEIS DANIEL W THEIS TINA L 876.71
01-03C-009-00 PUEHLER HOWARD P PUEHLER VICTORIA L753.44
01-03E-040-00 HALE JUDY G 97.69
01-03E-041-00 HALE JUDY G 1,413.19
01-03E-045-00 CARPENTER HOWARD A 79.31
01-03F-003-00 MARTINEZ JAMES M & MARTINEZ BETHANNA J 118.97
01-03F-006-00 GRIMES PHILLIP P 353.96
01-04A-011-00 AVERESCH CHARLES 329.01
01-04S-003-00 JUSTINGER JERRY A JUSTINGER LINDA L 735.90
01-04S-006-00 EVANS MYRA J 334.87
01-05S-001-01 MANN LARRY MANN JUDY C 233.58
01-10S-013-00 BALES MELODY K 100.18
01-10S-014-00 BALES MELODY K 69.06
01-11S-001-03 ECKART ROGER C ECKART PATRICIA L 262.49
01-11S-001-06 HAMM DARRIS A HAMM BEULAH M 508.17
01-11S-001-08 VALDEZ RUBEN 264.15
01-14A-009-00 SHELLENBARGER WILLIAM H SHELLENBARGER JOYCE A 553.13
01-14B-004-00 SMITH JOHN D 72.84
01-14B-006-00 SMITH JOHN D 72.84
01-14D-026-00 HANENKRATT JACKIE HANENKRATT BARRY 203.94
01-15A-006-00 PACK SHANE T 332.99
01-15A-016-00 SCHOOLEY JAMES 513.92
01-15A-026-00 SHARP RAYMOND 431.29
01-15A-043-00 KOCHEL CHARLES R TOD 435.22
01-15A-051-00 SCHOOLEY JAMES 582.62
01-17A-005-02 YOUNG CHARLES YOUNG WANDA 170.96
01-17A-005-04 MARTIN KENNETH M 64.21
01-17B-014-00 AULT BRUCE 60.80
01-17B-025-00 WARREN DALE D 183.70
01-19S-009-01 FINNEY AMANDA J 201.36
01-21S-008-00 PESSEFALL JAMES PESSEFALL SUSAN RAE 283.47
03 - BENTON TWP
03-03S-016-01 SNYDER MITCHELL D 200.00
03-08S-009-01 GLASS JAMES A GLASS NANCY Y 118.58
03-11S-004-01 PRAUL TODD 788.23
03-18S-010-01 BOWMAN JORDAN 676.73
04 - BENTON TWP/ PAYNE VILL
04-20S-014-00 FROWNFELTER S GREG FROWNFELTER LINDA L 823.29
04-24S-023-00 FLAUGH ETHEL A 956.75
04-24S-029-00 KAROLYI FRANK 433.17
04-26S-034-00 GLASS JAMES A & GLASS NANCY Y 1,114.85
05 - BLUE CREEK TWP
05-15S-001-02 HICKS WILLIAM E HICKS ANGELA K 1,634.46
05-19A-037-00 BLEEKE DUSTEN & GAY MY LEI 797.87
05-19A-038-00 BLEEKE DUSTEN & GAY MY LEI 256.25
06 - BLUE CREEK TWP HAVILAND VILL
06-03S-022-00 MOSER DUSTIN G 183.87
06-03S-025-00 ROBERTS TIM ROBERTS MICHELLE 510.18
06-03S-028-00 PUCKETT SHANNON 401.94
06-03S-042-00 SEARFOSS TONI S SEARFOSS GEORGE SR 57.73
06-04S-014-00 LEWIS LARRY L 244.94
06-04S-022-00 JEWELL CATHY 87.95
06-05S-010-00 LEWIS LARRY L 51.39
06-06S-008-00 KLEWER MARK C & KLINE DONELDA J 280.25
06-08S-021-00 HURD SHAWN 2,310.46
06-08S-022-00 HURD SHAWN 58.60
07 - BLUE CREEK TWP SCOTT VILLAGE
07-01S-013-00 SNYDER HERMIE G LIFE EST 55.02
07-01S-031-00 BOLEY RICK D 172.27
07-03S-015-00 BYLER BENJAMIN M & BYLER MARIE M 779.35
08 BROWN TWP
08-03S-001-00 PESSEFALL JAMES PESSEFALL SUSAN RAE 1,161.18
08-03S-005-00 PESSEFALL JAMES PESSEFALL SUSAN RAE 291.19
08-03S-005-01 PESSEFALL JAMES L ET AL 1,791.26
08-03S-007-00 PESSEFALL CHRISTOPHER J PESSEFALL SANDRA L 926.85
08-03S-008-02 PESSEFALL JAMES L PESSEFALL SUSAN RAE 284.82
08-03S-012-00 WATSON PAMELA J 1,198.68
08-05S-021-01 WEAVER BRENT 428.60
08-05S-027-00 CARNAHAN BRICE CARNAHAN MARJORIE 313.26
08-08S-003-00 GARY DONALD ETAL 300.15
08-20S-003-02 BULLINGER TONY R 1,114.84
08-22S-037-04 PARRETT JUDD A PARRETT MYRA 1,263.72
08-25S-010-01 BASQUEZ PHILIP 64.86
08-32S-007-00 MERRIMAN JOHN D 665.62
08-33S-006-00 GEE NATHAN E 412.61
09 - BROWN TWP/MELROSE VILL
09-03S-033-00 SMITH MICHAEL SMITH CHERYL 75.46
09-03S-035-00 SWITZER LARRY SWITZER CYNTHIA 254.52
09-03S-044-00 RUNYAN TODD E 57.54
09-03S-045-00 RUNYAN TODD E 57.54
09-03S-046-00 RUNYAN TODD E 57.54
09-03S-047-0 RUNYAN TODD E 51.15
09-03S-048-00 RUNYAN TODD E 57.54
09-03S-049-00 RUNYAN TODD E 69.60
09-03S-051-00 RUNYAN TODD E 69.60
09-04S-021-00 ARMY KEDAR 92.76
09-05S-032-00 DAVIS DALE F DAVIS KATHRYN L 175.95
09-05S-042-00 WISEMAN JASON E WISEMAN DONNA J 317.88
09-06S-037-00 FERGUSON JOSEPH D FERGUSON VICKI J 112.00
09-12S-004-00 PAHOLAK WILLIAM W PAHOLAK DEBORAH J 286.07
10 - BROWN TWP/ OAKWOOD VILL
10-03S-004-00 DANGLER TODD C 928.97
10-03S-007-00 ROHLF JOHN & ROHLF JUDY M 54.58
10-07S-003-00 CASS JUDY M 748.86
10-10S-004-00 KELLEY JENNIFER 676.73
10-12S-009-00 ROHLF JOHN & ROHLF JUDY M 575.31
10-15S-001-00 SIXMILE DEVELOPMENT LLC 308.76
10-15S-009-00 TOUSELY JEREL A & TOUSELY AMY L 356.65
10-15S-010-00 TOUSELY JEREL A & TOUSELY AMY L 106.13
10-16S-032-00 VORLICKY RONALD AVORLICKY DARLENE G 434.61
10-16S-037-00 KING RICHARD L KING TERRY L 68.74
10-17S-017-00 KING RICHARD L KING TERRY L 763.82
10-20S-037-00 WEDDINGTON DELORES JEAN 150.96
10-21S-017-00 LINEBACK PATRICK LINEBACK VICKI 746.70
10-22S-010-00 OWENS GARY 786.58
11 - CARRYALL TWP
11-06S-003-00 BRENNEKE MARK A 2,234.54
11-13S-004-00 BEGLEY MONA SHELLY 1,045.70
11-14S-011-01 FLETCHER CINDY S 3,017.34
11-15S-007-01 ROBBINS CHADWICK 517.80
11-18S-005-01 HANKINSON CHARLES R HANKINSON LINDA K 795.96
11-19S-023-01 SIGG THOMAS L REINHART CRISSY F 133.87
11-19S-023-02 MESSMAN KAREN 500.12
11-20S-008-01 LOCKHART JAMES D LOCKHART SHERRI L 71.53
11-26S-032-01 VANCLEAVE TODD S VANCLEAVE CARLA J 221.09
11-28S-011-00 BERNARD CHARLES L 885.49
11-31S-011-06 JPMORGAN CHASE BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION 1,226.16
11-32S-012-00 MILLER RONALD R 965.08
11-33B-009-00 SMITH RACHEL E 108.57
11-33S-005-00 DOLINSKI PAUL A & DOLINSKI DIANE M 1,180.66
11-33S-022-01 DELARUELLE ROBERT L DELARUELLE JOAN K 52.48
11-36S-005-0 KANABLE DONALD R 880.12
12 - CARRYALL TWP/ANTWERP VILL
12-01S-004-00 MEGLICH JOHN R MEGLICH SHAWNA J 1,092.17
12-01S-005-00 MEGLICH JOHN R MEGLICH SHAWNA J 51.13
12-01S-007-00 MEGLICH JOHN R MEGLICH SHAWNA J 56.19
12-03S-018-00 DEVORE JOHN L DEVORE TRACI L 537.93
12-04S-051-00 BRADTMUELLER DAVID WBRADTMUELLER TAMARA S 1,514.92
12-05S-005-00 MARLIN PHILIP 337.25
12-08S-001-00 HOLLINGER RACHAEL D 1,419.00
12-08S-012-00 SMITH LARRY L 248.58
12-10S-005-00 MARENBERG MARK ATRUSTEE 846.02
12-10S-007-00 MARENBERG MARK ATRUSTEE 280.99
12-10S-009-00 MARENBERG MARK ATRUSTEE 599.81
12-10S-076-00 SHAFFER JODY R 331.85
12-11S-034-00 RIED TIMOTHY P 74.91
12-20S-018-00 SPROLES RICHARD EUGENE & SPROLES ANGEL LYNN 86.20
12-24S-023-00 MILLER LARRY E MILLER MARIE 278.51
12-26S-004-00 TADSEN BRIAN 1,282.91
12-26S-023-00 WOODCOX JOHN P WOODCOX CARLA R 1,032.32
12-27S-015-00 WHITNEY KELLY WHITNEY KATHY 745.10
12-34S-096-00 MEGLICH JOHN R MEGLICH SHAWNA J 406.93
12-38S-007-00 SNYDER EDDIE M 820.69
12-38S-014-00 STOUT GAIL A 881.81
13 - CRANE TWP
13-02S-004-00 BALDWIN EARL L BALDWIN DONNA R 472.30
13-03S-016-00 PACK SHANE T & PACK JULIE A 544.50
13-04S-018-00 MCCABE CHAD D & MCCABE TERRI J 686.49
13-10S-025-00 LEWIS MICHAEL R LEWIS JEANENE L 1,168.74
13-12S-010-03 JEWELL KENNETH W JEWELL LISAA 564.04
13-22S-006-01 RETTIG MONICA L 56.35
13-23S-004-00 RINGLER EDWARD P RINGLER MARI BETH 1,036.98
13-25S-004-00 THOMAS WENDELL THOMAS JENNIFER 996.00
14 - CRANE TWP/ANTWERP DIST
14-04S-012-01 SHULL GREGORY W 581.27
14-04S-013-03 LUCAS STEPHEN J LUCAS KIMBERLY J 1,327.77
14-05S-005-01 ROOKS JOSEPH L ROOKS SUSAN L 1,500.73
14-06S-004-02 SCOTT ROBERT J & SCOTT KATHERINE S 556.51
14-06S-007-00 RODRIGUEZ FREDDIE 198.30
14-10S-012-02 FEENEY JEFFREY A JR & CURTIS LORETTA 1,508.83
14-10S-012-04 PROXMIRE BRADLEY & PROXMIRE BOBETTE 241.71
14-15A-006-00 STEEL MELISSAA 2,166.93
14-17S-003-00 RICHHART GEORGE P RICHHART TERESA L 569.50
14-17S-008-00 SESLAR RICHARD H SESLAR MARY E 469.83
14-17S-011-00 RATLIFF CHADD C RATLIFF ELIZABETH K 1,095.68
14-18S-005-00 GOUDY RUSSELL F 58.52
14-19B-014-00 SESLAR GENE E 1,140.05
14-19S-022-02 WEIR JOHN & WEIR NORMA 394.93
14-20S-003-00 CLEVINGER MATTHEWC CLEVINGER MICHELLE K 248.92
14-20S-007-00 CLEVINGER MATTHEWC CLEVINGER MICHELLE K 203.73
14-30S-007-01 RAGER BEN L 119.06
15\CRANE TWP/CECIL VILL
15-02S-007-00 GEIGER MICHAEL D SR & GEIGER KERRYA 222.64
15-05S-008-00 ELKINS PATRICK MICHAEL ELKINS RUTH ANN 205.47
15-05S-024-00 BELCHER LEWIS BELCHER MARY L 55.90
15-06S-024-00 TUTTLE KELLY S 561.70
15-06S-025-00 TUTTLE KELLY S 55.90
16 - EMERALD TWP
16-01S-002-02 PRICE ARTHUR F PRICE LATASHA CHERI 248.27
16-01S-002-03 PRICE ARTHUR F PRICE LATASHA CHERI 577.21
16-02S-001-06 VANVLERAH SCOTT M & VANVLERAH AMY J 1,197.46
16-02S-001-12 MEYER JEFF G BEVINS PATRICIA L 2,426.09
16-02S-016-00 POWELL THOMAS H TRUST POWELL JACQUELINE ATRUST 164.44
16-06S-014-00 SKALA HEATHER LYNN 1,509.49
16-16S-008-00 VANCLEVE RITAVANCLEVE RICKY W 747.62
16-17S-007-00 BUELL JOIE D 1,332.60
16-23S-002-00 DEATRICK WILLIAM J 847.40
16-30A-003-00 BRYANT ELIZABETH M 1,024.58
16-34S-003-00 SCHLEGEL VESTELA SCHLEGEL DEBORAH K 335.78
16-34S-007-00 SCHLEGEL VESTEL A SCHLEGEL DEBORAH 543.56
16-34S-008-03 TAYLOR ROBERT E 977.13
17 - HARRISON TWP
17-17S-001-00 LITZENBERG MICHAEL R 621.35
17-27S-018-00 THOMAS BENJAMIN D THOMAS STACY L 599.49
17-31S-004-01 HOUSE ANTHONY HOUSE CHERYL 339.89
17-35S-009-01 NATIONAL FIBER REDUCTION DANIELA GUMBERT PROPRIET 159.20
17-36S-013-01 HESSLER JOHN DANIEL HESSLER NANCYALFRIEDA 1,409.79
18 - HARRISON TWP/ANTWERP DIST
18-02S-007-00 STARRY CHARLES EDMOND 502.22
19 - HARRISON TWP/PAYNE VILL
19-02S-012-00 BURKLEY DUANE M 349.72
19-05S-009-00 CC REO GROUP LLC 277.75
19-05S-026-00 NATIONAL FIBER REDUCTION DANIELA GUMBERT PROPRIET 7,776.84
19-09S-001-00 MCNAMARA RANDALL C MCNAMARA LINDA S 458.58
19-09S-012-00 CANFIELD IMOGENE LIFE EST & PENDERGRAST KATHLEEN 97.96
19-09S-069-00 COLLIS CHRISTOPHER J 525.91
19-09S-072-00 YENSER THELMA D LIFE EST 63.62
19-15S-003-00 WILLINGHAM PATRICIA R 826.60
19-16S-086-00 HOUSE ANTHONY K & HOUSE CHERYL K 328.05
19-17S-006-00 GEBHART VINCENT N 816.56
19-17S-007-00 GEBHART VINCENT N 72.51
20 - JACKSON TWP
20-04S-007-00 LAFOUNTAIN GARRY L SR & LAFOUNTAIN DOROTHY 234.47
20-13S-004-00 BOK BRETT A 672.44
20-25S-009-05 ECKART PATRICIA L ECKART ROGER C 210.13
20-25S-009-06 ECKART PATRICIA L ECKART ROGER C 210.13
20-25S-009-08 ECKART PATRICIA L ECKART ROGER C 376.20
20-26S-012-00 CARNAHAN BRICE JUNIOR 179.59
21 - JACKSON TWP/WAYNE TRACE DIST
21-21S-003-01 CLEMENS HARVEY C CLEMENS SUSAN C 759.78
21-27S-010-00 CRITTEN CRAIG N CRITTEN ANGELA D 783.62
21-34A-003-00 SACO JOHN W SACO BRIGITTE H 236.86
21-35S-002-01 AVERESCH DOUGLAS A 300.07
21-35S-008-01 DYSINGER CASSIE 415.11
21-35S-014-00 .SAXTON FRANCIS 860.35
22 - JACKSON TWP/BROUGHTON VILL
22-03S-022-00 FLINT BERNARD R LIFE ESTATE 148.34
22-03S-031-00 ACKERMAN ALYSE MARIE 1,028.28
22-06S-006-00 SCHLEGEL JILL R 56.39
22-07S-006-00 MATTHEWS PEGGY S 100.05
23 - JACKSON TWP/PAULDING VILL
23-15S-020-00 PHLIPOT JOSEPH L PHLIPOT JUDITH A 59.39
23-15S-021-00 PHLIPOT JOSEPH L PHLIPOT JUDITH A 780.00
23-51A-056-00 SANTO TIMOTHY R 231.58
23-51B-038-00 DEARING TODD R 1,425.88
23-51B-047-00 MULLINS WILMA S 593.71
23-51B-086-00 GOINGS FLORENCE A 138.82
24 - LATTY TWP
24-13S-009-00 SIDLE LARRY 450.92
26 - LATTY TWP/GROVER HILL VILL
26-02S-021-00 GRAVES DAVID J 900.26
26-03S-017-00 SIXMILE DEVELOPMENT LLC 415.97
26-03S-034-00 ROGERS VIRGIL C ROGERS TONI L 1,029.30
26-04S-027-00 LEE RHONDA SUE 271.06
26-06S-006-00 SCOTT MARY 96.54
26-07S-015-00 MCGUIRE JESSICA D 224.23
26-07S-020-00 WAGONER JULIAA 985.81
26-08S-025-00 WIMBERLY ROBERT DEAN 90.32
26-08S-027-00 WIMBERLY ROBERT DEAN 112.19
26-08S-028-00 WIMBERLY ROBERT DEAN 474.09
26-09S-005-00 FOUST WESLEY C FOUST BETHANY J.A. 153.38
26-09S-048-00 FOUST WESLEY C FOUST BETHANY J.A. 394.83
26-11S-004-00 HARTING KASEY 769.20
27 - PAULDING TWP
27-07S-002-00 HUSS JOHN WAYNE HUSS ANGELIC MARIE HUDSON 701.94
27-14S-001-00 DOSTER CHRISTOPHER A DOSTER SALLY J 423.50
27-18S-001-01 JOHNSON WILLIAM R JOHNSON ANGELA R 762.45
27-20S-007-00 HELLE DENNIS WAYNE 652.56
27-22S-015-00 ENGLISH MARGARET A 533.41
27-29S-004-00 SHRIDER THOMAS M ET AL 691.86
27-30S-001-00 HELLE ALLAN RAY ETAL 250.16
28 - PAULDING TWP/WAYNE TRACE DIST
28-30S-014-00 FRALEY CHARLES A LE ET AL 293.46
28-33S-040-00 BAUER KEVIN R 386.93
28-33S-041-00 RICHARDSON PREDEST D & RICHARDSON BRENDA 842.69
29 - PAULDING TWP/LATTY VILL
29-04S-010-00 ABBOTT HELEN M 117.90
30 - PAULDING TWP/PAULDING VILL
30-06S-023-00 LOCKHART JAMES D 424.26
30-09S-023-00 SETTY CLAUDIA J 778.26
30-09S-028-00 CLINE PETER J 839.92
30-12S-021-00 WARREN CLARA SUE 200.00
30-12S-026-00 JASSO SYLVIA M 339.26
30-13S-006-00 FULK TIMOTHY R FULK REBECCA S 272.84
30-13S-007-00 KONOPKA BARBARA L TRUSTEE 503.94
30-14S-044-00 GONZALES CHARLES S GONZALES CHARLOTTE A 154.35
30-17S-007-00 COMBS SHEILA R TOD & COMBS HACKER 543.75
30-19S-025-00 SNODGRASS JON W 435.91
30-22S-058-00 MARTINEZ ANNA J 341.81
30-23S-032-00 MARENBERG MARK ATRUSTEE 352.09
30-23S-033-00 MARENBERG MARK ATRUSTEE 615.07
30-23S-057-00 ANKNEY JOHN R ANKNEY TERESA L 493.78
30-23S-083-00 MARENBERG MARK ATRUSTEE 397.56
30-26S-022-00 MILES ALEAN 187.73
30-27S-073-00 VERFAILLIE BRANT SAMUEL VERFAILLIE JESSICA LYNN 1,476.14
30-30S-002-00 FOLTZ LORI L 94.39
30-30S-003-00 FOLTZ LORI L 514.57
30-34S-001-00 CLINTON LISA M 726.00
30-34S-008-02 LARSON JAIMIE L 664.87
30-40S-008-00 CLIPPINGER DANAA E BUSSARD PENNY 1,042.87
30-43S-020-00 FREDERICK PAMELA J ETAL 220.00
30-44S-006-00 POWELL MARY & POWELL JAMES G 219.90
31 - WASHINGTON TWP
31-13S-002-00 HICKS DEBORAH K LIFE EST 336.89
31-20S-006-00 STAHL DANNY J 151.14
31-24S-004-00 LEWIS LARRY L 765.29
31-25A-019-00 REAPER NATHAN D 56.17
31-29S-006-00 RATLIFF WESLEY B RATLIFF DEBRA K 1,189.36
31-29S-008-00 STAHL RHONDA K LLOYD 212.30
31-31S-017-00 HOWELL TINA M HOWELL JODY 99.81
31-31S-018-00 HOWELL TINA M HOWELL JODY 1,526.92
31-32S-004-01 MILLER RHONDA K 79.41
31-33S-005-00 MARKLEY GERALD 236.42
31-33S-005-02 MARKLEY JASON D 1,091.90
31-33S-005-03 MARKLEY GERALD E 1,305.36
31-33S-005-04 MARKLEY GERALD 129.30
32 - WASHINGTON TWP/PAULDING DIST
32-15S-005-02 BUCHMAN PATRICK 1,821.44
DELINQUENT REAL ESTATE TAX LIST
The land, lots and parts of lots, returned delinquent by the County Treasurer of Paulding County, with taxes, assessments, interest,
and penalties, charged against them agreeable to law, are contained and described in the following list:
Notice is hereby given that the whole of such several lands, lots, or parts of lots will be certified for foreclosure by the County Auditor pursuant to law unless
the whole of the delinquent taxes, assessments, interest, and penalties are paid within one year or unless a tax certificate with respect to the parcel is sold under
Section 5721.32 or 5721.33 of the Revised Code. The names of persons who are making payments to the County Treasurer are designated by an asterisk.
Claudia J. Fickel
County Auditor
Wednesday, October 16, 2013 Paulding County Progress - 13A
14A - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, October 16, 2013
ANNI VERSARY SPECI AL OFFERS
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Accepting new patients and physician
referrals. Call 419-542-5669 or
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Dr. Sam has privileges at the following Ohio and Indiana hospitals:
Community Memorial, Van Wert, Paulding, and Dupont.
Sam Neuschwanger, DPM
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THE PAULDING COUNTY PROGRESS GOES TO HAWAII This summer the Paulding Progress traveled to the Hawaiian Islands.
Dr. John and Karen Saxton took a 10-day vacation visiting the islands of Oahu and Maui with their children and grandchildren.
Here are the families of Chip and Terrie Giesige, Beth and Matt Kelly, Brian and Tammy Saxton, Cory and Stephanie Giesige,
Wendy and Jeff Price and John and Karen enjoying a traditional Hawaiian luau. Their source for exclusive Paulding County news?
The Paulding County Progress! Are you headed to some distant, exotic destination? Take the Progress along with your camera
and send a photo and a little information about your trip to progress@progressnewspaper.org.
THE PAULDING COUNTY PROGRESS GOES TO EUROPE Bruce and Pam Dumire of rural
Paulding County spent time in May touring locations in Europe. Trip stops included Sarajevo,
Venice, Dubranik, Bosnia, Slovinia and Montenegro. Their source for exclusive Paulding County
news? The Paulding County Progress! Are you headed to some distant, exotic destination? Take
the Progress along with your camera and send a photo and a little information about your trip to
progress@progressnewspaper.org.
THE PAULDING COUNTY PROGRESS GOES TO CHICAGO Sarah Knapp, Susan Knapp, Lilly
Knapp and Kynzi Knapp enjoyed a Taylor Swift concert at Chicagos Soldier Field on Aug. 10.
Their source for exclusive Paulding County news? The Paulding County Progress! Are you
headed to some distant, exotic destination? Take the Progress along with your camera and send
a photo and a little information about your trip to progress@progressnewspaper.org.
Wednesday, October 16, 2013 Paulding County Progress - 1B
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HUNTING AND
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Sat. 10 am - 2 pm
Wed. 10 am - 8 pm
10 am - 6 pm
Mon.-Tues.-Thurs. & Fri.
HOURS:
1251 N. Williams Street
Paulding, OH | (419) 399-3136
www.acehardware.com
Hunting Supplies & Licenses
Fishing Supplies | Live Bait
Firearms | Ammunition
Exploding Targets | Carhartt
BUY SELL TRADE
Hunting Supplies & Licenses
Fishing Supplies | Live Bait
Firearms | Ammunition
Exploding Targets | Carhartt
BUY SELL TRADE
Paulding
Hardware
Visit your local Kenn-Feld
Group dealer for all of your
Gator needs.
www.kennfeldgroup.com
Rd. 171, Oakwood, OH 45873
1-800-248-6625
Evening Painting Classes Offered
MULLEN
ARCHERY &
GUN SHOP
HUNTING
GUIDE
A Special Three Page Feature of the Paulding Progress
ODNR offering many youth
hunting opportunities
COLUMBUS Crisp fall air and brilliant
fall foliage signal the start of Ohios world-
class hunting seasons and family traditions
that can be carried on for generations. Ohios
young hunters have many opportunities to
learn and improve their outdoors skills during
several special youth hunting seasons, accord-
ing to the Ohio Department of Natural Re-
sources (ODNR).
Ohio offers great hunting opportunities for
sportsmen and women of all ages, said
ODNR director James Zehringer. Our youth
hunts provide parents a chance to share with
their children the excitement of their first
hunt.
Small game: Hunters age 17 and younger
may hunt statewide for rabbit, pheasant and
all other legal game in season during two des-
ignated weekends, Oct. 19-20 and Oct. 26-27.
Quail also may be hunted in 16 designated
open counties.
The ODNR Division of Wildlife will re-
lease pheasants prior to these weekend dates
on the following state wildlife areas: Berlin,
Caesar Creek, Camp Belden, Darke,
Delaware, Dillon, Fallsville, Grand River,
Killdeer Plains, Oxbow, Resthaven, Rush
Run, Spencer, Tiffin River and Wellington,
and Charlemont Metropark in Lorain County
and Ringneck Ridge Area in Sandusky
County. A permit is required to hunt the Ring-
neck Ridge Area. The free permit can be ob-
tained from the Sandusky County Park Dis-
trict by calling 419-334-4495.
White-tailed deer: A youth deer-gun sea-
son will be open statewide Nov. 23-24 for
hunters age 17 and younger. Hunters holding
a valid youth hunting license and youth deer
permit may harvest deer of either sex during
this season in accordance with existing bag
limits. Young hunters, regardless of age, must
be accompanied by a non-hunting adult, 18
years or older, when hunting during this sea-
son.
Wild turkey: It is not too early to begin
planning for the 2014 spring youth wild
turkey hunting season. A statewide spring
youth wild turkey season will be offered April
19-20, 2014. This hunt is open to youth age
17 and younger.
To participate in a youth hunt, all young
hunters must be accompanied by a non-hunt-
ing adult and must abide by all regular hunt-
ing hours and bag limits. Accompany means
to go along with another person while staying
within a distance from the person which en-
ables uninterrupted, unaided visual and audi-
tory communications.
A valid 2013-14 youth hunting license,
along with appropriate permits, is required.
For complete details on all of Ohios youth
hunting seasons, refer to the 2013-2014 Ohio
Hunting Regulations, call 800-WILDLIFE
(945-3543) or go to wildohio.com.
Share the bounty: Donate
venison to those in need
There are several organizations in Ohio
fighting hunger by helping hunters donate a
portion or all of their venison to folks who
need it.
The Division of Wildlife wishes to thank
Ohio hunters for making a difference by do-
nating their venison to the hungry of our state.
Farmers and Hunters Feeding the Hungry
(FHFH) is an outreach ministry called upon
to help feed venison and other big game to the
hungry among us. This program began in
1997 and continues to grow, with representa-
tion in more than one-half of the United
States.
To make a donation, contact FHFH. Go to
the national website (www.fhfh.org), go to
Donate Deer, select Ohio from the list of
states, and find an active chapter near you.
Look at the processors available for that chap-
ter. Each chapter has a contact person and the
processors name and address.
Venison donated to food banks must be
processed by a local or state-inspected and in-
sured meat processor who is participating
with FHFH. Hunters wishing to donate their
deer to a food bank are not required to pay for
the processing of the venison as long as the
program has funds available to cover the cost.
A subsidy grant from the Division of Wildlife
was awarded to FHFH to help with the costs
of venison processing
The Sportsmen Against Hunger program
helps share natures bounty with the hungry.
This program is active in all 50 states of the
U.S., in parts of Canada, and in several coun-
tries around the world.
Deer hunters wishing to help fight hunger
and homelessness may donate venison to
Ohio food pantries by contacting Safari Club
International on their website (www.safari-
clubfoundation.org) under Sportsmen Against
Hunger. Deer meat will be accepted during
any of the Ohio deer seasons.
Whitetails Unlimited (WTU) is a national
non-profit organization with over 30 chapters
in Ohio. WTUs purpose is to raise funds in
support of education, habitat conservation,
and the preservation of the hunting tradition
for the direct benefit of the white-tailed deer
and other wildlife.
Local WTU chapters use local funds for
programs such as venison donation to the
needy, youth archery and shooting sports ac-
tivities, conservation club grants, and hunting
promotion. Go to the national website
(www.whitetailsunlimited.com) to find a local
chapter or for info on starting a chapter in
your area. You can also call 1-800-274-5471
for more information.
302 South 400 East, Decatur, IN
(260) 592-7313
Canned Deer Meat
Jerky & Snack Sticks
Variety of Bratwurst
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After the 16th, we will only be accepting clean,
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um
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mm me um er umm er mme Sa mer au us Sa sa Sau sa aus ummer Sausa usa
After the 16th, we will only be accepting clean,
We will accept carcass deer until 12/16/13.
Wrap & Freeze Deer
ag ge ge ag age age
After the 16th, we will only be accepting clean,
We will accept carcass deer until 12/16/13.
If frozen, not over 8 weeks
or frozen, but it must be from this
Meat. The boneless meat can be fresh
boneless, fresh or frozen (not Ground) Deer
After the 16th, we will only be accepting clean,
or containers such as
plastic food grade bags
old. Please use clear
If frozen, not over 8 weeks
years hunting season.
or frozen, but it must be from this
Meat. The boneless meat can be fresh
boneless, fresh or frozen (not Ground) Deer
After the 16th, we will only be accepting clean,
or containers such as
plastic food grade bags
old. Please use clear
If frozen, not over 8 weeks
years hunting season.
or frozen, but it must be from this
Meat. The boneless meat can be fresh
boneless, fresh or frozen (not Ground) Deer
After the 16th, we will only be accepting clean,
Ziploc bags or trash bags,
Closed Sundays
Saturday 8-NOON
Monday-Friday 8-5
used in these bags.
scents or pesticides
because of chemicals,
Ziploc bags or trash bags,
Closed Sundays
Saturday 8-NOON
Monday-Friday 8-5
used in these bags.
scents or pesticides
because of chemicals,
Ziploc bags or trash bags,
(260) 592-7313
302 South 400 East, Decatur, IN
(260) 592-7313
302 South 400 East, Decatur, IN
manleymeats.com
Closed Sundays
(260) 592-7313
302 South 400 East, Decatur, IN
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Closed Sundays


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2B - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, October 16, 2013
HUNTING GUIDE
2013-14 Ohio hunting and
trapping season dates
COLUMBUS The 2013-2014 Ohio hunt-
ing and trapping season dates have been re-
leased by the Ohio Department of Natural
Resources (ODNR). The seasons include
changes to address deer management on a
county level, and increase hunting opportuni-
ties through extended hours and a new early
muzzleloader season.
Deer archery: Sept. 28-Feb. 2, 2014
Antlerless deer muzzleloader: Oct. 12-13
Youth deer: Nov. 23-24
Deer gun: Dec. 2-8
Deer muzzleloader: Jan. 4-7, 2014
Squirrel (gray, red and fox): Sept. 1-Jan.
31, 2014
Ruffed grouse: Oct. 12-Jan. 31, 2014
Fall wild turkey: Oct. 14-Dec. 1
Youth upland game: Oct. 19-20, Oct. 26-
27
Cottontail rabbit: Nov. 1 -Feb. 28, 2014
Ring-necked pheasant: Nov. 1-Jan. 5, 2014
Bobwhite quail: Nov. 1-Dec. 1
Fox, raccoon, opossum, skunk and weasel:
Nov. 10-Jan. 31, 2014
Mink and muskrat: Nov. 10-Feb. 28, 2014
Mink, muskrat, raccoon, opossum, skunk
and weasel (Erie, Ottawa and Sandusky coun-
ties, and Lucas County east of the Maumee
River): Nov. 10-March 15, 2014
Beaver: Dec. 26-Feb. 28, 2014
River otter: Dec. 26-Feb. 28, 2014
Crow: June 7-March 8, 2014; June 6,
2014-March 7, 2015 (Friday, Saturday and
Sunday only)
Youth spring wild turkey: April 19-20,
2014
Spring wild turkey: April 21, 2014-May
18, 2014
Coyote and feral swine (wild boar): No
closed season
Groundhog: Closed only during deer gun
season
Deer bag limits are now determined by
county. Deer bag limits, by county:
One either-sex permit, one antlerless
permit (eight counties): Darke, Erie, Fayette,
Hancock, Madison, Ottawa, Sandusky and
Wood.
Two either-sex permits, one antlerless
permit (23 counties): Auglaize, Butler,
Champaign, Clark, Gallia, Harrison, Henry,
Hocking, Jackson, Jefferson, Lawrence,
Logan, Meigs, Mercer, Miami, Monroe,
Montgomery, Perry, Preble, Ross, Shelby, Van
Wert and Washington.
Three either-sex permits, one antlerless
permit (57 counties): Adams, Allen, Ashland,
Ashtabula, Athens, Belmont, Brown, Carroll,
Clermont, Clinton, Columbiana, Coshocton,
Crawford, Cuyahoga, Defiance, Delaware,
Fairfield, Franklin, Fulton, Geauga, Greene,
Guernsey, Hamilton, Hardin, Highland,
Holmes, Huron, Knox, Lake, Licking, Lorain,
Lucas, Mahoning, Marion, Medina, Morgan,
Morrow, Muskingum, Noble, Paulding, Pick-
away, Pike, Portage, Putnam, Richland,
Scioto, Seneca, Stark, Summit, Trumbull, Tus-
carawas, Union, Vinton, Warren, Wayne,
Williams and Wyandot.
Deer hunting hours are 30 minutes before
sunrise to 30 minutes past sunset for all deer
seasons. Antlerless permits will be valid until
Dec. 1, the Sunday before the deer-gun sea-
son.
Hunters may harvest only one buck in Ohio,
regardless of method of take or location. The
statewide bag limit is nine deer, but a hunter
cannot exceed a county bag limit. Additional
controlled hunting opportunities do not count
against the statewide bag limit.
The antlerless deer muzzleloader season
was added in October. The December bonus
gun weekend, the early muzzleloader season
at three public hunting areas (Salt Fork
Wildlife Area, Shawnee State Forest and
Wildcat Hollow), and urban hunting zones are
discontinued.
The fall wild turkey season begins on Oct.
14, the Monday following the antlerless deer
muzzleloader season. Butler, Delaware, Fair-
field, Franklin, Hamilton, Huron, Seneca and
Warren counties are added to the list of coun-
ties open for fall turkey hunting.
Deer and fall turkey permits went on sale
July 1.
Cottontail rabbit hunting restrictions are re-
moved in the snowshoe hare protected area in
Geauga and Ashtabula counties. Remaining
snowshoe hares are still protected as a state-
endangered species, and it remains illegal to
kill them in Ohio.
Season dates and bag limits for migratory
birds, including mourning dove, Canada
goose, rail, moorhen, snipe, woodcock and
waterfowl will be set in August in compliance
with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services
2013-2014 framework.
Northwest Ohios hunting heritage
By LINDSAY McCOY
DHI Correspondent
During the 1700s and
1800s, the land that would be-
come Paulding and Van Wert
counties and many of its sur-
rounding counterparts, were
part of a larger territory known
as the Great Black Swamp.
This swamp area provided
rich hunting grounds as many
animals collected for their fur
called this place their home.
The beaver was one of these
animals and made the Black
Swamp a popular hunting
ground, as this animals fur
commanded the highest prices
in the larger cities in Europe.
A beaver pelt was a soft, yet
resilient material that could be
molded into a variety of
shapes.
From 1550-1850, beaver
hats were the height of fashion
in Europe, and as this fashion
trend continued to increase,
the number of beavers in
North America began to dwin-
dle, which further fueled the
hunt for the furs of this de-
creasing population. In 1624,
Dutch settlers in America
recorded having shipped 1,500
beaver skins to Europe.
Ultimately, the European
trend and mass hunting drove
the beaver population to near-
extinction. The popularity of
beaver hats eventually de-
clined in the early/mid-19th
century as silk hats became the
new trend.
During the time of heavy fur
trade, the competition between
France and England for con-
trol of the fur trade market in
the Black Swamp is thought to
have brought the first known
white men here, but this area
was not only a hunting desti-
nation for settlers and white
men.
During the winter hunting
season, the Black Swamp re-
gion was a paradise for the
Native American hunters who
knew the trails through the
swamp land. The hunting
grounds of northwest Ohio
eventually fell under the con-
trol of the Shawnee, who had
lost these fertile grounds to the
Iroquois many years before.
Relics of Native American
living such as their hunting
weapons can still be found
throughout the counties once
part of the Great Black
Swamp.
Eventually, American
armies sought to seize Native
American ground throughout
Ohio including the Black
Swamp, and after General
Arthur St. Clairs victory over
the Native Americans at Fallen
Timbers near Maumee, the In-
dians lost the hunting grounds
left to them by their forefa-
thers.
Today, the land in Paulding
County, as well as its neigh-
boring counties, remains par-
ticularly fertile due to having
been swampland for several
centuries. Hunting has re-
mained very popular, but as a
sport instead of for trade or
survival purposes. Beavers are
no longer sought after for their
fur, and turkeys and deer have
become the popular game in
this region of Ohio.
Turkey hunting in northwest
Ohio did not become popular
until recent years as the wild
breed of turkey was com-
pletely eliminated from the
state of Ohio in 1904. They
were not reintroduced until the
1950s. Today, there are an es-
timated 230,000 turkeys in
Ohio, and during the 2013
spring hunting season, 18,391
gobblers were harvested.
A group of Ohio rabbit hunters, 1930s. Photo from Ohio Division of Wildlife.
See HERITAGE, page 3B
BIRDS N SPURS
TAXIDERMY
Doug Bashore
Turkeys - Pheasants - Geese - Ducks
and anything else that flies
419-399-9121 Cell: 419-670-4154
Stop in to sign up for the
CCW class
xCCW class: October 19, 2013 &
November 23, 2013 (for Ohio & Florida!!)
x12 hours, meets requirements to get CCW
license. Call or stop in for details!!
xWe carry new and used guns.
xWe may buy or trade.
xWe will sell on consignment.
xIf we do not have what you are looking for we
will order it.
116 S. Main St., Antwerp, Ohio 45813
Phone: 419-258-1373
Monday: 10am-6pm
Tuesday & Thursday: 10am-3pm (during the winter)
Wednesday: 2pm-7pm
Friday: 2pm-8pm
Saturday: 9am-2pm
Sunday: CLOSED
xNew guns,
xUsed guns,
xAmmunition,
xAnd much more!
McDougall Firearms, LLC
www.mcdougallfirearms.com
Emails: info@mcdougallfirearms.com or
ashley@mcdougallfirearms.com
Wednesday, October 16, 2013 Paulding County Progress - 3B
HUNTING GUIDE
ODNR expands
deer check system
Landowners can check deer using mobile devices
COLUMBUS An enhanced website will
offer Ohio hunters a quick and easy way to
check harvested white-tailed deer with their
smartphones, according to the Ohio Depart-
ment of Natural Resources (ODNR).
The enhanced site at ohiogamecheck.com
became available when the 2013-14 deer-
archery season began on Saturday, Sept. 28.
The mobile-friendly site is available for all
hunters to check deer, including landowners
not required to purchase a deer permit. A valid
email address and phone number are required
to use the website on a mobile device.
A new tagging procedure administered by
the ODNR Division of Wildlife requires
hunters to make their own game tag to attach
to a deer. Game tags can be made of any ma-
terial (cardboard, plastic, paper, etc.) as long
as it contains the hunters name, date, time
and county of the kill. Go to the Deer Hunting
Resources page at www.wildohio.com for
more information on changes to the game
check process.
All hunters must then report their deer har-
vest using the automated game-check system.
Hunters have three options to complete the
game check:
Online at http://ohiogamecheck.com;
Call 877-TAG-ITOH (824-4864);
Visit a license agent. A list of agents can
be found at www.wildohio.com or by calling
800-WILDLIFE (945-3543).
Game-check transactions are available on-
line and by telephone seven days a week, in-
cluding holidays. Landowners exempt from
purchasing a deer permit, and other people not
required to purchase a deer permit, cannot use
the 877-TAG-ITOH option, but they can use
the new enhanced Internet site.
Deer hunters checklist
Avoid Problems, Be Prepared!
1. Get the landowners permission to hunt.
2. Buy your annual hunting license and deer permit early.
3. Make sure your gun is plugged and not capable of holding more
than three (3) shells.
4. Make sure you meet hunter orange requirements.
5. Know how to attach your temporary tag. Carry a piece of string,
watch, and pencil or pen.
6. Know the rules for use of communication devices.
7. Know your APV laws.
8. Know the season dates, hours, and Deer Zones.
9. Follow proper check station procedures.
10. Hunt safely!
11. After hunting, check carefully for small, dark crawling or attached
ticks and remove immediately.
Having permission to hunt on private property is not only a
common courtesy, its the law.
nHERITAGE
Continued from Page 2B
Deer are not only hunted
for gaming purposes, but to
maximize recreational op-
portunities including view-
ing and photography, while
minimizing conflicts with
agriculture and motor travel.
In 2012, a total of 219,748
deer were harvested in
Ohio, an 8 percent decrease
from the season before.
Ohios buck, doe and button buck harvest by
county, season and year
Sports
4B - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, October 16, 2013
Football
Tinora ...................48
Antwerp ................20
Allen East .............30
Paulding ...............20
Wayne Trace ..........43
Hicksville.................7
Volleyball
Van Wert def. Antwerp
22-25, 25-2, 25-13,
25-18
Paulding def. Wauseon
25-23, 25-21,
25-17
Wayne Trace def.
Delphos Jeff. ..25-19,
25-21, 17-25, 25-22
Wayne Trace def.
Antwerp....25-15, 25-
4, 14-25, 25-12
Ada def. Paulding .....
20-25, 26-24, 25-16,
25-23
Ayersville def. Antwerp
25-20, 25-17, 25-27,
25-10
Wayne Trace def.
Fairview..........15-25,
25-14, 25-15, 17-25,
15-10
Cross Country
COUNTY MEET
Boys meet
Antwerp ................28
Paulding ...............45
Wayne Trace ..........49
Girls meet
Paulding ...............19
Antwerp...............NTS
Wayne Trace ........NTS
Varsity Games
of the Week
Serving 12,900 members in
PAULDING PUTNAM VAN WERT DEFIANCE COUNTIES
IN OHIO AND ALLEN COUNTY IN INDIANA
- Sponsored By -
Touchstone Energy Power
PLAYER OF THE WEEK
Paulding-Putnam Electric
WAYNE TRACE
#21
Go Raiders!
KORBIN SHOWALTER
2013 Youth Football Champions Paulding Panther Mini Football Team
We would like to thank the following for all their help in making this a successful football season.
Advanced Auto Parts, Boyd Automotive, Don & Perry Furniture, Marco's Pizza, and Poly One.
A special thanks to Coach Coleman, his Varsity Staff and Players, Chris Etzler and the Athletic Dept.
Paulding Athletic Boosters, and everyone who baked and donated food for our home game.
A HUGE thank you to Lafarge for their donation
that provided every football player with a new helmet.
At Crestview:
NWC MEET
Boys meet
Lincolnview ...........36
Columbus Grove....39
Crestview ..............53
Paulding .............130
Spencerville........153
Bluffton...............164
Allen East ...........183
Ada ....................210
Girls meet
Spencerville..........38
Bluffton.................51
Columbus Grove....58
Crestview ..............87
Paulding .............115
At Haviland:
GMC MEET
Boys meet
Ayersville...............57
Fairview ................76
Edgerton...............85
Hicksville ..............99
Antwerp ..............101
Wayne Trace........122
Tinora .................151
Holgate...............163
Girls meet
Edgerton...............40
Holgate.................70
Tinora ...................74
Fairview ................78
Ayersville ..............84
Sports
schedule
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17
Volleyball: Div. IV Sectionals
Wayne Trace vs. Kalida, played at
Ottoville; Antwerp vs. Hicksville,
played at Bryan
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 18
Football: Antwerp at Fairview;
Paulding hosts Columbus Grove;
Wayne Trace at Tinora
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 19
Cross Country: Paulding at Div. II
Districts at Liberty Center; Antwerp
and Wayne Trace at Div. III Districts
at Ottawa
Volleyball: Div. III Sectionals
Coldwater-Paulding winner vs. Ft.
Recovery, plated at Lincolnview;
Div. IV Sectionals Wayne Trace-
Kalida winner vs. Crestview-Conti-
nental winner, played at Ottoville;
Antwerp-Hicksville winner vs. Mont-
pelier-Edgerton winner, played at
Bryan
Showdown set for GMC title
By KEVIN
WANNEMACHER
Sportswriter
HAVILAND The game
everybody in the Green
Meadows Conference has
wanted to see finally materi-
alizes Friday night when
Wayne Trace makes the trip
to Tinora in a battle of un-
beatens in league play.
Both teams did their part
last Friday with wins in
Paulding County as the
Raiders defeated visiting
Hicksville 43-7 while Tinora
won at Antwerp 48-20.
Fridays upcoming battle
will feature a pair of teams
currently in the top four of
Division VI Region 20 in a
game that will also have huge
playoff positioning implica-
tions for week 11.
The Rams come into the
game with an overall record
of 6-1 while standing 4-0 in
the GMC.
Tinora dropped its season
opener to Liberty Center,
falling to the Tigers 21-14 in
triple overtime.
Since that point, the green
and white has ran off six
straight victories, scoring at
least 34 points in each.
The Rams bounced back
with a 34-10 victory over
Hillsdale (MI) before rolling
to a 35-21 win at Fort Lo-
ramie in week 3. Tinora
opened league play with a 48-
7 win at Edgerton and fol-
lowed that up with a 46-21
victory over Hicksville. The
green and white beat Defi-
ance County rival Fairview
63-6 in week six.
Tinora comes into the con-
test averaging 41 points per
game while giving up 15
points a night. The Rams cur-
rently stand fourth in the
playoff chase with another
key conference game at Ay-
ersville (6-1) next week. The
Pilots are eighth in the region
with a road game at
Hicksville Friday.
Wayne Trace is scoring 55
points a night offensively and
the Raider defense allows 10
points per game.
The red, white and blue is
averaging 517 yards of total
offense per contest but one
key area of concern for the
Raiders is taking care of the
ball.
Wayne Trace has commit-
ted 23 turnovers offensively,
an area that must get cor-
rected if the red, white and
blue wants to win the league
or make a playoff run.
We have to do a better job
of taking care of the football,
noted Raider head coach Bill
Speller. Its something we
have talked about but its an
area that we have to get better
at.
In Fridays win over
Hicksville, the Raiders had
five turnovers but used a big
first half to post the win.
Senior quarterback Colby
Speice posted first quarter
touchdown passes to Jake
Arend (57 yards) and Korbin
Showalter (37 yards) as
Wayne Trace grabbed a quick
14-0 lead.
The Raiders added a sec-
ond quarter touchdown pass
from Speice to Showalter (23
yards), a 45-yard punt return
for a score by Jake Dingus
and a 19-yard scoring strike
by Speice to Jake Gerber that
gave Wayne Trace a com-
manding 36-0 lead at the in-
termission.
We played very well in
the first half, noted Speller.
The second half we seemed
to come out very flat offen-
sively.
Wayne Traces defense was
again stellar. The Raiders al-
lowed only 102 yards of total
offense, including 44 on the
ground, stifling the Hicksville
attack.
Speice had 14 tackles to
lead the Raider defense with
Chuckie Chastain and Devin
Wenzlick recording a dozen
each. Brock Worden and Jake
Dingus picked up eight stops
a piece as well.
Defensively, we were very
good tonight, Speller contin-
ued. Outside of the one pos-
session, they played
tremendous.
Hicksvilles lone score
came on a 32-yard run by
Kaleb Johns on the first pos-
session of the second half.
Wayne Traces final touch-
down was scored by Daron
Showalter on a 13-yard run
with 1:20 left in the contest.
We have to be better next
week and we will, con-
cluded the Raider mentor.
This is one of the games that
have been circled on our cal-
endar all year and we will be
ready. It should be a great
game between two very qual-
ity teams.
Jim Bowers/Paulding County Progress
Korbin Showalter #21 finds a perfectly placed pass waiting for him for a first half score last
Friday night against Hicksville.
Jim Bowers/Paulding County Progress
The Raiders Jake Gerber #13 snags a pass and heads toward
the end zone last Friday night against Hicksville.
Jim Bowers/Paulding County Progress
Wayne Traces swarming defense kept Hicksville from running
the ball effectively last Friday night in GMC play.
Jim Bowers/Paulding County Progress
Jake Dingus #12 takes advantage of a kick coverage break-
down to score a first half touchdown for the Raiders Friday night
to help them remain unbeaten.
www.progressnewspaper.org
Want to
see more
photos of
your
favorite
story?
The Progress ...
is Paulding Countys
newspaper of record.
Sports Scoreboard
Wednesday, October 16, 2013 Paulding County Progress - 5B
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Jim Bowers/Paulding County Progress
Antwerps Jordan Laker #68 tries to break through Tinoras
offensive line last Friday night.
Jim Bowers/Paulding County Progress
The Archers Colton Stout #8 takes the Tinora runner down
after a short gain last Friday night in GMC action.
Jim Bowers/Paulding County Progress
Tyler Messman #24 tries to break outside of the Tinora de-
fense last Friday night.
Archers cant stop Tinoras running game
By JOE SHOUSE
Sportswriter
ANTWERP On a beau-
tiful night for football, the
Antwerp Archers gave a
valiant effort but couldnt
match the powerful rushing
attack by the Tinora Rams.
The Rams defeated the
Archers 48-20 to keep their
record unblemished in the
Green Meadows Conference
(6-1, 4-0) and setting up a
showdown with undefeated
Wayne Trace (7-0, 4-0) this
Friday on the Rams home
field.
The Archers will need to
regroup as they travel to
Fairview (2-5, 1-3) on Fri-
day.
Late in the second quarter,
Archer QB Derek Smalley
went down with what ap-
peared a strain or sprain of
his knee.
It looks like its not seri-
ous, like an ACL tear, but
that he hyperextended the
knee. We will have it
checked out and see, said
Coach Drew Altimus.
After jumping out to a 7-0
lead early in the first quarter,
the Tinora Rams needed just
six offensive plays to score
four touchdowns to take a
34-6 lead at intermission.
Sophomore Riley Nagel
led Tinora with four touch-
downs on just five totes.
Nagel scored on runs of 25,
50, 33 and 18 yards. He led
his team with 127 rushing
yards. Teammate Kurt
Kahle, a senior halfback, to-
taled 110 yards on the
ground on six carries includ-
ing touchdown runs of eight
and 49 yards.
Quarterback Brevin
Renollet, only a sophomore,
threw for 82 yards on 6-of-7
attempts. The Rams ran for
316 yards with all seven
touchdowns coming on the
ground.
They (Tinora) are good.
With their strength and expe-
rienced players, they can do
a lot of things that will hurt
you. That was the best defen-
sive line weve seen all
year, said Altimus.
Antwerps first touchdown
came with 6:01 showing on
the clock in the second quar-
ter. On a nine-play, 65-yard
drive featuring a 34-yard
carry by senior Tyler Mess-
man, the Archers crossed the
goal line on a one-yard
plunge by junior fullback
Nick Barnhouse.
The Archers used six min-
utes on their next drive, cov-
ering 65 yards on 12 plays.
On the first play of the fourth
period, quarterback Bevin
Hall connected with sopho-
more Bryce Hall for a 30-
yard score. Barnhouse
managed his way through
the Tinora defensive line for
a successful two-point con-
version to make the score 48-
14.
With many substitutes in
the Tinora lineup, the Rams
failed in their next possession
and turned the ball over to
Antwerp on downs at the 20
yard line. Antwerp QB Bevin
Hall marched the Archers
down the field on 15 rushing
plays covering 80 yards
capped off by another Barn-
house touchdown from two
yards out with 0:46 remain-
ing.
Offensively, the Titans
were led by Messman with
107 yards rushing with
Bevin Hall adding 51 yards
and Barnhouse 33 yards in-
cluding two touchdowns.
Tonight I thought we
were able to move the ball a
little bit. I thought our offen-
sive line did well. We kept
plugging away and I think
that says something about the
character of our team, said
Altimus.
Improving Panthers drop
gallant chase at Allen East
By JIM LANGHAM
Sportswriter
LIMA The Paulding Panthers gave
Allen East all it wanted before falling
back in the final stanza to drop a 30-20 de-
cision at the Mustangs home field last
Friday.
Julian Salinas had a strong showing
once again, scoring three touchdowns and
rushing for over 100 years to lead the Pan-
ther charge.
After the Mustangs drew first blood, 8-
0, Salinas took advantage of the Mustangs
in the first quarter when he grabbed a punt
on the 58-yard line and raced back to the
Mustang 18 for a 40-yard return. Salinas
then raced across the goal line to bring the
Panthers within one point, 8-7 at the end
of the first stanza.
Early the fourth quarter, the Panthers
were still hanging on to the heels of Allen
East, trailing by one, 14-13, but the Mus-
tangs outscored the Panthers 16-0 down
the home stretch to pull away for the win.
Their big fullback was hard to handle
and I think we kind of wore down a little
in the last part of the game, said Paulding
head coach Kyle Coleman. We are con-
tinuing to improve. Both sides of the foot-
ball are getting better. We are playing
much smarter football. The players are
adapting to various situations much bet-
ter.
This is good for us in the future, con-
tinued Coleman.
Coleman said that consistency contin-
ues to be the big challenge for his squad.
We are getting slow glimpses of what
can be, but we are still not finishing a lot
of things; our blocking, our tackling, our
offensive efforts, said Coleman. We
need to continue to work in completing all
phases of the game.
Julian Salinas had another great game;
he ran for over 100 yards and scored three
touchdowns, said the mentor. Dylan
Carnahan and Taylor Deatrick made some
great plays. They took short passes and
turned them into big plays.
In point standings, three Northwest
Conference teams in Division VI are cur-
rently in the top eight of their various re-
gions for qualifying for playoff action. In
Region 20, Delphos Jefferson is second,
Ada fourth and Crestview seventh.
The Panthers return home for the next
two Fridays, hosting Columbus Grove this
Friday and Bluffton the following week.
The local squad then finishes its regular
season at Crestview.
(Editors note: Team coaches are
reminded to please submit result
forms to the Progress office. We
rely on these forms to report
game results to your fans. You
may drop off forms or fax them to
419-399-4030, or email info to
progress@progressnewspaper.org
)
ANTWERP
Junior High Volleyball Tinora
won the Green Meadows Confer-
ence eighth grade tournament
championship by defeating
Fairview in the championship
match at Antwerp High School. The
Lady Rams posted a three-set win
over the Apaches to take the title.
Tinora defeated host Antwerp in
the semifinals in three sets with
Fairview sweeping past Edgerton
in the other semifinal.
In the quarterfinals, the
Apaches beat Holgate in three
sets while Tinora defeated
Hicksville in three sets. The other
two quarterfinal matches saw
Edgerton sweep Wayne Trace and
Antwerp sweep Ayersville.
PAULDING
Junior High Volleyball Paulding
dropped a pair of matches to Defi-
ance on Thursday. The Panther eighth
graders fell by scores of 25-16 and
25-17 to drop to 10-5 on the sea-
son. Pauldings seventh graders are
now 7-9 after Defiance posted a 24-
26, 25-20 and 25-21 win over the
maroon and white.
Junior High Volleyball Paulding
swept past Delphos Jefferson in ac-
tion last week. The Panther seventh
graders posted a 21-25, 25-21 and
25-20 win over the Wildcats while
Pauldings eighth grade was victori-
ous by scores of 25-20 and 26-24.
WAYNE TRACE
Junior High Volleyball Wayne Trace
and Fairview split a match in action
on Tuesday. Fairview won the eighth
grade tilt by sweeping the Raiders
25-8 and 25-14. The Raider seventh
graders outlasted the Apaches by
scores of 20-25, 26-24 and 25-16.
Eighth Grade Football Wayne
Trace got past county rival Antwerp
48-0 in action last Tuesday. Noah
Glass ran for one touchdown and re-
turned a punt for a second score
while Hunter Showalter posted three
touchdown runs. Josh Kuhn also
tossed a touchdown pass to Jake
Kuhn for the red, white and blue.
Glass threw two-point conversion
passes to Gabe Sinn and Adam
Stoller as well. Defensively, Glass
and Jake Kuhn each recorded inter-
ceptions.
Junior Varsity Football Wayne
Trace moved to 5-1 on the season
with a 42-22 win over Edgerton. Jay-
den Sherry, Gabe Wobler and Caleb
Schultz all ran for scores for the
Raiders. Gabe Wobler also tossed a
pair of scoring strikes to David Sinn
while also connecting with Jake
Baksa for another score. Wobler
added a pair of two-point conversion
runs and Baksa ran for another. Cas-
sidy Hilkey had an interception for
the red, white and blue defense with
Scott Wenninger recovering a fum-
ble.
Junior Varsity Volleyball Wayne
Trace wrapped up a perfect season
by defeating Leipsic, Pandora Gilboa
and Liberty Benton to win the Miller
City Invitational. The Raiders finish
22-0 on the year while also captur-
ing the Green Meadows Conference
with a 7-0 record.
The red, white and blue opened
the Wildcat tournament by defeating
Leipsic 25-23, 18-25 and 25-21.
Pacing the Raiders in the match
were Mackenzie Swary (19 digs),
Blair Baumle (16 assists), Carrigan
Critten (five digs, three kills), Haley
Saylor (seven kills, 11 digs), Sydney
Critten (three digs), Estie Sinn (three
kills) and Erin Mohr (nine kills).
Wayne Trace then defeated Pan-
dora Gilboa in three sets, dropping
the first 25-23 before rallying for vic-
tories of 25-14 and 27-25. Top play-
ers for the red, white and blue
included Swary (18 digs), Baumle
(12 assists), Carrigan Critten (three
kills), Stacy Flint (three kills), Danae
Myers (two kills), Saylor (seven kills)
and Sydney Critten (three aces,
five digs).
The Raiders then closed the day
by defeating Liberty Benton in the
championship. Wayne Trace took
the first set 25-19 before the Ea-
gles won game two 25-23. In a
battle of the red, white and blue,
Wayne Trace captured the decisive
third set 25-19. Swary (16 digs),
Flint (two kills), Baumle (18 as-
sists), Carrigan Critten (four kills),
Saylor (11 digs), Sydney Critten
(five digs), Sinn (three kills) and
Mohr (10 kills) paced the way for
Wayne Trace.
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6B - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, October 16, 2013
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NEW
Cross Country results
GMC Cross Country Meet
Bulldogs, Pilots win
GMC championships
By KEVIN
WANNEMACHER
Sportswriter
GROVER HILL The
Green Meadows Confer-
ence cross country meet was
held at Welcome Park in
Grover Hill on Saturday
with the Edgerton girls and
Ayersville boys claiming the
league championships.
Edgertons girls claimed
the championship with 40
points to easily get past sec-
ond place Holgates 70 and
third place Tinoras 74.
Fairview (78) and Ayersville
(84) were the only other full
teams in the field.
Holgates Emma Willet
won the championship in
20:26 and Edgertons Na-
talee Landel took second in
21:02. Tinoras Allison
Weber (21:11), Holgates
Cameron Slee (21:11),
Edgertons Devin Stark
(21:19), Ayersvilles Kaylee
Clemens (21:23) and
Tinoras Emma Bowden
(21:31) all picked up First
Team all-GMC honors by
finishing in the top seven.
Second Team honors went
to Antwerps Bailee Sigman
(8th, 21:46), Holgates
Gabbi Willet (21:53),
Edgertons Keisha Carlin
(22:02), Fairviews Allison
Schwarzbek (22:07), the
Bulldogs Kenzie Stein
(22:07), Hicksvilles De-
laney Osmun (22:12) and
the Apaches Chyanne
Retcher (22:20).
Runner garnering Honor-
able Mention included
Edgertons Molly Miller
(15th, 22:24), Ayersvilles
Samantha Wank (22:26),
Tinoras Allison Helmke
(22:30), Fairviews Malin
Adams (22:35), the Bull-
dogs Kiera Suffel (22:37),
the Pilots Mackenzie Guil-
ford (22:41) and the
Apaches Sara Carder
(22:43).
Other Archer runners in-
cluded Samantha Provines
(32nd, 23:51), Rachel
Becker (43rd, 26:25) and
Maggie Reinhart (45th,
34:18).
Hollie Wannemacher and
Madi Poling took 29th and
30th, respectively, for Wayne
Trace with times of 23:21 and
23:29. Shayna Temple fin-
ished 38th in 25:22 and Becca
Hamrick was 42nd in 26:16.
Ayersville took the boys
title with 57 points followed
by Fairview (76) and Edger-
ton (85). Antwerp was fifth
with 101 points and Wayne
Trace took sixth with 122.
Antwerps Sam
Williamson won the race in-
dividually with a time of
16:11 followed by Ay-
ersvilles Kyle Behringer
with a time of 16:50.
Hicksvilles Dakota Frost
(16:56), Wayne Traces Arlen
Stoller (17:05) and Edger-
tons Dakota Freeman
(17:15) rounded out the top
five runners. Along with
those five, Fairviews Austin
Graham (17:15) and
Hicksvilles Austin Stone
(17:20) also were named First
Team GMC for placing in the
top seven.
Runners receiving Second
Team all-GMC were
Fairviews Tarrence Grandey
(17:22), Edgertons Andrew
Jones (17:37), Antwerps Erik
Buchan (17:37), Ayersvilles
Greg Odom (17:50), the
Apaches Zach Thomas
(18:22), the Pilots Elijah
Fackler (18:31) and Edger-
tons Jacob Ferrebee (18:35).
Ayersvilles Simon Miller
(18:39) and Jordan Rue
(18:47), Tinoras Chris Hoell-
rich (18:49), Hicksvilles
Zach Betz (18:54), Holgates
Trey Jones (18:57), Edger-
tons Mitchell Cercone
(18:57) and the Tigers Owen
Clady (19:11) all received
Honorable Mention for tak-
ing 15th-21st.
Rounding out the Archer
runners were Matt Reinhart
(22nd, 19:12), Chase Gerken
(27th, 19:25), Jerett Godeke
(41st, 20:33) and Matthew
Dooley (46th, 21:12).
Tanner Cook (25th, 19:21),
Joe Schmidt (29th, 19:30),
Chance Elliott (30th, 19:30),
Ruger Goeltzenleuchter
(34th, 19:41), Chandler
Thompson (45th, 20:57) and
Brandon Zartman (47th,
21:29) completed the list of
Raider runners.
Junior high
In the junior high boys
meet, Fairview took first with
20 points followed by Tinora
(46) and Hicksville (62).
The Apaches Austin John-
son finished in first place in-
dividually, posting a time of
11:35, with teammates Cole
Crites (11:48) and Lane Kolb
(12:13) taking second and
third, respectively.
Antwerps Brandon Laney
was fifth in 12:33 and Drake
Gerken took seventh with a
time of 12:58. The Archers
Brian Geyer placed 10th in
13:11.
Evan Mohr led Wayne
Trace with a time of 13:52,
good for 17th place. Levi
Manz took 20th in 14:13 and
Jaeden Jimenez was 32nd in
18:55.
Edgerton won the junior
high girls portion with 17
points. Tinora took second at
51 points and Fairview fin-
ished third with 64.
The Lady Archers Brooke
Hatlevig took ninth in 14:25
while Callie Perry was 15th
in 15:26. Wayne Traces Gra-
cie Laukhuf placed 16th in
15:34. Antwerps Taylor
Provines crossed the line in
17:03, good for 26th place.
Both Antwerp and Wayne
Traces varsity squads will
travel to the Division III dis-
trict at Ottawa.
Other schools participating
in the district include Ada,
Allen East, Bluffton, Carey,
Coldwater, Columbus Grove,
Crestview, Delphos St.
Johns, Fort Recovery, Hol-
gate, Kalida, Lima Central
Catholic, Lincolnview, Mar-
ion Local, McComb, Minster,
New Bremen, New
Knoxville, North Baltimore,
Ottoville, Parkway, Patrick
Henry, Riverdale,
Spencerville, St. Henry,
Upper Scioto Valley and
Waynesfield Goshen.
NWC Cross Country Meet
Lancers, Bearcats capture titles
By KEVIN
WANNEMACHER
Sportswriter
VAN WERT The Lincolnview boys and
Spencerville girls each claimed championships
at the Northwest Conference cross country meet
on Saturday in Van Wert.
Lincolnview captured the boys meet with 36
points to nip second place Columbus Groves 39.
Host Crestview finished third at 53 points and
Paulding was fourth with 130.
Crestviews Mycah Grandstaff claimed the in-
dividual championship with a time of 16:36 and
Columbus Groves Colton Grothaus was second.
Lincolnviews Bayley Tow, the Lancers Alex
Rodriguez and Crestviews Charles Thornburg
rounded out the top five runners.
Travis Jones paced Paulding by taking 21st in
18:49 with teammates Andrew Layman (19:10)
and Simeon Shepherd (19:12) finishing 26th and
28th, respectively. Other Panther finishers in-
cluded Lucas Arend (29th, 19:16), Dayton
Pracht (42nd, 20:06) and Cameron Mohley
(79th, 23:15).
Spencerville won the girls meet with 38
points followed by Bluffton (51), Columbus
Grove (58), Crestview (87) and Lincolnview
(115).
No other schools fielded full teams.
The Lady Bearcats Karri Purdy and Cierra
Adams finished first and second, individually,
with times of 20:51 and 21:53. Lincolnviews
Anna Gorman was third while Spencervilles
Tori Hardesty took fourth and Columbus
Groves Megan Langhals crossed the line fifth.
Pauldings Ashley Johanns took 12th place
with a time of 23:35 and Shayla Shepherd was
17th in 24:09. The Lady Panthers Melissa Mar-
tinez ran a 24:41, good for 26th place, and Taylor
Farr finished 43rd in 26:46.
Lincolnviews Bayley Tow and Spencervilles
Karri Purdy were named the Male and Female
Runners of the Year in voting by the conferences
coaches. Lincolnviews Matt Langdon was
named the Male Coach of the Year and
Spencervilles Brian McMichael was honored as
Female Coach of the Year.
Junior high
The Panther junior high boys team took sec-
ond place with 79 points. Lincolnview won the
meet with 27 points.
Calahan Wolfrum of Lincolnview won the in-
dividual championship, completing the course in
a time of 11:37.
Pauldings Bailey Manz was ninth in 13:00
with teammate Michael Kohart finishing 12th in
13:19. Carson Shull (17th, 13:31), Ethan Letso
(20th, 13:51), Shawn Jackson (24th, 14:25) and
Corbin Kohart (26th, 14:37) rounded out the
Panther participants.
Bluffton took the junior high girls team title
with 22 points while Lincolnview posted 41 and
Crestview had 65.
Columbus Groves Bailey Dunifon was the in-
dividual winner, running a 13:36. Pauldings
Mary-Cate Panico was 21st in 16:43 while Alex
Cardin took 26th in 17:55. The Panthers Heather
Manz finished 28th in 18:35 and Shana Manz
took 31st in 19:52.
Pauldings varsity boys and varsity girls teams
will take part in the Division II district at Liberty
Center High School on Saturday. Other schools
in the meet include Bryan, Lake, Liberty Benton,
Napoleon, Oak Harbor, Otsego, Rossford,
Swanton, Toledo Rogers, Toledo Scott, Toledo
Woodward and Wauseon.
Archer boys win county
cross country meet
By KEVIN
WANNEMACHER
Sportswriter
GROVER HILL The
Antwerp boys won a tri-
match between the trio of
Paulding County schools last
Tuesday afternoon at Wel-
come Park in Grover Hill.
The Archers totaled 28
points compared to second
place Pauldings 45 and third
place Wayne Traces 49.
Antwerps Sam Williamson
won the individual race with a
time of 16:46 followed by
Wayne Traces Arlen Stoller
(17:36) and the Archers Erik
Buchan (18:35).
Rounding out the top 10
were Pauldings Lucas Arend
(19:00), the Panthers An-
drew Layman (19:05),
Antwerps Matt Reinhart
(19:11), Pauldings Simeon
Shepherd (19:21), the
Archers Evan Hilton (19:30),
Wayne Traces Chandler
Thompson (19:32) and
Antwerps Chase Gerken
(19:40).
Paulding was the only
school to field a full girls
squad.
Individually, Antwerps
Bailee Sigman took first in
22:15 with Pauldings Sidney
Salinas (22:54) second and
Wayne Traces Madison Pol-
ing (22:58) third.
Completing the top 10 in
the girls race were Pauldings
Ashley Johanns (23:19),
Wayne Traces Hollie Wan-
nemacher (24:08), the Pan-
thers Shayla Shepherd
(24:43), Antwerps Samantha
Provines (25:01), Pauldings
Melissa Martinez (25:23), the
Raiders Shayna Temple
(25:27) and Wayne Traces
Becca Hamrick (26:02).
Antwerps Brandon Laney
and Brooke Hatlevig took
first in the junior high boys
and girls races, respectively.
Laney posted a time of
12:50 to nip teammates
Drake Gerken (13:08) and
Brian Geyer (13:19), who
took second and third. Pauld-
ings Bailey Manz (13:40)
and Mike Kohart (14:07)
completed the top five finish-
ers. Wayne Traces Levi
Manz (14:54) finished 10th to
lead the Raiders.
Hatlevig ran a 14:47 to eas-
ily get past Wayne Traces
Gracie Laukhuf, who finished
second in 16:11. Antwerps
Callie Perry (16:34), Pauld-
ings Mary-Cate Panico
(17:46) and the Panthers
Heather Manz (18:42)
rounded out the top five indi-
viduals in the junior high girls
race.
Wednesday, October 16, 2013 Paulding County Progress - 7B
TOUGH FOR FALL. TOUGH ALL YEAR.




































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www.progressnewspaper.org
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PAULDING COUNTY
PROGRESS
P.O. Box 180, 113 S. Williams St., Paulding, OH 45879
419-399-4015 Fax: 419-399-4030
Varsity Volleyball
Raiders win in 5
Wayne Trace closed out the
regular season with a record of
14-8 overall and 4-3 in the
Green Meadows Conference
after a five-set win over
Fairview.
The Raiders dropped game
one 25-15 before rebounding
to take games two and three by
scores of 25-14 and 25-15.
Fairview evened the match
with a 25-17 victory in the
fourth set but the Raiders won
the decisive fifth set, 15-10.
Pacing the way for Wayne
Trace were Sarah Young (17-
18 hitting, two kills), Sylvia
Young (11-11 serving, 35-41
hitting, 12 kills), Madison Mc-
Clure (22-22 serving, 10 digs,
20 assists), Brenda Feasby (15-
16 serving, 20-26 hitting, three
kills, 41 digs), Lauren Speice
(16-17 serving, 35-38 hitting,
seven kills, five digs), Amber
Combs (14-14 serving), Addi-
son Baumle (20-20 serving,
22-25 hitting, ten kills, five
digs), Gina Sinn (eight digs)
and Libby Stabler (10 assists).
Panthers drop match
Paulding dropped a four-set
match to Ada in Northwest
Conference action Tuesday.
The Panthers won game one
25-20 before the Bulldogs ral-
lied with consecutive victories
of 26-24, 25-16 and 25-23.
Kaley Varner (15 assists, 21
digs), Jaycie Varner (11 kills,
10 digs), Combs (20 digs, nine
kills), McCullough (four kills,
five assists, 15 digs), Vogel
(eight kills), Claudia Foltz
(three digs), Katie Carnahan
(two digs) and Riley (38 digs)
led the Panthers.
Pauldings junior varsity fin-
ished with a record of 12-9
after a 9-25, 25-20 and 27-25
win over the Bulldogs.
WT bests Antwerp
Wayne Trace posted a
Green Meadows Conference
victory over county rival
Antwerp last Tuesday as the
Raiders recorded a 25-15, 25-
14, 14-25 and 25-12 decision.
Pacing the way for the red,
white and blue were McClure
(19-19 serving, 12 digs, 15
assists), Feasby (19-20 serv-
ing, 19 digs), Sylvia Young
(16-18 serving, 10 kills), Spe-
ice (seven kills, 12 digs),
Sarah Young (eight kills) and
Sinn (17 digs).
Top players for Antwerp in-
cluded Longardner (18 digs),
Gabby Zuber (11-11 serving,
two aces), Tempel (seven digs,
10-10 serving), Reinhart (nine
digs, 10-11 serving), Braaten
(13 digs), Derck (10 digs, five
assists), Jemison (three digs, 10
assists), Short (seven digs),
Recker (four digs, two kills),
Rebber (five digs, two blocks,
five kills), Hamman (nine kills,
two blocks) and Miesle (three
digs).
Wayne Traces junior varsity
moved to 18-0 on the season
with a 25-7, 25-9 win over the
Archers.
Archers fall to VW
Antwerp dropped a non-
league match to Van Wert last
Monday as the Cougars
posted a 22-25, 25-22, 25-13
and 25-18 win.
Pacing the way for the blue
and white were Peyton Short
(13 assists, two kills, 14 digs),
Emily Derck (12 assists, two
kills, nine digs, two aces),
Emily Hamman (nine kills,
21-23 hitting, three blocks),
Kiana Recker (six kills, 16
digs), Audrie Longardner
(two kills, four digs), Blaire
Rebber (seven kills), Kaiya
Jemison (three kills), Avery
Braaten (16 digs), Annie
Miesle (four digs) and Mad-
die Reinhart (two digs).
Panthers win in 4
Paulding picked up a
straight-set win over
Wauseon last Monday, win-
ning set one 25-23 before tak-
ing the second game 25-21
and game three 25-17.
Leading the maroon and
white were Jaycie Varner
(nine kills, 19 digs), Brooke
Combs (six kills, 15 digs),
Sierra McCullough (nine
kills, nine assists, 10 digs),
Morgan Riley (24 digs),
Kaley Varner (17 assists,
seven digs) and Faith Vogel
(five kills).
Raiders in 4 sets
Wayne Trace got past
Delphos Jefferson in non-
conference action as the
Raiders recorded a 25-19, 25-
21, 17-25 and 25-22 victory.
Top players for the Raiders
were Madison McClure (13
digs, 29 assists), Brenda
Feasby (seven kills, 13 digs),
Lauren Speice (12 kills),
Sylvia Young (13 kills, nine
digs), Addison Baumle (three
aces, six kills), Sarah Young
(five kills), Gina Sinn (25
digs) and Libby Stabler (nine
assists).
UNDEFEATED SEASON The Wayne Trace junior varsity volleyball team wrapped up an un-
defeated season on Saturday by winning the Miller City Invitational. The Lady Raiders defeated
Leipsic, Pandora Gilboa and Liberty Benton to win the championship. Wayne Trace ends the sea-
son with a record of 22-0 while also capturing the Green Meadows Conference title with a 7-0
record. Team members are, front from left Carrigan Critten, Blair Baumle, Haley Saylor, Macken-
zie Swary; back row coach Colleen Saylor, Sydney Critten, Estie Sinn, Danae Myers, Erin Mohr
and Stacy Flint.
Antwerps Erik Buchan, Wayne Traces Brandon Zartman and Pauldings Simeon Shepherd
compete at the county meet.
8B - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, October 16, 2013
To schedule an appointment,
call 419.784.1414 or toll free
1.800.925.4642.
Members of Mercy Medical Partners













Visit mercyweb.org/doctors to learn
more about Dr. Remaley.
St. Anne St. Charles St. Vincent Childrens Deance Tifn Willard
Mercy Deance
Clinic welcomes
Trey Remaley, D.O.,
Orthopedics and Sports
Medicine Specialist.
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School Lunch Menus
Staff Photo/Paulding County Progress
The new Herb Monroe Community Park continues to take shape. The water feature has been installed
and is running, and trees, bushes, ornamental grasses and other plants have been added. Engraved
brick-size pavers can be purchased for $100. The pavers, similar to ones along the sidewalk around
the square, will be placed under a pergola in the park. Anyone interested in ordering can contact Ron
Williamson, fundraising and marketing chairman and LIA member, at the senior center, 419-399-3650,
or Sonya Herber at the United Way of Paulding County office, 419-399-8240.
Last week, 1996 Paulding High School graduate Shane Jeffreys spoke to the students at Pauld-
ing High School and Paulding Middle School on the topic of bullying. On March 17, 1994, in the
present day Paulding High School gym, Shane was punched by a bully and suffered a traumatic
brain injury, causing lasting disabilities. He created Hates Not Cool Ltd. with the mission to ed-
ucate todays youth on the dangers and consequences of bullying. His story can be found in his
autobiography, titled End It Now, which can be purchased on Amazon and also on his website
www.hatesnotcool.com.
Menus are subject to change
ANTWERP LOCAL SCHOOLS
Week of Oct. 21
MONDAY No school, Inservice
TUESDAY Lunch: Tex-Mex chili, baked fries,
pineapple, milk. Plus: Salad bar.
WEDNESDAY Lunch: Pizzaburger on bun, green
beans, pears, milk. Plus: Salad bar.
THURSDAY Lunch: Nachos with meat and
cheese, sweet potato fries, mixed fruit, milk. Plus:
Salad bar.
FRIDAY Lunch: Cheesy breadsticks, carrots and
celery, applesauce, milk. Plus: Salad bar or chicken
salad sandwich.
PAULDING HIGH SCHOOL
Week of Oct. 21
MONDAY Breakfast: Breakfast pizza, juice, fruit,
milk. Lunch: Pizza sticks with marinara sauce, green
beans or salad bar with breadstick, fruit, milk.
TUESDAY Breakfast: Sausage links, tator tots,
cheese, juice, fruit, milk. Lunch: Spicy chicken caesar
salad, breadstick or sandwich with whole grain bun,
oven fries, fruit, milk.
WEDNESDAY Breakfast: Egg, ham and cheese
bagel, juice, fruit, milk. Lunch: Glazed chicken with
dip, macaroni and cheese, top your own burrito, fruit,
milk.
THURSDAY Breakfast: Sausage links, waffles
with syrup, fruit, milk. Lunch: Pasta with meat sauce,
salad, garlic toast, or pretzel with cheese and mari-
nara sauce, fruit, milk.
FRIDAY Breakfast: Sausage gravy and biscuits,
juice, fruit, milk. Lunch: Patty melt with whole grain
bun, onion, oven potatoes or salad bar with bread-
stick, fruit, milk.
OAKWOOD ELEMENTARY
Week of Oct. 21
Packed lunch: Hot dog on bun, vegetable, fruit,
milk.
MONDAY Breakfast: Yogurt with Goldfish crack-
ers. Lunch: Mini pancakes, mini sausage, celery
sticks, carrot sticks, fruit, milk.
TUESDAY Breakfast: Warm biscuit with sausage,
fruit, milk. Lunch: Grilled chicken on bun, broccoli with
cheese sauce, fruit, milk.
WEDNESDAY Breakfast: Breakfast burrito, fruit,
milk. Lunch: Popcorn chicken, whipped potatoes,
gravy, bread, lettuce salad, fruit, milk.
THURSDAY Breakfast: Breakfast pizza, fruit,
milk. Lunch: Pepperoni cheese breadstick, marinara
sauce, green beans, fruit, milk.
FRIDAY Breakfast: Assorted cereals, crackers,
fruit, milk. Lunch:
Taco wrap, lettuce, cheese, refried beans, fruit, milk.
PAULDING ELEMENTARY
Week of Oct. 21
MONDAY Breakfast: Yogurt, Goldfish crackers,
juice, fruit, milk. Lunch: Hamburger on whole grain
bun, mixed vegetables, vegetable choice, fruit, milk or
bologna, salami sandwich.
TUESDAY Breakfast: Pancakes, fruit, juice, milk.
Lunch: Taco salad with crackers, lettuce, cheese,
salsa, fruit, milk or bologna salami sandwich.
WEDNESDAY Breakfast: Breakfast burrito, juice,
fruit, milk. Lunch: French toast sticks, sausage, oven
potatoes, tomato juice, fruit, milk or corn dog.
THURSDAY Breakfast: Muffin, string cheese,
fruit, juice, milk. Lunch: Salisbury steak, whipped po-
tatoes and gravy, corn, bread, fruit, milk or peanut but-
ter and jelly, Gogurt, crackers.
FRIDAY Breakfast: Cereal or bar, Goldfish crack-
ers, juice, fruit, milk. Lunch: Fish nuggets, salad, veg-
etable choice, bread, fruit, milk or peanut butter and
jelly, Gogurt.
WAYNE TRACE SCHOOLS
Week of Oct. 21
MONDAY Breakfast: Sausage pizza. Lunch:
Chicken strips, tator tots, carrot sticks, fruit, milk. Also
at Jr/Sr. High School Chef salad, pizza sub with
salad bar, grilled chicken on bun with salad bar.
TUESDAY Breakfast: Egg cheese muffin. Lunch:
Cheeseburger macaroni casserole, green beans, fruit,
milk. HS - roll. Also at Jr/Sr High - Chef salad, salad
bar with pizza sub or grilled chicken on bun, salad bar.
WEDNESDAY Breakfast: Mini pancakes and
sausage. Lunch: Ham on bun, baked beans, cherry
tomatoes, fruit, milk. Also at Jr/Sr High Chef salad,
salad bar with pizza sub or grilled chicken on bun,
salad bar.
THURSDAY Breakfast: Cheese omelet, toast,
juice, milk. Lunch: Breaded chicken on bun, California
blend, fruit, milk. Also at Jr/Sr High - Chef salad, salad
bar and pizza sub or grilled chicken on bun, salad bar.
FRIDAY Breakfast: Fruit turnover, juice, milk.
Lunch: Pizza, romaine lettuce, corn, fruit. HS-cookie.
Also at Jr/Sr. High Chef salad, pizza sub or BBQ rib
on bun with salad bar.
DIVINE MERCY SCHOOL
Week of Oct. 21
Same menu as Wayne Trace; no breakfast served.