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SPECIAL 2013 HALL OF FAME ISSUE

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DEC 13/JAN 14 Display until 1/28/14
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Matt
Larsen
BILL
WALLACE
Undefeated
in the Ring,
Unmatched in
the Industry
LESS
THAN
LETHAL
What You Need to
Know About the
Expandable Baton
ASYMMETRIC
WARFARE
HOW MODERN ARMY COMBATIVES
CAN MAKE YOU A STRONGER FIGHTER
YOUR
GUIDE TO
SURVIVING
A MASS
ATTACK



contents
12.2013
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1.2014
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COVER STORY
34 FIGHTING STRATEGIES
FROM MACP
Designed for the Modern
Army Combatives
Program, these strategies,
techniques and training
methods work for civilians,
too. Theyre brought to you
by Matt Larsen, the martial
artist who made MACP.
FEATURES
42 EXPANDABLE BATON
Veteran martial artist Jim
Arvanitis explains why this
often-overlooked impact
weapon should be your go-
to tool for most real-world
DISCLAIMER: BLACK BELT COMMUNICATIONS, an Active Interest Media Publication, as publisher, does not endorse and makes no representation, warranty or guarantee concerning the safety or effectiveness of either the
products and services advertised in this magazine or the martial arts or other techniques discussed or illustrated in this magazine. The publisher expressly disclaims any and all liability relating to the manufacture, sale or use of
such products and services and the application of the techniques discussed or illustrated in this magazine. The purchase or use of some of the products, services or techniques advertised or discussed in this magazine may be
illegal in some areas of the United States or other countries. Therefore, you should check federal, state, and local laws prior to your purchase or use of these products, services or techniques. The publisher makes no representa-
tion or warranty concerning the legality of the purchase or use of these products, services and techniques in the United States or elsewhere. Because of the nature of some of the products, services and techniques advertised or
discussed in this magazine, you should consult a physician before using these products or services or applying these techniques.
FRQLFWV
50 WORLDS GREATEST KICKER
FOR 50 YEARS!
In the conclusion of this story about
Bill Superfoot Wallace, the most liked
person in the martial arts reveals more
about the events that took him to the top.
56 NINJA II: SHADOW OF A TEAR
Scott Adkins and Kane Kosugi team up
with director Isaac Florentine for nonstop,
old-school, martial arts action. The sequel
is scheduled for a December release.
60 MASS ATTACK SURVIVAL GUIDE
For many martial artists, an encounter
with multiple opponents can mean low
odds of success. Jeet kune do stylist
Matthew J. Numrich wrote this article to
maximize your chances of getting out
alive!
64 BLACK BELT HALL OF FAME 2013
Meet the men and women who have
been inducted into the martial arts worlds
oldest hall of fame.

with authenticity and respect


- Variety

Magnetically played...
an extraordinary life. an epic conclusion.
" , 5 2 ! 9 s $ 6 $ s $ ) ' ) 4 ! ,
NOV. 12

8 EDITORS NOTE
10 MAILBOX
12 TIMES
69 ESSENTIAL GEAR
76 BLACK BELT PAGES
82 FROM THE ARCHIVES
VOL. 52 NO. 1. BLACK BELT (ISSN 0277-3066) is published bimonthly by Cruz Bay Publishing, Inc., an Active Interest Media company. Advertising and editorial offces at 24900 Anza Drive, Unit E, Santa
Clarita, California 91355. The known offce of publication is 475 Sansome St., Suite 850, San Francisco, CA 94111. Periodicals postage paid at San Francisco, CA and at additional mailing offces. POST-
MASTER: Send address changes to Black Belt, P.O. Box 420235, Palm Coast, FL 32142-0235. SUBSCRIPTIONS: Palm Coast Data, P.O. Box 421113, Palm Coast, FL 32142-0235. Customer service: (800)
266-4066. Subscription rates in the United States are one year $28. Canada: $40.Foreign: $52 (US funds only). The publisher and editors will not be responsible for unsolicited material. Manuscripts and
photographs must be accompanied by a stamped, self-addressed return envelope. Printed in the United States by RR Donnelley, Strasburg, VA. 2013 by Black Belt Communications LLC, an Active Interest
Media Publication. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited.
18 VERSUS
Weve all heard about the ranges of
combat: kicking, punching, trapping and
grappling. This Black Belt columnist thinks
he has a better way to classify techniques.
20 FIGHTBOOK
On September 8, 2013, the martial
arts world lost aikido master and law-
enforcement training specialist Robert
K. Koga. This is a tribute to his life in the
martial arts.
22 MIL-SPEC
If your self-defense training doesnt
prepare you to persevere after suffering
an injury in a fght, you need to read what
Kelly McCann has to say.
24 DESTINATIONS
In "Return to Shaolin, Part 1," roving
reporter Antonio Graceffo heads back to
the hallowed Chinese temple to become a
full-time student of the art of san da.
26 KARATE WAY
Dave Lowry examines the supernatural
origination myths of the Japanese
martial arts and hypothesizes about why
theyre conspicuously absent from most
Okinawan styles.
28 FAR EAST
When our East Coast correspondent
interviewed pekiti tirsias Leo T. Gaje Jr.,
Gaje insisted the story be titled "The Man
Who Never Was." Find out why.
30 WAY OF THE WARRIOR
Its easy, some might even say expected,
for new students to assimilate into the
martial arts community. Keith Vargo
examines the notion, as well as an art in
which thats not the norm.
32 FIT TO FIGHT
A martial arts M.D. describes the most
common ways your wrists can get hurt in
the dojo and tells you why you might want
to take pains to protect them.
72 BETTER BUSINESS
These questions from an experienced
instructor will make all school owners
scrutinize their businesses to see if
theyre signing up as many new students
as they could be.
74 COMPANY SPOTLIGHT
Martial artists loved the frst two Ip Man
movies. If youre one of them, get ready
for the release of the next installment-
Ip Man: The Final Fight.
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8 BLACK BELT I DECEMBER 2013/JANUARY 2014 BLACKBELTMAG.COM
LEGENDS LOST
O
ne of the few negatives associated with working at Black Belt is the all-too-
frequent need to inform readers that another martial arts icon has passed
away. During the production of this issue, two such men were lost: Robert
Koga and Ted Tabura. A tribute to Koga appears in this issues FightBook
column. Because of space limitations, Ive placed our tribute to Tabura here.
Robert W. Young
Executive Editor
EFIPANIO THEODORE TED TABURA
On August 12, 2013, renowned lima
lama master and weapons expert Ted
Tabura left us at age 72. The Black Belt
Hall of Famer suffered a stroke earlier
this year and was undergoing therapy to
regain strength and rebuild motor skills.
Unfortunately, kidney failure, diverticulitis
and other complications sidelined his
recovery.
Teds body was just too weak to pull
him through, his wife Lois Tabura said.
"He fought a valiant fght, but he became
too tired to fght anymore. With family
and friends at his side, his face calm
and peaceful, he passed away. We will
surely miss him, but seeing him trying to
eat, move and even breathe was hard.
Having accepted Christ, Ted is in a good
placeprobably doing martial arts with
Ed [Parker] and Tino [Tuiolosega].
Tabura began his martial arts career in
boxing. He fought in two Golden Gloves
championships while attending school in
Hawaii. His interest sparked, he received
weapons training from his grandfather
and his uncle, as well as empty-hand
tutelage from Ralph Delacasada, Gordon
VOLUME 52, NO. 1 DEC 13/JAN 14
GROUP PUBLISHER Cheryl Angelheart
EXECUTIVE EDITOR Robert W. Young
GROUP CREATIVE DIRECTOR Alexander Norouzi
GROUP ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Donna Diamond
DIRECTOR OF DIGITAL MEDIA Raymond Horwitz
SPECIAL PROJECTS ART DIRECTOR John Bodine
SPECIAL PROJECTS EDITOR Vicki Baker
WEB EDITOR Jon Sattler
SENIOR COPY EDITOR Jeannine Santiago
A/R MANAGER Alice Negrete
RESEARCH DIRECTOR Kristy Kaus
ADVERTISING ACCT MGR Laura (Flores) Thorne
PRODUCTION MANAGER Patrick Sternkopf
ASSOCIATE ART DIRECTOR Dana Collins
CONTRIBUTING EDITORS
Floyd Burk, Jason Brick, Mark Cheng, Antonio
Graceffo, Mark Hatmaker, Mark Jacobs, Dasha
Libin Anderson, Dave Lowry, Kelly McCann,
Keith Vargo, Dr. Robert Wang
CONTRIBUTORS
Jim Arvanitis, J.T. Bingham, Matt Larsen, David J.
Moore, Kelly Muir, Matthew J. Numrich, J. Torres
BLACK BELT COMMUNICATIONS, LLC
An Active Interest Media Publication
24900 Anza Dr. Unit E, Valencia, CA 91355
Toll Free: (800) 423-2874
In CA (661) 257-4066
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For information about selling Black Belt magazine,
contact BGiacalone@aimmedia.com.
Back issues can be purchased from
Palm Coast Data, (800) 266-4066
Efrem Zimbalist III
CHAIRMAN & CEO
Andrew W. Clurman
PRESIDENT & COO
Brian J. Sellstrom
SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT & CFO
Patricia B. Fox
SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS
Doversola, John Louis and Tuiolosega.
Much later in life, Tabura created his
own system, which he called Tabura-
style karate-do.
My system is nothing special, just
a little bit of this and a little bit of that,
like mulligan stewthe hobo style, the
always-humble master said. Mentors
are important to me. They are our
capunas, the wise people whom you
go to for advice. They are the light that
helps lead you to safety. Thats how
I feel about the styles. Im not taking
any credit for developing my style.
After many years, it was just there.
All the credit goes to my teachers and
mentors.
Although Tabura blended
contemporary aspects with classical art
forms, he never abandoned bushido.
You should never dump the martial
from the art, hed tell students.
Decorum played a central role in his
life, too. Everything we do begins and
ends with respect and formalities, he
said. If you get on an ego trip with
your pride all out of whack, you will
be too messed up in your head to
handle the unexpected. You lose the
connection to the universe and reality.
Then all you know is Murphys law,
where everything goes wrong. So be
humble. Win or lose, always shake
the hands of your fellow competitors
and judges. Show that you are of good
character.
Tabura certainly showed that he
was of good character. He served his
country as a member of the U.S. Army.
Together with Lois, his wife of 49 years,
he raised a daughter, DeeDee, and two
sons, Barron and Casey. He wasnt
hesitant about working part-time jobs
to supplement the income he earned in
the aerospace industry if thats what it
took to provide for his family. In his free
time, he taught karate and organized
tournaments that launched the careers
of many martial artists.
Whether or not he knew it while he
was alive, Ted Tabura was a capuna,
and well miss him.
Floyd Burk P
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email: training@RussianMartialArt.com
www.RussianMartialArt.com

Lots of Love for Jim Kelly
Thanks for the excellent article on Jim Kelly
in the October/November 2013 issue. Win-
ning championships and tournaments is
quite an accomplishment, but also achiev-
ing success in the movie industry during an
era of enormous racial bias is an incredible
achievement and testimony to his strength
of spirit.
There are countless martial artists with
great physical skill, but rare are those who
also possess charisma and a personal
style that inspires others to get into martial
arts when they otherwise would not have
myself included.
In this regard, the martial arts community
owes a debt of gratitude to Jim Kelly.
Scott Bolan - via the Internet
And a Recollection From a Student
Thank you for the cover and article on Jim
Kelly. I was a student of his Los Angeles
dojo from 1974 to 1976. I am 48 years old
and still practice some of the moves and
exercises today. It was an honor to learn
karate from one of the greats in the sport.
Sensei Kelly seldom taught class because
of his schedule, but when he did, it was
always special. Learning from him was
priceless.
Korey Henderson - via the Internet
Getting the Scoop on Superfoot
I was skimming through the October/No-
vember 2013 issue of Black Belt when I
came across the Bill Wallace article written
by Floyd Burk. I was able to attend a train-
ing seminar with Wallace a few years ago
but still did not have much insight into his
background, such as why he started mar-
tial arts, how he injured his leg and what
made him the champion he became. Now I
do. The article was superbly written.
Kylie Lowe - via the Internet
Christian MartiaI Arts-No Conict There
Im glad that someone wrote a letter (Au-
gust/September 2013 issue) stating that
Christians can do martial arts. I am a Chris-
tian and practice kenpo and mixed martial
arts. There are many Christians in our style,
and we practice our faith, also. If everyone
read the New Testament, they would see
that Jesus once told his disciples before
sending them into the world to go and buy
two swords. The point is, Jesus would nev-
er want us to let our families be hurt.
Charles Schmid - Easthampton, MA
Mold the Lesson to the Student
I found Dave Lowrys insight on teaching
self-defense to older students (August/
September 2013) spot on, but he didnt
go far enough. Ive been teaching in the
university classroom for 23 years, and one
of the lessons Ive discovered is that my
students learn best when I design my cur-
riculum around their interests and needs,
not mine as the instructor.
When I created the semester-long self-
defense curriculum that I will be imple-
menting at Florida State University, I fo-
cused on the real threats my students face
based on actual campus crime reports. My
students likely wont face trained attack-
ers, and those taking the course will prob-
ably be female college students who arent
athletes, dont work out regularly and cant
spend hours every day in the dojo.
The techniques we teach are grounded
in tried-and-true martial arts skills but sim-
plifed to maximize effectiveness with a
heavy dose of free response to train the
brain." The skills we teach dont require f-
nesse or fne mastery. They do, however,
emphasize threat discernment, gross body
movement, consistent execution and men-
tal resilience.
Sam Staley - Tallahassee, FL


12 BLACK BELT I DECEMBER 2013/JANUARY 2014 BLACKBELTMAG.COM
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MARTIAL ARTS NEWS YOU CAN USE. READ IT - KNOW IT - LIVE IT
TIMES

BLACKBELTMAG.COM DECEMBER 2013/JANUARY 2014 I BLACK BELT 13
ONE ON ONE
BUILD A
KILLER KICK
If youre hunting for a
knockout, you certainly
can do it with your hands.
For many martial artists,
however, its easier to
generate the necessary
power with a kick. In large
part, thats because of the
massive musculature that
moves the lower limbs, as
well as the length of the
leversyour legsthat
are used to strike.
One leg technique that
has incredible KO poten-
tial is the heel kick, aka
the reverse roundhouse
kick. Few techniques pos-
sess as much raw thump-
ing power, not to mention
the ability to accurately
deliver that power to a
vulnerable target. Adding
to its effectiveness is the
small surface area of the
heel. As soon as it makes
contact with its targetfor
example, an attackers
templethe altercation
is over.
Ian Lauer, CSCS, ian-
lauer.com
What:
Wide Walking Lunge
WHY: The heel kick involves a
large amount of adduction (your leg
moves toward the centerline of your
body) and abduction (your leg moves
away from the centerline). It follows
that you need to work the muscles
responsible for those movements to
enhance your ability to do the kick.
Yes, there are specifc machines
and exercises that develop those
muscles, but martial artists will fnd
it more benefcial to perform a func-
tional strength-training movement like
the wide walking lunge. It will work
through the abduction and adduction
while hitting the gluteus maximus and
hamstrings.
HOW: Start with your feet shoul-
der-width apart and a barbell on your
upper back or dumbbells in your
hands. Step approximately one foot
forward and one to two feet to the
side. As you do so, keep your feet
facing forward. Your front foot should
stay fat on the foor, but lift the heel
of your rear foot so that knee can
drop. This is the bottom of the lunge.
The next step entails pushing off your
rear foot and pulling forward with
your front leg to lift your body back
into a standing position. Your feet
should be shoulder-width apart. Re-
peat on the opposite side.
HOW MANY: 5 sets of 8-15 reps
per leg. Perform once or twice a
week.
What:
Reverse Lunge
WHY: This exercise engages the
gluteus maximus and hamstrings.
These two muscle groups are crucial
to generating the power that makes
the heel kick so devastating.
HOW: Start with your feet slightly
closer than shoulder-width apart. With
a barbell on your upper back or dumb-
bells in your hands, step straight back
with one foot. Depending on the length
of your legs, your foot should move
backward two to three feet. As you do,
drop the knee of your rear legyou
can touch it lightly on the foor or stop
an inch above it. At this point, both
legs should be bent at roughly 90 de-
grees. After you reach the bottom of
the movement, drive the heel of your
front foot into the foor and pull your-
self upright with that same leg. Repeat
with the opposite leg.
If you want to emphasize muscular
conditioning as opposed to cardio-
vascular endurance, repeat with the
same leg rather than switching to the
opposite leg. Finish the set, then move
to the other leg.
PRO NOTE: Dont let your knee hit
the ground hard. That will take the
stress off the musculature youre trying
to develop. Even worse, it can dam-
age your patella.
HOW MANY: 5 sets of 8-15 reps per
leg. Perform once or twice a week.

14 BLACK BELT I DECEMBER 2013/JANUARY 2014 BLACKBELTMAG.COM
Preserving History
MUSEUM OF SPORT KARATE OPENS IN TEXAS
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After a decade and a half of work,
the offcial grand opening and ribbon-
cutting ceremony for the Museum of
Sport Karate took place on October 3-5,
2013, in Pasadena, Texas. It was held
in conjunction with the Living Legend
Celebrity Roast and the Texas Martial Arts
Hall of Fame ceremony.
The museums founder is Gary Lee,
a lifelong martial artist whos competed
in sport karate for four decades. "Ive
been dreaming of this for so long, and 14
years ago, I began putting my idea into
action," Lee said. "After much planning
and preparation, the Sport Karate Museum
opened its doors on Christmas day in 2012.
I was flled with so much emotion. At the
offcial grand opening [in October], sport-
karate icon Mike Stone came to do the
ribbon-cutting honors-along with dozens of
the biggest names in [the martial arts]."
A primary mission of the museum will
be to record the history of sport karate
and recognize individual achievement and
the contributions of martial artists who
helped create and perpetuate the sport in
America. Lee has divided the history into
four generations. The frst generation is
from 1946 to 1959. It represents karates
early years, when it struggled for a
foothold on American soil. The second
generation is from 1960 to 1979, the
period Lee calls sport karates heyday.
The third generation is from 1980 to 1999.
The fourth generation is still being lived
and will be covered in the museum when
the time is right, Lee said.
To document the evolution of sport
karate, Lee assembled a team of
knowledgeable martial artists, which he
calls the Museum of Sport Karate history
generals. They laid the groundwork by
helping create an accurate account of
sport karates rise. The group, which
Lee affectionately calls the Ten Animals,
consists of Mike Stone, Al Weiss,
Peter Urban, Sid Campbell, Mako, Ken
Knudson, Allen Steen, Jim Harrison,
Johnny Kuhl and Michael DePasquale Jr.
These men, some of whom have since
passed away, were tasked with setting the
record straight. Lee has "deputized" more
than 150 additional history generals to
help him continue his fact-fnding quest.
The museum, situated on the frst two
foors of a building with 10,000 square feet
of usable space, has been transformed
into a mega martial arts facility. The
frst foor houses the main offce, a
2,000-square-foot dojo and the Uniform
Room, which is flled with autographed gi
that were worn by Jeff Smith, Joe Lewis,
Roy Kurban, Jerry Piddington, James
Toney, Gene LeBell and other luminaries.
The lower level also includes 10 rooms
that have been earmarked for the display
of future memorabilia.
The second foor consists of the sport-
karate rooms. "Our museum spans the
eras of sport-karate development, from
1946 when Robert Trias opened the frst
sport-karate studio in Arizona, all the
way through 1999," Lee said. "We cover
karate, kung fu, judo and taekwondo
competitors. There are fve categories of
history and memorabilia: the House of
China, the House of Japan, the House
of Okinawa, the House of Korea and the
House of America.
"Then there are other rooms-the
Weapons Room, the Black Dragon
Fighting Society Room, the Texas Martial
Arts Hall of Fame Room, the Mako Room,
the Sid Campbell Room and the Black Belt
Magazine Room with issues from 1966 to
2013. Finally, we have the theater, where
folks can sit down and watch videos of
their favorite sport-karate hero in action."
Memorabilia and souvenirs can be
found throughout the edifce, and each
one has a fascinating tale or anecdote
associated with it. Examples include a
Hattori Hanzo sword and a bullet fred
by Chuck Norris during the flming of a
Walker, Texas Ranger episode.
Lees business plan includes a mobile
unit that hell haul to trade shows,
schools, colleges and special events.
Of course, his expansion plans are
contingent on funding-which is where
martial artists like you come in. How can
you support the museum? You can visit
the facility. Better yet, you can bring your
friends and family-or your entire student
body, if youre an instructor. The museum
is located at 3222 Burke Road, Pasadena,
Texas 77504. The phone number is (713)
483-0476.
You also can make a donation. Checks
should be mailed to Museum of Sport
Karate, c/o Gary Lee, 13403 Nantucket
Drive, Sugarland, Texas 77478.
The website is sportkaratemuseum.org.
Floyd Burk
Mike Stone (left)
and Gary Lee

^HYYPVYTLKP[H[PVUJVT

16 BLACK BELT I DECEMBER 2013/JANUARY 2014 BLACKBELTMAG.COM
Active Interest Media, Black Belts parent compa-
ny, recently acquired MuscleMag International and
Oxygen magazines. Both publications will relocate to
the Black Belt offces in Valencia, California.
In Tennessee, a fencing instructor intervened when
he saw two men pepper-spray two people before rob-
bing them. Grabbing his epee, the martial artist chased
them off, and they were later apprehended by police.
On September 7, 2013, former Black Belt contribut-
ing editor Jim Wagner was lauded by the Martial Arts
History Museum in Burbank, California. He received
the Honors Award for excellence in the martial arts.
martialartsmuseum.com
Black Belts YouTube channel now boasts more
than 13,200 subscribers and has served up more
than 4.5 million videos. youtube.com/blackbeltllc
On the Facebook front (facebook.com/
BlackBeltMagazine), the magazines like tally has
exceeded 53,000. On Twitter (twitter.com/Black_Belt_
Mag), the total number of followers has topped 7,000.
On October 11, 2013, karate pioneer Mike Stone
dropped by the Black Belt offces for an interview. He
few to Southern California after visiting the Museum
of Sport Karate, which Gary Lee recently opened in
Pasadena, Texas.
Diana Lee Inosanto and her husband Ron Balicki
taught kali stick fghting to Aaron Eckhart for his
starring role in the flm I, Frankenstein. The movie is
NEWS BITES
New Fight Gear
HAYABUSA INTRODUCES
THE MIRAI SERIES
Hayabusa, maker of fne fght gear and garments, has released a new product line
called Mirai. The Mirai Series stemmed from our ongoing determination to improve
performance equipment and shape the industry as a whole," says Justin Haberman,
Hayabusas marketing manager.
Our mission was to provide support superior to laces with the ease of hook-and-
loop systems. Boa Technology provided all the benefts we were expecting, plus
more. With a simple turn of the knob, the Mirai Series delivers a level of comfort, ft
and performance you need to experience and believe." HayabusaFight.com
Competition Op
ARNOLD
SPORTS
FESTIVAL
TO INCLUDE
MARTIAL ARTS
The Arnold Sports Festival will
celebrate its 26
th
anniversary
when it takes place in Columbus,
Ohio, on February 27-March 2,
2014. More than 175,000 sports
and ftness fans are expected
to attendin addition to 18,000
athletes.
The event, which is co-
produced by Arnold Schwar-
zenegger and Jim Lorimer, has
taken place since 1989. In its
early years, it was a bodybuilding
competition, but it now spans 50
sports, including amateur boxing,
archery, fencing, grappling/jiu-
jitsu, judo and taekwondo. It will
also host a Martial Arts Festival
and an Amateur MMA Festival.
arnoldsportsfestival.com
scheduled to hit theaters in January.
On September 28, 2013, Bill Superfoot Wal-
lace was honored by Independent Karate Schools of
America with a lifetime achievement award in rec-
ognition of 50 years of continuous study, practice and
teaching of the martial arts. Wallace was the featured
instructor at the annual IKSA National Training
Seminar. iksa.com
In early October, Black Belt Web trafc hit a new
high. Visits to the page that hosts the article "How Kyo-
kushin Karate Master Kenji Yamaki Endured the 100-
Man Kumite experienced the spike after a Cracked.
com story about martial arts myths linked to it.
The latest effort to legalize mixed-martial arts
competition in New York failed.
The editors of Black Belt Books have completed
work on two projects. One is titled Modern Army
Combatives: Battle-Proven Techniques and Train-
ing Methods by Matt Larsen. Its available for pre-
order at store.blackbeltmag.com.
The other is titled The Complete Ninja Collection
by Stephen K. Hayes. Its an updated compilation of
the Black Belt Hall of Famers six best-selling books.
It, too, can be pre-ordered at the Black Belt Store.
On September 25, 2013, The Diplomat reported that
the Democratic Republic of East Timor banned the
practice of pencak silat because it was being used by
criminals.


18 BLACK BELT I DECEMBER 2013/JANUARY 2014 BLACKBELTMAG.COM
Tactics vs. Strategies
Unarmed combat, whether sport or street oriented, is often broken into cat-
egcr|es |c a|e || eas|er |c 1|scass par||ca|ar aspec|s c| ||e g||. Jsaa||,
these are called ranges of combat with an outside-to-inside scheme that
sees ara||rar||aa1 |s|a|ea|aase1 ca aa ca|s|1e|a ||||ar c1e|. |e
||||ar c1e| a |ac|a1e |cagraage ar||||er ca ||e ca|s|1e aa1 w|a1 ap
w||| |a|aa|r ca ||e |as|1e. |e aaare1 c1e| sees |c prcgress a|cag ||e
same lines, with kicking on the outside and grappling on the inside.
a ar| Ha|a|er
I
inu the iange mouel lacking be-
cause it encouiages you to see the
ight in teims of uistance equating
with tool choice Example Im
in kicking iange so theies no neeu to
woiiy about this oi that Big mistake
0i Weie giappling now so this is off
the table Anothei big mistake
Anyone whos playeu the game long
enough oi even paiu attention as an
obseivei knows that iange mouels sim-
ply uont apply in NNA oi any blenueu
ight game Even woise they can actu-
ally hinuei youi peifoimance
Aumitteuly I may be splitting haiis
heie but theies no getting aiounu
the fact that iange is a uesignatoi of
uistance anu if what weie uesciibing
uoesnt iefei to speciic ianges why use
such a uesignation
IVE SETTLED ON the woiu element
to uesciibe the inuiviuual aspects of a
ight I chose it with puipose because
elements aie single uispaiate entities
anu moie impoitant elements can be
combineu with othei elements to cie-
ate new substances
boxing game plus knees elbows kicks
heau butts anu whatevei othei bouy
paits you ueem woithy of thiowing
Rathei than make this a sepaiate ele-
ment such as kicking I nameu it to
convey the piimacy of boxing even
when you auu othei stiiking tools Ex-
ample Note how skilleu kickboxeis
will set up theii kicks with theii hanus
Shooting: This is composeu of take-
uowns without the beneit of the clinch
Its usually but not always limiteu to
techniques aimeu at the lowei bouy
The Clinch: This is a tiue pieblenueu
element because the clinch can be the
focus of some ightstopping stiikes anu
because it can be useu to set up anothei
class of takeuowns usually uppeibouy
uepenuent Bespite this it must be
thought of as an inuiviuual element be-
cause its unlike any otheiits not puie
stiiking anu its not puie takeuown
Mat Work/Wrestling: This element is
sepaiate fiom submissions even though
submissions that aie uovetaileu into the
wiestling uiills can be a huge pait of it
0ften the giounu game is seen in teims
of the iousing submissions that can be
ieapeu but this is an element that must
be piacticeu to fostei luiu anu aggiessive
contiolling anu seconunatuie uefensive
low Naking the sub moie impoitant
than wiestling is akin to teaching a ight-
ei to thiow punches without uiscussing
footwoik slipping bobbing anu weaving
Submissions: Its exactly what it
saysa way foi the ightei to submit
his opponent via a lock oi choke
ITS EASY TO EYE each element as com-
pletely sepaiateanu they can be uiilleu
in a mannei that allows us to focus on
weak aieas But weve got to be caieful
not to keep the elements sepaiateu foi
too long oi well fall piey to the same
pioblem as the ianges We uont want to
become ighteis who shift geais between
elements as in Im boxing now Im
clinching now Im on the mat
Rathei what we shoulu stiive foi is
seeing that the ight is composeu of
these elements but knowing theyie
most valuable when we combine them
Recall that hyuiogen anu oxygen aie vi-
tal builuing blocks of the univeise but
its not in theii sepaiate foims that these
chemical elements aie most beneicial
Its only when two paits hyuiogen anu
one pait oxygen aie combineu will they
keep us fiom uying of thiist
I consiuei boxing a sepaiate element
anu the clinch a sepaiate element but
as we all know boxing can be biought
to the clinch anu the clinch can be
biought to boxing When we uo such
combining we have a new animal that
can be uealt with foi what it isas op-
poseu to tiying to iguie out what uis-
tance we ciosseu to move fiom boxing
iange to clinch iange
Now that Ive intiouuceu a uiffeient
way of thinking lets move on to what
I see as the six elements of unaimeu
combat
Boxing: Ive placeu thiowing the
hanus at the top of the list foi two iea-
sons 0ne its intuitive People with
zeio combat tiaining will attempt to hit
one anothei with theii hanus Its fai
easiei to take an ingiaineu inclination
anu coach it to science than it is to stait
a counteiintuitive skill fiom sciatch
Two its useful Whethei youie on
youi feet oi on the giounu the stats
show that punching wins moie ights
than any othei tool by a wiue maigin
Boxing-Plus: This element is youi

ZZZ7XUWOH3UHVVFRP

20 BLACK BELT I DECEMBER 2013/JANUARY 2014 BLACKBELTMAG.COM
P
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F
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The Passing of Robert K. Koga
Oa Sep|eaer &, Z9IJ, ||e ar||a| ar|s wcr|1 saere1 ||e |css c| aikido master and law-enforcement training specialist Robert
K. Koga. He was 83. The cause of his death was mesothelioma.
by Mark Jacobs
A
)APANESEAMERICAN Koga
began his martial arts prac-
tice unuei uificult ciicum-
stances during World War II.
He was only 12 when he was placed in
a Japanese internment camp in Utah.
Runins with iufians convinceu the
boy that hed better learn self-defense,
so he took up judo. After the war, he
continued his judo studies and added
wrestling to his repertoire. In 1949 he
joined the U.S. Air Force and, while was
stationed in Japan, seized the opportu-
nity to further polish his grappling.
Be latei seiveu in the Koiean Wai
wheie he was wounueu Aftei he in-
ished his enlistment, he settled in Cali-
fornia and joined the Los Angeles Po-
lice Department.
Koga quickly determined that the
hand-to-hand training he and his fel-
low IAPB oficeis ieceiveu was lacking
That prompted him to begin crafting a
combatives system that woulu boiiow
from the many martial arts hed studied,
including judo, jujitsu and jodo. How-
evei the style that woulu play the most
important role in his reformulation of
IAPB uefensive tactics was aikiuo
KUCA LEARNED the strategies and
techniques of Morihei Ueshibas art
fiom iistgeneiation stuuent Koichi
Tohei. Demonstrating the utmost re-
spect for tradition, Koga asked permis-
sion befoie alteiing his masteis moves
anu Tohei gave it Koga then combineu
mouiieu aikiuo with his othei aits to
create the Koga System, and it was well-
ieceiveu at the acauemy
An equally signiicant contiibution
to police uefensive tactics ievolveu

around perseverance. After review-
ing use-of-force reports involving of-
iceis who weie seveiely injuieu oi
killeu Koga concluueu that theie weie
speciic points in violent confionta-
tions at which the oficeis simply gave
upoften when theii own weapons
weie taken away anu about to be useu
against them In iesponse he ueviseu
his tiauemaik No give up motto Be
taught cauets that even when they can-
not mount an offense as long as they
keep those thiee woius in minu theyll
have a much gieatei chance of ietain-
ing theii gunsanu theii livesin a
confrontation.
In 1979 Koga ietiieu fiom IAPB to
concentiate on his woik at the Koga In-
stitute the nonpioit entity he cieateu to
tiain lawenfoicement coiiections anu
piivate secuiity peisonnel Be became
a soughtaftei instiuctoi foi police ofi-
ceis acioss the 0niteu States as well as
in Canaua Nexico anu othei nations
To facilitate the spieau of his message
anu methous he wiote foui books on
the maitial aits anu staiieu in a Black
Beltpiouuceu BvB seiies titleu Practi-
cal Aiki-Do.
MITCH GROBESON, an IAPB veteian
began tiaining with Koga in 19S anu
eventually became an instiuctoi in the
Koga System uiobeson says the tech-
niques anu tactics he leaineu saveu
his life seveial times 0n one occasion
he chaseu a gang membei into a builu-
ing that unbeknownst to him was
the gangs heauquaiteis Suiiounueu
by moie than a uozen gangbangeis
uiobeson immeuiately heaueu towaiu
the suspect whom he secuieu with an
aim lock anu wiist lock
I iemembeieu his auvice anu useu
the suspect as a shielu then put my
back to a wall uiobeson saiu I useu
one of Bobs tiicks to twist the suspects
ingeis anu lift him up on his toes until
he was in pain anu yelling foi the othei
gang membeis to keep back
Bobs ueath was a gieat loss to law
enfoicement anu the maitial aits com-
munity I uont know of any peison
whos been so selless anu ueuicateu
to making suie those who piotect anu
seive aie themselves piotecteu anu
seiveu Bob Koga maue suie we all
maue it home eveiy night
For more information about the Koga
System, visit kogainstitute.com.
I used one of Bobs tricks to twist the
susects |ae|s +ac |||t ||a u ca ||s
tces uat|| |e w+s |a +|a +ac ,e|||a |c| t|e
ct|e| +a aeace|s tc |ee c+c|.'

22 BLACK BELT I DECEMBER 2013/JANUARY 2014 BLACKBELTMAG.COM
T
wo small words that say so much will answer those questions best: If
only. If only we never got hit hard, never got staggered, never had to take
a knee. Obviously, we all want to train to succeed, but wed be silly not to
consider failure and develop skills for what were going to do in the event
we zig when we shouldve zagged.
In combat sportsboxing, MMA and muay Thaia byproduct of hard training is
the development of your chin. Hard sparring teaches you how to roll with a punch
and adjust your range to mitigate strikes, and it helps you identify where the holes
are in your defense. Unfortunately, the same cant be said about practice sessions in
which sparring stops when blood is drawn and complete inishes arent encouraged
So how are you supposed to react when your bell is rung? What does it feel like?
hat will it do to your ability to ight ntil it happens to you you cant really learn
how to deal with it. Continuous aggressive pressure teaches you that a good de-
fense isnt complete unless you can make your attacker step back. If all youre do-
Its Only a Flesh Wound
One thing people routinely fail to incorporate into their training is what to
do when theyre hurt. Its probably because were all invincible and immortal,
right? I mean, were doing the hurting, not the other way around arent we?
by Kelly McCann
P
h
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b
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P
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t
e
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L
u
e
d
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r
s
ing is covering up to protect yourself
or worse, turning your backIve got
some really bad news for you.
YOUR TRAINING SHOULD include
simple combinations that you grind
into your motor memory. When you
catch a good shot, its apparent to who-
ever threw it. If hes aggressive enough
to be ighting with you in the irst place
hes likely smart enough to know when
and how to close the deal. You want to
ruin his intention.
Glove up with a training partner and
have him ire off a few shots lock and
defend but immediately ire backnot
exactly blindly but certainly directly.
Make him feel at risk. Do this over and
over until your shots are literally follow-
ing his retracting hands back to him.
Once youve got the hang of it, add


this: Immediately sit down, step out to
the side and punch again from a new
angle. Drill this simple response until
you can get it done consistently and
reliablyeven if youre a little rocked.
Defend, hit back, change levels, be
somewhere new, hit back again.
If you get hit square and youre sud-
denly tasting blood in the back of your
throat, dont freak out. You can cer-
tainly spit it out, but dont hang your
mouth open to gasp for air. Just breathe
through and around your teeth. Keep
biting downyou dont want to sustain
another hit with your mouth open. Dont
blow your nose, either; just let it drip.
PERHAPS THE HARDEST thing about all
this for most people is ighting through
pain and adversity, knowing that youre
hurt and not 100 percent. Take heart!
Many boxing coaches have told their pu-
pils he most dangerous ighter can be
the one youve hurt. Theres a reason for
that admonishment. When you suddenly
understand the gravity of the situation,
you can leverage the adrenaline dump
to your advantageif you have the skills
and the training.
When you train, make every effort not
to just participate but to dominate the
range inside which youre both at risk.
Remember that in order to hit, youve
got to be within range to be hit. Being
able to take a heavy shot while stay-
ing focused is essential to dominating
that space. The only way to learn how
to do that is to experience it. You have
to learn that a heavy-handed hit alone
doesnt mean you cant still prevail ex-
perientially, not theoretically.
Youve undoubtedly seen it during
combat-sports events. Tim Bradley vs.
Ruslan Provodnikov comes to mind
Bradleys determination and instincts to
survive were so strong he weathered a
terrible beating and still managed to step
off a powerful and aggressive Provod-
nikov. Developing that in yourself doesnt
come easily or cheaply; it takes commit-
ted training with the potential for injury.
If youre serious about self-defense,
you have to subject yourself to increas-
ingly harder training in which theres an
element of real riskcontrolled and safe,
of course, but risk nonetheless. Theres
no substitute for inuring yourself to the
presence of risk and learning to deal with
the possible consequences, especially
when youve sustained some damage.
If youre serious about self-defense, you have to
subject yourself to increasingly harder training in
which theres an element of real riskcontrolled
and safe, of course, but risk nonetheless.
In volume two of Kelly McCanns new Kem-ba-Tivz
Sudden Violence Series, Maury Abreu shares his
knowledge and passion for edged-weapon combatives.
Abreu teaches you a new way of training for responding
to sudden, violent edged-weapons attacks . . . a way of
training that has been successfully tested by combatants
around the globe. 85 minutes. Also available on Blu-ray.
No one is born knowing how to fght. For Dan
Schreiber, the gates to the combatives world were
opened by Kelly McCann and the late Bob Kasper.
In A Better Fighter, Schreiber brings together
various concepts from karate, as well as alternatives
from boxing, muay Tai, and wrestling, in a curriculum
designed to turn a hard-working student into a better
fghter. 190 minutes. Also available on Blu-ray.
#BETTDVD $39.95
PALADIN PRESS
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1.800.392.2400
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#EWKDVD $39.95
TWB XEW PRBBIITS FRBH PALABIX PRESS
N
E
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24 BLACK BELT I DECEMBER 2013/JANUARY 2014 BLACKBELTMAG.COM
Return to Shaolin, Part 1
Oa ||e I9|| aaa|ersar c| rs| scjcara |c S|ac||a, | re|arae1 |c ||e |ep|e ||a|s c||ea c|a|e1 |c ae ||e a|r||p|ace
c| |aag |a. |ss|ca was |c s|a1 saa 1a. rae |c |cr, ||e |ra|aers |e1|a|e| |erse1 e |a ||e rea|re1 |esscas.
| wcaa1 ap 1c|ag s|\ |cars c| ar||a| ar|s, |wc |cars c| ccaersa||caa| O||aese, aa1 aa |car aa1 a |a|| c| wr|||ea O||-
aesea|| ca rs| 1a.
a /a|ca|c racec
M
y trainers kept me occu-
pied until 8:40 p.m., by
which time I felt exhaust-
ed. I hit the sack, knowing
I had to rise at 5:45 the next morning
to do it all again. Making matters worse,
this time the regimen would have to
be endured without help from my old
friends meat, Coke and Mountain Dew.
0n my iist tiip to the temple I
vowed to stay for a year, but after sev-
eral monthsduring which I was beset
by illness, worn down by unsanitary
conditions and concerned by the SARS
epidemicI departed. Since then, the
temple has stood strong in the back
of my mind. I convinced myself that if
I returned, Id thrive as a student be-
cause Im older, calmer and better at
Chinese Ny iist visit biought high ex-
pectationson some level, Id hoped to
discover something mystical about the
martial artsbut I left disappointed.
This time, I went to Shaolin, expecting
the worst. To my surprise, it ended up
being one of the best training experi-
ences Ive had in Asia.
FULL DISCLOSURE: When people say
they study at Shaolin, they dont actu-
ally live in the temple. Some 65 martial
arts schools exist outside the com-
pound, and a handful of others are on
Shaolin property, but no matter which
one you choose, you wont be living in
the temple proper.
In 2003 things were different. When
I aiiiveu I spent my iist few nights
in the temple. After that, I moved to a
house a few hundred yards from the
gate and walked to the monastery for
my daily training session. That para-
digm ended in 2010 when UNESCO
declared Shaolin a world heritage site.
Now, most of the martial arts schools
are several miles away. Tagou, the larg-
est and oldest facility, as well as the
government-run Wushu Academy, re-
main in their original locations, which
now puts them on the expanded temple
grounds.
ON THIS TRIP TO SHAOLIN, I was sur-
piiseu to inu that the Bisneyinspiieu
Shaolin Village had been erected near-
by; it reminded me of Kung Fu Panda.
The village hosts several schools for
foreign students.
Anothei uiffeience between my iist
and second Shaolin experiences in-
volved money. Back in 2003, I paid $200
a month for training, food and lodging.
This time, I paid $1,000 a month. The P
h
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ABOUT THE AUTHOR:
Antonio Graceffo is a freelance writer
based in Asia. To order Warrior Odyssey,
the book he wrote about his travels, visit
blackbeltmag.com.
price jump brought an upgrade in ac-
commodations: In 2003 I shared a
building with 60 people. It boasted four
bedrooms but lacked indoor toilets. In
2013 the ratio was down to 30 people
per building (three to a room), with
two bathrooms and indoor showers
and toilets.
I quickly discovered that overall hy-
giene also had received a boostnot
quite to Western standards, but it was
surgically clean by Shaolin standards.
Why was I paying so much attention to
cleanliness he irst time around got
sick once a week from contaminated
food. This time, I didnt get a stomach
bug for the irst month
THE SMALL SCHOOL in which I
planned to live and train this time was
unique in that Chinese and foreign stu-
dents practiced together. Most facili-
ties choose to cater to one group or the
other, or they serve both but train them
in wushu separately. San da seemed to
provide a reason for uniication ven
in big schools like Tagou, foreigners
enrolled in the san da program train
alongside Chinese students.
When I arrived, I found only three oth-
er foreigners and 12 Chinese students
living in the house. Hugo, a student of
New York-based Shi Yan Ming, said, I
like this place a lot because we get to live
with the Chinese kids and learn about
their lives.
I quickly concluded that at least in
our house, the Chinese students were
a lot of fun. They constantly clowned
around with us and were eager to pro-
vide glimpses into the Chinese lifestyle.
One sifu said to me: I dont know why
foreigners would come to China and
then train with other foreigners. They
could do that in their own country. Ob-
viously, he believed in letting us mingle
with locals. Its a good thing I did, too,
because there was about to be a whole
lot of mingling.
Some 65 martial arts schools exist outside
the compound, and a handful of others are
on Shaolin property, but no matter which
one you choose, you wont be living in the
temple proper.

26 BLACK BELT I DECEMBER 2013/JANUARY 2014 BLACKBELTMAG.COM
S
ometimes these stories are odd.
The katori shinto ryu, one of Ja-
pans oldest martial traditions,
traces its origins back to a found-
er who, in the early 15
th
century, saw a
horse being washed with water from a
well at a Shinto shrine. The animal sud-
denly died. According to the ryus lore, its
death gave the founder arcane insights
into the power of the shrine that came to
form the ryus principles.
IT ISNT UNUSUAL for a revelation to
follow strenuous physical effort from
the founder of an art. In the 16
th
century,
Muso Gonnosuke, an expert with the
long staff, was defeated but not injured in
a famous duel with Miyamoto Musashi.
He retreated to a mountaintop cave and
trained until he was exhausted. He was
eventually visited by a deity who in-
structed him to reduce the length of the
staffwhich resulted in the creation of
the jo. This is the origination story of the
tenshinsho-den shinto muso ryu of jojutsu.
Tengu, the mountain-dwelling goblins
of Japan, are also supposed to have con-
tributed to the origins of some ryu. It was
early 1960s. And the goddess is, judging
from her depiction on isshin-ryu patches,
obviously moie inluenceu by Westein
folktales than by the original Okinawan
bunaigami, or sister goddess.
ONE REASON FOR the lack of supernat-
ural myths in Okinawan karate might be
these arts didnt really develop into any
coherent, distinguishable form until rela-
tively recent times. Just like a divine or
mystic origination myth associated with,
say, hamburgers would seem weird, Oki-
nawan karate may be so relatively mod-
ern that such tales never arose.
Another possibility might be that the
Okinawans view these arts within their
culture differently than do the Japanese.
Karate was a means of protection, a form
of physical education, a method for prov-
ing oneself in matches against other vil-
lages; rarely was it a matter of life and
death. Losing a karate bout might mean
sustaining an injuiy Iosing a battleielu
contest meant dying. The stakes were
much higher for the Japanese warrior.
Perhaps thats why the powerful, super-
natural myths were necessary to give
him moie belief moie coniuence The
Okinawan karateka, by comparison,
didnt need such a structure in his belief
system.
My own suspicionit is only thatis
that no goblins or deities played a role
in the creation of Okinawan karate sys-
tems because the Okinawans already
had in place an object of veneration and
respect. It was China.
Okinawans were visiting China by
the 15
th
century. Trade was thriving be-
tween the tiny island kingdom and the
mainlanu China piofounuly inluenceu
Okinawan culture. For the Okinawans,
the knowledge and culture of China
must have been awesome. Chinese com-
bat arts, which played an extensive role
in the ieinement of 0kinawan kaiate
would have seemed very impressive; its
masters would have been venerated.
Those Okinawans who made the voy-
age to China would have been something
like todays astronauts, rare individuals
who have been to fantastically far-off
places and seen and learned wondrous
things. The Okinawans did not need su-
pernatural tales to give their arts cred-
ibility or a sense of the special. For them,
the Chinese from whom they learned
would have been as extraordinary an
origination story as they wanted or
needed.
Goblins and Mystic Visions
|e cc|a| ||||e c| seera| iapaaese |cra aac|ea| ar||a| ar|s) |ac|a1es ||e
p|rase tenshinsho-den cr sce|||ag s|||ar. raas|a|e1 as 1||ae| |asp|re1 aa-
s|c |eac||ags, || re|ers |c ||e cr|g|aa||ca || c| aa ar|. cs| |cra parpcr| |c
|ae s|ee1 |rc saperaa|ara| eea|s.
a Dae |cwr
a tengu that, according to some legends,
taught the famous 10
th
-century war-
rior Minamoto Yoshitsune the secrets of
swordsmanship that are today contained
in the principles of the kurama ryu.
ITS INTERESTING THAT while super-
natural events mark the creation of most
Japanese classical martial arts, theyre
almost absent in Okinawan karate sys-
tems. This seems particularly odd when
you consider that Okinawan culture is
deeply, profoundly mystical. Okinawan
religion is full of elaborate, secretive
rituals and folklore. It would seem natu-
ral that the karate of that island nation
woulu ielect some of this
There are some exceptions to this curi-
ous absence in a few karate systems. The
kojo ryua small, traditional Okinawan
karate stylehas a dozen postures in-
corporated into its kata that represent
the 12 animals of the Chinese zodiac. The
symbol of the isshin ryu features a mer-
maid-like goddessthe inspiration for
the systems founder, Tatsuo Shimabuku,
when she appeared in a vision to him.
But this myth dates back only to the


28 BLACK BELT I DECEMBER 2013/JANUARY 2014 BLACKBELTMAG.COM
The Man Who Never Was
I want you to call this story The Man Who Never Was, Leo Gaje said to me. Because he was holding a razor-sharp, 10-
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F
or a long time, Ive been hearing
tales of Leo T. Gaje Jr., the grand-
master of the pekiti tirsia sys-
tem of kaliperhaps the most
contioveisial iguie in the Filipino mai-
tial arts. Over the years, Id had the op-
poitunity to uiscuss the man with half a
uozen of his senioi stuuents anu an equal
numbei of colleagues anu acquaintances
but until iecently Iu nevei met him So
when my fiienu Ahkmeu Boouiaca invit-
eu me to a uaje seminai he was hosting
in New Yoik I thought I might inally get
a bettei unueistanuing of him
TRYING TO UNDERSTAND Gaje is
reminiscent of the Japanese story
Rashomon, wheiein eveiy chaiactei
iecounts the events fiom a uiffeient
viewpoint with no one agieeing on the
facts 0pinions vaiy wiluly with some
loving Gaje and some loathing him. The
one thing almost everyone agrees on is
his incieuible maitial aits skill
Boouiaca calls uaje the tiuth anu
saiu he owes eveiything he has to the
man But anothei longtime stuuent of
uaje once uesciibeu him as puie evil
When I inally met him he seemeu
moie a genial gianufatheily iguie
putteiing aiounu in a baseball cap anu
a baggy I Iove Texas sweatshiit than
the peisoniication of uaikness Then
he took the looi to teach the pekiti
tirsia style he learned from his grand-
father Conrado Tortal. Gaje began a
simple knifeighting technique then
suuuenly uioppeu to his knees anu pio-
claimeu Now we piayfoi his ueath
Possessing phenomenal grace and
agility foi a man in his 7us uaje swept
his foe to the giounu anu mounteu
him befoie uiagging his tiaining knife
acioss his neck in a casual thioat
cutting motion Then he smackeu him
across the face, jabbed the tip of the
uull knife into his caiotiu jammeu his
othei hanu unuei the fellows nose to
shove his heau back anu once moie cut
his thioat befoie summaiizing Enjoy
ituiink his bloou At that point he
maue a sucking noise
Welcome to the woilu of Ieo uaje
BORN IN NEGROS OCCIDENTAL in the
Philippines, Gaje began training in the
P
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martial arts at age 6. His grandfather
uiilleu him in nothing but footwoik
for three years before moving on to
the stiiking aspects of the system anu
schooling him in the use of knives
sticks anu vaiious othei weapons The
boy also learned the empty-hand tac-
tics that make up the pekiti tiisia cui-
iiculum But like eveiything suiiounu-
ing uaje the natuie anu oiigins of
many of these techniques aie mysteii-
ous Some have claimeu uaje boiioweu
moves from other styles and incorpo-
iateu them into pekiti tiisia while oth-
eis have stateu hes continually moui-
ieu his teachings ovei the yeais uaje
insisteu theies no tiuth to any of this
Eveiything I teach is the tiauitional
ait that I leaineu he saiu Why woulu
I change anything when it was all theie
alieauy Its just that people have only
seen paits of the system so when they
see something new they think Ive
maue changes But these things have
always been theie
Whatever hes teaching, Gajes meth-
ous seem to woik Bis stuuents ieau
like a whos who of Filipino maitial

arts luminaries, including world ar-
nis champion Tom Bisio, Dog Brothers
co-founder Eric Knaus, sayoc kali head
Chris Sayoc and pekiti tirsia expert Wil-
liam McGrath. Beginning his teaching
career in New York with Boouraca and
these others back in the early 1970s,
Gaje skillfully built a style thats now
practiced around the globe.
RENOWNED FOR HIS expertise with
edged weapons, Gaje is a sought-af-
ter instructor with military and law-
enforcement organizations and has
served as a close-quarters combat in-
structor for the Philippine marines.
But always there were rumors of his
dark side. One hears bizarre stories
such as how when he irst moved to
New York, he used to ride the subways
He still carries three knives at all times, but he has
a logical reason for it: I carry two for me and one
for my opponent. That way, if I give him one and kill
him, the police cant say I killed an unarmed man.
late at night with money hanging out
of his pockets, looking half asleep in
hopes that someone would attempt to
mug him so he could practice his mar-
tial arts. Surely this cant be true.
Oh yes, thats true, he said. I wanted
to see if my techniques worked. Whats
the point in practicing this stuff for all
those years if you never get to use it?
Bisio once told me about the time he
got on a subway train with Gaje while
Gaje was carrying three knives, a sword
concealed inside a cane and a ball bear-
ing embedded in the palm of his glove.
Exaggeration?
I remember that, Gaje said. I al-
ways want to be prepared for what
comes up.
He still carries three knives at all
times, but he has a logical reason for it:
I carry two for me and one for my op-
ponent. That way, if I give him one and
kill him, the police cant say I killed an
unarmed man.
Gaje offered many of these comments
with a gallows humor that made me
think he was joking perhaps.
You have to have fun and enjoy what
youre doing, he said. You cant be so
serious all the time, especially when
youre doing martial arts and teaching
people kill, kill, kill!
So was he joking or was he serious? Is
he a martial arts messiah or the devil in
disguise? Gaje, characteristically, pre-
fers to remain mysterious.
People online have called me a mad-
man, he said. Im not a madmanbut
I am crazy. Im misunderstood. But to
be misunderstood is to be great.

30 BLACK BELT I DECEMBER 2013/JANUARY 2014 BLACKBELTMAG.COM
Maintaining the Self in a
Community of Martial Artists
These days, we take for granted that each of us belongs
to many overlapping communities. All the kids, parents
DQG VWD PHPEHUV DW P\ VRQV HOHPHQWDU\ VFKRRO VHH
themselves as part of a school community. The foreign
residents here in Tokyo talk about being part of the expa-
triate community. And, of course, everyone reading Black
Belt is part of the martial arts community.
by Keith Vargo
W
hat often gets lost in all this talk of community
is how much of an individual endeavor martial
arts training is.
In eveiything fiom leaining a foim to ight-
ing in the cage to inuing spiiitual insights community is
about suppoit 0sually its about giving us context anu guiu-
ance. But no matter what a martial arts community does for
people it can only take them so fai The maitial aits always
end in individual achievement.
THE MOST OBVIOUS example comes fiom the ight spoits
You coulu be a pio NNA guy with a team of coaches nutii-
tionists anu conuitioning specialists all focuseu on you You
coulu be one membei of a big juuo team that spais constantly
anu uoes oluschool conuitioning woik togethei It uoesnt
mattei Youi maitial aits community can only help you get
ieauy to ight its the ightei who wins oi loses the match
The same goes foi the seemingly simple act of leaining an
ait Some mistakenly believe that leaining is a passive pio-
cess They think the instiuctoi gives them techniques anu
they simply uo what he says The ieality is that leaining is
always an active piocess Its something that the stuuent
does and that the instructor guides. Without that individual
stiuggle to ieally unueistanu an ait anu uo it well theies
no ieal leaining just iote memoiization
Spiiitual uevelopment is just as much of an active piocess
as leaining the skills of ighting is Enlightenment oi some
lessei insight might come to a few maitial aitists suuuenly
but its iaiely without effoit 0sually the ieal guius anu
mystics of the aits spenu yeais in contemplation anu stuuy
befoie theii lash of awaieness
MY FAVORITE EXAMPLE of this is kyudo. Its one of the few
aits that aie competitive anu spiiitual Anu like all aits you
have to iguie things out foi youiself even when you have
help fiom an instiuctoi
The competitive siue of kyuuo is piobably the puiest ex-
ample of inuiviuual achievement in the maitial aits You anu
you alone hit oi miss the taiget Theies no opponent who
can make you look goou oi bau You cant blame faulty equip-
ment if you fail to hit the taiget because youie as much ie-
sponsible foi youi own equipment as you aie foi making the
shot As kyuuo mastei Biuehaiu 0numa saiu the bow uoesnt
lie When you shoot it shows who you ieally aie
The spiiitual siue of kyuuo emeiges natuially fiom piac-
tice Theies a uesiie to hit the taiget that can get in the way
of actually hitting it a uesiie that must be oveicome foi the
shooting to become effoitless Theies the sense of time anu
distance being illusionswhen master archers feel that
the aiiow alieauy exists in the taiget All these things come
only thiough long concentiateu effoit
Then theies the simple act of leaining kyuuo The foims
aie shoit anu the movements few but leaining to uo them
iight iequiies constant selfexamination anu effoit A nov-
ice can be taught anu guiueu but only he can leain to feel
the iight position of his bouy anu when to let the aiiow ly
0nly an active stuuent can gain the kinu of intuitive feel foi
coiiect shooting that }apanese aicheiy is fameu foi
0f couise community is as impoitant in kyuuo as in any
maitial ait It takes a lot to oiganize competitions anu iun
a kyudojo. But even with all the carefully coordinated effort
uuiing piactice anu all the caie neeueu to maintain an ai-
cheiy iange theies still nothing moie inuiviuual than hit-
ting that target yourself.
THE BEST THING about having a sense of community is
youi iuentity expanus Youi connection with the people
gives a laigei sense of self something biggei anu moie
meaningful than just youi own talents But thats also its
gieatest uangei Its easy to get lost in youi community to
iuentify too closely with it to let actual maitial aits achieve-
ment faue anu allow youi peisonality to become uiffuse
You just become pait of the gioup insteau of youiself Anu
the antiuote is always the same to inu youiself thiough
some kinu of maitial aits achievement That is what ueines
our community and ourselves.
ABOUT THE AUTHOR:
Keith Vargos book Philosophy of Fighting: Morals and Motivations
of the Modern Warrior is available on paper and as an e-book at
blackbeltmag.com.


32 BLACK BELT I DECEMBER 2013/JANUARY 2014 BLACKBELTMAG.COM
Wrists at Risk
In the dojo, the most common cause of broken wrists is a fall in
which the martial artist attempts to lessen the impact by extend-
|ag aa ar |c a|e rs| cca|ac| w||| ||e ccr. / |essccca
caase |s a 1|rec| a|cw ||a| |||s ||e wr|s|. U|ea ca ccas|1er |cw
important the wrist is in the delivery of poweras well as in lock-
ing, grabbing and escaping from grabsit pays to know the physi-
c|cg|ca| ||||s c| ||e jc|a|. /a1 |cr ||cse ||es w|ea ||e wcrs|case
sceaar|c |appeas, ||s aeaec|a| |c |acw w|a| |c e\pec| w|ea a
wr|s| |s arc|ea.
a kcaer| Uaag, .D.
ABOUT THE AUTHOR:
Robert Wang, M.D., is a Fellow of the Royal College of
Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. Hes an orthopedic
surgeon specializing in sports medicine.
F
irst, the anatomy. The wrist joint is designed to allow many
uegiees of movement lexion extension iauial anu ulnai ue-
viation anu supination tuining the palm up anu pionation
tuining the palm uown The uistal iauius anu ulna foim the
wiist bone anu connect to the hanu caipal bones thiough ligaments
The uistal iauius anu ulna aie also connecteu to each othei by liga-
ments.
When we talk about wiist fiactuies weie iefeiiing to a bieak in the
uistal iauius anuoi ulna at the level of the metaphysis which is the
laieu iegion of a bone In chiluien an injuiy to the wiist bone can con-
sist of uamage to the giowth plate because theyie not skeletally matuie
yet Chiluien also can suffei an incomplete fiactuie wheiein only one
siue of the bone is bioken Yet anothei common injuiy in young maitial
aitists is a buckle fiactuie which follows a compiessive loau thiough
the uistal iauius Anu of couise kius can sustain a
complete fiactuie just like auults
Foi a matuie maitial aitist a wiist fiactuie is ei-
thei uisplaceu oi unuisplaceu anu it involves the
uistal iauius anuoi the ulna Bisplaceu means
theies been a shift in position between the two
bioken paits 0nuisplaceu means theie has been
no movement or shift.
An unuisplaceu fiactuie is tieateu nonopeia-
tively The wiist is immobilizeu with a secuie
splint oi a cast The injuiy geneially takes foui to
six weeks to heal
When the wiist fiactuie is uisplaceu it usu-
ally waiiants a ieuuction to piopeily align the
bones uetting the wiist into auequate align-
ment is impoitant because if it heals in a ciookeu
position it will pose pioblems in the futuie
Those pioblems may incluue pain stiffness anu
uecieaseu giip stiength
WHEN YOU SUSTAIN a wiist injuiy the meuical
assessment will involve Xiays If a ieuuction is
iequiieu foi a uisplaceu fiactuie anothei Xiay
will be obtaineu aftei the ieuuction to juuge the
quality of the pioceuuie If the alignment is ac-
ceptable the injuiy may be tieateu in a cast anu
closely monitoieu If at the next followup ap-
pointment the wiist bones have shifteu again
uespite being in a cast suigeiy will be neeueu
Foi unstable wiist fiactuiesthose whose
alignment cannot be maintaineu in a castsui-
geiy will piobably be iecommenueu The ueci-
sion to unueigo suigeiy shoulu take into account
factois such as the patients age activity level
and overall health.
The postopeiative couise also shoulu be inui-
viuualizeu If the bone quality is goou anu the
ixation is stiong eaily iangeofmotion theiapy
can be initiateu If the bone is soft anu the ixa-
tion questionable theiapy may be staiteu latei
to minimize the iisk of fuithei fiactuie uisplace-
ment.
IT TAKES EFFORT to unueigo the theiapy neeu-
eu to iecovei fiom a wiist fiactuie Even when
that happens the joint can feel stiff anu it can
take months to regain motion, strength and base-
line functionality If the fiactuie is seveie anuoi
the tieatment is not optimal theies a possibil-
ity you wont iegain all the motion stiength anu
functionality you hau Thats why its impeiative
that you seek meuical attention anytime you suf-
fei a wiist injuiy that might involve a fiactuie

YOUR MIND IS WEAK
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Advertisement

DESIGNED FOR
THE MODERN
ARMY COMBATIVES
PROGRAM,THEY
WORK FOR
CIVILIAN MARTIAL
ARTISTS, TOO!
FIGHTING
STRATEGIES
FROM MACP

BY MATT LARSEN
PHOTOS BY PETER LUEDERS

36 BLACK BELT I DECEMBER 2013/JANUARY 2014 BLACKBELTMAG.COM
In 2002, then-U.S. Army Ranger
Matt Larsen was tasked with re-
writing the U.S. Army Field Manual
for Combatives. In mid-2013, he
iuisbeJ work ou o more compre
hensive book titled Modern Army
Combotives BottleProveu Tecb
niques and Training Methods. The
followiuq is ou excerpt tbot will
belp civiliou mortiol ortists wbo
wout to become more wellrouuJeJ
ouJ iustructors wbo wout to croft
o curriculum tbot eficieutly quiJes
students to that goal.
Editor
W
hen the war in Afghanistan
began in 2001, our ideas
about what hand-to-hand
ights woulu look like weie
welluevelopeu We hau howevei a faii
ly simplistic view of the way ights on
the battleielu stait anu the tactical iole
foi combatives We thought the piimaiy
iole of combatives woulu be when a sol
uieis weapon faileu to function
In oui uefense the pievailing wisuom
was that combatives woulunt ieally be
necessaiy because of iiepowei anu
supeiioi tactics In the initial phase of
the wai in Iiaq in uu when the Aimy
was baiieling acioss the countiy at
tacking anu cleaiing towns anu builu
ings as necessaiy oui pieconceiveu
notions woikeu out well The steps oui
tioops useu weie as follows
1 Close the distance: Contiolling a
stanuup ight means contiolling the
iange between the ighteis 0ntiaineu
ighteis aie piimaiily uangeious at lon
gei ianges wheie they can biing weap
ons to beai moie easily The goal is to
avoiu that iange The most uangeious
thing even a supeiioi stiikei can uo is
to spenu time in the iange within which
the enemy has the highest piobability
of victoiy
2 Gain dominant position: Before
any killing oi uisabling technique can
be applieu the soluiei must gain anu
maintain uominant bouy position It
also allows a soluiei to contiol an en
emy moie effectively making it moie
uificult foi him to ueploy a weapon of
oppoitunity
inish the ight When uominant
bouy position has been achieveu the
ightei tiies to inish his opponent
secuie in the knowleuge that if an at
tempt fails as long as he maintains
uominance he may simply tiy again
If on the othei hanu a inishing tech
nique is attempteu fiom othei than a
uominant position anu it fails it coulu
mean uefeat
NEW REALITY
Soon aftei the wai enteieu its seconu
phase soluieis weie no longei simply
attacking anu cleaiing builuings The
most likely scenaiio foi combatives
now involveu the neeu to physically
uominate a iesisting peison who may
oi may not be an enemy In othei woius
1. 2.

BLACKBELTMAG.COM DECEMBER 2013/JANUARY 2014 I BLACK BELT 37
soldiers had to remain in control of the
situation, use restraint in the amount
of force they employ, and be ready to
turn it up to overwhelming force in-
stantly if there is even the smallest sign
of the resistance turning aggressive or
a weapon being deployed. Given these
realities, we slowly began to arrive at a
new, more sophisticated strategy.
It is a principle of infantry doctrine
that a unit should make contact with
the enemy with the smallest possible
element. This gives the larger unit the
most freedom to maneuver. When con-
tact is made, the leader has three basic
tactical options based on the mission
and the situation: He can attack straight
into the enemy, he can set up a base of
ire and attempt an envelopment or he
can break contact.
In the same way, it was determined
that soldiers need to gain control of an
enemy at the farthest possible range. If
that is verbally from across a room, it is
much better than becoming physically
engaged. At some point, however, sol-
diers often must lay hands on people.
At this time, the same principlegain-
ing control at the farthest range pos-
sibleapplies. In addition to having
the most tactical options if passive re-
sistance escalates, this helps keep the
enemy from grasping a soldiers gear.
DEFENSIVE LINES
Control achieved at arms length gives
three lines of defense if the enemy does
attack. From farthest (and most desir-
able) to closest, they are the following:
2 Post, as the name implies, is es-
sentially a stiff-arm, like in football. A
soldier can use it when advancing, ba-
sically to stiff-arm someone to get past
him without becoming too engaged, or
when grabbing someone to move him.
2 Frame is using an elbow to keep
someone off. It can be done with the
hand on either side of the opponents
headon the same side as in the muay
Thai clinch or across, which has advan-
tages when trying to get past someone.
2 Hook with head control is either
an underhook or overhook, exactly like
in wrestling. The soldier uses his head
to provide control and as a block to
keep control of the range.
Once the enemy has been stopped,
the soldier has three tactical options:
2 Regain projectile-weapons range.
This is the primary option because it al-
lows the most lexibility for the soldier
It cannot always be usedfor example,
if the mission is to capture someone
who is trying to lee herefore soldiers
must train for other options.
2 Transition to a secondary weap-
on. Often when a soldier is engaged, he
will not be able to bring a long gun to
bear, especially if the enemy is attempt-
ing to gain control of it. Once he has
momentarily achieved a controlling po-
sition, he has the option to use a second-
ary weapon. It is usually a pistol or knife
but also can include weapons of oppor-
tunity, such as a brick or a ballpoint pen.
2 Achieve the clinch. Acquiring a
secondary weapon cannot always be
done safely. If, for instance, a soldier is
unable to gain control of the opponent,
drawing a pistol or knife could have the
effect of giving it away to the enemy.
Also, if the enemy begins to bring a sec-
ondary weapon into the ight the best
option might be to close the distance
and gain control of it.
These three lines of defense and
three tactical options apply even if tak-
LINES OF DEFENSE: Matt Larsen (left) demonstrates the post (1), the frame on the
same side (2), the frame across (3) and the hook with head control (4). The farther
away the opponent is, the better able you are to control the position, Larsen says, but
no matter where you fnd yourself, you must be able to stop your opponents advance.
3. 4.

38 BLACK BELT I DECEMBER 2013/JANUARY 2014 BLACKBELTMAG.COM
en to the groundas long as the enemy
has not established a dominant posi-
tion. They give a soldier a framework
and the ability to handle a wide array
of situations. Of course, they are also
built on solid grappling ability. The bet-
ter and more practiced a soldiers grap-
pling skills are, the more likely it is that
he will be able to dictate at what range
the ight takes place
FIGHTER DEVELOPMENT:
GROUND GRAPPLING
A soldier can make the quickest sub-
stantial gains in the area of ground
grappling he only ighter who can af
ford to be aggressive in an altercation
is the one who is skilled at the closest
ranges. Just like a tall boxer must be
careful to stay away from his opponent
in order to use the advantage of his
superior range and the shorter ighter
longs to get up close to nullify that ad-
vantage, the inferior grappler must
take pains to avoid becoming decisively
engaged lest he be beaten where he is
weakest. Therefore, becoming a supe-
rior ground grappler is the foundation
of training to be a competent ighter
he irst techniques of ground grap
pling serve to impart the concept of the
hierarchy of position from Brazilian jiu-
jitsu and the movement patterns that will
make someone an effective grappler. Ad-
ditionally, each technique is representa-
tive of a class of techniques. Those funda-
mental techniques include a method to:
2 escape the mount by rolling on top
2 pass the closed guard to side control
2 gain the mount from side control
2 gain the rear mount from the mount
2 escape the rear mount
2 escape the mount and place the op-
ponent in the closed guard
2 sweep the opponent from within
the guard to mount him
2 choke from the mount
2 choke from the rear mount
2 choke from the guard
2 arm break from the mount
2 arm break from the guard
The escapes and sweeps that are
taught come from opportunities set
up by the chokes and arm breaks. The
techniques exploit openings that would
be common when ighting an untrained
ighter so students are not simply learn
ing to ight each other n example of this
is teaching how to attack someone who
presents straight arms while attempting
to push an opponent off the mount.
Notice that the basics do not include
how to defend against chokes or joint at-
1.
2.

BLACKBELTMAG.COM DECEMBER 2013/JANUARY 2014 I BLACK BELT 39
LINES OF DEFENSE ON THE GROUND: Unable or unwilling to use his weapon,
Matt Larsen (bottom) demonstrates how the post works during grappling. He stiff-
arms the assailants face (1) and lifts his torso so he can support his weight on his
elbow (2). Sitting upright, Larsen extends his arm (3) and uses it to regain his feet
(4)all while keeping his left arm straight and his hand on the mans face.
tacks other than ways to use the attacks
as an opening to improve on a position.
It is a common mistake to teach an attack
and the defense to the attack in the same
or proximal sessions. The result would be
meeting every attempt at an attack with a
defense. Of course, the attack will not be
well-developed, so even a poor defense
will stand a good chance of working. If
the attack seldom works, students will be
discouraged from attempting it. There-
fore, the attack will never become well-
developed nor will the defense because
it will have to be used only against poor
attacks. It is much better to teach only at-
tacks at the beginning. Instructors should
wait until the students have a well-de-
veloped attack and everyone thinks the
technique is almost unbeatable before
teaching the defense.
hen a ighter has become proicient
in the basics and can use them during
ground sparring, new moves from each
of the basic classes of techniques can
be taught and they will it naturally into
the ighters repertoire dditionally
new classes of techniquesfor exam-
ple, passing the half guardcan be in-
troduced easily and the ighters can use
them effectively almost immediately.
s ighters progress the new tech
niques can open up new methods of
sparring. For example, after teach-
ing how to defend against punches
from the guard ighters can spar with
strikes. This same method works with
higher-end techniques and training
methods such as the introduction of
grappling over weapons.
Training also should include reminders
that there are no rules on the battleield
It is easy to forget, when sparring with
friends that in a ight the enemy will put
his thumb in an adversarys eye or bite
his nose off if given the opportunity.
FIGHTER DEVELOPMENT:
CLINCH FIGHTING
lthough ground grappling is most im
portant because it allows a ighter to
be aggressive clinch ighting is where
a ighter can decide whether he wants
to go to the ground. This is the range
where a ighter gains the ability to use
more than just the most basic tactics.
linch ighting is taught by doing drills
and then expanding on them. We begin
with basic pummeling like in wrestling.
his builds the habit of ighting for un
derhooks and is a key to takedown set-
ups and defense. That is essential given
the aggressive nature of combatives dur-
ing close-quarters battle in which very
3.
4.

40 BLACK BELT I DECEMBER 2013/JANUARY 2014 BLACKBELTMAG.COM
little time is spent outside clinch range.
The next drill involves neck wrestling
or swimming for neck control like in
muay Thai. After the fundamental move-
ment of swimming one hand under to
gain inside position and proper posture
have been learned, techniques can be
added for each of the ways combatants
may make this dificult for soldiers ew
positions of control can be introduced,
and knee strikes and knee defense can be
added. Finally, takedowns are included.
fter the fundamental clinchighting
drills have been learned, they should be
practiced against a padded wall. Most of
the clinch ighting and takedowns done
on the battleield involve pushing some
one, or being pushed, against a wall.
FIGHTER DEVELOPMENT:
STRIKING SKILLS
ecause every untrained ighter knows
how to throw some sort of blow, a soldier
must have skill to be effective. This takes
time and practice. Techniques are taught
and movement patterns built over the
course of two or three months. Sparring
is slowly introduced, beginning with jab
sparring and body sparring before pro-
gressing to full sparring, to avoid mak-
ing the student punch shy. Sparring can
be introduced earlier in the case of very
self-motivated students, but effectiveness
in actual ighting because of the more
complicated nature of timing and range
control, simply takes time.
proven approach involves irst
teaching a few basic punching combi-
nations and having students memorize
them instead of trying to teach the de-
tails of correct technique. This can be
done with or without training aids such
as boxing gloves and mitts, although
they make it easier to hit hard. In each
session, the leader or coach can make
small corrections in the soldiers tech-
nique, introducing footwork, defense,
etc., and after a little time, if this be-
comes routine, there will be a percep-
tible growth in technique.
Sparring should be introduced slow-
ly, not only for safety but also because
it will better ensure everyones growth.
It is very easy for a motivated coach
who loves to spar because he is good
at itto forget that in every sparring
session, someone is getting the worst
of it. In a gym where the objective is to
train champions, this may be OK, but
in a unit, it is the skill level of the av-
erage member that matters. Care must
be taken to ensure that everyone has a
good experience. Jab sparring should
be taught irst for quite some time
thereafter, the training sessions should
concentrate on defending against the
jab. This guarantees that few people
take any serious blows for their irst
few sparring sessions, allowing them
Self-Defense Instructor of the Year
During an abnormally lengthy voting
period, your peers proclaimed their
support for Matt Larsens induction
into the Black Belt Hall of Fame. After
reading this article and contemplating
the depth of knowledge he possesses,
along with all the effort hes put into
helping U.S. military men and women
prevail in violent encounters, Im sure
youll agree with their choice.
For those few who may be wonder-
ing why a martial arts magazine is
lavishing so much attention on a man
whose primary claim to fame involves
wearing a soldiers uniform instead of
a gi, consider this: To get to where he
is today, Larsen trained extensively
in karate, kali, bujinkan ninpo, judo,
Japanese jujitsu, Brazilian jiu-jitsu,
wrestling, boxing, muay Thai and
sambo. Even more impressive is that
he didnt study all those systems and
keep the knowledge to himself. He
devoted nearly two decades of his life
to spreading the wealth, frst to the
military and now to the public.
Black Belt is proud to name Matt
Larsen its 2013 Self-Defense Instruc-
tor of the Year.
Robert W. Young
1.
2.

BLACKBELTMAG.COM DECEMBER 2013/JANUARY 2014 I BLACK BELT 41
time to get used to the give-and-take.
When the iist ive punch combos
have been leaineu uefenses aie auueu
in a way that makes ighteis ieact natu
ially to an enemy attack anu instills
counteiattacking as a ielex Soon kicks
aie integiateu then takeuowns as well
as the uefenses foi bothalways in
ways that can happen in a ight
FIGHTER DEVELOPMENT:
FULL SPARRING
Full spaiiing combines all othei meth
ous of spaiiing Although it is one of the
main categoiies of live tiaining it is less
useful than othei foims because the
moie skillful oi physically gifteu ightei
only tiains in his best position
2 Jab sparring is useu as an intio
uuction to spaiiing with stiikes anu
iemains impoitant as a means of ue
veloping a goou jab anu the ability to
uefenu against it
2 Body boxing is usually ieseiveu
foi beginneis anu allows only bouy
punches It peimits new ighteis to be
come comfoitable with spaiiing befoie
punches to the heau aie alloweu Bouy
boxing also foices ighteis to become
accustomeu to exchanging blows at
close iange Allowing punches to the
heau too eaily can cause some ighteis
to become punch shy which hinueis
theii uevelopment
2 Boxing is spaiiing in which only
punches to the heau anu toiso aie al
loweu It is the founuation of stiiking
skills uevelopment anu shoulu not be
neglecteu
2 Kickboxing is spaiiing in which
punches anu kicks aie alloweu Kicks
shoulu not be limiteu to the uppei bouy
2 Kickboxing with takedowns can be
uone with boxing gloves heaugeai anu no
unifoim top oi with no gloves anu a uni
foim top being gloveless makes giasping
a shiit possible In the lattei openhanu
stiikes to the heau anu closeuist stiikes
to the bouy aie alloweu
FOR MORE INFORMATION
This aiticle outlines only pait of the
Nouein Aimy Combatives Piogiam
that I helpeu cieate 0bviously NACP
has othei essential components in
cluuing knife use anu uefense iieaims
use anu uefense anu tiaining meth
ousas well as iules anu iegulations
foi a foim of competition that is ue
signeu to fostei ighting skill insteau of
spoiting skill Those topics anu moie
aie coveieu in my book
To order Modern Army Combatives by
Matt Larsen, visit store.blackbeltmag.com.
GRAPPLING OVER WEAPONS: One of the techniques soldiers learn to stop an
enemy whos trying to take their secondary weapon in a grappling encounter revolves
around the reverse bent armbar, aka the kimura. While Matt Larsen (bottom) has his
opponent in the closed guard, the man reaches for Larsens knife (1). After he traps
the opponents arm with his right hand, Larsen key-locks it (2) and lies back to execute
the lock (3). Once Larsen has control, he can deploy his weapon (4).
3.
4.


A BLE BATON
WHY IT SHOULD BE YOUR GO- TO IMPACT
WEAPON FOR MOST REAL- WORLD CONFLICTS
BY JIM ARVANITIS
PHOTOS BY THOMAS SANDERS

44 BLACK BELT I DECEMBER 2013/JANUARY 2014 BLACKBELTMAG.COM
Scenario: A thug with a knife accosts
you and starts making unacceptable demands.
You know you have two choices: Comply and hope
he doesnt carve you up anyway after getting what
he wants, or make a stand in order to survive.
Reality check: If the circumstances force you
to ight back theres a good chance your classi-
cal weapons training wont be particularly rel-
evant because he wont be armed with a katana,
nunchaku or tonfa. Far more common in modern
society are knives, guns and assorted bludgeons.
Resolution: Youll be better prepared to deal
with a 21
st
-century threat if you have a dedicated
weapon one you carry speciically for personal
protection xamples include a knife a irearm
and a canister of pepper spray. Having access to
such a self-defense tool will give you much better
odds, especially against a blade.
Solution: One of the most effectivealthough,
for some reason, frequently overlookedequal-
izers is the expandable baton. Also called a col-
lapsible baton, its an impact weapon that mea-
sures about 7 inches when closed. When extend-
ed, however, it reaches out from 16 inches to 26
inchesall with a lick of the wrist
An expandable baton consists of two or three
concentric shafts inside an outer shaft that
serves as the grip. When you extend the baton,
the inner shafts slide out and lock in place, ef-
fectively doubling or tripling the weapons reach
and positioning the solid tip of the innermost
shaft for maximum striking effectiveness. Espe-
cially against a short-range weapon like a knife,
the extra reach of the baton can be a lifesaver.
One strike to an attackers weapon arm often will
be enough to stop him cold. If need be, though,
you can re-chamber the lightweight weapon and
hit him againand again.
MANUAL OF ARMS
Opening and Closing: To open an expandable ba-
ton use a downward lick of your wrist he move-
ment must be executed with force; otherwise, it
wont lock in position and could collapse when
it makes contact. Most batons use a friction lock,
which means that once opened, theyll remain open
until you tap the tip on a hard surface to close it.
Reaction Time and Distance: Because its an
impact weapon, the baton requires time to gain the
momentum it needs to inlict damage hat means
you must maintain some distance between the
weapons starting position and its target. Ideally,
you should remain a half step outside the range at
which you can touch your opponent or his weapon.
1.

BLACKBELTMAG.COM DECEMBER 2013/JANUARY 2014 I BLACK BELT 45
Jim Arvanitis evades a knife
attack while moving to the outside
of the weapon arm (1), then delivers
a horizontal baton strike to the neck
from a position of relative safety (2).
2.
First, Learn the Law
Expandable batons are used by law-enforcement offcers
around the United States. Civilians, however, should not
interpret that as tacit permission to carry one.
Laws vary from state to state. California, Connecticut and
Michigan have banned the expandable baton. Missouri,
Texas, Massachusetts and Florida allow them as long
as theyre not concealed and you have a permit to carry.
Otherwise, its a class A misdemeanor. New Hampshire has
no laws against carrying a concealed baton.
If you live in an area where the expandable baton is
classifed as a dangerous weapon and you cannot obtain a
permit, consider alternatives that employ similar mechanics
such as a kubotan or a heavy-duty fashlight.
P
h
o
t
o

C
o
u
r
t
e
s
y

o
f

P
a
l
a
d
i
n

P
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e
s
s

46 BLACK BELT I DECEMBER 2013/JANUARY 2014 BLACKBELTMAG.COM
This spacing not only will enable you to step for-
ward and strike effectively but also will afford you
the reaction time you need to move back and ex-
ecute a defense with your baton if he attacks.
he most eficient combat distance is one that
enables you to stay outside his striking range yet
still permits you to reach him with your baton. If
you target his weapon, hand or armwhichever
is closest to youyoull be more successful than if
you aim for his body or head.
Footwork and Positioning: Motion is essential
when using an expandable baton. In lieu of linear
movements, step to the outsidealso known as
the dead sideof your attacker with diagonal
footwork hat wont signiicantly change the gap
between you, but it will give you a little more reac-
tion time and a better angle of attack on the hand
holding the weapon. Even better, youll be inside
his preferred striking distance while hes right
where you want him.
The same applies when you move backward. If
your opponent charges at you, retreat diagonally,
divert his strike if necessary and land a blow as he
passes. Again, move and hit to the outside of his
weapon hand if possible. That will make it more
dificult for him to strike back and if he does sim-
plify what you need to do to defend yourself.
Gripping and Striking: Wrap your thumb
around the handle; dont merely rest it alongside
the axis of the handle. Your grip should be secure
but not tight because speed requires a degree of
relaxation, especially in your wrist, elbow and
shoulder.
Baton strikes are like ordinary stick strikes. Most
use a whipping action and are delivered either hor-
izontally or diagonally downward. These tend to be
the most destructive techniques, and its easier to
transition from one to the next because youre mov-
ing with the momentum of the weapon, thus main-
taining its energy as you redirect it.
Other baton strikes include the jab and thrust.
The jab snaps forward in a straight line and im-
pacts the target, then retracts to its original po-
sitionlike a boxers jab. This is a fast, accurate
attack for conined spaces he thrust is similar
to an uppercut punch rather than a straight blow.
It can be used effectively at relatively close range
and, when aimed at a sensitive target like the so-
lar plexus can deinitely hurt e aware however
that the baton is collapsible and a powerful thrust
can cause it to close. Even if that does happen,

BLACKBELTMAG.COM DECEMBER 2013/JANUARY 2014 I BLACK BELT 47
Depending on the nature of the initial
attack, the defender can counter with a
baton strike to the knife (opposite page) or
the knife hand (above).
Pre-Conict Considerations
If you fnd yourself facing a knife and escape is not an
option, your continued existence likely will depend on your
ability to disable your assailant. That causes many martial
artists to adopt a strategy that entails being proactive and
attacking the attacker.
Such an approach is not without pitfalls, however. If you
strike frst with an expandable baton, you could be seen
as the aggressor in the eyes of the law. Of course, youll
need to apply a degree of force thats consistent with the
situation. If youre going to carry a batonor any weapon,
for that matteryou must have the judgment to use it only
to the degree thats necessary to stop an attack.

48 BLACK BELT I DECEMBER 2013/JANUARY 2014 BLACKBELTMAG.COM
theres a good chance itll stop the attacker long enough for
you to reopen it.
Targeting: A major advantage of an impact weapon like
the baton is that you can strike at an assailants weapon
to stop him from attacking. A solid blow to the hand can
cause him to drop it, although this isnt something you
should depend on in a ight
In addition to the hand, the best targets on an attackers
body are the inner and outer wrist, elbow, knee, ribs and
collarbone. A baton strike to muscle tissue will cause pain
and possibly cramping, but it wont be as debilitating as a
blow to a bony area. Note that debilitating is very different
from killing. A strike to the knee often will end an encoun-
ter without causing a potentially lethal injury. However, a
blow to the head, neck or spine is considered deadly force.
Blocking: In addition to using strikes to intercept a blow,
you also can use a baton to block or parry. To block, sim-
ply move the weapon between yourself and the incoming
attack. Your entire body pushes into the block. Keep the
baton close to you; dont extend your arm(s) to meet the
attack. Use your free hand to support your baton hand and
stabilize the block. Make sure you have good skeletal align-
ment so the force of impact travels from the baton straight
down your forearm and into your body.
A block requires very little energy to divert a blow. How-
ever, because its a purely defensive maneuver, it wont do
anything to disrupt a barrage of attacks. Also, it requires
more effort to low from a block to a strike than it does to
low between strikes onsequently blocking isnt the best
way to deal with an attack, but there are times when its
your only option.
TRAINING TIME
eveloping proiciency with the baton requires drills that iso-
late various weapon attacks and counters against them. Once
these basic skills are mastered, engaging in armed free spar-
ring is the next step. If youre practicing baton-vs.-knife sce-
narios, be sure to use a training blade thats made of plastic
or blunted aluminum, as well as a rubber baton.
In the beginning, safety equipment should be worn, in-
cluding headgear, padded gloves and leg guards. That will
enable you to practice with contact while minimizing the
risk of injury. For maximum versatility, train outdoors as
well as indoors, on pavement as well as on grassin any
environment where an encounter could occur.
No matter how thorough your training, remember that
there are no guarantees with any weapon or technique.
he baton is just one option for realworld conlict reso-
lution. Because its compact, easily concealed and capable
of delivering debilitating strikes from a relatively safe dis-
tance, its better than most. However, its not foolproof.
The best way to make it as close to foolproof as possible, of
course, is with training.
About the author: Black Belt Hall of Famer Jim Arvanitis ap-
peoreJ ou bis irst Block Belt cover iu 197S ouJ bos beeu
o ixture iu tbe mortiol orts meJio ever siuce Ees writteu
severol books iucluJiuq Tbe Iirst HixeJ Hortiol Art Pou-
krotiou Irom Hytbs to HoJeru Times blockbeltmoqcom
Ee teocbes emptybouJ ouJ weopous skillsiucluJiuq bo-
tou tocticsto civilious os well os militory ouJ loweuforce-
meut persouuel
The jab is a quick strike that has
the expandable baton mimic
the trajectory of a jab punch
straight out and straight back.

BLACKBELTMAG.COM DECEMBER 2013/JANUARY 2014 I BLACK BELT 49
Remember Your Other Weapons
Just because you have an expandable
baton in your lead hand doesnt mean its
your only hope in an altercation. You also
have your rear hand, which should be kept
safely out of range and ready to strike or
trap if the opportunity presents itself. Also,
remember that you have two legs. Dont
become so fxated on the baton that you
forget to kick.


YEARS!
WORLDS GREATEST
KICKER FOR
BILL WALLACE
REFLECTS ON
HIS STORIED CAREER
IN THE MARTIAL ARTS
CONCLUSION
BY FLOYD BURK


BLACKBELTMAG.COM DECEMBER 2013/JANUARY 2014 I BLACK BELT 53
B
l
a
c
k

B
e
l
t

P
h
o
t
o
s
The very next day, my father set
me up to go to Frankfurt, Indiana, to
interview for a school-teaching job,
Wallace says. I went there and they
said they wanted me to be the metal-
shop teacher. They told me that if I
stayed there until the wrestling coach
retired, I could take his place and be the
head wrestling coach and earn another
600 bucks a year. My dad told me, I
really want you to take the job. All the
way home, I was thinking, I really dont
want to be a schoolteacher.
The next day, after Wallace had
arrived at his dojo, the phone rang. It
was Red West, Elvis Presleys chief of
security. West said, Elvis wants to talk
to you.
He said, Im going to open a karate
school here in Memphis, and I want you
to run it for me, Wallace recalls. He
said, Ill pay you $1,000 a month, move
you down here, pay all your expenses
and buy you a car.
I said, Hmm, and [Elvis] said, OK,
how about $1,000 a month after taxes?
It was a real dilemma. It would prob-
ably mean the derailment of my school-
teaching career, which would certainly
disappoint my dad, who always wanted
me to follow in his footsteps. I was
thinking, I cant make everybody happy.
Its kind of hard to say no to Elvis. Fi-
nally, I said, OK, Mr. Presley, Ill do it.
He said, Great, Ill see you soon.
Wallace moved his family back to
Memphis and in May 1974 set up a ka-
rate school. Later in May, our Ameri-
can full-contact karate team went over
to urope to ight in the uropean
Championships, Wallace says. I won
my match, Joe won his match, and Jeff
Smith and Howard Jackson both won
their matches. We were undefeated.
INTO FULL CONTACT
n eptember 1974 allace oficially
switched from point ighting to profes-
sional kickboxing. We started doing
kickboxing, what was called full-contact
karate, he says. I won my inaugural
full-contact match. In 1975 I defended
the title at the Battle of Atlanta in front
of 10,000 people, the biggest crowd ever
at such an event. In 1976 I defended my
title ive times and in 1977 defended
my title another ive times
In 1977 he was inducted into the
Black Belt Hall of Famefor the second
time. That year wasnt all good, howev-
er; it also brought the loss of his friend
Elvis, who died in August.
Wallaces next title defense took
place in Monaco. In 1978 I defended
my title in Monte Carlo in front of
Princess Grace and Prince Rainier III,
knocking out the European champion
in the fourth round with a side kick,
he recalls. Then I had dinner with
the prince and princess and also met
their kids, Prince Albert II and Prin-
cess Stephanie. Monte Carlo was great.
While I had a lot of matches, I always
stayed in shape. One of my secrets was I
didnt drink, smoke or party, which was
the downfall for many other ighters
They always had to get back in shape to
ight just stayed that way
Later in 1978, Wallace was honored
as Black Belts Man of the Year. Two key
In late 1973, Bill Wallace was invited to Indianapolis to
open a karate school, and he accepted. Then in May 1974,
Joe Lewis called to tell him they were picking people for
a full-contact karate team and Wallace was chosen as the
middleweight. I didnt want to do it, Wallace says. I
liked the point ghting with the control and everything,
but full contact sounded different. I never wanted to
hurt anybody, never wanted to prove that I could beat
anybody up. To me, competition was just a game. I touch
you rst, I win. You touch me rst, you win.
Lewis wouldnt take no for an answer, however, and
Wallace nally gave in.

54 BLACK BELT I DECEMBER 2013/JANUARY 2014 BLACKBELTMAG.COM
reasons for his winning ways were he
uiunt change his ighting positioning
anu he uiunt tiy to put extia powei into
his techniques Back then most people
weie changing theii kaiate stances to
fiontfacing boxingstyle stances he
says This maue it ieally uificult foi
them to thiow any of theii kicks This
woikeu to my auvantage as I coulu uo
all my kicks because I just stayeu siue-
ways to piotect my knee
Ny uisauvantage was I uiunt have
any hanu techniques with any popjust
the backist Thats why I leaineu how
to uo the jab anu the left hook The jab
helpeu keep people away anu I coulu
pounu with the hook if someone got
insiue I also leaineu to uo an uppeicut
which I useu in the clinch I kept piac-
ticing the siue the iounu anu the hook
kicksthose nevei changeu at all
Wallace claims one of his main stiate-
gies was to execute his moves natuially
I nevei tiieu to thiow them haiuI
just thiew them he says The uam-
age I uiu to people the knockouts anu
whatnot came fiom people walking
into my techniques Ny opponents uiu
it to themselves They helpeu me knock
them out Eaily on I won with kicks
Iatei as I uevelopeu some hanu anu
kicking combinations I began lanuing
some punches which contiibuteu to
me winning my ights
HELLO, HOLLYWOOD!
Also in 197 Chuck Noiiis askeu Wal-
lace to appeai in A Force of One. Wallace
lew to Ios Angeles wheie he stayeu
fiom 0ctobei 197 to }anuaiy 1979 I
hau fun uoing that movie anu woiking
with Chuck Wallace says I leaineu a
whole lot uuiing the piocess but I nev-
ei tiuly enjoyeu uoing it
Aftei a few moie movies I founu
that I uiunt like it at all You spenu all
those months woiking on something
that people watch in an houi anu a half
While the money is teiiiic theies a lot
of wasteu time spent uoing not much
of anything Its fun at timeswhen its
youi tuin to uo somethingbut when
youie not the stai you just sit aiounu
most of the time Boiing as heck Foi
a guy like me it was like being back in
King Salmon Alaska but without the
juuo guy to play juuo with
After shooting A Force of One, Wallace
ietuineu home anu went a yeai with-
out uefenuing his title Be uiu howevei
paiticipate in a couple of exhibition
matches In eaily 19u I fought two
moie nontitle ights he says Then
on }une 1S 19u I hau my ietiiement
ight which I won
That was it I ietiieu unuefeateu with
stiaight victoiies I uiu continue to
ight exhibitionsIve fought uozens of
them I fought }oe Iewis I even fought
Naivin Baglei Iionically aftei I ietiieu
I fought moie exhibition matches than
I evei fought title ights Seems like ev-
eiybouy wanteu to go to an exhibition
anu see a guy kicking
LIFE AFTER RETIREMENT
In the eaily 19us Wallace woikeu on
some bigbuuget movies with }ohn Be-
lushi (Neighbors and Continental Divide)
anu uiu the Blues Biotheis Toui with
Belushi anu Ban Aykioyu Be appeaieu
in some lowbuuget movies as well In
194 Wallace lanueu a iole in The Pro-
tector, which staiieu }ackie Chan
Afteiwaiu Wallace focuseu his fiee
time on uoing seminais aiounu the 0nit-
eu States anu Euiope Beu occasionally
bag a job uoing stunt woik oi ight cho-
ieogiaphy Bis Ios Angeles home base
seiveu him well because he was close
to the aiipoit the movie stuuios anu the
meuia Bis column in Black Belt was a
staple of the magazine foi yeais
In 1999 Wallace ielocateu to Floiiua
0ne of the ieasons The locale piom-
iseu to pioviue him with plenty of
oppoitunities to puisue his favoiite
hobby golf Two yeais latei he signeu a
ueal to iepiesent Centuiy Naitial Aits
To keep his name alive Wallace agieeu
to }oe }ennings iequest foi him to be
in a seiies of tiaining tapes by Panthei
Piouuctions They solu well anu guai-
anteeu Wallace yeais of ioyalty checks
Be went on to stai in seveial viueos foi
Centuiy anu wiite foui books
Foi the past S yeais Wallace has
taught at Kaiate College the tiaining
camp fellow Black Belt Ball of Famei
}eiiy Beasley holus annually in Rau-
foiu viiginia Foi the past 1S yeais
Wallace has inetuneu the Supeifoot
System anu nuituieu the instiuctois
whove joineu his oiganization Be con-
tinues to tiavel the woilu uoing what
he loves most which is teaching the
maitial aits
About the author: Floyd Burk is a San
Diego-based 10
th
-degree black belt with
more than 40 years of experience in the
arts. To contact him, visit the Indepen-
dent Karate Schools of America website
at iksa.com.
Bill Wallaces
Life Lessons

Learn to give and take. If its all


give, youll have lots of friends but
you wont have any money to live on,
Wallace says. If its all take, youll
have lots of money but no friends to
share it with. You must do both.
Respect others and be condent.
"You can learn respect, but its diffcult
to teach it, he says. The key is [let-
ting] people observe it in you by show-
ing respect to them. Teaching respect
is done by example.
"Like respect, confdence is something
you can learn, but its not easy to
teach. Confdence comes from effort.
If you show effort in what you do, peo-
ple will see that it works, put effort into
their endeavors and learn confdence
[at the same time].
Learn to pIay the game. Get along
with people, Wallace advises. Get-
ting along with people is the primary
reason for my longevity. If you dont
like what I do, well, Im sorry. Ill be the
frst to apologize. Ill do it even if Im
right. If it makes you feel good, then it
makes me feel good.

BLACKBELTMAG.COM DECEMBER 2013/JANUARY 2014 I BLACK BELT 55
Superfoot
Exclusive!

Did you and your father ever reconcile


after you decided to make the martial
arts your career?
Bill Wallace: It took a long time, but yes.
Since day one, my father would always
say, When are you going to quit doing
that stupid crap and get a real good job?
The night I won the world championship, I
called my father to tell him. The next day,
my mother called: You should hear your
father now! Hes telling everyone, My son
is the world champion. The stuff about
getting a jobit stopped that night.
What are the primary reasons you were
so good at full contact?
Wallace: Fitness and a good trainer. Be-
ing a wrestler, a judo player and a black
belt in karate[with] my degrees in physi-
cal educationI knew a whole lot more
about conditioning than most people. I
knew how to stay in shape. Also, I didnt
smoke or drink or eat a bunch of crap.
Most important, I had a really good
trainera boxing trainer from Memphis
who believed in me, trusted me and didnt
try to change my stances and many of the
things that made me successful. He just
added a few things to my repertoire. A lot
of other guys were pretty stubbornthey
trained themselvesbut I learned my
lesson about pain and injury, and I didnt
want to get hit. So I found someone to
help me keep from getting hit too much.
How were you able to jump into the
movie business without schooling or
experience?
Wallace: I learned so much working with
Chuck [Norris]. I didnt know anything about
movies back then, but Id watch him every
day. Even when I didnt have to be there, I
was there watching and learning. I watched
the director do scene after scene, take after
take. I watched the stunt choreographer and
stuntmen do what they do. I saw Chuck and
everyone else add their artistic touches to
their work. I also learned that youve got to
play the game in that business. Its a pro-
cess. Things move slowly.
Why have you been so successful on
the seminar circuit?
Wallace: Anyone who wants to do seminars
has to fnd a niche and provide something
people want. Luckily for me, I was very
good at fexibility, kicking and all the related
conditioning. I could explain and demon-
strate exactly why you do what you do. The
problem for most people is they dont have
a specialty that someone at the host school
cant do just as good as them. Whos going
to pay you $1,000 to come and teach when
they can do what you can do?
Some well-known fghters cant do semi-
nars because while they can win, they cant
explain why or how to do it. These same
people are the ones who, once they start
losing, cant come back by fguring out how
to win again. Heres one of my secrets: I
learn from my seminar students. Ever since
I started doing seminars, Ive used them
as my own laboratory. I always throw tech-
niques and ask people to block or evade. If
someone blocks one of my kicks, Im glad to
have something to work on. Thats how Ive
kept upor kept ahead, even.
Theres a lot of bickering in the martial
arts. How have you stayed out of it and
maintained so many friendships over
the years?
Wallace: Everybody has their own way of
doing something. Theres no wrong way,
but theres also no perfectly right way.
People argue all the time about whos
right and whos wrong. I say, play the
game and get along with people. My job is
to give ideas. Your job, as a student, is to
take those ideas, play with them, change
them and go make them work for you.
How have you remained so in demand
even after retiring?
Wallace: First of all, I really love what I
do. Ive always made a point of getting
to know people and trying to remember
who they are. I also take my job seriously.
When I teach, say at the Martial Arts
SuperShow or some other event where I
have a couple of seminars to do, I focus
on teaching the class during class time.
Only before or afterward will I stop to sign
autographs or take pictures. If you pay me
for a day, you get me for a dayIll stay
there all day long. After all these years,
Im still pretty well-known, but I might not
be well-known three years from now if
I blow off everybody at these [events]. I
enjoy talking to people or doing whatever
needs to be done. Ill demonstrate, speak,
judge fghts, do whatever. I might even
learn something. Its what I love to do.

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BLACKBELTMAG.COM DECEMBER 2013/JANUARY 2014 I BLACK BELT 57
ing a bieathei between ights The
othei one was a bit moie clean anu
piistine This one is in Thailanu paitly
in Buima Its giittiei The maitial aits
will be much lashiei than what we uiu
on the iist Ninjano CuI no silly bat
wings no silly ninja cult
DIFFERENT DIRECTION
The sequel inus Casey on the tiail
of thugs who muiueieu his beloveu
Namiko Aukins saiu he was giateful
foi the chance to give his chaiactei the
euge it lackeu in Ninja: I was a bit uis-
appointeu with the iist oneat least
with my peifoimance Ny chaiactei
was kinu of blanu Be was a bit of a wet
blanket That was the chaiactei in the
sciipt I tiieu to peifoim the chaiactei
as it was on the page anu so when we
watcheu it back theie wasnt much of
an euge
With this one weve taken him to a
uaikei place Eveiything he holus ueai
is taken fiom him anu when you think
of goou ninja movies you think of the
ievenge stoiyline Weie ueinitely go-
ing uown that tiack Bes giown moie
into himself Bes a bit wisei hes a
bit coolei Bes full of angei anu ven-
geance
Belping Aukins anu Floientine
achieve a fiesh take on the action anu
ight choieogiaphy was Tim Nan
Tiaineu in juuo jujitsu, taekwondo, viet
vo dao, boxing anu wushu, hes woikeu
on seveial Thai maitial aits piouuc-
tions incluuing Ong Bak 2 uu anu
Kill em All u1 In Ninja II, Nan was
taskeu with not only cieating all the
ights but also oveiseeing the stunts
anu playing a villain
Woiking with Tim anu his team is
a joy Floientine saiu They aie inno-
vative cieative anu iesponsible anu
the most amazing thing is how oiga-
nizeu they aie When they came they
sketcheu the action anu showeu me
what they coulu uo anu I knew I coulu
sleep ieally well
JAPANESE FLAVOR
To engineei those uynamic ights foi
Ninja II, Nan uiew fiom his maitial aits
backgiounu Its basically a }apanese
style but moie iealistic anu moie biutal
in the way that Isaacs Undisputed mov-
ies weie Nan saiu I hau a uiscussion
with Isaac anu he tolu me he wanteu
the ights to feel like his Undisputed
F
oi a vaiiety of ieasons the
ilm inuustiy no longei chuins
out maitial aits supeistais
like Biuce Iee Chuck Noiiis
Steven Seagal anu }eanClauue van
Bamme Bowevei the moviemakeis
who catei to the uiiecttoviueo maiket
continue to piouuce quality motion pic-
tuies that featuie ieallife maitial ait-
ists Peihaps the most notable success
stoiy is Scott Aukins stai of Undisputed
II: Last Man Standing uu6 Undisput-
ed III: Redemption u1u Ninja (2009)
anu Universal Soldier: Day of Reckoning
u1
Becembei 1 u1 will maik the
ietuin of Aukins with the ielease of
Ninja II: Shadow of a Tear. In it the Biit
iepiises his iole as Casey a man whos
foiceu to uon a ninja unifoim to exact
ievenge on men who woulu uo evil
The Nillennium Enteitainment ilm
ieunites Aukins with his longtime col-
laboiatoi uiiectoi Isaac Floientine foi
the seventh time
0n the set in Bangkok it quickly be-
came appaient that even though Ninja
II is a sequel it will featuie a unique
tone anu textuie This ones a bit moie
uown anu uiity Aukins saiu while tak-
Scott Adkins, Isaac
Florentine and Kane
Kosugi Team Up for
Nonstop, Old-School,
Martial Arts Action!
BY DAVID J. MOORE
Ninja II:
Shadow of
a Tear

58 BLACK BELT I DECEMBER 2013/JANUARY 2014 BLACKBELTMAG.COM
movies and The Raid. When I showed
him the iist pieviews he went Nah
it neeus to be moie }apanese 0nce
I unueistoou what he wanteu it was
pietty easy to inu the style he was
looking foi
Nan mesheu well with Floientine on
the set I think hes amazing Nan saiu
Nost of the uiiectois Ive seen when
they uiiect a ight sceneIm talking
about the Westein uiiectoisthey ba-
sically covei the action But Isaac is ac-
tually uiiecting the action Bes telling
us wheie the cameia is going to come
anu how weie going to move Its not
often that you see this
Piouucei Fiank BeNaitini is ceitain
auuiences will be thiilleu by what Nan
has ciafteu with his choieogiaphy I
think theyie going to get a goou iiue
because these ights will be veiy giit-
ty anu stylistic in a way that hasnt been
seen a lot in the maitial aits woilu Foi
example at this point theie is only one
wiie stunt in the movie Eveiything else
is being uone liveits being uone foi
ieal in the vein of a 197us oi 19us ac-
tion movie Bopefully we can elevate
beyonu the iist one so that we can
make a thiiu one shoitly theieaftei
STAR POWER
In auuition to Aukins Ninja II stais
Kane Kosugi The son of fameu }apa-
nese maitial aitist Sho Kosugi (Enter
the Ninja, Revenge of the Ninja, 9 Deaths
of the Ninja), Kane Kosugi giew up co
staiiing in ilms with his fathei but be-
came a bona iue maitial aits stai in }a-
pan
Aftei I went to }apan anu woikeu foi
u yeais ninjas staiteu coming back
with Ninja Assassin uu9 anu Isaac
anu Scotts Ninja, Kosugi saiu I always
wanteu to uo a ninja movie as an auult
because the iist movies I uiu as a kiu
weie about ninjas Its cool to come back
with it
In Ninja II, Kosugi plays Nakabaia
Caseys maitial aits senioi Im kinu of
his fiienu anu his mentoi anu Ive helpeu
him thiough his tough time he saiu
Nakabaia has many faces Bes ieally
ueep Bes been in the maitial aits since
hes been alive anu hes a mastei Bes a
goou guy on the outsiue but ueep uown
hes got a lot of layeis Bes inteiesting
Floientine whos wanteu to woik with
the youngei Kosugi foi a uecaue beameu
as he spoke about him I knew 1uu pei-
cent that he woulu uelivei Bes a iaie
combination of someone who has feet on
two continents Bes Ameiican but hes
liveu in }apan foi so many yeais that he
can be }apanese Be can play the }apa-
nese chaiactei but he uoesnt have the
baggage of stiuggling with an accent Be
can up the action too
Aukins saiu hes thiilleu to stai along-
INJURED IN ACTION
During a ferocious fght on the set of
Ninja II: Shadow of a Tear, Scott Ad-
kins endured more than his share of
pain, but for the real-life martial artist,
that comes with the territory.
"When you make as many action
flms as I do, [youre] probably going
to get hurt," he said. "If its a normal
drama, you go home and work on
your lines for the next day, then you
come in and work. But when youre
smashing yourself on concrete or
throwing spinning kicks while trying
to raise the bar and do things that
havent been seen, youre sacrifcing
your body for what you do. Im happy
to do that, but its not easy."
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BLACKBELTMAG.COM DECEMBER 2013/JANUARY 2014 I BLACK BELT 59
ABOUT THE AUTHOR:
David J. Moore is a freelance writer. He
traveled to Bangkok for this report.
side Kosugi. I watched Black Eagle a lot
when I was a kid during my Van Damme
fascination, and of course Im a big fan
of his dad Sho, Adkins said. Hes really
got that form, that samurai look about
him, which I struggle at. Im more of a
kickboxerthats my bread and but-
terso I have to adjust to the Japanese
ninja style Bes ueinitely got that
BEAUTY OF COMBAT
Cinematographer Ross Clarkson has
ilmeu seven of Floientines movies
and worked with some of the greatest
martial arts stars, including Michael Jai
White, Jean-Claude Van Damme, Dolph
Lundgren and, of course, Scott Adkins.
Hes got a huge potential, Clarkson
said about Adkins. He just needs the
right vehicle to blast off.
To ensure that Ninja II is that vehicle,
Clarkson stayed in the middle of the
action day in and day out. Youve got
these guys jumping all over the place
doing really cool stuff, and [you] try to
keep the camera on them while theyre
uoing all this he saiu Fiom a cameia
operating point of view, its quite a chal-
lenge because theyre quick.
Floientine is coniuent vieweis will
be able to see everything on camera
anu maitial aits fans will be satisieu
by the ights Theie will be some nice
coheient action in this ilmaction
that you can see, he said. We empha-
size the beauty and the dynamic of the
ighting but not the violence of it I like
the action to always be clean and co-
herent because I like to see technique.
Coming from martial arts, I like to see
the beauty of it.
Kosugi appieciateu Floientines at-
tention to detail on the set. Isaac is a
martial arts encyclopedia, he said. He
knows what looks good. I havent had
too many opportunities to work with
someone like that.
HARD CORE
Ninja II promises to be a throwback to
the days of innocent action, a term
derived from the era when audiences
werent inundated with the mind-
numbing special effects and quick-cut
edits that tend to obscure the martial
arts. It aims to please the hardest of the
hard-core fans, as well as recruit new
followers.
The world has seen lots of stuff now,
Kosugi said. They know whats fake
and whats not. They know whats wire
and whats real. Theyve seen so many
action movies that its hard to surprise
them. You dont want to go to the mov-
ies and see something youve already
seen. You want to see something that
touches you and surprises you, some-
thing that makes you forget your wor-
rieslike with The Expendables. After
all the high-tech computerized stuff, its
nice to go back and see the real thing
again.
Adkins summed up the situation sur-
rounding his latest project: There is a
good time and place for a ninja movie,
[but] youve got to do a ninja movie the
right way. A modern-day ninja movie
is always going to be slightly cheesy.
Its going to be a bit tongue-in-cheek.
I think thats why Im not running
around in the daylight in the ninja suit
for most of the movie. We save the ninja
suit for when its dark and when he
needs to slay people silently.
Theies moie to this ilm than just
the ninja stuff. Youre going to get bril-
liant ights anu youie going to get the
best people in the business doing what
they love to do.

60 BLACK BELT I DECEMBER 2013/JANUARY 2014 BLACKBELTMAG.COM
Mass
Attack
Survival
Guide
Maximize Your Chances
of Getting Out Alive!
BY MATTHEW J. NUMRICH
PHOTOS BY MELISSA MILES

BLACKBELTMAG.COM DECEMBER 2013/JANUARY 2014 I BLACK BELT 61
throw, something you strike with or
something you cut with. This is the sin-
gle most important action you can take
in a mass attack.
Examples of equalizers include a tire
iron you grab from your trunk a istful
of gravel you snatch from the ground
and throw, and a lawn chair you col-
lapse and wield as a weaponanything
that will make the assailants think
twice about continuing. Best-case sce-
nario: Your act of arming yourself will
halt their assault altogether. Of course,
it also could cause them to ind weap-
onswhich is why you must use your
equalizer immediately after you ind it
Step No. 2: Zone around the aggres-
sors. This is also known as stacking. It
entails maneuvering so one of them is
between you and the other(s). This is es-
pecially important if youre unable to ind
an equalizer. In such a situation, zoning
can give you an opportunity, albeit a short
one, to focus on just one person. Barrage
him with quick and brutal strikes.
If making sure you can focus on just
one attacker is good, it follows that get-
ting stuck in the middle of two or more
attackers is bad. Avoid it at all costs. De-
spite what you see in movies, you cant
maintain awareness of multiple attack-
ers on opposite sides of your body, and
that means its only a matter of time
before one of them connects.
I
f theres one thing that jeet kune
do teaches us, its to train for
every conceivable self-defense
scenario. To that end, we prac-
titioners of Bruce Lees system love to
examine other martial arts and train-
ing methods to see if they have ways of
handling situations we havent consid-
ered. Every time I do that, Im amazed
at the frequency with which I see peo-
ple preparing for street defense using
concepts that make success in a mass
attack extremely unlikely.
The main two problems Ive wit-
nessed are as follows: First, many mar-
tial artists simply dont train for a mass
attack. They lack knowledge of how
street ights unfold and therefore tend
to believe that all real-life altercations
are one-on-one. Consequently, their
training revolves around match ights
And you cant blame them. For the
past 20 years, that mentality has been
reinforced by the mixed martial arts.
Yes, MMA competition has provided
and continues to provide valuable les-
sons about ighting but it also makes
martial artists forget that a self-defense
situation is likely to involve two or
more attackers who are bent on their
victims destruction.
Second, those practitioners who do
prepare for a mass attack often use
strategies that appear to be based on
When facing multiple attackers,
your most important mission is
to acquire a weapon. It can be
any object that allows you to
strike, cut, blind or otherwise
incapacitate the assailants.
In certain situations, the mere
acquisition of a weapon will
stop the fght, the author says.
the ights featured in Billy Jack (for
older practitioners) or The Matrix (for
younger ones). In other words, they
switch back and forth between the op-
ponents, and whichever bad guys arent
ighting seem to be frozen in time ts
risky to assume youll be able to do that
in a ight because one of the universal
characteristics of a mass attack is con-
stant movement. No one just stands in
line, waiting to receive a beating.
The sad truth is, attacks in which two
or three people jump one person are the
norm on the street because its a strat-
egy of cowards. With that in mind, all
martial artists should examine their self-
defense training to see if it addresses
this reality. The good news is, there is a
game plan that can augment your ability,
no matter your art or training regimen.
GAME PLAN
The defensive strategy for dealing with
a mass attack that will give you the
greatest chance of surviving is com-
posed of three steps. Some might argue
that all you need is one step or action,
whatever that might be, but Ive found
that these three will enable you to deal
with any complications that crop up.
Step No. 1: Acquire an equalizer. By
deinition an equalizer is anything you
can pick up and use against your op-
ponentswhether its something you


62 BLACK BELT I DECEMBER 2013/JANUARY 2014 BLACKBELTMAG.COM
Step No. 3: Keep moving. Use con-
tinuous footwork to maintain that one-
on-one stack, to move in to strike and
to retreat so you can focus on another
threat. While doing that, remember
that the second person (and the third)
wont wait his turn. Make it harder for
him to get to you by staying mobile.
Keeping your strikes direct and to the
point will minimize the time youre
devoting to a single person. Among
the best offensive options are elbow
strikes, jabs and head butts.
MASS-ATTACK Q&A
Experienced martial artists know that
self-defense scenarios have many vari-
ableswhich is why I get so many
questions when I teach defense against
a mass attack. Heres the FAQ:
Question No. 1: Shoulu I attack iist
or wait for the bad guys to come to me?
After you pick up an equalizer and/or
start your zoning, strike. Its as simple
as that. Waiting for two or more oppo-
nents to close the gap will only put you
in a worse position.
Question No. 2: Whom do I zone
aiounu iist The biggei guy The
smallei guy The louumouth
None of the above. You should zone
aiounu the closei attackei iist Its
easier, and it helps you move through
your game plan more quickly. And its
much better than chasing your oppo-
nent of choice.
Question No. 3: What happens if I
have a third party with mesuch as a
child?
Thats a tough question uet in fiont
of that person and move him or her
with you as you zone. Of course, thats
easy to say but not so easy to do.
Question No. 4: What happens if my
opponents drive me into a corner?
uo aftei the closest attackei clinch
with him and attempt to spin until
youre on the outside and hes in the
corner. Your goal is to get out of that po-
sition as soon as possibleeven before
you woiiy about taking the iist assail-
ant out of commission.
Question No. 5: What if one or both
attackers have a weapon and I cant get
to one?
This question neeus an entiie aiticle
to answei The shoit veision of the so-
lution is to zone around the person who
has a weapon, addressing the highest
piioiity iist If one attackei has a knife
and the other a stick, zone around the
knife guy iist
My rationale for thisand its backed
up by hours and hours of training with
noncompliant partnersis that I never
want to lose sight of the person with
the more dangerous weapon.
Question No. 6: What happens if
there are three or more attackers?
The goou news is that you use the
same game plan, which makes it easy
to tiain anu easy to iemembei The bau
news is that going from two attackers
to three or more exponentially increas-
es the threat level.
CONCLUSION
Many martial artists get turned off to
mass-attack training because they par-
ticipate in drills that fail to build their
coniuence Consequently they often
lose their motivation to keep it up. Dont
let that happen to you. Its easy to prac-
tice what youre good at and to stay away
from what youre not good at, but that
wont improve your self-defense ability.
The key to impiovement is to peise-
vere. Practice the fundamentals. Leave
out the wild-and-crazy variables until
you have the basics down pat.
Theies no uoubt that the most intel-
ligent way to deal with a mass attack is
to run away. However, you dont always
have that luxury. If you chose to ignore
multiple-assailant scenarios in training,
youre not doing yourself any favors.
ABOUT THE AUTHOR:
A senior full instructor in jeet kune do and the
Filipino martial arts, Matthew J. Numrich is the
founder of Elite Defense Systems. For more
information, visit FearlessStreetFighter.com.
A key component of fending off a mass
attack is zoning, the author says. It entails
maneuvering so one assailant is between
you and the other assailant(s),
If you fnd yourself in the middle of a mass attack
and youre with a loved one, you should position
yourself between that person and the threat,
Matthew J. Numrich says. Then youll need to move
him or her as you maneuver away from danger.



BLACKBELTMAG.COM
Weapons Instructor of the Year
Michael D. Echanis
BY GREG WALKER
T
he legacy of Michael D. Echanis has been well-document-
ed in Black Beltas recently as the August/September
2013 issue. Nevertheless, some of the facts bear repeat-
ing here.
Echanis served in Vietnam as a member of C Company, 75
th
Ranger
Infantry, and was awarded the Purple Heart, Vietnamese Cross of
Gallantry and Bronze Star for Valor. After suffering a severe wound,
he drew from his cultural heritage as a asque and his ighting spirit
as a martial artist to engineer a remarkable physical, mental and
emotional recovery despite being rated 100-percent disabled by the
Veterans Administration.
chanis was the irst modern martial artist to introduce the train-
ing methods and techniques of the ancient Japanese and Korean
schools of shadow warfare to the militaryspeciically the
Army Special Forces and Rangers, the Navy SEALs and the Marine
Corps Force Reconnaissance.
When it came to providing the military with programs that cou-
pled combatives with discipline, Echanis set the bar highand it
has yet to be moved any higher. As charged by the John F. Kennedy
Special Warfare Center and School, Echanis successfully organized
demonstrations of physical and mental prowess designed to show
that his methods for developing the modern American warrior were
working. Much of what he promulgated was based on hwa rang do,
in which he earned a black belt under Joo Bang Lee.
Echanis was a pioneer in the military/paramilitary martial arts,
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BLACKBELTMAG.COM DECEMBER 2013/JANUARY 2014 I BLACK BELT 65
MMA Fighter of the Year
Ronda Rousey
BY ROBERT W. YOUNG
A
s I prepare to praise the accomplishments of our 2013 MMA
Fighter of the Year, its worth stopping along the way to examine
the selection process. First, the magazine announces the start of
the voting, during which readers and visitors to our social media
sites weigh in on their favorites for each category. As you may have guessed,
Ronda Rouseys name popped up often this year. In fact, it appeared more
often than all the other nominees for this category combined.
The next step has the Black Belt staff evaluating the top choices to
determine if they deserve to be in the running. In most cases, they need
to have accomplished great things in their lifetimes or to have somehow
altered the martial arts paradigm during the past year. In Rouseys case,
both conditions were met.
She was a judo star long before she leveled up to MMA. She won bronze at
the 2008 Olympics, as well as championship titles before and after. And she
bolstered her resume in the past year by doing something no one else has
managed: She built herself into such a star that the UFC had no choice but
to allow womenand herentry into its ranks. Bet you never thought of
Ronda Rousey as a crusader for equal rights!
Shes done far more than that to keep the martial arts in the public eye.
Check out iecent issues of magazines uevoteu to spoits oi womens itness
anu youll inu shes giaceu a bunch of coveis Tune in to The Ultimate
Fighter on Fox Sports 1, and youll see her serving as coach. Switch channels
to any of the MMA talk shows on cable, and youre likely to see her in action
or being interviewed. Buy a ticket to The Expendables 3 when it opens in
August 2014, and youll witness her debut on the silver screen.
Rousey has become the face of mixed martial arts, having eclipsed the men
in many respects, and shes certainly the face of womens ight spoits In
fact, shes so popular that we broke our own unwritten rule: These days, we
seldom induct a martial artist into the Black Belt Hall of Fame twice, and we
almost never do it three times. But Ronda Rousey is an exception to many
rules. Shes also Black Belts 2008 Judoka of the Year, 2012 MMA Fighter of
the Year and, as of now, our 2013 MMA Fighter of the Year.
and amazingly he achieved that status
while iecoveiing fiom his battleielu
injuries. His physical limitations never
held him backwitness the feats of
strength and endurance he demon-
strated in the pages of Black Belt, all of
which required a hardened body, mind
and spirit. That was just one of the
reasons the Special Warfare commu-
nity named Echanis the foremost au-
thority and wave of the future where
advanced hand-to-hand training and
conditioning were concerned.
Although Echanis left this planet pre-
maturely, martial artists are fortunate
to have access to his ighting concepts
anu techniques Be was the iist mou-
ern martial artist/military instructor
to write and see published a series of
books describing his philosophies and
training methods. First published by
Black Belt Books in 1977 as the Special
Forces/RangerUDT/SEAL Hand-to-
Hand Combat/Special Weapons/Special
Tactics Series, the texts are still in print,
albeit under a new name: The Complete
Michael D. Echanis Collection.
Perhaps the most important part of
what Echanis practiced, wrote about and
taught involved weapons. His training
encompassed the short stick, the long
stick anu vaiious lexible anu eugeu
weapons. In addition, he was a student
of the crossbow and the gun. The reason
he focuseu on ighting implements was
the same in the 1970s as it is today:
Weapons make the mission of those who
protect our nation and our way of life
ininitely moie likely to succeeu
It was in part because of his familiar-
ity with all types of weapons that Echa-
nis became the only nonactive-duty
Special Warfare warrior to be allowed
to join classiieu missions 0ne of these
was a 1977 counter-guerrilla opera-
tion in Puerto Rico, where he joined a
company of the 5
th
Special Forces Group
to provide assistance to the Puerto Rico
National Guard during a period when
terrorists were seeking to destabilize
the country. He was included because of
his acumen with weapons and his com-
bat experience, as well as the esteem
the Special Forces had for him.
Because of his achievements and ac-
complishments as a warrior, teacher,
martial artist and defender of our nation,
and because of his courage and sacri-
ice anu his eveilasting contiibution to
the martial arts, Black Belt has named
Michael D. Echanis its 2013 Weapons
Instructor of the Year.
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66 BLACK BELT I DECEMBER 2013/JANUARY 2014 BLACKBELTMAG.COM
R
aymond Horwitz, Black
Belts director of digital
media, wasnt the only
staffer to notice it,
but he was the iist to put it into
words: When Wang Bo walked
into the ofice anu staiteu talk-
ing, you could feel a sense of calm
emanating from him.
He made that observation the
minute Wang Bo and his students
left the builuing aftei theii photo
shoot. It wasnt something I was
thinking about when I invited the
martial artist to the shoot, which
yielueu a twopaitei that was
publisheu in the Septembei anu
October 2012 issues, but I had
to admit that I sensed it, too. It
uiunt come as much of a suipiise
though, what with Wang Bo
having been euucateu at Shaolin
Temple
A iaie bieeu the ighting monks
of Shaolin aie ienowneu foi the
way they meld consummate
combat skill with the inner
peace that comes fiom living a
life of Zen. Wang Bo embodies
both qualities in a way thats
appaient to anyone Watch him
kick punch movejust watch
him stietch foi that mattei
and youll immediately think of
all the buzzwords we associate
with maitial aits masteiy powei
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piecision ielaxation
balance explosiveness anu
so on Beai him speak anu
youll feel like youre Kwai
Chang Caine listening to
Master Po.
Like anyone whos
reached a high level in
a maitial ait that piizes
moie than just the physical
act of ighting Wang Bo
is a complex combination
of the tangible and the
intangible. As I mentioned,
his kung fu is impeccable
and his ability to convey
the skills he acquired at
Shaolin is supeib But when
he does so, its clear that
he is at heait a paciist
anu a peison who ueeply
appieciates the health anu
spiiitual beneits his ait
offeis the woiluwhich
is why hes doing his best
to spieau it to the woilu
staiting with his Southein
Califoinia Shaolin tiaining
center.
In short, Wang Bo is the
kind of instructor we need
more of in the martial arts
community. For all these
reasons, Black Belt has
named him its 2013 Kung
Fu Artist of the Year.
Kung Fu Artist of the Year
Wang Bo
BY ROBERT W. YOUNG

BLACKBELTMAG.COM DECEMBER 2013/JANUARY 2014 I BLACK BELT 67
Instructor of the Year
Vladimir Vasiliev
BY ROBERT W. YOUNG
I
f youre a regular reader of Black Belt, you know
all about Vladimir Vasiliev. He appeared on the
cover of the August/September 2013 issue, and
he was featured in numerous articles in the
years prior to that. In case youre new to the magazine,
heres the short version of his life story.
Vasiliev hails from Russia. A veteran of the Russian
special forces, he studied systema under Mikhail Ry-
abko and became his top student. In 1993 Vasiliev de-
cided to leave his country and settle in Canada, which
is where he founded the irst foreign school for what
he calls Russian martial art systema. From his base of
operations in Toronto, Vasiliev started propagating the
art he loves.
Perhaps the most fascinating aspect about Vasiliev,
one that I immediately noticed while interviewing him
for his recent cover story, is that hes about far more
than selfdefense eficacy es about using the arts
to promote health, to help people relax and to offer
a path to a more fulilling life e sees the big picture
and acts accordinglyand thats refreshing these days.
His organizations website sums up the philosophy
of the man and the martial art: The synergy of three
components creates a true warrior [with] combat skill,
strong spirit and a healthy body.
The systema he teaches is profound and unique, as
much a map of the human condition as a martial art,
Martin Wheeler, a Los Angeles-based instructor under
Vasiliev, said when I asked him about the Russian expat.
[His] skill is off the charts, but the most impressive thing
about him is that hes still learning, still improving and
still growing es humble sincere and illed with a genu-
ine desire to share his amazing art as if it were a gift.
The staff of the magazine and a large percentage of
Black Belt readers concur. Vladimir Vasiliev has been
named our 2013 Instructor of the Year.
Woman of the Year
Diana Lee Inosanto
BY J.T. BINGHAM
I
ts got to be tough to carve out a place for yourself in the
martial arts community when Dan Inosanto is your father
and Bruce Lee is your godfather. But those who know Di-
ana Lee Inosanto will tell you she isnt one to let anything
hold her back. She long ago decided to live her own life outside
the conines of the world inhabited by her famous father and her
Uncle Bruce. The only reason were talking about her now in
Black Belt is she never let her path through life take her far from
her roots as a martial artist.
What Inosanto did do is parlay her warrior upbringing into a
career that encompassed stunt worka natural extension for
someone whose physique has been honed by jeet kune do. She
branched out into acting ight choreography and more recently
training celebrities for motion pictures. If youve seen Milla
Jovovich in the Resident Evil movies, youve seen the martial arts
handiwork of Inosanto and her husband Ron Balicki.
Inosanto really shines when she wears more than one hat.
Case in point: For 2008s The Sensei, she served as director,
producer and actor. That enabled her to tackle some tough
topics, including bullying, hate crimes and AIDS in the dojo.
ince that critically acclaimed ilm shes continued to take on
projects that have her accurately and realistically portraying
the martial arts on the silver screenmost recently, by working
with her husband again to teach kali stick ighting to actor aron
Eckhart for his role in I, Frankenstein.
I was always taught that jeet kune do is about self-discovery,
self-expression and freedom[that] it was about learning how
to adapt, how to explore, how to keep an open mind, Inosanto
once said.
elfexpression is exactly what deines her whether shes
doing glamorous things like choreographing ilm ights or not
so-glamorous things like writing an article for BlackBeltMag.
com about the unsung hero of Tao of Jeet Kune Do: Gilbert
Johnson, the man who brought order to Bruce Lees notes prior
to the books publication and later died from AIDS, which he
contracted during a blood transfusion.
Diana Lee Inosanto continues to devote her time and energy
to inluencing and educating the world on the subject of the
martial arts and how they mesh with modern society, and for
that shes Black Belts 2013 Woman of the Year.
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BLACKBELTMAG.COM DECEMBER 2013/JANUARY 2014 I BLACK BELT 69
GEAR
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KENDO
Subtitled A Comprehensive Guide to Japanese Swordsmanship,
this book comes from Geoff Salmon, a seventh-degree black belt
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What do you get when you mix the exercises that are used to prep practi-
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The original Spyderco Matriarch was inspired by a request from the companys
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$129.95
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70 BLACK BELT I DECEMBER 2013/JANUARY 2014 BLACKBELTMAG.COM
SHAOLIN LONG FIST KUNG FU
In Advanced Sequences, Part 2, Nicholas C. Yang, son of Black
Belt Hall of Famer Yang Jwing-Ming, teaches a pair of traditional
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includes footage of the senior Yang, who speaks about the history
of the sequences. 490 minutes,
$59.95
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NICOLAES PETTER BIO
If the title of this book didnt capture your attention, perhaps
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in 1674 in the Netherlands. Researchers and history buffs will
appreciate this 635-pager.
$36
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STREET SMART SAMURAI
In The Cane Edition, Black Belt Hall of Famers Mark Shuey
Sr. and Dana Abbott tap into the self-defense potential of
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Martin J. Dougherty presents 20 simple techniques that win any
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The subtitle of this new book, Harnessing the Mental Strength
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Ralph Thorn has collected his best blade lessons for this DVD.
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72 BLACK BELT I DECEMBER 2013/JANUARY 2014 BLACKBELTMAG.COM
BETTER BUSINESS
W
hen I crave a few hours of
escape from my own real-
ity, I watch Kitchen Night-
mares. I cant recall why
that show iist caught my attention but
once I saw an episode, I was compelled
to watch them all. If you arent familiar
with the concept let me give you some
backgiounu A ienowneu chef nameu
Gordon Ramsay travels the country to
help iestauiants that aie on the euge
of failuie The owneis of the establish-
ments have iequesteu his help because
of his tiack iecoiu anu theyie often
exubeiant when theyie chosen 0nce
he shows up anu begins the ievival pio-
cess howevei they tenu to become ie-
sentful anu angiy
Why Because he tells it like it is Even
though these businesses aie about to
collapsesome are hundreds of thou-
sanus of uollais in uebtthe owneis
iesist changing any of the things that
have lanueu them in tiouble
Dojo Nightmares
by Kelly Muir
tions weie all guilty of the occasional
cleaning faux pas Aie the mats sani-
tizeu iegulaily Aie theie cobwebs in
the coineis Its easy to neglect the
little things when youie focuseu on
teaching
Is the environment welcoming?
Ramsay often obseives that iestau-
iant owneis uont uo enough to make
passeisby even notice the builuing let
alone walk insiue It coulu be because
the signage is lacking the exteiioi of
the builuing is iun uown oi the lawn
neeus mowing As he likes to ieminu
people excellence begins outsiue This
is one I need to focus on.
Is the curriculum relevant? Restau-
iant owneis neeu to be conceineu with
ensuiing theii menu is cuiient anu iel-
evant, and dojo owneis neeu to think
the same way about theii cuiiiculum
In essence, its our menu. When was the
last time you took a haiu look at what
youie teaching Aie you keeping up to
uate on teaching methous anu maitial
arts trends? How many journals and
magazines uo you subsciibe to
Is your staff composed of the right
people? To answer this question, list
each aiea of iesponsibility in youi
school then make anothei list of the
skills iequiieu foi the positions Now
evaluate the people uoing those jobs
Bo they have the necessaiy skills Aie
you pioviuing piopei tiaining Aie
you paying them Foiget the uays of
volunteer teachers and unpaid front-
ofice woikeis If people woik foi you
get them tiaineu infoimeu about youi
expectations and paid for services ren-
dered.
FINALLY, AND THIS IS THE BIG ONE,
aie you willing to heai feeuback Nany
of the restaurateurs who appear on
Kitchen Nightmares become uefensive
when Ramsay provides constructive
ciiticism All business owneis how-
evei shoulu seek to impiove theii sei-
vices anu that iequiies being open to
obseivations fiom outsiueis
If we want oui inuustiy anu oui busi-
nesses to continue evolving we must
constantly review our operations, lis-
ten to feeuback fiom customeis anu
take action when necessaiy As Kitchen
Nightmares ieminus us its the busi-
ness owner with an open mind whos
most likely to succeeu in this evei
changing maiketplace
Example Ramsay fiequently sug-
gests a menu oveihaul to ievive the
enthusiasm of customeis Even though
customers may not enjoy some of the
current dishes, owners are often reluc-
tant to comply. Some reference the old
menu items as tradition, a family rec-
ipe oi simply a uish thats been offeieu
for years. Ramsay doesnt care. His re-
sponse is the same If it isnt woiking
change it Foiget the emotional attach-
ments and the tradition.
That solution along with othei iecui-
iing comments such as upuate the u-
coi simplify the menu change the staff
anu clean the place thoioughly have
piompteu me to look at my maitial
aits centei anu ask myself some basic
questions. Here are a few Ive recently
consiueieu
IS THE DOJO CLEAN? Although most
maitial aits schools uont have uisgust-
ing anu potentially unhealthy conui-


74 BLACK BELT I DECEMBER 2013/JANUARY 2014 BLACKBELTMAG.COM
The Force Behind Ip Man
by J. Torres
W
hether they know it or
not maitial aits ilm
aicionauos owe a uebt
of giatituue to Well uo
USA Entertainment. What am I talking
about Well uo is the uistiibutoi foi a
plethoia of Chinese maitial aits ilms
incluuing Ip Man (2008), Ip Man 2:
Legend of the Grandmaster u1u anu
Ip Man: The Final Fight (2013). Think
what you want about the eficacy of
wing chun kung fu the iist two mov-
ies have been almost univeisally lauueu
within the actionilm woilu Black Belt
Ball of Famei Bonnie Yen biought a sto-
ic intensity to the life stoiy of the wing
chun founuei anu his ieallife maitial
aits skill set maue the onscieen battles
even moie convincing
The ieason Im wiiting about Well uo
heie is the company is iamping up foi
the Novembei 1 u1 BvBBluiay
release of Final Fight, which playeu in
theateis in Septembei It boasts a new
stai nameu Anthony Wong Wong is a
bit oluei than Yen but thats iathei ap-
propriate, seeing how the Ip in Final
Fight is more mature than he was in the
iist two movies
Anthony Wong tiuly uiives the ilm
as an elueily maitial aits gianumas-
tei who uespite auapting to the time
sticks to his philosophy of his passion
of maitial aits saiu Albeit valentin of
KungFuCinemacom Beinitely a must
see
Beboiah Young of The Hollywood Re-
porter also gave Final Fight, which is
iateu Pu1 foi its maitial aits action a
thumbsup It nostalgically taps into
Bong Kong cinema of yesteiyeai while
still ueliveiing consiueiable excitement
in the ight scenes
In auuition to its honoiablemaitial
aitistsvstheBongKongtiiaus sto-
iyline the thiiu entiy in the seiies au-
uiesses Ips latei yeais in the Biitish
colony Aftei the ueath of his wife the
mastei couits a young singeianu up-
sets his closest stuuents Ip also seeks
to impiove his ielationship with his
son anu weighs in on the success of his
most famous followei Biuce Iee
Final Fight is uiiecteu by Beiman Yau
who helmeu u1us The Legend Is Born:
Ip Man a uiffeient seiies of ilms In
auuition to Wong in the title iole Final
Fight stais Eiic Tsang }oiuan Chan uil-
lian Chung Naivel Chow Anita Yuen
Xiong Xinxin anu Wong Cholam
In case you neeu an auuitional ieason
to acquiie the movie on uisc theies the
bonus content It will incluue a making
of featuiette inteiviews with the Final
Fight cast anu ciew anu the 0S anu in-
ternational trailers.
COMPANY SPOTLIGHT
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OTHER MARTIAL ARTS
MOVIES YOU MAY LIKE
Browse the Well Go USA
catalog at wellgousa.com, and
youll see plenty of fght flms,
including:
Bangkok Revenge
Butterfy Swords
Legend of the Fist
Muay Thai Warrior
Shaolin: Protect the Temple
Tai Chi Hero
Tai Chi Zero
Wudang

NAPMA.com/PrivateCoachingSession

76 BLACK BELT I DECEMBER 2013/JANUARY 2014 BLACKBELTMAG.COM
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BLACKBELTMAG.COM DECEMBER 2013/JANUARY 2014 I BLACK BELT 77
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80 BLACK BELT I DECEMBER 2013/JANUARY 2014 BLACKBELTMAG.COM
U.S. Postal Service
Statement of Ownership, Management and Circulation
(Required by 39 U.S.C. 3685)
1. Title of publication: Black Belt
2. Publication number: 0277-3066
3. Date of filing: September 12, 2013
4. Frequency of issue: Bimonthly
5. Number of issues published annually: 6
6. Annual subscription price: $28.00
7. Location of known office of publication: Black Belt
Communications Inc., 475 Sansome St., Ste. 850, San
Francisco, CA 94111
8. Location of headquarters or general business offices at
publishers: 24900 Anza Dr., Unit E, Valencia, CA 91355
9. Names and complete address of publisher, editor and
managing editor
Publisher: Cheryl Angelheart, 24900 Anza Dr., Unit E,
Valencia, CA 91355
Editor: Robert W. Young, 24900 Anza Dr., Unit E,
Valencia, CA 91355
10. Owner: Cruz Bay Publishing Inc., 300 N. Continental Blvd.,
Ste. 650, El Segundo, CA 90245
11. Known bondholders, mortgages and other security
holders owning or holding 1 percent or more of total
amount of bonds, mortgages and securities: None
13. Publication title: Black Belt
14. Issue date for circulation data below:
October/November 2013
15. Extent and nature of circulation:
Average No. of copies No. of copies
of each issue of single issue
during preceding published nearest
12 months to filing date.
A. Total No. of copies printed 43,307 45,795
B. Paid circulation
1. Mail subscription 21,299 21,452
3. Sales through dealers and carriers, street vendors
and counter sales 5,325 5,219
C. Total paid circulation 26,624 26,671
D. Free distribution by mail, carrier or other means,
samples, complimentary and other free copies
3. Other classes mailed through
the USPS 221 221
4. Free distribution outside
the mail 608 1,305
E. Total free distribution 829 1,526
F. Total distribution 27,453 28,197
G. Copies not distributed 15,854 17,598
H. Total 43,307 45,795
I. Percent paid and/or requested 96.98% 94.59%
17. I certify that the statements made by me above are correct
and complete.
Circulation Director: Jenny Desjean
Date: September 12, 2013
For completion by publishers mailing at the regular rates (Section
132.121, Postal Service Manual): 39 U.S.C. 3626 provides
in pertinent part: No person who would have been entitled
to mail matter under former section 4359 of this title shall
mail such matter at the rates provided under this subsection
unless he files annually with the Postal Service a written
request for permission to mail matter at such rates. In ac-
cordance with the provisions of this statute, I hereby request
permission to mail the publication named in item 1 at the
phased postage rates presently authorized by 39 U.S.C.
3626.
Jenny Desjean
Explore the philosophy behind Bruce
Lees martial art with digitally enhanced
illustrations by Bruce Lee, never-before-
seen Chinese translations, and editorial
commentaries by many of Bruce Lees
closest friends and colleagues, including:
s Chris Kent
s Jerry Poteet
s Diana Lee Inosanto
s Tim Tackett
s Richard Bustillo
s Yori Nakamura
Thirty-seven years after its initial
publication, Tao of Jeet Kune Do continues
to provide the rare opportunity to learn
directly from Bruce Leeone of the most
celebrated and inspirational gures in
martial arts history.
Pages: 248 t Code: 524 t Retail: $26.95
ISBN: 978-0-89750-202-3
BRUCE LEE
NEW EXPANDED EDITION
TAO JEET KUNE DO
OF
Jeet Kune Do is the enlightenment.
It is a way of life, a movement toward
willpower and control.
Bruce Lee
REVISITED AND EXPANDED
FOR THE FIRST TIME IN MORE THAN 30 YEARS!
ORDER YOURS
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BRUCE LEES MOST
INFLUENTIAL BOOK!
To order, call toll-free: (800) 581-5222
or visit blackbeltmag.com/TAO
To order, call (800) 581- 5222 or
visit www.blackbeltmag.com/shop
Black Belt: The First 100
Issues (Covers and Highlights
1961-1972) celebrates
the genesis of one of the
longest-running and most
inuential sports magazines
ever in a large-format,
softcover, color coffee-table
book. As a commemorative
compilation of Black Belt
magazines industry-dening material, it features the
cover art and content highlights of the rst 100 issues.
Cover photographs and illustrations include such martial
arts luminaries as Bruce Lee, Chuck Norris, Mas Oyama,
Joe Lewis, Gene LeBell as well as celebrity practitioners
like Sean Connery and Toshiro Mifune. 208 pgs.
(ISBN-13: 978-0-89750-173-6)
Book Code 499Retail $9.99
BLACK BELT
THE FIRST 100 ISSUES
Covers and Highlights 1961-1972
To order, call (800) 581-5222 or visit
blackbeltmag.com/shop
by Bruce Lee
Black Belt Books new
edition of Chinese Gung
Fu: The Philosophical Art of
Self-Defense gives martial
arts enthusiasts and collectors
exactly what they want: more
Bruce Lee. In addition to the
masters insightful explanations
on gung fu, this sleek book
features digitally enhanced
photography, previously unpublished pictures with Lees
original handwritten notes, a brand-new front and back
cover, and introductions by widow Linda Lee Cadwell
and daughter Shannon Lee. Fully illustrated. 112 pgs.
(ISBN-13: 978-0-89750-112-5)
Book Code 451Retail $12.95
CHINESE GUNG FU
The Philosophical Art of Self-Defense
(Revised and Updated)

To order, call toll-free: (800) 581-5222 or visit blackbeltmag.com/winning
Code: 527
Pages: 200
Retail: $18.95
ISBN: 978-0-89750-205-4
In WINNING ON THE GROUND: Training and Techniques for Judo and MMA Fighters, Dr. AnnMaria De Mars,
1984 world judo champion, and James Pedro Sr., coach of international judo medalists, present a variety
of techniques developed over the years. Their coaching has helped such winners in the worlds of judo and
mixed martial arts as Ronda Rousey (De Mars daughter) and Kayla Harrison take home medals at the
highest levels of competition. Winning on the Ground demonstrates that you can overcome your opponent,
even from a position that may seem hopeless. The key is in training for various scenarios.
Winning on the Ground includes the following:
s six secrets to better mat work
(and mistakes to avoid)
s coaching tips from the authors
s a dozen quick ways to gain an
opponents submission
s how to do the perfect armbar
and half nelson
s smarter training: drills for connecting
techniques for the win
s and MUCH MORE!
WINNING ON THE GROUND
TRAINING AND TECHNIQUES FOR JUDO AND MMA FIGHTERS
The New Book by Dr. AnnMaria De Mars and James Pedro Sr.
Featuring Ronda Rousey and Kayla Harrison

82 BLACK BELT I DECEMBER 2013/JANUARY 2014 BLACKBELTMAG.COM
The 159th issue of Black Belt
was dated March 1977. It was
84 pages long and featured
silhouettes of two unidentified
martial artists on the cover.
From
the
Archives
Vol. 15, No. 3, $1
Serendipity strikes again: Jim Arvanitis, the
martial artist who wrote this issues story about the
expandable baton, is featured in Massad F. Ayoobs
Jim Arvanitis and the Five Phases of Mu Tau.
Tadashi Nakamura withdraws from Mas Oyamas
International Kyokushinkai organization. His new
group will be called Seido Karate.
Why was Zen so important to the samurai? Zen is
a system which teaches [one] not to look backward
once the course is decided upon, says Dr. George
Parulski, author of A Path to Oriental Wisdom.
Hayward Nishioka notes that American judoka are
being held back by their propensity to focus on the
stand-up aspects of the grappling art: Very few of
our competitors take advantage of the beneits that
may be had in mat work. The emphasis in U.S. judo
has lopsidedly been in favor of tachi waza (standing
techniques or throws).
Shoshin Nagamine, an authority in matsubayashi
shorin-ryu karate, embarks on a good-will tour of the
United States.
The discipline of coordinating body and mind
that is the truth of the martial arts. So says Howard
Lee, choy li fut instructor.
The World Taekwondo Federation in Seoul, South
Korea, starts its own magazine. Its titled, naturally
enough, World Taekwondo.
Black Belt reports on the Aspen Academy of Martial
Arts, the renowned facility in Colorado founded by
tai chi chuan master Marshall Hoo.
Heard of zurkhaneh? Apparently, it means house
of strength. The term is used to refer to a school of
Persian martial arts. A Black Belt writer provides all
the details.
Taekwondo pioneer Jhoon Rhee creates the World
Black Belt League.
You can buy a katana sword with a hilt of antique
silver metal in ine relief for 11195 he blade is
reportedly tempered steel.
Black Belt proiles the imba ojang reputedly
the winningest martial arts school in Washington,
D.C. Founded by Phil Cunningham and Furman
Marshall, it teaches taekwondo. Our students are
very poor, Cunningham says. They dont usually
have tournament fees, so we pool our funds and then
decide who will represent us.
A reader from San Francisco takes Black Belt to
task because of what he perceives as overly violent
cover images. To illustrate his point, he mentions the
ctober 1976 issue of World Karate, which he says
depicts a grisly murder scene on its cover. Were
not sure of the connection there, but OK.
(Note: Back issues are not for sale. To purchase a hard copy of the
cover of this issue or any other, visit facebook.com/BlackBeltMagazine
and click Cover Reprints at the top of the page.)

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