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Tsao, Ashley || Senior Division || Individual Website

The Longest Walk


Primary 1. American Indian Airlift II. San Francisco, CA: International Indian Treaty Council, 1982. Print. This talks about the American Indian Airlift and I trust this source because it has valid evidence that supports their topic and motivation for this subject. Cobb, Daniel M., and Loretta Fowler. Beyond Red Power: American Indian Politics and Activism since 1900. Santa Fe, NM: School for Advanced Research, 2007. Print. 2. Banks, Dennis, and Richard Erdoes. Ojibwa Warrior: Dennis Banks and the Rise of the American Indian Movement. Norman: University of Oklahoma, 2004. Print. Dennis Banks, an American Indian of the Ojibwa Tribe, is probably the most influential Indian leader of our time. Banks tells his own story for the very first time and reveals an inside look at the birth of the American Indian Movement. 3. Borodzicz, Fanua. "The Longest Walk." The Longest Walk. Longestwalk, 20 May 2008. Web. 26 Sept. 2013. This book also has a ton of pictures from the actual event. It shows the pictures of where they were marching with a description of their enthusiasm. The pictures show the Longest Walk sign with volunteers in costumes. 4. Brightman, Quanah. "Dr. Lehman Brightman LED THE LONGEST WALK 1978." YouTube. YouTube, 30 July 2010. Web. 27 Sept. 2013. <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o86w-erjlgQ>. This is also a video from the conclusion of the first Longest Walk. Professor Lehman, the speaker of the video, was a major supporter of the American Indian Movement. In the video, he talks about the rights and responsibilities of the average American Indian. I trust this video because the speaker is an actual witness to the Longest Walk event. 5. Brookes, Brita. "The Longest Walk." The Longest Walk. Longestwalk, 13 Feb. 2008. Web. 26 Sept. 2013. <http://www.longestwalk.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=280&Itemid=126>. This link has a ton of pictures from the actual event. It shows the enthusiasm and pride of all the volunteers. Since this is the second Longest Walk, it is still going on and so there are many pictures

from the event. I trust this event because they are actual photos from real volunteers and photographers. 6. Brookes, Brita. "Southern Walkers Head towards Sunrise Ranch 2-16-08." The Longest Walk. N.p., 19 Feb. 2008. Web. 27 Sept. 2013. <http://www.longestwalk.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=339&Itemid=126>. This link is important because it shows the dedication of the volunteers and the hard work of the American Indians. I like these pictures because it shows the commitment from all the supporters. 7. Brookes, Brita. "The Longest Walk." The Longest Walk. Longestwalk, 20 Feb. 2008. Web. 27 Sept. 2013. This link has many pictures of the conference and lunch get-togethers from the Longest Walk 2. I trust this website because it has many pictures from the actual event and the photographers are the volunteers that help to make this movement possible. 8. Chapman, Roger. Culture Wars: An Encyclopedia of Issues, Viewpoints, and Voices. Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe, 2010. Print. Although openness and inclusion are cornerstones of life in the United States, intolerance and reactionary politics are also very real. Roger Chapman talks about as the nation prepares to elect a new president; "The Culture Wars" addresses the key defining issues of contemporary American society through the lens of political and social controversy. 9. David, Jay. The American Indian: The First Victim. New York: William, Morrow &, 1972. Print. Twenty-six selections from personal narratives, essays, short stories etc., portraying their beliefs, daily lives, suffering and hopes before and after encounters with the White Man. 10. Deloria, Vine, and Clifford M. Lytle. The Nations Within: The Past and Future of American Indian Sovereignty. Austin: Univ. of Texas, 2006. Print. Clifford M. Lytles has a great reputation. The book has many pictures from actual event. She is a loud and proud supporter of the American Indian Movement. 11. Edwards, Judith. The History of the American Indians and the Reservation. Berkeley Heights, NJ: Enslow, 2008. Print. Judith Edwards explores the difficult changes American Indians were forced to make, including moving off their land, adapting to life on reservations, and how those reservations have changed since their creation.

12. Fixico, Donald Lee. The Invasion of Indian Country in the Twentieth Century: American Capitalism and Tribal Natural Resources. Niwot, CO: University of Colorado, 1998. Print.

Donald Lee Fixico talks about the struggle between Indians and whites for land did not end on the battlefields in the 1880s. When this hostile era closed with Native Americans forced onto reservations, no one expected that rich resources lay beneath these lands that white America would desperately desire. 13. Fuhr, Ute, and Raoul Sautai. American Indians. London: Moonlight, 1995. Print. I trust this source because its written by three authors instead of one, meaning there are three different points of views instead of one so they all have their known facts and opinions about the subject.

14. Gali. "The Longest Walk." The Longest Walk. Longestwalk, 20 Feb. 2008. Web. 27 Sept. 2013. <http://www.longestwalk.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=352&Itemid=126>. This link has a lot of pictures from the actual event. It shows many American Indians and volunteers in costumes gathering together to converse. I trust this website because the pictures are from the real event and it can be proven. 15. Garland, Hamlin, Frederic Remington, and Keith Newlin. The Book of the American Indian. Lincoln, Neb.: University of Nebraska, 2005. Print. Hamlin Garland talks about a Hopi child is torn from his parents and sent off to boarding school; white settlers encroach on the Cheyenne reservation, and the Cheyenne vow to fight to the death rather than give up their land. This book is very in the moment.

16. Geroux, Robert. "The Longest Walk." The Longest Walk. Longestwalk, 27 July 2008. Web. 26 Sept. 2013. <http://www.longestwalk.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=828&Itemid=126>. This page has pictures of the flyer that they were passing out to try to get their movement more well-known. This website is very trustworthy because they have constant updates on their events and are always looking for more supporters for their movement. 17. Gold, Susan Dudley. Worcester v. Georgia: American Indian Rights. New York: Marshall Cavendish Benchmark, 2008. Print. Susan Gold was actually at the second longest walk in Alcatraz Island. There is a picture of the movement that she took herself. I trust this book due to the fact that he has reliable sources. 18. Goldstein, Margaret J. You Are Now on Indian Land: The American Indian Occupation of Alcatraz Island, California, 1969. Minneapolis, MN: Twenty-First Century, 2011. Print. Explores what led Native Americans to stage an occupation of Alcatraz and how the standoff with the federal government ended. Also how this event inspired other Native American activists around the country to lead their own demonstrations and fight for American Indians rights.

19. Hertzberg, Hazel W. The Search for an American Indian Identity: Modern Pan-Indian Movements. [Syracuse, N.Y.]: Syracuse UP, 1971. Print. This author is a proud support of American Indian Movements. She wrote this book to tell people about their history and accomplishments. I trust this book. 20. Hoxie, Frederick E. Encyclopedia of North American Indians. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1996. Print. Even as interest in the powerful, often tragic history of Native America grows, many books continue to perpetuate long-standing misconceptions of the past as well as the romantic stereotypes often popularized today. Readers can now rely on Encyclopedia of North American Indians for an authentic and often surprising portrait of the complexities of the Native American experience. 21. Hoxie, Frederick E., Peter C. Mancall, and James Hart Merrell. American Nations: Encounters in Indian Country, 1850 to the Present. New York: Routledge, 2001. Print. In this book by Frederick E. Hoxie, he writes twenty-three essays by academics that consider the historical, cultural, religious and political circumstances of various Native American peoples. 22. Hurtado, Albert L., and Peter Iverson. Major Problems in American Indian History: Documents and Essays. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2001. Print. This text presents a carefully selected group of readings, on topics such as European encounters and contemporary Native American activism that allow students to evaluate primary sources. 23. Indian Common Law: The Role of Custom in American Indian Tribal Courts Part II. Bepress, n.d. Web. 13 Nov. 2013. This link also has a ton of pictures from the actual event. It shows the pictures of where they were marching with a description of their enthusiasm. The pictures show the Longest Walk sign with volunteers in costumes. 24. Iverson, Peter. Carlos Montezuma and the Changing World of American Indians. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico, 1982. Print. Peter Iverson talks about Carlos Montezuma, who was one of the great Native American crusaders for Indian rights in the early twentieth century. This biography by an authority on Southwest Indian history tells a dramatic story that sheds light both on Montezuma's career and on the movements he influenced.

25. James, Esther. "The Longest Walk." The Longest Walk. Longestwalk, 15 Mar. 2008. Web. 26 Sept. 2013. <http://www.longestwalk.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=493&Itemid=126>.

This link has a lot of pictures from the actual event. It shows many American Indians and volunteers in costumes gathering together to converse. I trust this website because the pictures are from the real event and it can be proven. 26. Johansen, Bruce E. Encyclopedia of the American Indian Movement. Santa Barbara: Greenwood, 2013. Print. This author is a proud support of American Indian Movements. He wrote this book to tell people about their history and accomplishments. I trust this book. 27. Johnson, Troy R., Joane Nagel, and Duane Champagne. American Indian Activism: Alcatraz to the Longest Walk. Urbana: University of Illinois, 1997. Print. This is a book from the actual first Longest Walk. In the description, they also describe the bills and rights passed that limited the American Indians. I trust this book because it is plausible and the sources seem to be reliable. 28. Johnson, Troy R. The Occupation of Alcatraz Island: Indian Self-determination and the Rise of Indian Activism. Urbana: University of Illinois, 1996. Print. Troy Johnson focused the attention of the world on Native Americans and helped develop pan-Indian activism. In this first detailed examination of the takeover, Troy Johnson tells the story of those who organized the occupation and those who participated, some by living on the island.

29. Koshikawa, Takeo. "The Longest Walk." The Longest Walk. Longestwalk, 27 July 2008. Web. 26 Sept. 2013. Takeo Koshikawa took make pictures from the Longest Walk 2 event. The pictures include performances by the American Indians. I like this page because it shows the passion and commitment from the supporters. 30. "Longest Walk 2, Columbus, OH." YouTube. YouTube, 09 June 2008. Web. 27 Sept. 2013. <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tJBETfYXzNc>. The publisher of this video had a very sarcastic description for this video and I think it fits it very well because in this video it shows American Indians being attacked by police in Columbus, Ohio. This should demonstrate how biased and unjustified the American Indians must feel towards some of the other races.

31. Mari. "The Longest Walk." The Longest Walk. Longestwalk, 21 July 2008. Web. 26 Sept. 2013. <http://www.longestwalk.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=816&Itemid=126>.

This link has many pictures of the conference and lunch get-togethers from the Longest Walk 2. I trust this website because it has many pictures from the actual event and the photographers are the volunteers that help to make this movement possible. 32. McCarty, T. L., and Fred Bia. A Place to Be Navajo: Rough Rock and the Struggle for Selfdetermination in Indigenous Schooling. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 2002. Print. In the book he employs indigenous oral testimony and critical ethnography to describe the life history of the Navajo community of Rough Rock, Arizona, home of the first American Indian community-controlled school, tracing the town's struggle for language, culture, and education rights. 33. Mihesuah, Devon A. Indigenous American Women: Decolonization, Empowerment, Activism. Lincoln: University of Nebraska, 2003. Print. I trust this book because he is an experienced writer and he has a trustable background. 34. Morin, Margaret. "The Longest Walk." The Longest Walk. Longestwalk, 20 July 2008. Web. 26 Sept. 2013. This link has pictures showing the volunteers in the costumes. It shows many American Indians and volunteers in costumes relaxing and walking with passion and commitment in the Longest Walk 2 event. I trust this website because it has many pictures from the same event that can be proven that its from the actual walk. 35. Perry, Barbara. Silent Victims: Hate Crimes against Native Americans. Tucson: University of Arizona, 2008. Print. Perry talks about hate crimes against Native Americans are a common occurrence. In this eyeopening book, Perry shines a spotlight on these acts, which are often hidden in the shadows of crime reports. 36. Rights, Douglas L. The American Indian in North Carolina. Durham, NC: Duke UP, 1947. Print. Douglas Rights talks about an attempt that is made in this volume to portray the character and manner of living of the American Indian in North Carolina, to identify tribes, and to trace tribal movements. 37. Sonneborn, Liz. Chronology of American Indian History: The Trail of the Wind. New York: Facts on File, 2001. Print. Liz Sonneborn talks about a year-by-year chronicle of interesting and important moments in Indian history, including major wars and battles, federal Indian policies and reactions to them, legal rulings, individual achievements, protests, migrations, religious movements, and other topics. Each event mentioned is followed by a one to two paragraph elaboration.

38. "The Longest Walk." Longest Walk. Longestwalk, 12 Feb. 2008. Web. 26 Sept. 2013.

This book of the Longest Walk is full of pictures from the actual event. I trust this book because the article writers and photographers are all from the Longest Walk. In the pictures, there are people holding up signs looking for equality and rights. 39. Thewheel, Ayearat. "American Indian Movement Take the Longest Walk with ..." YouTube. YouTube, 09 Sept. 2008. Web. 27 Sept. 2013. <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OzLdZY3Uvq8>. This video shows a member of the American Indian Movement, Dennis Banks. He has been standing up and fighting for human rights for a very long time. I trust this video because it was an actual interview of a real, dedicated volunteer. 40. Trafzer, Clifford E. American Indian Prophets: Religious Leaders and Revitalization Movements. Sacramento, Calif. (P.O. Box 255354, Sacramento 95865-5354): Sierra Oaks Pub., 1986. Print. This author is a proud support of American Indian Movements. He wrote this book to tell people about their history and accomplishments. I trust this book. 41. "Tune in to the NBC4 American Indian Heritage Month Special." NBC Southern California. N.p., 13 Nov. 2013. Web. 15 Nov. 2013. NBC4 Southern California is proud of its long tradition of celebrating several ethnic heritage months throughout the year, honoring the people and stories that celebrate the unique diversity that makes the Southland so special. 42. Weyler, Rex. Blood of the Land: The Government and Corporate War against the American Indian Movement. New York: Everest House, 1982. Print. "Media Framing of Movement Protest: The Case of American Indian Protest." Media Framing of Movement Protest: The Case of American Indian Protest. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Nov. 2013. 43. Yaynicut. "Video 12d: Longest Walk 2 Southern Route." YouTube. YouTube, 26 Mar. 2008. Web. 27 Sept. 2013. <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S_htWXXut1A>. This video is from the same youtube account which is a volunteer or American Indian supporter that shows the Longest Walk 2 driving through Arizona. They travel extremely long distances to fight for what should be theirs. 44. Yaynicut. "Video 22: Longest Walk 2 Southern Route." YouTube. YouTube, 19 July 2008. Web. 27 Sept. 2013. <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bf1zLg5b73o>. This video also shows a few of the many members of the Longest Walk 2. This is important because they are tired from walking long distances but they are still persistent and want their rights. 45. Yaynicut. "Video 12a: Longest Walk 2 Southern Route." YouTube. YouTube, 26 Mar. 2008. Web. 27 Sept. 2013. <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X5rNEzaIFYg>.

This video is from the same publisher of most of the other videos that show basically the same thing. All these American Indians, supporters, and volunteers are tired from walking such long distances to fight for rights that should already by theirs. 46. Yaynicut. "Video 14c: Longest Walk 2 Southern Route." YouTube. YouTube, 26 Mar. 2008. Web. 27 Sept. 2013. <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tzXeuP-Utf4>. This video shows a lot of the members holding up the signs, fighting for their rights. This is important because they are so dedicated and the volunteers are still trying to help them. 47. Yaynicut. "Video 14b: Longest Walk 2 Southern Route." YouTube. YouTube, 26 Mar. 2008. Web. 27 Sept. 2013. <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omPgQfRsJi0>. This video also shows a lot of the members holding up the signs trying to protest against the rest of the world to fight for their rights. This is important because they are so persistent and wont give up until they find their right place in the world. 48. "Video 21: Longest Walk 2 Southern Route." YouTube. YouTube, 19 July 2008. Web. 27 Sept. 2013. <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mLSnn6tnzwQ>. This video shows a few of the many members of the American Indian Movement. This is important because they have been standing up and fighting for human rights for a very long time. I trust this video because they were actually talking to the volunteers. 49. Ziolkowska-Boehm, Aleksandra, and Aleksandra Ziolkowska-Boehm. Open Wounds: A Native American Heritage. Pierpont, SD: Nemsi, 2009. Print. They talk about the American Indians and their stories. I trust this link because there are many different point of views in the book.

50. "4-28-08b Longest Walk 2 Southern Route." YouTube. YouTube, 08 May 2008. Web. 27 Sept. 2013. <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_DQciSzpcnw>. This video is from the second Longest Walk. In the video, it shows American Indians marching through Hammon, Oklahoma while holding up a few signs declaring what theyre protesting. Secondary 51. "American Indians and the Affordable Care Act." Indian Country Today Media Network. N.p., 13 Nov. 2013. Web. 15 Nov. 2013. With open enrollment now started, Oklahomans can enroll in the Affordable Care Acts (ACA) Marketplace to shop for an insurance plan that fits their health needs and budget, as required by the mandate that goes into effect in 2014.

52. Andrews, Thomas. "The Longest Walk 2." SRIC. SRIC, 2008. Web. 25 Sept. 2013. <http://www.sric.org/voices/2008/v9n2/Voices_Summer08_Longest_Walk_2.pdf>. Thomas Andrews is an actual volunteer in the second Longest Walk. He took pictures from the actual event. I trust his website because SRIC is a big organization and his article is part of it. 53. Amram, David. "African-Native American Lives in the Americas." African-Native American Lives in the Americas. Smithsonian, n.d. Web. 26 Sept. 2013. <http://nmai.si.edu/exhibitions/indivisible/civil_rights.html>. David Amrams website has a picture from the actual event. His article is part of a very large organization known as Indivisible. He is a large supporter of the American Indian Movement. 54. Brown, Dee. Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee: An Indian History of the American West. New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 1971. Print. In the Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, Dee Brown's eloquent, fully documented account of the systematic destruction of the American Indian during the second half of the nineteenth century really brings out the meaning of the movements.

55. Brown, Patty. "The Longest Walk Comes Through Kansas City." The Longest Walk Comes Through Kansas City. Sierra Club, 2010. Web. 25 Sept. 2013. Patty Brown is a supporter of the American Indian Movement and The Longest Walk. Her article is part of a very popular website so I believe her sources and links are plausible. She has also been a long time supporter. 56. Fixico, Donald Lee. Treaties with American Indians: An Encyclopedia of Rights, Conflicts, and Sovereignty. Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO, 2008. Print. Donald Lee Fixico is the Distinguished Foundation Professor of History at Arizona State University. He is the author of many American Indians history books. I trust his book because of his professional background and credentials. 57. Fortunate, Eagle Adam, and Tim Findley. Heart of the Rock: The Indian Invasion of Alcatraz. Norman: University of Oklahoma, 2002. Print. An Indian journalist who covered the Native American occupation of Alcatraz in the early 1970s chronicles this seminal event in terms of its place in modern Indian history. 58. Franco, Yaynicut. "The Longest Walk 1978-2008." LongestWalk. Longestwalk, 27 July 2008. Web. 26 Sept. 2013. <http://www.longestwalk.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=blogcategory&id=41& Itemid=125>.

Yaynicut Francos article is from the actual website longestwalk.org. All the contributors in that website are all proud supporters of the American Indian Movement. I trust this website because a few of the contributors are actual volunteers and they all strongly support the Longest Walk. 59. Freeman, Jo. "Indians End Longest Walk in Washington DC." Indians End Longest Walk in Washington DC. N.p., n.d. Web. 25 Sept. 2013. <http://www.jofreeman.com/photos/Longest_Walk.htm>. Jo Freeman is a known writer who compliments American Indian history. This helped me because she is an experienced writer and she has studied this. Her website also has pictures from the actual event and a caption for each one. 60. Gold, Susan Dudley. Worcester v. Georgia: American Indian Rights. New York: Marshall Cavendish Benchmark, 2008. Print. Susan Gold was actually at the second longest walk in Alcatraz Island. There is a picture of the movement that she took herself. I trust this book due to the fact that he has reliable sources. 61. Goldstein, Margaret J. You Are Now on Indian Land: The American Indian Occupation of Alcatraz Island, California, 1969. Minneapolis, MN: Twenty-First Century, 2011. Print. Explores what led Native Americans to stage an occupation of Alcatraz and how the standoff with the federal government ended. 62. Horse, Capture George P., Duane Champagne, and Chandler C. Jackson. American Indian Nations: Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow. Lanham, MD: AltaMira, 2007. Print. George Paul Horse Capture was a Native American anthropologist, activist, and writer. He was one of the first Native American museum curators. He was an enrolled member of the Aaninin tribe. 63. Johnson, Troy R. You Are on Indian Land!: Alcatraz Island, 1969-1971. Los Angeles, CA: American Indian Studies Center, University of California, Los Angeles, 1995. Print. Troy Johnson is a very experienced American Indian writer. In his book, he reveals that he has followed the supporters walk in one of the movements. I trust this book because of his past experience. 64. Johnson, Troy R. Alcatraz, Indian Land Forever. Los Angeles, CA: American Indian Studies Center, University of California, 1994. Print. This publication commemorating the twenty-fifth anniversary of the Alcatraz occupation presents poetry and political statements written by Indian people during the occupation or commemorating the event. 65. Josephy, Alvin M. Red Power; the American Indians' Fight for Freedom. New York: American Heritage, 1971. Print.

A select collection of 24 articles and documents dealing with the right of Indians to be free of colonialist rule and to run their own affairs with security for their lands and rights. 66. Joseph, Alan N. American Indians' Fight for Freedom. Alabama: American Heritage, 1979. Print. A select collection of 20 articles and documents dealing with the right of Indians to be free of colonialist rule and to run their own affairs with security for their lands and rights. 67. McCool, Daniel, Susan M. Olson, and Jennifer L. Robinson. Native Vote: American Indians, the Voting Rights Act, and the Right to Vote. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2007. Print. They all are experienced writers in American Indians history. I trust their books because they all have professional backgrounds and writing experience. I chose their book because they combined all their sources into one book so there are different opinions and points of views. 68. Moquin, Wayne, and Doren Charles Lincoln Van. Great Documents in American Indian History. New York: Praeger, 1973. Print. An anthology of writings records the ideas and attitudes of American Indians throughout history and offers insight into their culture and struggles with the white man. 69. Nichols, Roger L., and George Rollie. Adams. The American Indian: Past and Present. Waltham, MA: Xerox College Pub., 1971. Print. They all are experienced writers in American Indians history. I trust their books because they all have professional backgrounds and writing experience. I chose their book because they combined all their sources into one book so there are different opinions and points of views. 70. Norrell, Brenda. "Longest Walk: U.S. Apology to Indians Is Diversion." The Narcosphere. The Narcosphere, 3 Mar. 2008. Web. 26 Sept. 2013. <http://narcosphere.narconews.com/notebook/brenda-norrell/2008/03/longest-walk-us-apologyindians-diversion>. Brenda Norrell has the article on a known website. He believes that this issue is very important and should be known more to the world. I trust his sources because hes a strong supporter of The Longest Walk. 71. O'Brien, Sharon. American Indian Tribal Governments. Norman: University of Oklahoma, 1989. Print. Sharon OBrien is an experienced American Indian writer. I trust this book because the sources seem real and the facts match a lot of the other facts in other books and websites. 72. Page, Jake. In the Hands of the Great Spirit: The 20,000-year History of American Indians. New York: Free, 2003. Print. The story of the American Indians has been told as a 500-year tragedy, a story of violent and fatal encounters with Europeans and their diseases, followed by steady retreat, defeat, and diminishment.

73. Rader, Dean. Engaged Resistance: American Indian Art, Literature, and Film from Alcatraz to the NMAI. Austin: University of Texas, 2011. Print. Profusely illustrated with more than one hundred images, this is the first book that focuses on how Native Americans have used artistic expression to both engage with and resist Anglo culture 74. "Richland County - The Longest Walk of 1978." Road Trip! ETV Commission, 2007. Web. 26 Sept. 2013. <http://www.knowitall.org/roadtrip/cr-html/search/search-results.cfm?id=132>. The writer seems very experienced. They are actual volunteers and so they are very strong supporters of The Longest Walk. I trust their website because they personally know about the subject and are proud to support it. 75. Roman-Szynkowski, Terri. "CENSORED NEWS.": Remembering the Longest Walk 1978 in St Louis. Blogspot, 29 Aug. 2013. Web. 25 Sept. 2013. <http://bsnorrell.blogspot.com/2013/08/remembering-longest-walk-1978-in-st.html>. Terri Roman-Szynkowski is a personal witness to the Longest Walk. She participated in the movement and her website shows a few pictures. I trust this website because she has witnessed this event. 76. Shoemaker, Nancy. American Indians. Malden, MA: Blackwell, 2001. Print. I trust this book because this collection brings together recent essays covering over five hundred years of American Indian history. 77. Vignes, Michelle. "Alcatraz Is Not an Island." PBS. PBS, 2002. Web. 26 Sept. 2013. <http://www.pbs.org/itvs/alcatrazisnotanisland/activism.html>. Michelle Vignes article is on a well known website with a great reputation. The article has many pictures from actual event. She is a loud and proud supporter of the American Indian Movement. 78. Vink, John A. "Alcatraz Island to Washington, D.C. February 11, 2006 - April 22, 2006 (Earth Day)." Pictures Of The Longest Walk. PhotoPage, 2006. Web. 25 Sept. 2013. <http://www.redfeatherweb.com/sacredrun2006/archives/longwalk/walk.html>. John Vink is a very experienced American Indian writer. In his website, he reveals that he has followed the supporters walk in one of the movements. I trust this website because of his past experience. 79. Yaynicut. "Video 20: Longest Walk 2 Southern Route." Longest Walk. 19 July 2008. Web. 27 Sept. 2013. This video had a volunteer describe to us what it was like to walk in a less-known but important movement. Everyone is gathered around and relaxing from walking such far distances. This video is important because it demonstrates their hard work towards this movement. 80. Zaragovia, Veronica. "Native Americans Walk to D.C. for Political Boost." PBS. PBS, 15 Aug. 2008. Web. 26 Sept. 2013. <http://www.pbs.org/newshour/updates/social_issues/julydec08/longestwalk2_08-15.html>.

Veronica Zaragovias article is part of a website with a very good reputation. She also uses many quotes from actual witnesses from the event. I trust her website because of her writing style and quotes.