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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Weekend Nov. 2-3, 2013 Vol XII, Edition 66
AIRPORT ATTACK
STATE PAGE 5
HILLSDALE
DOWNS COLTS
SPORTS PAGE 11
GUNMAN KILLS TSA OFFICER AT LAX,WOUNDS TWO OTHERS
Study urges
changes to
prison law
Recommendations would relieve
burden from California counties
By Don Thompson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO A study of Gov.
Jerry Browns 2-year-old prison realign-
ment law released Friday recommends
major changes that would relieve some of
the burden from Californias counties.
Under the law, lower-level offenders are
sent to county jails instead of state pris-
ons, sometimes for lengthy sentences.
When theyre released, theyre supervised by local proba-
tion ofcers instead of state parole agents.
The study by the Stanford Criminal Justice Center recom-
mends capping county jail sentences at three years and hav-
Foster Farms and Costco
sued over tainted chicken
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Foster Farms brand chicken sold at two Costco stores in
San Mateo County led to salmonella poisoning and hospi-
talization, according to two separate lawsuits led against
the two companies in recent weeks.
The latest suit, led Thursday by Sally A. Claverie in San
Mateo County Superior Court, argues Foster Farms placed
the defense of its reputation ahead of concern for consumer
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Every year, YouTube honors
those who are in line to be the
next superstars in education and
this year one of the winners was
Stanford Universitys Alex
Dainis.
Dainis, who hails from
Manseld, Mass. and received her
undergraduate degree from
Brandeis University in 2011 ,
recently began a Ph.D. program in
genetics at Stanford. San Bruno-
based YouTube also recently
named her one of its superstar
teachers because of her weekly
Bite Sci-zed videos.
Its really exciting, she said.
It was kind of a surprise to me. I
had no idea they were going to do
that.
Before deciding to go back and
get another degree, she worked as
an associate producer for Richard
Lewis Media Group.
I missed talking to people
about science on day-to-day basis,
so I started Bite Sci-zed, said
Dainis, 24.
Her YouTube channel used to
include weekly videos, but she
hasnt had as much time to post
them since beginning her Ph.D.
program this fall.
My videos revolve around ques-
tions like why do we get motion
sickness? she said. There are
daily questions about the world
that pop up in my life.
Some other ideas for her
YouTube videos often come from
conversations shes having with
YouTube teaching star begins Ph.D. at Stanford
Alex Dainis runs a show called Bite Sci-zed
Stanfords Alex Dainis has been named a YouTube Superstar Teacher
because of her series Bite Sci-zed.
Second violinist Debbie Passanisi, center, has been in the Peninsula Symphony for 41 years.
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
With the news earlier this month
that $500,000 had gone missing from
the Peninsula Symphony of Northern
California, a Burlingame woman is
helping lead the effort to rebuild the
group.
Burlingames Debbie Passanisi has
been with the symphony since 1972.
She began playing violin when she
was in the fourth grade at Roosevelt
Elementary School in Burlingame and
continued playing at Burlingame
Intermediate School, Burlingame High
School and at University of
California, Davis where she studied
English literature. Now she is princi-
pal second violin and an orchestra rep-
resentative to the Board of Directors.
The rst shows of the season, that
opened the weekend of Oct. 25, were
bittersweet for the symphony, which
lost almost its entire budget, Passanisi
said.
We love playing together, but we
dont know the future, she said. Alot
of people have rallied behind us.
For now, the group is fundraising
and calling past patrons to ask for
donations. Passanisi even wrote a let-
ter asking for community support. To
date, the symphony has raised around
$220,000, said Mitchell Klein, music
director and symphony conductor.
I am honored and privileged to play
with my fellow musicians in the
Peninsula Symphony under Maestro
Klein, who is a figure of towering
achievement and gentle sensitivity,
she wrote. At this moment, it feels
like the end of world. Please help us
continue to be the messengers of the
Woman helps rebuild symphony
Groups funds went missing at the beginning of October
Jerry Brown
See LAW, Page 23
See LAWSUIT, Page 18
See DAINIS, Page 23
See MUSIC, Page 18
FOR THE RECORD 2 Weekend Nov. 2-3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
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Rapper Nelly is 39.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1948
President Truman surprised the
experts by winning a narrow upset
over Republican challenger Thomas
E. Dewey.
If I have any beliefs about immortality,
it is that certain dogs I have known will
go to heaven, and very, very few persons.
James Thurber (1894-1961)
Political
commentator
Patrick Buchanan
is 75.
Country singer
Erika Jo is 27.
Birthdays
REUTERS
Big-wave surfer Garrett McNamara of the United States drops in on a large wave at Praia do Norte, in Nazar, Portugal.
Saturday: Sunny in the morning then
becoming partly cloudy. Highs in the
upper 50s. Light winds...Becoming west
5 to 10 mph in the afternoon.
Saturday night: Partly cloudy in the
evening then becoming clear. Lows in the
upper 40s. Northwest winds 10 to 20
mph.
Sunday: Sunny. Highs in the mid 50s. Northwest winds 10
to 20 mph.
Sunday ni ght: Mostly clear. Lows in the mid 40s.
Northwest winds around 20 mph...Becoming 10 to 15 mph
after midnight.
Monday: Sunny. Highs in the upper 50s.
Monday night and Tuesday: Mostly clear. Lows in the
upper 40s. Highs in the upper 50s.
Local Weather Forecast
In 1783, Gen. George Washington issued his Farewell Orders
to the Armies of the United States near Princeton, New Jersey.
In 1795, the 11th president of the United States, James Knox
Polk, was born in Mecklenburg County, N.C.
In 1865, the 29th president of the United States, Warren
Gamaliel Harding, was born near Corsica, Ohio.
In 1889, North Dakota and South Dakota became the 39th
and 40th states.
In 1917, British Foreign Secretary Arthur Balfour issued a
declaration expressing support for a national home for the
Jews in Palestine.
In 1947, Howard Hughes piloted his huge wooden ying
boat, the Hughes H-4 Hercules (dubbed the Spruce Goose by
detractors), on its only ight, which lasted about a minute
over Long Beach Harbor in California.
In 1959, game show contestant Charles Van Doren admitted
to a House subcommittee that hed been given questions and
answers in advance when he appeared on the NBC-TVprogram
Twenty-One.
In 1962, President John F. Kennedy delivered a brief state-
ment to the nation in which he said that aerial photographs
had conrmed that Soviet missile bases in Cuba were being
dismantled, and that progress is now being made toward the
restoration of peace in the Caribbean.
In 1963, South Vietnamese President Ngo Dihn Diem was
assassinated in a military coup.
In 1976, former Georgia Gov. Jimmy Carter became the rst
candidate from the Deep South since the Civil War to be elect-
ed president as he defeated incumbent Gerald R. Ford.
In 1979, black militant JoAnne Chesimard escaped from a
New Jersey prison, where shed been serving a life sentence
for the 1973 slaying of New Jersey state trooper Werner
Foerster.
Phobophobia is a fear of developing a
phobia.
***
The rst ice cube tray was patented in
1932. The stainless steel tray exed
sideways to eject the ice cubes. It cost
50 cents.
***
The oldest shoe in existence is the
sandal. Sandals made of woven
papyrus were discovered in an
Egyptian tomb from 2000 B.C.
***
The only woman to be pictured on a
U.S. currency note was Martha
Washington (1731-1802). Her por-
trait was on the $1 silver certicates
printed from 1886 to 1891.
***
Chopsticks, the piano music, was
originally called the Celebrated Chop
Waltz when it was written by 16-year-
old Euphemia Allen (1861-1949) in
1877. The British girl composed the
tune using the pseudonym Arthur de
Lulli.
***
There are no ants in Antarctica. Ants
live on every other continent.
***
Do you know what Melvil Dewey
(1851-1931) is famous for? See
answer at end.
***
The Vietnam Veterans Memorial in
Washington, D.C., lists 58,209
names of those who died during the
war. The names are engraved on pol-
ished black granite walls that are 493
feet long.
***
Baby carrots, sold pre-packaged as
snacks, are actually regular carrots cut
into two inch pieces and shaved down
The worlds rst crossword puzzle was
printed as a mental exercise in the
Sunday edition of the New York World
in 1913. It was so popular that by the
early 1920s every major newspaper in
America featured its own crossword
puzzle.
***
The largest manufacturer of playing
marbles is Vacor de Mexico. The com-
pany makes 90 percent of the worlds
marbles. More than 12 million little
glass balls are produced each day.
***
Charles Dickens (1812-1870) claimed
that his rst love was ctional Little
Red Riding Hood. He thought that he
would have known perfect bliss if he
could have married her.
***
Some oxymorons: quiet storm, steel
wool, deliberate mistake, mud bath.
***
The rst Gap store was opened in San
Francisco in 1969. Today the interna-
tional company has their world head-
quarters in San Francisco.
***
The term horsepower was rst coined
by Scottish engineer James Watt
(1736-1819) who invented a steam
engine. One unit of horsepower equals
33,000 foot-pounds per minute.
***
The most common rst letter of sur-
names in the United States is S.
However, there has never been a presi-
dent of the United States that has had a
last name starting with the letter S.
***
The largest and most complete skele-
ton of a Tyrannosaurus rex is on dis-
play at the Field Museum in Chicago.
The skeleton is 13 feet high and 42
feet long. The bones were discovered
in South Dakota in 1990. The skele-
ton is referred to as Sue, named after
the fossil hunter Sue Hendrickson
(born 1949) who discovered the
bones.
***
Answer: He was an American librari-
an that developed the Dewey Decimal
System. While working as a librarian
at Amherst College in 1876, Dewey
developed the classification system
for books; books are put in general
categories and designated with num-
bers from 000-999. The number after
the decimal point designates more
specic subjects.
Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
the weekend and Wednesday editions of the
Daily Journal. Questions? Comments?
Email knowitall(at)smdailyjournal.com or
(Answers Monday)
VOUCH DOUSE HECKLE SLEIGH
Yesterdays
Jumbles:
Answer: When he got the bill for their extravagant lob-
ster meal, he was SHELL SHOCKED
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
LANPK
SEUSG
SECCAS
SCHNET
2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
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Answer
here:
Singer Jay Black (Jay and the Americans) is 75. Actress
Stefanie Powers is 71. Author Shere (shehr) Hite is 71. Rock
musician Keith Emerson (Emerson, Lake and Palmer) is 69.
Country-rock singer-songwriter J.D. Souther is 68. Actress
Kate Linder is 66. Rock musician Carter Beauford (The Dave
Matthews Band) is 56. Actor Peter Mullan is 54. Singer-song-
writer k.d. lang is 52. Rock musician Bobby Dall (Poison) is
50. Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Lynn Nottage is 49.
Actress Lauren Velez is 49. Actor David Schwimmer is 47.
Christian/jazz singer Alvin Chea (Take 6) is 46.
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Lucky Charms,
No. 12, in rst place; California Classic, No. 5, in
second place;and Gold Rush,No.1,in third place.
The race time was clocked at 1:46.80.
4 5 0
32 35 49 62 67 1
Mega number
Nov. 1 Mega Millions
2 36 40 49 54 10
Powerball
Oct. 30 Powerball
1 13 17 18 19
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
8 6 6 2
Daily Four
8 1 5
Daily three evening
3 12 33 44 47 22
Mega number
Oct. 30 Super Lotto Plus
3
Weekend Nov. 2-3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
SAN MATEO
Mi s cel l aneous. A woman reported that
her roommate misplaced her money on the
800 block of North Humboldt Street
before 10:31 p.m. Wednesday, Oct 31.
Theft. Approximately $500 in cash was
stolen from several lockers and purses at
the 900 block of Alameda de las Pulgas
before 8:30 a.m. Wednesday, Oct. 30.
Indecent exposure . Aman was reported
to have been exposing himself outside of
an office on the 800 block of Airport
Street before 7:55 p.m. Monday, Oct. 28.
Thef t. A report of stolen credit cards
being used at several stores on the
Peninsula was made on the 2200 block of
Bridgepointe Parkway before 4:28 p.m.
on Monday, Oct. 28.
MILLBRAE
Pet t y t hef t . A stolen license plate was
found on the 500 block of Magnolia
Avenue before 4 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 31.
Burglary . An arrest was made for a bur-
glary on the first block of El Camino Real
before 11:39 a.m. Monday, Oct. 26.
Pet t y t hef t. A man that was found to
have an active warrant was arrested for
petty theft on the 500 block of El Camino
Real before 5:41 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct.
29.
Police reports
He needed a lot of help
A man went into Costco and asked for
help to detox at Metro Center Boulevard
in Foster City before 7:50 p.m. on
Tuesday, Oct. 29.
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
The former president of a Daly City chari-
ty pleaded no contest to felony embezzle-
ment for reportedly taking approximately
$68,000 and gambling it away betting on
horse races.
Ruperto Reyes, 74, faces up to 10 months
jail on the charge when sentenced Dec. 12.
Reyes spent 12 years from August 2000
to June 2012 heading the nonprofit Luzon
Visayas Mindanao Association, a Filipino-
American organization intended to provide
aid to local community members, accord-
ing to the San Mateo
County District
Attorneys Office.
The group raised around
$73,000 over the years
but only distributed
around $5,000. When
other board members at
the nonprot began ask-
ing to see the books ear-
lier this year, Reyes
allegedly delayed them and made excuses. In
early 2012, board members discovered that
a bank account that should have held around
$68,000 contained only $19.
When confronted, Reyes apologized and
promised to pay the money back, but only
paid $2,500, prosecutors said.
After board members went to police,
detectives determined that Reyes had used
the accounts ATM card 188 times to make
withdrawals at the Jockey Club in San
Mateo.
Reyes remains free from custody on his
own recognizance pending sentencing.
Ex-charity head takes embezzlement deal
Ruperto Reyes
By Terry Collins
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND Bay Area Rapid Transits
two largest unions voted Friday on a tenta-
tive contract agreement after a bitter labor
dispute prompted two strikes.
More than 2,300 members of Service
Employees International Union Local 1021
and Amalgamated Transit Union Local 1555
voted on whether to approve a new four-
year contract that includes a 15 percent
raise and improved safety conditions.
The agreement also requires BART work-
ers to pay into their pensions for the rst
time and increases their monthly health
care contributions from about $92 to $129.
The unions represent train operators, sta-
tion agents, custodians and maintenance
and clerical workers.
The vote also comes nearly two weeks
after the unions reached a deal with BART
management that ended months of tortured
talks over salary, benets and safety condi-
tions. The unions went on strike for nearly
ve days in July and after a state-mandated
cooling off-period, went back to the picket
lines for another four days last month
angering thousands of commuters.
During the second strike, two BART
workers killed by a train operated by an
employee under training in Walnut Creek
on Oct. 19 which many believe drew the
parties back to the bargaining table to
nally iron out a deal a couple of days later.
SEIU said they will announce its voting
results late Friday.
Weve already gotten an amazing
turnout. Weve had members waiting in line
getting ready to vote early this morning,
SEIU spokeswoman Cecille Isidro said.
Were optimistic they will approve it.
ATU President Antonette Bryant shared a
similar view Friday.
I think the members will come down and
make their choice, Bryant said. Our exec-
utive board is recommending a yes vote,
but it remains to see what the members
choices are.
If the two unions ratify the contract,
BARTs board of directors would likely then
vote on the new contract during a special
meeting, BARTofcials have said.
Bay Area Rapid Transits unions
vote on contract that ended strike
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4
Weekend Nov. 2-3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
Carolyn M. Browne
Carolyn M. Browne, born May
14, 1941, died Oct. 26, 2013, at
her home at the age of 72.
She was a res-
ident of
Millbrae.
She was born
in San
Francisco and
attended St.
Joan of Arc
C a t h o l i c
School then
Capuchino High School where she
met and married her high school
sweetheart. Carolyn was a devoted
wife, mother and grandmother who
loved her family, friends and ani-
mals. She worked in the banking
industry for 35 years and loved
working at the Unique Bride.
Survived by her devoted husband
of 53 years, Bill Browne; three
daughters Joanne Browne
Galentine, Lisa Browne and Kim
Cline; two granddaughters
Kaileigh and Kourtney Cline; sis-
ter, Blanche Hanna; sons-in-law
Lee Galentine and Dan Cline; and
puppy Cody. She is also survived
by numerous nieces, nephews,
aunts, uncles, cousins, brothers
and sisters-in-law. Carolyn was
preceded in death by her parents
Frank and Irene Vidulich and niece
Angela Hanna.
Carolyns family wishes to
thank the professionals at Kaiser
Hospital and Hospice South San
Francisco.
In lieu of flowers, donations
may be made to Scleroderma
Foundation, Pulmonary
Hypertension Association or
Peninsula Humane Society.
A funeral mass will be 10:30
a.m. Thursday, Nov. 7 at St.
Roberts Church, San Bruno.
Processional to Holy Cross
Cemetery in Colma immediately
following the mass.
Ernestine Hall
Ernestine Hall died Oct. 30,
2013, at her home in South San
Francisco at the
age of 81.
She was pre-
ceded in death
by her husband
Albert Donald
Hall and is sur-
vived by her
cousin Carol
(Lou). Auntie
Tootsie to Joe (Stacey), Rob
(Georgia), Chris (Debbie) and
Steve (William); her grandnieces
and grandnephews Nikole, Karlie,
Dominic, Lucy, Olivia and
Charlie; and dear friend Carolyn
(Cheryl). She leaves behind her
two beloved cats Missy and
Rusty.
She was born in San Francisco
and attended Galileo High School.
Together with her husband Don,
she was the proud owner of Halls
Ice Cream Shop in South San
Francisco.
She was a caring friend who
will be missed by all.
Friends and family are invited to
visit Tuesday, Nov. 5 beginning at
4 p.m. with a 7 p.m. vigil service
at the Chapel of the Highlands,
194 Millwood Drive at El Camino
Real in Millbrae. The funeral mass
will be celebrated 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday, Nov. 6 at the Good
Shepherd Church, 901 Oceana
Blvd., Pacica. Committal to fol-
low at Holy Cross Catholic
Cemetery in Colma.
Donations in Mrs. Halls memo-
ry may be made to a favorite chari-
ty of choice.
Obituaries
By Michele Kayal
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Is a meal without Sriracha worth
eating? Its a quandary that recent-
ly took on real and scary propor-
tions for fans of the wildly per-
haps even weirdly popular
tangy Thai hot sauce.
Sriracha lovers had a near miss
this week when a judge rejected a
Southern California citys bid to
shut down production at the
Irwindale facility. Residents had
complained that the pungent odor
of peppers and garlic coming from
the Huy Fong Foods plant gave
them headaches, burned their
throats and made their eyes water.
If we did lose Sriracha, it would
be a bigger crisis than having an
oil shortage, joked kind of
Edward Lee, who plies Asian-
inected Southern cuisine at 610
Magnolia in Louisville, Ky.
People would riot in the streets.
So far, the streets are clear. But it
never hurts to be prepared.
Sriracha is a puree of ripe, red
jalapeno peppers, sugar, salt,
vinegar and garlic. But many simi-
lar and some would say superior
sauces are widely available in
ethnic markets, mainstream super-
markets or online.
SAMBAL OELEK
A chunky condiment of vinegar
and lightly ground chilies, think
of sambal oelek as Sriracha with-
out the pureeing (or the garlic).
Sambal delivers a big blast of heat,
and works well on any food in need
of spice.
The avor on it is very clean,
says Scott Drewno, executive chef
at The Source in Washington,
D.C., where he uses it in stir-fries,
dipping sauces and dozens of other
preparations. You can use it hot,
cold, he says. If the world didnt
have Sriracha, it would denitely
be the next thing.
GOCHUJANG
Drewno also is a big fan of
gochujang, a Korean paste of
chilies and fermented soy beans.
Less assertive than other chili
pastes, gochujang offers a salty,
savory component similar to
miso, with just a hint of heat.
I use that rampantly, Drewno
says. You get that umami, that
depth, that haunting resonating
flavor profile. Drewno said he
smears gochujang on grilled steak
and other meats, or sometimes uses
it as a marinade with rice vinegar,
sesame oil and a pinch of sugar. It
rocks as a rub for roast chicken,
and does a ne job of adding depth
and heat to chili.
CHIPOTLES IN ADOBO
Like Sriracha, chipotles are made
from ripe, red jalapenos. The ripe
chilies are picked, dried, then
smoked to create chipotles. The
dried peppers then are pickled in
adobo, a tomato-based sauce
spiked with vinegar, herbs and
sometimes other dried chilies.
They have that same wild mix
as Sriracha, where its sweet, its
spicy, its tangy, says Pati Jinich,
author of Patis Mexican Table:
The Secrets of Real Mexican Home
Cooking. Thats what drives
people crazy.
Sriracha shortage panic?
There are tons of options
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND A car re in the
tunnel that links Oakland to other
east San Francisco Bay area com-
munities has sent motorists
streaming out of their cars on foot
and eight people to the hospital
to be treated for minor smoke
inhalation.
California Highway Patrol Ofcer
Daniel Hill said the re that broke
out in an eastbound lane of the
Caldecott Tunnel Friday morning
was extinguished within an hour.
Hill says ofcials used the tun-
nels ventilation system to clear the
thick smoke that lled the channel
and were able to allow trafc back
through once drivers returned to
their abandoned vehicles.
Oakland Fire Department
Battalion Chief Robert Lipp says
six children and two adults were
taken to area hospitals.
In 1982, a re in the Caldecott
Tunnel caused by a collision
between a gas tanker and several
other vehicles left seven people
dead.
Fire closes East Bay tunnel as drivers flee smoke
5
Weekend Nov. 2-3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
STATE
Open Gym Clinics
Fridays, 6:00-7:30 PM
ages 12s, 13s, & 14s
Sundays:
4:30-6:00 PM ages 11 & under
development/12 & under competitive
6:00-7:30 PM: ages 13s & 14s
7:30-9:00 PM, high school girls 15s+.
Tryouts
November 2nd & 3rd
at Paye's Place in San Carlos
Times & preregistration available
on our web site:
www.payeselitevolleyball.net
All events are hosted at Paye's Place:
595 Industrial Road, San Carlos CA 94070
888.616.6349
Reachyour potential withour girls volleyball programs
By Tami Abdollah and Pustin Pritchard
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES A man carrying a note
that said he wanted to kill TSA pulled a
semi-automatic rie from a bag and shot his
way past a security checkpoint at Los
Angeles International Airport on Friday,
killing one Transportation Security
Administration ofcer and wounding two
others, authorities said.
The gunman was wounded in a shootout
with airport police and taken into custody,
authorities said. His condition was not dis-
closed.
The attack at the nations third-busiest air-
port sent terried travelers running for cover
and disrupted more than 700 ights across
the U.S., many of which were held on the
ground at LAX or not allowed to take off for
Los Angeles from other airports.
The slain security worker was the rst TSA
ofcer killed in the line of duty in the 12-year
history of the agency, which was founded in
the aftermath of 9/11.
The FBI and Los Angeles Airport Police
identied the gunman as Paul Ciancia, 23, of
Pennsville, N.J. He had apparently been liv-
ing in Los Angeles.
A law enforcement ofcial, speaking on
condition of anonymity because the person
was not authorized to discuss the investiga-
tion publicly, said Ciancia was wearing
fatigues and carrying a bag containing a
handwritten note that said he wanted to kill
TSA employees and pigs. The ofcial said
the rant refers to how Ciancia believed his
constitutional rights were being violated by
TSAsearches and that hes a pissed-off patri-
ot upset at former Department of Homeland
Security Secretary Janet Napolitano.
Ciancia had at least ve full 30-round mag-
azines on him, said the ofcial, who was
briefed at LAX on the investigation. The of-
cial said Ciancia was shot in the mouth and
leg by two airport police ofcers.
Early Friday afternoon, Ciancias father in
New Jersey had called authorities for help in
nding his son after the young man sent one
of his siblings a text message about commit-
ting suicide, Pennsville Police Chief Allen
Cummings said.
The chief said he called Los Angeles
police, which sent a patrol car to Ciancias
apartment. There, two roommates said that
they had seen him Thursday and that he was
ne, according to Cummings.
Cummings said that the Ciancias own-
ers of an auto body shop are a good fami-
ly and that his department had had no deal-
ings with the son.
The attack began around 9:20 a.m. when
the gunman pulled an assault-style rie from
a bag and began ring inside Terminal 3, Los
Angeles Airport Police Chief Patrick Gannon
said.
Gunman kills TSA officer at LAX, wounds two others
NOTECONTAINEDHATEFORTSA
A law enforcement ofcial says the
handwritten note in the suspected
gunmans bag refers to how he believed
his constitutional rights were being
violated by TSA searches and hes a
pissed-off patriot upset at former
Department of Homeland Security
Secretary Janet Napolitano. The ofcial
was not authorized to discuss the
investigation publicly and spoke on
condition of anonymity.
DETAILSONINJURIES
Los Angeles Fire Department Battalion
Chief Armando Hogan says ve people
were taken to hospitals after the
shooting: the gunman, the TSA ofcer
who died, two other people who were
shot, and one person with a broken
ankle. A sixth person was treated at the
scenefor ringingintheearsfromgunre.
The TSA said both surviving shooting
victims are TSA ofcers.
SHOOTERHADMOREAMMO
Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti says the
airport shooter was carrying a lot of
additional ammunition. There were
more than 100 more rounds,he said.
PASSENGERSONWAYBACKIN
As two terminals reopened,hundreds of
passengerspulledrollingsuitcasesacross
a road outside the facilities, standing
shoulder-to-shoulder acrossall four lanes.
Motorcycle police with megaphones
followed slowly behind, trying to herd
them onto the sidewalk.
HUNDREDSOFFLIGHTSAFFECTED
Airport ofcials say 746 ights
nationwide were affected by the
incident. Some 46 were diverted, and
others were held at LAX or at the
originating airport.Terminal 3,where the
shootingoccurred,remains closedas the
forensics investigation continues.
AIRPORTSLOWLYREOPENING
Employees are being let back into two
closed terminals,and taxis and buses are
again running on a loop through the
airport.In addition,the FAA has dropped
its ground stoporder,meaning airliners
in other cities are allowed to resume
ying to LAX. Nearly 200 ights were
cancelled and others were diverted.
MOREONVICTIMS
Oneof thevictimstakentoHarbor-UCLA
Medical Center arrived without signs of
life, says trauma surgeon David Plurad.
Doctors worked for over an hour to try
torevivetheman,but wereunsuccessful.
He died from gunshot wounds to his
chest and abdomen. Another man was
shot in the shoulder and is expected to
survive.
Another person was released from
RonaldReaganUCLAMedical Center.The
hospitals did not identify the patients,
citing privacy issues.
SHOOTERSFATHERWASCONCERNED
A New Jersey police chief says the
suspect hadapparentlymadereferences
to suicide. Pennsville Chief Allen
Cummings says Paul Ciancias father had
called him Friday saying another of his
children had received a text message
from the suspect in reference to him
taking his own life.Cummings says the
elder Ciancia,alsonamedPaul,askedhim
for help locating his son.
HOTELSFLOODEDWITHTRAVELERS
Travelersbythehundredshavestreamed
into hotels near LAX. The lobbies of the
Sheraton and Radisson at the airports
entrance overowed onto sidewalks.
RonaldDauzat,owner andheadmaster of
a Los Angeles private school, was on his
way to Berlin for an educational
conference. He had resigned himself to
spending most of the day at the
Sheraton.Im dealing with it the best I
can,he said.We just have to wait it out.
FIRSTTSAOFFICERKILLED
UnionandTSAofcialssaytheTSAofcer
shot at LAX was the rst ever killed in the
line of duty. J. David Cox Sr., national
president of the American Federation of
Government Employees,says the ofcer
was one of the behavioral detection
ofcers stationedthroughout theairport
looking for suspicious behavior.
SOURCE: NOTE THREATENED TSA
ANDPIGS
A law enforcement ofcial tells the
AssociatedPress that 23-year-oldsuspect
Paul Ciancia is from New Jersey and was
wearing fatigues and carrying a bag
containing a hand-written note that said
he wanted to kill TSA and pigs. The
ofcial requestedanonymitybecausehe
was not authorized to speak publicly.
ATTHEHOSPITAL
Threepeoplearebeingtreatedat Ronald
Reagan UCLA Medical Center.
A hospital ofcial says one was in critical
condition and two were in fair condition.
Twowerewoundedbygunshotsandthe
other suffered other injuries.All are male.
Dr. Lynne McCullough, an emergency
medicinephysician,saysthehospital was
capable of taking up to 50 patients.As
it turnedout,verythankfully,wereceived
only threepatients, she said.
CELEBSATLAX
James Franco was among the travelers
caught up in the chaos. The actor
tweeted that some (expletive) shot up
the place. His publicist conrmed
Franco was on a ight that landed
shortly after the shooting occurred.
Singer NickJonas tweetedabout waiting
on board a plane and said he was
praying for the victims.
SHOOTERIDENTIFIED
Law enforcement ofcials identify
shooting suspect as 23-year-old Paul
Ciancia.
Reporters notes from LAX
6
Weekend Nov. 2-3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/NATION
Winter Holiday Promotions
Foot Reexology $19.99/1Hr Reg:$40
Body Massage $45/Hr Reg.$60
Combo Specials
Foot Soak. Massage(40min) & Full Body oil Massage
(30min) $40/70min
Hot Stone & Aromatherapy Massage $68/70min
Health Care
Acupuncture $39/For Initial Visit Reg: $88
Therapy Tuina $48/1Hr Reg: $68
Exp. 01/10/2014
www.CiminoCare.com
Burlingame Villa
24-hr. Alzheimers
& Dementia Care
1117 Rhinette Ave.
Burlingame
(behind Walgreens on Broadway)
(650) 344-7074
Lic #410508825
Mills Estate Villa
24-hr. Assisted Living
Board & Care
1733 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650) 692-0600
Lic #41560033
I lived in a
Nursing Home until
my son discovered
Mills Estate Villa.
I have a place I call
home and we are
saving thousands
ooar, cacI
month.
Jccovcrg-vacaIo-Jc,Ic-5Io;; 1crw 5Iag,
Always Welcome!
G
l e e guitarist Deri k
Ne l s on and his band
will be coming to
Mi l l s Hi gh School to help
raise money for their high
school arts programs through a
live pop/rock concert.
This concert is part of
Nelsons Take Chances Tour,
providing high schools the
opportunity to raise money
through ticket sales for his
shows.
Mills High Schools concert is
7 p.m. Nov. 8 at Mi l l s Hi gh
Sc hool Theatre, 400
Murchison Drive in Millbrae.
Tickets are $15, $22 and $30
and are available at
millsmusic.org. For more infor-
mation contact 619-3582.
***
The San Mateo Uni on
Hi gh School Di stri ct Board
o f Trustees will hold a dedica-
tion ceremony for the naming of
Capuchi no Hi gh School s
new performing arts center to
Samuel Johnson Jr. , a former
superintendent with the district.
The event is 4 p.m.-5:30 p.m.
Saturday, Nov. 16 at Capuchino
High School, 1501 Magnolia
Ave. There will also be hors
doeuvres, music and a tour of
the new center. RSVP to Judy
Pucci ni at jpuccini@sanbruno-
cable.com by Nov. 10.
Following the ceremony, the
Capuchi no Hi gh School
Al umni As s oci at i on is spon-
soring a dinner at 5:30 p.m. in
the cafeteria and trivia contest.
The cost is $10. Reservations
can be made at
wepay.com/events/battle-of-the-
wits and tickets can also be
bought at the door.
***
Through donations from par-
ents, school staff, community
members and students, the
Millbrae Education
Foundati on raised more than
$158,000 during the recent
Donat i on Days event, a new
record for the annual two-day
fundraising effort.
***
The Sequoi a Hi gh School
Al umni As s oci at i on
announced it has awarded $5,312
to teachers at Sequoi a Hi gh
Sc hool under its annual
Cherokee Grants program
as well as $150 to the Cheer
Team and $165 to the baseball
program.
***
Carl et on Col l ege honored
Menlo Parks Julia Morgan
Jones and Woodsides Emma
Southgate for their accom-
plishments and service during
the 2012-13 academic year.
***
Sequoi a Hi gh School will
perform, Thoroughl y
Modern Mi l l i e 7 p.m. Nov.
22-24. There will also be a
Sunday matinee 3 p.m Nov. 24.
Tickets are $15 for adults and
$10 for students and seniors.
Advance tickets are available at
showtix4u.com, by phone at
(866) 976-8167 and at the door.
The box office will open one
hour before each performance.
Class notes is a column dedicated to
school news. It is compiled by educa-
tion reporter Angela Swartz. You can
contact her at (650) 344-5200, ext.
105 or at
angela@smdailyjournal.com.
From left,Ayla,Meaghan Carr (Head of School),Maddy,Max,Henry,Lauren
Brown (second grade teacher, student council advisor), Trevor, William
Potter (P.E. teacher, student council advisor), Jacob, Sophia and Jacob.
Students at Serendipity School in Belmont raised $385 at their annual fall
fundraiser. Funds will go for Teddy, a dog that was injured in a fatal crash.
The proceeds raised will be donated to the Hope Fund at the Peninsula
Humane Society.The fund provides veterinary services for animals in need
throughout the Peninsula.Teddy received lifesaving care at North Peninsula
Veterinary Emergency Clinic in San Mateo due to donations made to the
fund. Donations can be made at phs-spca.org/hope.
Growing number of
part-time professors
joining labor unions
By Sam Hananel
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON Thousands of
part-time college professors are
joining labor unions, a growing
trend in higher education thats
boosting the ranks of organized
labor and giving voice to teachers
who complain about low pay and a
lack of job security at some of the
nations top universities.
The move to unionize at campus-
es from Georgetown University in
Washington, D.C., to Tufts
University near Boston follows a
shift in hiring practices at col-
leges that rely more than ever on
adjunct faculty to teach classes.
Last month, adjuncts at Tufts
became the latest to join the 2.1
million-member Service
Employees International Union,
which has been aggressively tar-
geting college instructors.
Adjuncts at Georgetown formed a
union with SEIU in May, and part-
time instructors at nearby
American University joined the
union last year.
SEIU now represents more than
18,000 members at 10 colleges
and universities, compared with
14,000 ve years ago. The union
is preparing to le for elections at
more colleges in the Los Angeles,
Seattle and Boston areas.
LOCAL/NATION 7
Weekend Nov. 2-3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The Department of Psychiatry is seeking
healthy, and psychiatric medication-free
depressed, and anxious participants between
55-110 years old who are right-handed and do
not have other major medical problems
(including thyroid problems) for an MRI study.
Participants will have 3 appointments at Stan-
ford University for a total of 8-10 hours.
Compensation: $150. Contact the Emotion
Aging Study at (650)-723-2795
For general information about oarticipants rights, contact 1-866-680-2906.
Samaritan House dining room relocating
Beginning Nov. 11, Samaritan Houses Dining Room will
relocate from Westside Church of Christ in San Mateo to a
new, temporary location at the Martin Luther King Jr.
Community Center at 725 Monte Diablo Ave. The service
will continue to be open to the community, and boxed to-go
meals will be handed out Monday through Friday from 5
p.m.-6 p.m.
Samaritan Houses Dining Room currently provides more
than 2,800 meals monthly and is part of the agencys food
assistance program.
After 17 years of serving meals from the Westside Church,
Samaritan House was informed that the propertys owners
had other plans for the location. The Samaritan House will
be allowed use of space at the King Community Center
through January 2014.
Unattended work lamp leads to house fire
An unattended work lamp left on in the basement of a
Belmont home lead to a house re Thursday afternoon,
according to the Belmont Fire Department.
At approximately 3:25 p.m., Belmont re units respond-
ed to a reported structure re on the 1800 block of Mezes
Avenue. Upon arrival, reghters found heavy smoke com-
ing from the basement area of the home. Belmont reght-
ers were assisted by reghters from the San Mateo-Foster
City Fire Department and the re was extinguished within
approximately 30 minutes. The re was conned to a small
portion of the basement and there were no injuries, accord-
ing to the re department.
The cause of the re is under investigation, however, pre-
liminary information indicates that the re was accidental
and appears to have been started by an unattended halogen
work lamp that was left on and was too close to some cloth-
ing and other household objects in the basement, according
to the re department.
Local briefs
CITY GOVERNMENT
The Redwood City Council
will hold a public hearing on the
citys report on water quality rela-
tive to public health goals as
required by the state when it detects
one or more excessive contami-
nants in drinking water. Redwood
Citys drinking water has excess lead due to leaching from
consumers home xtures rather than the citys water dis-
tribution system, according to the Publ i c Works
Depart ment . The citys full report to the state
Department of Public Health is available at www.red-
woodcity.org/publicworks/water/water_quality.htm
The City Council meets 7 p.m. Monday, Nov. 4 at City
Hall, 1017 Middleeld Road, Redwood City.
By Laurie Kellman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON Think youre con-
fused by Obamacare. Its roiling
Capitol Hill behind the scenes, too.
Members of Congress are governing
themselves under President Barack
Obamas signature law, which means
they have great leeway in how to apply
it to their own staffs.
For House members and senators,
its about a section of the law that may
or may not require lawmakers to
toss some staffers off of their federal
health insurance and into the
Affordable Care Acts exchanges. The
verdict from congressional ofcers is
ultimately that lawmakers, as employ-
ers, have discretion over who among
their staffs gets ejected, and who
stays. And they dont have to say who,
how many or why.
What they all say is this:
I followed the law, said Sen.
Barbara Mikulski, D-Md., echoing
Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid and
others.
But the law as written is open to
broad interpretation, inspiring a
bureaucratic web of memos, regula-
tions and guidance that members of
Congress say allows them to proceed
on the question of staffers and cover-
age as they see t. Lawmakers this
week were required to nalize plans for
who stays on federal insurance and
whos forced onto an exchange.
The Affordable Care Act, signed into
law in 2010, only requires members of
Congress and their official staff
members to get health insurance
through one of the laws marketplaces,
or exchanges. Guidance memos from
the Senates nancial clerk and the
Houses chief administrative ofcer,
obtained by the Associated Press,
dene ofcial aides as those who
work in the lawmakers personal
offices. Committee and leadership
aides, then, would be exempt and could
stay on the federal health insurance
program.
Unless lawmakers decide otherwise.
Individual members or their
designees are in the best position to
determine which staff work in the of-
cial ofce of each member, the memos
quote from an Office of Personnel
Management regulation.
Congress governs self under Obamacare
By Matthew Daly
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON A year after
Superstorm Sandy devastated the East
Coast, President Barack Obama signed
an executive order Friday to make it
easier for states and local governments
to respond to weather disasters.
The executive order establishes a
task force of state and local ofcials to
advise the administration on how to
respond to severe storms, wildres,
droughts and other potential impacts
of climate change. The task force
includes governors of seven states
all Democrats and the Republican
governor of Guam, a U.S. territory.
Fourteen mayors and two other local
leaders also will serve on the task
force. All but three are Democrats.
The task force will look at federal
money spent on roads, bridges, ood
control and other projects. It ultimate-
ly will recommend how structures can
be made more resilient to the effects of
climate change, such as rising sea lev-
els and warming temperatures.
The White House said the order rec-
ognizes that even as the United States
acts to curb carbon pollution, ofcials
also need to improve how states and
communities respond to extreme
weather events such as Sandy. Building
codes must be updated to address cli-
mate impacts and infrastructure needs
to be made more resilient, the White
House said in a statement.
The task force includes Govs. Jerry
Brown of California, Jay Inslee of
Washington and Neil Abercrombie of
Hawaii, as well as Delaware Gov. Jack
Markell, Maryland Gov. Martin
OMalley, Vermont Gov. Peter
Shumlin and Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn.
Obama signs order on response to climate change
REUTERS
Barack Obama listens during a session with reporters after meeting with Iraqs
Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki in the Oval Ofce.
NATION/WORLD 8
Weekend Nov. 2-3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Deb Reischmann
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON Secretary of State John
Kerrys remark that some National Security
Agency surveillance reached too far was the
rst time a high-ranking Obama administra-
tion ofcial acknowledged that U.S. snoop-
ing abroad might be seen as overzealous.
After launching into a vigorous defense of
surveillance as an effective counterterror
tool, Kerry acknowledged to a video-confer-
ence on open government in London that
in some cases, I acknowledge to you, as has
the president, that some of these actions
have reached too far, and we are going to
make sure that does not happen in the
future.
There is no question that the president and
I and others in government have actually
learned of some things that had been happen-
ing, in many ways, on an automatic pilot
because the technology is there, Kerry said,
responding to a question about transparency
in governments.
Kerry was responding to questions from
European allies about reports in the past two
weeks that the National Security Agency had
collected data on tens of millions of Europe-
based phone calls and had monitored the cell
phones of 35 world leaders, including that of
German Chancellor Angela Merkel.
The State Department said Friday his
remarks were in sync with what President
Barack Obama has already said on the contro-
versial spying practices. But Obama has said
the administration was conducting a review
of surveillance practices and said that if the
practices went too far they would be halted.
Kerry rst joked with British Foreign
Secretary William Hague, whom he said
should also answer the question about sur-
veillance because otherwise, would it mean
that Britain did not do its own surveillance
abroad? The joke was a subtle jab at the U.S.
position that allies spy on each other rou-
tinely.
Kerry said in the wake of 9/11, the United
States and other countries realized they were
dealing with a new brand of extremism where
people were willing to blow themselves up,
even if it meant civilians would be killed.
Kerry: Some NSA surveillance reached too far
By Geir Moulson
and Kirsten Grieshaber
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BERLIN The U.S. refused to show any
leniency to fugitive leaker Edward
Snowden on Friday, even as Secretary of
State John Kerry conceded that eavesdrop-
ping on allies had happened on automatic
pilot and went too far.
Snowden made his appeal for U.S.
clemency in a letter released Friday by a
German lawmaker who met with him in
Moscow. In it, the 30-year-old American
asked for international help to persuade
the U.S. to drop spying
charges against him and
said he would like to tes-
tify before the U.S.
Congress about the
National Security
Agencys surveillance
activities.
Snowden also indicat-
ed he would be willing to
help German officials
investigate alleged U.S.
spying in Germany, said Hans-Christian
Stroebele, a lawmaker with the opposition
Green Party and a member of the parlia-
mentary committee that oversees German
intelligence.
Stroebele met with Snowden for three
hours on Thursday, a week after explosive
allegations that the NSA had monitored
Chancellor Angela Merkels cellphone
prompted her to complain personally to
President Barack Obama. The alleged spy-
ing has produced the most serious diplo-
matic tensions between the two allies
since Germany opposed the U.S.-led inva-
sion of Iraq in 2003.
In his one-page typed letter, written in
English and bearing signatures that
Stroebele said were his own and
Snowdens, the American complained that
the U.S. government continues to treat
dissent as defection, and seeks to criminal-
ize political speech with felony charges
that provide no defense.
However, speaking the truth is not a
crime, Snowden wrote. I am confident
that with the support of the international
community, the government of the United
States will abandon this harmful behav-
ior.
In Washington, State Department
spokeswoman Jen Psaki would not respond
directly to Snowdens appeal, but said the
U.S. position has not changed.
Snowden seeks the worlds help against U.S. charges
Edward
Snowden
REUTERS
John Kerry addresses the SelectUSA Investment Summit in Washington, D.C.
OPINION 9
Weekend Nov. 2-3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Vote yes on Measure P
Editor,
As a Foster City parent, Measure L
Citizen Oversight Committee
Member and Measure P campaign vol-
unteer, I am proud of the diverse com-
munity support Measure P has
received.
State senators Jerry Hill and Leland
Yee, Assemblyman Kevin Mullin,
Supervisors Carole Groom and Dave
Pine, San Mateo County Democratic
Party, San Mateo County Labor
Council, San Mateo-Foster City
School District PTACouncil, local
businesses leaders and many others
agree that Measure P is needed now
for local schools.
Community support has resulted in
these endorsements, hours of volun-
teer phone banking and neighbor-
hood walks, and nancial support to
the Yes on P campaign. Parents,
employees and PTAs have donated
alongside local business owners.
Because it will produce local jobs and
support their neighborhood schools,
local labor organizations have donat-
ed to support improved schools.
Our community supports Measure P
because its a community plan to con-
tinue student success in our schools.
Measure P will fund the carefully con-
structed plans to address district-wide
school overcrowding, ensure all stu-
dents have safe and modern class-
rooms and provide updated technolo-
gy to meet rigorous, 21st century aca-
demic standards. Measure P is the
result of community input, careful
collaboration and board approval of
our districts Enrollment Management
Plan, Technology Plan and Facilities
Master Plan.
Our community current and for-
mer parents of San Mateo and Foster
City Students, teachers, business
owners, seniors and local elected
leaders has come together to pass
Measure P because its vital for every
student in our entire district. On
Tuesday, Nov. 5, please join us and
vote yes on P.
Julie Scanlon
Foster City
Vote no on Measure P
Editor,
The Yes on P campaign touts the
endorsements of politicians, but
where are the usual supporters of
school bond issues such as the San
Mateo Elementary Teachers
Association and 10 SMFC PTAunits?
They voted no position on Measure
P. The teachers and parents arent out
in force to support the bond? Now
that has to be a rst. On an issue such
as this, I place more credence with
parents and teachers than politicians
that have their own agendas.
The Yes on P campaign claims that
installing solar panels results in $1
million in savings annually. What
they fail to mention is that the capi-
tal cost of these solar panels is $18
million plus interest. It will take at
least 18 years before the school dis-
trict breaks even. There are other
ways to nance solar panels without
burdening the taxpayers.
The Yes on P campaign claims that
San Mateo received the majority of
the funds when the last school bond
measure passed (Measure L). What
they fail to mention is that Measure L
was proportionately distributed based
on student population (two-thirds to
San Mateo since two-thirds of the stu-
dent population was in San Mateo and
one-third to Foster City since one-
third of the student population was in
Foster City).
While a well-conceived school
bond would be much needed for facili-
ties improvements, Measure P is not
well-conceived. Vote no on P.
Ainette Marshall
San Mateo
School board loan
Editor,
If the San Carlos Elementary
School District Board of Trustees does
not give me a loan of $1.3 million
from taxpayer dollars without a vote
in the next few days, as it did for its
superintendent, I will vote against all
incumbents on that board, and I
invite all readers who did not get their
loans to do the same. Almost anyone
could handle our money with less cor-
ruption and incompetence than these
incumbents.
Darwin Patnode
San Carlos
Letters to the editor
The Affordable Care
Act conspiracy theory
P
resident Obama nally agreed to a six-week exten-
sion, to March 31, for all Americans to sign up
for affordable health care. But I wonder: How can a
health care act built on lies succeed?
Obama said that all Americans would be covered. Fact:
The Congressional Budget Ofce has stated that
Obamacare will cover less than half of the uninsured.
Obama said there would be no new taxes on the middle
class (families earning less than $250,000 annually).
Fact: Obamacare contains 20 new or higher taxes on
American families and small businesses, totaling more
than $500 billion in tax hikes over the next 10 years (For
a full list of the tax hikes, their
effective dates and where to nd
them in the bill, go to
http://jeffduncan.house.gov/full-
list-obamacare-tax-hikes).
Obama promised that a typical
familys health care premiums
would be lowered by $2,500.
Fact: Health care premiums for
the average family will grow by
$2,976.
Obama promised there would
be no increase in the decit.
Fact: The CBO has stated that the
new reform law will raise the decit by more than $500
billion during the rst 10 years.
Obama promised that you could keep your present health
care plan if you like. Fact: You cant .
Even if the website is xed, prognosticators are predict-
ing a very low sign-up rate with most of those being the
ones with serious medical problems. The main problem is
having the young and healthy pay for insuring the very
sick. They will be grossly overcharged. If they refuse to
pay, then the insurance companies will start losing
money instead of making the huge prots they predicted.
When that happens, the price of health care will go up
again. At that time, the corporations will stop providing
health insurance to their employees.
Meanwhile, most doctors are planning to refuse to take
new patients under Obamacare. The net result of that is
going to be to make the emergency rooms even more
crowded.
The result of all this is that taxes will be raised, jobs
will be lost and our national debt will increase exponen-
tially.
If you still are not afraid of Obamacare, Wayne Allyn
Root has written a book, The Ultimate Obama Survival
Guide, which might make you pay attention. His views
are a little extreme and border on what I call conspiracy
theory.
Root claims that Obamacare was never meant to lower
health care costs. It is actually a purposeful attack upon
capitalism and that it will be a success because it will:
Redistribute wealth the rich, the middle class and
the small business owners now have to pay for their own
health care at much higher rates and also pay higher taxes;
Eliminate the middle class and make them dependent
on government Root says the IRS predicts that health
insurance will be $20,000 a year for a typical American
family. If true, they would be forced to seek subsistence
from the government;
Eliminate decent paying jobs in the economy thereby
making most people wards of the state;
Starve donations to the GOP. Without the middle class
and small business owners, there would be far fewer dona-
tions to Republican candidates and conservative causes;
Make the IRS all-powerful. Obamacare adds thousands
of new IRS agents who will snoop into every aspect of
your life, including your nance and your medical infor-
mation;
Unionize 15 million health care workers. This will
produce $15 billion in new union dues, most of which will
go to funding Democratic candidates and socialist causes.
Obamacare will prove to be a huge success if it kills
jobs, ruins the economy, brings down capitalism and we
are forced under duress to accept big government.
Those who disagree the people who believe in the
Constitution, the people who believe exactly what the
Founding Fathers believe, the people who want to take
power away from corrupt politicians who have put
America $17 trillion in debt, are terrorists, according to
Obamacare supporters.
I know it is close to Halloween, but I didnt mean to
scare you. Roots view is extreme but there is just enough
of the truth in his predictions to get you to pay attention.
So stand up and start ghting.
Chuck McDougald served as statewide volunteer chair for
Carly Fiorinas campaign for the U.S. Senate. He lives in
South San Francisco with his wife and two kids.
San Mateo County
Community College District
Richard Holober
Tom Mohr
Belmont-Redwood
Shores Elementary School District
Rakesh Hegde
Amy Koo
Charles Velschow
Hillsborough City
Elementary School District
Lynne Esselstein
Don Geddis
Kaarin Hardy
San Bruno Park School District
Patrick Flynn
John Marinos
Henry Sanchez
San Carlos Elementary
School District
Nicole Bergeron
Carol Elliott
Kathleen Farley
Sequoia Union
High School District
Alan Sarver
Chris Thomsen
Belmont City Council
Warren Lieberman
Eric Reed
Charles Stone
Burlingame City Council
Michael Brownrigg
Russ Cohen
Ann Kieghran
Millbrae City Council
Reuben Holober
Ann Schneider
Redwood City Council
Jeff Gee
Diane Howard
John Seybert
San Bruno City Council
Marty Medina
Rico Medina
San Carlos City Council
Bob Grassilli
Matt Grocott
Cameron Johnson
San Mateo City Council
Josh Hugg
David Lim
Robert Ross
South San Francisco City Council
(two-year seat)
Karyl Matsumoto
South San Francisco City Council
(four-year seat)
Mark Addiego
Maurice Goodman
Pradeep Gupta
Mid-Peninsula Water
District Board of Directors
Mike Malekos
Al Stuebing
Dave Warden
Measure P-YES
$130 million bond measure for the
San Mateo-Foster City Elementary
School District
Measure R-YES
$174 parcel tax for the Belmont-Red-
wood Shores Elementary School
District
Measure U-YES
Increase of business license tax in
Foster City
ChuckMcDougald
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BUSINESS 10
Weekend Nov. 2-3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 15,615.55 +69.80 10-Yr Bond 2.62 +0.078
Nasdaq 3,922.04 +2.34 Oil (per barrel) 94.66
S&P 500 1,761.64 +5.10 Gold 1,315.10
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Friday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
American International Group Inc., down $3.37 to $48.28
The property and casualty unit paid out more in claims than it took in,
spooking investors.
The Container Store Group Inc., up $18.20 to $36.20
Shares of the storage retailer doubled during its debut on the New York
Stock Exchange with millions of shares traded.
General Motors Co., up 44 cents to $37.39
October sales rose 16 percent as full-size pickup trucks rebounded from
a slow September, despite weak Chevy Cruze sales.
Spirit AeroSystems Holdings Inc., up $1.85 to $28.54
The aircraft equipment company sold a half-share in a joint venture of
aerospace suppliers, though terms were not disclosed.
Nasdaq
Ruths Hospitality Group Inc., up 35 cents to $12.52
A pair of insurance settlements and strong business at its steak houses
send third-quarter prot close to $3 million.
Lululemon Athletica Inc., down $1.24 to $67.85
The company is elding new complaints about the quality of its yoga
pants.
First Solar Inc., up $8.83 to $59.14
The solar companys stock was the biggest percentage gainer on the
S&P 500 index after doubling its quarterly prot and raising its outlook
for the year.
Body Central Corp., down $1.68 to $3.94
The clothing and accessories retailer saw its losses widen during the
third quarter and same-stores sales fell 18 percent.
Big movers
By Ken Sweet
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK The stock market
started November on a strong note as
investors reacted to an expansion in
U.S. manufacturing last month.
The improvement came during what
could have been a difcult month for
the U.S. economy, with a partial gov-
ernment shutdown that lasted 16 days
and a narrowly averted default on the
U.S. governments debt, which could
have rattled nancial markets.
With what happened in the last two
months, its amazing how strong this
market has been, said Bob Doll, chief
equity strategist at Nuveen Asset
Management.
The Institute for Supply
Management reported that its manufac-
turing index increased to 56.4, the
highest level since April 2011. That
was better than the 55.1 gure econo-
mists were expecting, according nan-
cial data provider FactSet.
The Dow Jones industrial average
rose 69.80 points, or 0.5 percent, to
15,615.55. The Standard & Poors 500
index rose 5.10 points, or 0.3 percent,
to 1,761.64. The Nasdaq composite
rose 2.34 points, or 0.1 percent, to
3,922.04.
Energy stocks lagged the market
after Chevron reported that its third-
quarter income fell 6 percent, missing
analysts estimates, due to weakness in
the companys oil rening business.
Chevron fell $1.95, or 1.6 percent, to
$118.01.
The energy sector was also weighed
down by a drop in the price of oil.
Crude oil fell $1.77, or 1.8 percent, to
$94.61 a barrel.
The positive start to this months
trading comes after a strong October
for the stock market. The S&P 500
closed at a record high seven times
during the month, most recently on
Tuesday. It ended October with a
gain of 4.5 percent.
However, some investors have
expressed skepticism that stocks can
keep up this rapid pace pace heading
into the last two months of the year.
The S&P 500 is up 23 percent so far
this year, while the average annual
return on the S&P 500 is around 8 per-
cent. Stocks are also starting to look
expensive by some measures.
Investors are paying more than $16
for every $1 of earnings in the S&P
500, the highest that ratio has been
since February 2011.
Stocks start November on a positive note
REUTERS
Traders work on the oor of the New York Stock Exchange.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON The Food and Drug
Administration on Friday approved a new
drug from South San Francisco-based Roche
to help treat patients with a type of cancer
of the blood and bone marrow.
The agency cleared Gazyva to ght chron-
ic lymphocytic leukemia in combination
with chemotherapy in patients who havent
previously been treated for the disease.
Gazyva works by killing cancer cells and
encouraging the immune system to ght
against them.
Chronic lymphocytic leukemia develops
slowly over time and is usually diagnosed in
the elderly. More than 15,600 Americans
will be diagnosed and 4,580 of them will die
from the disease this year, according to esti-
mates from the National Cancer Institute.
The FDA approved the drug based on a
study showing Gazyva plus chemotherapy
was superior to chemotherapy alone at
slowing the progress of the disease.
Patients treated with Gazyva had median sur-
vival of 23 months before death, relapse or
worsening of their disease. That compares
with 11.1 months for the chemotherapy
patients.
The injectable biotech drug is the rst
medicine approved under FDAs break-
through designation, which was authorized
by Congress last year. The new designation
is designed to speed up the approval of
promising drugs by providing companies
with extra meetings and earlier communica-
tion with FDA scientists to discuss drug
development.
Gazyva will be marketed by Roches
Genentech unit, which is based in South San
Francisco.
A spokeswoman for Genentech said the
drug would cost $41,300 for one course of
treatment, which lasts six months.
Common side effects seen in company
studies included anemia, fever, muscle and
bone pain and lower levels of white blood
cells.
Shutdown slows but
doesnt halt U.S. car demand
DETROIT The government shutdown
dampened but didnt stall Americans
demand for new cars and trucks.
The 16-day shutdown slowed U.S. auto
sales in the rst two weeks of October, but
they picked up speed in the last two weeks.
Sales rose 11 percent to 1.2 million.
General Motors, Ford, Nissan and
Chrysler all recorded double-digit sales
gains, while Toyota, Honda and Hyundai
saw smaller increases. Of major automak-
ers, only Volkswagens sales fell.
Stable fuel prices, low interest rates and
the increased availability of credit pushed
people to buy regardless of the political
wrangling, said Kurt McNeil, GMs vice
president of U.S. sales.
All those things that have been driving
the economy? Theyre still there, he said.
Pickup trucks sold well as business
improved for contractors and other workers.
Sales of the Chevrolet Silverado, GMs top
selling vehicle, jumped 10 percent to near-
ly 43,000, and Chryslers Ram truck was up
18 percent. Sales of Fords F-Series pickups
rose 13 percent and topped 60,000 for the
sixth month in a row.
Chevron profit falls
on refining weakness
NEW YORK Chevron said Friday that
net income fell 6 percent in the third quarter
as weak rening results and higher operat-
ing costs offset higher oil and gas produc-
tion and prices.
The nations second-biggest oil company
posted net income of $4.95 billion for the
quarter on revenue of $56.6 billion. The
company earned $5.25 billion on revenue
of $55.66 billion in the same quarter last
year.
The latest earnings amounted to $2.57 per
share. Analysts had expected earnings of
$2.69 per share, on average, according to
FactSet.
FDA approves clears new
leukemiadrug fromRoche
By Michelle Chapman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK Just a few months after
Lululemon Athletica pulled yoga pants
from shelves because they were too sheer,
costing the company millions in sales,
its fielding new complaints about quality.
The Canadian company had blamed the
problems from spring on a style change
and production issues.
New yoga pants have since made their
way into stores, but there are recent com-
plaints on the Lululemon Facebook page
and its website about pants that are still
too sheer. There are also complaints about
pants pilling after a few months of wear
or even just a few uses and about holes
and seams coming apart.
The fresh batch of problems could alien-
ate the retailers legion of hardcore fans
who have been willing to shell out $100 or
more for yoga pants. These followers
helped Lululemon, founded in 1998, ring
up $1.4 billion in sales last year.
Lululemon is trying to put the see-
through yoga pants snafu behind it. Its
looking for a new CEO after its current
chief executive, Christine Day, said in
June she was planning to leave. On
Thursday, it announced it had hired a new
chief product officer, bringing in a Kmart
leader to fill a role that had been left
vacant.
Lululemon will certain face new chal-
lenges if the pilling and seam problems
are real, said Sterne Agee analyst Sam
Poser in a research note.
One complaint from Lululemons web-
site, from Oct. 7, on the page for the
Groove pant, says As much as I love my
lulu pants that I purchased in August, I will
not be recommending this to anyone at
all. For the price I paid, its just not justi-
fiable at all. The waist bands are pilling,
the back is pilling and same as the com-
plaint below I wash and care for them with
like garments.
Quality complaints about Lululemon pants
Business briefs
<< Page 12, As exercise
option on Coco Cruisp
Weekend, Nov. 2-3, 2013
ANOTHER ROUT: BURLINGAME GOES OVER THE 40-POINT MARK AGAIN IN WIN OVER CAPUCHINO >> PAGE 12
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Things started easy for the Hillsdale foot-
ball team as it hosted El Camino under the
portable lights in San Mateo Friday night.
The Knights took the opening kickoff and
marched 58 yards on 12 plays to take a quick
7-0 lead.
Then things got tough for the Knights.
They allowed a 57-yard touchdown run
before turning the ball over three times in
the rst half.
Despite the adversity, Hillsdale managed
to get everything pointed in the right direc-
tion. The Knights led 14-6 at halftime on
their way to a 28-6 win over the Colts to put
them in the drivers seat for the Peninsula
Athletic Leagues Lake Division title.
It was an adverse situation (in the rst
half) and we kept on truckin, said Hillsdale
coach Mike Parodi. Our kids stepped up and
made plays.
Which is the exact opposite of what El
Camino could not do, according to coach
Mark Turner.
They (Hillsdale) made plays, Turner
said. We had opportunities and we didnt
make plays.
Hillsdales win, coupled with Kings
Academys 49-14 win over Carlmont means
next weeks Kings Academy-Hillsdale game
in San Mateo Friday afternoon will decide
the Lake Division champion and the divi-
sions lone automatic berth into the Central
Coast Section playoffs.
Hillsdale (4-0 PAL Lake, 6-2 overall)
scored a touchdown in every quarter as the
Knights amassed 380 yards of offense.
Receiver Brandon Butcher hauled in touch-
down passes of 2 and 32 yards from quarter-
back Cole Carrithers, nishing with six
catches for 92 yards. Carrithers nished the
night with three touchdown and 195 yards
on 12 of 19 passing. Running back
Giancarlo Boscacci nished with 76 yards
rushing and a touchdown catch of 42 yards
Hillsdale controls Lake
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
Hillsdales BrandonButcher hauls in the rst of his two touchdown catches during the Knights
28-6 win over El Camino Friday night.
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
After cruising through the rst ve weeks
of the season, the Sacred Heart Prep football
found itself in a ght for the second week in
a row when the Gators hosted Sequoia Friday
afternoon.
last week, Sacred Heart Prep needed a
fourth-quarter rally to hold off Menlo-
Atherton. Friday, while the Gators never
trailed, they were frustrated to be leading
only 12-3 at halftime.
No one was talking (in the locker room
at halftime), said SHP running back Andrew
Segre. We were frustrated even though we
were winning.
Sequoia coach Rob Poulos, on the other
hand, was pleased to be down only nine
points at halftime.
In the second half, however, the Gators
pulled away to record a 33-3 victory.
Segre had a huge hand in the Gators win
as he scored four touchdowns, rushed for 126
yards on 14 carries and caught four passes
for 94 more yards.
Ricky Grau gave the Gators two runners
who went over the 100-yard mark as he n-
ished with 116 yards on 14 carries. Mason
Randall had another efcient game at quar-
terback, throwing a pair of touchdown pass-
es while completing 10 of 15 passes for 192
yards.
All told, the Gators piled up 484 yards of
offense on the day.
Sequoia was paced by Aaron Burns, who
rushed for 66 yards on 13 carries. Liam
Clifford added 43 yards on 10 carries. The
Cherokees rushed for 209 yards, but their
Gators too
much for
Cherokees
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Woodsides head football coach, Josh
Bowie, stood in front of his troops Friday
afternoon after a 42-13 win and reminded
them that their win against San Mateo had
been a tale of two halves.
And if you dig a little deeper into the
Wildcats season, its looking more and
more like the actual season is taking a sim-
ilar metaphoric state.
After suffering through a gauntlet of a
non-league schedule that saw Woodside go
winless, the Wildcats are now 3-1 in the
Peninsula Athletic League Ocean Division
with a huge game against league-leader
Burlingame High School (8-0, 3-0) still
come to this after defeating the Bearcats
in dominating fashion in a game in which
the Wildcats actually trailed. Woodside shut
out San Mateo in the second half, turning an
eight-point halftime lead into a four-touch-
down romp. Awin against Burlingame next
week and things in the PAL Ocean Division
will be very, very interesting.
But for the time being, Bowie and the
Wildcats felt good about Fridays win.
When you look back at that lm (from
non-league play), it was really a matter of us
beating ourselves, Bowie said. We had our
opportunities and it was just to minimize
our mistakes. When we do that, I think
were a tough team to beat for anybody.
Woodside proved just how tough in a
game the Wildcats controlled in the rst
half and then dominated in the second
behind a slew of San Mateo turnovers.
The Bearcats jumped out in front after a
forcing an early Woodside punt. It took the
Bearcats seven plays to travel 53 yards. All
seven plays, they went to the rush attack
and were rewarded when Watson Filikitonga
did the honors from 16 yards out for the
early 7-0 lead.
But the touchdown woke up Woodside. It
Woodside keeps Ocean Division title hopes alive
See WILDCATS, Page 14
See GATORS, Page 16
See KNIGHTS, Page 15
There is no question that the
West Catholic Athletic League is
one of the toughest leagues in the
entire state. Serra, who went into
Fridays game against nemesis St.
Francis-Mountain View unbeaten
in league play, found that out the
hard way, yet again, following a
41-34 loss to the Lancers. Serra
had the lead with seven minutes
left in the game, but St. Francis
scored the nal 10 points.
Elsehwere in local scores, Terra
Nova turned a close game into a
blowout, beating Menlo-Atherton
57-27. The Tigers are now 4-0 in
PAL Bay Division play.
Menlo School took care of
South City 48-22. The Knights led
34-15 after one half of football.
In the Ocean Division, Half
Moon Bay pulled off an upset of
Aragon with a 32-21 win. The
Cougars scored 14 points in the
fourth quarter to pull away. The
loss drops Aragon to 2-2 and all
but eliminates them from title
contention.
In the Lake Division, Mills
offense exploded for 69 points in
a shutout of Jefferson-Daly City.
The Vikings had loss two straight.
And nally, the Kings Academy
set up a huge matchup with
Hillsdale High School next week
after downing Carlmont 49-14.
SPORTS 12
Weekend Nov. 2-3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A couple of games into the
Peninsula Athletic League Ocean
Division football season,
Burlingame has established itself
as the team to beat. With an
unblemished record, the bulls eye
on the Panthers collective back is
huge and matches perfectly with
their school colors.
But, three games into the Ocean
docket, its becoming very clear
that the idea of really wanting to
beat these Panthers and actually
executing at the level you need to
can vanish in about, oh, 13 sec-
onds.
Thats how it long it took
Burlingames Robby Baumgarten
to set the tone in Fridays 41-0 win
over Capuchino. After taking the
opening kickoff at the 4-yard line
and letting his blockers set up,
Baumgarten took off like a rocket,
entered orbit and didnt touch down
until he found the end zone.
Just like that, Baumgarten and
the rest of the Panthers showed the
Mustangs just what kind of night it
was going to be.
I love that feeling,
Baumgarten said. I love to set the
tone. Im always saying, Let me
set the tone, boys. Follow me. Ill
follow you if you follow me. I love
to set the tone and get the tempo
going.
Thats something that we
stress, said Burlingame head
coach John Philipopoulos. Try to
come out and set the tone and get
off to a fast start. Theres still some
things we need to work on. It got a
little sloppy there a few penal-
ties, missed blocks, missed tack-
les, things like that. Were happy
to be 8-0, but there is still a lot we
need to work on if we want to
accomplish our goals.
Talking missed blocks and
penalties is actually nit-picking a
bit considering it was yet another
game the Panthers dominated and
pretty much had on cruise control
from the end of the rst quarter on.
Four plays into their rst offen-
sive series, after Capuchino earned
zero yards on its rst possession,
it was Baumgarten again on a long,
explosive run to put the Panthers
up 14-0. This time, No. 4 took the
ball over the left side and took off
57 yards down the sideline for a
score.
Last season, we had a great team
but it just didnt go as planned,
Baumgarten said. I think this sea-
son, we have it all. We have a team
with devotion, passion, we have
the athletes. I think were a legit
team this year.
The Panthers made it 21-0 with
3:59 left in the rst quarter when
they took the ball at mideld and
scored eight plays into another
drive. This time, Manese Palu ran
the ball in from a yard out.
Capuchino nally got its initial
rst down with 1:58 left in the rst
quarter. The Mustangs got as far the
Burlingame 47-yard line before a
sack and an incomplete thwarted
their best drive of the period. At the
end of one, they were down 21-0
and 98-21 in the total yards depart-
ment.
Burlingame added to its lead by
eating up over five minutes of
clock during a drive that lasted 11
plays and 92 yards. It culminated
with Laipeli Palu rushed in from 16
yards out. The missed extra point
made it 27-0.
Capuchinos longest drive of the
night came next. It was a solid 12-
play drive that got all the way to
the Burlingame 24-yard line but
ended with an incomplete pass.
The teams went into recess with the
same score.
The teams held in the third quar-
ter in terms of scoring. But that
doesnt tell the entire story as
Burlingame scored three seconds
into the fourth quarter after getting
the ball to the 1-yard line on its
second drive of the period. Keoni
Keahe did the honors from a yard
out after doing much of the work on
that drive. With the score 34-0, the
game went into a running clock.
Its all 11 players, Baumgarten
said of the defense. And the back
ups. I think thats a great thing
about our team. We have great back
ups on offense and defense that
take control of games. We practice
hard and thats something you
dont always see on teams and
thats what makes us special.
I was really happy with the
defense, Philipopoulos said.
They played well. They flew
around. For the most part, we kept
their guys in check.
Capuchino had one drive under
that running clock and it was actu-
ally Burlingame and Chi Li Tang
who found pay dirt one more time.
No. 11 scored from 46 yards out
with 1:59 left.
With the win Friday, Burlingame
is a win away from owning at least
a share of the Ocean title their
first such championship since
2003. But lurking is a talented
Woodside team, which just beat up
on San Mateo 42-13.
Thats something we tell the
kids, too, Philipopoulos said.
Were in rst place. Were 8-0.
Were the team to beat. So at this
point, we expect to get every
teams best effort. And I think
weve gotten it for the most part
and the guys have handled it fairly
well. But again, we need to get to
what we do best.
Lets worry about Burlingame,
and making sure we approach the
practice week the right way, we
approach Friday night the right
way. So we still got things we need
to work on. We need to focus on us
and making sure we do things the
right way. I think if we do that,
things will take care of itself.
Another easy victory for Burlingame
I love to set the tone. Im always saying,Let me set the tone, boys. Follow me. Ill
follow you if you follow me. I love to set the tone and get the tempo going.
Robby Baumgarten on his game-opening kickoff
return for a touchdown in Burlingames 41-0 win over Capuchino
Local Scores
SPORTS 13
Weekend Nov. 2-3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
E V E RY T HI NG MARKE D DOWN!
We Dont Meet
Our Competition,
We Create It!
601 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Hours: Mon.- Sat. 10am to 7pm
Sun. Noon to 6pm
Phone: 650.588.0388
Fax: 650.588.0488
Grand
Opening Sale
By Josh Dubow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND Chip Kelly is
very familiar with what Terrelle
Pryor can do as a quarterback.
Kelly tried to recruit Pryor to
Oregon when he coached there,
lost to him in the Rose Bowl, and
now gets the chance to face him in
the NFLwhen Kellys Philadelphia
Eagles visit the Oakland Raiders.
Terrelle was always driven to be
a quarterback, which is an awe-
some thing, Kelly said. Ive
seen him play quarterback for a
while; I lost to him in the Rose
Bowl when he played quarterback
at Ohio State. He threw the ball on
us then. I think hes starting to
develop.
Pryor and Kelly have both had
up-and-down seasons in their rst
years in their new roles. Pryor has
provided a spark to the Raiders
offense with his game-breaking
speed as a runner and improved
passing.
Kelly has brought his up-tempo
offense to the Eagles (3-5), who
have put up a lot of yards but not
enough wins to please
Ph i l a d e l p h i a
fans.
Kelly has a
fan in Pryor,
who ultimately
chose Ohio
State over
Oregon because
of its proximi-
ty to his moth-
er in
Pennsylvania, and because he felt
a pro-style offense would better
prepare him for the NFL.
I loved his personality and the
re he brought to the game, Pryor
said. He came to my high school
and spent a lot of time there, from
showing me uniforms to showing
me the playbook, some of the stuff
that he runs. Seeing that was very
interesting and intriguing, but my
whole thing that cut it out right
away was the distance.
Here are ve things to watch for
when the Eagles visit the Raiders
(3-4):
Passing Pryor
Pryor dazzled Raiders fans with
his 93-yard touchdown run to open
last weeks win over Pittsburgh
the longest run in franchise histo-
ry and longest TD run ever by a
quarterback. But Kelly has been
most impressed with Pryors
improvement as a passer. He is
completing 63.1 percent, show-
ing the accuracy that many doubt-
ed he had when he came out of
Ohio State.
Theyre doing a lot more
things with him as a passer,
Kelly said. He seems like he
wants to stay in the pocket and
throw the ball. Hes that package
that you worry about as a defen-
sive group because he can throw
it, but he can also tuck it down and
make some really good plays. Hes
obviously a very big threat, and
we need to make sure we contain
him.
Nifty Nick
Because of injuries, the Eagles
have had to use three quarterbacks
this season. Nick Foles has clear-
ly been the best passer of the lot
and will get the start this week
after sitting out one game with a
concussion. Michael Vick started
in the loss to the Giants but was
replaced by rookie Matt Barkley
after reinjuring his hamstring.
Foles has completed 52 of 90
passes for 622 yards with six
touchdowns. He has not thrown an
interception, and has a 101.3
passer rating this season.
Hes got a great grasp of where
we are as a team offensively,
Kelly said. Hes got a really good
understanding of what we do and
were excited to have him back.
Tale of two halves
The Raiders have been a vastly
different team in the rst half than
the second in recent weeks.
Oakland has outscored the opposi-
tion 59-20 in the rst half the past
four games, generating 196.3
yards of offense to build the leads.
That has changed in the second
half when the Raiders have been
outscored 63-10 and gained just
91.3 yards per game. That trend of
fast starts could continue this
week as the Eagles have been held
scoreless in the rst half the past
two weeks.
Fast-break offense
For all the talk of Kellys fast-
paced offense, the Eagles are aver-
aging 67 1-2 plays per game, just
2 1-2 more than the league aver-
age. While its not quite what
Kelly had going at Oregon,
Raiders defensive coordinator
Jason Tarver has experience going
up against Kelly. Tarver was a
defensive assistant at Stanford in
2011 when the Ducks beat the
Cardinal 53-30.
Slew of sacks
The Raiders make it difcult for
the opposing offense by using
almost every player on defense as
a pass rusher at times. Fourteen
players have gotten credit for
Oaklands 21 sacks as the unusual
blitzes have confused quarterbacks
and are a major reason the defense
is so improved from last season.
The Raiders blitzed 35 percent
more this year than at this point
last season because they trust their
secondary more in coverage.
Weve been able to implement
a few more things that we want to
try to do defensively, coach
Dennis Allen said. We can get a
little more aggressive.
Eagles coach faces QB he once tried to recruit
Terrelle Pryor
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND Coco Crisp makes
the Oakland Athletics go from the
top of the order, and gures to be
doing so again in 2014.
The As exercised their $7.5 mil-
lion club option for the center
fielder Friday, though general
manager Billy Beane announced it
as soon as the season ended with a
ve-game division series loss to
the Detroit Tigers for the second
straight year.
Aswitch-hitter and speedy lead-
off man, Crisp hit a career-high 22
home runs in the leadoff spot for
his most homers since he hit 16
with Cleveland in 2005. Even
Crisp himself was surprised by the
power surge.
Luck of the draw for me. I have,
I guess, enough power to do since
Ive done it, Crisp said late in the
year. But thats not my game. Its
part of it, a little bit but 20 home
runs, 20-plus home runs has kind
of caught me off guard. I think it
caught a lot of people off guard,
especially having more home runs
than stolen bases.
Ill take it. Next year it might
go back to normal where I hit 10
to 15 and steal more bases. I hope
thats what it is. Its just one of
those years Im grateful for.
Oakland also exercised its $8
million option on left-hander
Brett Anderson as planned and
declined an $8.5 million option
on catcher Kurt Suzuki and an $11
million option outfielder Chris
Young.
Young gets a $1.5 million buy-
out and Suzuki $650,000.
As planned, As exercise option for Coco Crisp
SPORTS 14
Weekend Nov. 2-3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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took the Wildcats less than three minutes to tie the score.
David Teu rushed for the majority of the 67 yards and that set
up a 13-yard pass to Tommy Cook for the equalizing score.
The TD boosted Woodsides condence and once again,
Teu did most of the damage. It was his 49-yard run that got
the ball on the San Mateo 8-yard line two plays into the
Wildcats next drive. Seconds later, Teu completed his work
on his rst touchdown run of the day to make it 14-7.
Hes been doing it really quietly for us all year, Bowie
said of his running back, adding thats Teus 700 yards rush-
ing this season is probably the quietest in the league. Hes
been a grinder for us. Hes the epitome of a team player. All
he does is go out there and work hard.
Early in the second quarter, it was San Mateos turn to
respond. The Bearcats did so by going 79 yards on 11
plays. Quarterback Jason Gonzalez had a couple of big late-
down runs, but mostly the Bearcats stuck with Finau Hafoka
to gain those tough yards. Gonzalez used his arm on 2nd-
and-goal to nd Cristian Zarco in the back on the end zone
for a touchdown. The extra point try was no good to make
the score 14-13.
But after doing such a great job of slowing down
Woodside superstar playmaker Josh Holman to the
point that No. 10 went 17 minutes without touching the
ball on offense the Bearcats slipped up and Holman made
them pay on a spectacular 80-yard touchdown reception for
touchdown. Holman did most of the work on the wide
receiver screen to make the score 21-13 going into recess.
Even though were a spread team, our focus is on the run-
ning back, Bowie said. And when you run the ball effec-
tively, you open up the perimeter for guys like Josh
(Holman). We tried a couple new personnel packages that
paid dividends for us. And we were really physical up front.
The second half began with San Mateo getting a taste of
what was to come offensively mostly, frustration. The
Bearcats took their initial drive deep into Woodside territo-
ry only to see 11 plays worth of work go to waste.
Fom there, fumbled snaps, loose balls and interceptions
did them in.
To their credit, the Wildcats capitalized on those opportu-
nities. After missing a eld goal in the third, Woodside
scored three times in the fourth. Teu ran in from four yards
out ve second into the fourth period. Holman pulled off
another magic trick on a 58-yard pass play only his sec-
ond touch of the game that resulted in another score.
Then, with San Mateo in desperation mode, Mitchell
Cockrum, who had intercepted a pass earlier in the game,
got another gift and redeemed it for six points to further
increase Woodsides lead.
We forced a bunch of things there at the end, said San
Mateo head coach Jeff Scheller. There were some things we
felt we would be able to do against Woodside coming in. We
just didnt execute. And Woodside did a good job of making
the most out of their opportunities.
We really rallied to the football, Bowie said of his sec-
ond half defensive effort. And you saw that with the three
forced fumbles today. We focused a lot on being ball hawks
all week. We took advantage of our opportunities.
The loss drops San Mateo to 2-1 in Ocean play.
Continued from page 11
WILDCATS
Sports brief
Nets hand Heat rst 2-game skid since January
NEW YORK Paul Pierce and Joe Johnson scored 19
points each, and the Brooklyn Nets ended years of futility
against the Miami Heat and sent the NBA champions to
their rst losing streak in 10 months with a 101-100 vic-
tory Friday night.
Pierce and Johnson both hit two free throws in the nal
seconds as the Heat were trying to pull off a comeback.
Instead, they fell to 1-2 and have dropped consecutive
games for the rst time since Jan. 8 and 10.
The Heat got Dwyane Wade back after he missed
Wednesdays loss in Philadelphia, and he scored 21 points.
LeBron James led Miami with 26.
The Nets ended a 13-game skid against the Heat with their
rst victory since March 20, 2009, before Miamis Big
Three got together and when the Nets were still playing in
East Rutherford, N.J. two homes ago.
Brooklyn, bigger and deeper, opened an 11-point lead
after three quarters and kept the lead right around there until
the nal 2 minutes. Then Miami ran off 10 straight, cutting
it to 96-94 with 18 seconds left after consecutive 3-point-
ers by Wade and Mario Chalmers.
James later nailed a 3-pointer from the corner to cut it to
99-98 with 4.7 seconds remaining before Johnson hit two
free throws. Chris Bosh was fouled and after making the
rst appeared to try and miss the second, but it went in and
the Heat couldnt commit another foul in time.
SPORTS 15
Weekend Nov. 2-3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
to finish with 118 yards from
scrimmage and two touchdowns.
There were a couple of things the
Knights proved Friday night: one,
they are more than just a passing
team. They ran for 185 yards and
since they were leading in the sec-
ond half, threw the ball only ve
times.
We never set out with the idea
to throw this many times or run
the ball this many times. We take
what the defense gives us, Parodi
said. We do not discriminate
against yards, points or wins.
Well take them however we can
get them.
The second thing Hillsdale
proved is that it can play some
defense. The Knights have allowed
a total of 13 points over the last
two weeks and other than one big
play, shut down El Camino run-
ning back Brandon Gip.
All told, Hillsdale allowed only
144 yards of total offense. Take
away a phenomenal 57-yard run
from Gip one that saw him run
over four tacklers and the Colts
managed only 87 yards for the rest
of the game.
We talked all week about (what
it takes to stop the Colts
offense), Parodi said. Were set
up to stop the run, but its up to
[the players] to do it.
Butcher hauled in a 2-yard scor-
ing pass from Carrithers to put
Hillsdale up 7-0 less than ve min-
utes into the game, but El Camino
(2-2, 5-3) got on the scoreboard
late in the rst quarter on Gips
beastmode run. Hillsdales John
Paran, however, blocked the extra
point attempt and the Colts still
trailed 7-6.
That would be as close as El
Camino would be the rest of the
night as the Colts failed to take
advantage of any of the turnovers
Hillsdale committed.
The Knights second turnover
came deep in their own territory
with El Camino recovering a fum-
ble at the Hillsdale 8-yard line.
The Knights defense held rm,
however, and they denied the Colts
any points when a 28-yard eld
goal attempt was partially blocked
and came up well short.
The Knights finally got its
offense on track late in the second
quarter and seized momentum
going into halftime when
Boscacci turned a slow-developing
screen pass into a 42-yard score to
put Hillsdale up 14-6 at the break.
Hillsdale upped its lead to 21-6
on its rst drive of the third quar-
ter, needing eight plays to go 36
yards following an 8-yard El
Camino punt. Boscacci took it in
from a yard out for the score.
The Knights put the icing on
cake late in the fourth when
Carrithers hooked up with Butcher
again, this time for a 32-yard scor-
ing strike with 3:41 to play.
It was awesome, Parodi said.
Before the game, we talked about
having fun. We were pretty
loose. When you get uptight, bad
things happen.
Continued from page 11
KNIGHTS
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
KANSAS CITY, Mo. If it had
been a foul ball or broken bat that
struck John Coomer in the eye as he
watched a Kansas City Royals game,
the courts likely wouldnt force the
team to pay for his surgeries and suf-
fering.
But because it was a hot dog thrown
by the team mascot behind the
back, no less he just may have a
case.
The Missouri Supreme Court is
weighing whether the baseball rule
a legal standard that protects teams
from being sued over fan injuries
caused by events on the eld, court or
rink should also apply to injuries
caused by mascots or the other per-
sonnel that teams employ to engage
fans. Because the case could set a
legal precedent, it could change how
teams in other cities and sports
approach interacting with fans at
their games.
Coomer, of Overland Park, Kan.,
says he was injured at a September
2009 Royals game when the teams
lion mascot, Sluggerrr, threw a 4-
ounce, foil-wrapped wiener into the
stands that struck his eye. He had to
have two surgeries one to repair a
detached retina and the other to
remove a cataract that developed and
implant an articial lens. Coomers
vision is worse now than before he
was hurt and he has paid roughly
$4,800 in medical costs, said his
attorney, Robert Tormohlen.
Coomer, 53, declined to discuss the
case. His lawsuit seeks an award of
over $20,000 from the team, but
the actual amount he is seeking is
likely much greater. Tormohlen
declined to discuss the actual amount.
Fan suing K.C. Royals
over mascot incident
16
Weekend Nov. 2-3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
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downfall was their inability to
throw the ball. Neither starting
quarterback Faave Brown, nor
third-stringer Aidan Pierce (back-
up Cameron Greenough was
injured last week) managed to
gain a yard through the air. They
each completed a pass one to
Spencer Smith and one to
Clifford but for no yardage.
SHP safety J.R. Hardy, howev-
er, managed to intercept each of
them Brown in the first quar-
ter and Pierce in the third.
Im completely happy and
completely frustrated, Poulos
said. Im happy because were
finally getting some push with
our running game. Im frustrated
with our inconsistency.
It appeared SHP (3-0 PAL Bay,
8-0 overall) was poised to turn
the game into a rout early on.
After only three offensive plays,
the Gators held a 12-0 lead. SHP
took the opening kickoff and
starting from its own 20 needed
only two plays to find paydirt.
Segre picked up eight yards on
his first carry before exploding
for 72 yards and a touchdown on
his second touch.
After Hardy made his first inter-
ception of the game a high-
flying, acrobatic catch the
Gators needed just one play to
find the end zone. Randall took
the snap and rolled to his right
and found Segre in flat. He turned
up field, got a block to get to the
corner and then juked the Sequoia
defensive back out of shoes and
sprinted down the sideline for a
70-yard score and a 12-0 SHP
lead.
On three touches in less than
three minutes of play, Segre had
150 yards of total offense and
two touchdowns.
Weve had some trouble start-
ing strong, Segre said. That
felt real good (to score two touch-
downs quickly).
Sequoia was staggered but the
Cherokees cleared their head and
did a good job of shutting down
the Gators for the rest of the half.
Sequoia (0-4, 3-5) lost Brown
late in the first quarter and turned
to Pierce the rest of the way. He
did a good job of moving the
Cherokees, but the SHP defense,
while bending, never did break.
Sequoia got as far as the
Gators 28-yard line in the first
half before settling for a Matt
Jenkins 43-yard field goal and
trailed just 12-3 at halftime.
In the second half, the Gators
finally got into a rhythm offen-
sively and scored on their first
three possessions. After forcing
a Sequoia punt to star the third
quarter, the Gators drove 80 yards
on 10 plays, culminating with a
Randall to Mitch Martella scor-
ing pass for 32 yards and a 19-3
lead.
Sequoia followed that by put-
ting together its best drive of the
day. Starting at his own 33,
Pierce guided the Cherokees down
the field, getting to the Gators
24-yard line.
On the next play, however,
Hardy came up with his second
pick of the day and returned it to
the 47 to set up SHPs next scor-
ing drive.
The Gators needed just seven
plays to go 53 yards, with Segre
scoring his third touchdown of
the day from three yards out for a
26-3 advantage.
Segre then completed his four-
touchdown day by taking it in
from eight yards on the Gators
next possession for the final
score of the day.
Continued from page 11
GATORS
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
J.R. Hardy intercepts a pass in Sacred Heart Preps 33-3 win over Sequoia.
SPORTS 17
Weekend Nov. 2-3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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NATIONALCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
Dallas 4 4 0 .500 230 186
Philadelphia 3 5 0 .375 176 211
Washington 2 5 0 .286 173 229
N.Y. Giants 2 6 0 .250 141 223
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
New Orleans 6 1 0 .857 196 120
Carolina 4 3 0 .571 170 96
Atlanta 2 5 0 .286 166 184
Tampa Bay 0 7 0 .000 100 163
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Green Bay 5 2 0 .714 212 158
Detroit 5 3 0 .625 217 197
Chicago 4 3 0 .571 213 206
Minnesota 1 6 0 .143 163 225
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
Seattle 7 1 0 .875 205 125
San Francisco 6 2 0 .750 218 145
Arizona 4 4 0 .500 160 174
St. Louis 3 5 0 .375 165 198
AMERICANCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 6 2 0 .750 179 144
N.Y. Jets 4 4 0 .500 143 211
Miami 4 4 0 .500 174 187
Buffalo 3 5 0 .375 176 213
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Indianapolis 5 2 0 .714 187 131
Tennessee 3 4 0 .429 145 146
Houston 2 5 0 .286 122 194
Jacksonville 0 8 0 .000 86 264
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Cincinnati 6 3 0 .667 217 166
Baltimore 3 4 0 .429 150 148
Cleveland 3 5 0 .375 148 179
Pittsburgh 2 5 0 .286 125 153
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
Kansas City 8 0 0 1.000 192 98
Denver 7 1 0 .875 343 218
San Diego 4 3 0 .571 168 144
Oakland 3 4 0 .429 126 150
ThursdaysGame
Miami 22, Cincinnati 20, OT
SundaysGames
Minnesota at Dallas, 10 a.m.
Tennessee at St. Louis, 10 a.m.
Atlanta at Carolina, 10 a.m.
New Orleans at N.Y. Jets, 10 a.m.
Kansas City at Buffalo, 10 a.m.
San Diego at Washington, 10 a.m.
Philadelphia at Oakland, 1:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Seattle, 1:05 p.m.
Baltimore at Cleveland, 1:25 p.m.
Pittsburgh at New England, 1:25 p.m.
Indianapolis at Houston, 5:30 p.m.
Open: Arizona, Denver, Detroit, Jacksonville, N.Y. Gi-
ants, San Francisco
MondaysGame
Chicago at Green Bay, 5:40 p.m.
Thursday, Nov. 7
Washington at Minnesota, 5:25 p.m.
Sunday, Nov. 10
Detroit at Chicago, 10 a.m.
Philadelphia at Green Bay, 10 a.m.
Jacksonville at Tennessee, 10 a.m.
Cincinnati at Baltimore, 10 a.m.
St. Louis at Indianapolis, 10 a.m.
Seattle at Atlanta, 10 a.m.
Oakland at N.Y. Giants, 10 a.m.
Buffalo at Pittsburgh, 10 a.m.
Carolina at San Francisco, 1:05 p.m.
Denver at San Diego, 1:25 p.m.
Houston at Arizona, 1:25 p.m.
Dallas at New Orleans, 5:30 p.m.
NFL GLANCE
EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 2 0 1.000
Toronto 1 1 .500 1
Brooklyn 1 1 .500 1
New York 1 1 .500 1
Boston 0 2 .000 2
SOUTHEASTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 1 1 .500
Charlotte 1 1 .500
Miami 1 2 .333 1/2
Orlando 1 2 .333 1/2
Washington 0 2 .000 1
CENTRALDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Indiana 2 0 1.000
Detroit 1 1 .500 1
Chicago 1 1 .500 1
Cleveland 1 1 .500 1
Milwaukee 1 1 .500 1
WESTERNCONFERENCE
SOUTWESTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Houston 2 0 1.000
San Antonio 2 0 1.000
Dallas 1 1 .500 1
Memphis 1 1 .500 1
New Orleans 0 2 .000 2
NORTHWEST DIVISION
W L Pct GB
Minnesota 2 0 1.000
Oklahoma City 1 1 .500 1
Portland 1 1 .500 1
Denver 0 2 .000 2
Utah 0 2 .000 2
PACIFICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Phoenix 2 0 1.000
L.A. Clippers 2 1 .667 1/2
Golden State 1 1 .500 1
Sacramento 1 1 .500 1
L.A. Lakers 1 2 .333 1 1/2
FridaysGames
Orlando 110, New Orleans 90
Philadelphia 109,Washington 102
Charlotte 90, Cleveland 84
Milwaukee 105, Boston 98
Atlanta 102,Toronto 95
Minnesota 100, Oklahoma City 81
Houston 113, Dallas 105
Memphis 111, Detroit 108, OT
Brooklyn 101, Miami 100
Portland 113, Denver 98
Phoenix 87, Utah 84
L.A. Clippers 110, Sacramento 101
San Antonio 91, L.A. Lakers 85
Saturdays Games
Cleveland at Indiana, 4 p.m.
Chicago at Philadelphia, 5:30 p.m.
Charlotte at New Orleans, 5 p.m.
Memphis at Dallas, 5:30 p.m.
Toronto at Milwaukee, 5:30 p.m.
Houston at Utah, 6 p.m.
San Antonio at Portland, 7 p.m.
Sacramento at Golden State, 7:30 p.m.
SundaysGames
Brooklyn at Orlando, 3 p.m.
Washington at Miami, 3 p.m.
Boston at Detroit, 3 p.m.
Phoenix at Oklahoma City, 4 p.m.
Minnesota at New York, 4:30 p.m.
Atlanta at L.A. Lakers, 6:30 p.m.
NBA GLANCE
EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Toronto 14 10 4 0 20 48 32
Tampa Bay 13 9 4 0 18 43 33
Detroit 14 8 4 2 18 33 37
Boston 12 8 4 0 16 35 22
Montreal 14 8 6 0 16 40 27
Ottawa 13 4 6 3 11 39 43
Florida 13 3 8 2 8 26 46
Buffalo 15 2 12 1 5 23 43
METROPOLITANDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 14 10 4 0 20 45 33
N.Y. Islanders 13 5 5 3 13 42 43
Washington 13 6 7 0 12 41 38
Carolina 13 4 6 3 11 26 39
N.Y. Rangers 12 5 7 0 10 20 37
Columbus 12 5 7 0 10 33 33
New Jersey 12 3 5 4 10 26 37
Philadelphia 12 3 9 0 6 20 37
WESTERNCONFERENCE
CENTRALDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Colorado 12 11 1 0 22 38 18
Chicago 13 8 2 3 19 45 38
St. Louis 11 8 1 2 18 42 25
Minnesota 14 7 4 3 17 34 34
Nashville 13 6 5 2 14 27 37
Dallas 13 5 6 2 12 33 39
Winnipeg 14 5 7 2 12 34 40
PACIFICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
San Jose 13 10 1 2 22 51 24
Anaheim 14 10 3 1 21 44 36
Phoenix 14 9 3 2 20 48 44
Vancouver 15 9 5 1 19 42 41
Los Angeles 14 9 5 0 18 40 36
Calgary 13 5 6 2 12 39 47
Edmonton 14 3 9 2 8 36 54
NOTE:Two points for a win,one point for overtime
loss.
FridaysGames
N.Y. Islanders 5, Ottawa 4, SO
Washington 7, Philadelphia 0
Pittsburgh 4, Columbus 2
Tampa Bay 3, Carolina 0
St. Louis 4, Florida 0
Minnesota 4, Montreal 3
Colorado 3, Dallas 2, OT
Detroit 4, Calgary 3
SaturdaysGames
Chicago at Winnipeg, noon
Anaheim at Buffalo, 4 p.m.
St. Louis at Tampa Bay, 4 p.m.
Philadelphia at New Jersey, 4 p.m.
Boston at N.Y. Islanders, 4 p.m.
Carolina at N.Y. Rangers, 4 p.m.
Florida at Washington, 4 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Columbus, 4 p.m.
Toronto at Vancouver, 4 p.m.
Montreal at Colorado, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Edmonton, 7 p.m.
Nashville at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m.
Phoenix at San Jose, 7:30 p.m.
SundaysGames
Dallas at Ottawa, 10 a.m.
Calgary at Chicago, 4:30 p.m.
New Jersey at Minnesota, 5 p.m.
BASEBALL
Major LeagueBaseball
MLB Suspended Chicago White Sox minor
league RHP Nicholas Blount (Great Falls-Pioneer)
50 games after testing positive for an ampheta-
mine. Suspended Chicago Cubs minor league SS
Elliot Soto (Daytona-FSL) 50 games after a second
violation for a drug of abuse.
AmericanLeague
BOSTONREDSOX Exercised the 2014 contract
option on LHP Jon Lester.
CHICAGOWHITESOX Sent RHP Simon Castro
outright to Charlotte (IL).
CLEVELANDINDIANS Exercised the 2014 con-
tract option on RHP Ubaldo Jimenez, who voided
the contract. Declined the 2014 contract option
on OF Jason Kubel.Agreed to terms with INF Ryan
Rohlinger and RHP J.C. Ramirez on minor league
contracts.
DETROIT TIGERS Declined the 2014 contract
option on RHP Jose Veras.Announced OF Matt Tu-
iasosopo was claimed off waivers by Arizona.
Reinstated INF Danny Worth from the 60-day DL.
NHL GLANCE
TRANSACTIONS
vs. Seattle
1:25p.m.
FOX
12/8
vs.Carolina
1:05p.m.
FOX
11/10
@Saints
1:25p.m.
FOX
11/17
@Redskins
5:40p.m.
ESPN
11/25
vs.Rams
1:25p.m.
FOX
12/1
vs.Titans
1:05p.m.
CBS
11/24
vs.Philly
1:05p.m.
FOX
11/3
@Giants
10a.m.
CBS
11/10
@Houston
10a.m.
CBS
11/17
vs.Phoenix
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/2
@Montreal
4p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/26
@Ottawa
2p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/27
@L.A. Kings
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/30
vs.Canucks
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/7
vs. Buffalo
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/5
@Tampa
10a.m.
FOX
12/15
@Dallas
1:30p.m.
CBS
11/28
@Jets
10a.m.
CBS
12/8
@Winnipeg
5p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/10
at 76ers
4p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/4
vs.Lakers
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/30
@LAC
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/31
vs.Kings
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/2
at Spurs
5:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/8
at Minnes.
5p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/6
@Memphis
5p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/9
18
Weekend Nov. 2-3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/WORLD
$12.00
Eat Lunch Downtown and
get your Hair Cut!
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
We Do Skin Fades
SAIGON BARBER SHOP
35 South B Street / 1st Ave.
(Next to China Bee)
Downtown San Mateo 94401
(650)340-8848
Mention this ad- Daily Journal Special
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HAIRCUT (reg.$14)
S.A.M S A M
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Hillsdale
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safety.
The salmonella outbreak announced in
early October and traced to Foster Farms
chicken has grown to more than 360 cases
in 21 states, including California, accord-
ing to the Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention.
Among them reportedly is Claverie who
seeks damages for, among other things,
medical care and negligence for the two
rotisserie cooked chickens she purchased
Sept. 11 at the El Camino Real Costco in
South San Francisco. The chicken was taint-
ed with a dangerous strain of salmonella
known as Salmonella Heidelberg that is
antibiotic resistant, the suit states.
Within a couple hours of eating the chick-
en in a sandwich, Claverie developed
severe stomach pain, cramps, diarrhea,
coldness and shivering and required med-
ical care, the suit states.
Claverie became physically weak, caus-
ing her to fall and fracture her neck which
required surgery, the suit states.
Foster Farms knew or should have known
as early as March that its poultry was con-
taminated because it knew of other con-
sumers hospitalized with salmonella illness
and, over the next six months, hundreds of
customers in as many as 20 states were sick-
ened, the suit states.
Yet, according to Claveries suit, Foster
Farms was grossly negligent in that it took
no action. The suit also specically takes
aim at company President Ron Foster who
was quoted that the company couldnt nd
anything that was broken with the produc-
tion process and that pulling the product
from the market would be lying to the con-
sumer that someone else is better.
The companys conduct was malicious,
the suit stated.
The week prior to Claverie ling suit,
Winston Mendoza similarly sued Foster
Farms and Costco on behalf of himself, six
others and his three young children after
purchasing cooked chicken at the store on
Sept. 14. Each became violently sick and
in most cases required hospitalization,
according to the complaint.
Foster Farms has not voluntarily recalled
any of its poultry products although the
South San Francisco Costco did recall thou-
sands of pounds of chicken.
Toby Baird, a Foster Farms spokesman,
said that the company cannot comment on
pending litigation.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
Continued from page 1
LAWSUIT
music from our past that is ever new.
For Passanisi, the symphony has been a
constant in her life throughout many times
of change.
There are so many moments like this
that I carry with me, and so many players
and friends who sat side by side with all of
us over the years, who are now gone, taken
away in life to other cities, and taken away
in death, beyond our reach, she wrote. My
time in the orchestra has been lled with
love and lost. I lost my father. I lost my
mother. I lost many cherished second violin
friends, but the music continued. I changed
jobs. I changed careers. The music contin-
ued. Throughout my life, the constant has
been the music that gives it meaning and
beauty.
Klein has been with the symphony for 29
years and said the musicians are a very
close-knit committed group of people who
are extremely dedicated to the experiences
on stage and success of the organization.
Some have been with the group for 40
years.
After the discovery of the missing funds,
everyone has renewed their efforts to keep
the organization alive and healthy, Klein
said. Debbie spoke [at an event] and led a
strong effort to make sure we able to have a
season even though didnt have money in
the bank at all at that time. Its expensive to
put on a season.
The symphony received $56,000 from the
orchestra itself. Members of the Board of
Directors raised about $140,000 in about
four days among themselves and their fami-
lies, Klein said. There are still donations
coming in, Klein said.
Theres been a great deal of support from
all over the country, Klein said. One of
things most important to all of us is to send
our orchestra into elementary schools that
have no music programs. Were hopeful we
will get through this season; we only have
about half as much we need and the even big-
ger task is reestablishing endowment
funds.
The Baker & McKenzie law rm is assist-
ing the organization in getting its assets
back. The Los Altos police are in their pre-
liminary stages of investigating the loss of
funds.
The groups next shows are 7:30 p.m.
Friday, Nov. 22 and 2:30 p.m. Sunday, Nov.
24 at Bing Concert Hall at Stanford
University. Call 941-5291 for tickets or to
donate to the symphony. You can also visit
peninsulasymphony.org/support.php.
angela@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 1
MUSIC
By Sarah El Deeb
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CAIRO Egypts new military-backed
government had hoped trying Mohammed
Morsi would close the chapter on his presi-
dency. Instead, the trial of the ousted
Islamist president on charges of inciting
murder, which begins Monday, is only
compounding their troubles.
Morsis supporters plan widespread
protests on the day of the trial, threatening
to disrupt the proceedings. Security con-
cerns are so high that the venue for the trial
has still not been formally announced,
though it is expected to be held in a heavi-
ly secured police academy in Cairo.
Then there is the political risk of
Morsi s ant i ci pat ed
first public appearance
si nce t he mi l i t ary
deposed him on July 3
and locked him in
secret detention, virtu-
al l y i ncommuni cado.
Morsi will likely rep-
resent himself in the
t ri al , t he fi rst t i me
public figure to do so
in the host of trials of
pol i t i ci ans si nce aut ocrat Hosni
Mubaraks ouster in 2011, Brotherhood
lawyers say. He will use the platform to
insist he is still the true president, ques-
tion the trials legitimacy and turn it
into an indictment of the coup, further
energizing his supporters in the street.
If Morsi is not brought to court at all, his
absence will further throw into question the
fairness of a trial that rights experts say is
already in doubt. Morsis Brotherhood has
denounced the trial as a farce aimed at polit-
ical revenge.
During four months of detention in undis-
closed military facilities, Morsi has been
extensively questioned and has not been
allowed to meet with lawyers. Virtually his
only contact with the outside world was two
phone calls with his family. Brotherhood
supporters have called the detention an out-
right kidnapping, and Morsi has refused to
cooperate with his interrogators.
Rights groups say the rst test in the
trial will be if the judge rules whether Morsi
should be brought out of secret detention
and moved to a regular prison during the
trial. Authorities have said military deten-
tion is necessary for security reasons in the
countrys turmoil.
Further weighing on the trials fairness,
Morsi will be tried in a judicial system
stacked with his adversaries, with whom he
clashed repeatedly during his year-long
presidency. Rights activists even ones
who believe Morsi should be tried for abus-
es during his presidency fear the pro-
ceedings are more concerned with retribu-
tion than justice. And the trial is taking
place in the atmosphere of a widescale
crackdown on the Brotherhood and its
Islamist allies in which several thousand
have been arrested and hundreds killed.
Trial of Egypts Morsi fraught with risks
Mohammed
Morsi
By Annika Ulrich
I
ts not that I should post less; its
that everyone else should post
more The time when your per-
sonal identity was a secret to your col-
leagues is over and done. And that is a good
thing, said social network mogul Randi
Zuckerberg.
In her recent column
for Time Magazine,
Zuckerberg discusses the
backlash she received
from coworkers regard-
ing the photos she post-
ed of her young son.
While she saw the pho-
tos as cute, colleagues
saw them as damaging to her professional
reputation.
Before discussing Zuckerbergs state-
ment, it is rst necessary to point out the
irony: Of all people, it is not surprising
that a multi-millionaire whose fortune is
derived from a social network would sup-
port sharing more of ones life online. As
her name suggests, Zuckerberg is social
network royalty. Not only is she the sister
of Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg and
former Facebook director of market devel-
opment, she is also the CEO of Zuckerberg
Media, a company she founded.
Yet, beyond Zuckerbergs obvious con-
ict of interest, her column shines light on
an issue that has slowly progressed without
signicant attention. As social network
users become more comfortable sharing
pictures and status updates with friends and
acquaintances, how have the rules changed
for mixing business with pleasure?
After consideration, Zuckerberg decided
The blurring of
personal and
professional lives
Diana
New biopic
is a waste of lm
SEE PAGE 21
Underground San Franciscans
A Subterranean Look at San Francisco
High Society. Join History Professor
Michael Svanevik as he reveals little-
known tales about prominent
personalities buried at Cypress Lawn.
The event is 1:30 p.m. Saturday. Meet at
East Gardens Archway at 1370 El Camino
Real, Colma. Wear comfortable walking
shoes for a leisurely walk on hilly terrain
and dress appropriately for the Colma
microclimate. Free.
Docent lecture
David Hockney docent lecture explores
artwork on display at de Young Museum
in San Francisco. The event is 2 p.m.
Saturday at the Belmont Library, 1110
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont. Free.
Da de los Muertos
Four ages 4 and up. Presented by the
Latino Cultural Advisory Committee. The
event is 2 p.m. Saturday at the San
Mateo Public Library, 55 W. Third Ave.,
San Mateo. Free.
Master Gardener clinics
San Mateo Arboretum Society presents
a Master Gardener Plant Clinic from
11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sunday and
Organic/Sustainable Gardening with
Composting from 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m.
Sunday. Kohl Pumphouse in San Mateo
Central Park. Free.
Best bets
By Scott Foundas
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES As creaky as an arthrit-
ic hip, Last Vegas does for four leading
stars of the 70s and 80s what movies like
Tough Guys and Grumpy Old Men did for
survivors of Hollywoods storied Golden
Age: It lets them show they can still throw a
punch, bust a move, and get it on, and that
theyre not quite ready for the Motion
Picture Home just yet. Beyond that, this
genteel Hangover for the AARP crowd has
little to recommend it, though a smattering
of funny gags and the nostalgia value of the
cast keeps the whole thing more watchable
than it has any right to be.
One doesnt exactly expect Death in
Venice from a movie that begins on a shot
of female cellulite jiggling beneath the sur-
face of a Florida community pool. But as
various senior-centric pics have proven,
from Martin Brests delightful caper Going
in Style to Ron Howards Cocoon, going
gray isnt automatically an impediment to a
screenplay that consists of more than death
and Viagra jokes. But Last Vegas scribe
Dan Fogelman (who wrote the monumental-
ly smarter and shrewder Crazy, Stupid,
Love) pretty much sticks to the lowest
common denominator as he contrives to get
four childhood friends together in Sin City
for the bachelor party of the last unmarried
man among them.
Hes named Billy and played by a blow-
dried, spray-tanned Michael Douglas in
what feels like a watered-down version of
Last Vegas a Geritol-powered Hangover
By Lou Kesten
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Its Christmas Eve in Gotham
City not the merriest time to be
Bruce Wayne. For one thing, hes
probably had enough of the Jingle
bells, Batman smells carolers.
This year, hes having a particu-
larly blue Christmas, for the nefar-
ious crime boss Black Mask has put
a $50 million bounty on his head.
Perhaps Bruce should take Alfreds
advice and stay home roasting
chestnuts? Not when hes got a
list and everyone on it is naughty.
Its a rogues gallery of DC Comics
villains, from the familiar (The
Penguin, Bane) to the ridiculous
(Mad Hatter, Calendar Man). And
yes, word has it theres a pesky new
troublemaker called The Joker on
the streets.
Batman: Arkham Origins (for
the Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, Wi i
U, PC, $59.99) is the third install-
ment in Warner Bros. Arkham
series, a grim take on the character
similar to Christopher Nolans
Dark Knight lms. WB has made
some substantial behind-the-
scenes changes, bringing in new
writers, new voiceover talent and,
most signicantly, a new develop-
ment team. But fans of the earlier
games, particularly 2011s
Arkham City, will be happy to
discover that this new chapter
retains much of their smooth game-
play.
Without even digging into the
main story line, its just at-out fun
to spread Batmans wings and soar
Batmans black-and-blue Christmas in Origins
See ORIGINS, Page 22
See STUDENTS, Page 22 See VEGAS, Page 22
WEEKEND JOURNAL 20
Weekend Nov. 2-3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Susan Cohn
DAILY JOURNAL SENIOR CORRESPONDENT
AN OLYMPIANS LEGACY: THE
BOB CHOW FIREARMS COLLEC-
TION AT THE NORTHEASTERN
NEVADA MUSEUM IN ELKO. When
Bob Chow, a former U.S. Olympic Team
member from San Francisco, died on Oct.
17, 2003, at the age of 92, his legacy in
the world of firearms was assured. First,
Chow was a champion pistol shooter who
was a member of the 1948 U.S. Olympic
Team that competed in London. Chow was
the only U.S. rapid-fire shooter to score 60
hits in the match and he placed 13th over-
all. Second, Chow was a renowned pistol-
smith, who from the 1950s until the 1980s
had his own shop in the Mission District
of San Francisco. Chow built pistols for
competition shooters and lawmen alike,
and his creations were, and still are, much
sought after. (He was known for polishing
the internal surfaces of his pieces as much
as the exterior.) Finally, Chow donated
carefully selected pieces from his personal
firearm collection to the Northeastern
Nevada Museum in Elko, where the Bob
Chow Firearms Collection makes that
museum the holder of the largest public
assemblage of guns in Nevada.
HOW THE CHOW COLLECTION
CAME TO ELKO. Apersonal connection
brought Chows collection to the
Northeastern Nevada Museum. Larry
Caughlan, a wildlife biologist with strong
connections to the Elko area, wanted train-
ing in rapid-fire pistol shooting and went
to Chow for lessons. Caughlan learned that
Chow was going to retire and was looking
for a place for his extensive weapons col-
lection. Caughlan contacted Howard
Hickson, director of the museum, and
Hickson and Dr. Thomas Gallagher, a mem-
ber of the Museums Board of Directors,
worked with Chow until September 1988,
when Chow donated 70 weapons to the
Museum. Hickson said, I traveled to San
Francisco to persuade Bob Chow to give
his magnificent firearms collection to the
museum. His guns were outstanding. Lynn
Rubel, the Museum registrar, traveled to
San Francisco and brought the firearms to
Elko. An additional 30 items, mostly Civil
War memorabilia, were included in the gift.
HIGHLIGHTS OF THE CHOW COL-
LECTION. The Chow collection includes
a number of notable specimens. There is a
Winchester 1873, The Gun That Won The
West, a model known to many through the
movie Winchester 73, starring James
Stewart; a Colt 1902 Sporting Model .38,
a pistol designed by John Browning, the
forerunner of the Model of 1911, which
was until relatively recently the standard
issue pistol for most branches of the U.S.
Military; and a Star Double Action of
1858, the third most popular revolver dur-
ing the Civil War behind Colt and
Remington. (The Navy models differed
from the Army models in their use of a
.36 caliber round ball, while the Army
models used a .44 caliber ball. The reason-
ing was that the Army might need a more
powerful weapon in order to stop a horse.)
Also on display is a Tabatiere Zulu shot-
gun, an example of the common practice of
converting late 19th century American,
British and French percussion military
muzzle loading muskets to use shotgun
shells by salvaging as many existing parts
as possible and adding a breech loading
mechanism.
BOB CHOW, THE TEACHER OF
THE TEACHERS. In his later years,
Chow spent a great deal of time at the
Coyote Point Rifle and Pistol Club in San
Mateo, as an instructor of the techniques of
marksmanship. Jay Finkelstein, who cur-
rently serves as a Range Safety Officer at
the Club, said, Bob Chow was the teacher
of the teachers of marksmanship at Coyote
Point. In the shooting sports he was
superb and he was known as a genius gun-
smith, particularly with the .45 Colt.
Some of the many medals that Chow won
are on permanent display at the Coyote
Point club.
MUSEUM PARTICULARS. The
Northeastern Nevada Museum is located at
1515 Idaho St. Elko, Nev. In addition to the
Bob Chow Firearms Collection, the muse-
um contains an American Mastodon exhib-
it, featuring rare fossils found near Elko;
the Wanamaker Wildlife Wing, displaying
mounted animals from around the world;
and numerous cases holding objects relat-
ing to mining and ranching. Look for the
wooden, cow-hoof shoes worn by a clever
cattle rustler. The shoes left behind no
human footprints, stumping law enforce-
ment ofcials until they caught the thief
red-footed, wearing his contraptions. For
more information visit www.muse-
umelko.org or call (775) 738-3418.
Susan Cohn can be reached at susan@smdai-
lyjournal.com or www.twitter.com/susanci-
tyscene.
MUSEUM GOTTA SEE UM
RON ANFINSON
ELKO MUSEUM HOLDS THE LARGEST PUBLIC COLLECTION OF GUNS IN NEVADA.The rearm
collection of Bob Chow, a U.S. Olympic shooting competitor and longtime instructor at the
Coyote Point Rie and Pistol Club in San Mateo, is part of the extensive permanent collection
of the Northeastern Nevada Museum in Elko.
ABCs This Week 8 a.m.
White House adviser Dan Pfeiffer; Sen.
Rand Paul, R-Ky.
NBCs Meet the Press 8 a.m.
Mitt Romney; Gov. Deval Patrick, D-Mass.
CBS Face the Nation 8:30 a.m.
Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif.; Rep. Mike
Rogers, R-Mich.; Michael Hayden, former
head of the National Security Agency and
the CIA.
CNNs State of the Union 3 p.m.
Sen. Kelly Ayotte, R-N.H.
Fox News Sunday 8 a.m.
Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C.
Sunday news shows
WEEKEND JOURNAL 21
Weekend Nov. 2-3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
A FAMILY SHARING HOPE IN CHRIST
HOPE EVANGELICAL
LUTHERAN CHURCH
600 W. 42nd Ave., San Mateo
Pastor Eric Ackerman
Worship Service 10:00 AM
Sunday School 11:00 AM
Hope Lutheran Preschool
admits students of any race, color and national or ethnic origin.
License No. 410500322.
Call (650) 349-0100
HopeLutheranSanMateo.org
Baptist
PILGRIM BAPTIST CHURCH
Dr. Larry Wayne Ellis, Pastor
(650) 343-5415
217 North Grant Street, San Mateo
Sunday Worship Services 8 & 11 am
Sunday School 9:30 am
Wednesday Worship 7pm
www.pilgrimbcsm.org
LISTEN TO OUR
RADIO BROADCAST!
(KFAX 1100 on the AM Dial)
4:30 a.m.at 5:30 PM
Buddhist
SAN MATEO
BUDDHIST TEMPLE
Jodo Shinshu Buddhist
(Pure Land Buddhism)
2 So. Claremont St.
San Mateo
(650) 342-2541
Sunday English Service &
Dharma School - 9:30 AM
Reverend Henry Adams
www.sanmateobuddhisttemple.org
Church of Christ
CHURCH OF CHRIST
525 South Bayshore Blvd. SM
650-343-4997
Bible School 9:45am
Services 11:00am and 2:00pm
Wednesday Bible Study 7:00pm
Minister J.S. Oxendine
Clases de Biblicas Y Servicio de
Adoracion
En Espanol, Si UD. Lo Solicita
www.church-of-christ.org/cocsm
Congregational
THE
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
OF SAN MATEO - UCC
225 Tilton Ave. & San Mateo Dr.
(650) 343-3694
Worship and Church School
Every Sunday at 10:30 AM
Coffee Hour at 11:45 AM
Nursery Care Available
www.ccsm-ucc.org
Lutheran
GLORIA DEI LUTHERAN
CHURCH AND SCHOOL
(WELS)
2600 Ralston Ave., Belmont,
(650) 593-3361
Sunday Schedule: Sunday
School / Adult Bible Class,
9:15am; Worship, 10:30am
Non-Denominational
REDWOOD CHURCH
Our mission...
To know Christ and make him known.
901 Madison Ave., Redwood City
(650)366-1223
Sunday services:
9:00AM & 10:45AM
www.redwoodchurch.org
Non-Denominational
Church of the
Highlands
A community of caring Christians
1900 Monterey Drive
(corner Sneath Lane) San Bruno
(650)873-4095
Adult Worship Services:
Friday: 7:30 pm (singles)
Saturday: 7:00 pm
Sun 7, 8:30, 10, & 11:30 am,
5 pm
Youth Worship Service:
For high school & young college
Sunday at 10:00 am
Sunday School
For adults & children of all ages
Sunday at 10:00 am
Donald Sheley, Founding Pastor
Leighton Sheley, Senior Pastor
By Jocelyn Noveck
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Lets start with the relatively good news:
Diana, a new biopic about the last two
years of Princess Dianas life, is not nearly
as horrendous as some of the reviews in her
homeland may have led you to believe.
(Car-crash cinema, one British paper
opined.)
Now the bad news: Its just not very
good.
And thats a shame, in at least three ways.
First, the gifted actress Naomi Watts
deserves to be in a better movie. Second,
Oliver Hirschbiegel, who directed the
admired and Oscar-nominated German-lan-
guage lm Downfall, about Adolf Hitler,
somehow, er, falls down here.
Finally, and most unfortunately, an
opportunity is lost to dig deeper into a per-
sonality that fascinated the world like few
others in our modern times the most
famous woman in the world, as the movie
aptly calls her.
So where does it go wrong? For starters,
the lmmakers may have been constrained
by a desire to be respectful. Its not hard to
imagine why. Dianas two sons are very
much alive, for one thing.
But blame must also be laid on the script.
Yes, we know that royals speak woodenly
in public. But were pretty sure they, and
the non-royals in their lives, loosen up in
private. Stephen Jeffreys script sometimes
sounds like hes unaware how real people
chat, irt, fall in love.
Speaking of love: the lm focuses on
Dianas nearly two-year affair a passion-
ate one, by all accounts with Pakistani
heart surgeon Hasnat Khan.
That affair isnt news. But the film
implies that Dodi Fayed, the boyfriend who
died with her in that 1997 crash in a Paris
trafc tunnel, was merely a minor ing a
ing that was chiey an effort by Diana to
make Khan jealous.
Is this true? Well, its the contention of a
2000 book the script is based on, Kate
Snells Diana: Her Last Love (Snell is an
associate producer on the lm). But Khan
has told the British media he has no inten-
tion of seeing the lm, and that hes sure it
got it all wrong.
The lm IS slavishly devoted to captur-
ing Dianas look and style. Watts wears a
prosthetic nose, and works gamely to cap-
ture Dianas coy expressions and body lan-
guage. And it must be said that the clothes
carefully recreated look great.
The lm starts on that fateful Paris night,
at the Ritz Hotel. As Diana, Dodi and a
small entourage enter the elevator to leave
after dinner, the scene turns eerily into sim-
ulated security footage, hinting at the
painstaking investigations to come.
We all know what happens next. But we
dont see it. Instead, the movie rewinds two
years. Diana is separated from Charles, liv-
ing in Kensington Palace, heating up
baked beans for supper.
In a chance hospital meeting, she
encounters Khan (Naveen Andrews of
Lost and The English Patient, who
might have done a better job with better
dialogue.) The two irt. She: Hospitals
fascinate me! He, explaining his passion
for his job: You dont perform the opera-
tion. It performs you.
Soon, the two are having secret trysts.
Some of it feels unlikely. Diana, showing
up alone at 4 a.m. to see her lover at his
hospital? Putting on a dark wig so they
can visit a jazz club? Lovingly doing dirty
dishes at Khans messy little apartment?
But actually its pretty much all based on
anecdotes from author Snell or others.
In any case, heres the thing: The movie
may not be great, but for some it
will be a ne guilty pleasure.
Just watching how Diana
lived the last two years of
her life or, OK,
watching some
approximation of
it is not the
worst way to
spend two
hours.
After all:
This is
Diana were
t a l k i n g
about.
Di a n a ,
a n
Ent e r t a i nme nt
One Films release, is
rated PG-13 by the
Motion Picture Association
of America for brief strong
language, some sensuality and
smoking. Running time:
113 minutes. One and a
half stars out of
four.
Mediocre Diana wastes an opportunity
Lack of black women
becomes SNL issue
By David Bauder
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK Kerry Washingtons turn as host of Saturday
Night Live this week gives that television institution some-
thing it hasnt seen much lately: a black woman onstage try-
ing to make people laugh.
The shows diversity has become an issue, pushed to the
forefront by comments from the two black male cast mem-
bers.
No black women are among the 16 repertory or featured
players currently on the show. While Eddie Murphy, Garrett
Morris, Chris Rock, Tim Meadows, Tracy Morgan and current
cast members Kenan Thompson and Jay Pharoah have been
major SNL players, the 137 people who have been cast
members since the show started on NBC in 1975 include four
black women.
The most recent, and most prominent, was biracial Maya
Rudolph, who left in 2007.
Founding producer Lorne Michaels, who is still the shows
top executive and generally keeps the casting process myste-
rious, said hes well aware of the issue and is on the lookout for
black women as potential cast members.
Its not like its not a priority for us, he said in an inter-
view with the Associated Press on Thursday night. It will
happen. Im sure it will happen.
Pharoah told the website The Grio recently that he hoped the
show would have a black woman in its cast, and he had a sug-
gestion: Darmirra Brunson.
Why do I think she should be on the show? he said.
Because shes black, rst of all, and shes really talented.
Shes amazing. She needs to be on SNL.
Its not clear whether she was ever considered, although its
currently a moot point. Brunson is a cast member on Tyler
Perrys show, Love Thy Neighbor, on Oprah Winfreys
OWN network.
Thompson, who Michaels said is as good as anyone whos
been on the show, blamed a lack of quality black comedi-
ennes. Its just a tough part of the business, like in audi-
tions, he told TVGuide. They never nd ones that are ready.
That didnt go over well in the comedy community, with
several people coming forth with suggestions for Thompson.
It was kind of an unfortunate, unthinking thing to say, said
Miriam Petty, a Northwestern University communications
professor and expert on black popular culture.
WEEKEND JOURNAL
22
Weekend Nov. 2-3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL

the actors magnificent aging lothario


from 2009s Solitary Man. When Billy
impulsively proposes to his strapping 31-
year-old girlfriend (in the midst of deliver-
ing a friends eulogy, no less), best bud
Sam (Kevin Kline) the one trapped in
that infernal Florida swimming pool
suggests a boys weekend in Vegas, and the
rest of this white-haired wolf pack is soon
to follow. Back when they were kids on the
streets of Brooklyn, Billy and his pals
were known as the Flatbush Four, though
now theyre mainly just flat and bushed: In
addition to Sam, theres stroke survivor
Archie (Morgan Freeman, essentially
reprising his Bucket List character) and
surly widower Paddy (Robert De Niro), who
hasnt forgiven Billy for skipping out on
his wifes funeral (she was their shared
childhood sweetheart).
From all points they converge on the
ultra-luxurious Aria casino resort, where
they find themselves comped with a pent-
house suite and a personal concierge
(Romany Malco) after Archie cleans
house at the blackjack table. That pretty
much gives them the run of the place,
though they do make one important side
trip to nearby Binions, where Billy catch-
es the eye of a jazz chanteuse shimmering
in a sparkly mauve gown as she belts out
Only You in a desolate hotel bar.
The singer, Diana (Mary Steenburgen), is
also of a certain age and has been around
the block a few times, but unlike her male
counterparts in Last Vegas, shes been
written as more than a one-dimensional
type, and shes played by the marvelous
Steenburgen with a richness that goes even
beyond whats on the page. Shes an oasis
of real, grown-up emotion in a movie that
often feels more sophomoric (and a lot less
funny) than the concurrent Bad Grandpa.
The rest of the movie rarely if ever rises
to Steenburgens level. Most of the comic
payoffs are so obviously telegraphed that
the audience can see them coming within a
few frames of the setup. Actors like these
can sometimes be a pleasure to watch even
when saddled with sitcom material, because
their timing and delivery is still better than
most. But in Last Vegas, everyone seems
to be on a mildly diverting paid vacation,
especially Freeman, who can scarcely dis-
guise his contempt for the material. He
doesnt just seem to be phoning it in; he
seems to be emailing it in from his trailer.
Last Vegas, a CBS Films release, is
rated PG-13 by the Motion Picture
Association of America for sexual content
and language. Running time: 104 min-
utes.
Continued from page 19
VEGAS
to disregard their comments in favor of
her own theory. She explains that as more
and more people grow up with the pres-
ence of social networking in their daily
lives, sharing is not only more acceptable
but expected; sharing more with col-
leagues creates a more trustworthy person.
Her point is valid; being overly secre-
tive can be interpreted as rudeness and
may isolate a person from his coworkers.
And as she explains, sharing photos that
may have been considered private 10
years ago can make a person seem friend-
lier, more human, more three-dimension-
al. But at the same time, isnt the work-
personal divide still worth something?
As a high school student, I view this
divide differently. While Zuckerberg works
with people of varying ages and attitudes
toward social media, I am surrounded by
my peers, most of whom have long
embraced social networking as an indis-
pensable part of life. Thinking about
moving forward in my life and eventually
getting a full-time job, I feel divided over
this issue about the blurred lines between
personal and private lives.
I agree with Zuckerberg that being a real
person in the eyes of ones colleagues is
beneficial. Relationships and team
dynamic can be strengthened when mem-
bers have an understanding of who each
person is beyond their resumes and job
description. But on the flip side, I also
worry how realistic it is to think that all
of my future coworkers will be open to
my social networking updates, even if
they are rare and appropriate. As I leave
school and enter a more competitive
working atmosphere, I worry that small
mistakes online could have devastating
effects on my professional reputation or
career.
In a poll connected to Zuckerbergs col-
umn, readers were asked to identify the
most annoying type of post from a col-
league. The results surprised me; the plu-
rality of respondents (42 percent) chose
political messages over baby photos,
self-promotion, fundraising appeals, and
even pictures of partying. This reiterates
the idea that it is impossible to know how
a posting will be interpreted by those who
peruse your page. The idea of posts
intended for friends and family negatively
impacting the respect you get from those
at work should make you think twice
before freely posting is daunting and
requires some foresight.
Fortunately, maintaining the divide
between ones personal life and profes-
sional life is a choice. There is no correct
way to approach maintaining separation,
but it cant hurt to have a few of your own
rules in place and stick to them.
Annika Ulrich is a senior at Aragon High School
in San Mateo. Student News appears in the week-
end edition. You can email Student News at
news@smdailyjournal.com.
Continued from page 19
STUDENT
around Gotham, breaking out the
Batclaw whenever you want to climb to
the top of the skyscraper. Even on
Christmas Eve, there are gangs of mis-
creants roaming the streets, so there are
plenty of opportunities to practice
Batmans acrobatic sticuffs on lesser
foes before taking on monsters like
Killer Croc. Gothams interior spaces
house more challenging set pieces that
require a stealthier approach; instead of
jumping into the fray, its wiser to hang
from the rafters and pick off enemies
one by one.
Meanwhile, there are scores of extor-
tion les hidden all over the city, many
of which are blocked by head-scratching
puzzles. And there are a handful of mur-
der mysteries to solve using a clever
mechanism that allows Bruce to digital-
ly reconstruct crime scenes. It took me
about 12 hours to conquer the games
core campaign, but I could easily spend
dozens more searching for everything
Origins has to offer.
The supervillains themselves serve up
some genuinely satisfying boss battles
that are much more imaginative than
your generic beat on the enemy until he
cries uncle fare.
Continued from page 19
ORIGINS
WEEKEND JOURNAL 23
Weekend Nov. 2-3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SATURDAY, NOV. 2
San Mateo History Museum
Docent Training Program. 7:45
a.m to 5 p.m. San Mateo County
History Museum, 2200 Broadway,
Redwood City. Lunch provided.
Free. For more information call 299-
0104 ext. 231 or email educa-
tion@histyory shocwcas.
California Classical Chinese
Dance Competition. 9 a.m. Skyline
College Theater, 3300 College Drive,
San Bruno. Help foster cultural
exchange and promote the beauty
and goodness of Chinese dance.
Tickets are $10 and can be pur-
chased by calling (415) 431-3161.
Registration details can be found at
www.feitian-california.org/chinese-
dance-competition.
San Carlos Grand Library
Reopening Celebration. 10 a.m.
San Carlos Library, 610 Elm St., San
Carlos. The ribbon-cutting ceremo-
ny begins at 10 a.m. There will be
live music and activities for all ages.
Activities include story time, craft
programs, library tours, the Tricycle
Music Festival with Corner
Laughers, and live jazz from the
Carlmont Jazz Band.
Rosener House Open House. 10
a.m. to 1 p.m. 500 Arbor Road,
Menlo Park. Come experience our
adult day program in action!
Rosener House offers care for adults
with challenges, including
Alzheimers, mild cognitive impair-
ment, dementia, Parkinsons or
post-stroke. Free. For more informa-
tion call 322-0126.
Harvest Festival. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Woodside High School, Redwood
City. New puzzles and games. $1
entrance fee. For more information
call 364-3634.
Free Fridays at San Mateo County
History Museum. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
San Mateo County History Museum,
2200 Broadway, Redwood City.
There will be events throughout the
day and a tour at 2 p.m. For more
information call 299-0104 or go to
www.historysmc.org.
Ah Sam Florist Holiday Open
House. Noon to 5 p.m. 2645 S. El
Camino Real. A celebration of the
fall and winter seasons. Discover
enchanting decor. Gorgeous
tablescapes. Artisan gifts. Free. For
more information email
lori@ahsam.com.
Tricycle Music Fest presents: The
Corner Laughers. 1 p.m. San Carlos
Library, 610 Elm St., San Carlos. Free
family music event to promote liter-
acy. Free. For more information go
to www.smcl.org.
Holiday Champagne Reception
and Fundraiser. 1 p.m to 4 p.m.
Plymire Schwartz House, 80
Chestnut Ave., South San Francisco.
$15 donation at the door includes a
tour of the House, a complimentary
beverage and an array of sweet
treats. A non-refundable advance
donation of $10 can be mailed (by
Oct. 26) to Plymire House. For more
information call 296-4012 or email
events@plymirehouse.org.
Animal Connections. 1:30 p.m to
2:30 p.m. 1651 Coyote Point Drive,
San Mateo. Saturdays and Sundays
during the month of November. Are
you an animal lover? Learn about
CuriOdysseys non-releasable ani-
mals. Shows themes will vary. Free
with admission. For more informa-
tion go to www.curiodyssey.org.
Art When East meets West. 2
p.m. to 4 p.m. NanHai Art, 510
Broadway, Millbrae, Suite 301.
NanHai Art is presenting a free sem-
inar series on art exchange
between the east and west on the
following Saturdays: Nov. 2, Nov. 9
and Nov. 16. Free. For more informa-
tion and to RSVP visit www.nanha-
iart.com/news. For questions, call
259-2100 or email art@nanhai.com.
David Hockney Docent Lecture. 2
p.m. Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda
de las Pulgas, Belmont. his docent
lecture explores the major art work
of David Hockney on display at de
Young Museum from Oct. 26, 2013,
to Jan. 20, 2014. Free. For more infor-
mation email conrad@smcl.org.
Da de los Muertos. 2 p.m. San
Mateo Public Library, 55 W. Third
Ave., San Mateo. Presented by the
Latino Cultural Advisory
Committee. For ages 4 and up. Free.
For more information call 522-7838.
BHS Musical Curtains. 7 p.m.
Burlingame High School
Auditorium, 1 Mangini Way,
Burlingame. $15 general admission,
$10 for students, seniors and chil-
dren. For more information call 558-
2854.
Dakila with special guest Raul
Rekow plus Lumbre. 8 p.m. Club
Fox, 2209 Broadway, Redwood City.
$15. For more information call (877)
435-9849 or visit
www.clubfoxrwc.com.
Hillbarn Theater presents Lettice
and Lovage. 8 p.m. Hillbarn
Theater, 1285 E. Hillsdale Blvd.,
Foster City. Tickets start at $23 and
can be purchased at
www.HillbarnTheater.org or by
emailing boxoffice@hillbarnthe-
ater.org.
Legends of the Celtic Harp. 8 p.m.
Unitarian Universalist Church of San
Mateo, 300 E. Santa Inez Ave., San
Mateo. Patrick Ball, Lisa Lynne and
Aryeh Frankfurter create a dramatic
ensemble that takes you deep into
the myths, magic and fabled history
of a captivating instrument. Tickets
are $18 in advance and $20 at the
door. Tickets for students and seniors
are $16 in advance and $18 at the
door. For more information contact
Lisa Lynne at lisa@lisalynne.com.
Pacifica Spindrift Players presents
Social Security, a comedy by An-
drew Bergman. 8 p.m. Muriel Watkin
Gallery, 1050 Crespi Drive, Pacifica.
Tickets are $25 for adults and $20 for
seniors and students but will be half-
priced during opening week. Runs
through Nov. 24. For tickets call the
reservation line at 359-8002.
Dragon Productions presents Rich
and Famous, a play by John Guare,
directed by Meredith Hagedorn. 8
p.m. The Dragon Theater, 2120 Broad-
way, Redwood City. A surreal comedy
with music that is part vaudeville,
part absurd and an entirely funny
romp through the perils of being a
successful artist. Tickets range from
$25 to $35 and can be purchased at
www.dragonproductions.net. Runs
through Nov. 3.
SUNDAY, NOV. 3
Sunday Farmers Market. 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. San Mateo Avenue between
Jenevein and Sylvan avenues, San
Bruno. For more information go to
www.westcoastfarmersmarkets.org.
Learning the Landscape. 10 a.m. to
3:30 p.m. Monte Bello Open Space
Preserve, Palo Alto. Join docent Dave
Kocsis to see how the motion of the
San Andreas Fault has shaped the
Santa Cruz Mountains while leaving
evidence behind and helping to cre-
ate a variety of natural communities.
This is a seven mile, moderately-
paced excursion with around 2,000
feet of climbing. Free. For more in-
formation go to
www.openspace.org/activities.
San Mateo Arboretum Society
presents Master Gardener Plant
Clinic. 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Kohl
Pumphouse in San Mateo Central
Park, enter at Ninth Avenue and Palm
Avenue. Free. For more information
call 579-0536.
Ah Sam Florist Holiday Open
House. Noon to 5 p.m. 2645 S El
Camino Real. A celebration of the fall
and winter seasons. Discover en-
chanting decor. Gorgeous
tablescapes. Artisan gifts. Free. For
more information email
lori@ahsam.com.
Piano Marathon. Noon to 8:30 p.m.
The Crestmont Conservatory of
Music, 2575 Flores St., San Mateo. The
marathon is a fundraiser. $20 per per-
son. For more information call
574-4633.
San Mateo History Museum Do-
cent Training Program. 12:30 p.m.
to 5 p.m. San Mateo County History
Museum, 2200 Broadway, Redwood
City. Free. For more information call
299-0104 ext. 231 or email educa-
tion@histyoryshocwcase.
San Mateo Arboretum Society
presents Organic/Sustainable Gar-
dening with Composting. 1 p.m. to
2:30 p.m. Kohl Pumphouse in San
Mateo Central Park, enter at Ninth Av-
enue and Palm Avenue. Free. For
more information call 579-0536.
Hillbarn Theater presents Lettice
and Lovage. 2 p.m. Hillbarn Theater,
1285 E. Hillsdale Blvd., Foster City.
Tickets start at $23 and can be pur-
chased at www.HillbarnTheater.org
or by emailing boxoffice@hill-
barntheater.org.
EarthquakeWalk. 2 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Join docents John Wertzler, Paul
Wineman and Noa Doitel for a fun
and educational hike along the San
Andreas Fault. On this two to three
mile stroll, youll stop to discuss the
wonder of plate tectonics and learn
how to prepare for future earth-
quakes. Free. For more information
go to www.openspace.org/activities.
Pacifica Spindrift Players presents
Social Security, a comedy by An-
drew Bergman. 2 p.m. Muriel Watkin
Gallery, 1050 Crespi Drive, Pacifica.
Tickets are $25 for adults and $20 for
seniors and students but will be half-
priced during opening week. Runs
through Nov. 24. For tickets call the
reservation line at 359-8002.
Dragon Productions presents Rich
and Famous, a play by John Guare,
directed by Meredith Hagedorn. 2
p.m. The Dragon Theater, 2120 Broad-
way, Redwood City. A surreal comedy
with music that is part vaudeville,
part absurd and an entirely funny
romp through the perils of being a
successful artist. Tickets range from
$25 to $35 and can be purchased at
www.dragonproductions.net. Runs
through Nov. 3.
BHS Musical Curtains. 2 p.m.
Burlingame High School Auditorium,
1 Mangini Way, Burlingame. $15 gen-
eral admission, $10 for students,
seniors and children. For more infor-
mation call 558-2854.
Piano recital. 2 p.m. Allegro Music
and Dance School, 1123 Industrial
Road, No. 300, San Carlos. Victoria and
Lilianna Gittoes and Suzanne and
Joanne Nie perform the solo songs,
piano concertos and piano duos by
Haydn, Mozart, Kuhlau, Tschaikovsky,
Shostakovich, Mier and Bizet. Free ad-
mission and refreshments. For more
information call 281-1441.
Groovy Judy at 10th Annual Har-
vest Run. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. HAMCDC
Club, 856 Green St., East Palo Alto. For
more information call 853-9758.
An Afternoon with Author Bill
Petrocelli. 3 p.m. Belmont Library,
1110 Alameda de las Pulgas, Bel-
mont. Bill Petrocelli will discuss his
first novel,The Circle of Thirteen. Set
in a turbulent futuristic society, this
provocative drama follows one
womans investigation into the dark
forces unleashing chaos around the
world a thrilling ride that will mes-
merize until the end. Free. For more
information email conrad@smcl.org.
East Palo Alto Blues Festival 2014
Benefit Fundraiser. 6 p.m. Club Fox,
2209 Broadway, Redwood City. $20.
For more information call 877-435-
9849 or go to www.clubfoxrwc.com.
MONDAY, NOV. 4
Hearing Loss Association of the
Peninsula November meeting. 1
p.m. Veterans Memorial Senior Cen-
ter, 1455 Madison Ave., Redwood
City. The program will be provided
by audiologist Erin Harrigan, Au.D
and will begin at 1:30 p.m. with cap-
tioning. Refreshments will be
provided. Free.
BHS Musical Curtains. 2 p.m.
Burlingame High School Auditorium,
1 Mangini Way, Burlingame. $15 gen-
eral admission, $10 for students,
seniors and children. For more infor-
mation call 558-2854.
Dance Connection with Live Music
by the Ron Borelli Trio. Free dance
lessons 6:30 p.m.-7 p.m., open dance
7 p.m.-9:30 p.m. Burlingame Womans
Club, 241 Park Road, Burlingame. $8
members, $10 guests. Light refresh-
ments. Baseball night, end of season.
Bring a new first-time friend and earn
free entry for yourself (only one free
entry per new dancer). Male dance
hosts, free admission. For more in-
formation call 342-2221.
TUESDAY, NOV. 5
Animals in Action. 11 a.m. 1651 Coy-
ote Point Drive, San Mateo. Tuesdays
through Saturdays during the month
of November. Animal Keepers doing
animal enrichment activities, taking
animals for walks or even training
sessions. Free with admission. For
more information go to www.curi-
odyssey.org.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
ing ex-offenders with serious or violent
records supervised by state parole agents,
not county probation.
The study also says parolees who repeat-
edly violate terms of their release should go
to state prisons and not county jails, where
they often are released within days because
of overcrowding.
Researchers interviewed 125 local police
officials, sheriffs, judges, prosecutors,
defense attorneys and probation ofcers for
the $200,000 study, which was funded part-
ly by the U.S. Department of Justice.
The consensus was this happened too
fast, the infrastructure was not ready, and we
went too far. We need to pull back a little
bit, said Stanford Law School professor
Joan Petersilia, the centers co-director.
The Brown administration referred
requests for comment to the state
Department of Corrections and
Rehabilitation. Department spokeswoman
Deborah Hoffman said in an emailed state-
ment that the study shows California has
made remarkable changes in its criminal
justice system since the law took effect. But
she also acknowledged that additional time
and collaboration is needed at all levels of
government to ensure ongoing success.
The state is working with its partners in
local government and law enforcement to
ensure that Californians are protected while
we continue to improve the criminal justice
system, she said.
Covina Police Chief Kim Raney, presi-
dent of the California Police Chiefs
Association, said his organization will
work with other local law enforcement of-
cials next year to change state law so the
reports recommendations can be imple-
mented.
Raney and Petersilia acknowledged that
most of the recommendations run counter to
the demands of federal judges to reduce over-
crowding in the states major prisons.
Brown sought the law to comply with feder-
al court orders requiring the state to reduce
crowding at state prisons to improve
inmates medical care.
Still, Raney said, there are some obvious
gaps that need to be adjusted or corrected.
Some criminals are being sentenced to
decades-long terms in county jails that were
designed to house inmates for less than a
year. The long-term sentences are causing
some of the same problems with medical and
mental health care in county jails that led to
the ongoing lawsuits against the state
prison system.
Thats not sustainable, Raney said.
Moreover, some paroled sex offenders
have repeatedly cut off their tracking
bracelets, although a law that takes effect in
January will keep in them in jail longer
when they are caught. The report recom-
mends that such offenders should be sent to
state prison.
The realignment law has helped reduce the
states inmate population by more than
25,000 over the last two years. The Brown
administration is in talks with a court-
appointed mediator over a February deadline
to further reduce prison crowding.
Federal judges gave the state until the end
of the year to reduce its prison population
by an additional 9,600 inmates. The state
already has made plans to shift about 5,200
of them, sending them to private prisons in
California, a new prison medical facility in
Stockton and re camps.
The governor is asking the federal court
for a three-year delay regarding the remain-
ing 4,400 inmates.
I think youve got to look at all the
options, Raney said. Is it time to make an
investment in prison capacity? I also think
theres a movement toward sentencing
reform, and using private bed space.
Continued from page 1
LAW
her friends, like why do we get brain
freezes when we eat ice cream too fast and
why do we sneeze?
Dainis said she is settling into life at grad
school.
I fell in love with the Bay Area when I
ew out here for interviews, she said. The
weather is gorgeous. Science is not so much
a career, but a lifestyle. Im in the lab a lot;
thats ne by me, its fun.
What does Dainis see in her future? Could
she be the next Bill Nye the Science Guy?
I would like to go into public science for
education media, she said. I love research,
and want to make science videos on a broad-
er scale.
Dainis also offers advice to girls looking
to get into the science and engineering
elds.
My advice to girls who want to get into
science is to pursue what you love and fol-
low it no matter what other people say, she
said. If you really, really love it, you can
make anything work for you. Seek out good
scientic mentors, be they women or men.
Along with her win this year, Dainis was
named a YouTube EDU Guru last year for her
video series.
Visit Dainis YouTube channel at
youtube.com/user/Lexie527.
angela@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 1
DAINIS
COMICS/GAMES
11-2-13
FRIDAYS PUZZLE SOLVED
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SUDOKU
ANSWERS
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Jumble Page 2 La Times Crossword Puzzle Classieds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classieds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
K
e
n
K
e
n

is
a
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is
te
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tr
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m
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k
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to
y
, L
L
C
.
2
0
1
3
K
e
n
K
e
n
P
u
z
z
le
L
L
C
. A
ll r
ig
h
ts
r
e
s
e
r
v
e
d
.
D
is
t. b
y
U
n
iv
e
r
s
a
l U
c
lic
k
fo
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U
F
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, In
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. w
w
w
.k
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k
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.c
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m
1
1
-
2
-
1
3
ACROSS
1 Little kids
5 Fishhook part
9 Pipe type
12 Smell terrible
13 vera
14 Sugarloaf locale
15 Not in harbor
16 Wild party
18 Threshold
20 Natural impulses
21 Sneak a look
22 Genetic letters
23 Goddess of the hunt
26 Like a pittance
30 Pentagon VIP
33 Hud Oscar winner
34 Indigo dye
35 Writer Dinesen
37 Seize
39 Stockholm carrier
40 Drop ones jaw
41 Figure of speech
43 Survey choice
45 Pharaohs river
48 Brats opposite
51 Exit
53 French wine
56 Appraise
57 Twilight, to a poet
58 Diamond number
59 Pizzeria must
60 Toolshed item
61 Does sums
62 Balance
DOWN
1 Pitfall
2 Fable writer
3 Steel plow inventor
4 Glided along
5 Bellow
6 Ring champ
7 L. Hubbard
8 In progress
9 Fuddy-duddy
10 Grape producer
11 Gear teeth
17 Theater offering
19 Similar
22 Lama
24 Sponsorship
25 Ancient ointment
27 Naval off.
28 Estuary
29 Loop trains
30 Band job
31 NASA counterpart
32 Snooze
36 Entered data
38 Dull clang
42 Funhouse feature
44 Ms. Verdugo
46 Shove off
47 Park, Colo.
48 Vigoda and Fortas
49 Scotia
50 Snowballed
51 Former spouses
52 Mailed
54 Assist
55 Sturm Drang
DILBERT CROSSWORD PUZZLE
CRANKY GIRL
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE
GET FUZZY
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2013
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Stay on top of
any situation that has the potential to run amuck.
Extravagance or overindulgence could interfere with
your progress. Keep it simple and within your budget.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Look for openings
to present what you have to offer. Following through on
your promises must be your intent, or you will damage
your reputation. If you make a pledge, keep it.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Everyone will
bend to what you want, but you must be careful to
keep everything transparent and out in the open.
Keep your record clean. You have too much to lose
and everything to gain.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) You will have
to remain focused if you intend to do your own
thing and avoid interference. Be ready to make
an unexpected change that will throw anyone
challenging you off track.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) If you can dream
it, you can get it right now by using your intuition,
imagination and determination. The sky is the limit, so
shoot for the stars.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) Sign up for something
with the intent to win. Your heart is ready to explore
any avenue that promises equality. A personal gain is
based on what you have to offer.
TAURUS ( April 20-May 20) Being for thright
and ready to take action will show your strength
and courage, moving you into a posi tion of
control. A par tnership will help you appreciate
unfamiliar tradi tions.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Base what you do next
on what motivates you the most. Refuse to take care of
demands and responsibilities that dont belong to you.
You will call the shots and reap the rewards.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) If you take part in an
event that teaches you something, it will encourage
you to engage in activities with people who will enrich
your life. An opportunity will begin with friendship.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Your emotions will spin
out of control if you let little things get to you.
Leave your routine behind and enjoy the company
of someone who is fun to be with.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You will learn something
valuable if you observe others. Attending a conference
or lecture will lead to an informative discussion with
someone who can help you restructure an idea with
successful results.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Dont give in to
aggressive behavior. Set your own strategy and move
in a direction that allows you to use your skills and to
enjoy lifes more toothsome moments.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
24 Weekend Nov. 2-3, 2013
THE DAILY JOURNAL
25 Weekend Nov. 2-3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
Employment Services
110 Employment
PROCESS SERVER, FT/PT, Car &
Insurance. Deliver legal papers,
(650)697-9431
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS, HHA, CNAS
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
15 N. Ellsworth Avenue, Ste. 201
San Mateo, CA 94401
PLEASE CALL
650-206-5200
Please apply in person from Monday to Friday
(Between 10:00am to 4:00pm)
You can also call for an appointment or
apply online at
www.assistainhomecare.com
ASSISTA
IN-HOME CARE
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
Established Independent
Small Business is expanding.
Now Accepting Applicatons For:
Bookkeepers
Administrative Assistants
IT Technician
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
PAID INTERNSHIPS
FOR TAX PROFESSIONALS
Apply in Person Monday - November
4, 2013, 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
1501 El Camino Real Suite I
Belmont CA 94002
For more information,
call (650)595-5604 Ext 12
110 Employment
CRYSTAL CLEANING
CENTER
San Mateo, CA
Two positions available:
Customer Service/Seamstress;
Presser
Are you..Dependable,
friendly, detail oriented,
willing to learn new skills?
Do you have.Good English skills, a
desire for steady employment and
employment benefits?
Immediate openings for customer
service/seamstress and presser
positions.
If you possess the above
qualities, please call for an
Appointment: (650)342-6978
DRY CLEANERS / Laundry, part time,
Saturday 7am to 4pm. Counter, must
speak English Apply LaunderLand, 995
El Camino, Menlo Park.
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
RETAIL JEWELRY SALES +
SALES MGR- (jewelry exp req)
Benefits-Bonus-No Nights!
650-367-6500 FX 367-6400
jobs@jewelryexchange.com
RESTAURANTS -
Managers, Servers, Bussers, Bartend-
ers, wanted. New Downtown San Mateo
Restaurant, Call (650)340-7684
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
127 Elderly Care
FAMILY RESOURCE
GUIDE
The San Mateo Daily Journals
twice-a-week resource guide for
children and families.
Every Tuesday & Weekend
Look for it in todays paper to
find information on family
resources in the local area,
including childcare.
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 524321
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
David Nathan Kahn
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, David Nathan Kahn filed a pe-
tition with this court for a decree chang-
ing name as follows:
Present name: David Nathan Kahn
Proposed name: Dakmali Karuna
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on December 4,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 10/18/ 2013
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 10/10/2013
(Published, 10/26/13, 11/02/2013,
11/09/2013, 11/16/2013)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257928
The following person is doing business
as: Sugar Muffn, 6160 mission St., Apt.
1, DALY CITY, CA 94014 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Elizabeth
Sanchez, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Elizabeth Sanchez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/12/13, 10/19/13, 10/26/13, 11/02/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258020
The following person is doing business
as: Conti Auto Sales, 1512 Rollins Rd.,
BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Enrique
Raminez, 1908 Shorview Ave., San Ma-
teo, CA 94401. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on .
/s/ Enrique Raminez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/09/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/12/13, 10/19/13, 10/26/13, 11/02/13).
LIEN SALE - On 11/20/2013 at 980
MONTGOMERY AVE SAN BRUNO, CA
a Lien Sale will be held on a 2005 MAZ-
DA VIN: 1YVFP80C755M31583 STATE:
CA LIC: 5LNV884 at 9am.
26 Weekend Nov. 2-3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257929
The following person is doing business
as: B&F Real Estate, 242 Oak Grove
Ave., ATHERTON, CA 94027 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Pega-
sus FB, LLC, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Limited Liability Company.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on.
/s/ Stephanie Harcus /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/12/13, 10/19/13, 10/26/13, 11/02/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258032
The following person is doing business
as: Chisto, 113 Belmont Ave., SOUTH
SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Tatya-
na Lizyura, 537 Flood Ave., San Francis-
co, CA 94121 and Galina, same address.
The business is conducted by a General
Partnership. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Tatyana Lizyura /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/11/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/12/13, 10/19/13, 10/26/13, 11/02/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257758
The following person is doing business
as: Wag Steady, 3205 Llano St., SAN
MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Martyn Jones,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on N/A.
/s/ Martyn Jones /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/24/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/19/13, 10/26/13, 11/02/13, 11/09/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258113
The following person is doing business
as: Cafe Bliss, 2039 Ralston Ave., BEL-
MONT, CA 94002 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Feng Yan Li,
2532 Ulloa St. San Francisco, CA 94116.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on .
/s/ Feng Yan Li /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/17/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/19/13, 10/26/13, 11/02/13, 11/09/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257666
The following person is doing business
as: Lead Gen Xperts, 1546 El St., SAN
CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Karen Johnson,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on .
/s/ Karen Johnson /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/18/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/19/13, 10/26/13, 11/02/13, 11/09/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257759
The following person is doing business
as: Renew Construction, 1580 Laurel St.,
Ste. b-1, SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Robert Stafford. 829 Edgewwood Rd.
Redwood City, CA 94062. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Robert Stafford /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/24/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/26/13, 11/02/13, 11/09/13, 11/16/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258251
The following person is doing business
as: Garden Gateway Care Home, 12 Sul-
livan Ave., DALY CITY, CA 94015 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Marlyn Sartiaguda Sheumaker, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on .
/s/ Marlyn Sartiaguda Sheumaker /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/25/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/26/13, 11/02/13, 11/09/13, 11/16/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258110
The following person is doing business
as: Glamour Salon Spa, 650 S. Norfolk
St., SAN MATEO, CA 9440 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Kevin
Ngo Dienxuan, 2271 W. Middlefield Rd.,
Mountainview, CA 94043. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Marlyn Sartiaguda Sheumaker /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/17/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/26/13, 11/02/13, 11/09/13, 11/16/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258303
The following person is doing business
as: De Colores Hair Studio, 1403 Chapin
Ave. BELMONT, CA 94002 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Nancy
Serio, 1230 North Rd., Belmot CA
94002. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Nancy Serio /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/30/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/02/13, 11/09/13, 11/16/13, 11/23/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257960
The following person is doing business
as: Organic Body Bar, 4060 El Camino
Real, Studio 25, SAN MATEO, CA 94403
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Diana Dannelly, LLC, CA. The
business is conducted by a Limited Lia-
bility Company. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s/ Diana Dannelly /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/07/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/02/13, 11/09/13, 11/16/13, 11/23/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258283
The following person is doing business
as: Agilmpex, 2319 Alameda De Las Pul-
gas, SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Martin
Rojo, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Martin Rojo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/29/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/02/13, 11/09/13, 11/16/13, 11/23/13).
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF
THE USE OF A FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT #255935
The following person is abandoning the
use of the fictitious business name: Fa-
mous Bail Bonds, 133 Arch St., Ste. 7,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94062. The ficti-
tious business name was filed on
05/17/2013 in the county of San Mateo.
The business was conducted by: Dikran
Ohanian, 6937 Village Pkwy, #2448,
Dublin CA 94568.
/s/ Dikran Ohanian /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 10/18/2013. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 11/02/13,
11/09/2013, 11/16/2013, 11/23/2013).
203 Public Notices
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
BETTY IRENE MARCHAND, aka BET-
TY I. MARCHAND, et al.
Case Number: 123749
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: Betty Irene Marchand,
aka Betty I. Marchand and Betty March-
and. A Petition for Probate has been filed
by Peggy Williams in the Superior Court
of California, County of San Mateo. The
Petition for Probate requests that Ralph
Russell Sims, Jr. be appointed as per-
sonal representative to administer the
estate of the decedent.
The petition requests the decedents will
and codicils, if any, be admitted to pro-
bate. The will and any codicils are avail-
bale for examination in the file kept by
the court.
The petition requests authority to admin-
ster the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This au-
thority will allow the personal representa-
tive to take many actions without obtain-
ing court approval. Before taking certain
very important actions, however, the per-
sonal representative will be required to
give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to
the proposed action.) The independent
administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an ob-
jection to the petition and shows good
cause why the court should not grant the
authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: December 6, 2013
at 9:00 a.m., Dept. 28, Superior Court of
California, County of San Mateo, 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063.
If you object to the granting of the peti-
tion, you should appear at the hearing
and state your objections or file written
objections with the court before the hear-
ing. Your appearance may be in person
or by your attorney.
If you are a creditor or a contingent cred-
itor of the decedent, you must file your
claim with the court and mail a copy to
the personal representative appointed by
the court within the later of either (1) four
months from the date of first issuance of
letters to a general personal representa-
tive, as defined in section 58(b) of the
California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days
from the date of mailing or personal de-
livery to you of a notice under section
9052 of the California Probate Code.
Other California statutes and legal qutho-
ity may affect your rights as a creditor.
You may want to consult with an attorney
knowledgeable in California law.
You may examine the file kept by the
court. If you are a person interested in
the estate, you may file with the court a
Request for Special Notice (form DE-
154) of the filing of an inventory and ap-
praisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special No-
tice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
John Iaccarino, ESQ.
533 Airport Blvd., Ste. 400
BURLINGAME, CA 94010
Dated: October 30, 2013
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on, November 2, 8, 12, 2013.
203 Public Notices
CHILD FIND NOTICE
The San Mateo County SELPA is
seeking children and young adults
from birth to age 21 who may need
special education services, including
highly mobile (such as migrant or
homeless) children with disabilities
and children who are suspected of
having a disability and are in need of
special education. If you believe
your child may have any of these
special needs, please contact your
local school district or the SELPA Of-
fice at (650) 802-5464.
AVISO PARA ENCONTRAR NINOS
SELPA del Condado de San Mateo
est buscando nios y jvenes (de 0
a 21 aos de edad) quienes puedan
necesitar servicios de educacin es-
pecial, incluyendo altamente mviles
(como nios migrantes o desampara-
dos) con discapacidades y nios que
se sospeche tengan una discapaci-
dad y tienen necesidad de servicios
de educacin especial, por favor con-
tacte a su distrito escolar local o la
Oficina de SELPA al (650) 802-5464.
210 Lost & Found
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shop-
ping Cente, by Lunardis market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST JORDANIAN PASSPORT AND
GREEN CARD. Lost in Daly City, If
found contact, Mohammad Al-Najjar
(415)466-5699
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
210 Lost & Found
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
RING FOUND IN BURLINGAME CALL
TO IDENTIFY (description) Foster City
Police Department Property Section
(650)286-3300
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
295 Art
ART PAPER, various size sheets, 10
sheets, $20. (650)591-6596
ART: 5 charcoal nude figures, unframed,
14 x 18, by Andrea Medina, 1980s.
$40. 650-345-3277
RUB DOWN TYPE (Lettraset), hundreds
to choose from. 10 sheets for $10.
(650)591-6596
296 Appliances
2 DELONGHI Heaters, 1500 Watts, new
$50 both (650)520-3425
2 DELONGHI Heaters, 1500 Watts, new
$50 both (650)520-3425
AMANA HTM outdoor furnace heat ex-
changer,new motor, pump, electronics.
Model ERGW0012. 80,000 BTU $50.
(650)342-7933
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
ELECTRIC DRYER (Kenmore) asking
$95, good condition! (650)579-7924
GAS STOVE (Magic Chef) asking $95,
good condition! (650)579-7924
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
296 Appliances
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MAYTAG WALL oven, 24x24x24, ex-
cellent condition, $50 obo, (650)345-
5502
OSTER MEAT slicer, mint, used once,
light weight, easy to use, great for holi-
day $25. (650)578-9208
PRESSURE COOKER Miromatic 4qt
needs gasket 415 333-8540 Daly City
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor,
(650)726-1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24 wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
298 Collectibles
101 MINT Postage Stamps from Eu-
rope, Africa, Latin America. Pre 1941,
All different . $6.00, (650)787-8600
1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1953 CHEVY Bel Air Convertible model.
Sun Star 1:18 scale.Blue. Original box.
$20 cash. (650)654-9252
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
27 Weekend Nov. 2-3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
298 Collectibles
2 VINTAGE Light Bulbs circa 1905. Edi-
son Mazda Lamps. Both still working -
$50 (650)-762-6048
2003 AMERICAN Eagle silver proof dol-
lar. Original velvet box and COA. $70
Cash. (650)654-9252
84 USED European (34), U.S. (50) Post-
age Stamps. Most pre-World War II. All
different, all detached from envelopes.
$4.00 all, 650-787-8600
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
$100., (650)348-6428
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
AUTOGRAPHED GUMBI collectible art
& Gloria Clokey - $35., (650)873-8167
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JAPANESE MOTIF end table, $99
(650)520-9366
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MARK HAMILL autographed Star Wars
Luke figure, unopened rarity. 1995 pack-
age. $75 San Carlos, 650-255-8716.
MEMORABILIA CARD COLLECTION,
large collection, Marilyn Monroe, James
Dean, John Wayne and hundreds more.
$3,300/obo.. Over 50% off
(650)319-5334.
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276
SILVER PIECE dollar circulated $30 firm
415 333-8540 Daly City
STAR WARS 9/1996 Tusken Raider ac-
tion figure, in original unopened package.
$5.00, Steve, SC, 650-255-8716
TATTOO ARTIST - Norman Rockwell
figurine, limited addition, $90., (650)766-
3024
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
UNIQUE, FRAMED to display, original
Nevada slot machine glass plate. One of
a kind. $50. 650-762-6048
WORLD WAR II US Army Combat field
backpack from 1944 $99 SOLD!
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
66 CHEVELLE TOY CAR, Blue collecti-
ble. $12. (415)337-1690
BARBIE BLUE CONVERTIBLE plus ac-
ccessories, excellent shape, $45., SOLD!
LARGE ALL Metal Tonka dump truck.
as new, $25, SOLD!
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertible
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
STAR WARS R2-D2 action figure. Un-
opened, original 1995 package. $10.
Steve, San Carlos, 650-255-8716.
STAR WARS, Battle Droid figures, four
variations. Unopened 1999 packages.
$60 OBO. Steve, 650-255-8716.
TONKA DUMP Truck with tipping bed,
very sturdy Only $10 SOLD!
TONKA METAL Excavator independent
bucket and arm, $25 SOLD!
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14 x 21, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18 high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72 x 40 , 3 drawers, Display case, bev-
elled glass, $500. (650)766-3024
303 Electronics
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
27 SONY TRINITRON TV - great condi-
tion, rarely used, includes remote, not flat
screen, $65., (650)357-7484
46 MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
AUTO TOP hoist still in box
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
303 Electronics
APPLE Harmon Kardon speakers, sub-
woofer, one side rattles. In San Carlos,
$40, 650-255-8716.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
BLACKBERRY PHONE good condition
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
DVD PLAYER, $25. Call (650)558-0206
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
IPHONE GOOD condition $99.00 or best
offer (650)493-9993
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
PHILLIPS ENERGY STAR 20 color TV
with remote. Good condition, $20
(650)888-0129
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
SAMSUNG 27" TV Less than 6 months
old, with remote. Moving must sell
$100.00 (650) 995-0012
SANYO C30 Portable BOOM BOX,
AM/FM STEREO, Dolby Metal Tape
player/recorder, 2/3 speakers boxes, $50
650-430-6046
SET OF 3 wireless phones all for $50
(650)342-8436
SLIDE PROJECTOR Air Equipped Su-
per 66 A and screen $30 for all
(650)345-3840
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
3 DRAWER PLATFORM BED Real
wood (light pine, Varathane finish). Twin
size. $50 (650)637-1907
8 DRAWER wooden dresser $99
(650)759-4862
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
bankers rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
AUTUMN TABLE Centerpiece unop-
ened, 16 x 6, long oval shape, copper
color $10.00 (650)578-9208
BBQ GRILL, Ducane, propane $90
(650)591-4927
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CABINET BLONDE Wood, 6 drawers,
31 Tall, 61 wide, 18 deep, $45.
(650)592-2648
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
CHANDELIER, ELEGANT, $75.
(650)348-6955
CHINA CABINET, 53 x 78 wooden
with glass. Good shape. $120 obo.
(650)438-0517
CHINESE LACQUERED cabinet, 2
shelves and doors. Beautiful. 23 width 30
height 11 depth $75 (650)591-4927
CURIO CABINET 55" by 21" by 12"
Glass sides, door & shelves $95 OBO
(650)368-6271
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36x58 with one leaf 11 1/2. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER - 6 drawer 61" wide, 31" high,
& 18" deep $50., (650)592-2648
DRESSERlarge, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLE, medium large, with marble
top. and drawer. $60 or best offer,
(650)681-7061
EZ CHAIR, large, $15. Call (650)558-
0206
FLAT TOP DESK, $35.. Call (650)558-
0206
HEADBOARD, QUEEN-SIZE,HALF-
MOON shape,decorated with small
stones,very heavy. Free to take away!
(650-342-6192)
I-JOY MASSAGE chair, exc condition
$95 (650)591-4927
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 medal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MATCHING RECLINER, SOFA & LOVE
SEAT - Light multi-colored fabric, $95.
for all, (650)286-1357
MIRRORS, large, $25. Call
(650)558-0206
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
NATURAL WOOD table 8' by 4' $99
(650)515-2605
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white
pen and paper holder. Brand new, in
box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
304 Furniture
PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs, glass top,
good condition 41 in diameter $95
(650)591-4927
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36 Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
PORTABLE JEWELRY display case
wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 in-
ches. (650)592-2648.
PRIDE MECHANICAL Lift Chair, Infinite
postion. Excellent condition, owners
manual included. $400 cash only,
(650)544-6169
QUEEN SIZE Hide a Bed, Like new
$275, (650)245-5118
RECLINING CHAIR, almost new, Beige
$100 (650)624-9880
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR Great condition,
1970s style, dark brown, wooden,
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR w/wood carving, arm-
rest, rollers, swivels $99., (650)592-2648
SEWING TABLE, folding, $20. Call
(650)558-0206
SHELVING UNIT from IKEA interior
metal, glass nice condition $50/obo.
(650)589-8348
SOFA 7-1/2' $25 (650)322-2814
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA / UTILITY CART, $15. (650)573-
7035, (650)504-6057
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TEAK BASE and glass cover cheese
holder. Great for holidays. $18.
(650)341-6402
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TV CABINET, brown wood, 3 shelves, 2
doors, brass hardware, 34 3/8wx20
1/2dx28 3/8h good condition. $35
(650)347-5104
TV STAND brown. $40.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
TV STAND, with shelves, holds large TV,
very good condition. $90. (650)573-7035,
(650)504-6057.
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent con-
dition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WICKER DRESSER, white, 3 drawers,
exc condition 31 width 32 height 21.5
depth $35 (650)591-4927
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Three avail-
able, Call (650)345-5502
BRADFORD COLLECTOR Plates THAI
(Asian) - $35 (650)348-6955
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
COFFEE MAKER, Makes 4 cups $12,
(650)368-3037
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
ICE CREAM MAKER - Westbend 4 qt.
old fashion ice cream maker, brand new,
still in box, $30., (650)726-1037
KIRBY VACUUM cleaner good condition
with extras $90 OBO (650)345-5502
MANGLE-SIMPLEX FLOOR model,
Working, $20 (650)344-6565
OSTER BREAD maker (new) $45.,
(650)520-3425
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good
condition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
TWO 21 quart canning pots, with lids, $5
each. (650)322-2814
VACUMN EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
VINTAGE VICTORIAN cotton lawn
dress, - $65. (650)348-6955
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436
PRO DIVER Invicta Watch. Brand new in
box, $60. (650)290-0689
WATCHES - Quicksilver (2), brand new
in box, $40. for both, (650)726-1037
308 Tools
12-VOLT, 2-TON Capacity Scissor Jack
w/ Impact Wrench, New in Box, Never
Used. $85.00 (650) 270-6637 after 5pm
308 Tools
6-8 MISC. TOOLS - used, nail tray with
nails, $15., (650)322-2814
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman, 10, 4 long
x 20 wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
MAKITA 10" mitre saw with 100 tooth
carbon blade $60 SOLD!
PROFESSIONAL MORTAR BOX Like
New $25 (650)368-0748
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)851-0878
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
TOOL BOX full of tools. Moving must
sell. $100.00 (650) 995-0012
309 Office Equipment
CANON COPIER, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
FILING CABINET, 4-drawer, letter $25
(650)341-8342
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20.00 (650)871-7200
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
2 GALLON Sprayer sears polythene
compressed air 2 1/2 inch opening, used
once $10 San Bruno (650)588-1946
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
ADULT VIDEOS - (50) for $50., SOLD!
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, anti-oxident proper-
ties, new, $100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WALKER, Foldable with
wheels. $15 (650)756-7878
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE LANTERN - (7) Olde Brooklyn
lanterns, battery operated, safe, new in
box, $100. for all, (650)726-1037
ARTIFICIAL FICUS TREE 6 ft. life like,
full branches. in basket $55. (650)269-
3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BABY BJORN Little Potty Ideal 4
travel/early training,(650)595-3933
BLUE/WHITE DUCK shaped ceramic
teapot, hand painted, made in China.
$18. (650)341-6402
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BREVILLE JUICE Maker multi speed
(Williams Somoma) never used $90
(650)994-4783
BRIEFCASE 100% black leather
excellent condition $75 (650)888-0129
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
CHEESESET 6 small and 1 large plate
Italian design never used Ceramica Cas-
tellania $25. (650)644-9027
DOLLS: NEW, girl and boy in pilgrim
costume, adorable, soft fabric, beautifully
made. $30. 650-345-3277
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 SOLD!
310 Misc. For Sale
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. SOLD!
GOLD COLORED ONE 3-pce. Martex
towel set(bath, hand, face),. Asking $15.
Call (650)574-3229
GOURMET SET for cooking on your ta-
ble. European style. $15 (650)644-9027
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HOT SANDWICH maker elec, perfect,
$9.95 (650)595-3933
HUMAN HAIR Wigs, (4) Black hair, $90
all (650)624-9880
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15.,
(650)345-3840
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX - for dogs 21-55 lbs.,
repels and kills fleas and ticks. 9 months
worth, $60., (650)343-4461
KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute cannon
$30. (650)726-1037
KITCHEN POTS 3 stainless steel, 21/2
gal., 4 gal., 5 gal. $10 all. (650)574-3229
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9 tall, 11 diameter, great con-
dition, $7., (650)347-5104
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide, wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LOW RIDER magazines 80 late 1999 all
for $80 (650)873-4030
LUGGAGE, BLACK Samsonite with roll-
ers, 3 compartments, condition clean,
never used. makeshift handle, $40
(650)347-5104
MANUAL LAWN mower ( by Scott Turf )
never used $65 (650)756-7878
MATCHING LIGHT SCONCES - style
wall mount, plug in, bronze finish, 12Lx
5W , $12. both, SOLD!
MEDICINE CABINET - 18 X 24, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MENS LEATHER travel bags (2), used
$25 each.(650)322-2814
MERITAGE PICNIC Time Wine and
Cheese Tote - new black $45
(650)644-9027
MICHAEL CREIGHTON HARDBACK
BOOKS - 3 @ $3. each, SOLD!
MIRROR 41" by 29" Hardrock maple
frame $90 OBO (650)593-8880
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
ONE 3-PCE. clay colored Martex towel
set (bath, hand, face), . Asking $15. Call
(650)574-3229
OUTDOOR GREENHOUSE. Handmade.
33" wide x 20 inches deep. 64.5 " high.
$70.00 (650)871-7200
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
PATIO ARMILLARY vintage iron 18" rd,
$60 obo email green4t @ yahoo.com
PET CARRIER Excellent Condition Very
Clean Size small "Petaire" Brand
$50.00 (650)871-7200
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
QUEENSIZE BEDSPREAD w/2 Pillow
Shams (print) $30.00 (650)341-1861
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICHARD NORTH Patterson 5 Hard-
back Books @$3.00 each (650)341-1861
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SCARY DVD movies, (7) in cases, Zom-
bies, Date Movie, Labyrinth, in original
boxes. $10/all. (650)578-9208
SET OF 11 Thomas registers 1976 mint
condition $25 (415)346-6038
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48 x 69
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. $35.
(650)574-4439
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6,
$60., (650)294-9652
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
STERLING SILVER loving cup 10" circa
with walnut base 1912 $65
(650)520-3425
TOM CLANCY HARDBACK BOOKS - 7
@ $3.00 each, SOLD!
TRIVIAL PURSUIT - Master Game/Ge-
nus Edition. Has all cards. Mint condi-
tion. Asking $10. (650)574-3229
310 Misc. For Sale
USB VEHICLE charger any mini USB
device $20 (650)595-3933
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WEST AFRICAN hand carved tribal
masks - $25 (650)348-6955
WHEEL CHAIR asking $75 OBO
(650)834-2583
WIN SIZE quilt Nautica brand New in pkg
Yellow/White/Black Trim San Marino"
pattern $ 40 Firm (650)871-7200
WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955
XMAS DECORATIONS: 6 unique, hand
painted, jointed new toy soldiers, holding
musical instrument. $34. 650-345-3277
311 Musical Instruments
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
LAGUNA ELECTRIC 6 string LE 122
Guitar with soft case and strap $75.
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
UKULELE STILL in box unused, no
brand $35 (650)348-6428
312 Pets & Animals
2 BEAUTIFUL canaries for sale. good
singers, $50 each Call evenings,
(650)592-6867
BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate de-
sign - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
100% COTTON New Beautiful burgundy
velvet drape 82"X52" W/6"hems: $45
(415)585-3622
ALPINESTAR MOTORCYCLE JEANS
Twin Stitched. Internal Knee Protection.
Tags Attached. Mens Sz 34 Grey/Blue
Denim $50.00 (650)357-7484
AUTHENTIC PERUVIAN VICUNA PON-
CHO: 56 square. Red, black trim, knot-
ted fringe hem. $99 (650)375-8044
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
INDIAN SARI $50 (650)515-2605
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKET Classic Biker Style.
Zippered Pockets. Sturdy. Excellent Con-
dition. Mens, XL Black Leather $50.00
(650)357-7484
LEATHER JACKET, brown bomber, with
pockets.Sz XL, $88. (415)337-1690
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, magenta, with shawl like new $40
obo (650)349-6059
SILK SCARF, Versace, South Beach
pattern 100% silk, 24.5x34.5 made in
Italy, $75. $(650)591-6596
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
WHITE LACE 1880s reproduction dress
- size 6, $100., (650)873-8167
28 Weekend Nov. 2-3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Some legal
cases
9 Its results
commonly fall
between 70 and
130
15 Take inventory?
16 Shade
17 Nurturing
18 Shilling spender
19 O or A, e.g.
20 Bottom topper
22 Old-school
lament
23 Discharged
British soldier
25 Electronic music
genre
27 Cologne article
29 Sign of summer
30 Roxy Music alum
33 Sirius B, for one
38 Food safety aid
39 They included
Chopins
Prelude in E
Minor, in a film
title
40 Princeton
Review subj.
41 MIT Sloan
degree
42 Wheels
43 Took in
46 Staircase support
50 Arabic for
struggle
53 Salts
55 The Diana
Chronicles
author Brown
56 Fulfills a need
58 They get high on
occasion
60 More futile
61 Ring
62 Makes hot
63 2012, e.g.
DOWN
1 Equally hot
2 Oarlock pin
3 Tribal emblem
4 Venus
counterpart
5 Indians home,
on scoreboards
6 Cotton Candy
musician
7 Key for some
clarinets
8 Panache
9 Newspaper
supply
10 Nickname for
Leona
Helmsley
11 Sierra follower,
in the NATO
alphabet
12 Singer born
Eithne Patricia
N Bhraonin
13 Whole lot
14 Place for an
adder?
21 Wood shop
device
24 Author of the
childrens book
The Saga of
Baby Divine
26 Valiant
28 Therapy goals
30 Major finale?
31 Highland
rejections
32 Bruin great
33 Small dam
34 Eat
35 Make potable,
as seawater
36 Like some
humor
37 Cabinet part
38 Plant activity:
Abbr.
43 Bates College
locale
44 Oil holder
45 Go (on) dully
47 Recoil
48 Name on a WWII
flier
49 Surgery tool
50 Language of
software
engineers
51 Novelist
Turgenev
52 White House
chief of staff after
Haldeman
54 Humane org.
57 Yearbook sect.
59 Criticize
By Barry C. Silk
(c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
11/02/13
11/02/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
316 Clothes
WINTER COAT, ladies european style
nubek leather, tan colored, green lapel &
hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
WOMAN;S LEVI'S Jacket Pristine cond.,
faded Only $29 (650)595-3933
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10. Elie Tahari
new, never worn $25 (650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
70 SPREADER cleats, 1 x 8 for 8
foundations. $25. (650)345-3840
BATHROOM VANITY, antique, with top
and sink: - $65. (650)348-6955
BRAND NEW Millgard window + frame -
$85. (650)348-6955
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3 & 4, approx.
20 of 3, 40 ft. of 4, $25.all,
(650)851-0878
ELECTRICAL MATERIAL - Connectors,
couplings, switches, rain tight flex, and
more.Call. $30.00 for all (650)345-3840
ONE BOX of new #1 heavy CEDAR
SHAKE shingles $14.00.(650)341-8342
PACKAGED NUTS, Bolts and screws,
all sizes, packaged $99 (650)364-1374
PVC - 1, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
USED LUMBER pieces 5 2x4's, 2 2x6's,
3 plywood sheets ALL $30.00
SOLD!
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
BICYCLE MAGNA -Great Divide Excel-
lent Condition Like New SSF Area
SOLD!
BOWLING BALLS. Selling 2 - 16 lb.
balls for $25.00 each. (650)341-1861
BUCKET OF 260 golf balls, $25.
(650)339-3195
FISHERS MENS skis $35 (650)322-2814
318 Sports Equipment
CAMPER DOLLY, excellent condition.
Used only once. $150. (650)366-6371
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18 di-
meter, Halex brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16 wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOTT 10-GAL beverage cooler$20.
(650)345-3840
KIDS 20" mongoose mountain bike 6
speeds front wheel shock good condition
asking $65 (650)574-7743
LADIES BOWLING SET- 8 lb. ball, 7 1/2
sized shoes, case, $45., (650)766-3024
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
MENS ROLLER Blades size 101/2 never
used $25 (650)520-3425
POWER PLUS Exercise Machine $99
(650)368-3037
REI 2 man tent $40 (650)552-9436
SALMON FISHING weights 21/2 pound
canon balls $25 (650)756-7878
Say Goodbye To The 'Stick In
Style & Gear Up For a Super
Season!
49er Swag at Lowest Prices
Niner Empire
957C Industrial Rd. San Carlos
T-F 10-6; Sa 10 -4
ninerempire.com
(415)370-7725
SCHWINN 26" man's bike with balloon
tires $75 like new (650)355-2996
STATIONARY BIKE, Volt, Clean, $15
(650)344-6565
STATIONERY BIKE, $20. (650)573-
7035, (650)504-6057.
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
318 Sports Equipment
WO 16 lb. Bowling Balls @ $25.00 each.
(650)341-1861
322 Garage Sales
GENUINE
ESTATE SALE/
MOVING SALE
Tons of good stuff!
Clothes, furniture,
pool table,
Lifetimes of goods
Saturday
November 2nd
ONLY
148 Costa Rica Ave
x St. Howard Ave
Burlingame
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Rugs
THROW RUG, 8 x 11, black and gold.w/
fring, beautiful,clean. $50. SOLD!
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTSMAN 5.5 HP gas lawn mower
with rear bag $55., (650)355-2996
LAWNMOWER - American made, man-
ual/push, excellent condition, $50.,
(650)342-8436
REMINGTON ELECTRIC lawn mower,
$40. (650)355-2996
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
CLASSICAL YASHICA camera
in leather case $25. (650)644-9027
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
VIVITAR ZOOM lens-28mm70mm. Filter
and lens cap. Original owner. $50. Cash
(650)654-9252
VIVITAR ZOOM lens. 28mm-210mm. Fil-
ter and lens cap. Original owner. $99.
Cash. (650)654-9252
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
379 Open Houses
SAN MATEO
OPEN SUNDAY
1:30-4:30
1826 Church Avenue
1,080 sq. ft., 3 bed-
rooms, 2 bathrooms, at-
tached garage, patio
5,304 sq. ft. lot, beauti-
fully remodeled kitchen
and custom bathrooms,
Washer and dryer hook-
ups, fireplace
Call Elaine at
650-888-9905 for info
Elaine Mott
Re/Max Realty Group
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650)595-0805
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
Dont lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY 1998 Monte Carlo 59,000 Miles
$3,000, Call Glen @ SOLD!
CHEVY HHR 08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD 93 $ 3,500/offer. Good
Condition (650)481-5296
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
MERCEDES 06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
TOYOTA 00 CAMRY LE, 4 dr, auto,
clean title, smogged. 129K miles, $3,800.
(650)342-6342
VW 01 BEETLE, Turbo Sport, 97K
miles, auto, $5,800. (650)342-6342
625 Classic Cars
FORD 63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$7,500 obo (650)364-1374
FORD 63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$7,500 obo (650)364-1374
635 Vans
67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW 03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $35. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35.,
(650)670-2888
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4 wide, 6
1/2 long & 2 1/2 deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
BOX OF auto parts. Miscellaneous
items. $50.00 OBO. (650) 995-0012.
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
MECHANIC'S CREEPER vintage, Com-
et model SP, all wood, pillow, four swivel
wheels, great shape. $40.00
(650)591-0063
MECHANIC'S CREEPER vintage, Com-
et model SP, all wood, pillow, four swivel
wheels, great shape. $40.00
(650)591-0063
NEW BATTERY and alternator for a 96
Buick Century never used Both for $80
(650)576-6600
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
RUBBERMAID 2 Gallon oil pan drainers
(2). Never used tags/stickers attached,
$15 ea. (650)588-1946
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, 1
gray marine diesel manual $40
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Dont lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
29 Weekend Nov. 2-3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Asphalt/Paving
NORTHWEST
ASPHALT REPAIR
Driveways, Parking Lots
Asphalt/Concrete
Repair Installation
Free Estimate
(650)213-2648
Lic. #935122
Carpentry
D n J REMODELING
Finish Carpentry
Windows Doors
Cabinets Casing
Crown Moulding
Baseboards
Mantels Chair Rails
(650)291-2121
Cabinetry
Carpets
COLEMAN'S
CARPET SERVICE
Green, Soap free,
Detergent Free Carpet Cleaning!
Dry in a few hours! $99.00!
2 Room minimum!
Call Gisele (510)590-7427
Contractors
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Cleaning
ANGELICAS HOUSE
CLEANING & ERRAND
SERVICES
House Cleaning Move In/Out
Cleaning Janitorial Services
Handyman Services
General Errands Event Help
New Client Promotion
(650)918-0354
myerrandservicesca@gmail.com
Cleaning
Concrete
Construction
DEVOE
CONSTRUCTION
Kitchen & Bath
Remodeling
Belmont, CA
(650) 318-3993
OSULLIVAN
CONSTRUCTION
(650)589-0372
New Construction, Remodeling,
Kitchen/Bathrooms,
Decks/ Fences
Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596
SPI CONSTRUCTION INC
Remodels New Additions
Kitchens Bathrooms
For all your construction needs
(650)208-8855
Lic. #812356
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed Insured Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
REDWOOD FENCES
AND DECKS
Chain Link
Ornamental Iron
Quality work at reasonable rates
(650)703-0344
License #289279
VICTORS FENCES
and House Painting
Interior Exterior
Power Wash
Driveways Sidewalk Houses
Free Estimates
(650)583-1270
or (650)808-5833
Lic. # 106767
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
Gardening
GENERAL
LANDSCAPE
MAINTENANCE
Commercial & Residential
Gardening
New lawn &
sprinkler installation,
Trouble shooting and repair
Work done by the hour
or contract
Free estimates
Licensed
(650)444-5887, Call/Text
glmco@aol.com
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGOS FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
Flooring
SLATER FLOORS
. Restore old floors to new
. Dustless Sanding
. Install new custom & refinished
hardwood floors
Licensed. Bonded. Insured
www.slaterfloors.com
(650) 593-3700
Showroom by appointment
Gutters
O.K.S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
RAIN GUTTERS
Gutters and downspouts,
Rain gutter repair,
Rain gutter protection (screen),
Handyman Services
Free Estimates
(650)669-6771
(650)302-7791
Lic.# 910421
Handy Help
AAA HANDYMAN
& MORE
Repairs Maintenance Painting
Carpentry Plumbing Electrical
Contractor Lic. 468963 Since 1976
Bonded and Insured
All Work Guaranteed
(650) 995-4385
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
Fences Decks Patios
Power Washes Concrete
Work Maintenance
Clean Ups Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)4581572
contreras1270@yahoo.com
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior Roof
Repair Base Boards New Fence
Hardwood Floors Plumbing Tile
Mirrors Chain Link Fence Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
SENIOR HANDYMAN
Specializing in Any Size Projects
Painting Electrical
Carpentry Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
Refinish
High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
by Greenstarr
Chriss Hauling
Licensed Bonded and Insured
Since 1985 License # 752250
www.yardboss.net
Yard c|ean up - att|c,
basement
Junk meta| remova|
|nc|ud|ng cars, trucks and
motorcyc|es
0emo||t|on
0oncrete remova|
Fxcavat|on
Sw|mm|ng poo| remova|
&
Tom 650.355.3500
Chris 415.999.1223
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Landscaping
by Greenstarr
0omp|ete |andscape
ma|ntenance and remova|
Fu|| tree care |nc|ud|ng
hazard eva|uat|on,
tr|mm|ng, shap|ng,
remova| and stump
gr|nd|ng
8eta|n|ng wa||s
0rnamenta| concrete
Sw|mm|ng poo| remova|
Tom 650. 355. 3500
Licensed Bonded and Insured
www.yardboss.net
Since 1985 License # 752250
Landscaping
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsulas Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MK PAINTING
Interior and Exterior,
Residental and commercial
Insured and bonded,
Free Estimates
Peter McKenna
(650)630-1835
Lic# 974682
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
30 Weekend Nov. 2-3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Plumbing Remodeling
HARVEST KITCHEN
& MOSAIC
Cabinets * Vanities * Tile
Flooring * Mosaics
Sinks * Faucets
Fast turnaround * Expert service
920 Center St., San Carlos
(650)620-9639
www.harvestkm.com
Tree Service
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
Trimming Pruning
Shaping
Large Removal
Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tile
BELMONT TILE &
FOLSOM LAKE TILE
Your local tile store
& contractor
Tile Mosaics
Natural Stone Countertops
Remodeling
Free Estimates
651 Harbor Blvd.
(near Old County Road)
Belmont
650.421.6508
www.belmontile.com
M-Sa 8:30 am - 5 pm
CASL# 857517
Window Washing
EXTERIOR
CLEANING
SERVICES
- window washing
- gutter cleaning
- pressure washing
- wood restoration
- solar panel cleaning
(650)216-9922
services@careful-clean.com
Bonded - Insured
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tors State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
BANKRUPTCY
Huge credit card debit?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650-363-2600
This law firm is a debt relife agency
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Dental Services
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6 M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACKS
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WESTERN FURNITURE
Grand Opening Sale
Everything Marked Down !
601 El Camino Real
San Bruno, CA
Mon. - Sat. 10AM -7PM
Sunday Noon -6PM
We don't meet our competition,
we beat it !
Guns
PENINSULA GUNS
(650) 588-8886
Handguns.Shotguns.Rifles
Tactical and
Hunting Accessories
Buy.Sell.Trade
360 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
DENTAL
IMPLANTS
Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880
Health & Medical
EYE EXAMINATIONS
579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
PAIN & STRESS RELIEF
$29 UP
Weight loss, Migraine, Stroke,
Fatigue, Insomnia, PMS, HBP,
Cough, Allergies, Asthma,
Gastrointestinal, Diabetes
(650)580-8697
Acupuncture, Acupressure Herbs
1846 El Camino Real, Burlingame
Accept Car & work injury, PPO
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AFFORDABLE
HEALTH INSURANCE
Personal & Professional Service
JOHN LANGRIDGE
(650) 854-8963
Bay Area Health Insurance Marketing
CA License 0C60215
a Diamond Certified Company
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
* All commercial insurance policies
* Employee benefit packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$45 per Hour
Present ad for special price
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
851 Cherry Ave. #29, San Bruno
in Bayhill Shopping Center
Open 7 Days 10:30am- 10:30pm
650. 737. 0788
Foot Massage $19.99/hr
Free Sauna (with this Ad)
Body Massage $39.99/hr
Hot StoneMassage $49.99/hr
GRAND OPENING
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
SEVEN STARS
DAY SPA
615 Woodside Road Redwood City
(650)299-9332
Body Massage $60/hour
$40/half hour,
$5 off one hour w/ this ad
Open Daily 9:30 AM to 9:30 PM
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes Multi-family
Mixed-Use Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
NAZARETH VISTA
Best Kept Secret in Town !
Independent Living, Assisted Living
and Skilled Nursing Care.
Daily Tours/Complimentary Lunch
650.591.2008
900 Sixth Avenue
Belmont, CA 94002
crd@belmontvista.com
www.nazarethhealthcare.com
Travel
FIGONE TRAVEL GROUP
(650) 595-7750
www.cruisemarketplace.com
Cruises Land & Family vacations
Personalized & Experienced
Travel Service
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1939
CST#100209-10
Massage Therapy
WORLD 31
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* While supplies last. Some restrictions apply. Events subject to change.
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Presented by Health Plan of San Mateo and The Daily Journal
Free Services include
F|u Shots
for seniors age 65+ provided for no fee by
San Mateo County Pharmacists Association
8efreshments
0oor Pr|zes and 0|veaways
8|ood Pressure
Ask the Pharmac|st
by San Mateo Pharmacists Assn.
Hea|th Screen|ngs
by Peninsula Special Interest Lions Club
K|dney Screen|ng
Free 0ocument Shredd|ng
for seniors age 62+ by Miracle Shred
and N08F
Senior
Showcase
Information Fair
Friday, November 15, 2013
9:00am to 1:00pm
Foster City Recreation Center
6050 Shell Blvd., Foster City
Free Admission, Everyone Welcome
Senior Resources and Services from
all of San Mateo County over 40
exhibitors!
2
0
1
3
2
0
1
3
Senior Showcase
FREE
ADMISSION
By Rasool Dawar and Kimberly Dozier
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PESHAWAR, Pakistan A U.S. drone
strike Friday killed Hakimullah Mehsud, the
leader of the Pakistani Taliban, in a major
blow to the group that came after the gov-
ernment said it had started peace talks with
the insurgents, according to intelligence
ofcials and militant commanders.
Mehsud, who was on U.S. most-wanted
terrorist lists with a $5 million bounty, is
believed to have been behind a deadly sui-
cide attack at a CIA base in Afghanistan, a
failed car bombing in New Yorks Times
Square and other brazen assaults in Pakistan
that killed thousands of civilians and secu-
rity forces.
The ruthless, 34-year-old commander who
was closely allied with al-Qaida was widely
reported to have been killed in 2010
only to resurface later.
But a senior U.S. intelligence ofcial said
Friday the U.S. received positive conrma-
tion that Mehsud had been killed. Two
Pakistani intelligence ofcials also con-
rmed his death, as did two Taliban com-
manders who saw his mangled body after the
strike. A third commander said the Taliban
would likely choose Mehsuds successor on
Saturday.
If true, the death of Hakimullah Mehsud
will be a signicant blow to the Pakistani
Taliban (TTP), an organization that poses a
serious threat to the Pakistani people and to
Americans in Pakistan, said Michael
Morell, a former acting CIA director who
retired in August and has championed the
drone program. His comments came in a
statement emailed to the Associated Press.
There is increased tension between
Islamabad and Washington over the drone
attacks, and Pakistan is also trying to
strike a peace deal with the Taliban.
The groups deputy leader was killed in a
drone strike in May, and one of Mehsuds
top deputies was arrested in Afghanistan
last month.
Officials: U.S. drone kills Pakistani Taliban leader
REUTERS
Pakistani
Taliban chief
Hakimullah
Mehsud,
center, sits
with other
militants in
South
Waziristan, in
this le still
image taken
from video
shot.
32 Weekend Nov. 2-3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
C oi ns Dent al J ewe l r y S i l ver Wat ches Di amonds
1211 80t||0zM0 0 650-34I-I00I
Expert Fine Watch
& Jewelry Repair
Not afliated with any watch company.
Only Authentic ROLEX Factory Parts Are Used
0eaI With xperts 0uick 8ervice
0nequaI 0ustomer 0are
www.8est8ated6oId8uyers.com
Tuesday - Saturday
11:00am to 4:00pm
www.BestRatedGoldBuyers.com
KUPFER JEWELRY BURLINGAME
(650) 347-7007
MUST PRESENT COUPON.
EXPIRES 11/30/13
WEBUY
$50
OFF
Established 1979
ROLEX SERVICE
OR RE PAIR