Many students will be traveling in

the coming months to visit family
over Tanksgiving and winter
break, which means deciding what
route to take when driving from
Lawrence to home, or the airport.
Te Kansas Turnpike is the only
road in Kansas that requires drivers
to pay a toll, but it also lets them
travel at a higher speed and arrive at
their destination faster.
But what about time spent at the
toll scrambling to fnd loose change
in a cup holder? Drivers can avoid
that hassle and potential trafc by
purchasing a K-TAG.
A K-TAG is a decal that drivers put
on their window to digitally log how
ofen they use the turnpike. It also
allows them to bypass tollbooths
and pay a monthly rate for traveling
on the highway.
Rachel Bell, communications
manager of the Kansas Turnpike
Authority, said they are encouraging
people to buy K-TAGs because of
their efciency.
"We can move more trafc through
the interchange electronically," she
said.
It's also cheaper for the KTA and
drivers if people use K-TAGS. Bell
said drivers save an average of 20
percent with a K-TAG, although it
varies slightly depending on which
toll checkpoints they use.
Te Kansas Turnpike requires tolls
because it was funded diferently
than most roads that are paid
for with taxes. Te Turnpike was
funded by bonds.
Now that the initial costs of
the highway have been paid of,
drivers continue to pay tolls for its
maintenance and upkeep.
Bell said the KTA generally raises
toll rates modestly every three
years so that, if major projects arise,
drivers won't be blindsided by a
huge increase in toll fees.
"We try to provide the best
road that we can so we can keep
everybody moving," Bell said.
Another beneft that Bell reminds
people of during this time of year:
“You don’t have to roll your window
down to get a ticket or pay – you
stay nice and warm.”
Sarah Bowersox, a sophomore
from Derby, said taking the Kansas
Turnpike saves her a half an hour or
more when she goes home.
K-TAGs cost $15 and charge
drivers monthly for each time they
pass through the toll checkpoints.
Drivers who travel frequently on the
Turnpike and spend more than $10
on tolls can prepay $40 and save on
the price of the K-TAG itself.
Bowersox said she thinks the
K-TAG is an investment that's well
worth it.
"My step dad seems to think it's
worth the money and I certainly
do because it saves me a lot of time
instead of being caught behind
other cars or semis," Bowersox said.
Students interested in buying
a K-TAG can purchase one at
the tollbooth next time they use
the Turnpike, go to a Kansas
triple-A ofce or buy one online at
ksturnpike.com.
— Edited by Duncan McHenry
1
Volume 126 Issue 53 kansan.com Tuesday, November 26, 2013
UDK
the student voice since 1904
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
All contents, unless stated otherwise, © 2013 The University Daily Kansan
CLASSIFIEDS 9
CROSSWORD 5
CRYPTOQUIPS 5
OPINION 4
SPORTS 10
SUDOKU 5
Sunny. North northwest
winds at 15 to 25 mph.
Today is National Shopping Reminder Day, so
plan your Black Friday
Index Don’t
forget
Today’s
Weather
It could be worse.
HI: 37
LO: 14
CAMPUS
FEES FOR PHOTOS
K-TAG adds convenience
to holiday highway travel
KAITLYN KLEIN
kklein@kansan.com
TRANSPORTATION
What is a K-TAG?

How much does it cost?
$15 or you can prepare a suggested $40 for those who spend more than $10 a month on tolls.
Where do I buy one?
• At Kansas Triple-A offices
• At the toll booth
• Online at ksturnpike.com (actual link: http://www.ksturnpike.com/k-tag/register_apply)
$
A decal that you stick on your windshield so you can drive through tolls without stopping to pay a toll
(you still pay the toll). It saves you money -- an average of 20%.
— KSturnpike.com
— The Wichita Eagle
Te Wichita Eagle recently
published a compiled list of the
top 10 highest-paid employees at
each of the six public universities
in Kansas (KU Medical Center was
included but considered a separate
institution). Of the top 10, eight
are from the University of Kansas.
Te list places Athletics Director
Sheahon Zenger in the top spot
at the University with a salary
of $450,000, while Chancellor
Bernadette Gray-Little comes in
second at $432,650.
In fact, of all seven institutions,
the University is the only one
where the president, chancellor
or appointive state agency head
does not top the list. Including the
numbers from the Medical Center,
the chancellor is also surpassed
by Doug Girod, executive vice
chancellor of the KU Medical
Center and the highest-paid
university employee in the state,
and Matthew Mayo, chairperson
of the Department of Biostatistics.
According to the American
Association of University
Professors, the average annual
pay for a full professor at a public
institution is $212,000, and CNN
Money marked the average annual
pay of university presidents
in 2011-12 at $441,392. Tis
essentially puts the University even
with the national average.
— Edited by Duncan McHenry
HIGHER EDUCATION
ASHLEIGH TIDWELL
atidwell@kansan.com
University employees make
TOP 10 HIGHEST-PAID PROFESSORS IN THE STATE
Kansas top 10 earners list
$687,001
$475,499
$450,000
$432,650
$402,480 $401,948 $401,000 $400,000
$408,153 $406,002
University of Kansas
Medical Center Executive
Vice Chancellor
University of Kansas
Medical Center
Chairperson-Professor
University of Kansas
Director Major
Division/ School
University of Kansas
Chancellor
University of Kansas
Medical Center
Chairperson-Professor
Kansas State
University Director
University of Kansas
Executive Vice
Chancellor/ Provost
University of
Kansas Medical
Center Dean
University of Kansas
Medical Center Professor
Kansas State University
President
Doug A. Girod
Matthew S. Mayo
Sheahon Zenger
Bernadette Gray-Little
Steven W. Stites John A. Currie Jeffrey Vitter Garold O. Minns
Buddhadeb Dawn Kirk H. Schulz
Student initiates petition to change photo lab policy
A change this summer in policy at
the School of Architecture, Design
and Planning has motivated a
University student to take action.
Matt Branham, a junior majoring
in ceramics from Kirkwood, Mo.,
has submitted a petition to several
University deans to change a policy
that now charges students outside
the school to use the photo lab in the
Art and Design Building.
“Tis past summer, I went and
they said I would have to set up
an appointment on Friday and
give them some money,” Branham
said. “I thought it was just a
miscommunication, so I told them
I was going to be sending them an
angry email.”
Branham found that it wasn’t a
miscommunication, though. Under
a new rule change, students in the
Visual Arts department, as well as
other schools, are not able to take
photographs of their own artwork
free of charge as they previously
were. Now, they instead must make a
reservation on a Friday for a lab staf
member to photograph their work,
and must pay $10 an hour.
Afer learning of the lab’s new policy
over the summer, Branham sent a
mass email to the approximately
150 Visual Art students in the fall
letting them know he was starting a
petition to challenge the new rules.
He has since collected 127 signatures
from those students and submitted
them to leaders in the Design
Department, the College of Liberal
Arts and Sciences, the School of
Architecture, Design and Planning
and the Ofce of the Provost.
Te photography lab is operated by
the School of Architecture, Design
and Planning. Te Visual Art
department and Design department
used to both fall under the umbrella
of the School of Fine Arts, but, in
2009, the Design department split
of into the School of Architecture,
Design and Planning and the Visual
Arts department moved to the
College of Liberal Arts & Sciences.
Branham said the new policy
greatly afects the Visual Arts
students because they use the lab to
document their artwork and submit
it for internships, residencies and
graduate school applications. He
said being able to photograph one’s
own work is vital to the students’
education, and the alternatives they
have to the photo lab just aren’t
cutting it.
“It’s kind of insane, because afer
undergrad we are not going to be
hiring photographers to shoot our
work,” he said. “Most of us have
cameras, but we need the physical
studio like the lighting, backdrop
and walls to shoot our work. As of
this semester, my work has had to
be shot of of the free-standing wall
in our sculpture area and it’s not
very presentable, so I wouldn’t feel
comfortable submitting it to any sort
of program.”
Chris Burke, a senior from Olathe
majoring in ceramics, said he has
been using the lab to photograph his
work all four years at the University,
and that the new change came as a
shock to him.
“Tat’s a tool we utilize to prepare
for our future, and I feel like they’re
kind of robbing us of that,” Burke
said. “Without spending a lot of
money it’s hard to take pictures of
your work now, which has become
such an important part of the artistic
process.”
John Gaunt, dean of the School of
Architecture, Design and Planning,
said the change in the lab’s policy is
used to cover the cost of expensive
technological equipment for
students.
“We have a large amount of
very sophisticated photographic
equipment, so the cost of technology
is very high at the University,” Gaunt
said. “Tat’s the purpose of the
technology fees for our courses.
So we thought a $10 cost for
photography for various students
would be modest and a fair cost.”
Gaunt added that he plans to meet
with Branham about the issue, but
the school has no plans to change
the policy as a result of the petition.
“I’m not anxious to impose any
cost on students that I don’t think
to be absolutely necessary and
appropriate,” he said. “I think to
remove the cost would be unfair
to other students as it relates to
photography. Every other course in
the school has a course fee associated
with it, and the whole point is to
cover the photographer costs, the
photographic equipment and so on.”
— Edited by Duncan McHenry
CODY KUIPER
ckuiper@kansan.com
CONTRIBUTED PHOTO
Ceramics major Matt Branham’s sculpture “Nest’s Awe.” Branham created it this
year using found metal.
BLACK FRIDAY SHOPPING HOLIDAY RECIPE
PAGE 5
PAGE 5
What: Carillon Recital
When: Noon to 12:30 p.m.
Where: Memorial Campanile
About: Dr. Elizabeth Berghout will
perform on the 53 bronze bells in the
World War II Memorial Campanile.
What: Tuesday Nite Swing
When: 8 p.m.
Where: Kansas Union
About: Admission is free and open to
all ages.
NEWS MANAGEMENT
Editor-in-chief
Trevor Graff
Managing editors
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Dylan Lysen
Art Director
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ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT
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Designers
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George Mullinix
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Wil Kenney
ADVISERS
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content strategist
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Sales and marketing adviser
Jon Schlitt
N
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
news
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2013 PAGE 2
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weather,
Jay?
What’s the
Wednesday Thursday Friday
HI: 27 HI: 49
LO: 21 LO: 27
— weather.com
Sunny. Zero
percent chance of
rain. Wind NNW at
10 mph.
Sunny. Zero
percent chance of
rain. Wind SSW at
11 mph.
Sunny. Zero
percent chance of
rain. Wind SE at
9 mph.
School’s out, and so is
winter apparently.
Give thanks, eat and
sleep on the couch.
Turkey hangover.
Calendar
Tuesday, Nov. 26 Wednesday, Nov. 27 Thursday, Nov. 28 Friday, Nov. 29
JOIN THE KANSAN ADVERTISING STAFF TODAY
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E: Kyle Hoedl
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anager, Social M
arketing
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TV & Nickelodeon International
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edia. The leadership and business skills
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FA
VORITE PA
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orking with m
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ultiple Addie weddings, held an Addie-m
ade baby,
and still go out on the weekends with the people I m
et
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A
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DDIES:
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THIS IS WHAT SUCCESS LOOKS LIKE THIS IS WHAT SUCCESS LOOKS LIKE
What: Thanksgiving Break
When: All day
Where: All University
About: No classes
What: Thanksgiving Break
When: All day
Where: All University
About: No classes
What: Thanksgiving Break
When: All day
Where: All University
About: No classes
HI: 46
LO: 22
A recent study conducted by
researchers from the University
of Edinburgh has strengthened
the theory that the onset of
dementia can be delayed for
bilingual speakers.
Te study took a sample group
of 648 patients with dementia,
391 of whom were bilingual,
and assessed when individuals
frst showed symptoms. Tey
then compared results between
monolingual and bilingual
groups.
Te frst signs of the disease
appeared, on average, 4.5 years
later in bilingual patients than in
monolingual patients.
“Tere has been a lot of focus
in psychology lately on the
bilingual advantage,” said Susan
Kemper, a Roberts distinguished
professor of psychology at the
University. “Tat advantage
holds up as individuals age and
pushes back the age at which
one may develop dementia and
Alzheimer’s disease.”
Bilingual advantage suggests
that bilingual speakers are better
than monolingual speakers at
certain cognitive functions.
Most of these advantages are in
the brain’s executive functions,
which control things such as your
inhibition, confict resolution
and multitasking.
Te Edinburgh study is the frst
to show that bilingual speakers
who are illiterate gain the same
benefts from speaking two
languages as do those that are
able to read and write.
Kemper said this is one of the
many unknowns when it comes
to the bilingual advantage.
“Tere’s just still so much
that we don’t understand,.” she
said. “Why are illiterate people
afected the same way? Do you
have to speak an equal amount
of each language? We just don’t
know.”
Te study builds on research
conducted by Canadian
neuroscientist Ellen Bialystok
in 2011, which showed speaking
two languages can reconfgure
the brain network in a way
that positively afects cognitive
function
“What’s happening with
bilingualism isn’t particular to
cognitive skill or ability, you’re
just building a better brain,”
Kemper said. “Education does
the same thing. Tere’s a big
cognitive diference between
someone with a Ph.D. and
someone with a high school
diploma.”
Unfortunately, for the
trilingual and beyond, the study
revealed that there are no added
benefts for those who speak
more than two languages.
— Edited by Duncan McHenry
RESEARCH
Bilingual skills can
combat dementia
KYLE PAPPAS
kpappas@kansan.com
We talked to several students on campus to see why or why
not they’d be interested in learning another language:
STUDENT ON THE STREET

“I think that being bilingual
is beneficial for new work and
cultural opportunities.”
ARIANA NASRAZADANI
senior, Emporia

“I think it would be cool to
learn another language, but
I just don’t have the time or
energy.”
LAURA-KATE ASSENMACHER
junior, Overland Park

“My grandpa served in the army
in Germany, and I took German
in high school. It was interesting
enough for me to keep up with it
through college.”
ZACK HADER
senior, Wichita
CRIME
Shooting hoax at Yale
causes short lockdown
NEW HAVEN, Conn. — Yale Uni-
versity was locked down for nearly
six hours Monday as authorities
investigated a phone call saying an
armed man was heading to shoot
it up, a warning they later said was
likely a hoax.
SWAT teams searching the Ivy
League campus didn't find a gunman
after a room-by-room search, and
the lockdown was lifted Monday
afternoon. No one was injured, police
said.
"New Haven is safe. The Yale cam-
pus is safe," New Haven police Chief
Dean Esserman said.
A 911 call was received at 9:48
a.m. from a man at a pay phone
about a mile from the campus who
said his roommate was on the way to
the university to shoot people, Officer
David Hartman said.
Esserman said he was leaning
toward the incident being a hoax
and a witness who reported seeing
someone with a rifle likely saw a law
enforcement officer.
"Though it is starting to tilt in the
direction of an innocent mistake, it
started with a purposeful and mali-
cious call," Esserman said, vowing
to track down and arrest the person
who made the call.
Authorities don't believe that the
caller was a Yale student or that his
roommate attended Yale, Esserman
said. There was nothing specific
about the threat, he said, and the
call lasted only seconds.
Classes aren't in session this
week, and many students and
staff members left campus for the
Thanksgiving holiday following
Saturday's traditional football game
against Harvard.
But many students were still in
their dorm rooms, Hartman said, and
Yale authorities sent out their first
warning about half an hour after the
911 call.
"The Yale police made the right
call," Esserman said. "They went
to immediate lockdown to keep
everybody safe."
Yale advised students and staff
members to shelter in place. It also
issued an advisory asking people off
campus to stay away. The shelter
advisory was lifted by late afternoon.
Police blocked off several streets
near the university's Old Campus, in
the heart of New Haven, where they
were concentrating their search.
Several local schools also were
placed in lockdown. Police in tac-
tical gear entered several campus
buildings. Pedestrian traffic in the
normally bustling area was sparse,
with cold and windy weather keeping
many people indoors.
On Black Friday, the most
crowded shopping day of the year,
all precepts of personal space are
ofen violated as consumers get
caught up in the frenzy.
“Sometimes I think people go to
the extreme,” Wichita freshman
Morgan Anderson said.
For the past four years, Anderson
has stood in line each Black Friday
awaiting deals at 3 a.m. She is well
aware of the Black Friday hype.
“I personally am not going to lose
my sense of humanity over a good
deal, but I might run a little to get
there,” Anderson said.
According to Ahreum Maeng,
assistant professor in the School of
Business, the discomfort shoppers
feel on Black Friday is natural
because their personal space is
being violated.
“When strangers in a shopping
mall get too close to you, a defensive
mechanism is most likely [going] to
be activated,” Maeng said. “It’s kind
of a biological, primitive avoidance
motivation.”
Maeng added that this stimulation
of a defense mechanism can
actually change consumer behavior.
In her research of consumer
decisions in crowded situations,
Maeng found that people adopted a
prevention-focused mindset when
their personal space was invaded.
One example, Maeng explained,
would be shoppers tending to
choose a shampoo that prevents
hair loss over one that enriches hair
in a crowded shopping situation
such as Black Friday.
In other words, Maeng said
people become less likely to take
risks and rely on concrete thinking
instead of abstract processing.
“When it comes to Black Friday,
consumers are more likely to
focus on the lower-level concrete
information of the product, which
could infuence their purchasing
decision,” Maeng said.
Consumers process information
in two ways: high-level abstract
and low-level concrete forms of
thinking. With high-level abstract
information processing, consumers
consider things like the overall
efect of the product, such as the
brand value. At low-level concrete
processing, however, consumers
look at details such as how cheap
the price is.
“I feel like when you are in such
a situation, especially a fast-paced
situation, there is not a lot of time to
look at the benefts of everything,”
Anderson said. “A lot of the time
the price captivates me more than
the actual product.”
According to Maeng, retailers
who understand this consumer
behavior can advertise their
products specifcally to shoppers in
a crowded situation.
“You can strategically manipulate
people’s perception in how you
communicate and sell your product
more efectively, depending on the
crowdedness of your store,” Maeng
said.
For consumers who are
overwhelmed by choices on Black
Friday, knowing these promotional
tactics can help them avoid being
lured in unawares.
“I don’t know how many
consumption decisions typical
students are making, but just being
aware of the social environment
they are infuenced by — that may
infuence their decision,” Maeng
said.
As for Anderson, she tries to limit
impulse purchases by planning
weeks in advance, coming up with
the list of deals she wants to get
and devising a plan of attack to get
exactly what she wants.
“I always try to have a list because
I think that’s the best econo-thing
to do,” Anderson said. “I have to
be more conscientious about the
stuf I’m purchasing because, when
it comes down to it, we are broke
college kids.”
— Edited by Duncan McHenry
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2013 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 3
POLICE REPORTS
Enjoy your Thanksgiving break,
everyone. There will certainly be
lots of traveling Jayhawks this
week, because just over one-third
of the KU student population is
from out-of-state.
A 21-year-old male was
arrested yesterday at mile
marker 393 on U.S. highway 24
on suspicion of driving while
intoxicated and leaving the
scene of an injury accident. A
$1,000 bond was paid.
An 18-year-old male was
arrested yesterday on the
200 block of 8th Street on
suspicion of reckless driving,
attempting to elude an officer
and driving while intoxicated.
A $750 bond was paid.
A 20-year-old female was
arrested Sunday on the 1300
block of Massachusetts Street
on suspicion of domestic
battery. No bond was posted.
—Emily Donovan
Information based on the
Douglas County Sheriff’s
Office booking recap.



RESEARCH
Study pinpoints Black Friday shopping habits
YU-KYUNG LEE
ylee@kansan.com
SHOPPING
Plan to shop smarter, not harder this holiday week
While battling the crowds in the
frigid midnight air is probably not
appealing to most, major retailers
are ofering deals you defnitely
won’t want to miss out on.
Especially on a student’s budget,
the upcoming holiday season can
add on extra stresses. Educate
yourself before you hit the stores,
and you’ll be able to score some
great deals that will go easy on
your wallet.
Best Buy:
Blockbuster Titles- Originally $34.99,
marked as $7.99
Toshiba Laptop Essentials Bundle-
$349.99
iPad 2- $299.99
Insignia 39” LED TV- $169.99
Select video games, originally marked
as $59.99, now $34.99
$150 dollars off all MacBook Air
computers
Target:
Buy two get one free video games
Nikon L320 Digital Camera- $99
Beats Headphones- $199.99
$4.00 Doorbuster DVDs
Women’s Fashion Boots- $18
40% off all denim and sweaters for
Women, Men and Children
Target is also offering customers a
20% off coupon if more than $75.00
is spent.
Wal-Mart:
Xbox One System- $499
Select Blu-Ray Movies- $3.96
TRU Non-Stick Griddle- $9.44
HD Wireless Printer- $49
iPhone 5s- $189
Beats by Dr. Dre Pill Portable Speaker-
$149.95
Select Bedding- $24.96
For those of you who prefer
to do your shopping snuggled
up in bed, make sure to check
Amazon.com when looking for
deals. According to the company
website, new deals will be added
to the site every ten minutes.
Visit the Amazon “Black Friday
Hub” site to check up on updated
pricings and items.
Tips:
Research deals before and make
sure to print the coupons you’ll
need.
Bundle up! Some stores may
require you to wait in line
outdoors, and with the freezing
Kansas weather, you’ll want to
make sure to dress in layers.
Stick to a budget. With all the
deals, it can be easy to go over
budget. Make a list of what you
need and only purchase those
items.
— Edited by Lauren Armendariz
HANNAH SUNDERMEYER
hsundermeyer@kansan.com
JAMES HOYT/KANSAN
Stores like Walmart will be having Black Friday sales that attract shoppers looking to save money on items. Biological
defense mechanisms can be activated by the irregular crowd sizes, according to research.
Recycle
this
paper
C
all it tapping out or just
taking a gap “lifetime,” but
I just don’t see a wel-
coming environment for young
people in America.
Tis isn’t about being shafed by
the economy or the job market.
Tis isn’t even about the massive
labor exploitation scheme that is
the internship system. It’s entirely
about an attitude that Generation
Y is somehow responsible for the
mess they’re in and that shaming
them is the best solution.
What I don’t understand is why
the Boomers and their afliates
get so violently defensive at any
mention of our generation. Tey
gather up their benefts and time-
shares around them like a nesting
badger and snarl at all the twen-
ty-somethings until they move
on to beg at the next front door.
Tere’s a sense that the best way
to prepare an entire generation is
to shame them when they can’t
fnd a job and then shrug when
they ask for a kickback.
All of this griping and bemoan-
ing each other isn’t a generational
diference, but a human one. De-
spite swearing up and down that
we’re just as generous as Barney,
the vast majority of us want to
keep what we’ve earned. As Social
Security drips out of the bottom
of the bucket, it’s only natural that
those that have earned their keep
begin to hoard what they can and
scare the poachers away with a
rusty spike.
Tat’s all fne and dandy. Te
solution to the bloated social
security system is too complex
to be discussed here. But our
attitudes toward one another? We
can fgure that out quickly.
Te unbelievably condescending
cycle of blog posts that peppers
all of our news feeds betrays an
unfortunate attitude from the
seniors in our community. Tese
articles and columns berate Gen
Y, harp on the “everyone gets a
trophy” mindset, and drop a few
zingers about Twitter to cap it
all of.
I guess I don’t understand why
if Generation Y has been raised
wrong, then we’re somehow
responsible for it. I think every-
one age 30 and up has colluded
in a back room and decided to
just blame Gen Y for all of their
problems, citing our coddled
childhoods while pandering to
the elders.
Are we all a social experiment
gone wrong? Do we just kick our
children out onto the street and
chuck a boot at them whenever
their wails are keeping us awake?
What can we do to help Gen Y
succeed but watch them crash
and burn and hope they learn a
lesson from it?
I don’t have a good answer for
that. Many millions of people
much smarter and much more
capable than me haven’t fgured
it out yet, so I’m content with not
knowing.
What I can do is ask the old
folks and young’uns to get along
for a little while. Long enough
to knock out global warming at
least. Hell, maybe we’ll patch up
the economy while we’re at it, and
have a few laughs along the way.
Wil Kenney is a sophomore majoring
in English from Leawood.
O
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
opinion
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2013 PAGE 4
A
s students at the Uni-
versity of Kansas, we are
privileged in our access
to top-of-the line educational
resources. According to KU’s
2012 fnancial report, which can
be found on the KU website, the
University spent $256,168,351 in
research expenditures. Basically,
the University funded over $250
million in 2012 alone on student
and faculty research projects that
aim to enlighten, explore and
broaden our knowledge of the
world. Tis spending, according
to a Forbes poll, ranks us at 118th
among both private and public
schools in the U.S., in regards to
research spending. Tese are stats
that we should be proud of, but
they also raise a question in my
mind. If KU can aford to be such
a strong research school, shouldn’t
they be able to fund free printing
for students?
Printing at the KU libraries has
a cost of 8 cents per black-and-
white page and 48 cents for color.
It’s not that much in the grand
scheme of things. But on a tight
college budget, like many of us are
on that charge can and will add
up. To think of it relatively, a 13-
page research paper or two pages
printed in color cost the same
as a McChicken at McDonalds.
Personally, I would rather pay
for a McChicken than pay for a
13-page paper I’ve spent all week
working on for a class that already
costs money to attend. To me, this
doesn’t add up.
Te University does sympathize
with us – somewhat. Each semes-
ter KU students are credited with
$8 of free printing. Tis adds up
to 100 free black-and-white pages
or 16.5 color pages. Tese free
pages are indeed a nice gesture
by the University, but is it really
enough?
According to the website
Collegeprowler.com, which is
a massive online database that
compares and ranks colleges for
prospective students, the average
annual tuition for the University
of Kansas is $23,748 out-of-state
and $9,678 for in-state. Tuition
does vary from person-to-person
and year-to-year, but College
Prowler averages and estimates to
obtain fairly accurate numbers.
Using these numbers, we can
deduce that for an out-of-state
student, approximately .00067
percent of their tuition goes
toward printing funds. Terefore,
the “free” $8 per semester KU
allocates is only 67-thousandths
of the cost of tuition for an out-of-
state student. As an English major
who fnds myself printing nearly
every day, that is not enough.
While the university is doing
an exemplary job funding 12
major research centers such as the
Biodiversity Institute, Life Span
Institute and the Bioengineering
Research Center, it’s important
that the little guys aren’t neglected
either. Before any of us are going
to be making groundbreaking re-
search for the Life Span Institute,
we’re going to have to take English
101 and print of countless essays,
or Calc 116 and print of pages
on pages of take-home quizzes or
the dozens of pages required for
Accounting 200 assignments with
t-counts afer t-counts. Te small
but signifcant cost of printing pa-
per does add up, and the students
shouldn’t have be responsible for
that fee.
Eddie Simon is a senior studying
English-Creative Writing
from Minneapolis, Minnesota.
University should provide free printing for students
Cyclical nature of music forecasts
change for future of hip-hop
Older generations
put blame on youth
BUDGETING
MUSIC SOCIETY
I
was asked recently if I
thought rap would be the
music our kids laugh at us for
playing when we’re older. At frst,
I waived it of as a humorous
notion. My response was “Who
knows?” and the discussion end-
ed as briefy as it had begun, but
the question stuck in my mind
for a few days.
I refected on the past of other
popular genres that died of, and
tried to research what caused
their decline. I noticed a recur-
ring trend of genres rooted in
youthful revolution that burned
out when their generations grew
up and moved on. Could hip-
hop really end in the same way?
Hip-hop began akin to other
musical movements—as a way
for a group to express them-
selves and fnd identity and
belonging. Te culture sprung
from a long-standing history of
oppression and racism, which
was adapted to a post-civil rights
era where these systems still have
a strangling efect. Te music de-
veloped as a method for modern
black people to fght against their
oppressors in a cathartic and
expressive method.
Te movement grew vastly in
the 80s and 90s. It grew so much
that it became a mainstay in the
music industry.
Its popularity made the artists
successful, and the involvement
of money changed how the mu-
sic was made. Te culture didn’t
necessarily dissipate because of
greed, but because of the “get-
rich-or-die-trying” mantra of
artists and executives.
Te same thing happened with
another mega-genre of the past:
rock ‘n’ roll.
Many rock artists sold 2-10
times the amount of records that
top hip-hop artists ever have. It’s
not farfetched that capitalism
can remove the passion of music,
but it can’t be the reason that
Hip Hop dies with such a gross
disparity in sales.
I looked closer at those two
genres, and noticed another
similarity.
Part of the reason that rock was
so immense was the develop-
ment of the radio and television.
Without these technologies, the
music could not have been as
popular.
Hip-hop experienced its own
technological breakthrough: the
internet. It hasn’t been around
long enough to tell whether it
will break hip-hop or not, but so
far it has only enabled the spread
of the music. Ten again, so did
television for rock.
I still hadn’t found the conclu-
sion that I was looking for yet,
so I looked back at the ages of
artists and fans.
From what I understand, Rock’s
most popular artists grew old,
split apart or died. Te fan base
followed suit.
Hip-hop’s oldest modern artists
and fans are currently around
40-50 years old, but there are a
plethora of younger artists on the
scene today. Te nature of Hip-
hop is oriented around youth,
but there does seem to be a place
for the older folk. Nas, one of the
most revered rappers from the
90s released an album in 2010
that was solid, yet mature. Emi-
nem released an album this year,
and he has a daughter almost as
old as I am. It appears that age
isn’t a huge factor.
I came to the conclusion that
predicting what will happen to
the genre is futile. Tere’s no
way to tell. Tere are too many
variables, too many possibilities.
We can refect on the past and
understand that history repeats
itself, but we cannot tell the
future. Such is life.
My work wasn’t completely
fruitless, however.
Trough analyzing the past and
considering the future, I found
a separate question that seemed
more relevant: What will happen
to us? Since music consists of
what we experience, we are mu-
sic. What happens to us, happens
to music. We fght oppression.
We live in culture. We become
irrelevant. We move on. We die.
At the end, I found my answer.
Hip Hop may die of, but at least
we were here to enjoy it.
Dalton Boehm is a freshman major-
ing in journalism from Prairie Village.
Three weeks before I graduate, I fi-
nally found the perfect pooping spot.
I don’t know what’s more disturb-
ing... Me asking my roommate if she
had an exacto knife or her saying yes.
I really do appreciate my roommate
wrapping her and her boyfriends
condoms in toilet paper before throw-
ing them away, but now we’re out of
toilet paper...
Yes, residents of Spahr Library, I
do have to sit here and yell at my
computer all day. I’m sorry for your
inconvenience.
PSA: The toilet in the men’s room
in the first floor of Mallot is broken.
-Lucky Survivor
Just wiped out on the stairs, posting
an FFA before everyone who saw me
does.
Am I the only one not going any-
where, eating a turkey sandwich, and
watching crappy tv for thanksgiv-
ing? Seems like it, based on all the
conversation around me.
Honestly, I would support getting rid
of Fall Break if it meant having a
week off for Thanksgiving. K-State
does and I’m jealous of them for it.
I’d be less worried about pranks-
giving and more worried about
slapsgiving.
I’m not sure what was more painful...
the 9 degree weather in Ames or the
“football” game I was attending...
Ay yo! Midnight Memories is out! Go
get it!
Everything you know about yams is
a lie.
Do they sell Heelys in adult sizes?
Could make my treks around Mt.
Oread more pleasant.
Shoutout to the Chiefs for reminding
me what it’s like to be a Chiefs fan
again.
If you can’t handle me in my long
underwear, you don’t deserve me at
my best.
I should just raise a certain flag
outside my house and Jade Garden
will know to send food.
Jon Heder really peaked with Napo-
leon Dynamite.
I’m just gonna need an IV of choco-
late milk.
I don’t play any video game that
doesn’t have the “Big Head” cheat
code.
Do you think Einstein ever typed
80085 into his calculator? I like to
think so.
Text your FFA
submissions to
785–289–8351 or
at kansan.com
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Trevor Graff, editor-in-chief
editor@kansan.com
Allison Kohn, managing editor
akohn@kansan.com
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dlysen@kansan.com
Will Webber, opinion editor
wwebber@kansan.com
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jschlitt@kansan.com
THE EDITORIAL BOARD
Members of the Kansan Editorial Board are Trevor
Graff, Allison Kohn, Dylan Lysen, Will Webber,
Mollie Pointer and Sean Powers.
@kla_hart
@KansanOpinion umm...do basketball tickets
count? #kubball
@coco_ehrlich
@KansanOpinion sending transcripts. Why do
I pay an arm and a leg in tuition and then have
to pay to send off a piece of paper?
@mattmeister87
@KansanOpinion Free printing, and parking
@emilyruth9
@KansanOpinion flashcards and coffee
@Vaughn_Diesel
@KansanOpinion the 1 star internet service...
What’s a school-related
expense you think your
tuition should cover?
FFA OF
THE DAY


Who wants to
celebrate Tom
Hanksgiving
with me? We
just get drunk
and watch
Larry Crowne
all day.
By Wil Kenney
wkenney@kansan.com
By Dalton Boehm
dboehm@kansan.com
By Eddie Simon
esimon@kansan.com
Follow us on Twitter @KansanOpinion.
Tweet us your opinions, and we just
might publish them.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2013
E
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
entertainment
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FOOD
CHRISTINA OSTMEYER/KANSAN
Sweet potatoes and yams are Thanksgiving staples on many tables. Try this simple sweet potato recipe this coming holiday.
What’s the diference between a
yam and a sweet potato? Te two
are actually not even botanically
related. Tough yams closely
resemble sweet potatoes, they
are much starchier, drier and
are primarily grown in Africa.
Ironically, the yam also has a
sweeter taste. Te skin of a yam
is rough compared to the smooth
exterior of a sweet potato. Te
confusion between the two is
derived from the United States
Department of Agriculture.
Te USDA needed a way to
diferentiate frm and sof sweet
potatoes and therefore began
calling the sofer varieties ‘yams.’
In efect, unless one is specifcally
seeking yams, he or she will
probably only fnd sweet potatoes
in most grocery stores.
Simple Mashed Sweet Potatoes
Ingredients:
5-6 sweet potatoes
½ cup brown sugar
¾ cup butter
1 tsp. salt
Place potatoes in a large pot and
fll with water so that potatoes
are completely covered, and boil
potatoes for 15 minutes.
Drain the water from the
potatoes and peel.
Chop potatoes and layer in pan,
equally dispersing salt, butter and
brown sugar throughout.
Bake at 375 F for 40 minutes.
Pull the potatoes out of the oven
and mash. Great additions could
include: goat cheese, pepper or
rosemary.
— Edited by Lauren Armendariz
Starchy versus sweet
CHRISTINA OSTMEYER
costmeyer@kansan.com
Yams and sweet potatoes are similar-tasting
holiday foods but pose significant differences.
Aries (March 21-April 19)
Today is a 9
Communication is key and comes
easier than normal. Write a business
proposal, a love letter or both. Apply
discipline to communications and
they’re potent. Let your partner take
the lead on a project. Confide to a
wise relative.
Taurus (April 20-May 20)
Today is a 7
Improve your living conditions and
your loving. Don’t be afraid to ex-
press your true feelings. It’s a great
time for meaningful conversation.
Silence can also be fun. Consider
the game you’re playing, and edit for
awesomeness.
Gemini (May 21-June 20)
Today is a 6
Your home could use some tender
loving care just about now. Do a
tough job yourself and save money,
or just pay for it. Take a serious
approach, regardless, and get it
done. Then you can announce it and
celebrate.
Cancer (June 21-July 22)
Today is a 7
Simplify your daily routine to im-
prove working conditions. Take pride
in your basic principles. An older
person offers help. The action you’re
taking feels exactly right. Send out
communications, and they travel far.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)
Today is a 9
Take a big step towards a new
level of financial independence. Get
in touch with old acquaintances
and profit arises naturally. Do
what seems right, even if nobody
else knows. Offer compassionate
listening.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
Today is a 9
Reminisce with old friends. Heed
a friend’s concerns, but don’t get
stopped by them. A private conver-
sation results in greater financial
flexibility. Being in charge can be
sexy. You’ve got it cooking. Make
poetry.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
Today is a 6
The skies are clearing up, figurative-
ly speaking, but it’s still not a
good idea to argue, especially with
authority. Phone a neighbor or friend
for support, or ask someone with
more experience. Emotion wins over
logic.
Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
Today is a 7
Look far and wide for bargains.
Don’t take “no” for an answer. Keep
your word. Plan a trip to a favorite
place, and advance through distant
contacts. Build a fun game with
friends, and turn your phone off for
a while.
Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
Today is a 7
It’s easier to make yourself
understood today. What can you
say for the greatest impact on your
community? You’re included in that.
Be your best. New ideas come in
odd moments; catch them. You’re
gaining respect.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
Today is an 8
A friendship formed now will last.
Heed wise words from a loving wom-
an. Be open to change for others
and yourself. You can delegate some
of your chores. It’s a win-win. Keep
good records and build security.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
Today is a 7
Trust the structures you’ve built,
and continue developing support.
Improving skills increases your ben-
efits, and your level of fun. Ask for
more and get it. Re-assure someone
who’s wobbly.
Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)
Today is an 8
Keep track of what you’re doing,
and take copious notes, or record it.
Increase your level of optimism and
you’re contagious. Others love to be
around you. The result is stability.
Relax and have fun.
“Farewell Transmission”
by Songs: Ohia
Album: “The Magnolia Electric Co.”
“Farewell Transmission” blurs the line between folk-like
instrumentation with long, drawn-out, jam-sounding rifs. Tis
7-minute-long song is a great one for a long drive, or a long relaxing
playlist. Songs: Ohia is the stage and recording name of musician,
Jason Molina, who performs with his lineup on this album that is
referred to as “Magnolia Electric Co.” Te blend of musical infuences
turns out to be a recipe for some beautiful music.
Whether you are driving 400 miles or 40 miles for your Tanksgiving break, these songs should help keep
you company while you travel.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2013 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 6
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ANSAN
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MUSIC
Songs for the drive home
TOM DEHART
tdehart@kansan.com
“Jazzy Belle”
by Outkast
Album: “ATLiens”
From Outkast’s second full-length album, this song features a well-
known sample and beat that has been used in more recent hip-hop
songs. Te lyrical development and speed of Andre 3000 on this track
is something to be heard, and also explains how Outkast became such
a big success in later years. An essential track for any hip-hop fan.
“I’m Not Feeling It Anymore”
by Van Morrison
Album: “Hymns to the Silence”
Van Morrison is better known for his singles such as “Moondance,”
“And it Stoned Me” and “Into the Mystic,” but he also has some lesser
known songs that are equal in power and tone. “I’m Not Feeling it
Anymore” provides a good look into the sounds of Van Morrison,
with an old, folk sound that leaves a good feeling lingering around
afer a listen. Te song is one that is likely to bounce around in your
head for a while.
“Green Onions”
by Booker T & the MG’s
Album: “Green Onions”
One of the most popular songs of the 1960s, “Green Onions,” by
Booker T & the MG’s has all of the great things about original R&B
music compiled into one song. Tough the song consists of a simple
chord progression on the organ, a consistent jazz beat on drums and
a walking bass line, the song is a classic. Te lead guitar on this track
makes the song, and it shows the extraordinary ways that music can
be great, despite how simple it is.
SECRETLY CANADIAN (2003)
Try out this playlist while traveling for break
Tere is no doubt about it — any
break from school is awesome. I
know I’m not alone when I say I’m
incredibly stoked for this break.
And, as excited as I’m to see all
of my family members and dogs,
I am also excited for some alone
time for relaxing and watching
some TV, while not feeling guilty
about the other things I could
be doing. Terefore, if any of
you have the time over break to
binge watch some TV shows or
marathon a movie series, here are
my recommendations.
X-Men movies
With the excitement around
“X-Men: Days of Future Past,” there
has never been a better time to catch
up on all of the other flms (which
include: “X-Men”, “X2”, “X-Men:
Te Last Stand” and “X-Men: First
Class”). You can even go above
and beyond if you have some extra
time and watch “X-Men Origins:
Wolverine and Te Wolverine.” I
have actually only seen one of the
X-Men flms, so I am personally
very excited to marathon these
over break and start to get excited
for the newest addition as well.
Friends
While being around family during
this time is incredible and makes
most people exceptionally happy,
I hope I’m not alone in saying that
I also really miss my friends from
Lawrence. Refecting on what I am
thankful for makes that even worse,
so in order to feel like you are still
around your friends the entire
break, “Friends” is the television
series for you. Another awesome
thing about this particular show is
that most people have seen a few
episodes, so you know personally
if it is the type of show you would
enjoy or not.
Malcom in the Middle
On the other hand, if you are
unable to go home or are unable
to see your family over break,
have a big dosage family lovin’
with “Malcom in the Middle.” See
Bryan Cranston, pre-Walter While
era, and then, for fans of Breaking
Bad, enjoy the alternate ending
that is available online that has a
crossover of the two shows. Also,
while there are sevem seasons of
the show, each episode is less that
30 minutes long, so you can speed
right through them and enjoy that
makeshif family time.
Merlin
Merlin, I realize, doesn’t really
ft in. Why would I recommend
Merlin for a binge watch? Te
reason is that you truly will not
be able to watch this show unless
you just watch all of it at one time.
What I mean by that is that Merlin,
while awesome and great, is one
of the cheesiest shows I have ever
watched. Terefore, if you think
about it for too long, most people
will start to realize that it is pretty
stupid and give up on it. However,
if you just watch all of it at one time,
you can make yourself believe that
it is actually really great, and then
fnally accept about a month later
that you were in a dark hole during
that time.
— Edited by Lauren Armendariz
— Edited by Lauren Armendariz
TELEVISION
LAFACE RECORDS LLC (1996)
POLYDOR (1991)
ATLANTIC RECORDING CORP. (1962)
WARNER BROS. TELEVISION
KAITLYN HILGERS
khilgers@kansan.com
Top shows to binge watch
over Thanksgiving break
AMES, Iowa — DeAndre Kane
had 20 points and eight rebounds,
and 17th-ranked Iowa State
trounced Missouri-Kansas City
110-51 Monday night for its ffh
straight win.
Sherron Dorsey-Walker added 17
points for the Cyclones (5-0), who
used a 27-0 run midway through
the frst half to put away the Kan-
garoos.
Iowa State, which was hosting a
game as a ranked team for the frst
time in eight years, held UMKC
scoreless for 7½ minutes and led
52-17 at halfime.
Te Cyclones also fnished with
their most points under fourth-
year coach Fred Hoiberg.
Martez Harrison had 14 points to
lead UMKC (1-4). Te Kangaroos
shot just 29.5 percent and lost for
the third time in four games.
Tough UMKC was never really
in the game, it did briefy stymie
the Cyclones by pressing afer
every made basket and throwing
in some zone looks on defense.
It only took a few minutes for
Iowa State to fnd its rhythm and
run away from the Kangaroos.
Te Cyclones reeled of 27
straight points midway through
the frst half afer letting UMKC
get to 19-13. Dustin Hogue beat
the zone with a mid-range jumper
and hit a layup to make it 28-13.
Kane nailed a 3-pointer to give
Iowa State a 35-13 lead, and
Melvin Ejim's 3 with 4:40 lef in
the frst half gave the Cyclones a
31-point cushion.
Tings got so lopsided so quickly
that Hoiberg was able to get
seldom-used reserves such as
Dorsey-Walker and K.J. Bluford
into the game before halfime.
Te Cyclones shot over 50
percent for the ffh time in their
frst nine halves of the season.
Tey also outrebounded UMKC
29-11, hit seven 3s and had eight
diferent players score in the frst
20 minutes alone.
All 12 of Iowa State's players
had at least one feld goal, and it
topped the 104 points it scored
against Chicago State in 2010 with
2:01 lef.
Matt Tomas had 14 points and
fellow freshman guard Monte
Morris scored 11 with seven
assists and seven rebounds for the
Cyclones.
1
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2013 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 7
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Stoops winningest coach in
school history
Afer Oklahoma beat Kansas
State, coach Bob Stoops found
himself in the middle of coaching
history.
Stoops surpassed Barry Switzer
to become Oklahoma’s all time
win leader with 158, and counting.
Stoops has a chance to register a
10-win season for the 12th time.
Te win wasn’t possible without a
stellar performance from redshirt
freshman quarterback Trevor
Knight.
Knight fnished 14 of 20 for 171
yards, which was a career high.
Knight also ran for 82 yards and a
touchdown.
Te Sooners have used Knight
and junior Blake Bell while decid-
ing which would become the long-
term quarterback. Afer Knight’s
performance Saturday, it appears
he could be the option.
Oklahoma State nears Big 12
title
Baylor’s ofense totaled three
points throughout the the frst
three quarters in its contest against
Oklahoma State on Saturday.
While Baylor was without two
of its dynamic playmakers, junior
running back Lache Seastrunk and
senior wide receiver Tevin Reese,
Oklahoma State stifed Baylor
quarterback Bryce Petty.
Petty was No. 5 in the quarter-
back rating coming into Saturday’s
contest, and while he fnished with
over 300 yards passing, he strug-
gled to fnd a rhythm all game.
Oklahoma State senior quarter-
back Clint Chelf completed his
frst 12 passes and fnished the
night with four touchdowns.
Oklahoma State coach Mike
Gundy said in the weekly Big 12
teleconference that it was one of
the better performances he has
seen from a quarterback since he
has been in Stillwater.
Te Cowboys are one win away
from staking claim to their second
Big 12 title in just three years.
Texas learns from mistakes
Texas won’t control its destiny of
winning the Big 12, but it could
be possible. If the Longhorns win
the next two games – against Texas
Tech and Baylor – there is a possi-
bility that the Big 12 title could be
shared or won outright.
Texas plays its annual Tanksgiv-
ing night game, this time against
Texas Tech, which has lost four
games in a row. Texas would travel
to Baylor the next week and need
help from Oklahoma, who would
need to defeat Oklahoma State, to
win the Big 12 outright.
A year ago, Texas was in the same
position as it faced TCU afer
moving up in the BCS standings
and had a chance to make a BCS
bowl. Texas lost 13-20 to TCU.
“It wasn’t what we wanted last
year, we didn’t play very well,”
Texas coach Mack Brown said
in the weekly Big 12 teleconfer-
ence. “TCU played much better
than us and we’ve got to get that
excitement back and play better on
Tursday night.”
Brown said the team talked too
much about the Big 12 Champi-
onship before it played Oklahoma
State.
It is now focusing on the task at
hand : beating Texas Tech at home.

—Edited by Heather Nelson

CONNOR OBERKROM
coberkrom@kansan.com
FOOTBALL NOTEBOOK
BIG 12
Bob Stoops breaks coaching record, Oklahoma State contends for title
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Oklahoma coach Bob Stoops runs to the locker room after defeating Iowa State 48-10 in Norman, Okla., Nov. 16.
FOOTBALL
BASKETBALL
Kansas still motivated for K-State matchup after loss
Afer the disappointing loss at
Iowa State Saturday, all eyes seem
to be looking ahead at the match-
up with Kansas State on Nov. 30.
Coach Charlie Weis stressed in
his teleconference on Monday that
motivating the team for the up-
coming contest with the Wildcats
has not been an issue.
“We are playing Kansas State.
How tough is it to get up when you
are playing your in-state rivals?”
Weis said. “Coach Snyder has done
a great job magnifying this game
from the Kansas State perspective,
and that’s what we are trying to do
here. It’s been in the weight room,
and running down on a [count-
down] clock since summertime.”
Additionally, Weis addressed
questions about the quarterback
unit afer a lackluster performance
against Iowa State.
“I think that if you wait to coach
a quarterback until the next day,
you’ve waited one day too long,
so I started addressing issues and
their fxes with him [freshman
quarterback Montell Cozart]
during the game,” Weis said.
Weis did not give any informa-
tion on who would be starting
against Kansas State.
Te fnal game will kickof at
11 a.m. at Memorial Stadium in
Lawrence and will be televised on
Fox Sports 1.
—Edited by Heather Nelson
JOEY ANGUIANO
janguiano@kansan.com
MICHAEL STRICKLAND/KANSAN
Senior running back James Sims is tackled by multiple Oklahoma State defenders during the game Nov 9. Kansas lost in Stillwater, Okla., 42-6.
Iowa State grabs major victory against UMKC
ASSOCIATED PRESS
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Missouri-Kansas City forward Nelson Kirksey, left, grabs a rebound over Iowa State guard DeAndre Kane during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game, Nov. 25,
in Ames, Iowa.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2013 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 8
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Wake Forest Demon Deacons (5-0):
Scoring leader: Codi Miller-McIntyre (18.6)
Rebound leader: Devin Tomas (11.6)
Assist leader: Codi Miller-McIntyre (4.8)

At A Glance:
Wake Forest is second in the nation in rebounding
(49.2 rpg), but hasn’t necessarily played anyone too
capable of knocking it of in general. Te Demon
Deacons have all but coasted through their frst few
games, which makes Kansas their frst real challenge.

Villanova Wildcats (4-0):
Scoring leader: JayVaughn Pinkston (20.3)
Rebound leader: Daniel Ochefu (8.8)
Assist leader: Darrun Hilliard (4.3)

At A Glance:
Te Wildcats enter the Bahamas with the No. 26
feld goal defense in the nation. Opponents, including
the same Towson team the Jayhawks recently defeat-
ed, are only shooting 36.7 percent against Villanova.
Te key for Villanova will be the play of Darrun
Hilliard – a guard who is averaging 14 points and 4.3
rebounds so far.

University of Southern California Trojans (4-1):
Scoring leader: Byron Wesley (19.8)
Rebound leader: Byron Wesley (8.8)
Assist leader: Pe’Shon Howard (4.2)

At A Glance:
Since dropping its season opener at Utah State, USC
has bounced back with four straight wins heading
into the Battle 4 Atlantis. Tis will be the frst time
we get to see coach Andy Enfeld back in the national
spotlight afer taking Florida Gulf Coast to the Sweet
16 last year.

Tennessee Volunteers (3-1):
Scoring leader: Jordan McRae (21.5)
Rebound leader: Jeronne Maymon (8.5)
Assist leader: Jordan McRae (3.0)

At A Glance:
It’s pretty clear Jordan McRae is the Volunteers’ best
weapon. He’s the team leader in scoring and assists,
which is a large reason why Tennessee has three
victories under its belt. Unfortunately, the marquee
matchup in the Vols’ opener set them back a bit. Xavi-
er was able to hand the Volunteers’ their only loss on
the year. In that game, Tennessee shot just 37 percent
from the line and lost 67-63.

Xavier Musketeers (4-0):
Scoring leader: Semaj Christon (16.3)
Rebound leader: Matt Stainbrook (9.0)
Assist leader: Dee Davis (7.0)

At A Glance:
Xavier’s signature win came against Tennessee in
a game that could have gone either way, if the Vols
hadn’t committed 25 fouls and given the Musketeers
a chance to win it at the line. Xavier should become a
top team by March, but it’s still pretty untested as of
now, just like every other school.

No. 23 Iowa Hawkeyes (5-0):
Scoring leader: Roy Devyn Marble (14.6)
Rebound leader: Aaron White (7.6)
Assist leader: Roy Devyn Marble (3.8)

At A Glance:
Te Hawkeyes are of to an impressive start thanks
to Roy Devyn Marble – senior guard who leads the
team in points and assists. Iowa is averaging 92.6
points per game right now. And while it hasn’t faced
stif competition, that will change when Xavier takes
the court with them on Tursday.

University of Texas El Paso Miners (3-2):
Scoring leader: McKenzie Moore (14.0)
Rebound leader: Vince Hunter (7.4)
Assist leader: McKenzie Moore (3.0)

At A Glance:
Te Miners haven’t had the easiest start to the
season. Afer falling twice to New Mexico State they’ll
face of against a Tennessee team with a lot to prove
in the opening round of the Battle 4 Atlantis. UTEP is
expected to contend in Conference USA this year, but
probably won’t in the Bahamas.
—Edited by Heather Nelson
BLAKE SCHUSTER
bschuster@kansan.com
GEORGE MULLINIX/KANSAN
Senior guard Natalie Knight looks for an open teammate during Kansas’ game
against Pittsburg State on Oct. 30. Knight is averaging 6.5 points and 2.8
rebounds this season.
Battle 4 Atlantis brings steady, varied competition
Kansas looks to leaders in Paradise Jam tournament
MEN’S BASKETBALL
WOMEN’S BASKETBALL
GEORGE MULLINIX/KANSAN
Freshman guard Frank Mason goes up for a dunk during Kansas’ game against University of Louisiana-Monroe. Mason is
averaging 8.3 points per game and a .773 free throw percentage.
While it will continue to be chilly
in Kansas over Tanksgiving
break, the Kansas women’s basket-
ball team (3-1) will be in the Vir-
gin Islands. Te team will compete
in the Paradise Jam tournament
and play against three opponents,
but there will also be time to enjoy
the island.
“Te players are excited, and they
should be excited,” coach Bonnie
Henrickson said. “Te team bond-
ing, that element of it, traveling
like that, but you also have quality
competition on a neutral foor in a
beautiful setting.”
Te team’s frst game will be on
Tanksgiving at 2:30 p.m. against
Central Michigan. Te Jayhawks
play Xavier the next day and fnish
the tournament against Duke on
Saturday. Each team will play ev-
ery other team once, and whoever
fnishes with the best record will
win the Island Division. Another
set of four teams will compete in
the Reef Division.
Te fve freshmen have not
encountered a tournament en-
vironment before, but the team
is looking to its upperclassmen,
such as juniors Natalie Knight and
Chelsea Gardner, to take the lead.
“As leaders, it’s diferent for
everybody this year, but coach
[Henrickson] has told us plenty
of times we do have to drag them
along or let them know how it’s
going to be and how we need to
come in mentally,” Knight said.
Te Jayhawks are focusing on
their matchup with Central Mich-
igan and taking a one-game-at-a-
time approach.
Central Michigan (1-2) averages
83.7 points a game and takes many
shots. Henrickson said Central
Michigan has a tough schedule,
and its current record is not indic-
ative of how good the team is.
Xavier (2-2) is a young team
that has eight freshmen on its
roster. Te Musketeers have been
inconsistent, but even with such
an inexperienced group the two
leading scorers on the team are
seniors. Guard Shatyra Hawkes
averages 21.5 points per game and
guard Ashley Wanninger adds 14.8
points a game.
No. 2 Duke will be the Jayhawks’
biggest test. Te Blue Devils
had four players named to the
Naismith Preseason List and cur-
rently outscore their opponents by
over 37 points per game.
Te Jayhawks are coming of
their frst loss of the season, which
was against Minnesota on the
road. Kansas controlled much of
the frst half, gave up a lead in the
second and attempted a comeback
that fell short. Henrickson said
there were both positives and
negatives to earning that loss.
“Tere are things we can hang
our hat on, a couple of things we
did really well, we’ve got to repeat
that,” Henrickson said. “Ten
we’ve got to clean up the rest.”
Henrickson said the team
should gain confdence from how
it started the game and made a
comeback, but the Jayhawks also
need to be tougher when they are
struggling with their shots.
Te Jayhawks are turning to their
next road trip hoping to learn
from their loss.
“We know it’s going to be a trip
of a lifetime,” Knight said. “We
are going to have time for fun. We
know when it’s time to be serious
and when it’s time to have fun.”
—Edited by Heather Nelson

“There are things we can
hang our hat on, a couple
of things we did really
well, we’ve got to repeat
that.”
BONNIE HENRICKSON
women’s basketball coach
STELLA LIANG
sliang@kansan.com
Follow
@KansanSports
on Twitter
WANT SPORT UPDATES ALL DAY LONG?
T
hanksgiving and sports, particularly
football, are quintessential parts of
being American. Tere’s a smattering
slate of NFL, NCAA basketball and football,
and high school football games across the
country every year. Te day’s routine has
become natural: wait for food to be ready
during the frst football game, pig out with
family, then watch the other games half-co-
matose on the couch with your belt unbuck-
led. Sports on Tanksgiving is an American
tradition.
Te origins of athletics on Tanksgiving
can be traced to the frst Tanksgiving feast
between the Pilgrims and the Wampanoags,
a Native American tribe from Plymouth,
Mass.
According to a Boston Globe article, the
Wampanoags were athletically adept be-
cause sport was an essential part of Native
American culture. Indigenous people were
skillful runners and swimmers for surviv-
al purposes — these were skills that trans-
ferred well into athletics. Te Wampanoags’
precursor to football involved a similar set of
rules to the current game. Tey played with
a deerskin ball and up to 100 players. Te
gridiron was on the beach, and the feld of
play stretched up to a mile long. It was one of
the many games played by the tribe.
Te Pilgrims were polar opposites. Be-
cause of their dedication to a six-day work
week and devotion to Sunday as a holy day,
there was little time for sports in their cul-
ture. Teir hesitance to participate in games
changed temporarily afer leaving Plym-
outh Rock. Sporting events between the two
groups occurred during the frst Tanksgiv-
ing, which was a three day long
event.
According to the Boston Globe
article, at one point, the Pilgrims
and Wampanoags fexed their
hunting prowess in a competi-
tion. Te Wampanoags wielded
their traditional bow and arrow,
while the Pilgrims shot their
muskets. Te Pilgrims were im-
pressed with the Wampanoags’
marksmanship, and the natives
were impressed with weapon-
ry they’d never seen before. It’s
now known as the frst sporting
event in America on Tanksgiv-
ing. Sports became an essential
element in the rocky relationship between
the Pilgrims and Wampanoags.
Sure, the NFL Tanksgiving lineup will
have playof ramifcations for the six par-
ticipating teams. But the games between the
Pilgrims and Wampanoags settled politics
and formed polices. Games were more ofen
played to resolve confict without entering
war, according
to a Yahoo-
Sports article.
Eventually, the
sporting wars
turned into all-
too-real wars of
bloodshed as Euro-
peans began settling
America.
But when announcers
on Tursday talk about
the “battle between the
trenches,” remember that
hundreds of years before,
wars were literally being re-
solved on the playing feld.
Sporting competitions be-
tween the Pilgrims and Wampanoags were
the start to a cultural tradition of sports and
bonding over food on Tanksgiving.
—Edited by Heather Nelson
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This week in athletics
Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday
No Events No Events
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2013 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 9
?
TRIVIA OF THE DAY
THE MORNING BREW
Q: Which NFL team has the best
record on Thanksgiving (minimum five
games)?
A: Minnesota Vikings. 5-1.
— profootballhof.com
!
FACT OF THE DAY
The Detroit Lions have the most wins on
Thanksgiving at 33, however it started
with a 19-16 loss to the Chicago Bears
on 11/29/34.
— rofootballhof.come
Thanksgiving provides many sports beginnings
“I like football. I find it’s an exciting
strategic game. It’s a great way to avoid
conversation with your family at Thanks-
giving.”
— Craig Ferguson
Comedian and host of The Late Late
show with Craig Ferguson
QUOTE OF THE DAY
Men’s Basketball
Villanova or USC
8:30 or 2:30 p.m.
Paradise Island, Bahamas
Men’s Basketball
Wake Forest
2:30 p.m.
Paradise Island, Bahamas
Women’s Basketball
Central Michigan
2:30 p.m.
St. Thomas, Virgin Islands
Football
Kansas State
11 a.m.
Lawrence
Women’s Basketball
Xavier
2:30 p.m.
St. Thomas, Virgin Islands
Women’s Basketball
Duke
2:30 p.m.
St. Thomas, Virgin Islands
Volleyball
Oklahoma
7 p.m.
Norman, Okla.
Men’s Basketball
TBA
Paradise Island, Bahamas
Volleyball
Denver
6:30 p.m.
Lawrence
No Events
nchadbourne@kansan.com
By Nick Chadbourne
No. 8 Syracuse tops Golden
Gophers, will face California
LAHAINA, Hawaii — C.J. Fair scored 16
points and had 10 rebounds as No. 8
Syracuse held off Minnesota 75-67 on
Monday in the first round of the Maui
Invitational.
The Orange (5-0) pushed through a late
run by the Golden Gophers, who pulled
within 67-65 with little more than two
minutes left.
But Minnesota (5-1) committed four
turnovers in the final two minutes,
scoring only once more when Austin
Hollins hit a meaningless layup in the
game's final moments.
Trevor Cooney scores 15 points all on
3-pointers, while Tyler Ennis and Jerami
Grant scored 12 points each.
Malik Smith had 16 points for Minne-
sota. Andre Hollins had 14 points while
Austin Hollins had 11 points. Elliott
Eliason led the Golden Gophers with
nine rebounds.
Syracuse — which moved up one spot
in the Associated Press Top 25 poll
earlier in the day — led by only three
points at halftime. But the Orange
started the second half with a 13-2 run
mostly led by Fair, who hit two jumpers,
two free throws and a tip-in as Syra-
cuse tallied 10 straight points.
Minnesota stopped short of fully com-
ing back from the 14-point hole, though
it cut the lead to 5 points in less than
four minutes and got even closer on two
free throws each from Austin Hollins
and Andre Hollins.
The game was filled with big runs by
both teams. Syracuse had two 7-0 runs
and a 5-0 run in the first half, while
Minnesota had a 12-0 run and a 7-0
run to take the lead 34-33 with just
over two minutes remaining before
halftime.
Syracuse will play California in the win-
ner's bracket of the Maui tournament,
while Minnesota will play Arkansas in
the consolation bracket. The tourna-
ment began Monday with eight teams,
including No. 11 Gonzaga and No. 18
Baylor.
—Associated press
BASKETBALL
Volume 126 Issue 53 kansan.com Tuesday, November 26, 2013
S
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
sports
By Ben Ashworth
bashworth@kansan.com
COMMENTARY
Big 12 exceeds
expectations
Other than Kansas, this year’s
Battle 4 Atlantis may not boast
top-ranked teams, but the tour-
nament should still challenge the
Jayhawks.
No. 2 Kansas is the only team
in the eight-team feld ranked
in the Top 20 of the Associated
Press poll. Every team in the feld
has a winning record, and fve
of the eight teams are currently
undefeated. Self believes as many
as fve of the teams could make the
NCAA Tournament.
“Te feld’s good,” Self said. “I
saw where somebody ranked it as
the frst or second best feld of all
the preseason tournaments.”
Each team is guaranteed to play
three games in the tournament,
which spans three days. If Kansas
wins against Wake Forest, it plays
the winner of the Villanova-USC
matchup. Te other side of the
bracket includes Iowa, Xavier,
Tennessee and UTEP. A consola-
tion bracket will determine which
teams earn ffh through eighth
place.
“It will be fun and it will cer-
tainly be good to play three good
teams in three days and see how
we react and go from there,” Self
said.
Sophomore forward Perry Ellis
is excited for the chance to play
so many games in such a short
period.
"In high school that's all we did,
we'd play even like three or four
games a day," Ellis said. "It's gonna
be a fun time, and I'm really excit-
ed to get out there."
Kansas is the only team in the
feld that has played a ranked op-
ponent this season. Villanova was
the only other team in the feld
to even make the 2013 NCAA
Tournament, while Kansas was
the only team to advance past the
round of 64.
Te Jayhawks play Wake Forest
in the opening round of the
tournament. Te Demon Deacons
are 5-0 but have yet to play a team
from a power conference. Tey
fnished 13-18 last season and only
won two away games. Sophomore
guard Codi Miller-McIntyre leads
the team in scoring. He has scored
20 or more points in four games
this season.
Villanova will be the favorite to
advance to the semifnals and face
the winner of the Kansas matchup.
Te Wildcats are coming of a
narrow win against Delaware but
thumped Towson by 34 points in
their previous game.
Tis isn’t the frst time Self has
brought his team to a tropical
environment such as the Baha-
mas. Te team played in the Maui
Invitational two years ago and
is scheduled to return to Maui
in 2015. Self will give his players
some free time, but the team didn’t
come this far for a vacation.
“Tis is a business trip,” Self said.
“…We’re not concerned about
anything other than trying to win
games.”
Ellis said being in the Bahamas
could be a distraction, but his
team is focused on basketball.
"We all know that we're heading
out there to handle business," Ellis
said. "Tat's the mindset that we
want to have going out there."
Te Jayhawks (4-0) are coming
of a 30-point victory over Towson
on Friday, Nov. 22. Te Demon
Deacons defeated Citadel 82-54 in
their last game.
Kansas currently leads the
country in feld goal percentage
shooting nearly 57 percent from
the foor.
Kansas plays at 2:30 p.m. on
Tursday, Nov. 28, on AXS TV. If
the Jayhawks make the semifnals
and fnals, the games will be aired
on NBC Sports Network.
—Edited by Heather Nelson
BRIAN HILLIX
bhillix@kansan.com
TROPICAL STORM
BUSINESS NOT PLEASURE
GEORGE MULLINIX/KANSAN
Coach Bill Self said the Jayhawks’ visit to the Bahamas is a business trip, not a vacation. The Jayhawks face Wake Forest
on Thursday at 2:30 p.m.
VOLLEYBALL
Kansas to face Denver in Allen Fieldhouse
BLAIR SHEADE
bsheade@kansan.com
T
he Big 12 didn’t get the
memo that it was supposed
to be on the decline this
year. It must have gotten lost in
the mail.
Even afer the news of Mar-
cus Smart’s return and Andrew
Wiggins’ commitment, pundits
seemed skeptical about the Big
12’s prospects this year. Te Big
12 underperformed in the NCAA
tournament last year, with Oklaho-
ma State and Kansas State sufering
frst round upsets and Kansas
faltering to Michigan. Couple that
with the fact that college basketball
around the nation was supposed to
be at its strongest in years.
Nevertheless, the Big 12 has come
up with several quality wins and,
other than Kansas State, each team
has met or exceeded expectations.
Kansas is still favored to take the
conference, but it won’t be without
its challenges.
Oklahoma State throttled a
ranked Memphis team behind
Smart, who has a new arsenal
which includes an improved
outside shot. Te Cowboys have
averaged 102 points per game.
Compare that to the Jayhawks
who, despite marveling scouts
with their ofensive prowess, have
not yet reached the century mark.
Kansas has not forgotten Smart’s
backfips on the Jayhawk logo, and
Lawrence is already buzzing about
the showdown at Allen Fieldhouse
on Jan. 18.
Iowa State has been impressive as
well, beating Michigan and BYU
within four days of one another.
Melvin Ejim will be a threat for Big
12 Player of the Year, and every
Cyclone in the rotation can shoot
the three. Kansas has exhibited
difculties closing out on the
outside shooter, and Fred Hoiberg’s
team has the potential to drive Bill
Self nuts.
Meanwhile, Baylor has gone 4-0,
yet many have felt underwhelmed.
Te Bears’ ofense has been rela-
tively stagnant, but their defense
has been impressive, holding oppo-
nents to 64 points per game. Two
of their four wins are against power
conference teams, while junior
college transfer Kenny Chery has
looked efective at the point guard
spot.
Tese three teams represent
the biggest threats to Kansas, but
there are several others who will
keep the Jayhawks on their toes.
Oklahoma has wins over Alabama
and Seton Hall, and its only loss
was to Michigan State in which it
was competitive throughout. Texas
is undefeated, which is a positive
even against weak competition.
Even TCU managed to beat Wash-
ington State.
Kansas’ non-conference schedule
is notoriously difcult. But even
if it emerges from the non-confer-
ence relatively unscathed, it cannot
aford to overlook the Big 12
competition. Doing so could lead
to a situation like last year, when
Kansas dropped games to Okla-
homa State, TCU and Oklahoma
consecutively. Te Jayhawks had
the senior leadership to overcome
such adversity, but it is up in the
air how this year’s youthful team
would respond.
Kansas is shooting for double
digits in its streak of conference
championships. With the Big 12’s
non-conference performance, it
may be more difcult than antic-
ipated.
—Edited by Heather Nelson
No. 21 Kansas comes of a senior
night at Horejsi Athletic Center
on Saturday, where the Jayhawks
(22-6, 12-3) swept Texas Tech.
Te program said farewell to sev-
en seniors that have contributed
to current success.
“Our team gave of gifs in the
locker room before we went out
and we were already all crying,”
senior setter Erin McNorton said.
Te Kansas Jayhawks play
tonight at Allen Fieldhouse
against the University of Denver
Pioneers (17-12). Tis match will
be the frst in the feldhouse since
the opening rounds of the 2012
NCAA tournament. McNorton
remembers playing in the feld-
house last season and knows how
special it can be.
“I love playing in the feldhouse,”
McNorton said. “I like how we
can get more fans in there and last
year we had a student section.”
Te last match Kansas played
in Allen Fieldhouse didn’t go ac-
cording to plan when the No. 11
ranked Jayhawks lost to Wichita
State 3-1 in the second round of
the tournament.
Te Pioneers fell to Indiana
University-Purdue University
Indianapolis (IUPUI) Sunday in
the Summit League Champion-
ship matchup. Coach Ray Bechard
said the match in the feldhouse
should be fun for both teams.
“Denver is excited,” Bechard
said. “We might have the frst two
rounds in there [Allen Field-
house]. So why not go in and get
some experience in there.”
Denver freshman outside hitter
Moni Corrujedo leads the team
with 310 kills and comes of a 13-
kill match against IUPUI.
McClinton recorded one of her
worst matches of the year on Nov.
20 against Iowa State when she
had three kills, a -0.67 hitting
percentage and was benched
for sophomore Tiana Dockery.
McClinton came out strong
Saturday with four kills on eight
attacks and zero errors, but was
still benched for Dockery in the
second set.
“Dockery, McClinton and
Carmichael have all been good,”
Bechard said. “We wanted to split
time between McClinton and
Dockery. McClinton has been
good and Dockery was good at
Iowa State so we decided to play
both of them.”
Dockery, who started at outside
hitter in the beginning of the
season before redshirt senior Car-
michael emerged as the starter,
ended Saturday with two kills on
12 attacks and one error.
McClinton will most likely start
the remainder of the season.
McClinton and the Jayhawks
host Denver at 6:30 p.m. at Allen
Fieldhouse, and the match will be
aired on ESPN3.
—Edited by Heather Nelson
ANDY LARKIN/KANSAN
Kansas huddles on the sidelines during a match against Texas Tech on Saturday. The Jayhawks won 3-0.
BAHAMAS PREVIEW
PAGE 8
High-scoring Jayhawks head to Bahamas to compete in the Battle 4 Atlantis

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