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Student Training Manual

FOUNDATION OF TAE KWON-DO Tae Kwon-do is a Korean martial art, which although having roots in the ancient orient, was developed as a modern art from the eight Kwans of Korea. Tae Kwon-Do was inaugurated on April 11th 1955 following extensive research and development by the founder. It was introduced into the United Kingdom by Master Rhee Ki Ha in 1967. The TAGB (Tae KwonDo Association Of Great Britain) was formed in 1983 and was the founder member of the British Tae Kwon-Do Council (BTC) on April 21st 1988. The BTC is recognised by the Sports Council. The TAGB is a member of Tae Kwon-do international, a world wide body with representation in every continent of the globe. TKD International was inaugurated on November 13th 1993. WHAT IS TAE KWON-DO It is a version of an ancient form of unarmed combat practised for many centuries in the Orient. Tae Kwon-Do became perfected in it's present form in Korea. Translated from Korean, 'Tae' literally means to jump, kick or smash with the foot. 'Kwon' means a fist- chiefly to punch or destroy with the hand or fist. 'Do' means art, way or method. Tae Kwon-Do indicates the techniques of unarmed combat for self-defence, involving the skilled application of punches, kicks, blocks, dodges and interception with the hand, arms and feet to the rapid destruction of the opponent. To the Korean people Tae Kwon-Do is more than a mere use of skilled movements. It also implies a way of thinking and life, particularly in instilling a concept and spirit of strict selfimposed discipline and an ideal of noble moral re-armament. In these days of violence and intimidation, which seems to plague our modern societies, Tae Kwon-Do enables the weak to possess a fine weapon to defend himself or herself and defeat the opponent as well. When wrongly applied it can be a lethal weapon. THE TENETS OF TAE KWON-DO COURTESY (Ye ui) - To be polite to ones' instructors, seniors and fellow students. Tae Kwon-Do students should attempt to practice the following elements of etiquette: To promote the spirit of mutual concessions. To be ashamed of one's vice contempting that of other's. To be polite to one another. To encourage the sense of justice. To distinguish the instructor from student and senior from junior. INTEGRITY (Yom chi) - To be honest with oneself. To be able to define right and wrong. In Tae Kwon-Do, the word integrity assumes a looser definition than the one usually presented in Weber's dictionary. One must be able to define right from wrong, and have the conscience, if wrong, to feel guilt. Listed are some examples where integrity is lacking: The instructor who misrepresents himself and his art by presenting improper techniques to his students because of lack of knowledge or apathy.
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The student who misrepresents himself by 'fixing' breaking materials before demonstrations. The instructor who camouflages bad techniques with luxurious training halls and false flattery to his students. The student who requests rank from an instructor, or attempts to purchase it. The student who gains rank for ego purposes or the feeling of power. The instructor that teaches and promotes his art for materialistic gains. PERSEVERANCE (In nae) - To achieve a goal, whether it is a higher grade or any technique, one must not stop trying; one must persevere. There is an old Oriental saying "Patience leads to virtue or merit. One can make a peaceful home by being patient for 100 times." Certainly, happiness and prosperity are most likely brought to the patient person. To achieve something, whether it is a higher degree or the perfection of a technique, one must set his goal then constantly persevere. Robert Bruce learned his lesson of perseverance and tenacity that finally enabled him to free Scotland in the fourteenth century. One of the most important secrets in becoming a leader of Tae Kwon-Do is to overcome every difficulty by perseverance. SELF CONTROL (Kuk gi) - To lose ones' temper when performing techniques against an opponent can be very dangerous and shows lack of self control. To be able to live, work and train within ones' capability shows good self control. This tenet is extremely important inside the Dojang, whether conducting oneself in free sparring or in one's personal affairs. A loss of self control in free sparring can prove disastrous to both student and opponent. An inability to live and work within one's capability or sphere is also a lack of self control. INDOMITABLE SPIRIT (Baekjul boolgool) - To show courage; when you and your principles are pitted against overwhelming odds. "Here lie 300 who did their duty." A simple epitaph for one of the greatest acts of courage known to mankind. Although facing the superior forces of Xerxes, Leonidas and his 300 Spartans at Thermopla showed the World the meaning of indomitable spirit. It is shown when a courageous person and his principles are pitted against overwhelming odds. A serious student of Tae Kwon-Do will at all times deal with the belligerent without any fear of hesitation at all with indomitable spirit, regardless of whosoever and however many the number be. BELT ORDER AND MEANINGS WHITE - Signifies innocence, as that of the beginning student who has no previous knowledge of Tae Kwon-Do. YELLOW - Signifies Earth, from which a plant sprouts and takes root as Tae Kwon-Do foundation is being laid. GREEN - Signifies the plant's growth as Tae Kwon-Do skills begin to develop. BLUE - Signifies the heaven towards which the plant matures into a towering tree as training in Tae Kwon-Do progresses.

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RED Signifies danger, cautioning the student to exercise control, and warning the opponent to stay away. BLACK Opposite to white, therefore, signifying the maturity and proficiency in Tae KwonDo. Also indicates the wearer's imperviousness to darkness and fear. INTERNATIONAL TAE KWON-DO OATH As a student of Tae Kwon-Do: I shall observe the tenets of Tae Kwon-Do I shall respect the instructor and seniors I shall never misuse Tae Kwon-Do I shall be a champion of freedom and justice I shall build a more peaceful world TAE KWON-DO OATH As a student of Tae Kwon-Do I do solemnly pledge to abide by the rules and regulations of the Tae Kwon-Do Association, to strive always to be modest, courteous and respectful to all members, in particular my seniors, to put the art into use only for self defence or in defence of the weak and never to abuse my knowledge of the art. TIMES BETWEEN GRADINGS 10th Kup to 4th Kup - Three months each grade. 3rd Kup to 1st Dan - Six months each grade. 1st Dan to 2nd Dan - Two years. 2nd Dan to 3rd Dan - Three years. 3rd Dan to 4th Dan - Four years. 4th Dan to 5th Dan - Five years. 5th Dan to 6th Dan - Six years. CONDUCT IN THE DOJANG Every student must observe the following conduct in the Dojang in order to maintain an orderly and effective training hall. 1. Upon entering, bow to the national flags 2. Bow to the instructor at a proper distance 3. Exchange greetings between students 4. Bow to the instructor upon forming a line before training 5. Meditate for one minute, sitting crossed legged after training 6. Bow to the instructor upon forming a line prior to dismissal 7. Bow to the national flags before leaving the dojang

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TEN POINTS TO BECOMING A GOOD STUDENT 1. Never tire of learning; a student must always be eager to learn and ask questions. A good student can learn anywhere, anytime. This is the secret of knowledge. 2. A good student must be willing to sacrifice for his art and his instructor. Many students feel that their training is a commodity bought with monthly fees, and are unwilling to take part in any demonstrations, teaching or work around the Dojang. An instructor can afford to lose this type of student. 3. Always set a good example to lower ranking students. It is only natural that they attempt to emulate their seniors. 4. Always be loyal and never criticise the instructor, Tae Kwon-Do or the teaching methods. 5. If an instructor teaches a technique, practise it and attempt to utilize it. 6. Remember that a students conduct outside the Dojang reflects on the art and the instructor. 7. If a student adopts a technique from another Dojang and the instructor disapproves of it, the student must discard it immediately, or train in the Dojang where it was learnt. 8. Never be disrespectful to the instructor. Although a student is allowed to disagree with the instructor, he must first follow the instruction, then discuss the matter later. 9. Always arrive before training is due to start, and ensure that you have a good attendance record. 10.Never break a trust. RULES OF THE DOJANG 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. No smoking inside the Dojang. No gum chewing. No jewellery may be worn during class. No shoes to be worn in the dojang at any time. Students should never leave class for a break, water or an early dismissal without permission. 6. Never lose your temper in the Dojang - especially during sparring. 7. Never lean on walls or lay spread out on the floor unless while exercising. 8. Students must keep finger and toe nails clipped short and clean. 9. Keep your uniform clean at all times. 10.No horse-play, whistling or loud talking in the Dojang. 11.No talking during class except to ask a question. 12.Before asking a question, raised your right hand to attract the instructor's attention. 13.While in the Dojang, always address the instructor as 'Sir' or 'Mr' using the instructors surname. 14.Students should behave in a disciplined manner while training. 15.Bow to the flag before entering or leaving the Dojang. 16.Respect all members of senior grade. 17.While fixing your Dobok or belt do not face your instructor. 18.Any student who is late for class must get the instructor's permission and bow to the instructor before joining the class.
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YOUR TAE KWON-DO ASSOCIATION There are over 400 schools in the Tae Kwon-Do association of Great Britain (TAGB). The TAGB is a founder member of the "British TKD Council" (BTC). The BTC is the only organisation recognised by the Sports Council as the governing body for TKD in the United Kingdom. RULES AND REGULATIONS 1. All students must complete and sign the relevant application forms prior to commencing training. 2. All students must be in possession of a TAGB membership and record card after their first four weeks of training. 3. Subscriptions to be paid in the first week of every month. Failure to do so will incur a penalty fee. 4. The build up of arrears is not accepted. 5. One month's prior notice must be given for adjustment of fees owing to holidays etc. 6. Any student not attending lessons and not paying fees for a continuous period of two months or more, shall pay a re-enrolment fee before being allowed to re-commence training. 7. No smoking, eating, drinking or wearing of jewellery, rings etc. in the dojang. 8. Whilst wearing a dobok NO SMOKING is permitted regardless of the place. (dojang, tournament, demonstration etc.) 9. When eating or drinking whilst wearing a dobok your belt must be removed. 10.After the first grading a dobok must be worn during training in the dojang, wearing tracksuits or outside clothes is not permitted, unless prior permission has been obtained from the instructor. 11.The most senior member present will commence training sessions promptly until the instructor arrives. 12.Misuse of the Art will result in disciplinary action. 13.Grading will depend on attendance and the instructors discretion as well as technical ability. 14.No student may officially change schools without completing a transfer form and obtaining prior permission from both instructors concerned. 15.All students should be in possession of a Students Handbook from the TAGB after their first grading. THE OFFICIALS OF THE TAGB CHAIRMAN: Mr David Oliver VICE CHAIRMAN: Mr Michael Dew TREASURER: Mr Ron Sergiew NATIONAL SECRETARY: Mr Donald Atkins LIASON OFFICER: Mr Paul Donnelly NATIONAL COACH: Mr Kenny Walton

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The Reason for 24 Patterns


THE FOUNDER OF TAE KWON-DO IS MAJOR GENERAL CHOI HONG HI 9th DAN

The life of a human being, perhaps 100 years, can be considered as a day when compared with eternity. Therefore, we mortals are no more than simple travellers who pass by the eternal years of an eon in a day. It is evident that no one can live more than a limited amount of time. Nevertheless, most people foolishly enslave themselves to materialism as if they could live for thousands of years. And some people strive to bequeath a good spiritual legacy for coming generations, in this way, gaining immortality. Obviously, the spirit is perpetual while material is not; therefore, what we can do to leave behind something for the welfare of mankind is, perhaps, the most important thing in our lives. Here I leave Tae Kwon-Do for mankind as a trace of man of the late 20th century. The 24 patterns represent 24 hours, one day, or all my life. The name of the pattern, the number of movements, and the diagrammatic symbol of each pattern symbolizes either heroic figures in Korean history or instances relating to historical events.
General Choi, Hong Hi November 09, 1918 to June 15, 2002

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NOTE: Sajo Jirugi is the first exercise given to all Tae Kwon-Do students to help develop coordination, direction changing, and breathing control. IT IS NOT A PATTERN, the main reason behind this is that it has no historical meaning. WHAT IS A PATTERN (TUL)? A pattern is a set of fundamental movements, mainly defence and attack, set in a logical sequence to deal with one or more imaginary opponents. Patterns are an indication of a student's progress a barometer in evaluating an individual's technique. WHY DO WE PERFORM PATTERNS? We practise patterns to improve our Tae Kwon-Do techniques, to develop sparring techniques, to improve flexibility of movement, master body-shifting, develop muscles, balance and breath control. They also enable us to acquire techniques which cannot be obtained from other forms of training. Tae Kwon-Do is an art. When first developed the only way to train was by performing patterns. POINTS TO BE CONSIDERED WHEN PERFORMING PATTERNS 1. Patterns should begin and end on the same spot. This will indicate the performers accuracy. 2. Correct posture and facing must be maintained at all times. 3. Muscles of the body should be tensed or relaxed at the proper critical moments in the exercise. 4. The exercise should be performed in a rhythmic movement with the absence of stiffness. 5. Each pattern should be accelerated or decelerated according to instructions. 6. Each pattern should be perfected before moving to the next. 7. Students should know the purpose of each movement. 8. Students should perform each movement with realism.

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Body Target Areas

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THE PHYSICS OF STRIKING When you strike an object or person (either by punching or kicking) what exactly are the factors controlling how much force that strike will have? The physics of this process are well understood and agree perfectly with the techniques used and recommended by martial art instructors in Tae-Kwon-Do and Karate. The basic technique is: 1. With the least possible muscle tension, accelerate the striking surface towards the target as quickly as possible. 2. Just before impact, tense all the muscles concerned with the body framework so that as the impact happens the body is as rigid as possible. How does this technique result in enough destructive force for a trained person to break pieces of ice the size of breeze blocks? What is the difficult part of this technique that prevents even the strongest novice from performing the same feats? Part of the answer to these questions lie in areas such as physical strength in the right muscles, confidence and the ability to use these attributes efficiently due to superior concentration and will. Questions on these aspects can only really be answered by an experienced martial artist and those answers will probably involve at least four years of hard training! The rest of the technique is down to physics and muscle control. Newton's Second Law: The rate of change of a body's velocity is proportional to the net force acting on it and takes place in the direction of that force. Force = Mass x Acceleration (Mass is the constant of proportionality) Newton's Third Law: Forces acting between bodies in contact are equal and opposite. (Newton's first law is really only a special case of his second law) With integration we can rewrite Newton 1 as:- F x dt = M x dv where : F is the average force applied during the time interval dt is the time interval M is the mass dv is the difference in velocity before and after the time interval When the fist (of mass M) collides with a target that cannot move away quickly (either because it is very heavy like a person or because people are supporting it with their bodies), that object must decelerate the fist from whatever velocity it had before it came into contact with the target (say V) to rest in a very short time (dt). To do this it must provide a force (F) which is equal to (M x V) / dt . If the target cannot provide this force, the fist will continue on until F x dt finally adds up to M x V sometime later. In the case of wooden boards this 'continuing on' simply bends them. If they have to bend too far however, the back surface (which is then under tension) will split and the board will break. In the case of person's body, this 'continuing on' will probably cause internal damage as organs are forced to move out of the path of the fist. If the target was a 40 ton block of steel however, it would have no problem providing the necessary stopping force instantly and by Newton 3 that force would have only the contact points on the fist to act on. This would probably result in damage to the fist.

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The three factors resulting in possibly damaging force being demanded from the target are therefore: 1. Mass of the attacking object. 2. Velocity (speed) of the attacking object on impact. 3. The amount of time the object takes to stop the attacking object from continuing. In most cases this can be measured as a distance before damage occurs. The basic technique of striking in terms of these factors will be explained using the example of a forward punch. At the moment of impact we want maximum mass and speed. To achieve the speed, we accelerate the fist from rest towards the target by applying a force F with the muscles. Newton 2 tells us that F = M x A so A = F / M. In other words, for a set force F (which we can only improve by getting stronger) we will get a larger acceleration (and thus impact speed) if the mass M is low. On impact though, as we have stated, we want the maximum possible mass for the target to have to decelerate. How can the mass of the striking object be changed from small (while the body accelerates it) to large (while the target decelerates it)? If the fist, forearm, shoulder etc. were made from a solid material such as metal and welded together, the mass of the striking object would simply be the masses of each of these parts added together. If however, these parts of the body were only connected by string or wires, the mass of the striking object would be that of the fist alone. In reality, the body is connected by bones, joints and muscles which is a situation between the two extremes. When the muscles are tensed, the body acts more like one solid object. When the muscles are relaxed, the body acts more like separate parts. What happens in a correct punch is this : 1. The body is kept as relaxed and 'disconnected' as possible to keep the effective mass of the fist down while it is accelerated towards the target. 2. 'Just before impact' the whole frame is tensed to get as close as possible to the 'one solid unit' state with maximum effective mass and hopefully the same velocity of the striking surface. If the tension is applied to early, the effective mass of the fist rises early which reduces the acceleration and, thus, final speed on impact. If the tension arrives too late, the effective mass of the fist is low and it will have less effect. To achieve the most efficient timing, strength, tension and posture to exploit this technique (which only lasts a fraction of a second) is not something that is learnt easily. Without the evidence of destruction demonstrations, the fact that it could be learnt at all would, I think, be in doubt. Some other strikes used in martial arts exploit the two other factors - speed and impact time more than the 'strongest' attacks such as the side kick and forward punch which rely on the above technique very strongly. Extra speed on impact can be achieved in some cases by extending the limbs in rotation much like a sling-shot or golf swing. Other strikes exploit the very short time of impact caused by hitting with a part of the body which is very rigid such as the elbow or head.
`THE PHYSICS OF STRIKING' Written by John Davies
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Newport Tae Kwon-Do


Grading Requirements for 10th Kup What the belt colours mean: White - Signifies innocence, as that of the beginning student who has no previous knowledge of Tae kwon-do. Yellow - Signifies earth, from which a plant sprouts and takes root as Tae kwon-do foundation is being laid. The Tenants of Tae Kwon-Do Courtesy (Ye Ui): To be polite to ones instructors, seniors and fellow students. Integrity (Yom Chi): To be honest with ones self. One must be able to define right and wrong. Perseverance (In Nae): To achieve a goal, whether it is a higher grade or technique, you must not stop trying; you must persevere. Self-control (Kook Chi): To lose ones temper when performing techniques against an opponent can be dangerous and shows lack of self-control. To be able to live, work and train within ones capability shows good self-control. Indomitable spirit (Baekjool Boolgool): To show courage when you and your principles are pitted against overwhelming odds. Line work: Sitting Stance single punch x10 Front rising kicks with twin side waist blocks x10 Walking stance obverse punch 4 times forward Walking stance obverse punch 4 times backwards Walking stance low block, reverse punch 4 times forward Walking stance low block, reverse punch 4 times backward Walking stance middle block, reverse punch 4 times forward Walking stance middle block, reverse punch 4 times backward

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Pattern:
Sajo Jirugi with a low outer forearm block, right side

Sajo Jirugi with a low outer forearm block, left side

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Sajo Jirugi with a middle inner forearm block, right side

Sajo Jirugi with a middle inner forearm block, left side

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Terminology: Counting English One Two Three Four Five Six Seven Eight Nine Ten General Terms English Tae Kwon-Do Belt Training Hall Training Suit Attention Ready Forwards Backwards About Turn Bow Dismiss Student Start Stop Return Ready Stance Instructor Assistant Instructor Sections English Low section Middle Section High Section Stances English Sitting Stance Walking Stance Parallel Stance Ready Stance Attention Stance Parts of the Body English Forearm Inner Forearm Outer Forearm Ap Joomuk Backfist Basic Movements English Inner Forearm Block Outer Forearm Block Obverse Punch Reverse Punch Front Rising Kick Side Rising Kick Kick Punch

Korean Hanna Dool Seth Neth Dasaul Yasaul Ilgop Yadoll Ahop Yoll

Korean Annun Sogi Gunnan Sogi Narani Sogi Chunbi Sogi Charyot sogi

Korean Foot Fist Art Ti Dojang Dobok Charyot Chunbi Apro Kaggi Dwiryo Kaggi Dwiryo Torro Kyung Yae Hassen Jeja Si jak Goman Barrol Sabum Boo Sabumnin Dungboon Korean Najundae Kaundae Nopundae

Korean Palmok An Palmok Bakat Palmok Forefist Dung Joomuk

Korean An Palmok Makgi Bakat Palmok Makgi Baro Jirugi Bandae Jirugi Ap Chaolligi Yop Chaolligi Chagi Jirugi

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Newport Tae Kwon-Do


Grading Requirements for 9th Kup What the belt colours mean: White - Signifies innocence, as that of the beginning student who has no previous knowledge of Tae kwon-do. Yellow - Signifies earth, from which a plant sprouts and takes root as Tae kwon-do foundation is being laid. Line work: Sitting Stance double punch x10 Front snap kick with twin side waist blocks 4 times forwards & backwards Walking stance double punch 4 times forward & backwards L stance middle block 4 times forward & backwards L stance knife hand strike 4 times forward Walking stance low block, rising block 4 times backwards

Terminology: General Terms English Left Right Pattern Stances English L-Stance Parts of the Body English Ball of the Foot Footsword Head Basic Movements English Rising Block Forearm Guarding Block Knife Hand Strike Double Punch Front Snap Kick Kick

Korean Wen Orun Tul

Korean Ap Kumchi Balkal Mori

Korean Niunja Sogi

Korean Chookyo Magi Palmok Daebi Makgi Sonkal Taerigi Doo Jirugi Ap Cha Busigi Chagi

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Pattern: Chon Ji 19 Movements

Along Koreas northern border with China sits the Kaema Plateau at an average elevation of 1,500 meters (4,921 ft). Mt. Paektu, Koreas highest peak and the source of the Yalu and Tumen Rivers, dominates the northwestern corner of this lava plateau, an area often called the roof of Korea. Just north of Mt. Paektus summit is a large crater lake named Chon -Ji, meaning Heavenly Lake. Paektu is an extinct volcano and it is also claimed to be the original home of the legendary founder of Korea, Dan-Gun. There are numerous accounts of a Loch Ness type of creature living in lake Chon -Ji. Chon-Ji is appropriately named because creation is the beginning of all things and this pattern establishes a good foundation for all the remaining patterns. Chon-Ji consists of two similar parts one part representing heaven one part representing earth. The stances and techniques in this pattern are the basic movements required for mastering all of the 24 patterns. Along Koreas northern border with China sits the Kaema Plateau at an average elevation of 1,500 meters (4,921 ft). Mt. Paektu, Koreas highest peak and the source of the Yalu and Tumen Rivers, dominates the northwestern corner of this lava plateau, an area often called the roof of Korea. Just north of Mt. Paektus summit is a large crater lake named Chonji, meaning Heavenly Lake.
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Newport Tae Kwon-Do

Grading Requirements for 8th Kup What the belt colours mean: Yellow - Signifies earth, from which a plant sprouts and takes root as Tae kwon-do foundation is being laid. Green - Signifies a plants growth as Tae kwon-do skills begin to develop. Line work: L stance, twin forearm block 4 times forward & backward Front snap kick, double punch 4 times forward L stance, inward inner forearm block 4 times backward Turning kick, L stance knife hand guarding block 4 times forward Dwiryo torro repeat 4 times backward L stance forearm guarding block 4 times forward & backward

Terminology: General Terms English Inwards Outwards Basic Movements English Knife Hand Guarding Block Twin Forearm Block Inward Inner Forearm Block Back fist Strike

Korean Anaero Bakaero

Korean Sonkal Daebi Makgi

Parts of the Body English Palm Backfist Korean Sonbadak Dung Joomuk

Sang Palmok Makgi Anaero An Palmok Makgi Dung Joomuk Taerigi Turning Kick Dolloyo Chagi Front Back fist Strike Ap Dung Joomuk Taerigi Sparring Matsoki 3 Step Sparring Sambo Matsoki

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Pattern: Dan Gun 21 Movements

The Legend of Dan-Gun Every October 3 is Gae-cheon-jeol or the Festival of the Opening of Heaven, the Korean foundation day. Dan-gun is considered the founder of 1st Korean Kingdom. The legend of Dan-Gun dates back to ancient times when world was ruled by Hwanin, Lord of the Heaven. His son, Hwangung along with 3,000 followers descended and lived in this world. It was told that a tiger and a bear prayed to Hwangung wishing to become human. He had given both 20 cloves of garlic and a bundle of mugwort. They were told to eat this sacred food and remain in the cave for 100 days. After 20 days the tiger gave up and left the cave but the bear remained in the cave and was transformed into a beautiful woman. She became known as Ungnyeo (Ung-Yo) which means bear-woman. Ung-Yo was grateful and made offerings to Hwang-Ung but as she lacked a husband she became sad and prayed. Hwang-Ung was moved by her prayers and took her as his wife and
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she gave birth to a son whom they named Dan-Gun (Tangun). Dan-Gun rose to the throne and built the city of Asadal, this given rise to the Korean Dynasty called Go-Joseon. He is regarded to have built the first altar on Kang-Wha Island in 2265 BC which is also known as Danguns Altar. Legend has it that Dan-Gun was a wise and powerful leader until his reign ended after being ousted by a Chinese descendant of the Shang Dynasty named Ki-Ja. Dan-Gun was said to have reigned for 1,211 years or until the age of 1,908 when he returned to his spirit form. Three Step Sparring Attacker starts in a left walking stance, obverse low section outer forearm block. Attack Forward three middle section obverse punches in walking stance to the opponent s solar plexus. 1. Right leg back walking stance, middle inner forearm block to the inside of the attackers forearm three times. Counter Attack Reverse middle section punch. 2. Left leg back, L Stance, middle inner forearm block to the outside three times. Counter Attack Move the left leg forward 45 degrees, move the right leg behind the opponents front leg in left L Stance, execute a right knife hand strike to the back of the neck. 3. Left leg back L stance, middle inward inner forearm block to the inside of your opponents arm three times Counter Attack Slide forward into a left L Stance and execute a right front back fist to the opponents philtrum. 4. Left leg back L stance, middle inner forearm block to the outside of the opponents arm three times. Counter Attack Move the left leg into a sitting stance, focus with the left hand, execute a double punch to your opponents kidney area.

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Newport Tae Kwon-Do


Grading Requirements for 7th Kup What the belt colours mean: Yellow - Signifies earth, from which a plant sprouts and takes root as Tae kwon-do foundation is being laid. Green - Signifies a plants growth as Tae kwon-do skills begin to develop. Line work: Walking stance back fist strike 4 times forward & backward Turning kick, L stance knife hand guarding block 4 times forward Dwiryo torro repeat 4 times backward Walking stance wedging block 4 times forward & backward Side kick, L stance forearm guarding block 4 times forward Dwiryo torro repeat 4 times backward Walking stance spear finger thrust 4 times forward & backwards

Terminology: General Terms English Korean Straight Sun Thrust Tulgi Basic Movements English Wedging Block Release Move Straight Spear Finger Thrust Backfist side Strike Side Piercing Kick Sparring 3 Step Sparring

Korean Hechyo Makgi Jappysol Tae Sun Sonkut Tulgi Dung Joomuk Taerigi Yop Cha Jirugi Matsoki Sambo Matsoki

Parts of the Body English Korean Finger Songarak As a group Sonkut Stances English Korean Fixed Stance Goojoong Sogi

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Pattern: Do San 24 Movements

Is the pseudonym of the patriot Ahn Chang-Ho (1876-1938) who devoted his life to the education of Korean and its independence movement

Three Step Sparring 5. Right leg back L Stance, middle outer forearm block to the inside of your opponents arm two times. Counter Attack Move to the right into a sitting stance parallel to your opponent. Execute a left outer forearm block and a high section punch to your opponents jaw 6. Right leg back L Stance, middle knife hand block to the inside of your opponents arm two times. Counter Attack Move to the right into a sitting stance parallel to your opponent. Execute a left outward knife hand block and a high section inward knife hand strike to your opponents neck. 7. Right leg back L Stance, middle outer forearm block to the inside of your opponents arm two times. Counter Attack Slide back at a 30 degree angle into a right L Stance with a forhand hand guarding block, execute a front snap kick landing in a walking stance and follow with a double punch to the solar plexus.

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The Life of Do-San Ahn Chang-ho was a Korean independence activist born in South Pyongahn-do on November 9, 1876. He is also referred to as Do-San, his popular pen name. At the age of 18 in 1894 he became a member of the Tongnip Hyophoe Independence Association which promoted independence from Japan but they were interrupted when the groups leader was forced into exile into the United States. This strengthened his belief that they had themselves to blame for their failures and victory would only come from within. It was in 1899 that he established the Cheomjin (gradual process) School in Pyongyang which reflected his philosophy of evolutionary social changes through education. Ahn Chang-ho was one of the first Koreans to emigrate to the United States when he arrived in September 1902 with his wife. It was then he decided to call himself Do-San meaning island mountain. While living in San Francisco, he initiated a social reform movement and organized the San Francisco Social Meeting which was desperately needed by the Korean American society. He also organized what is known as Kungminhoe (Korean National Association) which inspired national independence for Korean immigrants. In 1906 he returned to Korea and organized an underground independence group called Shinmin-Hoe (New Peoples Association) which was to promote Korean independence by cultivating nationalism. In 1908 he founded the Tae-Song (large achievement) School in Pyongyang. At this time the Japanese were in the process of removing education for Koreans to ensure illiteracy and create a class of slaves. The Shinmin-Hoe had grown in size and was considered a threat by the Japanese occupiers. In December 1910, the Japanese fabricated an plot to assassinate the Japanese Governor General Terauchi. Over 600 Christians and all of Shinmin-Hoe leaders were arrested, with over 105 brought to trial following torture. Pressure was felt from the world community that most of the defendants had to be set free after it was alleged that the plot was an obvious fabrication. After the passage of an Education Act in 1911 the Japanese occupiers started to close all Korean schools and as a result the Tae-Song School was closed in 1913 and by 1914 all Korean schools had been shut down.
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Newport Tae Kwon-Do


Grading Requirements for 6th Kup What the belt colours mean: Green - Signifies a plants growth as Tae kwon-do skills begin to develop. Blue - Signifies Heaven to which a plant sprouts and matures into a towering tree as training in Tae kwon-do progresses. Line work: Walking stance spear finger thrust 4 times forward & backward First 3 moves of Won Hyo 4 times forward & backward Walking stance circular block 4 times forward & backward Turning kick, L stance knife hand guarding block 4 times forward Dwiryo Torro Side kick, L stance forearm guarding block 4 times backward Snap, turning kick combination, L stance knife hand guarding block 4 times forward Dwiryo Torro Turn, side kick combination, L stance forearm guarding block 4 times backward

Terminology: General Terms English Back Basic Movements English Circular Block Hooking block Waist Block Pushing Block Vertical Punch Inward Knifehand Strike Side Punch Reverse Turning Kick Reverse Knifehand Strike Reverse Side Kick 3 Step Sparring Semi Free Sparring

Korean Dwit

Parts of the Body Foot Parts Habansin Hand Parts Sangbansin Back Sole Dwit Kumchi Back Heel Dwit Chook Stances Vertical Stance Closed Stance Bending Stance Sogi Soojik Sogi Moa Sogi Goburyo Sogi

Korean Dollimyo Makgi Golcho Makgi Hori Makgi Miro Makgi Sewo Jirugi Anaero Sonkal Taerigi Yop Jirugi Bandae Dollyo Chagi Sonkal Dung Taerigi Bandae Yop Chagi Sambo Matsoki Ban Jayoo Matsoki

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Pattern: Won Hyo 28 Movements

Three Step Sparring 8. Right leg back L Stance, middle knife hand block to the inside of your opponents arm two times. Counter Attack Slide back at a 45 degree angle into a right L Stance with a forearm guarding block, execute a right side kick landing in a left L Stance follow with a right knife hand strike to the neck. 9. Right leg back L Stance, middle palm pushing block to the inside of your opponents arm two times. Counter Attack Slide back at a 45 degree angle to the outside of your opponent into a right L Stance with a knife hand guarding block, execute a right mid section turning kick to your opponents solar plexus, put the kicking foot behind your opponents front leg, landing in a vertical stance whilst executing a knife hand strike to the back of the neck. 10.Right leg back L Stance, middle knife hand block to the inside of your opponents arm two times. Counter Attack Slide back at a 45 degree angle into a right L Stance with a knife hand guarding block, execute a reverse side kick with the right leg, landing in a right walking stance whilst executing a left hand reverse knife hand strike to the opponents philtrum.
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The Life of Won-Hyo Won-Hyo was born on 617 AD in the town of Za-in-myon in Kyongsang Province. His name at birth wa Sol Sedang but assumed his pen name in later years Won -Hyo from his nickname Sedak meaning dawn after being accomplished as a Buddhist philosopher and poet. It is thought that he became a monk at the age of 20 after witnessing many of his friends being killed during the civil wars amongst the Koguryo, Silla, and Paekche kingdoms. There are many differing accounts of how he became a monk. Some say he converted his house into a temple, while other say he just shaved his head and went into the mountains to live as a monk. It is even unclear where he learned Buddhism. At the age of 33 he set out for China with a friend inspired to study under the Buddhist scholar Huan-Tchuang. They barely escaped capture as they were mistaken for spies. Here is one of the stories in Korean Buddhism which involves Won-Hyos enlightenment during his journey to China. One evening as Won-Hyo crosses the desert he stops and sleeps at a small patch of green with trees and water. As it was pitch dark, he searched for water and found a cup on the ground. He picked it up and drank the water. He bowed in gratitude and thanked Buddha for the delicious gift of water But when he woke up the next morning he saw what was beside him was a shattered skull, blood caked with flesh stuck to the cheek bones. As he saw the skull he began to vomit. As the vomit poured he began to understand, since last night as he hadnt thought and seen anything, the water was delicious but in the morning it made him vomit. He said to himself, thinking makes good and bad, life and death. Without thinking, there is no universe, no Buddha, No Dharma. All is one and this one is empty. He realized there was no need to find a master as he understood life and death. He turned and headed back across the desert to Korea. His friend Uisang continued to China and learned the doctrines of Hua-yen and established this in Korea. Upon his return he took vast amounts of scholarly work and was well known to the general population and to the royal family. In 660 AD King Muyo asked him to live in the royal palace of Yosok. It resulted with a relationship with the royal princess Kwa and subsequent marriage and birth of their son Sol-Chong. He travelled around the country and became respected by the people. In 661 AD he developed the Chongto-Gyo (pure land) sect which required diligent prayer for salvation. This made religion accessible to the lower class and became popular among the entire population. By 662 AD he left the priesthood and travelled the country teaching his sect to the common people. His contributions to culture and national awareness of Silla were instrumental in the unification of three kingdoms of Korea.
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Won-Hyo died at the age of 70 just nine years after the unification of the Korean Peninsula under the Silla dynasty. It was said that during his time he authored 240 works in Buddhism of which 20 works in 25 volumes still exist. One of the forms he chose to use was Hyang-Ga, a special Silla Poetic form. His poem is said to be among the most admired poems. In his life Won-Hyo dominated intellectual and religious arenas in and out of Korea. He set shape and form of Silla Buddhism and a dominant figure in Korean Buddhist tradition. He is one of the most influential thinkers Korea has produced. Student Notes:

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Newport Tae Kwon-Do

Grading Requirements for 5th Kup What the belt colours mean: Green - Signifies a plants growth as Tae kwon-do skills begin to develop. Blue - Signifies Heaven to which a plant sprouts and matures into a towering tree as training in Tae kwon-do progresses. Line work: Walking stance knife hand block, reverse punch 4 times forward & backward Walking stance low X block, twin vertical punch 4 times forward & backward Walking stance obverse, reverse hooking block, obverse punch 4 times forward & backward L stance twin knife hand block 4 times forward & backward Turning kick, knife hand guarding block 4 times forward Dwiryo Torro Side kick, L stance forearm guarding block 4 times backward Snap, turn kick combination, L stance knife hand guarding block 4 times forward Dwiryo Torro Turn, side kick combination, L stance forearm guarding block 4 times backward Side, back Kick combination - Dwiryo Torro repeat Terminology: General Terms English Jumping Parts of the Body Elbow Knee Stances X Stance Basic Movements English Double Forearm Block Hooking block X Block Upward Palm Block Twin Knifehand Block Upset Punch Flat Fingertip Thrust Crescent Kick Twin Vertical Punch Two Step sparring

Korean Twigi

Palkup Moorup Kyocha Sogi

Korean Doo Palmok Makgi Golcho Makgi Kyocha Makgi Ollyo Sonbadak Makgi Sang Sonkal Makgi Dwijibo Jirugi Opun sonkut Tulgi Bandal Chagi Sang Sewo Jirugi Ibo Matsoki
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Pattern: Yul Gok 38 Movements

Two Step Sparring Attacker starts right leg back, forearm guarding block. Defence starts in parallel ready stance. 1. Attack - Right leg forward, right walking stance, obverse punch, left leg low front snap kick. Defence Left leg back walking stance, rising block. Right leg back left walking stance, X fist pressing block. Counter Attack Slide forward into walking stance, twin vertical punch to opponents face. 2. Attack -Right arm side punch, fixed stance then middle turning kick with left leg Defence Right leg back L Stance, upward palm block. Left leg back, left L stance, waist block with right outer forearm. Counter Attack Slide forward into right L stance, right side elbow strike to opponents abdomen.

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3. Attack - Right leg front kick, step forward into left walking stance, high twin vertical punch. Defence Right leg back left walking stance, low X fist pressing block. Left leg back right walking stance, high outer forearm wedging block. Counter Attack Knee kick to the solar plexus, at the same time pull opponents shoulders forward and downwards. 4. Attack Right flat finger thrust in right walking stance then middle side kick with left leg. Defence Right leg back left walking stance, knife hand rising block. Left leg back L stance, inward palm block. Counter Attack Front snap kick to the coccyx, twin upset punch to the kidney area. The Life of Yul-Gok Yul-Gok was born a child prodigy on December 26, 1536 in Kangwon Province. At the age of three he knew Chinese scripts, and composed poems in Chinese before his 7th birthday. By age 7 he had finished lessons in Confucian Classics and passed the Civil Service literary exam at the age of 13. By the age of 29 he passed a higher civil service exam with full marks. His thesis was regarded as a literary masterpiece displaying his knowledge of history and politics and his profound knowledge of Taoism. He took the pen name Yul-Gok meaning valley of chestnuts and at 34 years he authored Tongho Mundap, an article about how righteous government could be achieved within his own lifetime and with measures to accomplish it. At 36 years of age after the death of his mother he secluded himself into the Diamond Mountains. It was not known why but some say that sought three years of lamentation, or he may have regarded it as a pleasure to retire to the countryside to rest. After his return to society he authored The Essentials of Confucianism in 1576. Yul-gok died in 1584 and the valuable Yul-gok Chonjip (The Complete Works of Yul-gok) was compiled after his death on the basis of the writings he left.

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Newport Tae Kwon-Do


Grading Requirements for 4th Kup What the belt colours mean: Blue - Signifies Heaven to which a plant sprouts and matures into a towering tree as training in Tae kwon-do progresses. Red Signifies danger cautioning the student to exercise control and warning your opponent to keep away. Line work: L stance reverse knife hand block 4 times forward & backward L stance knife hand guarding block, walking stance upward elbow strike 4 times forward and backward L stance back fist strike, release walking stance high section reverse punch 4 times forward and backward Turning kick, knife hand guarding block 4 times forward Dwiryo Torro Side kick, L stance forearm guarding block 4 times backward Snap, turning kick combination, L stance knife hand guarding block 4 times forward Dwiryo Torro Turning, side kick combination, L stance forearm guarding block 4 times backward Side, back kick combination - Dwiryo Torro - repeat Terminology: General Terms English Forging Post Parts of the Body Side sole Arc Hand Side Fist Stances English Rear Foot Stance Basic Movements English Pressing Block Downward Block U Shaped Block Twin Straight Forearm Block Turning Punch Twin Upset Punch Basic Movements English Back Kick

Korean Dollyon Joo

Yop Bal Badak Bandal Son Yop Joomuk Korean Dwit Bal Sogi

Korean Noollo Makgi Naeryo Makgi Digutja Makgi Sang Sun Palmok Makgi Dollyo Jirugi Sang Dwijibo Jirugi Korean Dwit Chagi
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Low Stance Sparring 3 Step Sparring 2Step sparring 1 Step Sparring Semi Free Sparring Free Sparring

Nachuo Sogi

Sambo Matsoki Ibo Matsoki Ilbo Matsoki Ban Jayoo Matsoki Jayoo Matsoki

Pressing Kick Reverse Turn Hooking Kick Consecutive Kick Upper Elbow Strike

Noollo Chagi Bandae Dollyo Goro Chagi Yonsak Chagi Wi Palkup Taerigi

Pattern: Joong Gun 32 Movements

Two Step Sparring Attacker starts right leg back, forearm guarding block. Defence starts in parallel ready stance.
5.

Attack - Right back kick, left walking stance, high palm strike. Defence - Right L stance, palm waist block, left L stance, inward outer forearm block. Counter - Right walking stance, left reverse knife hand, middle inward strike (slipping right foot).

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6. Attack - Right high turning kick, left walking stance arc-hand strike. Defence - Sitting stance twin straight forearm block (moving left foot diagonally), right L stance palm hooking block (grabbing the arm). Counter - Left side kick (still holding grabbed arm). 7. Attack - Right fixed stance, side fist side strike, left middle reverse turning kick. Defence - Left L stance, twin forearm block, right L stance knife hand guarding block (sliding away using block as guard only). Counter - Right high reverse turning kick. 8. Attack - Right middle side kick, right L stance, knife hand high strike (turning clockwise). Defence - Right L stance, inward inner forearm waist block, right L stance knife hand guarding block (double stepping). Counter - Left X stance, high back fist side strike. The Life of Joong-Gun Ahn Joong-Gun was born on 1879 in the town of Hae-Ju in Hwang-Hae Province. He became a teacher and founded a school called Sam-Heung (three success). But with the Japanese occupation of Korea this means, just like all schools, it would be under scrutiny. Korea got involved with the conflict as a result of trouble from China in 1900. The colonial powers moved into the Orient, England formed an alliance with Japan after Russia moves into Manchuria. After which a Russo-French Alliance moves into northern Korea. Japan demands the removal of Russian troops from Korea but when Russia rejected this Japan launches a naval attack and subsequently invades Korea. Hiro-Bumi Ito was named the first Japanese Governor General of Korea in 1905 and pressured the Korean government to sign the Protectorate Treaty on November 19, 1905 which gave Japan legal rights to occupy Korea. The new Japanese puppet government passed laws that allowed Korean land to be sold to Japanese even as land was just taken. This enraged the people of Korea and a number of guerrilla groups were formed to attack the Japanese forces but were crushed by the larger Japanese army. Many local Korean officials committed suicide and Korean signatories to the Protectorate Treaty were assassinated. Because of this, Ahn Joong-gun went into exile and formed a small guerrilla movement of 300 men to carry out raids across the border. In June 1907 Emperor Ko_Jong sent an emissary to the Hague Peace Conference to expose the Japanese aggression but Hiro-Bumi Ito found out and forced Ko-Jong to abdicate the throne. This led to rioting involving Korean army units. The Japanese army disbanded the Korean army and police force and defeated any of their retaliation. Ahn Joong-Gun led his guerrillas on a successful raid in June 1909, but the Japanese arrived at an agreement with the Chinese giving them access to the Southern Manchurian Railway. This
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allowed the exploitation of mineral resources in Manchuria. In exchange the Japanese give China territorial rights to Kando. This led to the assassination plan of Hiro-Bumi Ito. Ito had planned to meet a Russian official in Manchuria and when his train arrived at Harbin train station, Ahn Joong-Gun was waiting. Even though he knew that he would be tortured if he was captured by the Japanese, Ahn shot Ito as he stepped off the train. Ahn Joong-Gun was indeed captured and imprisoned in Port Arthur and suffered 5 months of barbaric torture. At 10am on March 26, 1910, Joong-Gun was executed at Lui-Shung prison at the age of 32. His sacrifice of life for his country symbolized the loyalty and dedication that Korean people felt towards their independence. In the calligraphy he wrote in his cell in prison prior to his execution it said The best rivers and mountains which can be interpreted to mean that he felt his country was the most beautiful on earth. He was an educator, a guerrilla leader and most of all one of Koreas great patriots. Student Notes:

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Newport Tae Kwon-Do


Grading Requirements for 3rd Kup What the belt colours mean: Blue - Signifies Heaven to which a plant sprouts and matures into a towering tree as training in Tae kwon-do progresses. Red - Signifies danger cautioning the student to exercise control and warning the opponent to keep away. Line work: First 2 moves of Toi Gye 4 times forward & backward Walking stance low X pressing block, twin vertical punch 4 times forward & backward Stamping into sitting block W shape block 4 times forward & backward Walking stance double forearm block 4 times forward & backward Snap, turning kick combination -Dwiryo Torro-Turning, side kick combination Side, back kick combination-Dwiryo Torro-Repeat Hook, side kick combination-Dwiryo Torro-Repeat Turning kick, reverse turning kick-Dwiryo Torro-Repeat

Terminology: General Terms English Flying Parts of the Body Upset Finger Tips Knee Basic Movements English W Shape Block Upper Elbow Strike Waving Kick Flying Kick Front Pushing Kick

Korean Twimyo

Dwijibun Sonkut Moorup

Korean San Makgi Wi Palkup Taerigi Doro Chagi Twimyo Chagi Ap Cha Milgi

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Pattern: Toi Gye 37 Movements

One Step Sparring Students are expected to develop their own techniques in one step sparring. Below are some examples of one step sparring using the existing 3 step counter attacks. Both attacker and defender start in parallel ready position, attacker step forward with right leg into walking stance and punches with right hand. On the second occasion, the same attacker steps forward, but with left leg and left hand punching. (Only right hand side is described below). 1. Move the left leg forward 45 degrees, move the right leg behind the opponents front leg into a left 'L' stance, execute a right knife hand strike to the neck, followed by side kick with right foot and step away. 2. In a left 'L' stance and execute a right front back fist strike to the face followed by an upward punch (left hand) hooking punch (right hand). 3. Move the left leg into a sitting stance, focus with left hand, and execute double punch, followed by turning kick with right leg followed by reverse side kick with the left leg.

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4. Move to the right into sitting stance parallel to opponent. Execute a left outer forearm block and a high section punch simultaneously, grab head with both hands and pull down whilst performing a left knee strike. 5. Move to the right, form a sitting stance parallel to opponent, execute left outer knife hand guard and a high inward knife hand strike to the neck, followed by upper elbow strike with left elbow. 6. Move right foot to left foot, pushing off left foot slide back at a 45 degree angle into a right 'L' stance with a forearm guarding block, execute a right front kick landing in a right walking stance double punch, reaching under their punching arm perform a hooking block to the top (right hand), brace elbow with left hand and take forward into arm lock. 7. Move right foot to left foot, pushing off left foot slide back at a 45 degree angle into a right 'L' stance with a forearm guarding block. Execute a right side kick landing in left 'L' stance, right front back fist strike or knife hand strike to the neck, grab their punching hand with your left hand, pull in and elbow strike to their head with your right arm whilst sliding into vertical stance. 8. Slide back at a 45 degree angle to the outside of your opponent into a right 'L' stance with a knife hand guarding block. Execute a right mid section turning kick, put the kicking foot behind the opponent's front foot landing in vertical stance while executing a knife hand strike to the neck, step through, put your right arm under their punching arm and using your inner forearm to their main neck artery (carotid artery), grab your inner forearm with your other hand and squeeze. 9. Move right foot to left foot pushing off left foot, slide back at a 45 degree angle into a right 'L' stance with a knife hand guarding block. Execute a reverse side kick, land in a right walking stance whilst executing a left hand reverse knife hand strike to the philtrum, step out perform turning kick with your left leg, step down reverse turning kick with your right leg. The Life of Toi-Gye Yi Hwang was born on November 25, 1501 in Ongye-ri (Tosan), North Kyongsang Province. As a child prodigy he started to learn the Book of One Thousand Letters from an old gentleman in his neighbourhood. At age six he learned the Analects of Confucius from his uncle Yi U. By the age of 19 he obtained the two volumes Songni Taejon, a great compendium of neo-Confucianism by Hu Guang. At age 23 Toi-Gye came to Seoul to study at the National Academy and passed the preliminary provincial civil service examination with top honours at the age of 33. He continued to work for the government as he moved through 29 different positions. He was persistent in cleansing of corrupt government officials. On several occasions he was exiled from the capital for his principles. He retired back to his home in 1549 and lived there until his death just like his pen name which means retreating stream. He began to build the Tosan Sowon, a private Confucian Academy offering instruction in the classics and honouring the sages with regular memorial
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rites. Toi-Gye died in 1570 without seeing the opening of his academy. Tosan Sowon opened in 1574 and remains open to this day. He was promoted to the highest ministerial rank after he died, and his mortuary tablet is housed in a Confucian shrine as well as in the shrine of King Sonjo. He was the author of many books on Confucianism and published a Shijo collection. He had also served under four kings while gaining fame in Korea for his interpretation of Li-chi dualism. Student Notes:

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Newport Tae Kwon-Do


Grading Requirements for 2nd Kup What the belt colours mean: Red - Signifies danger cautioning the student to exercise control and warning the opponent to keep away. Black - Opposite to white therefore signifying the maturity and proficiency in Tae Kwon-Do. Also indicates the wearers imperviousness to darkness and fear. Line work: First 2 moves of Toi Gye 4 times forward & backward Walking stance low X knife hand block, X knife hand rising block 4 times forward & backward L Stance back fist, release, walking stance reverse punch 4 times forward & backward Pressing kick, side kick combination 4 times forward & backward Snap, turning kick combination Dwiryo Torro turning, side kick combination. Turning, reverse turning kick combination Dwiryo Torro Repeat Hook , side kick combination Dwiryo Torro Repeat Jumping snap kicks (back leg) landing in fighting stance. Jumping turning kick, landing in fighting stance. Jumping back kick, landing in fighting stance. Terminology: General Terms English Flying Basic Movements English PushingBlock Upward Punch Downward Punch Vertical Kick Twisting Kick Three Step Sparring Two Step Sparring One Step Sparring 3 Step Semi Free Free Sparring

Korean Twimyo

Parts of the Body Instep Baldung Reverse Footsword Balkal Dung

Korean Miro Makgi Ollyo Makgi Naeryo Maki Sewo Chagi Bituro Chagi Sambo Matsoki Ibo Matsoki Ilbo Matsoki Sambo Ban Jayoo Jayoo Matsoki

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Pattern: Hwa Rang - 29 Movements

One Step Sparring Students are expected to develop their own techniques in one step sparring. Below are some examples of one step sparring using the existing 3 step counter attacks. Both attacker and defender start in parallel ready position, attacker step forward with right leg into walking stance and punches with right hand. On the second occasion, the same attacker steps forward, but with left leg and left hand punching. (Only right hand side is described below). 1. Move the left leg forward 45 degrees, move the right leg behind the opponents front leg into a left 'L' stance, execute a right knife hand strike to the neck, followed by side kick with right foot and step away. 2. In a left 'L' stance and execute a right front back fist strike to the face followed by an upward punch (left hand) hooking punch (right hand). 3. Move the left leg into a sitting stance, focus with left hand and execute double punch, followed by turning kick with right leg followed by reverse side kick with the left leg. 4. Move to the right into sitting stance parallel to opponent. Execute a left outer forearm block and a high section punch simultaneously, grab head with both hands and pull down whilst performing a left knee strike.
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5. Move to the right, form a sitting stance parallel to opponent, execute left outer knife hand guard and a high inward knife hand strike to the neck, followed by upper elbow strike with left elbow. 6. Move right foot to left foot, pushing off left foot slide back at a 45 degree angle into a right 'L' stance with a forearm guarding block, execute a right front kick landing in a right walking stance double punch, reaching under their punching arm perform a hooking block to the top (right hand), brace elbow with left hand and take forward into arm lock. 7. Move right foot to left foot, pushing off left foot slide back at a 45 degree angle into a right 'L' stance with a forearm guarding block. Execute a right side kick landing in left 'L' stance, right front back fist strike or knife hand strike to the neck, grab their punching hand with your left hand, pull in and elbow strike to their head with your right arm whilst sliding into vertical stance. 8. Slide back at a 45 degree angle to the outside of your opponent into a right 'L' stance with a knife hand guarding block. Execute a right mid section turning kick, put the kicking foot behind the opponent's front foot landing in vertical stance while executing a knife hand strike to the neck, step through, put your right arm under their punching arm and using your inner forearm to their main neck artery (carotid artery), grab your inner forearm with your other hand and squeeze. 9. Move right foot to left foot pushing off left foot, slide back at a 45 degree angle into a right 'L' stance with a knife hand guarding block. Execute a reverse side kick, land in a right walking stance whilst executing a left hand reverse knife hand strike to the philtrum, step out perform turning kick with your left leg, step down reverse turning kick with your right leg. The History of the Hwa-Rang The Korean peninsula was divided into three kingdoms of Silla, Koguryo, and Paekche during the 6th century AD with the smallest kingdom, Silla, constantly besieged by its neighbours. So in 576 AD the 24th king of the Silla dynasty established Hwa-Rang warriors from groups of young noblemen to be trained in all forms of warfare and defend the kingdom. Each group consisted of thousands of members from the nobility chosen by popular election and each senior leader would be regarded as Kuk-Son which were similar to the Knights of King Arthurs round table. There were five cardinal principles of human relations, three scholarships and six ways of service that trainees had to learn and after completion they were presented to the king for nomination as Hwa-Rang or Kuk-Son. The Hwa-Rang trained to improve their military skills, enhance their minds with principles, and strengthen their bodies with physical training. Along with lessons in arts, literature and science these candidates also learned the art of warfare and hand to hand combat. The hand to hand combat was based on Um-Yang principles of Buddhist philosophy. Subak
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which was practiced by common people throughout the three kingdoms was adopted and transformed by the Hwa-Rang, as they intensified and added more techniques to the discipline. It was believed that a Hwa-Rang punch was so powerful as it could penetrate a wooden armour of the enemy. The Hwa-Rang code was established in the 30th year of King Chin-Hungs rule. It was told that a set of commandments was given by Wong-Gwang Popsa, a famous Buddhist warrior monk, and based these on Confucian and Buddhist principles that were divided into five rules and nine virtues. The Hwa-Rang were the first group to possess a spiritual warrior code which was passed on to Japan and gave birth to the famous Samurai tradition. The zeal of Hwa-Rang helped Silla become the worlds first Buddhist kingdom and united the three kingdoms of Korea. After the unification and the defeat of the Chinese Tang dynasty, the people started to think more of philosophical ideas. With their vast knowledge of healing they became known as specializing in Buddhist philosophy, healing and poetry and no longer as royal warriors. Student Notes:

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Newport Tae Kwon-Do


Grading Requirements for 1st Kup What the belt colours mean: Red - Signifies danger cautioning the student to exercise control and warning the opponent to keep away. Black - Opposite to white therefore signifying the maturity and proficiency in Tae Kwon-Do. Also indicates the wearers imperviousness to darkness and fear. Line work: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Low block, rising block combination reverse punch forward Knife hand guarding block, upward elbow backward Rear leg snap, turning kick combination, double punch forward Double forearm block middle Section then L stance low section backward Side kick, back Kick, reverse punch pull back guarding block forward First 3 movements Won-Hyo backward Turning kick, reverse turning kick, lead hand ridge hand, reverse punch pull back guarding block forward 8. First 2 movements Toi-Gye backward 9. Front leg hook, side kick combination, then rear leg axe kick forward 10.Double hooking block, obverse punch, twin knife hand block backward 11.Knife hand guarding block, front Leg snap kick, flat fingertip thrust forward 12.U shape block fixed stance backward 13.Jumping side kick, rear leg, with step forward 14.Wedging block walking stance, knife hand strike L stance backward 15.Jumping front kick without step, pressing block low stance forward 16.X fist pressing block, X fist rising block. Terminology: Parts of the Body English Korean Side Fist Yop Joomuk Reverse Knife Hand Sonkal Dung Basic Movements English Checking Block Downward Block Double Arc Hand Block Stamping Kick Overhead Kick

Korean Momchau Makgi Naeryo Makgi Doo Bandalson Makgi Cha Bapgi Twio Nomo Chagi
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Stances One Leg Stance

Wae Bal Sogi

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Pattern: Choong Moo 30 Movements

One Step Sparring Students are expected to develop their own techniques in one step sparring. Below are some examples of one step sparring using the existing 3 step counter attacks. Both attacker and defender start in parallel ready position, attacker step forward with right leg into walking stance and punches with right hand. On the second occasion, the same attacker steps forward, but with left leg and left hand punching. (Only right hand side is described below). 1. Move the left leg forward 45 degrees, move the right leg behind the opponents front leg into a left 'L' stance, execute a right knife hand strike to the neck, followed by side kick with right foot and step away. 2. In a left 'L' stance and execute a right front back fist strike to the face followed by an upward punch (left hand) hooking punch (right hand). 3. Move the left leg into a sitting stance, focus with left hand, and execute double punch, followed by turning kick with right leg followed by reverse side kick with the left leg.

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4. Move to the right into sitting stance parallel to opponent. Execute a left outer forearm block and a high section punch simultaneously, grab head with both hands and pull down whilst performing a left knee strike. 5. Move to the right, form a sitting stance parallel to opponent, execute left outer knife hand guard and a high inward knife hand strike to the neck, followed by upper elbow strike with left elbow. 6. Move right foot to left foot, pushing off left foot slide back at a 45 degree angle into a right 'L' stance with a forearm guarding block, execute a right front kick landing in a right walking stance double punch, reaching under their punching arm perform a hooking block to the top (right hand), brace elbow with left hand and take forward into arm lock. 7. Move right foot to left foot, pushing off left foot slide back at a 45 degree angle into a right 'L' stance with a forearm guarding block. Execute a right side kick landing in left 'L' stance, right front back fist strike or knife hand strike to the neck, grab their punching hand with your left hand, pull in and elbow strike to their head with your right arm whilst sliding into vertical stance. 8. Slide back at a 45 degree angle to the outside of your opponent into a right 'L' stance with a knife hand guarding block. Execute a right mid section turning kick, put the kicking foot behind the opponent's front foot landing in vertical stance while executing a knife hand strike to the neck, step through, put your right arm under their punching arm and using your inner forearm to their main neck artery (carotid artery), grab your inner forearm with your other hand and squeeze. 9. Move right foot to left foot pushing off left foot, slide back at a 45 degree angle into a right 'L' stance with a knife hand guarding block. Execute a reverse side kick, land in a right walking stance whilst executing a left hand reverse knife hand strike to the philtrum, step out perform turning kick with your left leg, step down reverse turning kick with your right leg. The Life of Choong-Moo Yi Soon-Sin (Choong-Moo) was born in Seoul on April 25, 1545. His family moved to Asan Chungcheongdo province where he started his education. He eventually took up the military course, passed the entrance examination at the age of 32 and was appointed an officer to start his military service. Through the years he rose through the ranks and was appointed as naval commander of the Left Division of Cheollado when he was 47 years old. This was the time when he came up with the idea of the armoured battleship Kobukson which had iron plates covering the top decks resembling a turtles shell. At his time the ship was regarded as revolutionary as being the most developed warship of its time. The Japanese Shogun Toyotomi Hideyoshi wanted conquest of China but knew it would be financially draining thus requested that Korea aid in this request. But after being refused, he ordered to attack Korea as his plan was to sweep through the peninsula and on to China. With superior technology such as muskets imported from Europe, the Japanese troops reached
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Seoul in a matter of 2 weeks and occupied the entire country by May 1592. In 1592 Admiral Yi Soon-Sin made headquarters in the port city of Yosu wherein he started construction of the Kobukson. He engaged the Japanese at Okpa and was successful in setting fire to 26 japanese ships and forced the rest to flee. A courageous and tactical genius Admiral Yi fought every Japanese squadron he encountered and seemed to always outguess the enemy. His bravery was shown by not demonstrating pain when shot in the shoulder, rather revealing his injury once the battle was over. Admiral Yis greatest engagement was on August 1592 when 100,000 Japanese reinforcements headed to the Pyongyang peninsula. He confronted them among the islands off the southern coast of Korea. He used his Kobukson to ram into the Japanese ships and his fleet copied his actions and were successful in sinking 71 vessels. Reinforcements came and Admiral Yi was able to sink 48 of them. It was considered as one for the historys greatest naval battles. Admiral Yi also took command of the entire Korean Navy of 180 ships and used them to attack the main Japanese naval forces that were still in anchor. He was able to sink over half of the Japanese vessels and this has been regarded as the most important series of naval engagements in history. He was so dominant over the seas that no Japanese supply ship could reach Korea and forced Japanese forces to dwindle. But then a Japanese spy was able to ingratiate himself to the Korean General Kim Eung-Sun and convinced that the Japanese was due to attack Korea with a great numbers. Choong-Moo was ordered to sink the Japanese fleet but yet refused orders claiming the area given was highly dangerous and filled with rocks. He was arrested due to insubordination and was eventually demoted to a foot soldier where he responded with humility and followed such orders. Student Notes:

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1st Kup Theory Test


History of Tae Kwon Do

1. What Does Tae Kwon Do mean 2. What are the Tenets of Tae Kwon Do 3. If you had to choose a sixth Tenet, what would it be and why 4. Where and on what date was Tae Kwon Do inaugurated 5. Who was the founder of Tae Kwon-Do 6. When did he die 7. When was Tae Kwon-Do introduced into the U.K 8. What does TAGB stand for 9. When was the TAGB formed 10. Who is the national secretary of the TAGB 11. Who are the Chairman and Vice-Chairman of the TAGB 12. Name the other members of the TAGB Management Council 13. What world wide organisation is the TAGB a member of 14. When was Tae Kwon-Do International inaugurated 15. What does BTC stand for 16. When was the BTC formed 17. What is the purpose of the BTC 18. Who is the Chairman of the BTC 19. What is the difference between WTF & ITF style Tae Kwon-Do 20. Which of these styles is TAGB Tae Kwon-Do based on
Colour and Belts 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Heaven Earth Plants growth Danger Innocence What does Black Belt mean Why is there a black edging on a Black Belt dobok.

Targets (In English) 1. 2. 3. 4. Name Four High section targets. Name four Middle section targets. Name three Low section targets. Why is the Philtrum such a dangerous target?
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In Korean 1. What is the term for hand parts 2. Name six hand parts 3. What is the term for forearm 4. Name three parts of the forearm 5. What is the term for foot parts 6. Name four parts of the foot 7. Name two elbow strikes 8. Name three spear finger thrusts 9. Name ten kicks 10.Name two parts of the foot used for turning kick 11.Name two parts of the foot used for hooking kick 12.Name ten blocks and which parts of the body they use 13.Name eight different stances Patterns and Set Sparring 1. What is a pattern 2. How many Tae Kwon-do patterns are there 3. Why do we perform patterns 4. Why do we learn pattern meanings 5. Name all the patterns you know and the number of moves in each 6. Name five forms of sparring we do 7. Name three of these in Korean 8. Why do we do one-step sparring 9. Why do we do three-step sparring 10.Why do we do three-step semi free sparring General Questions 1. Why do you do Tae Kwon-Do 2. Why do you want to be a Black Belt7 3. Which colour belt patterns end in a left hand attack 4. Name the colour belt patterns that include a back fist strike 5. Name the colour belt patterns that contain release moves 6. What is the difference between the jump in Yul Gok and Toi Gye 7. What is the difference between move 6 in Won Hyo& move 6 in Hwa Rang and why 8. What are the three kingdoms of Korea 9. What have you given back to Tae Kwon-do since you started training 10.What is the difference between a strike and a thrust 11.Explain the meaning of indomitable spirit 12.What date did you start Tae Kwon-Do

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Junior Black Blck Belt Test for 1st Star after 1 Year at 1st Dan Choice of Coloured Belt Pattern Set Coloured Belt Pattern Choice 1st Dan Pattern Choice of Special Demonstration Technique (Jump High or Long to Hit Focus Pads) 2 x Sparring Rounds All Terminology & Pattern Meanings

The student if not wishing to do a special technique can perform a pattern which they designed themselves, either to music (not more than 2.5 minutes long), or without music (no more than 40 movements).

Junior Black Blck Belt Test for 2nd Star after 2 Years at 1st Dan Choice of Coloured Belt Pattern Choice of Two 1st Dan Patterns 4 Direction special technique e.g. 4 targets held at compass points, pads to be struck in quick succession to simulate a 4 direction attack. Multiple strikes to consist of no more than 1 hand technique and each to be different to any of the others. 2 x Sparring Rounds Theory Multiple choice or 20/30 question test paper to be timed and completed at the grading

The student if not wishing to do a special technique can perform a pattern which they designed themselves, either to music (not more than 2.5 minutes long), or without music (no more than 40 movements)

Junior Black Blck Belt Test for 3rd Star after 3 Years at 1st Dan Perform all 1st Dan Patterns Special technique A jumping technique with multiple strikes e.g. 2 or more targets hit while student is in the air (kicks). The student will need to perform a pattern which they have designed, either to music (not more than 2.5 minutes long), or without music (no more than 40 movements). 3 x Sparring Rounds Theory Essay or Project entitled The Benefits of Tae Kwon-Do to be presented to the examiner at least 2 days prior to their grading.
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Newport Tae Kwon-Do

Grading Requirements for 1st Dan Black Belt All Coloured Belt Patterns All 1st Dan Patterns All Three Step Sparring All Two Step Sparring One Step Sparring Take Downs Permitted Free Sparring All Terminology Applicable & All Pattern Meanings Forward Low Knife Hand Guarding Block L Stance, Slip Front Foot to Walking Stance Circular Block. Backward Double Forearm Block, Reverse Low Block. Forward Double Turning Kick, Reverse Punch Pull Back Guarding Block. Backward Horizontal Punch (Soopyong Jirugi). Forward Low, Middle Side Kick, Land In L Stance Inward Knife Hand Strike. Backward U Shape Grasp. Forward Jumping Turning Kick (No Step) Land Pressing Block, Normal Speed. Backward X Knife Hand Block, L stance Single Upset Punch Opposite Hand to Shoulder. Forward Twist Kick, Double Punch. Backward 9 Shape Block In Walking Stance. Forward Turning Kick, Jumping Side Kick Land Twin Vertical Punch Pull Back Guarding Block. Backward Rising Block, Then Low Outer Forearm Block, Double Arc Hand. Forwards Front Leg Hook Kick Turning Kick Combination Then Rear Leg Axe Kick Land Reverse Punch, Pull Back Guarding Block. Backwards Jumping Spinning Back Kick, Land Then Wedging Block Inner Forearm in Walking Stance.

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Pattern: 39 Movements

Student Notes:

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Pattern: Po Eun 36 Movements Po Eun is the pseudonym of a loyal subject Chong Mong-Chu (1400) who was a famous poet and whose poem "I would not serve a second master though I might be crucified a hundred times" is known to every Korean. He was also a pioneer in the field of physics. The diagram represents his unerring loyalty to the king and country towards the end of the Koryo Dynasty.

Start: Ready stance with heaven hands 1. Move the left foot to B, forming a right L-stance toward B while executing a middle guarding block to B with the forearm. 2. Pull the right foot to the left knee joint to form a left one-leg stance toward D, at the same time lifting both fists while turning the face toward A. 3. Execute a pressing kick to A with the right foot keeping the position of the hands as they were in 2. 4. Lower the right foot to A to form a sitting stance toward D while executing a middle side strike to A with the right knife-hand. 5. Execute an angle punch with the left fist while maintaining a sitting stance toward D. 6. Execute a pressing block with the left, fore fist while executing a side front block with the right inner forearm, maintaining a sitting stance toward D. 7. Execute a pressing block with the right fore fist and a side front block with the left inner forearm while maintaining a sitting stance toward D. 8. Execute a middle wedging block with the inner forearm while maintaining a sitting stance toward D. 9. Thrust to C with the right back elbow supporting the right fore fist with the left palm keeping the face as it was in 8 while maintaining a sitting stance towards D. 10.Execute a middle punch to D with the right fist slipping the left palm up to the right elbow joint while maintaining a sitting stance toward D. 11.Thrust to C with the left back elbow supporting the left fore fist with right palm, keeping the face as it was in 10 while maintaining a sitting stance toward D. 12.Execute a right horizontal punch to A while maintaining a sitting stance toward D. Perform 6 through 12 in a continuous motion. 13.Cross the left foot over the right foot forming a right X-stance toward D while executing a low front block to D with the right outer forearm and bringing the left finger belly on the right under forearm. 14.Move the right foot to A forming a left L-stance toward A at the same time executing a U-shape grasp to A. 15.Bring the left foot to the right foot forming a closed stance toward D while executing a horizontal thrust with a twin elbow, turning the face toward B. Perform in slow motion 16.Move the left foot to B to form a sitting stance toward D while executing a side back strike to C with the right back fist and extending the left arm to the side downward
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17.Cross the right foot over the left foot forming a left X-stance toward D while executing a low front block with the left outer forearm and bringing the right finger belly to the left side fist. 18.Move the left foot to B to form a sitting stance toward D while executing a low guarding block to B with a reverse knife-hand. 19.Execute a forearm middle guarding block to A while forming a left L-stance toward A pivoting with left foot. 20.Pull the left foot to the right knee joint to form a right one-leg stance toward D, at the same time lifting both fists while turning the face toward B. 21.Execute a pressing kick to B with the left foot keeping the position of the hands as they were in 20. 22.Lower the left foot to B to form a sitting stance toward D while executing a middle side strike to B with the left knife-hand. 23.Execute an angle punch with the right fist while maintaining a sitting stance toward D. 24.Execute a pressing block with the right, fore fist while executing a side front block with the left inner forearm, maintaining a sitting stance toward D. 25.Execute a pressing block with the left fore fist and a side front block with the right inner forearm while maintaining a sitting stance toward D. 26.Execute a middle wedging block with the inner forearm while maintaining a sitting stance toward D. 27.Thrust to C with the left back elbow supporting the left fore fist with the right palm keeping the face as it was in 26 while maintaining a sitting stance towards D. 28.Execute a middle punch to D with the left fist slipping the right palm up to the left elbow joint while maintaining a sitting stance toward D. 29.Thrust to C with the right back elbow supporting the right fore fist with left palm, keeping the face as it was in 28 while maintaining a sitting stance toward D. 30.Execute a left horizontal punch to B while maintaining a sitting stance toward D. Perform 24 through 30 in a continuous motion. 31.Cross the right foot over the left foot forming a left X-stance toward D while executing a low front block to D with the left outer forearm and bringing the right finger belly on the left under forearm.. 32.Move the left foot to B forming a right L-stance toward B at the same time executing a U-shape grasp to B. 33.Bring the right foot to the left foot forming a closed stance toward D while executing a horizontal thrust with a twin elbow, turning the face toward A. Perform in slow motion. 34.Move the right foot to A to form a sitting stance toward D while executing a side back strike to C with the left back fist and extending the right arm to the side downward. 35.Cross the left foot over the right foot forming a right X-stance toward D while executing a low front block with the right outer forearm and bringing the left finger belly to the right side fist. 36.Move the right foot to A to form a sitting stance toward D while executing a low guarding block to A with a reverse knife-hand.

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Pattern: Gae Baek 44 Movements Gae Baek is named after Ge-Baek, a great general in the Baek Je Dynasty (660 AD). The diagram represents his severe and strict military discipline.

Start: Parallel ready stance 1. Move the right foot to C forming a right L-stance toward D while executing a checking block D with an X-knife-hand. 2. Execute a low twisting kick to D with the right foot keeping the position of the hands as they were in 1. 3. Lower the right foot to D forming a right walking stance toward D while executing a middle punch to D with the right fist. 4. Execute a middle punch to D with the left fist while maintaining a right walking stance toward D. Perform 3 and 4 in a fast motion. 5. Move the right foot to C forming a left walking stance toward D while executing a rising block with the left forearm. 6. Execute a low block to D with the left forearm while maintaining a left walking stance toward D. Perform 5 and 6 in a continuous motion. 7. Execute a high block to AD with a double arc hand while looking through it maintaining a left walking stance toward D. 8. Turn the face toward D while forming a right bending ready stance A toward D. 9. Lower the left foot to AD to form a sitting stance toward AC while executing a scooping block to AC with the left palm. 10.Execute a middle punch to AC with the right fist while maintaining a sitting stance toward AC. Perform 9 and 10 in a connecting motion. 11.Execute a front strike to AC with the left back fist while maintaining a sitting stance toward AC 12.Move the right foot on line AB and then move the left foot to C forming a right L-stance toward C while executing a middle guarding block to C with a knife-hand. 13.Execute a low side front snap kick to C with the left foot keeping the position of the hands as they were in 12. 14.Lower the left foot to C forming a left low stance toward C while executing a high thrust to C with the left flat finger tip. 15.Execute a high thrust to C with the right flat finger tip while maintaining a left low stance toward C. 16.Execute a middle side piercing kick to C with the right foot while pulling both hands in the opposite direction. 17.Lower the right foot to C forming a right L-stance toward D while executing a middle
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guarding block to D with the forearm. 18.Move the right foot to D turning counter clockwise to form a right L-stance toward C while executing a middle guarding block to C with the forearm. 19.Move the left foot to D turning counter clockwise to form a right L-stance toward D while executing a middle guarding block to D with a knife-hand. 20.Move the left foot on line CD to form a sitting stance toward A while executing a right 9-shape block. 21.Move the right foot to D, turning counter-clockwise to form a left walking stance toward C while executing a low block to C with the left knife-hand. 22.Execute a middle turning kick to BC with the right foot and then lower it to C. 23.Execute a flying side piercing kick to C with the right foot. Perform 22 and 23 in a fast motion. 24.Land to C to form a right walking stance toward C while executing a high vertical punch to C with a twin fist. 25.Execute a high block to AC with a double arc-hand while looking through it maintaining a right walking stance toward C. 26.Execute an upset punch to C with the left fist while maintaining a right walking stance toward C. 27.Move the right foot on line CD, forming a left walking stance toward D while striking the left palm with the right front elbow. 28.Jump to D, forming a right x-stance toward BD while executing a high block to D with the right double forearm. 29.Move the left foot to BC to form a sitting stance toward BD, at the same time executing a scooping block to BD with the right palm. 30.Execute a middle punch to BD with the left fist while maintaining a sitting stance toward BD. Perform 29 and 30 in a connecting motion. 31.Execute a front strike to BD with the right back fist while maintaining a sitting stance toward BD. 32.Move the left foot to C, forming a left walking stance toward C, at the same time executing a high front strike to C with the right reverse knife-hand. 33.Move the left foot to A about half a shoulder width while executing a middle turning kick to C with the right foot. 34.Lower the right foot to C, and then turn counter-clockwise to form a left walking stance toward D, pivoting with the right foot while executing a high vertical punch to D with a twin fist. 35.Execute a middle punch to D with the right middle knuckle fist, bringing the left side first in front of the right shoulder while forming a right L-stance toward D pulling the left foot. 36.Move the right foot to D to form a sitting stance toward B, at the same time executing left 9-shape block. 37.Execute a low guarding block to C with a reverse knife-hand while maintaining a sitting stance toward B. 38.Execute a low guarding block to D with a knife-hand while maintaining a sitting stance toward B. Perform 37 and 38 in a continuous motion. 39.Move the left foot to D in a stamping motion to form a sitting stance toward A while executing a W-shape block with the outer forearm.
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40.Move the left foot to C in a stamping motion to form a sitting stance toward B while executing a W-shape block with the outer forearm. 41.Move the right foot to C forming a right walking stance toward C while executing a rising block with the right forearm. 42.Execute a middle punch to C with the left fist while maintaining a right walking stance toward C. 43.Move the right foot on line CD forming a left walking stance toward D while executing a rising block with the left forearm. 44.Execute a middle punch to D with the right fist while maintaining a left walking stance toward D.

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Black Belt Theory Test 1. What is the difference between a thrust and a strike? 2. How many coloured belt patterns have a release in them? 3. How many coloured belt patterns have a back-fist strike in? 4. Name five types of back-fist strike? 5. How many coloured belt patterns have a fingertip thrust in them? 6. Name three coloured belt patterns that start in Moa Sogi? 7. How do you create power? 8. What is the Korean word for `breaking'? 9. What is the Korean term for consecutive kick and what does it mean? 10.What is the Korean word for combination kick and what does it mean? 11.Name three kicks that use the heel? 12.Name five vital spots of the upper body? 13.Name five vital spots of the middle body? 14.Name five vital spots on the lower body? 15.Count to ten in Korean. 16.Why do we twist the fist to punch? 17.What is the meaning of `Hwa-Rang'? 18.How many people are on the TAGB Committee? 19.Who are they? 20.What are their titles? 21.When was Tae Kwon-Do inaugurated? 22.What year did Tae Kwon-Do come to Great Britain? 23.When was the TAGB formed? 24.When was the BTC (British Tae Kwon-Do Council) formed? 25.When was Tae Kwon-Do International created? 26.What is the significance of the year 2333BC? 27.Who was Admiral Yi Sun Sin? 28.Why does the pattern Choong Moo end in a left hand attack? 29.Who was Ahn Joong Gun? 30.What is the significance of 29 movements in pattern Hwa Rang? 31.What is the significance of the year 686AD? 32.Who was Yi Hwang? 33.Who was Ahn Ch'ang Ho? 34.What do the 38 movements in Yul Gok represent? 35.What else does 38 signify in Yul-Gok? 36.Who was Yi I? 37.When would you use your toes to perform a kick? 38.What is the difference between `dwit' and `dung'? 39.What is the purpose of stances? 40.What is the difference between a back kick and a reverse side kick? 41.What is the Korean name for `grabbing knee kick'? 42.What is the blocking tool for `golcha makgi'? 43.What is the blocking tool in `digutja makgi'? 44.What is the difference between back back-fist strike and side back-fist strike? 45.How do you know if a stance is a left or right stance?
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46.What are the weight distributions for walking stance, low stance, L-stance, X-stance and rear foot stance? 47.When you perform `anuro sonkal taerigi' (2nd move in Won Hyo), what is the other arm used for? 48.Green signifies a plant's growth - what does the plant represent? 49.Who introduced Tae Kwon-Do to the UK? 50.What does `sun' mean? 51.What is `doo palmok makgi' used for? 52.What is `dollimyo makgi' used for? 53.What were the three kingdoms of Korea? 54.When were the three kingdoms unified? 55.When was the Yi Dynasty formed? 56.In `kaunde sun sonkut tulgi' what techniques are you performing? 57.What is the difference between a twin forearm block `sang palmok makgi' and double forearm block `doo palmok makgi'? 58.Name the different knife hand strikes you know? 59.Name the different finger tip thrusts you know and possible target areas? 60.General Korean - inward, upward etc 61.In `Yul Gok' when performing elbow strike, what is the hand you are striking used for? 62.Why is the palm facing up on a low section upset finger tip thrust? 63.Why do we use inner and outer forearm to block with? 64.Name the different elbow strikes & thrusts you know? 65.Name the kicks you know and the striking tool used? 66.What is the Korean name and purpose of double arc hand block? 67.What is the Korean name and purpose of horizontal punch? 68.What is the Korean name and purpose of 9-Shaped Block? 69.What do the pattern interpretations mean to you? 70.What is a pattern? 71.Why do we perform patterns? 72.Why do we learn the interpretation of patterns? 73.Who is your regional representative? 74.When did General Choi Hong Hi die? 75.What two further tenets would you suggest? 76.What is the formula for power? 77.What is kinetic energy? 78.What does Moa Junbi Sogi `A' represent? 79.Why do we perform `kyocha joomuk chookyo makgi' (as in Joong Gun)? 80.Why do we perform `kaunde sonkal taerigi' in L-stance in Dan Gun (movement 18) but in sitting stance in Do San (movement 23)? 81.Why do we pull our elbows down sharply in `sonkal daebi makgi' and `palmok daebi makgi'? 82.What is Tae Kwon-Do? 83.What are the components of Tae Kwon-Do? 84.What is Taek Kyon? 85.What are the targets for `high flat fingertip thrust'? 86.Why do we practise patterns beyond 6th Dan? 87.Why are the floating ribs a vulnerable target area?
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88.What does Mikulgi mean? 89.Why do we perform a breaking test? 90.Why do we perform 1 step sparring? 91.Why do Black Belts have additional black trim on their doboks? 92.How many coloured belt patterns have a bending ready stance in them? 93.What is the Korean for `turn'? 94.What is the Korean term for `waving kick' and what is its purpose? 95.What is the Korean for the following? 96.What are `sonkal batang' and `umji batang'? 97.What could you tell someone who was interested in Tae Kwon-Do about the TAGB? 98.What was the largest of the three kingdoms of Korea? 99.What is the difference between the side punch performed in Won Hyo (third move) and in Hwa Rang (fifth move)? 100. What is the Korean for `Tenet'? 101. What are the tenets of Tae Kwon-Do in Korean? 102. What impact has Tae Kwon-Do had on your life? 103. What does being a Black Belt mean to you? 104. How would you say you have changed since your last grading? 105. What is the difference between an inward block and an inside block? 106. Why might you use knife hand to block rather than the forearm? 107. Is 4 directional punch `saju jirugi' a pattern? 108. Which kicks can use the instep as a striking tool? 109. Name the following parts of the arm in Korean (the examiner will demonstrate)? 110. What is the difference between side piercing kick and side thrusting kick? 111. What is the Korean term for wrist release? 112. What is the difference between WTF and ITF style Tae Kwon-Do? 113. What is the difference between turning punch `dollyo jirugi' and angle punch `giokja jirugi'? 114. What is the significance of the colours in the Tae Kwon-Do International logo? 115. What is the Korean term for wedging block and what is its use? 116. When might you use crescent kick? 117. What is the Korean term for master and who can use this title? 118. What is `sonbadak noollo makgi' used for? 119. What is Confucianism? 120. What is Neo-Confucianism?

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Newport Tae Kwon-Do

Grading Requirements for 2nd Dan Black Belt All Coloured Belt Patterns All 1st Dan Patterns All 2nd Dan Patterns All Three Step Sparring All Two Step Sparring One Step Sparring Take Downs Permitted Free Sparring All Terminology Applicable & All Pattern Meanings Forward Double Side Kick, Spinning Back Kick, Lead Hand Ridge Hand, Change Leg. Backward 1st 4 Moves Ko-Dang. Forward Front Leg Hook/Side Kick Combination, Rear Leg Axe Kick Land Reverse Punch Pull Back Guarding Block. Backward Double Knife Hand Strike In Walking Stance. Forward Hook Kick Land Cross Cut Finger Tips, Land Guarding Block (Ko-Dang). Backward Wedging/Circular/Downward Double Palm Blocks, Reverse Punch Reverse Knife Hand. Forward Rear Leg, Front/Turning Kick Combination, Axe Kick Same Leg, Reverse Punch, Lead Hand Ridge Hand. Backward Double Pressing Palm Block in L Stance, Then High Inward Block, Back Fist Strike. Forward Jumping Reverse Turning Kick 4 Times, Knife Hand Strike, Elbow Strike Slipping Front Foot. Backward Downward Back Hand Strike in L Stance Opposite Hand Reverse Punch, Reverse Knife Hand Block, Low 9 Shape Block. Forward Front Kick Reverse Arc Hand Strike. Backward Low Knife Hand Block, Reverse Palm Strike Walking Stance. Forward Twist Kick, X Fist Pressing Block/Knife Hand Rising Block, Guard with Kicking Leg Forward. Backward Downward Elbow Then Downward Outer Forearm Block (Ko-Dang). Forward Jumping Side Kick with Step. Backward Jumping Back Kick 4 Times, Then Twin Knife Hand Strike Walking Stance, (Choong-Jang).

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Newport Tae Kwon-Do


Grading Requirements for 3rd Dan Black Belt All Coloured Belt Patterns All 1st Dan Patterns All 2nd Dan Patterns All 3rd Dan Patterns All Three Step Sparring All Two Step Sparring One Step Sparring Take Downs Permitted Free Sparring All Terminology Applicable & All Pattern Meanings Forward Double Side Kick, Spinning Back Kick, Lead Hand Ridge Hand, Change Leg. Backward X Fist Pressing/X Knife Hand Rising Block Twist Hands Reverse Punch From Yoo Sin. Forward Front Leg Hook/Side Kick Combination, Rear Leg Axe Kick Land Reverse Punch Pull Back Guarding Block. Backward Double Forearm Block, Reverse Low Block Yoo Sin. Forward Back Hand Strike L Stance, Crescent Kick Hitting Palm, Side Kick Same Leg Land Back Hand Strike. Backward U Shape Punch. Forward Rear Leg, Front/Turning Kick Combination, Axe Kick Same Leg, Reverse Punch Lead Hand Ridge hand. Backward Twin Punch Low Section In L Stance from Sam-Il. Forward Jumping Reverse Turning Kick 4 Times, Knife Hand Strike, Elbow Strike Slipping Front Foot. Backward Low Outer Forearm Block In L Stance, Opposite Hand Armpit, Punch Opposite Hand Shoulder. Forward Reverse Turning/Side Kick Combination, Front Elbow Strike, Guard with Kicking Leg Forward. Backward Reverse Inward Outer Forearm Block, Obverse Punch From Sam-Il. Forward Twist Kick, X Fist Pressing Block/Knife Hand Rising Block, Guard with Kicking Leg Forward. Backward Knife Hand Rising Block, Circular Block, Obverse Punch from Choi-Yong Forward Jumping Side Kick With Step Backward Jumping Back Kick 4 Times, Then Twin Knife Hand Strike Walking Stance, (Choong-Jang).

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Newport Tae Kwon-Do


Grading Requirements for 4th Dan Black Belt
Any 1st or 2nd Dan Pattern of Own Choice. Then One coloured belt pattern of own choice. 1st, 2nd or 3rd Dan patterns chosen by examiner. 1st, 2nd or 3rd Dan patterns chosen by examiner. 1st, 2nd or 3rd Dan patterns chosen by examiner. 3 4th Dan patterns. All Set sparring The examiners set the line work therefore it can be anything. Here are a few examples of recent floor work. (A lot of emphasis is placed on your knowledge of the black belt syllabus, therefore a considerable amount of the floor work is taken from previous Dan grades) Reverse Pressing Block (Se-Jong) Inward Outer Forearm Block, Rear Foot Stance, Slip Back Foot, Inward Palm Block Walking Stance Double Reverse Knife-Hand Block (Tong-Il) Obverse Under-fist Strike, Reverse Palm Strike (Tong IL) High Reverse Knife-Hand Strike, Opposite Hand In Front Of Head (Ul-Ji) Double Forearm Block, Reverse Low Block Twin Horizontal Punch Rising Block, Low Block, Double Arc Hand Turning Kick, Jumping Kick, Twin Vertical Punch, Guarding Block Jumping Spinning Back Kick, Then Wedging Block, Inner Forearm Walking Stance The First 4 Moves Of Ko-Dang Down Backhand L Stance Opposite Hand Punch, Then Reverse Knife-Hand Block Low, 9 Shape Block Low Knife-Hand Block, Reverse Palm Strike, Walking Stance Twist Kick, X Fist Pressing Block, Knife-Hand Rising Block, Land In A Guard With Your Kicking Leg In Front Double Knife-Hand Strike Walking Stance Cresent Kick, Crosscut, Guarding Block (Ko-Dang) X Fist Pressing Block, X Fist Rising Block, Twist Hands, Reverse Punch (Yoo-Sin) Knife-Hand Rising Block, Circular Block, Obverse Punch (Choi-Yong) Twin Punch In L Stance, Low Section (Sam-Il) U Shape Punch Rear Leg Front, Turning Kick Combination, Axe Kick Same Leg, Reverse Punch, Lead Hand Ridge-Hand Jumping Back Kick, Then Twin Knife-Hand Strike in Walking Stance
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Complete Terminology Index HAND TECHNIQUE Vertical Punch Side Punch Side Front Punch Upward Punch Upset Punch U-shape Punch Crescent Punch Downward Punch Turning Punch Angle Punch Knuckle Fist Punch Twin Fore-knuckle Fist Middle Knuckle Fist Twin Middle Knuckle Fist Thumb Knuckle Fist Horizontal Punch Long Fist Punch Open Fist Punch Double Fist Punch Horizontal Thrust Twin Elbow Single Elbow Back Elbow SON GISOOL Sewo Jirugi Yop Jirugi Yobap Jirugi Ollyo Jirugi Dwijibo Jirugi Digutj Jirugi Bandal Jirugi Naeryo Jirugi Dollyo Jirugi Giokja Jirugi Songarak Joomuk Jirugi Sang Han Songarak Joomuk Kaunde Joongji Joomuk Jirugi Sang Kaunde Joongji Joomuk Jirugi Umji Songarak Joomuk Soopyong Jirugi Ghin Joomuk Jirugi Pyon Joomuk Jirugi Doo Joomuk Jirugi Soopyong Tulgi Sang Palkup Wae Palkup Dwit Palkup
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Twin Side Back Elbow Cross Cut Inward Cross Cut Outward Cross Cut Side Cross Cut Upper Elbow Strike Upper Back Elbow Strike Front Elbow Strike High Elbow Strike Inward Knife-Hand Strike Twin Knife-hand Strike Reverse Knife-hand Strike Twin Reverse Knife-hand Strike Under Fist Strike Bear Hand Strike Finger Pincers Strike Downward Strike Side Downward Strike Side Downward Knife-Hand Strike Side Downward Side Fist Strike Side Downward Back Hand Strike Front Downward Strike Outward Knife-hand strike Outward Side-fist Strike Knife Hand Side Strike

Sang Yop Dwit Palkup Ghutgi Anuro Ghutgi Bakuro Ghutgi Yop Ghutgi Wi Palkup Taerigi Widwi Palkup Taerigi Ap Palkup Taerigi Nopun Palkup Taerigi Anuro Sonkal Taerigi Sang Sonkal Taerigi Sonkal Dung Taerigi Sang Sonkal Dung Taerigi Mit Joomuk Taerigi Gomson Taerigi Jipge Son Taerigi Naeryo Taerigi Yop Naeryo Taerigi Yop Naeryo Sonkal Taerigi Yop Naeryo Yop Joomuk Taerigi Yop Naeryo Sondung Taerigi Ap Naeryo Taerigi Bakuro Sonkal Taerigi Bakuro Yop Joomuk Taerigi Sonkal Yop Taerigi
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Side Fist Strike Back Fist Strike Twin Back Fist Back Hand Strike Twin Back Hand Back Fist Wedging Strike Knife-Hand Horizontal Strike Twin Back Fist Horizontal Strike Twin Side Fist Horizontal Strike Twin Back Hand Horizontal Strike Back Fist Side Front Strike Back Hand Side Front Strike Reverse Knife-hand Side Front Strike Front Back-fist Strike Front Knife-hand Strike Front Reverse Knife-hand Strike Crescent Strike Arc Hand Crescent Strike Finger Pincers Crescent Strike Backside Strike Side Front Strike Reverse Knife-hand Side Front Strike THRUSTING TECHNIQUE Fingertip Double Fingertip

Yop Joomuk Taerigi Dung Joomuk Taerigi Sang Dung Joomuk Taerigi Sondung Taerigi Sang Sondung Taerigi Dung Joomuk Hechyo Taerigi Sonkal Soopyong Taerigi Sang Dung Joomuk Soopyong Taerigi Sang Yop Joomuk Soopyong Taerigi Sang Sondung Taerigi Dung Joomuk Yobap Taerigi Sondung Yobap Taerigi Sonkal Dung Yobap Taerigi Ap Dung Joomuk Taerigi Ap Sonkal Taerigi Ap Sonkal Dung Taerigi Bandal Taerigi Bandal Son Taerigi Jipge Son Bandal Taerigi Yopdwi Taerigi Yobap Taerigi Sonkal Dung Yobap Taerigi TULGI Sonkut Tulgi Doo Sonkut Tulgi
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Flat Fingertip Upset Fingertip Straight Fingertip Angle Fingertip Downward Thrust Straight Elbow Side Thrust Double Fingertip Side-front Thrust Side Elbow Single Side Elbow Twin Side Elbow FLYING HAND TECHNIQUE Flying Punch Flying Vertical Punch Flying Upset Punch Flying Front Punch Flying Side Strike Flying Side Front Strike Flying Back Fist Side Strike Flying Back Hand Side Strike Flying Knife-hand Side Strike Flying Side-fist Side Strike Flying Front Strike

Opun Sonkut Tulgi Dwijibo Sonkut Tulgi Sun Sonkut Tulgi Homi Sonkut Tulgi Naeryo Tulgi Sun Palkup Tulgi Yop Tulgi Doo Sonkut Tulgi Yobap Tulgi Yop Palkup Wae Yop Palkup Sang Yop Palkup TWIMYO SON GISOOL Twimyo Jirugi Twimyo Sewo Jirugi Twimyo Dwijibo Jirugi Twimyo Ap Jirugi Twimyo Yop Taerigi Twimyo Yobap Taerigi Twimyo Dung Joomuk Yop Taerigi Twimyo Sondung Yop Taerigi Twimyo Sonkal Yop Taerigi Twimyo Yop Joomuk Yop Taerigi Twimyo Ap Taerigi

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Flying Reverse Knife-hand Front Strike Flying Back-fist Front Strike Flying Mid-air Strike Flying Spinning 180 Degree Flying Spinning 360 Degree Flying Flat Fingertip Cross-cut Flying Flat Fingertip Inward Cross-cut

Twimyo Sonkal Dung Ap Taerigi Twimyo Dung Joomuk Ap Taerigi Twio Dolmyo Taerigi 180 Twio Dolmyo Taerigi 360 Twio Dolmyo Taerigi Twimyo Opun Sonkut Ghutgi Twimyo Opun Sonkut Anuro Ghutgi

Flying Flat Fingertip Outward Cross-cut Twimyo Opun Sonkut Bakuro Ghutgi Flying Double Attack Flying Double Punch Flying Vertical Double Side Punch Flying Middle Knuckle Fist Twimyo I - Jung Gong Gyok Twimyo I - Jung Jirigu Twimyo Soojik I - Jung Yop Jirugi Twimyo Kaunde Joongi Joomuk Jirugi

FOOT TECHNIQUES KICK PREFIXES Front Side Piercing Raising Thrusting Snap Skipping Dodging Kick Consecutive Combination Kick

BAL GISOOL N/B Ap Yop Cha Jirugi Olligi Cha Tulgi Cha Busigi Durokamyo Pihamyo Chagi Yonsuk Chagi Honhap Chagi

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Direction of Kicks Foot Shifting Spot Kicks Flying Kick KICKS Turning Reverse Turning Hooking Reverse Hooking Front Snap Kick Back Snap Kick Side Front Snap Kick Twisting Low Twisting Middle Twisting High Twisting Front Rising Side Rising Front Piercing Side Piercing Back Piercing U-Shape Punching Kick Side Punching Kick Front Punching Kick Front Checking

Chon Bang Hyang Jajun Bal Gujari Chagi Twimyo Chagi CHAGI Dollyo Chagi Bandae Dollyo Chagi Golcha Chagi Bandae Dollyo Goro Chagi Apcha Busigi Dwitcha Busigi Yopap Cha Busigi Bituro Chagi Najunde Bituro Chagi Kaunde Bituro Chagi Nopunde Bituro Chagi Ap Cha Olligi Yop Cha Olligi Ap Cha Jirugi Yop Cha Jirugi Dwitcha Jirugi Digutja Jirumyo Chagi Yop Jirumyo Chagi Ap Jirumyo Chagi Apcha Momchugi
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Side Checking Side Pushing Kick Back Pushing Kick Downward Pick-Shape Kick Crescent Vertical Stamping Sweeping Straight Kick Pressing Kick Skip Kick Double Kick Triple Kick Upward Kick (Knee) Outward Kick Punching Kick Horizontal Striking Kick Side Turning (On 75 Degree) Inward Kick Waving Kick Foot Tackling (Take down) Grasping Kick Counter Kick Checking

Yopcha Momchugi Yopcha Milgi Dwitcha Milgi Naero Chagi Gokaeng-I Chagi Bandal Chagi Sewo Chagi Cha Bapgi Suroh Chagi Jigeau Chagi Noollo Chagi Duro Gamyo Chagi L-Jung Chagi Samjung Chagi Ollyo Chagi Baturo Chagi Jirumyo Chagi Soopyong Taerimyo Chagi Yop Dollyo Chagi Anuro Chagi Doro Chagi Bal Golgi Butjapyo Chagi Bada Chagi Cha Mumchugi
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FLYING TECHINQUES Flying Front Kick Flying Side Front Kick Flying Turning Kick Flying Hooking Kick Flying Reverse Turning Kick Flying Side Piercing Kick Flying Side Thrusting Kick Flying Side Pushing Kick Flying High Kick Flying Twisting Kick Flying Crescent Kick Flying Hooking Kick Flying Double Side Kick Flying Double Turning Kick Flying Double Front Kick Flying Double Twisting Kick Flying Triple Kick Flying Two Directional Kick Flying Three Directional Kick Flying Twin Foot Front Kick Flying Front-Back Kick Flying Combination Kick Flying Consecutive Kick

TWIMYO GISOOL Twimyo Ap Chagi Twimyo Yobap Chagi Twimyo Yop Chagi Twimyo Golcho Chagi Twimyo Bandae Dollyo Chagi Twimyo Yopcha Jirugi Twimyo Yopcha Tulgi Twimyo Yopcha Milgi Twimyo Nopi Chagi Twimyo Bituro Chagi Twimyo Bandal Chagi Twimyo Golcho Chagi Twimyo I - Jung Yop Chagi Twimyo I - Jung Dollyo Chagi Twimyo I - Jung Ap Chagi Twimyo I - Jung Bituro Chagi Twimyo Samjung Chagi Twimyo Sangbang Chagi Twimyo Sambang Chagi Twimyo Sangbal Ap Chagi Twimyo Apdwi Chagi Twimyo Honap Chagi Twimyo Yonsok Chagi

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Overhead Kick Overhead Double Kick Flying Vertical Kick Flying High Kick Flying Downward Kick Flying Twin Foot Front Kick Flying Twin Foot Front Checking Kick Flying Twin Foot Side Piercing Kick Flying Double Foot Side Pushing Kick Flying Twin Foot Middle Twisting Kick Flying Twin Foot High Kick Mid-Air Kick Mid-Air Double Kick Tumbling Kick (Back Summersault) Flying Spiral Kick Flying Scissors-shape Kick Flying Square Punching Kick Flying Trapezoid Punching Kick Flying U-shape Punching Kick Flying Horizontal Striking Kick Reflex Kick (using wall) STANCE Side Facing Full Facing Half Facing

Twio Nomo Chagi Twio Nomo I-Jung Chagi Twimyo Sewo Chagi Twimyo Nopi Chagi Twimyo Naeryo Chagi Twimyo Sangbal Ap Chagi Twimyo Sangbal Apcha Momchugi Twimyo Sangbal Yopcha Jirugi Twimyo Doobal Yopcha Milgi Twimyo Sangbal Kaude Bituro Chagi Twimyo Sangbal Nopi Chagi Twio Dolmyo Chagi Twio Dolmyo I - Jung Chagi Joma Chagi Twimyo Rasonsik Chagi Twimyo Kawi Chagi Twio Sagak Jirumyo Chagi Twio Jaegak Jirumyo Chagi Twio Digutja Jirumyo Chagi Twio Soopyong Taerimyo Chagi Bansa Chagi SOGI Yopmom Ohnmom Bahnmom
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Sitting Parallel Walking Attention Diagonal L X Fixed Close Bending One Leg Vertical Rear Foot Low Outer Open Stance (45 Degree) Inner Open Stance (toes inward) Ready Parallel Ready Walking Ready Bending Ready Warrior Ready Stance L-Ready X-Ready Sitting Ready Close Ready (type A,B,C)

Annun Sogi Narini Sogi Gunnun Sogi Charyot Sogi Sasun Sogi Niunja Sogi Kyocha Sogi Gojung Sogi Mao Sogi Guburyo Sogi Waebal Sogi Soo Jik Sogi Dwit Bal Sogi Nachuo Sogi Bakat Palja Sogi An Palja Sogi Junbi Sogi Narani Junbi Sogi Gunnun Junbi Sogi Guburyo Junbi Sogi Moosa Junbi Sogi Niunja Junbi Sogi Kyocha Junbi Sogi Annun Junbi Sogi Moa Junbi Sogi (A,B,C)
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Crouched BLOCKS High Block Middle Block Low Block Outside Block Inside Block Outward Block Inward Block Knife-hand Low Block Forearm Low Block Reverse Knife-hand Low Block Palm Low Block Rising Block X-Fist Rising Block X-knife-hand Rising Block Twin Palm Rising Block Arc-Hand Rising Block Double arc hand Block Double Forearm Block Twin Forearm Block Circular Block Dodging Block Grasping Block Nine (9) -Shape Block

Oguryo Sogi MAKGI Nopunde Makgi Kaunde Makgi Najunde Makgi Bakat Makgi An Makgi Bakuro Makgi Anuro Makgi Sonkal Najunde Makgi Palmok Najunde Makgi Sonkal Dung Najunde Makgi Sonbadak Najunde Makgi Chookyo Makgi Gyocha Joomuk Chookyo Makgi Gyocha Sonkal Chookyo Makgi Sang Sonbadak Chookyo Makgi Bandal Son Chookyo Makgi Doobandalson Makgi Doo Polmok Makgi Sang Palmok Makgi Dollimyo Makgi Pihagi Makgi Butjaba Makgi Gutja Makgi
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Louring Block Flat Block Waist Block Checking Block Straight Forearm Side Front Block X-fist Block X-knife hand Block U-shape Block U-shape Grasp Upward Block Palm Upward Block Reverse Knife-hand Upward Block Thumb Ridge Upward Block Bow Wrist Upward Block Twin Palm Upward Block Downward Block Palm Downward Block Twin Palm Downward Block Alternate Palm Downward Block Twin Forearm Downward Block Knife-hand Downward Block Twin Knife-hand Downward Block Straight Elbow Downward Block X-fist Downward Block

Yuin Makgi Opun Makgi Hori Makgi Momchau Makgi Sun Palmok Yobap Makgi Gyocha Joomuk Gyocha Sonkal Makgi Digutia Makgi Digutja Japji Ollyo Makgi Sonbadak Ollyo Makgi Sonkal Dung Ollyo Makgi Umji Batang Ollyo Makgi Sonmok Dung Ollyo Makgi Sang Sonbadak Ollyo Makgi Naeryo Makgi Sonbadak Naeryo Makgi Sang Sonbadak Naeryo Makgi Euhkallin Sonbadak Naeryo Makgi Sang Palmok Naeryo Makgi Sonkal Naeryo Makgi Sang Sonkal Naeryo Makgi Sun Palkup Naeryo Makgi Gyocha Joomuk Naeryo Makgi
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X-knife-hand Downward Block Pressing Block Palm Pressing Block Fore-fist Pressing Block Twin Palm Pressing Block X-Fist Pressing Block Hooking Block Palm Hooking Block Forearm Hooking Block Knife-hand Hooking Block Back-hand Hooking Block Wedging Block Inner Forearm Wedging Block Outer Forearm Wedging Block Knife-hand Wedging Block Reverse Knife-hand Wedging Block Vertical Block W-shape Block Outer W-shape Block Knife-hand W-shape Block Reverse Knife-hand W-shape Block Inner W-shape Block Front Block Twin Palm Front Block Reverse Knife-hand Front Block

Gyocha Sonkal Naeryo Makgi Noollo Makgi Sonbadak Noollo Makgi Ap Joomuk Noollo Makgi Sang Sonbadak Noollo Makgi Gyocha Joomuk Noollo Makgi Golcho Makgi Sonbadak Golcho Makgi Palmok Golcho Makgi Sonkal Golcho Makgi Sondung Golcho Makgi Hechyo Makgi An Palmok Hechyo Makgi Bakat Palmok Hechyo Makgi Sonkal Hechyo Makgi Sonkal Dung Hechyo Makgi Sewo Makgi San Makgi Bakat San Makgi Sonkal San Makgi Sonkal Dung San Makgi An San Makgi Ap Makgi Sang Sonbadak Ap Makgi Sonkal Dung Ap Makgi
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X-fist Front Block X-Knife hand Front Block Side Block Knife hand Side Block Forearm Side Block Reverse Knife-hand Side Block Single Straight Forearm Block Twin Straight Forearm Block Twin Straight Knife-hand Parallel Block Inner Forearm Parallel Block Outer Forearm Parallel Block Knife-hand Parallel Block Reverse Knife-hand Parallel Block Back Forearm Parallel Block Back Hand Parallel Block Pushing Block Palm Pushing Block Double Forearm Pushing Block Reverse Knife-hand Pushing Block Knife hand Pushing Block Scooping Block Palm Scooping Block Reverse Knife-hand Scooping Block Guarding Block

Gyocha Joomuk Gyocha Sonkal Ap Makgi Yop Makgi Sonka Yop Makgi Palmok Yop Makgi Sonkal Dung Yop Makgi Wae Sun Palmok Sang Sun Palmok Makgi Sang Sun Sonkal Makgi Narani Makgi An Palmok Narani Makgi Bakat Palmok Narani Makgi Sonkal Narani Makgi Sonkal Dung Narani Makgi Dwit Palmok Narani Makgi Sondung Narani Makgi Miro Makgi Sonbadak Miro Makgi Doo Palmok Miro Makgi Sonkal Dung Miro Makgi Sonkal Miro Makgi Duro Makgi Songbadak Duro Makgi Sonkal Dung Duro Makgi Daebi Makgi
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Forearm Guarding Block Knife-hand Guarding Block Inner Forearm Guarding Block Knife-hand Low Guarding Block

Palmok Daebi Makgi Sonkal Daebi Makgi An Palmok Daebi Makgi Sonkal Najunde Daebi Makgi

Reverse Knife-hand Low Guarding Block Sonkal Dung Najunde Daebi Makgi Twin Forearm Block Twin Knife-hand Horizontal Block Twin Palm Horizontal Block Twin Knife-hand Horizontal Block GROUND TECHNIQUES Ground Punch Ground Downward Strike Ground Inward Strike Ground Thrust Ground Cross Cut Holding Checking Covering Parallel Palm X Back Hand Parallel Back Hand Overlapping Back Hand Ground Front Snap Kick Ground Side Piercing Kick Sang Palmok Makgi Sang Sonkal Makgi Soopyong Makgi Sang Sonbadak Soopyong Makgi Sang Sonkal Soopyong Makgi NOOWO GISOOL Noowo Jirugi Noowo Naeryo Taerigi Noowo Anuro Taerigi Noowo Tulgi Noowo Ghutgi Bachigi Momchugi Karioogi Narani Sonbadak Kyocha Sondung Narani Sondung Pagaen Sondung Noowo Apcha Busigi Noowo Topcha Jirugi
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Ground Downward kick Ground Turning Kick Ground Side Thrusting Kick Ground Twisting Kick Ground Front Checking Kick Ground Crescent Kick Ground Dodging Kick Ground Knee Bending Ground Leg Crossing BODY PARTS HAND PARTS Fore-fist Side-fist Back-fist Under Fist Long Fist Open Fist Knuckle Fist Middle Knuckle Fist Fore-Knuckle Fist Thumb Knuckle Fist Knife-hand Reverse Knife-hand Base Of Knife-hand Fingertip

Noowo Naeryi Chagi Noowo Dollyo Chagi Noowo Yopcha Tulgi Noowo Bituro Chagi Noowo Apcha Momchugi Noowo Bandal Chagi Noowo Pihagi Noowo Moorup Gulburigi Noowo Dari Kogi MOM BANSIN SANG BANSIN Ap Joomuk Yop Joomuk Dung Joomuk Mit Joomuk Ghin Joomuk Phun Joomuk Songarak Joomuk Joongi Joomuk Inji Joomuk Umji Joomuk Sonkal Sonkal Dung Sonkal Batang Sonkut
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Flat Fingertip Straight Fingertip Upset Fingertip Angle Fingertip Forefinger Double Fingertip Forearm Inner Forearm Outer Forearm Back Forearm Under Forearm Elbow Front Elbow Finger Pincers Finger Belly Arc Hand Back Hand Palm Press Finger Thumb Thumb Ridge Bow Whist Bear Hand FOOT PARTS Sole

Opun Sonkut Sun Sonkut Dwijibun Sonkut Homi Sonkut Han Songarak Doo Songarak Palmok An Palmok Bakat Palmok Dung Palmok Mit Palmok Palkup Wi Pulkup Jipge Son Songarak Badak Bandal Son Sondung Sonbadak Jiap Umji Umji Batang Sonmok Dung Gomson HA BANSIN Kumchee
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Back Sole Side Sole Ball of foot Foot Foot Sword Toes Instep Side Instep Reverse Foot-sword Back heel Knee MISCELLANEOUS PARTS Head Forehead Occiput (back of head) Shoulder Outer Ankle Joint Inner Ankle Joint Tibia Inner Tibia Back Tibia Outer Tibia Shin Toe edge

Dwit Kumchee Yop Bal Badak Ap Kumchee Bal Balkal Balkut Baldung Yop Baldung Balkal Dung Dwichook Moorup GITA BOOWI Mori Ima Hudoo Euhke Bakat Balmok Gwanjol An Balmok Gwanjol Kyong Gol An Kyong Gol Dwit Kyong Gol Bakat Kyong Gol Jong Kwaeng-I Balgarak Nal

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VITAL SPOTS High Section of the Body Middle Section Low Section The Head The Neck The Chest The Abdomen The Extremities Skull Temple Bridge of nose Eyeball Mast rid Mandibula Philtrum Jaw Point of the chin Lips Angle of the mandible Upper neck Adam's Apple Windpipe Clavicle Thenar

KUPSO Nopun Bumbun Kaunde Babun Najun Babun Mori Mok Gasum Bakboo Pal Gwa Dari Dae sin moon Gwanja Nori Migan Angoo Hoo-i-boo Tok gwanjol Injoong Yop tok Mit tok Ipsul Wit tok Witmok Gyol hoo Soom tong Swe gol Umjigoo
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Radical artery Back wrist artery Wrist joint Nose Neck Artery Sternum Heart Solar Plexus Spleen Liver Epigastrium Lower Abdomen Public region Groin Scrotrum Instep Occiput Cervix Upper back Small of the back Kidney Fossa Achilles tendon Ankle joint Elbow joint

Maekbak sonmok dongmaek Dung sonmok dongmaek Sonmok gwanjol Kotdung Mok Dongmaek Hyung gol Shin jang Myong chi Bi jang Gan jang Sang bokboo Ha bokboo Chiboo Sataguni Nang shim Baldung Hoodoo Gyong boo Gyon gap Gyong chu Kongpal Ogum Dwichuk himjool Balmok gwanjol Palgup gwanjol
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Armpit Floating ribs Knee joint Inner thigh Tibia Training Hall Training Equipment Practice Suit Shirt (Do Bok top) Pants Belt Training Aids Straw Pads Focus Pads Blocking Apparatus Pullers Dumbbells Skipping Rope Stance Mould Push Ups Callisthenic's Leg Stretching Punching Ball Mirror Power Holder

Gyodurang Nuk gol Murupgwanjol Anjok hobok dari Kyong gol Do Jang Sooryon Jangbi Do Bok Jeogori Baji Ti Dallyon Goo Jip Byogae Chatjum Bangpae Makgi Dae Dollyon Jool Aryong Twim Jool Sogi Pan Momtong Bachim Dosoo Dollyon Dari Pyogi Dallyon Gong Ko Ul Gyokpa Dae
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Special Technique Holder Training Schedule Fundamental Exercises Preparatory Exercise Spot Training Commands One Two Three Four Five Six Seven Eight Nine To your spot In your own time Rest Stop Start Bow Bow Posture Attention How to use "Lets Go"

Tukgi Dae Sooryun Gehek Pyo Gibon Yonsup Junbi Undang Gujari Chagi

Hanna Dool Set Net Tassot Yassot Ilgope Yaudal Ahope Paru Hire nops Chose Goman Si Jak Kyong ye Kyong Sogi Charyot Sayong Bop Kapsipsida
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Greetings: Good Morning / Evening Procedure for leading a class Method of Exercise

Annyongh Asimnigga Sooryon Jidi Bop Yonsup Bop

MISCELLANEOUS TERMINOLOGY System of Rank Dan Gup Jedo Student 1st - 3rd Degree 4th - 6th Degree 7th - 8th Degree 9th Degree Jeja Boosabum Sabum Sahyun Saseong Boosabum nim geh, Kyong ye Sabum nim geh, Kyong ye Sah hyung nim geh, Kyong ye Sah syung nim geh, Kyong ye Sabum Jongyu Simpan Jongyu Taekwon-do Goosung Soonhwan Do Taekwon-do Yoksa Taekwon-Do Chul Hak Chingho wa Kinung Chingho Kubun Him Ui Wolli Bandong Ryok

Bow to the National Instructor Bow to the International Instructor Bow to the Master Bow to the Grand Master Classification of Instructors Classification of Umpire Composition of Taekwon-do Circle of Taekwon-do (In Composition) History of Taekwon-do The philosophy of Taekwon-do Title and Function Distinction of the Turtle Theory of Power Reaction Force

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Concentration Equilibrium Breathe Control Mass Speed Section of the Body Direction of Diagram Toward A Toward B Toward C Toward D Back View Side View Front View Tool Test Demonstration Dynamic Stability Static Stability SECTION High Middle Low Front Side

Jip Joong Kyun Hyung Hohup Jojul Zilyang Sokdo Mom Dungboon Bang Hyang Pyo A - Bang B - Bang C - Bang D - Bang Dwit Mosup Yopmosup Apmosup Boowi Simsa Sibum Dongtchuk Anjong Jungtchuk Anjong DUNGBOON Nopunde Kaunde Najunde Ap Yop
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Back Left Right SPARRING 3-step 2-step 1-step Free Pre-arranged sparring Pre-arranged free sparring Model Sparring SELF-DEFENSE TECHNIQUES How to defend from a grab Defenses against a sudden attack Defense against an arm opponent Throwing and Falling Techniques Against a Dagger Against a Bayonet (Rifle with knife) Against a Club Against a Pole Defence Against a Pistol COMPETITION Rules for Competition Male Female

Dwit Wen Oran MATSOGI Sambo Matsogi Ibo Matsogi Ilbo Matsogi Jayo Matsogi Yaksok Matsogi Yaksok Jayu Matsogi Mobum Matsogi HOSIN SUL Jappyosul Tae Dae Boori Gong Gyok Dae Moogi Dunjigi Wa Torojigi Dae Dando Dae Chong Gum Dae Gonbong Dae Mongdung - I Dae Gwon Chong KYONG GI Kyong Gi Kyu Jong Namja yoja
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Weight Micro Light Middle Heavy Hyper Time allowance Injury Disqualification Fouls Warnings Demerit Points Scoring Vital Spots ACTIONS Attack technique Defence Technique Holding Covering Checking Dodging Stepping Double Stepping Treble Stepping

chegup Aju Jagun Kabyoun Kaunde Mukoun Gajang Khun Shingan Baedang Busang Silkyok Banchik Kyongko Kamjom Dukjom Chejom Ghupso N/B Gong Gyokgi Bang Eau Gi Bachigi Karioogi Mom chugi Pihagi Omgyo Didigi Ibo Omgyo Didigi Sambo Omgyo Didigi
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Shift Stepping Step - stepping Step - turning Jumping Body dropping (dipping) Foot Lilting Sliding Forging Sine Wave Leg Stretching Push Ups MORAL CULTURE Humanity Righteousness Propriety Wisdom Trust Travel Cold Showers and Baths Public Service Etiquette TENETS OF TAEKWON-DO Courtesy Integrity Perseverance

Jajunbal Omgyo Didigi Omgyo Didimyo Jajunbal Omgyo Didimyo Dolgi Twigi Mom Nachugi Bal Dulgi Mikulgi Dollyon Hwalding Pahdo Dari Pyogi Momtong Bachim JUNGSHIN SOOYANG In Ui Ye Ji Shin Yo Haeng Naengsoo Machal Sahwe Bongsa Ye Jol TAEKWON-DO JUNGSHIN Ye Ui Yom chi In Nae
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Self Control Indomitable Spirit The Theory of power Reaction Force Concentration Equilibrium Breathe Control Mass Speed Speed and Reflex

Guk Gi Baekjul Boolgool Him Ui Wolli Bandong Ryok Jip Joong Kyun Hyung Hohup Jojul Zilyang Sokdo Sokdo wa Banung

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BLACK BELT THEORY ANSWERS

1. A thrust goes straight to a target, whilst a strike can come from any direction. Thrusts are only performed using the fingers or the elbow. 2. Three - Do-San, Joong-Gun, Hwa-Rang. 3. Five - Do-San, Yul-Gok, Joong-Gun, Toi-Gye, Choong-Moo. 4. Front (as in no 3 three-step sparring) Back (as in Toi Gye) Downward (aiming for the shoulder) Spinning (as in Do San) Side (as in Choong Moo) 5. Six - Do-San, Won-Hyo and Yul-Gok and Hwa Rang (middle straight), Toi-Gye (low upset and high flat), Choong-Moo (high flat). 6. Won-Hyo (A), Joong-Gun or Toi-Gye (B), Hwa-Rang (C). 7. Reaction force, waist/hip twist, speed, kinetic energy. 8. Gyokpa 9. Yonsok chagi. A consecutive kick is when two or more kicks are executed using the same foot without lowering the leg to the floor. 10.Honap chagi. A combination kick is when both feet are used to execute two or more kicks in succession while jumping or flying. 11. Downward (axe) kick (naeryo chagi) Reverse turning kick (bandae dollyo chagi) Hooking kick (golcha chagi) 12. Philtrum (injoong) Mandibular joint (tok gwanjol) Point of jaw (mit tok) Eyes (angoo) Adam's apple (gyol hoo) 13. Sternum (hyung gol) Solar plexus (myong chi) Kidneys (kongpat) Floating ribs (nuk gol) Stomach /abdomen (bokboo)

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14.

Coccyx (migol) Groin (sataguni) Instep (baldung) Knee (moorup) Shin (jong kwaeng-i)

15.

1 Hanna 2 Dool 3 Seth 4 Neth 5 Dasaul 6 Yosaul 7 Ilgop 8 Yodoll 9 Ahop 10 Yoll 16.For power and penetration. 17.Flowering Youth - Hwa (Flower) Rang (Young man). 18.Nine 19. Dave Oliver Michael Dew Don Atkins Ron Sergiew Paul Donnelly Kenny Walton Brian Towndrow Gianni Peros 20. Dave Oliver (Chairman of TAGB) Michael Dew (Vice Chairman of TAGB and Chairman of BTC) Don Atkins (National Secretary) Ron Sergiew (Treasurer) Paul Donnelly (Liaison Officer) Kenny Walton (National Coach) 21.Tae Kwon-Do was inaugurated in South Korea on 11 April 1955 by Gen Choi Hong Hi. 22.Tae Kwon-Do was introduced to Great Britain in 1967 by Master Rhee Ki Ha. 23.The TAGB was formed in August 1983. 24.The BTC was formed on 21st April 1988 and is recognised by the Sports Council (Sport UK) as the only governing body for Tae Kwon-Do in the UK. The TAGB is a founder member of the BTC.

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25.Tae Kwon-Do International was created on 13 November 1993 and is a worldwide body with representation on every continent. TKDI is a non political organisation open to all styles of Tae Kwon-Do. 26.The year the Holy Dan Gun founded Korea. 27.Admiral Yi was posthumously awarded the title of Choong Moo (man of loyalty and chivalry) for his victories over the Japanese navy. In 1592 he invented the first armoured battleship, known as the Kobukson. 28.To symbolise Choong Moo's regrettable death, having no chance to show his unrestrained potential checked by the forced reservation of his loyalty to the king, (he refused to obey an order to intercept the Japanese fleet, which he knew to be a trap). 29.Ahn Joong Gun was the patriot who assassinated Hiro Bumi Ito, the first Japanese Governor General of Korea. He was executed at Lui Shung prison in 1910. 30.The 29 movements refer to the 29th Infantry Division where Tae Kwon-Do developed into maturity. 31. It's the year the noted monk Won Hyo introduced Buddhism into the Silla dynasty. 32. Yi Hwang was a 16th century authority on Neo-Confucianism, as stated in the pattern Toi Gye - (his pen name). 33.Ahn Ch'ang Ho devoted his entire life to furthering the education of Korea and its independence movement. His pseudonym was Do San. 34. The 38 movements refer to Yul Gok's birthplace on the 38 degree latitude. 35.It is the latitude that divides North and South Korea. 36.Yi I was a great philosopher and scholar (1536-1584) who was nicknamed the `Confucius of Korea'. His pseudonym was Yul Gok. 37.You would perform a kick using your toes only if you were wearing shoes or footwear. 38.Both mean back, dung refers to a part of the body e.g. reverse, as in sonkal dung (reverse Knife hand), Dwit refres to the direction, as in dwit palkup tugi (back elbow thrust) 39.Stances help to develop strong leg muscles and provide a stable base from which to execute techniques. 40.Nothing - they are both the same. 41.Butjaba moorup chagi. 42.Sonbadak (palm), then grabbing with bandal son (archand). 43.Sonkal dung (reverse knife-hand) then grabbing with bandal son (archand). 44.It is the direction of strike in relation to the body, i.e. towards the back or side. 45.This is defined by whichever leg bears the most weight, or if evenly distributed, whichever leg is forward. 46.Walking stance and Low stance (50:50), L-stance (70:30), X-stance and Rear foot stance (80:20) 47.The extended arm is used to grab and pull the opponent in, as a reaction force. It is also in the ready position to defend the body against another attack. 48.The student. 49.Grand Master Rhee Ki Ha (9th Dan). 50.Straight. 51.It is a sweeping block where the rear arm supports the main blocking arm against a heavy attack. The rear arm also protects the mid section and is in a position to perform a low block against a second attack.

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52.Circular block is a combined block against a low kick and middle attack. The block is first used to scoop the attacking leg and throw the opponent off balance, then to block a following middle attack. 53.Silla, Baek Je and Koguryo. 54.Silla conquered Koguryo and Baek Je unifying the three kingdoms in 668 AD. 55.The Yi Dynasty was formed in 1392 AD after the fall of the Koryo Dynasty. 56.One arm is deflecting an attack and is then in a ready position to defend the body whilst the other is performing a straight fingertip thrust. 57.A twin block is a defence against two attackers, and a double block is a defence against one attacker. 58.Knifehand side strike, (sonkal yop taerigi) Knifehand front strike (sonkal ap taerigi) Downward knifehand strike (naeryo sonkal taerigi) Inward knifehand strike (anuro sonkal taerigi) Outward knifehand strike (bakuro sonkal taerigi) 59.High flat fingertip thrust to the throat/eyes (nopunde opun sonkut tulgi) Middle straight fingertip thrust to the solar plexus (kaunde sun sonkut tulgi) Low upset fingertip thrust to the groin (najunde dwijibo sonkut tulgi) 60. An inner Bakat outer anuro inward bakuro outward wi upper ollyo upwards ap front dwit back bandae reverse baro obverse najunde low kaunde middle nopunde high orun right wen left apro kaggi forwards dwiyro kaggi backwards dwiyro torro - about turn dolgi - turn 61.It is used to focus your attack and simulates holding the opponent's head to which you are striking. 62.If the hand is deflected upwards by the attacker (i.e. by a kick), it can be rotated to perform a forefist punch. The hand will also not be in a position to be bent backwards by a kick. 63.Because of the inherent strength and close proximity of the bone to the surface of the skin, causing pain to the opponent on impact.

64.
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65.

Front elbow strike (ap palkup taerigi) Side elbow thrust (yop palkup tulgi) Upper elbow strike (wi paluk taerigi) Back elbow thrust (dwit palkup tulgi) Straight elbow downward thrust (sun palkup naeryo tulgi) Double elbow strike (jau palkuk taerigi)

Front kick (ap chagi) ball of the foot Side kick (yop chagi) footsword Turning kick (dollyo chagi) ball of the foot or instep Back kick (dwit chagi) footsward Reverse turning kick (bandae dollyo chagi) heel Downward (axe) kick (naeryo chagi) heel Crescent kick (bandal chagi) footsword (outward) or sole of the foot (inward) Twist kick (bituro chagi) ball of the foot Pressing kick (noollo chagi) footsword Side pushing kick (yop cha milgi) footsword 66.Doo bandal son makgi - used as a checking block to the sternum or to block a thrown object. 67.Soopyong jirugi - the purpose is to defend against two attackers, using a turning punch (dollyo jirugi) for one coming at close range, and a side punch (yop jirugi) for the other at a middle distance. 68.Gutcha makgi - it is used to block a middle punch and to break the elbow joint. 69. Chon Ji - represents the beginning of human history - therefore whatever goals we reach in our everyday life, we should not forget that we all started out as beginners. Dan Gun - legendary founder of Korea - inspirational. Do San - patriot who devoted his entire life to furthering the education of Korea and its independence movement, thus showing indomitable spirit and loyalty to his country. Won Hyo - introduced Buddhism into the Silla dynasty, therefore had the perseverance and indomitable spirit to break with the traditional ideology of the time. Yul Gok - philosopher and scholar who was nicknamed `Confucius of Korea', challenging the thinking of the time and showing his integrity in maintaining his beliefs. Joong Gun - patriot who risked his own life by assassinating the Japanese Governor General of Korea, therefore showed loyalty to his cause and his country. Toi Gye - philosopher and scholar who was an authority on Neo-Confucianism, challenging the thinking of the time and showing his integrity in maintaining his beliefs. Hwa Rang Flowering Youth Group who were instrumental in unifying the three kingdoms of Korea, showing their loyalty to their king and country, and indomitable spirit through their motto Never to Retreat in War Choong Moo - great admiral and inventor who died before he could achieve his full potential constrained by his loyalty to king and country. Kwang Gae - King Kwang Gae-T'o Wang, who was responsible for the recovery and expansion of territories once owned by Korea, therefore shows indomitable spirit,
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perseverance and loyalty to his subjects. Po Eun - great poet and scientist who showed loyalty to his king and country and gave them inspiration through his poetry. Ge Baek - known for his strict military discipline which might result in courtesy, perseverance and indomitable spirit in the armies. 70.A pattern is a set of fundamental movements, mainly attack and defence, set in a logical sequence to deal with one or more imaginary opponents. Patterns are an indication of a student's progress - a barometer in evaluating an individual's progress. 71.We practise patterns to improve our Tae Kwon-Do techniques, to develop sparring techniques, to improve flexibility of movement, master body shifting, develop muscles, balance and breath control. Patterns also enable us to acquire techniques which cannot be obtained from other forms of training. 72.The interpretation gives a pattern a meaning, each pattern is based on a historic moment in Korean history, where legendary figures showed loyalty, dedication and even gave their lives to make significant changes to their country. We learn interpretations of patterns to gain inspiration from the events and people portrayed in the meanings. 73.Master Don Atkins, 7th Dan. 74.15 June 2002. He was laid to rest on 17 June at Pyongyang. 75.Loyalty and Humility, because loyalty to their cause has been demonstrated by the patriots, scholars and philosophers in the meaning of the patterns. Humility is necessary to avoid aggression and shows respect for others. 76.Force = mass x acceleration (F = MA) Kinetic Energy = _ x mass x velocity x velocity (KE = _ MV2) The energy available in a technique depends on the mass and the square of the velocity. Speed (velocity) is therefore more important than mass in promoting power. We cannot change our mass, but we can increase our speed through training. 77.Energy from motion 78.Um Yang which means Oppositesas in the hard and soft sides of Tae Kwon-Do or the martial aspect versus the philosophical perspective. 79.To block a blow to the head and be in a position to grab the opponent or weapon with both hands. 80.It depends on the direction of travel for the following move. In Dan Gun the next move is forwards into nopunde ap joomuk jirugi, but in Do San, the side strike is repeated along the same direction of travel. 81.To create tension, ready to guard the body from an attack. Bringing the elbows down sharply may also help deflect an oncoming attack. 82.Tae Kwon-Do is a Korean military martial art, developed by General Choi Hong Hi in 1955. Loosely translated it means Foot Fist Art. `Tae' means to jump, smash or kick with the feet and `Kwon' to punch, strike with the hand and `Do' is a way of life - or a philosophy to live your life by. 83.Taek Kyon, Shotokan Karate and Subak. 84.Taek Kyon was an early Korean form of self-defence. Tomb paintings dating back to 50BC show men practising forms known as Taek Kyon from which Tae Kwon-Do developed. 85.Throat, eyes and philtrum. 86.To maintain balance and co-ordination and to continue to improve.
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87.Because they are only attached to the spine and are unsupported at the front/side, and therefore weak. 88.Sliding. 89.To demonstrate the power in the technique and to show commitment. 90.To practise defence techniques in as realistic a way as possible, to practise speed and reaction to an attack. 91.The black trim is symbolic, as in ancient Korea the colour black signified the highest position, i.e. royalty and the aristocracy. 92.Three - Won Hyo, Yul Gok, Choong Moo 93.Dolgi 94.Doro chagi - to defend against a kick to the groin. It can also be used to stamp. 95. Head Mori Arm - Pal Hand Son Foot - Bal Chest Gasum Eye Angoo 96.'Base of knifehand' and `thumb ridge' 97. The TAGB is the largest organisation of its type in Europe with over 450 clubs and around 20,000 members. It has over 20 years' experience as an organisation run with the expertise of a longstanding Committee. The instructors are all experienced who use a carefully worked out syllabus. It is a non-political organisation and in 1988 was a founder member of the British Tae Kwon-Do Council. 98.Koguryo. 99.In Won Hyo, it is performed in fixed-stance moving only the front foot with a body shift (milagi). In Hwa Rang it is performed in fixed-stance while sliding both feet forward (mikulgi). 100. Jungshin 101. Courtesy - Ye ui Integrity - Yom chi Perseverance - In nae Self control - Guk gi Indomitable spirit - Baekjul boolgool 102. There is no set answer for this question, the examiner is looking to understand your personal motivations. 103. There is no set answer for this question, the examiner is looking to understand your personal motivations. 104. There is no set answer for this question, the examiner is looking to understand your personal motivations. 105. Inward block refers to the direction of travel of the block, from the outside towards the centre of the defenders body. Inside block refers to the part of the opponent's body that is blocked i.e. the block connects with the inside of the opponents arm or leg.

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106. Using knife hand allows the defender to follow up the block with a grab if necessary. The force of a block is also applied to a very small area, allowing the defender to injure the opponent. 107. No, Saju jirugi is a fundamental exercise, not a pattern main reason ist that it has no historical reference. 108. Turning Kick - Dollyo Chagi Front kick - Ap Chagi Twistinf kick - Bituro Chagi 45 degree kick - Beet Chagi 109. Fore fist - Ap joomuk Side fist - Yop joomuk Back fist - Dung joomuk Palm Sonbadak Knife hand Sonkal Fingertip Sonkut Fore knuckle fist - Inji joomuk Middle knuckle fist - Joongji joomuk Thumb knuckle fist - Umji joomuk Inner forearm - An palmok Outer forearm - Bakat palmok Back forearm - Dung palmok Under forearm - Mit palmok Elbow Palkup 110. Side piercing kick uses the foot sword as the striking tool and side thrusting kick uses the ball of the foot. 111. Jappyosol tae 112. WTF (World Taekwondo Federation) style TKD concentrates on the sport side of Tae Kwon-Do and is recognised as an Olympic sport. Competitors wear chest protectors but no gloves and sparring is full contact with no punches allowed to the head. The WTF is actively supported by the South Korean government. ITF (International Tae Kwon-Do Federation) style TKD concentrates on the self defence aspect of Tae Kwon-Do. Competition sparring is semi-contact with punches and kicks allowed to the head and body and competitors wear both gloves and feet padding. Until recently the ITF was actively supported by the North Korean government. TAGB style TKD is very similar to ITF, but the TAGB is an independent martial art organisation. 113. In turning punch the fist finishes in line with the centre of the body and in angle punch the fist finishes in line with the opposite shoulder. 114. The colours white, yellow, green, blue, red and black represent all of the belt colours in Tae Kwon-Do, which are based on the colours used in ancient Korea to indicate rank and status. 115. Hechyo makgi. This block is used to defend against twin fist vertical punch, or against an opponent attempting to grab the throat with both hands

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116. Bandal chagi uses the foot to block an attack and can be used if the arms are injured or if the opponent is further away. 117. Sahyun. Black belts ranked 7th and 8th Dan are entitled to use this title in recognition of their extensive knowledge and experience of Tae Kwon-Do. 118. Palm pressing block is used to check a low section front kick. This block is always accompanied by a palm upward block used to defend against a middle punch. It is often performed in patterns as a conditioning exercise i.e. as a slow motion movement. 119. Confucianism is the ethical system of the Chinese philosopher, Confucius who was born in approximately 552BC. It is not a religion that is based on the worship of a supernatural power, more a collection of teachings emphasising devotion to the family, morality and the proper exercise of political power. 120. Neo-Confucianism was developed in China around the 11th century AD and is essentially a reinterpretation of Confucian teachings to incorporate metaphysical aspects i.e. the nature of reality and man's relationship with the universe. The most noted exponent of Neo Confucianism was the 12th century Chinese philosopher Chu Hsi, but Yi I and Yi Hwang of Korea also contributed many works.

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