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OCTOBER 2329, 2013
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Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Classified . . . . . . . . . . . . 18-19
Editorials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Police Report . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Letter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
INSIDE THIS ISSUE
Contract terms
Municipal administrator reaches
contract agreement with town. PAGE 2
On Sunday, Oct. 27, dress
up in your best costume and
join the Arts Council of
Princeton for the Annual
Hometown Halloween Parade.
Bring your family and friends
for a spooky good time! Meet
on Albert Hinds Plaza at 4
p.m. The Princeton University
Marching Band will lead the
parade to Palmer Square
Green.
The Arts Council invites you
to celebrate the creativity
and imagination that
Halloween represents.
Children and adults of all
ages are welcome to march
in the parade or to simply
observe from the sidewalk.
Costumes are invited and
encouraged! For more infor-
mation, call the Arts Council
of Princeton at (609) 924-
8777.
SPOTLIGHT
Holiday parade
Fall Weekend celebration
Officials:
Educate
to avoid
coyotes
By KATIE MORGAN
The Sun
Princeton will not hire profes-
sional hunters to control the
growing coyote population in
town, according to Councilman
Bernie Miller. Instead, officials
will seek to educate residents on
avoiding interaction with the ani-
mals.
Officials have said the town has
received numerous complaints
about a growing coyote popula-
tion in the last two years, and the
larger animals have killed several
pets.
This has stirred a lot of inter-
est locally, statewide, and to some
extent, nationwide, Miller, who is
also the chair of the Animal Con-
trol Advisory Committee, said.
Weve had a lot of anecdotal evi-
dence of contact between coyotes
and humans in Princeton.
Miller said that most of the re-
ported incidents or sightings have
occurred in the vicinity of Prince-
please see COMMITTEE, page 5
Special to The Sun
ABOVE: A young
Princeton Day School
student, dressed in
blue and white to sup-
port the PDS athletes
in matches against
Lawrenceville, gets
creative at the
schools Fall Weekend
celebration on Oct. 5.
LEFT: Princeton Day
School soccer players
face off against
Lawrenceville in a 5-0
loss during the
schools Fall Weekend
on Oct. 5.
2 THE PRINCETON SUN OCTOBER 2329, 2013
Bruschi, town reach contract agreement
By KATIE MORGAN
The Sun
Municipal administrator Bob
Bruschi has reached an agree-
ment with the town on the terms
of his final contract with Prince-
ton. Officials have begun review-
ing their options for replacing the
towns top civilian employee.
The contract extends Bruschis
employment to the end of 2014,
though Bruschi may leave his po-
sition before that time if a re-
placement is found.
The terms of the contract
retroactively set Bruschis annual
salary at $180,000, beginning Sept.
1. This is a $10,000 raise from Br-
uschis salary last year.
The administrator shall retire
on or before Dec. 31, 2014, the
contract reads. It also entitles Br-
uschi to all of his accrued sick
leave and vacation time.
We could end earlier if they
bring somebody on or promote
someone, Bruschi said at a press
conference. Its all depending on
what the schedule is and how
they decide to choose a replace-
ment.
Bruschi was the administrator
of the former Princeton borough
prior to consolidation. Bruschi
began considering retirement
when he was still in his position
in the former borough, and offi-
cials have long known that this
may be Bruschis last contract.
Ive said from the beginning
that I want to give the governing
body time to be ready to make a
determination as to how they
want to proceed with replacing
me, Bruschi said.
It is unclear whether Bruschis
replacement will be promoted
from within the municipality or
whether the town will do a full
search for the next municipal ad-
ministrator.
After Bruschis new contract
was approved by a unanimous
Council vote, Mayor Liz Lempert
thanked him for his continued
service to the municipality.
Thank you, Bob, she joked.
Well have you to kick around for
another year.
In other news from the Oct. 14
meeting, a tie-breaking vote from
Lempert determined that the
Council would not go into closed
session as planned to discuss re-
cent litigation and negotiations
with Princeton University.
Members of the Council said
they were uncomfortable with in-
formation from closed sessions
being leaked to the press.
Im reluctant to participate
further in closed sessions until
we all share the same understand-
ing, Bernie Miller, council presi-
dent, said. We are like the board
of directors of a corporation.
There is a code you follow. Part of
that code is that when you discuss
things in closed session, it re-
mains privileged information for
those who participate.
Lempert and Miller voted with
Councilmembers Heather
Howard and Lance Liverman to
avoid meeting in closed session.
Attorney Bill Kearns is expect-
ed to work with the mayor and
council during a training ses-
sion on Oct. 22. Kearns will an-
swer councilmembers questions
about confidentiality.
The Council is expected to go
into closed session at the Oct. 28
meeting.
Siblings find way to give back to community
By KATIE MORGAN
The Sun
Princeton residents Matthew,
16, and Rachel Asir, 14, organized
their first charity event in 2010.
Over the next three years, the sib-
lings have raised more than
$24,000 for charitable organiza-
tions in the area.
Matthew and Rachels mother,
Helen Asir, said her childrens in-
terest in giving back to their com-
munity was sparked by a gift
from an uncle.
They were given an iPad,
Asir said. They played with it all
summer, and they were so excited
that they forgot everything
around them. At the time, an iPad
cost more than $700. I sat them
down and asked if they under-
stood how much it cost, and they
had an idea, but they couldnt put
into perspective what $700 meant
how many children could eat, or
go to school, on $700.
Asir said Matthew and Rachel
were inspired by the conversa-
tion.
They said they wanted to do
something to raise money, and
they wanted to utilize their tal-
ents, Asir said. Matthew plays
the classical sitar, and Rachel per-
forms classical Bharatanatyam
dance. They put together a pro-
gram at our home with an elegant
dinner, cocktail hour and per-
formances. They called it Hope.
That first event, in 2010, raised
nearly $10,000. Matthew and
Rachel discussed their desire to
help underprivileged children
with their pastor at Trinity
Church in Princeton.
The pastor pointed the siblings
toward Urban Promise, a shelter
organization that helps fund pro-
grams for children living in im-
poverished or dangerous areas.
Urban Promise provides hope
and promise to children in Cam-
den, Asir said. With the money
raised by Matthew and Rachel,
they were able to buy several lap-
tops for children in high school
and help educate them after
school hours.
Asir said she told her children
about their uncle, who had epilep-
sy as a child, and was develop-
mentally disabled as a result.
He was beaten and mistreat-
ed, Asir said. Because no one
knew how to care for him.
Spurred by the story of their
family members lack of care, in
2011 Matthew and Rachel chose to
donate the proceeds from their
Hope event to the Pediatric
Epilepsy Program at the Chil-
drens Hospital of Philadelphia.
Hope 2012 supported HiTOPs, a
Princeton-based organization, in
its efforts to educate and counsel
teens and children in the preven-
tion of teenage pregnancy and in
responsible, safe sex practices.
Hope 2013 will be held on Oct.
25, again at the Asirs home.
This year they are supporting
the Juvenile Rights Program of
the American Friends Service
Committee to ensure that young
immigrant children are given a
fair trial and reunited with their
families back home rather than
kept in detention facilities end-
lessly at the cost of the U.S. tax-
payer, Asir said. Imagine that
you are 14 years old and are navi-
gating a web of confusing immi-
gration hearings alone and un-
represented.
An immigration system that
baffles grownups, a hearing that
may be in a language not your
own, and this hearing happens
while you are held in a detention
facility hundreds of miles from
family and home.
Asir said this years event
would be attended by between 300
and 400 people. She said Matthew
and Rachel are looking forward to
giving the money they raise to the
Juvenile Rights Program, and
helping young immigrants navi-
gate the system, and reunite with
their parents.
This is children helping chil-
dren, Asir said. Thats what life
in America is about. You have
wonderful opportunities for your-
self, as my children have, and you
take advantage of the opportuni-
ties you have to give back to your
community.
Special to The Sun
Matthew Asir performs
classical Sitar music at the
charity event he organized
with his sister in 2012.
4 THE PRINCETON SUN OCTOBER 2329, 2013
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ton Community Village and the
Institute for Advanced Study, both
of which are heavily wooded sec-
tions of the town.
We believe that there are
somewhere between 40 and 60 coy-
otes in the community at the pres-
ent time, Miller said. At an earli-
er meeting the committee consid-
ered the possibility of recom-
mending a culling program.
Miller said that after the initial
meeting, members of the commit-
tee, including himself and Ani-
mal Control Officer Mark John-
son, did extensive research on
methods of coyote population con-
trol.
We found out that coyotes are
really pervasive in both suburban
and urban environments, Miller
said. This is not a problem that is
unique to Princeton. They dont
have any natural predators in this
kind of environment.
Miller said the research indi-
cated that the most effective way
to control interaction between hu-
mans and coyotes in a setting like
Princeton is an education pro-
gram.
Some of our research suggest-
ed that culling in a suburban set-
ting is not productive, as it leads
to inbreeding of coyotes and dogs,
and the population quickly re-
turns to a pre-culling level.
Miller told the Princeton Coun-
cil on Oct. 14 that the Animal Con-
trol Advisory Committee would
continue to collect data on the coy-
otes in Princeton.
The committee recommends
that we undertake a program to
educate our residents on the best
practices to reduce interaction be-
tween coyotes, humans and their
pets, Miller said. In the mean-
time, the animal control officer
will collect quantitative data on
the seriousness of the coyote
problem, and present it to the
committee in June of next year.
We will evaluate that information
and make decisions based on
what will then be quantitative
rather than anecdotal informa-
tion.
Miller said that while coyotes
will not be culled, the annual deer
cull is scheduled to proceed.
Council passed an agreement
with the United Bowhunters of
New Jersey regarding recreation-
al deer hunting in Princetons
woods.
Its the same terms and condi-
tions of last years contract,
Miller said. Last year it was
quite successful. There were no is-
sues that we encountered with the
recreational bowhunters on
Princeton lands.
Miller said a contract for a pro-
fessional deer cull with hunting
firm White Buffalo would appear
before Council at the Oct. 28 meet-
ing. Mayor Liz Lempert said infor-
mation about coyote interaction
and education would be made
available on the towns website,
and she said she would also like to
enlist the school districts help in
distributing the educational infor-
mation to residents.
Committee researched population control
COMMITTEE
Continued from page 1
letters to the editor
in our opinion
6 THE PRINCETON SUN OCTOBER 2329, 2013
1330 Route 206, Suite 211
Skillman, NJ 08558
609-751-0245
The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit
Media LLC, 1330 Route 206, Suite 211,
Skillman, NJ 08558. It is mailed weekly to
select addresses in the 08042 and 08540 ZIP
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If you are not on the mailing list, six-month
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For information, please call 609-751-0245.
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email advertising@theprincetonsun.com.
The Sun welcomes comments from readers
including any information about errors that
may call for a correction to be printed.
SPEAK UP
The Sun welcomes letters from readers.
Brief and to the point is best, so we look for
letters that are 300 words or fewer. Include
your name, address and phone number. We
do not print anonymous letters. Send letters
to news@theprincetonsun.com, via fax at
609-751-0245, or via the mail. Of course,
you can drop them off at our office, too.
The Princeton Sun reserves the right to
reprint your letter in any medium includ-
ing electronically.
PUBLISHER Steve Miller
EXECUTIVE EDITOR Tim Ronaldson
VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES Joe Eisele
MANAGING EDITOR Mary L. Serkalow
CONTENT EDITOR Kristen Dowd
PRINCETON EDITOR Katie Morgan
ART DIRECTOR Tom Engle
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Russell Cann
CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Barry Rubens
VICE CHAIRMAN Michael LaCount, Ph.D.
ELAUWIT MEDIA GROUP
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Dan McDonough, Jr.
EDITOR EMERITUS Alan Bauer
Washington Crossing Park
needs a friends group
I applaud Gov. Christies efforts on be-
half of the shore, but I am writing about
New Jerseys significantly historic Wash-
ington Crossing Park. I wish to rock the
boat and ask that he give attention to
this state park, a treasure in the states
parks system that needs his help.
The state park is on New Jerseys side
of Gen. Washingtons famous crossing
of the Delaware. Using boats from up and
down the Delaware, Washington and his
army left Pennsylvania in 1776, landed
here and then moved on to Trenton. The
Johnson Ferry house, used by Washing-
ton and his staff, is still there. The Swan
collection of American Revolutionary
War artifacts is there. It is the annual site
of New Jerseys history fair. But the mu-
seum and its various structures are in
desperate need of repair, and the park it-
self needs major attention.
The park also has a great nature center,
meadows and trails for hiking, but many
of the trails were affected by hurricane
Sandy and are still blocked. The historic
family pavilions, footbridges, picnic ta-
bles and restrooms are also in rough
shape.
The park needs a friends group to
help, but it also needs a big push from the
state Department of Environmental Pro-
tection. A friends group is what I am in
the process of forming to assist this beau-
tiful park to return to its former glory.
DEP Commissioner Bob Martin has made
numerous references to historic tourism
and a relationship between the state and
friends groups. I hope to find out that
he means what he said.
I hope readers also will help rock the
boat.
Joe Carney
YWCA Princeton is offering a new
womens empowerment series this fall.
Discover your new future: Overcome the
top four mistakes most women make that
keep them stuck is an empowering and
life-changing four-part series designed to
help women get unstuck in their lives.
Over the course of four weeks, partici-
pants will learn the four key mistakes that
keep many women depressed and frustrat-
ed. The program will be held at YWCA
Princeton on Wednesday evenings, start-
ing Oct. 30, and continuing through Nov.
20, from 7-8:30 p.m. The cost to participate
in all four captivating sessions is $65 for
YWCA members and $ 75 for non-mem-
bers.
For more information on the series or to
register for the event, please visit
www.princetonjudo.org, www.ywcaprince-
ton.org, or contact (609) 497-2100 ext. 0.
YWCA Princeton offers
empowerment series
G
hosts, goblins, ghouls and a lot
of superheros and princesses
will be parading up and down
streets in town in one short week. Hal-
loween is an exciting time for kids,
parents and neighbors alike.
Its a time for fun, a time for laugh-
ter, a time for adorable pictures, a time
for candy, a time for celebration and a
time when we all need to pay attention
to safety.
First and foremost, motorists need
to be extra cautious when driving
through the streets that day, not just in
your own neighborhood, but sur-
rounding ones, as well. Make sure to
be aware of trick-or-treating hours,
and be especially careful when dark-
ness settles in. Be especially alert in
residential neighborhoods, as kids
tend to run excitedly from house to
house.
Parents should be on high alert that
day as well, reminding their kids to
look both ways before crossing the
street and cross only at intersections
and cross-walks, when possible.
If kids are trick-or-treating without
adult supervision, make sure they
know the route so they dont get lost
and confused. Other safety tips, cour-
tesy of the website, www.safekids.org:
Decorate costumes and bags with
reflective tape or stickers and, if possi-
ble, choose light colors.
Choose face paint and makeup
whenever possible instead of masks,
which can obstruct a childs vision.
Have kids carry glow sticks or
flashlights to help them see and be
seen by drivers.
When selecting a costume, make
sure it is the right size to prevent trips
and falls.
If you need more tips or tricks of
the trade for trick-or-treating, visit
www.safekids.org. The local police de-
partment will also have safety recom-
mendations, and the municipality will
also have more information about spe-
cific rules and regulations for the day.
Be safe this Halloween. And most
importantly, have a scary good time!
Safety first this Halloween
Parents, kids, homeowners and motorists should follow these tips
Halloween photos
While youre out trick-or-treating this
Halloween, or attending a local
Halloween parade, dont forget about
The Sun! Wed love to print photos of
you enjoying the holiday. Send them to
us via e-mail, to the address at the right.
OCTOBER 2329, 2013 THE PRINCETON SUN 7
Annual reading
program kicks off
By KATIE MORGAN
The Sun
Princeton Reads, a community-
wide program sponsored by the
Princeton Public Library, encour-
ages all Princeton residents to
read and discuss a selected book.
The events for this years
Princeton Reads choice, Matthew
Quicks The Silver Linings Play-
book, kicked off on Oct. 20 with
a Garbage Bag Run, led by Prince-
ton officials, from Princeton High
School to Hinds Plaza.
A pep rally in Hinds Plaza was
planned as the official kick-off
event of the sixth annual Prince-
ton Reads program.
Pat Peoples, the main charac-
ter in The Silver Linings Play-
book, takes daily runs while
wearing a garbage bag.
In the book, Peoples, a former
high school history teacher and
fervent Philadelphia Eagles fan,
has recently been released from a
mental health facility and is fixat-
ed on winning back his estranged
wife. Peoples gets involved with a
similarly troubled young woman,
and the story takes him from Lin-
coln Financial Stadium to a ball-
room dance competition.
Quicks novel explores mental
illness and its sufferers, the im-
portance of family and communi-
ty and classic literature.
The selection of The Silver
Linings Playbook is a catalyst for
the community to have a discus-
sion about the stigmas and hard-
ships faced by both sufferers of
mental illness and their fami-
lies, said Leslie Burger, execu-
tive director of Princeton Public
Library. We hope the book, and
the many scheduled programs
and events associated with it, cre-
ate awareness about helping peo-
ple get the diagnoses and treat-
ment they need.
Tim Quinn, communications
director at the library, said The
Silver Linings Playbook is dif-
ferent from books that have been
featured by Princeton Reads in
the past.
We did a more literary book
last time; this ones more accessi-
ble, Quinn said in an email. The
author has New Jersey roots and
is a former high school English
teacher. Since the book involves
football, we thought wed get
more men involved than in previ-
ous years.
Quinn also mentioned that the
book is the first Princeton Reads
choice with a major movie tie-
in.
A major motion picture of the
same name, adapted from the
novel and starring Bradley Coop-
er, Jennifer Lawrence and Robert
De Niro, opened to major critical
success in September 2012.
The film will be screened at the
library several times over the
next month. Events focused on
the novel are scheduled for nearly
every evening through Nov. 15.
Events include tango lessons,
screenings of films about ball-
room dancing, discussion groups
and more.
A full list of Princeton Reads
events centered on The Silver
Linings Playbook is available on
the librarys website at
www.princetonlibrary.org.
Princeton Reads will culminate
on Nov. 15 with an appearance by
Quick, the books author, at the
John Witherspoon Middle School
Auditorium at 7 p.m. Quick will
discuss The Silver Linings Play-
book and his newest novel for
young adults, Forgive Me,
Leonard Peacock.
More than 100 copies of The
Silver Linings Playbook are
available to borrow at the library,
and an official guide to the pro-
gram, featuring discussion ques-
tions, mental health resources,
football resources and a profile of
Quick is available at the library
in a limited-edition binder while
supplies last.
SPORTS SCORES
Did you know The Sun will
print sports scores, free of
charge? Send them on in.
WEDNESDAY Oct. 23
Soundtracks Series, Princeton
Symphony Orchestra. Princeton
Public Library. (609) 497-0020. 7
p.m. Screening of 'Orchestra of
Exiles,' the story of the rescue of
Jewish musicians from Nazi Ger-
many. Refreshments. Free.
www.princetonsymphony.org.
Open Mic, Alchemist & Barrister. 28
Witherspoon St., Princeton. (609)
924-5555. 10 p.m. 21-plus.
www.theaandb.com.
Soundtracks, Princeton Public
Library. 65 Witherspoon St.,
(609) 497-0020. 7 p.m. Art
response to the Holocaust. Free.
www.princetonsymphony.org.
The White Snake: Relaxed Perform-
ance, McCarter Theater. 91 Uni-
versity Place, Princeton. (609)
258-2787. 7 p.m. Performance for
families with children on the
autistic spectrum, or have learn-
ing disabilities or sensory and
communication disorders. Wheel-
chair seating, family restrooms
and assistance with seating.
Lights will remain on low
throughout the show. Sudden
loud noises and special effects
are softened. Drama by Mary
Zimmerman based on a Chinese
fable. $15. www.mccarter.org.
Lewis Center for the Arts, Prince-
ton University. 185 Nassau St.,
Princeton. (609) 258-1500. 8
p.m. Chekhov's dark comedy,
Uncle Vanya, is directed by R.N.
Sandberg. $12.
www.princeton.edu/arts.
Contra Dance, Princeton Country
Dancers. Suzanne Patterson Cen-
ter, Monument Drive, Princeton.
(609) 924-6763. 7:30 p.m. to
10:30 p.m. Instruction followed by
dance. $8. www.princetoncoun-
trydancers.org.
Cornerstone Community Kitchen,
Princeton United Methodist
Church. Nassau at Vandeventer
Street, Princeton. (609) 924-
2613. 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Hot
meals served, prepared by TASK.
Free. www.princetonumc.org.
Tour and Tea, Morven Museum. 55
Stockton St., Princeton. (609)
924-8144. 1 p.m. Tour the
restored mansion, galleries and
gardens before or after tea. Reg-
ister. $20. www.morven.org.
Guided Tour, Drumthwacket Foun-
dation, 354 Stockton St., Prince-
ton. (609) 683-0057. 1 p.m. New
Jersey governor's official resi-
dence. Group tours are available.
Registration required. $5 dona-
tion. www.drumthwacket.org.
THURSDAY Oct. 24
Centennial Awards for Youth
Development, Princeton Young
Achievers. Princeton YMCA's
gymnasium, Princeton. (609)
497-9622. 6 p.m. Awards for Bar-
bara Blumenthal, founding board
member; Carol Golden, youth
advocate and founder; Clayton
Marsh, former president; Anne
Reeves, founder of the Red
Umbrella literacy program;
Shirley Satterfield, retired educa-
tor, community historian, and
leader; and Robert Hackett, presi-
dent of the Corella & Bertram F.
Bonner Foundation. Lifetime
achievement award for Shirley
Paris, founder of YA, presented
posthumously. Family style din-
ner and silent auction. Register.
www.princetonyoungachievers.or
g.
Chris Thile, McCarter Theater.
Richardson Auditorium. (609)
258-2787. 7:30 p.m. Mandolin
concert features music from his
new Bach recording, contempo-
rary music and his own composi-
tions. In association with Prince-
ton University Concerts. $35.
Note location. www.mccarter.org.
Chris Nickey, Alchemist & Barrister.
28 Witherspoon St., Princeton.
(609) 924-5555. 10 p.m. 21-plus.
www.theaandb.com.
The White Snake, McCarter The-
ater. 91 University Place. (609)
258-2787. 7:30 p.m. Drama by
Mary Zimmerman based on a
Chinese fable. Pride night party
at 6 p.m. in the Lockwood Lobby.
$20 and up. www.mccarter.org.
Lewis Center for the Arts, Prince-
ton University. 185 Nassau St.,
Princeton. (609) 258-1500. 8
p.m. Chekhov's dark comedy,
Uncle Vanya, is directed by R.N.
Sandberg. $12.
www.princeton.edu/arts.
Filmmaker, Princeton Public
Library. 65 Witherspoon St.,
(609) 924-8822. 6:30 p.m.
Screening of 'Mad Hot Ballroom'
followed by Q&A with Amy
Sewell, the writer and producer
of the film. www.princetonli-
brary.org.
Argentine Tango, Viva Tango.
Suzanne Patterson Center. 45
Stockton St., Princeton. (609)
948-4448. 8 p.m. Beginner and
intermediate dance lessons. No
partner needed. $12 includes
refreshments. Pierre and Maria of
Tango North and South. vivatan-
go.org.
Romance Author Symposium,
Princeton University. Betts Audi-
torium. (609) 258-3000. 5 p.m.
to 7:30 p.m. 'The Popular
Romance Author: A Symposium
on Authorship in the Popular
Romance Genre' brings together
scholars and writers. Keynote
addresses by Kay Mussell, a pro-
fessor; and Jennifer Crusie, an
author. Roundtable discussion
follows. Register. Free.
www.princeton.edu/prcw.
Centennial Awards, Princeton
YMCA. 59 Paul Robeson Place,
Princeton. (609) 497-9622. 6
p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Cocktail recep-
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Council files for status
in pipeline project
The Princeton Council unani-
mously approved a resolution on
Oct. 14 to submit an application to
the federal government to become
an intervener in the approval
process that Williams Company
must undergo to expand a 1.2-
mile stretch of natural gas
pipeline in town.
Having intervener status will
allow town officials to view and
track filings between Williams
Co. and the Federal Energy Regu-
latory Commission, the entity
that will ultimately have to ap-
prove the project. The town will
also have the right to request new
FERC hearings and to appeal
FERCs decisions to the U.S. Cir-
cuit Court of Appeals.
This allows us to keep our op-
tions open, Mayor Liz Lempert
said. And allows us to be a full
participant as the project moves
forward.
Williams Co. representatives
have met with Princeton resi-
dents and officials several times
this year. The company has
agreed to limit the construction
to the existing 50-foot easement,
and to use 42-inch diameter pipe,
a narrower pipe than was origi-
nally intended for the project.
Lauren Petrie, a member of
Food and Water Watch, an organi-
zation opposed to the project,
warned Council to be wary of
changes in Williams Co.s guaran-
tees.
They may become a complete-
ly different animal when it comes
to what they have and have not
agreed to do, Petrie said. Youre
only going to get one chance to go
a round with this industry. Its all
riding on how strongly you want
to pursue intervener status.
Voters turn out
en masse for election
Newark Mayor Cory Booker
was elected to the U.S. Senate in a
statewide special election on Oct.
16. According to the Princeton
Municipal Clerks office, a total of
5,075 Princeton residents voted
using the machines at their desig-
nated polling places. In addition,
more than 600 residents voted
using mail-in ballots.
We havent gotten a number
yet on the total registered voters
in Princeton, Kathy Brzezynski,
deputy clerk, said. But the think-
ing is that this was a pretty good
turnout.
Municipal officials were un-
able to predict prior to Oct. 16
whether there would be a large
number of voters in the special
election.
Elections are typically held on
Tuesdays, but Gov. Chris Christie
opted for a Wednesday election.
Critics suggest that Christie, a Re-
publican running for reelection,
did not want to appear on the
same ballot as Booker, a popular
Democrat.
BRIEFS
please see BRIEFS, page 11
In August, Booker beat Rep.
Rush Holt in the Democratic pri-
mary for the special election.
Booker, who won the senate
race to fill the seat left by the late
Sen. Frank Lautenberg with 55
percent of the vote, beat Steve
Lonegan, a former mayor of Bo-
gota.
When he is sworn in, Booker
will become the first African
American senator from New Jer-
sey.
Resolution passed in
support of equality
The Princeton Council unani-
mously voted to endorse mar-
riage equality in the Legislature
in a resolution passed on Oct. 14.
This Mayor and Council here-
by respectfully request that the
New Jersey State Legislature fol-
low the principles set forth by the
United States Supreme Court in
its decision to reject [the Defense
of Marriage Act,] the resolution
read. And duly enact a bill legal-
izing gay marriage in the State of
New Jersey, thereby securing the
freedom to marry equally in our
great state for the benefit of all of
our citizens.
The resolution, spearheaded by
Councilwoman Heather Howard,
lists multiple reasons for their in-
sistence that a marriage equality
bill be enacted immediately.
The Princeton Council is
proud to stand among the over-
whelming majority of New Jer-
seyans who want marriage equal-
ity in our state before the end of
the year, Mayor Liz Lempert
said. Our community had al-
ways voiced its support for equal
rights, and I look forward to the
day when I can officiate the wed-
dings of all loving, committed
couples who desire to marry.
The full text of the resolution
is available at
www.princetonnj.gov/council/ag
-min/101413.
Council member may be
investigated over call
A spokesperson for the Mercer
County Prosecutors Office con-
firmed that there is an active in-
vestigation into a 9-1-1 call placed
by Councilwoman Jo Butler on
Sept. 18.
Butler called 9-1-1 from the
Dinky station, and did not report
details of an emergency.
In a later interview, she said
she placed the call over concern
about where 9-1-1 calls made from
the Princeton University campus
are routed.
Calls from landlines on the
campus go directly to University
Public Safety, while calls from cell
phones are routed to the Prince-
ton police dispatcher.
According to NJ Criminal
Code, a person is guilty of a
crime in the fourth degree if the
person knowingly places a call to
a 9-1-1 emergency telephone sys-
tem without purpose of reporting
the need for 9-1-1 service.
The Mercer County Prosecu-
tors Office has jurisdiction over
any criminal matter that involves
a municipal employee or elected
official. No charges have been
filed.
Katie Morgan
OCTOBER 2329, 2013 THE PRINCETON SUN 11
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The following are reports
and announcements from
the Princeton Police Department.
On Oct. 12 at 2:22 p.m., a
caller reported to police that
while shopping in the Niko
Niko store on Nassau Street,
two bags of merchandise from a
previous purchase at another
store were stolen. The total
value of the theft is approximate-
ly $135.
On Oct. 13 at 2:16 a.m., while
investigating a vehicle parked
after hours in the parking
area on Princeton-Kingston Road
near Shadybrook Road, an
officer located the driver of the
vehicle, and after a brief
investigation it was discovered
that the driver was in
possession of suspected marijua-
na. She was placed under arrest,
transported to police headquar-
ters and was later released on her
own recognizance pending a
court date.
On Oct. 14 at 9:29 a.m., subse-
quent to a motor vehicle stop, an
active child support warrant was
found for the driver in the
amount of $13,238. The driver was
placed under arrest, transported
to police headquarters and was
later released after posting par-
tial bail of $2,000.
On Oct. 15 at 9:33 a.m., a
victim reported to police that
sometime between 10:30 p.m. on
Oct. 13 and 8:30 a.m. on Oct. 15,
an unknown person removed
two bicycles from his front
porch. Stolen were a Schwinn
mens bike and a womens
Raleigh, with a combined value of
$1,000.
On Oct. 15 at 9:02 a.m., a worker
with the Princeton Parking Au-
thority reported to police that
sometime between Oct. 11 and the
time of the call, an unknown per-
son damaged a parking meter on
William Street. with an unknown
object. The cost to repair the
meter is estimated at $100.
On Saturday, Oct. 26 from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. the Princeton Police
Department will participate in
Operation Take Back NJ. The
program allows the community
to anonymously turn in any un-
wanted or expired prescription
and over the counter medications
(no syringes, please). The drop off
location will be in the lobby of the
Princeton Police Headquarters lo-
cated at 1 Valley Road, Princeton.
Any questions can be directed to
Det. Adam Basatemur at (609) 921-
2100, ext 2170.
The Police Department is spon-
soring a Winter Clothing Drive to
assist the residents of Princeton
who are in need. The clothing
drive began on Sept. 23, and will
end on Nov. 15. A collection bin
has been placed in the lobby of
the Police Department, outside of
the Communications Center, for
all clothing to be deposited. The
items we are looking for are: win-
ter coats, winter hats, gloves,
sweatshirts, pants, socks, scarves,
boots and blankets. They can be
for both adults and children and
do not need to be new, but should
be in good condition. If you have
any questions, please call the Safe
Neighborhood Bureau at (609)
921-2100 or email
jbucchere@princetonnj.gov,
lthomas@princetonnj.gov or
dfederico@princetonnj.gov.
OCTOBER 2329, 2013 THE PRINCETON SUN 13
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police report
* Getting married?
* Engaged?
* Expecting?
* Need to thank someone?
Send news and photos to
The Princeton Sun via email
to news@theprincetonsun.com.
Tell us your news.
Well tell everyone else.
Please recycle this newspaper.
14 THE PRINCETON SUN OCTOBER 2329, 2013
1.) Make your final pitch. Why should you
be elected to Princeton council?
Diversity of background, experience
and political point of view leads to view-
ing the issues of the day with a fresh per-
spective, and encourages innovation and
transparency. As the first Latina in
Princeton Council history, I will be com-
mitted to seeking new opportunities for
constructive engagement.
Princeton, after consolidation, has $135
million in debt, must restrain from addi-
tional capital projects for the next six
years, and spends 18 percent of its annual
budget on debt serv-
ice. Taxpayers are
paying over and over
again for costs in-
curred in the past, in-
stead of the present.
The municipality is at
the mercy of interest
rates. Long-term resi-
dents have seen their
tax bills multiply over
the years.
At the same time,
Council decisions are
made behind closed
doors, theres no apparent advocacy
with the school board or the county on be-
half of Princetons taxpayers, and rela-
tions with Princeton University are
strained.
Princeton needs someone who can
bring new ideas, understand priorities,
strive to build consensus, and work to-
ward realistic solutions for the three
most important issues: High property
taxes, traffic congestion and long-stand-
ing turmoil in the police department.
Princeton needs someone who sees the
role of a Council member as a fiduciary
for the community, and who understands
that the taxpayer is not an open check-
book.
Eight percent of Princetonians are
Latinos, striving to integrate and live in
our community, many in the process of
becoming citizens. We want to stay in
Princeton. Seniors who have lived here,
some for generations, want to age in
place and stay in Princeton as well.
The middle class is leaving or wants to
leave. Local businesses are struggling or
have left. Who else will have to leave?
I want to preserve Princeton for
Princetonians, new and old. Vote for me
on Nov. 5!
1.) Make your final pitch. Why should you
be elected to Princeton council?
Having lived in Princeton for more
than 20 years and having raised three
children here, I believe Princeton is one
of the best places to live in the world if
not the best. I'm running for re-election
so I can continue working to keep it that
way. This means preserving our small
lot, old-fashioned neighborhoods and pro-
tecting the scale and character of our
downtown. Tree-lined streets define our
in-town neighborhoods, and its green
parks and open spaces bestow peaceful-
ness and natural beauty in the outer
areas of the new town. Our community's
support of the library, the
Human Services Commission,
our Senior Center and recre-
ation programs are a manifesta-
tion of our strong community
values.
We struggle with high prop-
erty taxes, which drive some of
our longstanding residents
away when they retire and
make it hard for lower-income
and even middle-class families
to move here. For the past four
years, as a borough council
member and a new Council member, I
have vigorously supported a frugal ap-
proach to governing. In the first 10
months of the new municipality,
the transition of our operations
has gone smoothly and we're set
continue on a positive track.
This year we reduced our over-
all budget, and the town is func-
tioning well. I feel my experi-
ence has been valuable and will
allow me to continue with the
work that has gotten us to this
point.
I'm on the Zoning Amend-
ment Review and Master Plan
subcommittees of the Planning
Board, and I look forward to working to
revise our Master Plan and land use ordi-
nances. I hope to advocate for protections
for neighborhoods in our land use ordi-
nances going forward. I'm also going to be
working on the committee that will be
forming Advisory Planning Districts,
which were promised as extra protection
for neighborhoods after consolidation.
I've been reviewing our general ordi-
nances, all of which have to be reconciled
for the new municipality within the next
few years. My familiarity with operations
and knowing how government works is
invaluable in this work.
Princeton is an extraordinary town
and I will work to keep it that way. I hope
voters will support me on Nov. 5. I invite
anyone who wants to contact me to go to
my website at www.jennycrumiller.com.
JENNY CRUMILLER
FAUSTA
RODRIGUEZ WERTZ
Every week, The Sun will ask candidates in the Nov. 5
election for Council seats to respond to questions pertinent to local issues. You can find all the responses
online at www.theprincetonsun.com. This weeks questions:
1.) Make your final pitch. Why should you be elected to Princeton council?
MEET THE
CANDIDATES
OCTOBER 2329, 2013 THE PRINCETON SUN 15
1.) Make your final pitch. Why should you
be elected to Princeton council?
I ran for council last year because I felt
I could make a real contribution to our
community as Princeton came together
as one town. I started out with a few key
goals: to implement the recommenda-
tions of the Consolidation and Shared
Services Study Commission and the
Transition Task Force to fully realize the
intended benefits of consolidation, to
work to improve local emergency plan-
ning and management, and to improve
the working relationship between the
municipality and the university.
I was successful in my bid for a seat on
the council, I was sworn in on Jan. 1 of
this year, and I have worked the past nine
and a half months to follow through on
each of those goals.
This year we have successful-
ly implemented consolidation,
and due to careful management
of personnel and operating
costs, we were able to implement
a cut in the municipal property
tax rate. In doing so we have con-
tinued the careful fiscal manage-
ment of recent Democratic mu-
nicipal governments from both
former municipalities. The bor-
ough had not raised municipal
property tax rates for four years prior,
and the township had not raised the tax
rate for two years prior. We set the munic-
ipal property tax in Princetons budget
this year three quarters of a million dol-
lars lower than the combined municipal
property tax budgeted five years ago, and
we did that while extending an
important municipal service,
residential garbage pickup, into
the former township. The mu-
nicipal property tax has shrunk
as a proportion of the overall
property tax in recent years as
well, and in 2013, the municipal
portion is only 22 percent of
Princetons total property tax
bill. The rest goes to the county
and to the schools.
This spring I chaired the
Emergency Preparedness Task Force,
and I serve now on the Local Emergency
Management Committee. This fall we ap-
proved the first basic Emergency Opera-
tion Plan covering all of Princeton, and
by the end of the year we expect to com-
plete 15 plan annexes covering various as-
pects of emergency management in de-
tail, including shelters and comfort cen-
ters, alerts and emergency communica-
tions, hazardous materials events, and
emergency medical.
I have also served on the Alexander
Street University Place Task Force, a
joint task force made up of elected repre-
sentatives, private citizens appointed by
mayor and council, and representatives
of Princeton University, studying poten-
tial traffic and transit improvements
along the Alexander Street - University
Place corridor.
I have enjoyed my work on council this
year, and I chose to run again simply to
have the opportunity, if the voters in
Princeton approve, to continue to work
on these and other important issues for
the community.
PATRICK SIMON
16 THE PRINCETON SUN OCTOBER 2329, 2013
tion and silent auction. 'Celebrat-
ing 20 Years' honors individuals
who nurture, support and guide
others to achieve their goals.
Honorees include Barbara Blu-
menthal, Carol Golden, Clayton
Marsh, Anne Reeves, Shirley Sat-
terfield, Shirley Paris (posthu-
mously) and the Corella &
Bertram F. Bonner Foundation.
Register. $100.
www.princetonymca.org.
Princeton Farmers' Market. Hinds
Plaza. Witherspoon Street,
Princeton. (609) 655-8095. 11
a.m. to 4 p.m. Produce, cheese,
breads, baked goods, flowers,
chef cooking demonstrations,
books for sale, family activities,
workshops, music and more. Rain
or shine. www.princetonfarmers-
market.com.
For Men Only, Man to Man Talks.
Panera Bread. 136 Nassau St.,
Princeton. (609) 915-5873. 7 p.m.
'NJ Men's Better Marriage and
Relationship' group to discuss
relationship issues and solutions
to have the best marriage possi-
ble. Facilitated by Steve Schloss,
author of 'The Man's Secret to a
Happy and Sexy Marriage in Less
Than 10 Minutes a Day' and blog-
ger at www.mantomantalks.com.
FRIDAY Oct. 25
Gallery Talk, Princeton University
Art Museum. Princeton campus.
(609) 258-3788. 12:30 p.m.
'Carved in Stone: Eternity and the
Egyptian Woman' presented by
Laura Berlik, museum docent.
Free. artmuseum.princeton.edu.
Lewis Center for the Arts, Prince-
ton University. 185 Nassau St.,
Princeton. (609) 258-1500. 8
p.m. Chekhov's dark comedy,
Uncle Vanya, is directed by R.N.
Sandberg. $12.
www.princeton.edu/arts.
The White Snake, McCarter The-
ater. 91 University Place. (609)
258-2787. 8 p.m. Drama by Mary
Zimmerman based on a Chinese
fable. $20 and up.
www.mccarter.org.
Folk Dance, Princeton Folk Dance.
Suzanne Patterson Center. 45
Stockton St., Princeton. (609)
912-1272. 8 p.m. to 11 p.m.
Beginners welcome. Lesson fol-
lowed by dance. No partner need-
ed. $5.
www.princetonfolkdance.org.
Rummage Sale, Trinity Church. 33
Mercer St., Princeton. (609) 924-
2277. 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Books,
gifts, art, linens, jewelry, house-
wares, electronics, antiques,
clothing and furniture. Preview
night. $10.
www.trinityprinceton.org.
SATURDAY Oct. 26
Verdi's 200th Birthday Concert,
Boheme Opera NJ. Richardson
Auditorium, Princeton University.
(609) 396-2435. 8 p.m. Concert
features a quartet of singers with
the orchestra. Singers include
Valerie Bernhardt, soprano; Gaili-
na Ivvannikova, mezzo soprano;
Benjamin Warschawski, tenor;
and Constantinos Yiannoudes,
baritone. Register. www.boheme-
opera.com.
Cafe Improv, Arts Council of Prince-
ton. 102 Witherspoon St. (609)
924-8777. 7 p.m. Music, poetry,
and comedy. Register to perform.
$2. www.cafeimprov.com.
Art Workshop, Arts Council of
Princeton. 102 Witherspoon St.
(609) 924-8777. 9:30 a.m. to 1:30
p.m. 'Feel Good Felting' benefits
American Cancer Society's
breast cancer research. Partici-
pants will create a scarf. Register.
$50. www.artscouncilofprince-
ton.org.
The White Snake, McCarter The-
ater. 91 University Place. (609)
258-2787. 3 p.m. and 8 p.m. Dra-
ma by Mary Zimmerman based
on a Chinese fable. Opened cap-
tioned performance. $20 and up.
www.mccarter.org.
Princeton Reads: The Silver Linings
Playbook, Princeton Public
Library. 65 Witherspoon St. (609)
924-8822. 11 a.m., Screening of
'Shall We Dance' at 11 a.m. 'Dance
with Me' at 1 p.m. and 'Strictly
Ballroom' at 3:30 p.m.
www.princetonlibrary.org.
Annual Rent Party, Housing Initia-
tives of Princeton. Present Day
Club. 72 Stockton St., Princeton. 7
p.m. Latin-themed music, food
and dancing. Silent auction and
recognition. $125.
www.housinginitiativesofprince-
ton.org.
Racial Diversity in the American
Jewish Community, Princeton
Jewish Center. 435 Nassau St.,
Princeton. 1 p.m. to noon. 'Talking
Together About Creating Path-
ways of Inclusion,' a program to
raise awareness about experi-
ences of Jews of color in Jewish
communal institutions. Facilitat-
ed by two members of the Jewish
Multiracial Network. Free.
www.thejewishcenter.org.
Walking Tour, Princeton Tour Com-
pany. 98 Nassau St. near Star-
bucks. (609) 902-3637. 2 p.m. to
4 p.m. Three miles of walking
around town with a trained guide.
Register. $25. www.princeton-
tourcompany.com.
Ghost Tour, Princeton Tour Compa-
ny. Witherspoon and Nassau
streets. (609) 902-3637. 8 p.m.
$20. Halloween tour. www.prince-
tontourcompany.com.
SUNDAY Oct. 27
The White Snake, McCarter The-
ater. 91 University Place. (609)
258-2787. 2 p.m. Drama by Mary
Zimmerman based on a Chinese
fable. Post-show discussion. $20
and up. www.mccarter.org.
Princeton Reads: The Silver Linings
Playbook, Princeton Public
Library. 65 Witherspoon St. (609)
924-8822. 2 p.m. Viva Tango
presents a beginner lesson in
Argentine tango followed by a
demonstration. www.princetonli-
brary.org.
Woody Allen, Friends of the Prince-
ton University Library. Richard-
son Auditorium. (609) 258-3155.
4 p.m. Filmmaker, author, and
playwright presents a question
and answer session with Maria Di
Battista, professor of English and
author of 'Fast Talking Dames.'
Allen has donated his papers,
including drafts of screenplays
and correspondence, to the
library. Members will have priori-
ty seating. Register.
ww.fpul.org/bae.
Walking Tour, Historical Society of
Princeton. Bainbridge House. 158
Nassau St., Princeton. (609) 921-
6748. 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Two-hour
walking tour of downtown Prince-
ton and Princeton University
includes stories about the early
history of Princeton, the founding
of the university, and the Ameri-
can Revolution. $7; $4 for ages 6
to 12. www.princetonhistory.org.
Diwali Celebration, Princeton Public
Library. Witherspoon Street,
Princeton. (609) 924-8822. 2
p.m. Immerse yourself in the cul-
ture of India with traditional
dances, Indian clothes, stories,
visual displays and a craft.
www.princetonlibrary.org.
Hometown Halloween Parade and
More, Arts Council of Princeton.
Hinds Plaza, Witherspoon Street.
(609) 924-8777. 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.
Meet at Hinds Plaza for the
parade. Princeton University
Marching Band leads the parade
to Palmer Square Green. Cos-
tumes invited. www.artscoun-
cilofprinceton.org.
Open House, The Laurel School.
407 Nassau St., Princeton. (609)
466-6000. 1 p.m. For students in
grades 1 to 8 with dyslexia.
www.laurelschoolprinceton.org.
MONDAY Oct. 28
Rehearsal, Jersey Harmony Cho-
rus. 1065 Canal Road, Princeton.
(732) 469-3983. 7:15 p.m. New
members are welcome. www.har-
monize.com/jerseyharmony.
Open House, John Witherspoon
Middle School. 217 Walnut Ave.,
Princeton. 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.
Tour the recently completed
learning commons. Refresh-
ments.
Keith Franklin Jazz Group, Wither-
spoon Grill. 57 Witherspoon St.,
Princeton. (609) 924-6011. 6:30
p.m. to 10 p.m.
TUESDAY Oct. 29
International Folk Dance, Princeton
Folk Dance. Riverside School. 58
Riverside Drive, Princeton. (609)
921-9340. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Ethnic
dances of many countries using
original music. Beginners wel-
come. Lesson followed by dance.
No partner needed. $3.
www.princetonfolkdance.org.
Communities of Light, Woman-
space. St. Paul's Church, Prince-
ton. (609) 394-0136. 5:30 p.m. to
7:30 p.m. Launch of the annual
lighting of luminary candles to
raise awareness of domestic vio-
lence and sexual assault begins
with a reception. The countywide
lighting of luminaries is Monday,
Dec. 9. Luminary kits are avail-
able for $10.
www.womanspace.org.
Princeton Reads: The Silver Lin-
ings Playbook, Princeton Public
Library. 65 Witherspoon St. (609)
924-8822. 10 a.m., 'Flavors of
Princeton' presented by Michael
LaCorte, executive chef of the
Nassau Inn. www.princetonli-
brary.org.
Finding Your Purpose, Princeton
Public Library. 65 Witherspoon
St., Princeton. (609) 924-9529. 7
p.m. Debra Lambo, a psychother-
apist, talks about finding your
passion as you approach retire-
ment age.
www.princetonlibrary.org.
Energy Efficient, Princeton Public
Library. 65 Witherspoon St.,
Princeton. (609) 924-9529. 7
p.m. 'Being Energy Smart: Practi-
cal Ways for Princetonians to
Save Energy and Money' present-
ed by Ted Borer, engineer at
Princeton University; Heidi Ficht-
enbaum, LEED architect; Scott
Fisher, founder of Ciel Power;
Sandra Torres, business energy
expert; and Rees Keck, former
home energy auditor.
www.princetonlibrary.org.
calendar
CALENDAR
Continued from page 8
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We will run photos if space is available and the quality of the photo
is sufficient. Every attempt is made to provide coverage to all
organizations.
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Again this year, Littlebrook El-
ementary School, a public school
in Princeton will be celebrating
the harvest from its thriving gar-
den education program on Oct.
24, Food Day. At 1:10 p.m., all 350
K-5 students will stream outside
to sample dishes made from crops
that they grew and harvested in
the schools courtyard garden.
The event will take place indoors,
in case of rain.
Each grade at Littlebrook has
its own garden project and its
own focus plant families that the
children study over the course of
the year under the leadership of
Science Lab Teacher Martha
Friend, winner last year of a Sus-
tainable Princeton Leadership
Award and Lemonick Science
and Mathematics Teaching
Award, and Garden Educator
Priscilla Hayes, winner last year
of a New Jersey Environmental
Lifetime Achievement Award and
Garden State Green Award.
On Oct. 24, the children will be
tasting, among other things, cu-
cumber pickles, bean dip, roasted
beets with fried onions, celery
root and carrot slaw, apple and
pear tarts, squash rings, and a
dish made from okra, collard
greens and fish peppers. The
dishes are prepared in some cases
by the children themselves, in
some cases by parents and teach-
ers, and in some cases by guest
chefs from area restaurants.
The garden program at Little-
brook is supported by the schools
PTO with the assistance of
Princeton School Gardens Coop-
erative, Inc. and the Church &
Dwight Employee Giving Fund.
Food Day is a nationwide cele-
bration of healthy, affordable, and
sustainably produced food and a
grassroots campaign for better
food policies. It is sponsored by
the Center for Science in the Pub-
lic Interest. www.foodday.org.
Littlebrook Elementary School
is located at 39 Magnolia Lane in
Princeton. For more informa-
tion, please contact Amy Mayer at
amyjmayer@gmail.com or (609)
651-4012.
Littlebrook Elementary School
to celebrate Food Day on Oct. 24
Back to League Night
planned for Oct. 29
The League of Women Voters
of the Princeton Area invites the
community to Back to League
Night, 7-9 p.m., on Tuesday, Oct.
29, the anniversary of Super-
storm Sandy. A brief documen-
tary, "Storming for the Vote: Hur-
ricane Sandy and the Election,"
which celebrates the organiza-
tions, government officials and
League of Women Voters of NJ
members whose efforts ensured
that citizens displaced by the
storm could vote in the 2012 Gen-
eral Election, will be shown.
The League is well known for
its active role in protecting the
right of every citizen to vote. The
League of Women Voters of the
Princeton Area is looking for
members from Kendall Park,
Kingston, Montgomery, Plains-
boro, Princeton, Rocky Hill,
South Brunswick and West Wind-
sor to help carry on this impor-
tant work.
Back to League Night will take
place in the Community Room at
Witherspoon Hall (formerly
Princeton Township Hall) at 400
Witherspoon St., Princeton.
Light refreshments will be
served. The event is free and
open to the public. To get involved
or for more information please
visit www.lwvprinceton.org.
Send us your
Princeton news
Have a news tip? Want to send
us a press release or photos?
Shoot an interesting video?
Drop us an email at
news@theprincetonsun.com.
Fax us at 856-427-0934. Call
the editor at 609-751-0245.
BIRTHS
Did you or someone you know recently welcome a baby into the
family? Send us your birth announcement and we will print it,
free of charge.
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T HE P R I N C E T O N S U N
OCTOBER 23-29, 2013 PAGE 18
W H A T Y O U N E E D T O K N O W
All ads are based on a 5 line ad, 15-18 characters per line. Additional lines: $9, Bold/Reverse Type: $9 Add color to any box ad for $20. Deadline: Wednesday - 5pm for the following week.
All classified ads must be prepaid. Your Classified ad will run in all 5 of The Sun newspapers each week! Be sure to check your ad the first day it appears.
We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, so call us immediately with any errors in your ad. No refunds are given, only advertising credit.
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OCTOBER 23-29, 2013 - THE PRINCETON SUN 19
Identity
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Academic Success:
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Piano & Flute Lessons
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Free Tax and Free Delivery* shall be given in the form of a discount from the price of items
purchased. Itemprice shall be discountedsuchthat the State Tax, whenapplicable, will be charged
nd paid. Free Delivery is on purchases of $499 and more, only within Mercer, Middlesex,
Monmouth, Burlington and Somerset Counties in NJ. NY and PA deliveries not included. When
applicable, anassembly surcharge shall apply. The Sale andthe Promotionexpire November 30th,
2013. 30-50% off are taken off posted MSRPs, sale prices are as marked. Not applicable on
previous purchases and may not be combined with other discounts, offers, or promotions
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2470 Brunswick Pike
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