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Click here to view experimental video showing how the creativity packet puzzles are used.

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Below are comments made by others about this and other aspects of Dt. Henricksons work

What you have described fits my daughter very well indeed. J.T.Baker, Canada, business consultant I consider that you are
pioneering something extremely important.
Thank you for forwarding your excellent and thought provoking article to the GSJ. It has been posted at http://wbabin.net and archived at http://wbabin.net/philos/henrickson.pdf

Kind Regards, Walter Babin

If I understand well your article is stricly related to USA in 1970. Do you have observations regarding, for instance, Europe's situation in XXI century? My impression for Italy 2009, is that the situation is even worse than that you describe, with no attention at all for teachers artistic formation programs. Moreover art school in the majority of cases is the last borderline for difficult students. The art system is holded by galeries and critics whose only interest is money, irrespective of artist skills and aestetic values of artistic works. Thank you for your attention. My best regards, sincerely yours, Piet As someone recently observed to me the SIGNIFICANCE (of the lie) gets lost in the deception. The liar believes the lie. and consequently does not know hes lying because he is supported by the majority in his environment. The participants may not be aware of their roles in this process, but certainly the social architects are.

Unless perhaps they too have become slightly confused and end up in a somewhat similar condition from the tradition passed along to them by the original architects. I think the architects are promoting a process that transfers entropic atomic decay radiation anti-life logic into a short term profitable entropic consciousness. Professor Robert Pope. New South Wales, Australia ro Antonio Bernabei M.D.University of Florence, Italy As someone recently observed to me the SIGNIFICANCE (of the lie) gets lost in the deception. The liar believes the lie. and consequently does not know hes lying because he is supported by the majority in his environment. The participants may not be aware of their roles in this process, but certainly the social architects are. Unless perhaps they too have become slightly confused and end up in a somewhat similar condition from the tradition passed along to them by the original architects. I think the architects are promoting a process that transfers entropic atomic decay radiation anti-life logic into a short term profitable entropic consciousness. Professor Robert Pope. New South Wales, Australia
the last sentence in your message may have more than a grain of truth to it. In fact, that is largely the message of the K. Gow chapter. Warm regards, Ian Plowman, social research service, Australia > I think the claim about the low-GPA people in the report may be true. > I wouldn't be at all surprised if there was some small percentage of > the population that are more skilled in some aspects of professional > work than some professionals.

> Speaking for myself, on balance I've found it an advantage never to > have worked in a job for which I was formally qualified. It allowed > me to avoid the indoctrination that professional training to some > extent almost unavoidably provides. > Pam Swepson, a Brisbane-based organisational psychologist From: Dirk Chardet [mailto:chardet@gmail.com] Sent: Monday, November 02, 2009 8:07 AM To: Paul henrickson Subject: Re:

"This is a society, then, that is ruled by the non-creative lying conformist. My Gosh! What a prospect!" YES ! Dch
(Dirk Chardet)

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It's worse than that - corruption is undergird by pathologies -hence, the system is insane...clinically. They aren't just lying conformists - but sociopaths mad with greed and power. Iona Miller,
hypnotherapist ********************************************************************************** ***********************

The power of puzzles and learning


June 18, 2006 We at Blogma have long been suspicious of conventional learning principles, especially when we got lousy grades. So we welcome ideas such as those from The Creativity Packet, which offers unconventional approaches to education, often non-verbal. Its latest concepts focus on the power of puzzles. Posted by Mike Yamamoto

I like the design above so much I didnt want not to use it again despite the information about the URL being incorrect. It is incorrect because the ISP I used at the time decided to secretly remove it from the web despite having been properly paid in advance and additionally, leaving visitors to it under the impression that I was at fault For the details of this little drama you can go to www.scribd.com under my name (Paul Henrickson) to three documents. these are :AN INDIVIDUAL EVOLUTIONARY PROCESS A CAUSE FOR CONCERN

CREATIVE MINORITY I share this information with you in the event, perhaps, that there may develop a rash of criminally behaving ISPs such as Melitaplc (ONVOL) and a national government that stupidly supports their effort.

Some years ago in the 1980s in Santa Fe New Mexico I had started to work on the assembly of waste products, containers for household items such as cereal, toothpaste and the like and painting them. This was, in its way, my first introduction actual practice with an approach others ha experimented with a half century or more earlier. I had done thirty or forty of these and they were distributed through out the house at the time the 6 and 7 year-old daughters of a friend visited. Theyhad been too shy to speak to me about what these objects were. Besides, without an explanation from me they instinctively knew what they were for as their father reported a month or so later that there were now making some themselves. I was greatly encouraged by that report for it told me several things. First among them was that children do not require wordy explanations for strange events, but they also should not be denied them,nor do they have a need to verbalize the experiece to

themselves or to others. ...they do it. And in this doing they understand. Now comes a thought that many may find provocative.If the untrained child can sense a comprehensible order in a made thing, doesnt it seem reasonable to suppose that the order the child senses had been intentionally placed there, or as an alternative perceiving chaos the childs natural response is to bring a satisfying order to it. Whether the child achieves the same order as may have originallybeen intended is of not great a matter. The child can alwats change his mind and rectify whatever he perceives as error. These puzzels afford the child the opportunity to make these sorts of judgments

. Thirty years later this is how that idea evolved.

Recent advice coming out of TheTottance Center at The University of Georgia has been that the creative child should learn how to be more discrete, however, since such advice would surely be a return to the period when it

was the rule children should be seen but not heard, a rule which I reject most heatedly.I would rather propose that the authoritative adult learn how to listen properly to the evidences spoken by the child who lacks the sophistcated adult vocabulary. I believe that Jean Piaget and John Dewey would both agree as they seemed to recognize that the brain was not a blank sheet of paper waiting to something written on it. One might suppose that this advice to be more discrete was offered as one device to protect the emerging mind from abusive and corrective control, however, acturally what is describs is a situation where the child is in a place between a rock and a hard place. Either way he looses. If he gives up exploring his perceptions he looses. If he accepts as legitimate the views of authorities, because they are authorities, he looses If he learns what game it is being played with his mind and keeps his vision, but keeps it private, he looses, for one of the most helpful proceedures in the learning process is to check out ones perceptions with others, preferably peers, for if there is disagreement, which is most probable, it is, at least not accompanied by implied threat. It is this particular social dynamic which argues in favor of understanding that creative thinking is essentially a private affair and not as some at Harvard have argued a coalecence of agreement amongst colleagues. If Thor Heyedal had acceded to the views of others he would not have achieved learning that one can sail the ocean currents in a bamboo raft from Africa across the Atlantic to South America. The conventional mind has the comfort and assurance of what it knows to be true. The creative mind is still working out a truth yet to be discovered. The conventional mind is applauded and rewarded. the creative one, the one really doing the work, is reviled, ridiculed and wornf out trying to communicate with those incapabele, at least for the moment, of understanding. What these puzzels have that make them far superior to the conventional puzzel with its presented image of how the finished product should look they lack the initiative detroying cpntoured puzzle shapes which seriously inhibit alternative decisions. The conventional puzzel enforces the order that the player will do what he is told to do,

The first two puzzel sets illustrated below will challenge the courageous player to arrive at an image he does not, at this moment,know what it is. Intensive trial and error may solve the problem. If you want to try it out, enlarge, print out, seprate pieces and start reassem bling.

An important added benefit to the use of these puzzles in the class room is to be found in the simple fact that the type of mental work required to learn the facts of mathematics, spelling, science is a different form of mental work from the process of discovery where in groping in the dark all ones senses must be alert. For this reason alone the puzzles become an important asset as a relief from the usual school disciplines which require the pupil, to learn, usually, by rote, a specific amount by a specific time. It is for this reason these puzzles have significant therapeutic value, BUT BEYOND THAT, these puzzles exercise that part of the mind which analyses relationships from among the pool of the unknown to bring IT into reality....and that is the major evidence for there being creative thinking It is, therefore, not at all recommended that the teacher show the pupil the final product as it was designed by the artist.

All things considered it is not an extravagant claim for the benefits derived from involvement with these puzzles that they assist the development of self confidence, eliminate the fear of making an error, promote the willingness to experiment all three of which benefits are therapeutic in nature. It should be noted that therapy is not only for the ill. School systems are urged, if they already have contracted to allow electronic experts to determine the nature of the professional material teachers are allowed to read are strongly urged to review that policy and to amend it as it will be clear to any thoughtful observer that only the teacher in the classroom is qualified to make judgments as to what is professionally required and what is not.

Contact Kurun Vella at likiak.paul@gmail.com