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CHECKLIST - DABOH

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Intercontinental Consultants & Technocrats Pvt. Ltd.


City Profile
CompanyName ICT Pvt Ltd
ULB Name Daboh
Whether the Sectoral Analysis report is as per UADD requisites Yes
T
o
w
n

B
r
i
e
f

Geographical location (Town)
Latitude 2602 North
Longitude 7853 East
Average rainfall (annual) MM 668.3
Height above mean sea level Mts 149-190
Municipal area (1991) Sq kms 12.7
Municipal area (2001) Sq kms 12.7
Municipal area (2011) Sq kms 12.7
Date of Constitution of ULB Date 1979
Historic importance
In one or
two
sentences
Nil
P
o
p
u
l
a
t
i
o
n

Population Year 1981 (under Municipal boundary
only)
Town
level
6508
Population Year 1991 (under Municipal boundary
only)
10856
Population Year 2001 (under Municipal boundary
only)
15897
Population Year 2011 (under Municipal boundary
only)
18534
Name of Population projection Method Ratio
Projected population adopted Year 2015 22974
Projected population adopted Year 2025 29886
Projected population adopted Year 2035 38878
L
a
n
d

U
s
e

Land Use
%
Standard
(as per
UDPFI)
Land use
(Tentative
in Sq kms
)
Land use
(Tentative
in
percentage)
Residential 45-50 4.81 37.80
Commercial 2-3 0.29 2.24
Public - semi public 6-8 0.49 3.85
Agriculture Balance* 5.43 42.67
Industrial 8-10 0.05 0.37
Roads 10-12 0.65 5.20
Green area 12-14 0.77 6.06
Water bodies Balance* 0.23 1.82
Total 12.7 100.00

* Area under Agriculture and water bodies is "balance"

CHECKLIST - DABOH
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City Profile (Ward Wise)
Ward # Total
Ward
1
Ward
2
Ward
3
Ward
4
Ward
5
Ward
6
Ward
7
Ward
8
Ward 9 Ward 10
Ward
11
Ward
12
Ward
13
Ward
14
Ward
15
Remark
Name of
ward
15
Subhas
h
Nagar
Gand
hi
Naga
r
Amb
edkar
Naga
r
Chan
dra
Sekh
ar
Naga
r
Jawa
har
Naga
r
Shiva
ji
Naga
r
Sanja
y
Naga
r
Shast
ri
Naga
r
Murli
Manoh
ar
Nagar
Mahavir
Nagar
Rahu
l
Naga
r
Ram
Krish
na
Naga
r
Jay
Prak
ash
Naga
r
Firoz
Naga
r
Din
Dayal
Naga
r

Ward
Populatio
n (2011)
18534 1317 1252 1396 914 644 1235 1242 2111 1040 962 1439 991 1955 904 1132 As per Census 2011
Area (sq
kms)
12.7 0.94 0.63 1.54 0.19 0.38 0.55 0.64 1.21 1.07 0.61 0.49 0.80 2.29 1.14 0.19

Density
(pph)
21 14 20 9 47 17 22 19 17 10 16 29 12 9 8 59

Male
(Census
2001)
8602 578 617 662 526 328 608 642 817 453 475 645 408 823 420 600 Census 2001
Female
(Census
2001)
7295 500 509 547 451 286 484 575 657 393 438 537 335 710 387 486

SC
(Census
2001)
3494 539 471 308 209 60 691 348 130 0 5 131 243 88 61 210

ST
(Census
2001)
190 8 0 131 7 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 22 0 21

Sex ratio
(Census
2001)
848 865 825 826 857 872 796 896 804 868 922 833 821 863 921 810

Literacy
rate (%)
(Census
2001)
72.2 65 68 61 82 86 67 75 76 91 67 73 52 78 64 72

BPL
Families
1467 99 124 124 70 43 134 59 138 40 117 84 124 87 104 120
CHECKLIST - DABOH
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Intercontinental Consultants & Technocrats Pvt. Ltd.


City Profile (Ward Wise)
Ward # Total
Ward
1
Ward
2
Ward
3
Ward
4
Ward
5
Ward
6
Ward
7
Ward
8
Ward 9 Ward 10
Ward
11
Ward
12
Ward
13
Ward
14
Ward
15
Remark
(Census
2012)
No. of
Primary
schools
7
4 Govt. Primary
Schools and 3 Govt.
Aided Primary
Schools
No. of
Primary
Health
Centre
1 1
No. of
Househol
ds
3294
(As
per
Censu
s
2011)
236 192 238 161 111 208 216 395 202 164 278 197 340 168 188
Primary
Activity
(Majority
)
2429 250 252 325 104 37 185 134 164 40 242 124 113 116 142 201 Census 2001
Seconday
Activity
191 11 8 13 1 0 3 0 39 7 6 32 10 25 35 1

Tertiary
Activity
2175 89 73 139 144 104 144 214 271 151 102 133 116 235 174 86

No. of
SS/LS
industrial
units
1 No.
(Govt.
Dairy)
1
No. of
Commerc
ial
establish
ments
106 9 97
CHECKLIST - DABOH
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Intercontinental Consultants & Technocrats Pvt. Ltd.


City Profile (Ward Wise)
Ward # Total
Ward
1
Ward
2
Ward
3
Ward
4
Ward
5
Ward
6
Ward
7
Ward
8
Ward 9 Ward 10
Ward
11
Ward
12
Ward
13
Ward
14
Ward
15
Remark
No. of
Slum
pockets
Notifi
ed 2
Nos.
1 1
Slum
populatio
n
2519 1239 1280
No. of
Slum
Houses
400 203 197
No. of
Individua
l water
connectio
ns in the
ward
916
No. of
Communi
ty water
connectio
ns
N/A 1 4
Nos. not available for
community water
connection
No. of
Commerc
ial water
connectio
ns
Nil
No commercial water
connection
No. of
Tubewells
5
No. of
Handpum
ps
84
No. of
Well
(Individu
al and
40
Indivi
dual
and 12

CHECKLIST - DABOH
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Intercontinental Consultants & Technocrats Pvt. Ltd.


City Profile (Ward Wise)
Ward # Total
Ward
1
Ward
2
Ward
3
Ward
4
Ward
5
Ward
6
Ward
7
Ward
8
Ward 9 Ward 10
Ward
11
Ward
12
Ward
13
Ward
14
Ward
15
Remark
Communi
ty)
Comm
unity
No. of
OHTs
0 (1
No.
not
functi
onal;
old
and
damag
ed)
1
Location: Jogiyana
Mahulla
%
Coverage
of piped
water
supply
43
As per Census 2001
calculated
No. of
Individua
l Toilets
1480
As per Sanitation
Survey, 2008,
UADD, MP
No. of
Individua
l Septic
tanks
410
No. of
Communi
ty Septic
tanks
NA
No. of
Communi
ty toilets
4
urinals
double
seat, 3
urinal
single
seat

CHECKLIST - DABOH
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Intercontinental Consultants & Technocrats Pvt. Ltd.


City Profile (Ward Wise)
Ward # Total
Ward
1
Ward
2
Ward
3
Ward
4
Ward
5
Ward
6
Ward
7
Ward
8
Ward 9 Ward 10
Ward
11
Ward
12
Ward
13
Ward
14
Ward
15
Remark
and 1
toilet
double
seat
% of
populatio
n - Open
defecation
39.94
No. of
Dust bins
Nil 1 1
Wardwise
Waste
generated
(Kgs)
4633.5 329.25 313 349 228.5 161
308.7
5
310.5
527.7
5
260 240.5
359.7
5
247.7
5
488.7
5
226 283
Road
sweeping
(1 time or
2 times)
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
Total no.
of
sanitary
workers
in the
ward
31 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
Length of
Pucca
road
(Mts)
26000
Length of
Kuccha
road
(Mts)
11000
Length of
State
3 kms
(Metal

CHECKLIST - DABOH
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Intercontinental Consultants & Technocrats Pvt. Ltd.


City Profile (Ward Wise)
Ward # Total
Ward
1
Ward
2
Ward
3
Ward
4
Ward
5
Ward
6
Ward
7
Ward
8
Ward 9 Ward 10
Ward
11
Ward
12
Ward
13
Ward
14
Ward
15
Remark
Highway Road)
Length of
National
Highway
Nil
Length of
Road side
drains
Pucca
(Mts)
11000
Length of
Road side
drains
Kuccha
(Mts)
12000
Length of
Natural
drains
(Nallah)
Pucca/Ch
annelized
(Mts)
3000
Length of
Natural
drains
(Nallah)
Kuttcha
(Mts)
5000
No. of
Streetligh
ts
433
(Merc
ury
40,
Tubeli
ght

CHECKLIST - DABOH
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Intercontinental Consultants & Technocrats Pvt. Ltd.


City Profile (Ward Wise)
Ward # Total
Ward
1
Ward
2
Ward
3
Ward
4
Ward
5
Ward
6
Ward
7
Ward
8
Ward 9 Ward 10
Ward
11
Ward
12
Ward
13
Ward
14
Ward
15
Remark
90,
Bulb
300
and 3
High
masts)
No. of
Electricit
y
connectio
ns
1714 As per Census 2001
Name of
Tourist
site if any
Kardh
en
Talav

Local recreational
zone; can be
developed as tourist
spot
Name of
Heritage
site if any
Nil
Bus stop
(No.)
Nil
No Dedicated Stop;
Bus stops in the main
road
Bus
stand(No.
)
Nil

Parks
(No.)
No
Ambe
dkar
Park

Playgrou
nd(No.)
Nil
High School Field is
currently used as
playground
No. of
Residenti
al
3777 227 198 291 169 109 222 260 598 219 162 357 181 415 152 217
CHECKLIST - DABOH
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Intercontinental Consultants & Technocrats Pvt. Ltd.


City Profile (Ward Wise)
Ward # Total
Ward
1
Ward
2
Ward
3
Ward
4
Ward
5
Ward
6
Ward
7
Ward
8
Ward 9 Ward 10
Ward
11
Ward
12
Ward
13
Ward
14
Ward
15
Remark
properties
No. of
Commerc
ial
properties
N.A.
Total
Property
tax
collection
(in Rs.)
1.38
Lacs

Property
tax
coverage(i
n %)
7.15%
Available
Governm
ent land
(Sq kms)
NA
Remarks


CHECKLIST - DABOH
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Intercontinental Consultants & Technocrats Pvt. Ltd.


Sectoral Analysis









P
h
y
s
i
c
a
l

I
n
f
r
a
s
t
r
u
c
t
u
r
e

W
a
t
e
r

S
u
p
p
l
y

Existing Source
Source Tubewell
Hand
Pumps
Wells
River/
Lake
Remarks
No. of
Tubewell /
River /
Well
5 84
52 (40
Individual
and 12
Communi
ty)
N.A.
Nos. of Wells and Other
sources are not available
Water
Supplied by
Tubewell /
River /
Well in
MLD
0.4 0.278 0.102 0
As mentioned in Table 5.1,
around 30% population
(5560 persons, Census
2011) gets water from
wells. There are 52 total
wells (individual-40 and
community-12) in the town.
If a conservative estimate
of 50 LPCD is taken, then
the total water supplied
through wells is around
0.278 MLD. The same
table shows that around
11% population is
dependent upon hand
pumps. According to the
50LPCD criterion is
assumed for hand pumps
also, than total water
supplied from hand pumps
is around 0.102 MLD. The
source of water supply in
town is ground water.
Total water supply in the town (MLD) 0.78
Existing Supply rate (LPCD) considering
distribution losses (from all sources)
22
Since the distribution losses
are not known, therefore
the figure of 22 LPCD is
inclusive of losses
Water Charges per household per month (Rs.)
Flat/Metered
30
(Flat)

% Coverage under paid water supply 43
Proposed source (Surface)
Pahuj
River
The Pahuj River is 15km
from the town
S
e
w
e
r
a
g
e

Total sewage generation (MLD)
No
sewer
system
in town

Whether any treatment plant exists (Y/N),If yes
mention capacity
No
Total no. of individual septic tanks 410
There are 1064 individual
soakpit tank als in the town
Total no. of community septic tanks 0
Nos. of Community Septic
Tanks are not available
Total no. of Sewage/Mud pumps available with
the ULB
Nil
CHECKLIST - DABOH
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Intercontinental Consultants & Technocrats Pvt. Ltd.


Sectoral Analysis
Frequency of Cleaning Individual Septic tanks
As
require
d (Once
in 1
months)

Frequency of Cleaning Community Septic
tanks
N.A.
D
r
a
i
n
a
g
e


Name of natural nallah (Storm water drain)
Kardha
n Nala

Length of natural nallah (Storm water drain)
Kms
8 km
Ultimate disposal point of nallah
Kardha
n Talab
and
Gathai
Talab
Length of road side drain (Kms) 23
Excluding the length of
Main drain
Coverage of road side drainage w.r.t roads (%) 75
Ultimate disposal point of Road side drains
Mriga
river
5km away from the main
town
Any treatment plant/procedure adopted No
P
h
y
s
i
c
a
l

I
n
f
r
a
s
t
r
u
c
t
u
r
e

S
W
M

Per capita Solid waste generation (Considering
Standards) (in gms)
250
Total SW generation (in Metric Tons) 4.6
Year 2035
Frequency of SW collection by the ULB (1 time
per day/2 times per day)
1
85% once daily as per
sanitation survey 2008
Collection efficiency of the ULB (%) 60
Any initiative for DTDC (Yes /No) No
Any initiative for scientific disposal of waste No
Name of dumping/ landfill site
Kachra
Sthan

Is the existing site Dumping site or allotted site
for Scientific disposal
Dumpin
g site

Area of allotted landfill site for Scientific
disposal
2.5 acre Undeveloped
Distance of the Dumping site/landfill site from
main settlement area (Kms)
0 with municipal boundary
No. of Tractor trolleys/vehicles available with
the ULB for carrying Solid waste to the LF site
1
Tractor
Trolley

If site for Scientific disposal is not allotted then
whether formally requested by the ULB
No
R
o
a
d
s

Name of National Highway passing from or
nearby from the town (NH-XYZ)
NH-25
Distance of National Highway if nearby from
the town (NH-XYZ) in Kms
36
Name of State Highway passing from or nearby
from the town (SH-XYZ)
SH-45
Distance of State Highway if nearby from the
town (SH-XYZ) in Kms
0
CHECKLIST - DABOH
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Intercontinental Consultants & Technocrats Pvt. Ltd.


Sectoral Analysis
Total length of Pucca
roads (Kms)
CC 6
WBM 20

Total
(kms)
26 Total Road length in the
nagar parishad area is 37
kms
Total length of Kuccha
roads (kms)
(kms) 11
Gap w.r.t Standards (kms) -
T
r
a
f
f
i
c

&

t
r
a
n
s
p
o
r
t
a
t
i
o
n

Total no. of vehicles in the town 3130
Bus stand (yes/No) No
Any intracity mass
transport mode (yes/no)
Yes
Bus
service

Name of locations facing
major traffic issues
1
Tehsil
Chorah
a

2
Meat
Market
Chorah
a

3
Konch
Chorah
a

Name of the street
beautified as per the
instructions of UADD
Nil
P
h
y
s
i
c
a
l

I
n
f
r
a
s
t
r
u
c
t
u
r
e

S
t
r
e
e
t

l
i
g
h
t
i
n
g

Total no. of street lights 433
No. of Streetlights under working condition N.A.
No. of Streetlights having Tubes 90
No. of Streetlights having CFL Nil
No. of Streetlights having Incandescent bulbs 300
No. of Streetlights having LED Nil
No. of Streetlights having LPS Nil
P
o
w
e
r

Location of Substation
http://www.mptransco.ni
c.in
400 KV
Gwalior

220KV
Mehgao
n

132KV
Seondh
a

Total no. of residential connections 1714
Total no. of Commercial connections N/A
Any subsidy for BPL (Y/N)
Y
(Single
phase)

Duration of Electricity supply per day (in Hrs) 6-8
H
e
r
i
t
a
g
e

&

t
o
u
r
i
s
m

H
e
r
i
t
a
g
e

&

t
o
u
r
i
s
m

Name of Heritage site/s Nil
Ownership/agency NA
Prevailing Heritage Act/s NA
Name of Tourist site/s Nil
Ownership/agency NA
CHECKLIST - DABOH
xiii
Intercontinental Consultants & Technocrats Pvt. Ltd.


Sectoral Analysis
Total no. of Pilgrims/ Tourists visiting town per
day
NA
E
n
v
i
r
o
n
m
e
n
t

Name of River/Lake/Forest range/Any specific
species
Pahuj
River
(15km)
and
Mriga
River
(5 KM)

Prevailing Environmental Act/s
Water ( Prevention and Control of
Pollution ) Madhya Pradesh Rules,
1975
Water ( Prevention and Control of
Pollution )(Consent) Madhya Pradesh,
Rules, 1975 Madhya Pradesh State
Prevention and Control of Water
Pollution Board and Its Committees
(Meetings) Rules, 1975
Madhya Pradesh Jaiv Anaashya
Apashistha (Niyantran) Act & Rule
Madhya Pradesh Jaiv Anaashya
Apashistha (Niyantran) Adhiniyam,
2004
Madhya Pradesh Jaiv Anaashya
Apashistha (Niyantran) Niyam, 2006
Areas facing threats N/A
S
o
c
i
a
l

I
n
f
r
a
s
t
r
u
c
t
u
r
e

H
e
a
l
t
h

No. of Primary Health centres/Dispensary 1
No. of Hospitals

Maternity
Home
1
Beds N/A
Private 0
Beds 0
Multispeciality hospital
if any (Y/N)
No
Name of Nearby town
reffered for Treatment

Name of
town
Gwalior

Distance
(Kms)
88
E
d
u
c
a
t
i
o
n

No. of Primary schools 7
No. of Secondary/High
schools
18
No. of Colleges 1
No. of ITI 0
S
o
c
i
a
l

s
e
c
u
r
i
t
y

s
c
h
e
m
e
s

No. of Beneficiaries under SJSRY (Street
Vendor)
6 2011-12
No. of Beneficiaries under Haath
thela/Rickshaw chalak yojna
0
No. of Rain Basera/Night Shelter 0
Ownership of Rain Basera (with ULB/Rental) 0
No. of Beneficiaries under Gharelu Kamkaji
Mahila Yojana
0
CHECKLIST - DABOH
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Sectoral Analysis
Name of
other Social
security
schemes
(2011-12)

Samajik
Suraksha
Pension
Scheme
217
Benefic
iaries
Loan disbursed for
FY2009-10 to FY2011-12

Rashtriya
Pariwar
Sahayata
Scheme
7
Benefic
iaries
Loan disbursed for
FY2009-10 to FY2011-12

Indira
Gandhi
National
Old
Pension
Scheme
314
Benefic
iaries
Loan disbursed for
FY2009-10 to FY2011-12

Indira
Gandhi
Widow
Pension
Scheme
81
Benefic
iaries
Loan disbursed for
FY2009-10 to FY2011-12

Indira
Gandhi
National
Disability
Pension
Scheme
21
Benefic
iaries
Loan disbursed for
FY2009-10 to FY2011-12

CHECKLIST - DABOH
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Sectoral Analysis
Slums & Urban Poor
Wa
rd
No
Name
of
Slum
pocket
/
refere
nce
name
Notif
ied/
Un-
notifi
ed
Ward
popula
tion
Slum
popula
tion
Individ
ual
water
connect
ions
No. of
Comm
unity
taps
No. of
Handpu
mps
No. of
Indivi
dual
toilets
No. of
Comm
unity
toilets
No.
of
Puc
ca
hou
ses
No.
of
Se
mi
puc
ca
hou
ses
No.
of
Kuc
cha
hous
es
No. of
Perma
nent
pattas
distrib
uted
No. of
Tempo
rary
pattas
distrib
uted
No.
of
Prim
ary
scho
ol in
the
slum
pock
et
No.
of
Prim
ary
Heal
th
centr
es in
the
slum
pock
et
Benefici
aries
under
social
security
schemes
Any
interven
tions
under
IHSDP
(Y/N)
3
Ambe
dkar
Ngr
Notif
ied
1396 1239
N/A N/A 9
Aroun
d 20%
HH
1
N.
A.
203
N.A
.
225
House
s
Nil N.A.
6
Shivaj
i
Nagar
Notif
ied
1235 1280 197
To
tal
2631 2519 9 1 400 225


CHECKLIST - DABOH
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Intercontinental Consultants & Technocrats Pvt. Ltd.


Municipal Finance
Year 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11
R
e
v
e
n
u
e

I
n
c
o
m
e

Rates and Tax Revenue 566719 794696 521294 1298216
Budget
not
prepare
d by NP
Assigned Revenues &
Compensation 5193702 5115050 5304040 8112530
Rental Income from
Municipal Properties 221704 113394 127211 107165
Fees & User Charges 1823473 1692770 1655517 1191082
Sale & Hire Charges 42492 16879 24434 84417
Revenue Grants,
Contribution and Subsidies 0 6000 15000 0
Income from Investments
Interest Earned 316111 61016 217486 283402
Other Income 29798 47325 17154 99361
Total - Revenue Income 8193999 7847130 7882136 11176173
C
a
p
i
t
a
l

R
e
c
e
i
p
t
s

Grants, Contribution for
specific purposes 0 5073000 6602220 6326535
Secured Loans
Unsecured Loans 116460 328700 95900 0
Deposits 0 305700 97100 69800
Deposit works
Total Capital Receipts 116460 5707400 6795220 6396335
R
e
v
e
n
u
e

E
x
p
e
n
d
i
t
u
r
e

Establishment Expenses 1597494 2520475 2658976 3697515
Administrative Expenses 2551590 1540218 2320284 1989779
Operations & Maintenance 1629050 1567088 1661749 1795069
Interest & Finance Charges
Programme Expenses 8929 263690 59314 83277
Revenue Grants,
Contribution and Subsidies 0 67000 60000 0
Miscellaneous Expenses 123219 185804 156563 398230
Transfer to Fund
Total - Revenue Expenditure 5910282 6144275 6916886 7963870
C
a
p
i
t
a
l

E
x
p
e
n
d
i
t
u
r
e
s

Fixed Assets 181518 155295 4770 19908
Capital Work-in-Progress 0 1841885 8561879 3755463
Investments -General Fund 0 209975 92836 538962
Investments-Other Funds
Stocks/Inventory
Loans, Advances and
Deposits 0 365500 114000 33000
Other Assets 4335 101002 15486 8680
Miscellaneous Expenditure
Total Capital Expenditure 185853 2673657 8788971 4356013
Total Income 8310459 13554530 14677356 17572508
Total Expenditure 6096135 8817932 15705857 12319883
Note: Refer Madhya Pradesh Municipal Accounting Manual for further details. Can be downloaded from
"Download" Section of www.mpurban.gov.in.

CHECKLIST - DABOH
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Reforms Action Plan
Reforms
Achieved
(Y/N)
Timeline to achieve reforms till 2015
Any City specific
Strategies adopted
Preliminary
estimate (if
any) for
implementat
ion
Implementing
agency
2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16
Full migration of double
accounting System
N
Training Training 50% 100%
Modernize
budgeting and
accounting system
NIL DNP
Property tax reforms, 85%
coverage ratio and 90%
collection ratio
N

Coverage:75%
Collection
Ratio: 70%
Coverage:80%
Collection
Ratio: 80%
Coverage:85
%
Collection
Ratio: 90%
Modernize tax
collection system
NIL DNP
Levy of user charges : full
recovery of O & M charges
for sewerage, water supply
and SWM
N
O & M O & M O & M O & M
Introduce private
sector participation
for cost effective
delivery of services
NIL DNP
Internal earmarking of basic
services to urban poor
N
NIL NIL NIL NIL

NIL DNP
E-governance N
Equipment Training
Partial
Implementat
ion
NIL DNP
Provision of basic services to
urban poor including security
of tenure at affordable prices,
improved housing, water
supply, sanitation
N

Providing Housing
for Urban Poor
Provision of Basic
Infrastructure for
Urban Poor
NIL DNP

ES-1
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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
ES.1 INTRODUCTION
The Government of Madhya Pradesh (GoMP) has initiated the preparation of City Development Plan
(CDP) with the aim of achieving systematic and planned development of small and medium towns.
The rapid growth of urban population has resulted in speedy urbanization of the towns causing
mounting requirement of basic services for the population. The delivery of basic services is a
challenge for the Urban Local Bodies (ULBs). The CDP is an exercise to redress the basic needs of
the population in these towns and cities through planned intervention for infrastructure development.
The CDP is not only a prerequisite for accessing Government of India (GoI)/ GoMP funds, but also
plays a key role in developing a strategic framework for coordinating various development activities
and setting the pace for the progress of the city.
The preparation of City Development Plan (CDP) for Daboh is the part of long term strategy
Government of Madhya Pradesh (GoMP). GoMP has initiated the preparation of City Development
Plan (280 towns) with the aim of achieving systematic and planned development of small and medium
towns. The Urban Administration and Development Department (UADD), GoMP is the state level
nodal agency for the implementation of this project. M/s Intercontinental Consultants and Technocrats
Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi, has been retained by the UADD for the preparation of CDP of 10 towns
1.

ES.2 OBJECTIVES OF THE ASSIGNMENT
The goals of a City Development Plan is to develop a collective city vision; action plan aimed at
improving urban governance and management; increasing investment to expand employment and
services; and systematic and sustained reduction in urban poverty. The specific objectives of the
assignment are as follows:
To scale up existing urban development and poverty alleviation schemes within a comprehensive
and coherent strategic planning framework in order to ensure optimal benefit from available
resources for the citizens of the ULBs.
To catalyse new thinking and provoke debate through a consultative stakeholder driven process.
The vision and strategic thrusts of the CDP will be built around the lessons and findings of a
comprehensive and rigorous stakeholder consultation and documentation process.
To serve the requirements of the UIDSSMT and IHSDP programs as well as JNNURM and other
development schemes.
To generate specific priority actions and projects that can be the basis for mobilizing funding from
diverse sources.


1
These towns named Akoda (District Bhind), Alampur (District Bhind), Daboh (District Bhind), Gormi (District Bhind),
Lahar (District Bhind), Mau (District Bhind), Mehgaon (District Bhind), Mihona (District Bhind), Phuphkalan (District
Bhind), and Seondha (District Datia).
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ES.3 SCOPE OF WORK
The scope of work includes the planning actions necessary to achieve the objectives set forth above,
following the standard professional practices. (Also refer Approach and Methodology given in
Chapter 1).
ES.4 THE PLANNING PROCESS (APPROACH AND METHODOLOGY)
The CDP of Daboh has been prepared as per the tool kits, guidelines and instructions provided by the
Urban Administration and Development Department (UADD), Government of Madhya Pradesh
(GoMP) and Urban Local Bodies (ULB) of Daboh during project period. The exercise involved the
following steps
Kickoff Workshop and Initial Assessment
City assessment: analysis of existing situation
Development of Strategic Agenda and a Vision for the City
Evolving strategies for development
Developing a City Investment Plan
Preparing a Financial Operation Plan
The City Development Plan report is structured sequentially into 15 chapters. This report describes
various issues and problems related to existing situation of the town. This report consists of separate
chapters on various components of including stakeholders consultation (it details out different issues
came out for development of town with a visions and mission statement); Strengths, Weaknesses,
Opportunities, and Threats (SWOT) analysis; Vision for the city of Daboh for next twenty five years;
Project identification; City Investment plan; Financial Operating Plan; and the Reform Road Map.
ES.5 STAKEHOLDERS CONSULTATION
The CDP has emerged out of the inputs provided by the local stakeholders. All the stakeholders were
met at possible dates and places of meeting and the concept of CDP and purpose of meeting was
indicated to them. On the appointed date and time the Consultants carried out the consultations,
including focus group discussions with shopkeepers, market association members, and other
stakeholders at a number of places. The participants shared their ideas, views to discuss the problems
and to come out with solutions. In most cases the discussions took a form of debate, later exchanged
their views. Consultations with local people were conducted in presence of male and female members
of different social communities. The problems or issues came out of consultation have been
incorporated in report at appropriate place. In order to prepare the City Development Plan, following
stakeholder consultations have been undertaken as mentioned in Table ES 1:
Table ES 1: List of Consultations/ workshops
S No. Description Dates
1 Consultations with Government Officials Project period
2 Kickoff Workshop 15
th
Nov.2011
3 2
nd
Workshop on vision, sectoral strategies and priority projects 23
rd
January 2012
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4 City Level Workshop 27
th
March 2012
5 Focused group discussions Project period
6 Multiple one-on-one informal interviews Project period
7 1
st
State Level Presentation 21
st
May 2012
8 2
nd
State Level Presentation 13
th
December 2012

ES.6 SWOT ANALYSIS
A city level SWOT analysis has been done based on an assessment of the status of various sectors of
the city. The summary of SWOT analysis is given below in Table ES 2.
Table ES 2: Summary SWOT Analysis of Daboh City
Strength Weakness
Important centre for trade for nearby villages,
especially for agro produce
Rich agricultural belt surrounding the city can
provide raw material for development of agro-
based industrial development
Presence of efficient local body as DNP
Ground water quality of good at some places in
the town
Vacant lands available with Nagar Parishad for
future development various purposes, like,
recreation, housing for economically weaker
section, old age home, etc.

Inadequate infrastructure facilities like
godowns, cold storage (essential for agro-
products), etc.
Unauthorized development (There is no
masterplan/building by-laws.)
Inadequate social and physical
infrastructure facilities
Lack of funds to upgrade the current
infrastructure facilities
Overdependence on grants
Development of the city is haphazard and
no recreational facilities are available in the
city
Inadequate technical staff to manage the
water supply system in town.
No sewer system is present currently in the
town
Lack of awareness and poor access to
information on Government schemes
Opportunities Threats
Potential to emerge as a agro-processing centre
and a local educational hub
Raw materials for oil industry in the form of
mustard seeds are available in the town
For long terms as a sustainable water source,
water can be brought from perennial Pahuj
Inadequate power supply hampers industrial
development
Ground water is scarce in the area and
cannot fulfil the long term future
requirement after population growth
Migration of citizens from the town because
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River near Asnet village
The initiation of the preparation of the City
Development Plan is an opportunity for
improvement in infrastructure facilities and
basic amenities in the city
Availability of animal waste and other waste
for composting and biogas production
of poor service
Poor and improper disposal of solid waste
along roads and open grounds
Unplanned development
Encroachment on government lands
Untreated waste causing environmental
pollution
Electricity theft is common in the town

ES.7 STAKEHOLDERS CONCERNS AND PRIORITIZATION
The prioritization of issues has been done based on two criteria. These include first, stakeholder
perception and second, analysis of existing status of future requirements. The major stakeholders
consulted include:
1. Members of Steering Committee
2. Elected representatives
3. Representatives from Line departments
4. Representatives of Civil Society
The assessment of the status of the various sectors in the city has brought in a set of issues for city
development. While all issues are important, it was considered important to prioritize them in order to
address them more effectively. The prioritization of the issues has been done based on several criteria
including stakeholder perception and technical assessment. The main outcomes of the consultation are
a number of different priority projects, which leads to the next important stage of project realization,
identified major priority actions in relation to the improvement and enhancement of urban
infrastructure. During the workshops in Daboh the following key activities were identified as the
priorities. Table ES 3 given below presents the project prioritization matrix for Daboh city.
Table ES 3: Prioritization Matrix
S No Sector/Projects Priority Ranking
Core Focused Sectors of Economic Development
1 Agro based industrial development Very High -
Other Focused Sectors for Development
1 Solid Waste Management Very High 1
2 Storm Water Drainage Very High 2
3 Sewerage and Sanitation Very High 3
4 Water Supply Very High 4
5 Traffic and Transportation High 5
6 Social Infrastructure & Other Projects High 6
7 Housing for Urban Poor High 7
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S No Sector/Projects Priority Ranking
8 Electricity & Street Lighting High 8
9 Education (Social Infrastructure) High 9
10 Health (Social Infrastructure) Medium 10
11 Environment and Tourism Medium 11
12 Urban Planning and Growth Medium 12
13 Municipal Finance Low 13
14 Urban Governance and Institutional Setup Low 14
Source: Generated by consultant with the help of stakeholders
ES.8 SHARED CITY VISION AND SECTOR GOALS
A vision is a statement of where the city wishes to go, within a given timeframe. The ambitious vision
was formulated by considering the strengths, potential, issues/problems, future focus areas,
preferences of the residents of the city and physical characteristics of the city.
Daboh City Vision 2035
To develop Daboh as an agro-industrial town without compromising the basic needs and services
The sectoral goals have been set after the detail analysis of individual sector. Table ES 4 shows the
goals identified in consultation with the stakeholders.
Table ES 4: Sector and Goals
S. No. Sector Goal
1 Water Supply
To ensure 24 X 7 safe drinking water supply for all
citizen.
2 Sewerage and Sanitation
100% access to sanitation facilities and to eradicate open
defecation.
3
Solid Waste Management
100% management of solid wastes with proper
segregation and treatment.
4 Storm Water Drainage
100% coverage by storm water drainage to prevent water
logging.
5 Traffic & Transportation
Well managed city traffic with a proper road network
and traffic & transportation facilities and smooth
mobility of people and goods.
6 Urban Poor and Slums
To make the city slum-free by promoting planned
development and ensuring infrastructure facilities to all.
7 Environment and Tourism
To ensure clean, green and hygienic living environment
and promote the local tourism.
8 Education (Social Infrastructure) To ensure education for all.
9
Health (Social Infrastructure)
To ensure adequately equipped health centres with
medicines, staffs and equipments.
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S. No. Sector Goal
10
Social Infrastructure & Other
Projects
To ensure socio cultural and recreational facilities for all
11 Electricity & Street Lighting
Coverage of whole city area by street light to make the
city safe.
12 Urban renewal and Growth
To ensure new development in a planned way and old
area to be managed properly.
13 Economic Development
To make city economically sustainable by creating more
employment opportunities.
14
Urban Governance &
Institutional setup
Implementation of Institutional reforms and clear cut
division of responsibilities & proper co-ordination
among various departments.
15 Municipal Finance
Generation of municipal own resources to sustain the
city in long run with the initial help of government.

ES.9 PHASING OF SHORT TERM PROJECT
Table ES 5 outlines the phasing of the projects identified above on the basis of the prioritization of
projects, city assessment and financial status.
Table ES 5: Project Phasing
Water Supply





















Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4
WS-1
Instalation of new tubewells 0.3
WS-2 Construction of 5 Over Head Tanks 0.5
WS-3 Repairing the existing OHT 0.05
WS-4 Repair of old pipe lines where ever is needed 0.4
WS-5 Laying down New Pipe lines 10.78
WS-6 Source development and intake 3.1
WS-7 Construction of WTP 4.34
WS-8 Supply and installation of bulk water meters 0.038
WS-9 Technological up-gradation of the Pumping Station 0.05
WS-10 Installation of vacuum feed chlorinators (short-term) 0.05
WS-11 Supply and installation of consumer water meters 1.944
WS-12 Community Taps in major market and institutional areas 0.01
WS-13 Awareness program on water conservation 0.2
WS-14 Computerization of Billing System 0.1
Total 21.862
Selection of DPR Consultant
DPR Preparation and Clearance
Bidding and Selection of Contractors/Suppliers
Project Implementation
Year1 Year2 Year4 Sub
Project ID
Sub Project
Cost (Rs. In
Crores)
Year3
Sub Projects and Components
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Sewerage & Sanitation

Traffic and Transportation

Storm Water Drainage











Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4
SS-1 Laying down Sewer line with pumping for entire city 22.800
SS-2 Construction of Sewerage Treatment Plant 3.750
SS-3 Community toilets for slum or BPL population 2.934
SS-4 Public Convenience mainly in main market, institutional area, etc 0.500
SS-5
Sewer cleaning equipments - Sewer Jetting Machine, High
Pressure Water Tanke & Sludge Vacuum tanker
0.120
SS-6 IEC measures for sanitation practice 0.1
Total 30.204
Selection of DPR Consultant
DPR Preparation and Clearance
Bidding and Selection of Contractors/Suppliers
Project Implementation
Year1 Sub
Project ID Sub Projects and Components
Sub Project
Cost (Rs. In
Crores)
Year3 Year2 Year4
Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4
T-1
Development of new bus stand 2
T-2
Parking 0.5
T-3
Junction Improvement and beautification 0.9
T-4
Widening and improvements of other city roads 33
T-5
Construction of new city road 36
T-6
Improvement of major roads and construction of
footpath on major city roads
8
T-7
Construction of bypass 6
T-8
Installing Signage for pedestrians as well as
vehicular traffic on the roads
0.006
Total 86.406
Selection of DPR Consultant
DPR Preparation and Clearance
Bidding and Selection of Contractors/Suppliers
Project Implementation
Sub
Project
ID Sub Projects and Components
Sub Project Cost
(Rs. In Crores)
Year1 Year2 Year3 Year4
Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4
SWD-1 Preparation of Drainage Master Plan 0.2
SWD-2 Construction of Primary drains 4.8
SWD-3 Construction of Secondary drains 8.4
SWD-4
Repairing/widening/de-silting of existing primary and
secondary drains
0.279
SWD-5 Repairing/widening/de-silting of existing main drains 0.435
SWD-6 Construction of Main Drain 7.15
SWD-7
Removing the encroachment on drains mainly in market
area , public areas and water logging low line areas
0.1
SWD-8
Procurement of Jeep Mounted Excavator , Regular
dozer, JCB and Dumper Truck
0.685
Total 22.049
Selection of DPR Consultant
DPR Preparation and Clearance
Bidding and Selection of Contractors/Suppliers
Project Implementation
Year1 Year2
Sub Project ID Sub Projects and Components
Sub Project
Cost (Rs. In
Crores)
Year3 Year4
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Environment & Tourism

Housing for urban poor (Slum Improvement)

Solid Waste Management
























Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4
UE-1 Tree Plantation along major roads 0.06
UE-2 Renovation of Existing ponds 0.5
UE-3
Construction of Rain Water
harvesting Structures
0.2
UE-4
Development of Mela ground &
community facilities for recreation
and organised mela during festivals
near Kardhan Talav
3
Total 3.76
Selection of DPR Consultant
DPR Preparation and Clearance
Bidding and Selection of Contractors/Suppliers
Project Implementation
Sub
Project
ID
Year4
Sub Projects and Components
Sub Project
Cost (Rs. In
Crores)
Year1 Year2 Year3
Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4
SI-1 Housing Scheme for Slum Dwellers 5.55
Total 5.55
Selection of DPR Consultant
DPR Preparation and Clearance
Bidding and Selection of Contractors/Suppliers
Project Implementation
Sub Projects and Components
Sub
Project
Cost (Rs.
Sub
Project
ID
Year4 Year1 Year2 Year3
Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4
SWM-1
Distribution of Community Dustbins
(Segregated Format) @ 300m
1.085
SWM-2 Purchase of 1 refuse compactor 0.21
SWM-3
Purchase of 1 Cess Pool Emptier
(covered)
0.16
SWM-4 Purchase of Tractors 0.08
SWM-5
Purchase of Covered trolley for
vehicles
0.014
SWM-6
Purchase of Tricycles (Containerized
Mechanized Tri-cycles of 200 ltr.
capacity and fully closed type)
0.092
SWM-7 Development of Landfill site 1
SWM-8
Purchase of Equipments for Landfill
site Management
0.2
SWM-9
Awareness programme for segregation
of waste at source and for solid waste
management system in general and
importance of community participation.
0.1
SWM-10 Composting and Vermiculture 0.5
Total 3.441
Selection of DPR Consultant
DPR Preparation and Clearance
Bidding and Selection of Contractors/Suppliers
Project Implementation
Year5 Year1 Year2 Sub
Project ID Sub Projects and Components
Sub Project
Cost (Rs. In
Crores)
Year3 Year4
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Social Infrastructure

Economic Development


Streetlight

Urban Governance and Institutional Setup




Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4
SOI-1 Improvement in Educational Facilities 2
SOI-2 Improvement in Health Facilities 1.85
SOI-3
Improvement in Recreation and Community
Facilities 9.08
Total 12.93
Selection of DPR Consultant
DPR Preparation and Clearance
Bidding and Selection of Contractors/Suppliers
Project Implementation
Sub
Project ID Sub Projects and Components
Year4
Sub
Project
Cost (Rs. In
Year3 Year2 Year1
Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4
UG1
Training of DNP staff and
Implementation Double entry system
0.1
UG2
Implementation of Double Entry Accrual
Based Accounting
0.1
UG3 Training and Institutional Strengthening 1.5
UG4
Communication and Citizen Participation
Programme
0.25
UG5 Modernizing Office Infrastructure 1
UG6
E-Governance System for Municipal
Services
6
UG7
Asset Management System (GIS
Mapping of Property Tax System, Water
Pipe line, Sewer Syatem, Drainage
System)
0.465
Total 9.415
Selection of Consultant
Software Preparation and Acceptance
Project Implementation
Year5
Sub
Project
ID
Year1
Sub Projects and Components
Sub
Project
Cost (Rs.
Year2 Year3 Year4
Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4
E-9
Installation of Hi Mast and other street lights 8.046
Selection of DPR Consultant
DPR Preparation and Clearance
Bidding and Selection of Contractors/Suppliers
Project Implementation
Year3 Year4 Sub
Project Sub Projects and Components
Sub Project Cost
(Rs. In Crores)
Year1 Year2
Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4
ED1
Development of
Vegetable mandi near
Hospital road
0.5
ED2
Development of some
market complexs in
Patara bag area
2
ED3
Development of vending
zones (each for 100
vendors)
1
TOTAL 3.5
Selection of DPR Consultant
DPR Preparation and Clearance
Bidding and Selection of Contractors/Suppliers
Project Implementation
Year4 Sub
Project
Sub Projects and
Components
Sub
Project
Year1 Year2 Year3
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ES.10 INVESTMENT REQUIREMENTS
With a continuous increase in the population of Daboh city over a period of time, the demand for the
infrastructure has grown several-folds. If we continue with the present growth rate, we would find that
after few years, the existing infrastructure in terms of solid waste management, drainage, sewerage,
drinking water, parking, public conveniences etc. would fall short way beyond the requirement. No
fire station in Daboh and Bhind caters to the need; in case of emergency. The following Table ES 6
summarizes the sectorwise investment requirement for urban infrastructure covering various facets as
per scope of the work. The total investment required would be 207.163 Crore.
Table ES 6: Broad Investment Plan (in Crore)
Projects Amount
Phase I
Till 2015
Phase II
2015-25
Phase III
2025-35
%
Water Supply 21.862 14.347 4.970 2.545 10.55
Sewerage 26.670 15.615 6.495 4.560 12.87
Sanitation 3.534 2.067 1.467 0.000 1.71
Storm Water Drainage 22.049 13.635 5.774 2.640 10.64
Solid Waste Management 3.441 2.423 0.782 0.235 1.66
Traffic and Transportation 86.406 52.596 26.535 7.275 41.71
Electricity & Street Lighting 8.046 4.824 1.620 1.602 3.88
Health 1.850 0.950 0.050 0.850 0.89
Education 2.000 1.000 1.000 0.000 0.97
Social Infrastructure & Other Projects 9.080 5.040 2.728 1.312 4.38
Housing for Urban Poor 5.550 5.550 0.000 0.000 2.68
Environment and Tourism 3.760 2.130 1.621 0.009 1.81
Economic Growth 3.500 2.000 1.000 0.500 1.69
Urban Governance and Institutional Setup 9.415 5.265 3.600 0.550 4.54
Total Cost 207.163 127.442 57.642 22.078 100.00

The shares of different sectors of the total investment tabulated above have been diagrammatically
depicted below in Figure ES1. As assessed out of the total investment nearly 41.71 % has been
earmarked for development of Traffic and Transportation facilities as currently the town has average
condition of Traffic and Transportation infrastructures. The next important investment is required for
Sewerage (12.87%) followed by Storm Water Drainage (10.64%), Water Supply (10.55%) etc.
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Figure ES1: Sectorwise Investment

ES 11 FINANCIAL OPERATING PLAN (FOP)
Five alternative financial scenarios were studied and alternative scenario 3 is the most sustainable
option. Under this scenario DNP is able to enhance its revenue from the current level of surplus of
34.65 lakh (2010-11) to surplus of 67.04 lakhs in 2016-17. In this scenario it is able to meet the
requirement of O&M cost of the assets created under CDP for first five year. Table ES 7 describes the
comparison of various alternatives.
Table ES 7: Comparison of various financial alternatives (in Lakhs)
Options Year 2006-
07
2007-
08
2008-
09
2009-
10
2010-
11
2011-
12
2012-
13
2013-
14
2014-
15
2015-
16
2016-
17
Alt 4 Surplus/Deficit
(Revenue)
22.84 17.03 9.65 32.12 34.65 12.21
12.21 -2.30 0.64 10.67 31.15
Alt 3 Surplus/Deficit
(Revenue)
22.84 17.03 9.65 32.12 34.65
12.21 22.91 38.45 61.09 94.18 142.67
Alt 2 Surplus/Deficit
(Revenue)
22.84 17.03 9.65 32.12 34.65 12.21 -7.39
-
13.11
-
17.29
-
19.59
-19.63
Alt 1 Surplus/Deficit
(Revenue)
22.84 17.03 9.65 32.12 34.65 12.21 17.82 24.70 33.13 43.44 56.00
BU Surplus/Deficit
(Revenue)
22.84 17.03 9.65 32.12 34.65 12.21 5.98 -3.60
-
19.13
-
43.91
-83.41

ES 12 GOVERNANCE FRAMEWORK
The summary of the analysis of the governance framework was carried out by studying quality and
quantity of human resources available, use of latest technology, transparency and accountability and
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financial management capabilities. The findings of the assessment of both the administrative and
political wings have been presented in ES 8.
Table ES 8: Assessment of Governance Capacity, DNP
Focus Areas
Present Status
Remarks
Administrative Wing Political Wing
Human Resources
Staff Strength
Inadequate staff strength
(29% vacant post)
Not Applicable
Immediate need for filling
vacancies
Technical
Capacity
Inadequate technical
capacity of staff
Do not have technical
know how
Increase capacity of staff by
providing training on skill
development for Councillors to
undergo training on technical
aspects of urban development,
for better decision making.
Efficiency
Reduced efficiency due to
over burdening and
inadequate office facilities
Lack of knowledge
about city needs, urban
development issues,
programmes and other
infrastructure schemes;
Lack of awareness on
roles and
responsibilities
Need to assess the training needs
of present staff.
Review of recruitment policy
and guidelines for future.
Management Information system
Mapping
Do not have infrastructure
for mapping urban
infrastructure
Not Applicable
Need to create separate mapping
and inventory division
Computerisation
Initiated computerisation
process.
Majority of the staff lack
computing skills
Not Applicable
Computerisation process to be
strengthened further and to
impart computer operations
training to all departments
Information
Dissemination
Very less dissemination of
information about various
programmes and projects
Lack of awareness
To have information
dissemination strategy.
Involvement of elected
representative in the process.
Transparency and Accountability
Personal
Management
Weak personal
management system.
Absence of performance
monitoring system.
Absence of
performance
management system.
To have performance based
incentives.
Inter-
departmental
coordination
Weak inter departmental
coordination.
Delay in implementation
of programme and
projects.
More involvement in
facilitation of inter-
departmental
coordination.
Frequent inter-departmental
stock taking meetings.
Citizen
Involvement
No citizen involvement
Does not involve citizen
in urban development
and management.
Creation of citizen forum.
Community involvement in
infrastructure needs assessment.
Strengthening NGO operation in
service delivery.
Financial Management
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Focus Areas
Present Status
Remarks
Administrative Wing Political Wing
Accounting
system
Single entry, cash based
system, liable to errors.
Not Applicable
Publication of financial
statement for citizens review.
Accrual based double entry
accounting system.
Record
Maintenance
Records are manually
maintained and not
recorded in regular
format.
Not Applicable
Computerisation of accounting
and budgeting procedures.
Auditing System
No regular auditing. Last
auditing was done in 2008
Not Applicable
Budgeting
system
Less transparent.
Does not involve
citizens in budget
preparation.
Implementation of social audit
Decentralization
Centralized decision
making in place in spite of
implementation of 74th
CAA.
Weak grass root level
decision-making.
Less community
involvement in planning
and programme
implementation.



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TABLE OF CONTENTS
List of Tables
List of Figures
Abbreviations
1. INTRODUCTION .................................................................................................................................... 1-1
1.1 INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................. 1-1
1.2 OBJECTIVES OF THE ASSIGNMENT ........................................................................................... 1-1
1.3 CONCEPT AND PRINCIPLES OF CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN ................................................ 1-2
1.4 PROJECT OUTPUT AND DELIVERABLES ................................................................................... 1-2
1.5 COMMENCEMENT OF THE STUDY AND TEAM MOBILIZATION .......................................... 1-2
1.6 TECHNICAL APPROACH AND METHODOLOGY ADOPTED ................................................... 1-3
1.7 STRUCTURE OF THE REPORT ........................................................................................................ 1-7
2. DISTRICT AND TOWN PROFILE ....................................................................................................... 2-1
2.1 INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................. 2-1
2.2 DISTRICT PROFILE ......................................................................................................................... 2-1
2.2.1 History and Administrative Division ............................................................................................. 2-1
2.2.2 Geology and Topography .............................................................................................................. 2-1
2.2.3 Climate ........................................................................................................................................... 2-1
2.2.4 Soil ................................................................................................................................................. 2-2
2.2.5 Surface Drainage ........................................................................................................................... 2-2
2.2.6 Demography .................................................................................................................................. 2-2
2.2.7 Economic Activities........................................................................................................................ 2-2
2.2.7.1 Agriculture, Industry and Other Activities ............................................................................................ 2-2
2.3 TOWN PROFILE ............................................................................................................................... 2-2
2.3.1 Location and Regional Linkages ................................................................................................... 2-2
2.3.2 Population Growth Trend .............................................................................................................. 2-3
2.3.3 Distribution of Ward Population ................................................................................................... 2-4
2.3.4 Composition of the Population ...................................................................................................... 2-5
2.3.5 Population Projection .................................................................................................................... 2-6
2.3.6 Socio Economic Profile of the Town .............................................................................................. 2-7
2.3.6.1 Literacy Rate and Sex Ratio .................................................................................................................. 2-7
2.3.6.2 Work Force Characteristics ................................................................................................................... 2-9
2.3.6.3 Industries ............................................................................................................................................... 2-9
2.3.6.4 Trade and Commerce ............................................................................................................................ 2-9
2.3.6.5 Tourism ............................................................................................................................................... 2-10
2.3.7 Economic Opportunities and Potential for Local Economic Development ................................. 2-10
2.4 ISSUES ............................................................................................................................................ 2-10
2.5 SWOT ANALYSIS .......................................................................................................................... 2-10
2.6 STRATEGY FOR LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT .......................................................... 2-11
3. URBAN GROWTH MANAGEMENT ................................................................................................... 3-1
3.1 INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................. 3-1
3.2 CONSTITUENTS OF DABOH NAGAR PARISHAD ...................................................................... 3-1
3.3 EVOLUTION AND GROWTH OF DABOH .................................................................................... 3-2
3.4 EFFORTS FOR PLANNED DEVELOPMENT................................................................................. 3-2
3.5 LANDUSE CHARACTERISTICS .................................................................................................... 3-2
3.6 COMPARISION WITH UDPFI STANDARDS ................................................................................ 3-3
3.7 FUTURE GROWTH SCENARIO ..................................................................................................... 3-4
3.7.1 Future Growth Assessment ............................................................................................................ 3-4
3.7.2 Physical Growth Constraints ......................................................................................................... 3-5
3.7.3 Future Growth Directions ............................................................................................................. 3-5
3.8 ISSUES .............................................................................................................................................. 3-5
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3.9 SWOT ANALYSIS ............................................................................................................................ 3-6
3.10 STRATEGY AND ACTION PLAN FOR URBAN GROWTH MANAGEMENT............................ 3-6
4. PHYSICAL INFRASTRUCTURE .......................................................................................................... 4-1
4.1 INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................. 4-1
4.2 WATER SUPPLY .............................................................................................................................. 4-1
4.2.1 Water Supply Existing Status ......................................................................................................... 4-1
4.2.1.1 Source and Coverage of Water Supply ................................................................................................. 4-2
4.2.1.2 Status of Groundwater .......................................................................................................................... 4-3
4.2.1.3 Groundwater Depth and Quality ........................................................................................................... 4-4
4.2.1.4 Quantity of Water Supply ..................................................................................................................... 4-4
4.2.2 Components of water supply .......................................................................................................... 4-4
4.2.2.1 Source of water supply .......................................................................................................................... 4-4
4.2.2.2 Storage of water .................................................................................................................................... 4-4
4.2.2.3 Distribution System .............................................................................................................................. 4-4
4.2.2.4 Operation and Maintenance .................................................................................................................. 4-4
4.2.2.5 Present Demand and Supply Gap .......................................................................................................... 4-5
4.2.3 Projected Water Demand and Supply Gap .................................................................................... 4-5
4.2.4 Service Level Benchmarking .......................................................................................................... 4-6
4.2.5 Issues: ............................................................................................................................................ 4-7
4.2.6 SWOT Analysis .............................................................................................................................. 4-7
4.2.7 Strategy and Action Plan for Water Supply ................................................................................... 4-8
4.3 SEWERAGE AND SANITATION .................................................................................................... 4-8
4.3.1 Status of Sewerage ......................................................................................................................... 4-8
4.3.2 Status of Sanitation Services .......................................................................................................... 4-8
4.3.3 Citizen Report Card on sanitation (Based on Sanitation Survey, 2008, UADD, MP) ................... 4-9
4.3.4 Projected Sewage Generation...................................................................................................... 4-11
4.3.5 Service Level Benchmarking ........................................................................................................ 4-12
4.3.6 Issues ........................................................................................................................................... 4-12
4.3.7 SWOT Analysis ............................................................................................................................ 4-13
4.3.8 Strategy for better sewerage & sanitation facilities .................................................................... 4-13
4.4 STORM WATER DRAINAGE ....................................................................................................... 4-13
4.4.1 Status of Storm Water Drainage .................................................................................................. 4-13
4.4.2 Main Drains ................................................................................................................................. 4-14
4.4.3 Major Water Bodies ..................................................................................................................... 4-15
4.4.4 Flood Prone Areas ....................................................................................................................... 4-16
4.4.5 Service Level Benchmarking ........................................................................................................ 4-16
4.4.6 Issues ........................................................................................................................................... 4-17
4.4.7 SWOT Analysis ............................................................................................................................ 4-17
4.4.8 Strategies and Action Plan .......................................................................................................... 4-17
4.5 SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT .................................................................................................. 4-18
4.5.1 Introduction ................................................................................................................................. 4-18
4.5.2 Generation of SW ......................................................................................................................... 4-18
4.5.3 Primary and Secondary Collection .............................................................................................. 4-19
4.5.4 Transportation of Solid Waste ..................................................................................................... 4-19
4.5.5 Disposal of Garbage .................................................................................................................... 4-19
4.5.6 Citizen Report Card on SWM: Sanitation Survey, UADD MP, 2008 .......................................... 4-20
4.5.7 Distance to the Storage Site (Dhalao/Garbage collection centre)............................................... 4-20
4.5.8 Designated place for storage of the garbage ............................................................................... 4-21
4.5.9 Frequency of garbage collection ................................................................................................. 4-21
4.5.10 Disposal of Waste Generated by Domestic Animals ............................................................... 4-21
4.5.11 SWM Compliance with MSW Rules 2000 ................................................................................ 4-22
4.5.12 Solid Waste Generation ........................................................................................................... 4-25
4.5.13 Service Level Benchmarking ................................................................................................... 4-25
4.5.14 Issues ....................................................................................................................................... 4-26
4.5.15 SWOT Analysis ........................................................................................................................ 4-27
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4.5.16 Strategies and Action Plan ...................................................................................................... 4-27
4.6 TRAFFIC AND TRANSPORTATION ........................................................................................... 4-27
4.6.1 Road Transport ............................................................................................................................ 4-27
4.6.2 Rail Transport .............................................................................................................................. 4-28
4.6.3 Air Transport ............................................................................................................................... 4-28
4.6.4 Public Transport .......................................................................................................................... 4-28
4.6.4.1 Parking Status ..................................................................................................................................... 4-28
4.6.5 Vehicles ........................................................................................................................................ 4-29
4.6.6 Issues ........................................................................................................................................... 4-30
4.6.7 SWOT Analysis ............................................................................................................................ 4-30
4.6.8 Strategies and Action Plan .......................................................................................................... 4-30
4.7 ELECTRICTY AND STREET LIGHTING ..................................................................................... 4-30
4.7.1 Status of Electricity ...................................................................................................................... 4-30
4.7.2 Status of Street Light .................................................................................................................... 4-31
4.7.3 Issues ........................................................................................................................................... 4-31
4.7.4 SWOT Analysis ............................................................................................................................ 4-31
4.7.5 Strategies and Action Plan .......................................................................................................... 4-31
5. SOCIAL INFRASTRUCTURE ............................................................................................................... 5-1
5.1 INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................. 5-1
5.2 EXISTING SITUATION OF SOCIAL INFRASTRUCTURE .......................................................... 5-1
5.2.1 Health Facilities ............................................................................................................................ 5-2
5.2.2 Demand Gap Assessment ............................................................................................................... 5-2
5.2.3 Education ....................................................................................................................................... 5-3
5.2.3.1 Basic Education/Literacy Indicators ..................................................................................................... 5-3
5.2.4 Demand Gap Assessment ............................................................................................................... 5-3
5.2.5 Recreation Facilities ...................................................................................................................... 5-4
5.2.6 Demand Gap Assessment ............................................................................................................... 5-4
5.2.7 Community Facilities ..................................................................................................................... 5-4
5.3 DEMAND GAP ASSESSMENT ....................................................................................................... 5-5
5.4 ISSUES .............................................................................................................................................. 5-5
5.5 SWOT ANALYSIS ............................................................................................................................... 5-5
5.6 STRATEGY AND ACTION PLAN FOR SOCIAL INFRASTRUCTURE ....................................... 5-6
6. URBAN POOR AND SLUMS ................................................................................................................. 6-1
6.1 INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................. 6-1
6.2 TOWN POVERTY PROFILE ............................................................................................................ 6-1
6.2.1 Poverty Estimates .......................................................................................................................... 6-1
6.2.2 Poverty Alleviation Programmes ................................................................................................... 6-2
6.2.2.1 Swarna Jayanti Sahari Rojgar Yojana (SJSRY) Daboh ........................................................................ 6-2
6.2.3 Social Welfare Schemes ................................................................................................................. 6-2
6.2.3.1 Samajik Suraksha Pension Scheme ....................................................................................................... 6-2
6.2.3.2 Rashtriya Pariwar Sahayata Scheme ..................................................................................................... 6-2
6.2.3.3 Indira Gandhi National Old Age Pension Scheme ................................................................................ 6-3
6.2.3.4 Indira Gandhi National Widow Pension Scheme .................................................................................. 6-3
6.2.3.5 Indira Gandhi National Disability Pension Scheme .............................................................................. 6-3
6.3 SLUMS .............................................................................................................................................. 6-4
6.3.1 Location and Distribution of Slums ............................................................................................... 6-4
6.3.2 Land Ownership and Tenure ......................................................................................................... 6-5
6.3.3 Access to Housing .......................................................................................................................... 6-5
6.3.4 Access to Infrastructure Facilities ................................................................................................. 6-5
6.4 BASIC SERVICES MAPPING IN SLUMS- COMMUNITY PERCEPTION ................................... 6-5
6.5 ISSUES .............................................................................................................................................. 6-7
6.6 SWOT ANALYSIS ............................................................................................................................... 6-7
6.7 STRATEGY FOR URBAN POOR AND SLUMS ............................................................................. 6-7
7. ENVIRONMENT AND TOURISM ........................................................................................................ 7-1
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7.1 INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................. 7-1
7.2 ENVIRONMENT .............................................................................................................................. 7-1
7.2.1 Natural Environment Baseline ....................................................................................................... 7-1
7.2.1.1 Land Resources ..................................................................................................................................... 7-1
7.2.1.2 Water Resources ................................................................................................................................... 7-1
7.2.1.3 Forests- Flora and Fauna ....................................................................................................................... 7-2
7.2.1.4 Natural Hazards .................................................................................................................................... 7-2
7.2.2 Environment Issues ........................................................................................................................ 7-2
7.2.2.1 Land Pollution ....................................................................................................................................... 7-2
7.2.2.2 Water Pollution ..................................................................................................................................... 7-3
7.2.2.3 Fire Hazards .......................................................................................................................................... 7-3
7.2.2.4 Poverty .................................................................................................................................................. 7-3
7.2.2.5 Solid Waste Management ..................................................................................................................... 7-3
7.2.2.6 Water Logging ...................................................................................................................................... 7-3
7.2.3 SWOT Analysis .............................................................................................................................. 7-3
7.3 TOURISM .......................................................................................................................................... 7-4
7.3.1 Major Tourist Spots ....................................................................................................................... 7-4
7.3.2 Tourist Infrastructure .................................................................................................................... 7-4
7.3.3 Tourism Related Issues .................................................................................................................. 7-4
7.4 STRATEGY FOR ENVIRONMENT ................................................................................................ 7-5
8. URBAN GOVERNANCE AND INSTITUTIONAL SETUP ................................................................ 8-1
8.1 INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................. 8-1
8.2 CONSTITUTION AND COMPOSITION OF DABOH NAGAR PARISHAD ................................. 8-1
8.2.1 Political Wing ................................................................................................................................ 8-1
8.2.2 Executive Wing .............................................................................................................................. 8-2
8.3 STAFF STRENGTH OF DNP ............................................................................................................. 8-2
8.3.1 Functions of the Daboh Nagar Parishad ....................................................................................... 8-3
8.3.2 Taxation Powers of Daboh Nagar Parishad .................................................................................. 8-7
8.4 INSTITUTIONAL FRAMEWORK FOR URBAN DEVELOPMENT & SERVICE DELIVERY.... 8-8
8.5 RECENT URBAN REFORMS .......................................................................................................... 8-9
8.6 ISSUES ............................................................................................................................................ 8-10
8.7 SWOT ANALYSIS ............................................................................................................................. 8-10
8.8 STRATEGIES FOR URBAN GOVERNANCE AND INSTITUTIONAL SETUP ......................... 8-11
9. MUNICIPAL FINANCE .......................................................................................................................... 9-1
9.1 INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................. 9-1
9.2 OVERALL STRUCTURE OF MUNICIPAL FINANCE .................................................................. 9-1
9.2.1 Municipal Receipts ........................................................................................................................ 9-1
9.2.2 Municipal Expenditure .................................................................................................................. 9-2
9.2.3 Municipal Surplus/Deficit Pattern ................................................................................................. 9-3
9.3 REVENUE ACCOUNT ..................................................................................................................... 9-3
9.3.1 Revenue Income ............................................................................................................................. 9-3
9.3.2 Revenue Expenditure ..................................................................................................................... 9-4
9.4 CAPITAL ACCOUNT ....................................................................................................................... 9-5
9.4.1 Capital Income ............................................................................................................................... 9-5
9.4.2 Capital Expenditure ....................................................................................................................... 9-6
9.5 FINANCIAL INDICATORS .................................................................................................................. 9-7
9.6 ISSUES .............................................................................................................................................. 9-8
9.7 SWOT ANALYSIS ............................................................................................................................... 9-9
9.8 STRATEGY FOR MUNICIPAL FINANCE ..................................................................................... 9-9
10. STAKEHOLDERS CONSULTATION ............................................................................................ 10-1
10.1 INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................................................... 10-1
10.2 STAKEHOLDERS CONSULTATION ........................................................................................... 10-1
11. VISION AND SECTOR STRATEGIES ............................................................................................... 11-1
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11.1 INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................................................... 11-1
11.2 VISION FORMULATION .............................................................................................................. 11-1
11.3 SECTOR LEVEL GOAL AND STRATEGIES ............................................................................... 11-2
11.3.1 Sector Goals ............................................................................................................................ 11-2
12. PROJECT PRIORITISATION AND CAPITAL INVESTMENT PLAN, 2035 ............................... 12-1
12.1 INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................................................... 12-1
12.2 PROJECT PRIORITISATION ......................................................................................................... 12-1
12.3 SECTOR INVESTMENT NEEDS FOR 2035 ................................................................................. 12-2
12.4 FINAL INVESTMENT NEEDS FOR 2035 ..................................................................................... 12-9
13. PROFILE OF SHORT TERM PROJECTS ......................................................................................... 13-1
13.1 INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................................. 13-1
13.2 PROFILE OF PRIORITY PROJECTS ....................................................................................................... 13-1
14. ANALYSIS OF GOVERNANCE FRAMEWORK AND REFORM ACTION PLAN ..................... 14-1
14.1 INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................................. 14-1
14.2 GOVERNANCE FRAMEWORK.................................................................................................... 14-1
14.3 REFORMS ACTION PLAN ................................................................................................................... 14-3

Annexures including Minutes of Workshop/ Meeting/ Attendance
Special Papers
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LIST OF TABLES
Table 1.1: Project Output and Deliverables ......................................................................................... 1-2
Table 2.1: Population and Growth Rate of Daboh Town ..................................................................... 2-3
Table 2.2: Ward wise population of Daboh, 2011 ............................................................................... 2-4
Table 2.3: Ward wise population composition of Daboh, 2001 .......................................................... 2-5
Table 2.4: Population and Growth Rate of Daboh Town ..................................................................... 2-6
Table 2.5: Population Projection .......................................................................................................... 2-6
Table 2.6: Literacy rate of Daboh ........................................................................................................ 2-7
Table 2.7: Ward-wise literacy rate of Daboh, 2001 ............................................................................. 2-7
Table 2.8: Sex Ratio of Daboh ............................................................................................................. 2-8
Table 2.9: Ward-wise Sex Ratio of Daboh, 2001 ................................................................................ 2-8
Table 2.10: Workforce Participation Rate, Daboh town, 2001 ............................................................ 2-9
Table 2.11: Economy, Demography and Spatial Growth .................................................................. 2-10
Table 3.1: Assessment of landuse for Daboh ....................................................................................... 3-2
Table 3.2: Comparison of developed area under various uses with UDPFI guidelines ....................... 3-3
Table 3.3: Planning Calculation for Future of Daboh Town ............................................................... 3-4
Table 3.4: Daboh- Urban Growth ........................................................................................................ 3-6
Table 4.1: Present Status of Water Supply, Daboh Town.................................................................... 4-1
Table 4.2: Distribution of Households by source of drinking water and its location .......................... 4-2
Table 4.3: Future Requirement of Domestic Water in Daboh Town ................................................... 4-6
Table 4.4: Service level benchmarking of water supply is Daboh town .............................................. 4-6
Table 4.5: SWOT Analysis .................................................................................................................. 4-7
Table 4.6: Type of Latrine within the House ....................................................................................... 4-9
Table 4.7 Status of availability of toilet within house in Daboh .......................................................... 4-9
Table 4.8: Preference of toilet (who dont have toilet) ........................................................................ 4-9
Table 4.9: Type of Toilet ................................................................................................................... 4-10
Table 4.10 Availability of Public Toilet in area ................................................................................. 4-10
Table 4.11: Willingness to contribute in toilet construction .............................................................. 4-10
Table 4.12: Willingness to Contribute in the O & M of toilet ........................................................... 4-11
Table 4.13: Status of Sewerage and Sanitation System in Daboh town ............................................ 4-11
Table 4.14: Projected Sewage Generation in Daboh ......................................................................... 4-11
Table 4.15: Service level Benchmarking of Sewerage and Sanitation System, DNP ........................ 4-12
Table 4.16: SWOT Analysis of Sewerage and Sanitation ................................................................. 4-13
Table 4.17: Type of Connectivity for waste water outlet ................................................................... 4-14
Table 4.18: Service level benchmarking of Storm Water Drainage, Daboh ...................................... 4-16
Table 4.19: SWOT Analysis of Storm Water Drainage ..................................................................... 4-17
Table 4.20: SWM Existing Situation ................................................................................................. 4-18
Table 4.21: Disposal of Garbage........................................................................................................ 4-20
Table 4.22: Distance to the storage Site ............................................................................................. 4-21
Table 4.23: Place designated to store the garbage ............................................................................. 4-21
Table 4.24: Frequency of Garbage collection by Municipality ......................................................... 4-21
Table 4.25: Availability of Domestic Animals .................................................................................. 4-22
Table 4.26: Disposal of Garbage Generated by Domestic Animal .................................................... 4-22
Table 4.27: SWM Compliance with MSW Rules 2000 ..................................................................... 4-22
Table 4.28: Solid waste generation .................................................................................................... 4-25
Table 4.29: Service Level Benchmarking of Solid Waste Management, DNP ................................. 4-26
Table 4.30: SWOT Analysis of SWM ............................................................................................... 4-27
Table 4.31: Registered Motor Vehicles As on 31st March 2009 in Bhind District ........................... 4-29
Table 4.32: SWOT Analysis of Traffic & Transportation ................................................................. 4-30
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Table 4.33: SWOT Analysis of Electricity and Street Lighting ........................................................ 4-31
Table 5.1: Status of Health Facilities in Daboh ................................................................................... 5-2
Table 5.2: Demand Estimation of Health Facilities of Daboh ............................................................. 5-2
Table 5.3: Status of Education Facilities in Daboh .............................................................................. 5-3
Table 5.4: Demand Estimation of Educational Facilities of Daboh ..................................................... 5-4
Table 5.5: Demand Estimation for Recreational Facilities of Daboh .................................................. 5-4
Table 5.6: SWOT Analysis for Social Infrastructure ........................................................................... 5-5
Table 6.1: BPL HH in Daboh .............................................................................................................. 6-1
Table 6.2: Description of Loan Benefits to BPL under SJSRY ........................................................... 6-2
Table 6.3: Description of Samajik Suraksha Pension Scheme ............................................................ 6-2
Table 6.4: Description of Rashtriya Pariwar Sahayata Scheme ........................................................... 6-3
Table 6.5: Description of Indira Gandhi National Old Pension Scheme ............................................. 6-3
Table 6.6: Description of Indira Gandhi Widow Pension Scheme ...................................................... 6-3
Table 6.7: Description of Indira Gandhi National Disability Pension Scheme ................................... 6-4
Table 6.8: Status of Infrastructure and Services .................................................................................. 6-5
Table 6.9: Situation Assessment for Infrastructure Facilities in Slums ............................................... 6-6
Table 6.10: Urban Poverty and Social Equity ...................................................................................... 6-7
Table 7.1: Distribution of households by availability of separate kitchen and type of fuel used for
cooking ................................................................................................................................................. 7-2
Table 7.2: SWOT Analysis of Environment ........................................................................................ 7-3
Table 8.1: List of Committees of Political Wing of DNP .................................................................... 8-1
Table 8.2: Assessment of Staff Strength .............................................................................................. 8-2
Table 8.3: Institutions and Urban Governance .................................................................................... 8-8
Table 8.4: Institutions in Service Delivery .......................................................................................... 8-9
Table 8.5: SWOT Analysis of Urban Governance & Institutional Setup .......................................... 8-10
Table 9.1: Overview of Municipal Finance in DNP (in Rs Lakhs) ..................................................... 9-1
Table 9.2: Trend of Overall Municipal Income in DNP (in Rs Lakhs) ............................................... 9-1
Table 9.3: Overall Municipal Expenditure Pattern of DNP (in Rs Lakhs) .......................................... 9-2
Table 9.4: Overall Surplus/Deficit Pattern in DNP (in Rs Lakhs) ....................................................... 9-3
Table 9.5: Summary of Revenue Income of Daboh Nagar Parishad (in Rs) ....................................... 9-3
Table 9.6: Summary of Revenue Expenditure in DNP (in Rs) ............................................................ 9-4
Table 9.7: Summary of Capital Income in DNP (in Rs) ...................................................................... 9-5
Table 9.8: Summary of Capital Expenditure in DNP (in Rs) .............................................................. 9-6
Table 9.9: Fiscal Health Indicators of Daboh Nagar Parishad ............................................................. 9-7
Table 9.10: SWOT Analysis - Municipal Finance ............................................................................... 9-9
Table 10.1: List of Stakeholders Consultations ................................................................................ 10-2
Table 11.1: Sector, Goals and Strategies ........................................................................................... 11-2
Table 12.1: Priority and Ranking of Projects ..................................................................................... 12-1
Table 12.2: Economic Development Investment Needs, 2035 (Rs. Crore) ....................................... 12-2
Table 12.3: SWM Investment Needs, 2035 (Rs. Crore) .................................................................... 12-2
Table 12.4: Storm Water Drainage Investment Needs, 2035 (Rs. Crore) .......................................... 12-3
Table 12.5: Sewerage Investment Needs, 2035 (Rs. Crore) .............................................................. 12-4
Table 12.6: Sanitation Investment Needs, 2035 (Rs. Crore) .............................................................. 12-4
Table 12.7: Water Supply Investment Needs, 2035 (Rs. Crore) ........................................................ 12-5
Table 12.8: Traffic & Transportation Investment Needs, 2035 (Rs. Crore) ...................................... 12-6
Table 12.9: Social Infrastructure & Other Projects Investment Needs, 2035 (Rs. Crore) ................. 12-6
Table 12.10: Housing for Urban Poor Investment Needs, 2035 (Rs. Crore) ..................................... 12-7
Table 12.11: Electricity and Street lighting Investment Needs, 2035 (Rs. Crore) ............................. 12-7
Table 12.12: Education Facilities Investment Needs, 2035 (Rs. Crore) ............................................ 12-7
Table 12.13: Health Facilities Investment Needs, 2035 (Rs. Crore).................................................. 12-8
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Table 12.14: Environment & Tourism Investment Needs, 2035 (Rs. Crore) .................................... 12-8
Table 12.15: Urban Governance and Institutional Setup Investment Needs, 2035 (Rs. Crore) ........ 12-8
Table 12.16: Sector wise total investment needs, 2035 (Rs. Crore) .................................................. 12-9
Table 13.1: Water Supply Short Term Sub-Project Profile ............................................................... 13-1
Table 13.2: Sewerage Short Term Sub-Project Profile ...................................................................... 13-3
Table 13.3: Traffic and Transportation Short Term Sub-Project Profile ........................................... 13-5
Table 13.4: Storm Water Drainage Short Term Sub-Project Profile ................................................. 13-7
Table 13.5: Environment and Tourism .............................................................................................. 13-8
Table 13.6: Slum Improvement Short Term Sub-Project Profile ...................................................... 13-9
Table 13.7: Solid Waste Management Short Term Sub-Project Profile .......................................... 13-10
Table 13.8: Social Infrastructure Short Term Sub-Project Profile ................................................... 13-12
Table 13.9: Electricity and Street Lighting Short Term Sub-Project Profile ................................... 13-13
Table 13.10: Economic Development .............................................................................................. 13-14
Table 13.11: Urban Governance & Institutional Setup Short Term Sub-Project Profile ................. 13-15
Table 14.1: Assessment of Governance Capacity, DNP .................................................................... 14-1
Table 14.2: Summary of JNNURM Mandatory Reforms undertaken by DNP, 2012 ....................... 14-3

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LIST OF FIGURES
Figure 2.1: Location and Connectivity of the town ............................................................................. 2-3
Figure 2.2: Ward wise population of Daboh town ............................................................................... 2-4
Figure 2.3: SC/ST Composition ........................................................................................................... 2-5
Figure 2.4: Population projection of Daboh town ................................................................................ 2-7
Figure 3.1: Administrative Map: Daboh .............................................................................................. 3-1
Figure 3.2: Landuse Map Daboh.......................................................................................................... 3-3
Figure 3.3: Physical Growth Constraints and Future Growth Directions of Daboh ............................ 3-5
Figure 4.1: Coverage of Pipe Water Supply ........................................................................................ 4-3
Figure 4.2: Depth of water level map (January, 2007) of MP ............................................................. 4-3
Figure 4.3: Type of Latrine in Daboh .................................................................................................. 4-9
Figure 4.4: Type of Connectivity for waste water outlet ................................................................... 4-14
Figure 4.5: Major Drains of the Town ............................................................................................... 4-15
Figure 4.6: Major water Bodies of Daboh ......................................................................................... 4-16
Figure 4.7: Location of Landfill Site ................................................................................................. 4-20
Figure 4.8: Existing Road Network ................................................................................................... 4-28
Figure 5.1: Social Infrastructure Service in the town .......................................................................... 5-1
Figure 6.1: Slum location map ............................................................................................................. 6-4
Figure 9.1: Revenue Receipts and Capital Receipts (in Rs in lakhs), 2006-2010 ................................ 9-2
Figure 9.2: Revenue Expenditure and Capital Expenditure (in Rs lakhs), 2006-10 ............................ 9-2
Figure 9.3: Average Revenue Income from different sources (2006-10) ............................................ 9-4
Figure 9.4: Average Revenue Expenditure from different sources (2006-10) ..................................... 9-5
Figure 9.5: Average Capital Receipts from different sources (2006-10) ............................................. 9-6
Figure 9.6: Average Capital Expenditure on different heads (2006-10) .............................................. 9-6
Figure 12.1: Sector wise total investment needs, 2035 (Rs. Crore) ................................................. 12-10
Figure 13.1 Water Supply Proposals.................................................................................................. 13-3
Figure 13.2: Location of Proposed Sewerage Short Term Sub-Project ............................................. 13-5
Figure 13.3: Location of Proposed Traffic &Transportation Short Term Sub-Project ...................... 13-7
Figure 13.4 Solid Waste Management Proposals ............................................................................ 13-12
Figure 13.5 Social Infrastructure Proposals ..................................................................................... 13-13

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ABBREVIATIONS
BPL : Below Poverty Line
CAA : Constitutional Amendment Act
CBO : Community Based organization
CDP : City Development Plan
CIP : City Investment Plan
CMO : Chief Municipal Officer
DNP : Daboh Nagar Parishad
DFID : Department of International Development
DPCs : District Planning Committees
FOP : Financial Operating Plan
ft. : Feet
GoI : Government of India
GoMP : Government of Madhya Pradesh
hrs : Hours
ICT Pvt. Ltd. : Intercontinental Consultant and Technocrats Pvt. Ltd.
IHSDP : Integrated Housing and Slum Development Program
JNNURM : Jawaharlal Nehru National Urban Renewal Mission
Km : Kilometer
lpcd : liters per capita par day
m : Meter
MPCs : Metropolitan Planning Committees
MPUSP : Madhya Pradesh Urban Services for Poor
MRTS : Mass Rapid Transit System
NGO : Non-Government Organization
NH : National Highway
pph : Persons Per Household
PPP : Public Private Partnership
PWD : Public Works Department
OHT : Over Head Tank
SC : Schedule Cast
SFCs : State Finance Committees
SH : State Highway
ST : Schedule Tribe
SWOT : Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats
TOR : Terms of Reference
UADD : Urban Administration and Development Department
UIDSSMT : Urban Infrastructure Development Scheme for Small and Medium Towns
ULB : Urban Local Bodies
WCs : Ward Committees
WFPR : Work Force Participation Ratio



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1. INTRODUCTION
1.1 INTRODUCTION
The Government of Madhya Pradesh (GoMP) has initiated the preparation of City Development Plan
(CDP) with the aim of achieving systematic and planned development of small and medium towns.
The rapid growth of urban population has resulted in speedy urbanization of the towns causing
mounting requirement of basic services for the people. The delivery of basic services is a challenge
for the Urban Local Bodies (ULBs). The CDP is an exercise to redress the basic needs of the
population in these towns and cities through planned intervention for infrastructure development. The
CDP is not only a prerequisite for accessing Government of India (GoI)/ GoMP funds, but also plays
a key role in developing a strategic framework for coordinating various development activities and
setting the pace for the progress of the city.
The Urban Administration and Development Department (UADD), GoMP is the state level nodal
agency for the implementation of this project. 280 cities of Madhya Pradesh have been selected for
preparation of the City Development Plan, out of which 250 towns are of municipal council and 30
towns are urban centres. M/s Intercontinental Consultants and Technocrats Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi, has
been retained by the UADD for the preparation of CDP of 10 towns namely, Daboh (District Bhind),
Alampur (District Bhind), Lahar (District Bhind), Mihona (District Bhind), Mau (District Bhind),
Mehgaon (District Bhind), Gormi (District Bhind), Phuphkalan (District Bhind), Akoda (District
Bhind) and Seondha (District Datia).
The first section of this chapter gives background information regarding the preparation of CDP.
Section 2 elucidates the objectives of the assignment. Section 3 briefs concept and principle of CDP,
Section 4 tabulates project output and deliverables and Section 5 updates on commencement of the
study and team mobilisation. The technical approach and methodology has been described in the
section 6 and the structure of the report has been discussed in the last section.
1.2 OBJECTIVES OF THE ASSIGNMENT
The goals of a City Development Plan include a collective city vision and action plan aimed at
improving urban governance and management, increasing investment to expand employment and
services, and systematic and sustained reductions in urban poverty. The specific objectives of the
assignment are as follows:
To scale up existing urban development and poverty alleviation schemes within a comprehensive
and coherent strategic planning framework in order to ensure optimal benefit from available
resources for the citizens of the ULBs.
To catalyse new thinking and provoke debate through a consultative stakeholder driven process.
The vision and strategic thrusts of the CDP will be built around the lessons and findings of a
comprehensive and rigorous stakeholder consultation and documentation process.
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To serve the requirements of the UIDSSMT and IHSDP programs as well as JNNURM and other
development schemes.
To generate specific priority actions and projects that can be the basis for mobilizing funding from
diverse sources.
1.3 CONCEPT AND PRINCIPLES OF CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN
The City Development Plan is both a planning process and a product, which promotes partnership
among various stakeholders in a city, the government, the private business sector, civil society,
academic, and national government agencies- to jointly analyze growth issues, develop a vision for
the future, formulate development strategies, design programs, prioritize projects, mobilize resources,
implement, monitor and evaluate implementation. The CDP is anchored on the following principles of
sustainability.
Livability - what can be done to ensure a healthy and dignified standard of living for the city's
residents?
Manageability: how can a city's management be improved? How can accountability, integrity
and transparency be made an integral part of a city's management?
Competitiveness - how can the cities be more competitive in the global economy?
Bankability - how can the cities be more sustainable? How can public-private partnerships be
promoted and/ or enhanced?
Good Governance - how can a city's management be improved? How can accountability,
integrity and transparency be made an integral part of a city's management?
1.4 PROJECT OUTPUT AND DELIVERABLES
The whole project will be completed in the stipulated period and deliverables submitted to the client
with the requisite reports as shown in Table 1.1.
Table 1.1: Project Output and Deliverables
S No. Deliverables Submission Date
1 Inception Report (including report of Kick off workshop) 09.12.2011
2
City Profile, Sector Analysis, City Vision, Strategy and Priority
Projects Report (Report of 2
nd
workshop)
03.03.2012
4 Draft CDP Report 23.10.2012
6 Final CDP Report February 2013
1.5 COMMENCEMENT OF THE STUDY AND TEAM MOBILIZATION
The study started with the receipt of Work Order from client in October 2011. The team along with
the team leader visited the Daboh town and met with Municipal Council officials and other
stakeholders. The team also did the reconnaissance survey of town with Nagar Parishad officials.
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1.6 TECHNICAL APPROACH AND METHODOLOGY ADOPTED
The entire work carried out has been grouped into various stages. These have been carefully framed
after appreciation of the various tasks to be performed. Theses stages are shown below. Each of these
Stages contains a set of tasks. Subsequently, the Description of the Methodology for each Stage is
detailed in succeeding paragraphs.
Stage I : Project Initiation
Stage II : Status Assessment
Stage III : Vision, Sector Goals and Strategies
Stage IV : Preparing a City Investment Plan and Financial Operating Plan
Stage V : Final City Development Plan
STAGE I: PROJECT INITIATION
The Consultant team was mobilized in the first week of November 2011. The Project start-up process
commenced with the arrival of the team on site. Consulting team interacted with client and concerned
officials including the elected representatives of the Daboh Nagar Parishad.
The team did the reconnaissance survey of town, collected data including reports of earlier studies and
organised discussions with ULB officials, representatives at concerned government agencies and key
stakeholders to identify the strengths and weaknesses of the town and to provide an understanding of
what impedes service delivery and management within the existing set-up and what contributes to
better service provision. The following heads were covered:
Demography Profile
Economic Base
Urban poor
Infrastructure Profile (Physical & Social)
Environment, Heritage and Tourism
Government policies and programmes
Financial Profile
Institutional Aspects
As part of the stage I, kick-off workshop was also organized in the town.
Inception Report Submission
At the completion of this stage the consultants prepared the Inception Report. The Inception Report
included description of Kick-Off Workshop along with review and analyse the current status and
unique features of the city with regard to the state of its development, systems and procedures, as
equally its institutional and financial context. This stage is meant to identify the basic strengths and
weaknesses in the citys development and to provide an understanding of what impedes service
delivery and management within the existing set-up and what contributes to better service provision.
The report also included rapid urban assessment including review of towns economic development,
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physical planning and growth management, physical infrastructure, social infrastructure and
municipal finance.
STAGE II: STATUS ASSESSMENT
Sector Analysis
At this stage the Consultant analysed the current situation with reference to each of the identified
sector. The status assessment is based on review of both primary and secondary data and stakeholders
views. SWOT of all identified critical sectors has been done based on the current status to project
present gaps and future requirements.
City Profile
The city profile includes the outcome of the analysis of the existing situation in all the sectors
identified and inputs from the city assessment. The parameters primarily include demography,
economic base, finance, physical and environmental issues, infrastructure and urban poor. The
Consultants further identified the project components and the existing demand-supply gap. The gap
evaluation is done through Strength, Weakness, Opportunity, Threat (SWOT) analysis. This also
include in-depth institutional assessment of organizational capacity, orientations of municipal
administration and elected members towards urban reforms, promoting economic development, role
of private sector, empowerment of the poor etc., and institutional capacity to deliver effective and
efficient governance.
STAGE III: VISION, SECTOR GOALS AND STRATEGIES
2
nd
Workshop (City Vision and Sector Goals)
The outcome of city profile comprising the existing status assessment of identified critical sectors was
presented to the stakeholders groups identified at the inception stage. The participants included
members of Steering Group, elected representative, municipal officials, representatives of identified
line departments, NGOs, CBOs, financial institutions, industrialists, youth association etc. The As-Is
situation of the town was presented to the stakeholders for their views and suggestions. The primary
objective of holding the 2
nd
workshop was to develop city vision and sector goals. Therefore the post
presentation discussion was oriented towards developing a collective and shared vision for the town.
Further discussion was initiated on strategies, priorities and major actions that are required in the next
five years to move towards Vision 2035.
A vision is a statement that indicates where city/ study area aspires to go, within a given timeframe.
The vision was developed by considering the physical characteristics of the study area, its strengths,
potential, issues, future focus areas and preferences of the residents of the city. The aim was to have
most desirable public-private and community participation and a spirit of ownership and sense of
belonging with pride among its citizens and to arrive at an overall goal to develop the study area in
such a way that it fulfil the needs of all its citizens. It is an exercise required to be conducted in order
to define the broad directions for future development of study area. A consensus approach was built
among the various groups of stakeholders in an integrated and cohesive manner to arrive at a common
vision for the city. The Sector wise visions have been fulfilled through sectoral strategies.
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Projection
Preparation of CDP requires forecasting of population for the horizon year 2035, which is very critical
planning input for calculation of sectoral demand like housing, infrastructure, trade and commerce,
socio-cultural facilities, etc.
Although there are many methods for population projection like Linear Method, Geometric Growth
Method, Exponential Curve Method, Ratio Method etc., but considering population dynamics of town
and the future potential of economic development. The most suitable population projection method
was used to project the population of town.
Sector Goal and Strategies
The Sector wise goals have been evolved followed by formulation of sectoral strategies. These sectors
were identified as critical sectors, which includes demography, economic development, land and
housing, urban poor and slum, physical infrastructure (water supply, sewerage and sewage disposal,
storm water drainage), social infrastructure (health, education, community services, recreational
facilities etc.), environment, heritage conservation and tourism, traffic and transportation, institutional
framework, municipal finance, project identification and costing etc. The sectors mentioned in CDP
report were ratified by stakeholders during 2nd workshop.
The sector goals were developed based on the aspiration of various stakeholders and vision for city
for horizon year 2035. Sectoral strategies were developed in consultation with local counterparts and
representatives of identified key line departments. The sector strategy is a plan of action designed to
achieve a particular goal set for respective sectors. Sector strategies are the best possible practical
process to achieve the desired goal by utilizing all the available resources (internal and external) in a
sustainable way. Local counterparts representing each sector, having knowledge of subject and well
aware of limitations and potentials played critical role in finalizing the sectoral strategies.
The process of developing sectoral strategies was not depended only upon existing status assessment,
SWOT, views of the local counterpart but was also enriched by taking the suitable example of best
practices at national and international level. By adopting this process, comprehensive development
strategies have been developed for each sector, which can be replicate to other cities.
Presentation of the Vision, Goal and Sector Strategies
The expected output at the end of this phase was a city vision, sector goals and possible strategies for
operationalisation of the various sectors. A presentation will be made at the District Level before the
District Collector to monitor the progress. A discussion was held at State Level with the Directorate of
Urban Administration and Development in Bhopal to monitor and report progress.
Submission 2: City Profile, Sector Analysis, City Vision, Strategy and Priority Projects Report
(Report on 2
nd
workshop)
At the completion of this stage the consultants prepared and submitted the City Profile, Sector
Analysis, city vision, strategy and priority projects Report, which included detailed sector analysis,
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demand assessment, city vision, sectoral goals, strategies and priority projects including proceedings
of 2
nd
workshop.
STAGE IV: PREPARING CITY INVESTMENT PLAN (CIP) AND FINANCING STRATEGY
(FINANCIAL OPERATING PLAN)
Project costing and determination of funding sources
The Consultants prepared cost estimate of all identified projects by using the schedule of rates of state
government. Consultations with different stakeholders were conducted to determine types and sources
of financing for priority projects from internal resources, state and central governments, local
financial institutions, donors, and through public-private partnerships. The implications of each of
these were considered.
City Investment Plan (CIP)
Based on the availability of resources, logical sequencing of actions and potential for immediate
implementation, the Consultants prepared a City Investment Plan (CIP) in consultation with ULB that
lays out the cost and revenue estimates of all priority projects in the next five years. The preparation
of the CIP is a reiterative process requiring adjustments to individual projects as well as changes in
scheduling to make the whole package work financially. The City Investment Plan was supported
with a Financial Operating Plan (FOP).
Financial Operating Plan (FOP)
The financial operation plan covers baseline scenario with no change in existing situation and
alternate scenario with sustainable rate of growth and help in preparation of project funding
requirement, funding strategies; likely impact of new investments & suggestions on improving
existing accounting framework.
The consultant had proposed Financial Operating Plan after the City Investment plan was prepared,
with a view to make sure that the financial feasibility and sustainability of ULB has been fully judged
and also that it takes care of the governments fiscal and economic policies and the general macro
environment. In view of the emerging trend amongst municipal bodies on revamping of their
accounting and financial policies in line with contemporary practices, the Consultant had adopted an
integrated approach combining it with the institutional and legal reforms.
The Consultants have compiled the draft CDP including the CIP and FOP and have finalised it after
feedback from stakeholders:
Third workshop on Draft CDP
The Consultants with support from ULB organized third workshop involving all the stakeholders,
who have been part of the CDP preparation process. The workshop sought an endorsement of the City
Development Plan from the stakeholder group present and agreement on procedures for performance
monitoring.
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The 2
nd
Stage discussion at the State Level was organised at the Directorate of Urban Administration
and Development, Bhopal to monitor the progress of the project.
Submission 3: Draft CDP and city level workshop report
At this stage a draft report was prepared and submitted comprising CIP and FOP along with
proceedings of the 3
rd
workshop.
Performance Monitoring
The Consultants, in consultation with the ULB had identified performance-monitoring/ sustainability
indicators to assist ULB to review the progress and outcomes of the CDP on an annual basis and to
enable them in setting the agenda for the future.
STAGE V: FINAL CDP DOCUMENT
Following the third and final workshop, the Consultants have finalized the CDP document
incorporating the feedback from the 3
rd
workshop and the inputs received at the 2
nd
Stage State Level
discussion. Inputs from Directorate of Urban Administration and Development, Bhopal have also
been incorporated in the final report. This document have been presented and submitted to ULB for
resolution, along with a summary of the CDP for publication and wider dissemination by the ULB.
Submission 4: Final CDP report
Final CDP report is being submitted after receiving the resolution form the ULB. Required numbers
of hard and soft copies of report are being submitted by the consultant.
1.7 STRUCTURE OF THE REPORT
The Report is structured in fifteen chapters such as;
Chapter 1, Introduction: This chapter includes objective of the work, principles followed by
technical approach and methodology of the CDP preparation.
Chapter 2, District and Town Profile: The chapter gives details of the physical features,
administrative divisions and overall socio-economic features of the district and the town. It also
describes population growth trends, projected population, SWOT analysis and strategy for the town.
Chapter 3, Urban Growth Management: Aspects related to evolution of the city, efforts for
planned development, future growth scenario, issues identified in urban growth management and
SWOT analysis are part of this chapter.
Chapter 4, Physical Infrastructure: This chapter deals in detail regarding water supply, sewerage
system, storm water drainage, solid waste management, urban transport and street lighting. SWOT
analyses of respective services are also included in this chapter.
Chapter 5, Social Infrastructure: Aspects related to social infrastructure such as hospital, education,
recreation, banking, police, post office and crematorium are discussed in detail in this chapter.
Demand supply assessment and SWOT analyses are also included.
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Chapter 6, Urban Poor and Slums: This chapter gives a detailed account of poverty alleviation
programmes and slums in the city. Access to various infrastructure facilities in slums and SWOT
analysis are part of this chapter.
Chapter 7, Environment: The information on natural environmental baseline of the city, natural
hazards and quality of environment, major environmental issues of the region and SWOT analysis are
included in this chapter.
Chapter 8, Urban Governance and Institutional Setup: Functions of the urban local body, details
on line departments, recent urban reforms are given in this chapter. Major issues with respect to urban
governance and SWOT analysis are also included.
Chapter 9, Municipal Finance: This chapter contains analysis of the municipal finance in terms of
revenue and capital account, assessment of the financial performance and SWOT analysis.
Chapter 10, Stakeholders Consultation: The consultations carried out during the inception stage
and city assessment stage is elucidated in this chapter. Details of meetings conducted with various
stakeholders are given in this chapter.
Chapter 11: Vision and Sector Strategies: This chapter gives the vision and sector strategies for city
in keeping with its issues for development.
Chapter 12: Project Prioritisation and Capital Investment Plan, 2035: The chapter describes
sector priority and their ranking followed by capital investment plan.
Chapter 13: Profile of Short-Term Projects: The chapter describes priority short term projects and
their implementation plan.
Chapter 14: Analysis of Governance Framework and Reform Action Plan: The chapter presents
the analysis of governance framework as well as reform action plan.
Chapter 15: Financial Operating Plan: This chapter details out the financial operating plan for
achieving the project implementation.


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2. DISTRICT AND TOWN PROFILE
2.1 INTRODUCTION
This chapter illustrates the profile of the district and town based on the analysis of secondary
information and interaction with officials of Daboh Nagar Parishad (DNP) and other Urban Local
Bodies (ULBs). The chapter describes the profile of the district and town in the context of historical
background, administrative division, climate, topography, geology, demography, economy, landuse,
and population projection. For better understanding of the chapter it has been divided into two broad
sections of District Profile and Town Profile respectively.
2.2 DISTRICT PROFILE
2.2.1 History and Administrative Division
Daboh is a Nagar Parishad town in the Bhind District of Madhya Pradesh. The district was constituted
on 28
th
May 1948 during unionisation of the 6 districts of United State of Madhya Bharat. Later
district Bhind became part of new Madhya Pradesh after the reorganization of States in November
1956. Bhind Nagar Parishad is its district headquarters. This district is located in the Chambal region,
in the northwest of the state. It is located between N Latitude 25
o
55 and 26
o
45 and E longitude 78
o

12 and 79
o
05. It is bounded by Uttar Pradesh on the north and east, towards south is the district of
Datia, while southwest and west are bounded by Gwalior and Morena districts, respectively. The total
area of this district accounts 4,459 square kilometres. Administratively district is divided into 7
tehsils, 6 blocks, 11 towns, 447 panchayats and 935 villages.
2.2.2 Geology and Topography
The Ravines, Fertile land and dense Forests describe the topography of the district. Physiographically,
a large area of the district forms part of the vast older plains including riverbeds with structural plains,
structural hills and valleys with denudation slope. It has an average elevation of 161 metres (528 feet).
The plains at present are cultivated fields devoid of trees, stubbed with shrubby growth only along the
moist hollows, and thickly populated. The only divisions of topography are offered by the network of
rivers with deep channels and steep bank. The widest plane of the district lies in the western part
around Gohad, Mehgaon and Mau. The ravine lands extend along both sides of the rivers and their
tributaries and are mostly unsuitable for cultivation and settlements.
2.2.3 Climate
The climate of Bhind district is characterized by general dryness, except during the south-west
monsoon season. The winter season from December to February is followed by the summer season
from March to about middle of June. The period from Middle of June to about the end of September
is the south-west monsoon season. October and November constitute the post-monsoon or retreating
monsoon season. The average annual rainfall of Bhind District is 668.3 mm. The spatial variation of
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the district is not too much. About 92% of the annual rainfall is received in the south-west monsoon
months. On an average there are 33 rainy days in a year (http://www.bhind.nic.in/).
2.2.4 Soil
The soil in the district generally falls under the broad group of deep alluvial soils. This alluvium is
deposited over the Vindhyan basement. The soil of Bhind is very fertile and is well drained by the
Chambal and Sind rivers and the tributary streams of the Kunwari and Puhuj. Color of the soil varies
from brown, yellowish brown to dark grey brown. Texture of soils varies from sandy loam (below
20% clay), loam (20 30% clay), clay loam (30 40% clay) & clay (more than 40% clay). Clay loam
soil found in some parts of Gohad & Mehgaon blocks and sandy loam soil is usually found in other
blocks.
2.2.5 Surface Drainage
Chambal, Asad, Kunwari, Besali, Sindh & Pahuj rivers drain the district. Ravines & Gullies have
developed along the course of all rivers particularly along the flood plains. A very fine network of
gullies and forming dendritic drainage network characterizes these. The depth of dissection by gullies
is more intense along the river Chambal as compared to others.
2.2.6 Demography
According to the 2011 census Bhind District has a population of 1,703,562. This gives it a ranking of
286th district in India (out of a total of 640). The district has a population density of 382 inhabitants
per square kilometre. It had population growth rate of 16.59% during 2001-2011. Bhind has a sex
ratio of 838 females for every 1000 males, and a literacy rate of 76.59 %.
2.2.7 Economic Activities
2.2.7.1 Agriculture, I ndustry and Other Activities
The economy of the district is based on agriculture. Based on 2001 census 72.2% workers are
involved in agriculture. The contribution of industry and other sector accounts only 2.2% and 25.6%
respectively.
There are 417 registered small scale industrial units under District Industry Centre employing a total
of 2340 workers. The Industrial estate of Bhind is situated on Lahar road, about 2 km from Bhind
town and occupies an area of 10 acres. Most of the Large and Medium Scale Industries are located at
Malanpur. Industrial giants like Cadbury, Godrej, and Hotline etc. are at Malanpur.
The other economic activities include trade and commerce, service and tourism.
2.3 TOWN PROFILE
2.3.1 Location and Regional Linkages
Daboh town is located in the south-east of the Bhind district and is mainly connected with Datia and
Gwalior for utilising higher order services except the administrative functions. Gwalior and Datia are
at a distance of 88 km and 67 respectively from Daboh. Bhind city is 80 km away from the town.
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Figure 2.1: Location and Connectivity of the town

2.3.2 Population Growth Trend
Based on 2001 census, Daboh housed 15897 persons whereas the provisional figure of 2011 census
registered 18534 persons in the town. The area of the town is 1272 ha and the gross population
density of town is 14.59 persons/ha. It is very low compare to the other big size cities but it is
common phenomenon in the comparable sized towns. As per 2001 census total households were 2539
with an average household size of 6 for the town. Table 2.1 describes the decadal growth rate of DNP.
It indicates that since 1991 decadal growth rate of population is decreasing drastically. Through the
various consultations and secondary data analysis it was observed that prior to 1991 mandi of Daboh
was very big and efficient, as well as economic activities related to mandi was more prominent in the
surrounding, but after that it reduced and due to less economic activities people from surrounding
started to out migrate resulted to reduction in population growth rate.
Table 2.1: Population and Growth Rate of Daboh Town
Year Population Decadal Growth Rate
1981 6508

1991 10856 66.81
2001 15897 46.44
2011 18534 16.59
Source: Census of India, 2001, Daboh Nagar Parishad 2012
Daboh
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2.3.3 Distribution of Ward Population
The town has been divided into 15 wards. Based on current population ward 8 (2111 persons)
accounts the highest followed by ward 13 (1955 persons) and ward 14(904 persons). The distribution
of ward wise population is exhibited in Table 2.2 and Figure 2.2. Similarly ward 15 shows the highest
density (59 pph) followed by ward 4 (47 pph) and ward 11 (29 pph). The average density has been
estimated 14.59 pph for the town. Ward 3, 13 and 14 have lowest population densities i.e. 9 pph, 8
pph and 9 pph respectively. This is due to the fact that all the agriculture area within in city
boundaries lies in these outer wards. Table 2.2 presents ward wise distribution of population density
in DNP.
Table 2.2: Ward wise population of Daboh, 2011
Ward Population
Density (pph)
1 1317
14
2 1252
20
3 1396
9
4 914
47
5 644
17
6 1235
22
7 1242
19
8 2111
17
9 1040
10
10 962
16
11 1439
29
12 991
12
13 1955
9
14 904
8
15 1132
59
Daboh Town 18534 14.59
Source: DNP 2012
Figure 2.2: Ward wise population of Daboh town
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2.3.4 Composition of the Population
As per 2001 census the distribution of male female population was 54% (8602) and 46% (7295)
respectively (Table 2.3). Schedule Cast (SC) and Schedule Tribe (ST) population accounts 23.2%
(3684 persons) of total town population. SC population is 22% (3494 persons) of the total population
of the town, which is quite significant. On the other hand ST population is insignificant with a 1.2%.
As shown in the table below, there are some wards which are predominantly populated by SC
population (Table 2.3 and Figure 2.3).
Table 2.3: Ward wise population composition of Daboh, 2001
Ward
No.
Male Female
SC
Population
ST
Population
SC and ST
Population (%)
% ST
1 578 500 539 8 50.0 0.7
2 617 509 471 0 41.8 0.0
3 662 547 308 131 25.5 10.8
4 526 451 209 7 21.4 0.7
5 328 286 60 0 9.8 0.0
6 608 484 691 0 63.3 0.0
7 642 575 348 0 28.6 0.0
8 817 657 130 1 8.8 0.1
9 453 393 0 0 0.0 0.0
10 475 438 5 0 0.5 0.0
11 645 537 131 0 11.1 0.0
12 408 335 243 0 32.7 0.0
13 823 710 88 22 5.7 1.4
14 420 387 61 0 7.6 0.0
15 600 486 210 21 19.3 1.9
Total 8602 7295 3494 190 22.0 1.2
Source: Census of India, 2001
Figure 2.3: SC/ST Composition
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2.3.5 Population Projection
The population of the town has been projected based on an assumed growth rate up to the horizon
period-2035. In most cases, the growth rates are arrived at by analysing trends of natural growth rate
of population the town. Having arrived at the growth rates and understanding the driving forces of
such a growth rate, several statistical techniques such as arithmetic increase, geometric growth
method, exponential method, and ratio methods were evaluated to project population for town.
However, the population projections arrived from these methods did not seem very realistic and a true
representation of the dynamic socio-economic forces operating in the state. Therefore, several
assumptions were made in order to arrive at a rationale for population projections for town.
The demographic projections for the town are designed to meet both short-term and long-term
planning needs, but are not designed to be exact forecasts to project specific annual variation, because
of the limitation of data availability i.e. the fluctuating trend in increase in population. Population
projections prepared using the adjusted 2001 census base (Table 2.4).
Table 2.4: Population and Growth Rate of Daboh Town
Year Population Density Decadal Growth Rate (%) Annual Growth Rate (%)
1981 6508 512 37.45 3.7
1991 10856 855 66.81 6.7
2001 15897 1,252 46.44 4.6
2011 18534 1,459 16.59 1.6
Source: Census of India 2001, Daboh Nagar Parishad, 2012 and ICT Estimation 2012
The 2011 Census of India, population figure (provided by ULB) has been used as base to verify the
projected population figure from various methods. In this process various projection methods have
been applied to find out the future population based on the past trend. In this way most realistic
projection method has been chosen based on their similarity to 2011 census population. The following
table gives the projected population obtained by various projecting techniques for the Horizon year
2035.
Table 2.5: Population Projection
Year Linear Method Geometric Growth Method Exponential Curve Method Ratio Method
2011 22077 23279 23451 20680
2015 24550 27116 27397 22974
2020 27640 32813 33275 26203
2025 30730 39707 40415 29886
2030 33820 48049 49087 34087
2035 36910 58145 59619 38878
Source: ICT Estimation 2012
After examining the various populations forecast methods outcomes and examining the existing
scenario of economic development, the forecast based on Ratio Method is perceived to be most
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appropriate. The projected population using Ratio Method i.e. total population of 38878 in the
horizon year 2035 is taken up for further estimation of services for City Development Plan 2035.
The Figure 2.4show the trend of projected population which depict the rate of growth of Daboh town.
Figure 2.4: Population projection of Daboh town
2.3.6 Socio Economic Profile of the Town
2.3.6.1 Literacy Rate and Sex Ratio
Literacy is an important indicator in showing the status of social development. The total number of
literates in the Daboh Nagar Parishad were 11478 (72.2%) in 2001 as compared to 4690 (43.2%) in
1991. Female literacy rate is comparatively low i.e. 56.7% as compare to male literacy rate of 85.1%.
Ward wise literacy rate is shown in Table 2.7 which indicates that ward 9 has the highest literacy rate
(91.3%) and ward 12 has the lowest literacy rate (52.2%).
For the improvement of status of literacy mainly among the female child various schemes has been
introduced by the MP Government like Usha Kiran Scheme, Ladli Laxmi Scheme, Gaon Ki Beti
Yojana, Development of Special Education Zone for Women, Kanya Utkarshatha Shiksha Kendra
Yojana, Free Bicycle Yojana, Kanya Shakharta Protsahan Yojana, Kanya Shiksha Parisar, Aashram
Shala, etc. These schemes have benefited the people resulting into significant improvement in literacy
rate, mainly in female literacy rate from 27.9 % to 56.7 %.
Table 2.6: Literacy rate of Daboh
Year Population Literacy Rate Male Literacy Rate Female Literacy Rate
1991 10856 43.2 55.9 27.9
2001 15897 72.2 85.1 56.7
Source: Census of India, 1991 and 2001
Table 2.7: Ward-wise literacy rate of Daboh, 2001
Ward Population Literacy Rate Male Literacy Rate Female Literacy Rate
1 1078 65.5 82.6 45.2
2 1126 68.4 81.3 52.8
3 1209 61.0 76.7 41.6
4 977 82.2 90.8 72.2
5 614 86.1 96.1 74.5
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Ward Population Literacy Rate Male Literacy Rate Female Literacy Rate
6 1092 67.3 82.3 47.8
7 1217 75.0 89.2 59.3
8 1474 76.4 86.4 63.3
9 846 91.3 97.2 84.5
10 913 67.4 80.6 52.9
11 1182 72.7 88.5 53.0
12 743 52.2 66.6 34.0
13 1533 78.4 90.6 64.2
14 807 64.1 76.7 49.4
15 1086 71.8 86.9 53.3
Daboh Town 15897 72.2 85.1 56.7
Source: Census of India, 2001
Sex ratio is a sensitive indicator of the status of women in society, at a given point of time. Indias
low sex ratio of 933 females per 1000 males (Census 2001) reveals a continuing imbalance in gender
relations. Though sex ratio in Daboh Nagar Parishad has increased to 848 in 2001 from 825 in 1991
(as shown in Table 2.8) still sex ratio in Daboh town is much lower (may be because girl child is less
preferred as told by stakeholders during consultation) than the national average but slightly higher
than the district average for urban population of 843(Census of India, 2001). But when compared with
the sex ratio of Bhind district (average urban and rural combined) 829 (Census of India, 2001), it is a
little higher. As far as intra-town variation is concerned, as indicated in ward-wise information in
Table 2.9, there is a huge variation within the town as ward 10 has the highest sex ratio (922) and
ward 6 has the lowest sex ratio (796).
Although there is an improvement in sex ratio since 1991 due to various policies of MP Government
for improving the health and economic conditions of women like Janani Suraksha Yojana, Prasooti
Sahayata Yojana, Mangal Divas, Project Shaktiman, Rastriya Maternity Benefit Yojana, Vivah
Sahayata Yojana, Nai Swarnim Yojana, etc which encourages the people for not promoting any
activities which is against the female child birth; yet it is far below the national average but slightly
higher than district urban sex ration average (843).
Table 2.8: Sex Ratio of Daboh
Year Population Sex Ratio
1991 10856 825
2001 15897 848
Source: Census of India, 1991 and 2001
Table 2.9: Ward-wise Sex Ratio of Daboh, 2001
Ward Population Sex Ratio
1 1078 865
2 1126 825
3 1209 826
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Ward Population Sex Ratio
4 977 857
5 614 872
6 1092 796
7 1217 896
8 1474 804
9 846 868
10 913 922
11 1182 833
12 743 821
13 1533 863
14 807 921
15 1086 810
Daboh Town 15897 848
Source: Census of India, 2001
2.3.6.2 Work Force Characteristics
Involvement of the people in various economic activities is measured in term of work force
participation rate (WFPR), which is 30% in Daboh town as per 2001 census. The town work force is
mainly dependent upon agriculture sector with 42.72% workers engagement (cultivator- 25.61% and
agriculture labourer-17.11%) followed by other worker
1
(38.35%). Worker engaged in household
industry workers are very low (3.36%).
Table 2.10: Workforce Participation Rate, Daboh town, 2001
Cultivator
Agricultural
Laborers
HH Industry
Workers
Others Total
N % N % N % N % N %
Main Workers 1175 24.50 618 12.89 144 3.00 1967 41.02 4795 84.33
Marginal Workers 281 31.54 355 39.84 47 5.27 208 23.34 891 15.67
Total 1456 25.61 973 17.11 191 3.36 2175 38.25 5686 100.00
Work force participation rate is 30%
Source: Census of India, 2001
2.3.6.3 I ndustries
As Daboh town does not have big industry barely 3.36% of the work force is engaged in household
industries. There are few small scale oil industrial units in the town.
2.3.6.4 Trade and Commerce
The trade and commerce activities in the town can be divided into two broad activities, namely
organised and unorganised markets. Presently, there are number of small local level market

1
Other Workers (as per Census): All workers, i.e., those who have been engaged in some economic activity during the last
one year, but are not cultivators or agricultural labourers or in Household Industry, are 'Other Workers.
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functioning in the town, which cater to the daily needs of Daboh. As per the Census of India 2001,
38.25% of the town workforce is engaged in trade and commerce and other tertiary activities. Small
level trade and agriculture mandi are the main commercial activities of the town. As per the grading of
mandi of MP, Daboh has agriculture sub-mandi of district Bhind. The main market areas in DNP are
Ganesh Chowk, Mandi area, Bhind Mander Road Bazar, Moch Tiraha etc. Also street shopping has
developed along some major roads and in the vacant spaces across various locations in the town.
2.3.6.5 Tourism
As discussed with the DNP Official, there is no potential of tourism and related activity in Daboh
town.
2.3.7 Economic Opportunities and Potential for Local Economic Development
Economic base of a town reflects its prosperity and is equally important to understand the economic
sustainability of town, which is critical to ascertain the overall sustainable development of town.
Daboh is a small town which is coming under the tehsil and block of Lahar. It is providing the lower
order services to the surrounding hinterland and people go to Gwalior and Datia for availing higher
order services.
Agriculture related activity is the main occupation of the people of Daboh town other than service and
business. Dairy is the main supplementary source of income of the farmers. The major crops in the
region are wheat, channa, bajra, sarson, alsi and masoor as the soil in the surrounding areas of town
is fertile but irrigation facilities are not good and agriculture is mainly dependent upon rain.
2.4 ISSUES
Low level of sex ration and literacy rate of the town.
Inadequate infrastructure for the economic development of the town.
Untapped human resource.
Untapped agriculture and industrial potential.
2.5 SWOT ANALYSIS
Table 2.11: Economy, Demography and Spatial Growth
Strength Weakness
Important centre for trade for nearby
villages, especially for agro produce
Rich agricultural belt surrounding the city
can provide raw material for development
of agro-based industrial development
Inadequate infrastructure facilities like
transportation hub, godowns, cold storage (essential
for agro products), etc.
At present there are no agro-based industries in the
city
There is a need for organized place for Sabji Mandi
Inadequate infrastructure facilities like godowns,
cold storage (essential for agro-products), etc.
Opportunities Threats
Potential to emerge as a agro-processing Cities with better infrastructure can emerge as
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centre and a local educational hub
Raw materials for oil industry in the form
of mustard seeds are available in the town
Secondary activities like bee-keeping,
pottery, etc. could be well developed
through proper training facilities
competitors
Inadequate power supply hampers industrial
development
2.6 STRATEGY FOR LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
An important precondition to sustainable urban development is the economic growth and
development of the town. Daboh is a regional trading town. Presently town is unable to meet these
aspirations due to lack of development of a significant economic base. Based on the SWOT Analysis
for the city, the following strategies have been identified for local economic development, livelihood
generation and thereby poverty reduction.
Develop the city as a logistics hub for agriculture produce and trading;
Development of agro based industries as the region has a rich and diverse agricultural base. Also,
agro based industries labour intensive (will provide more employment), require less capital and
also comparatively lower level of skills;
Easy loan facilities and promotional activities for Agro-based Small/household industry and
identified value chains;
Improve regional connectivity of the town;


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3. URBAN GROWTH MANAGEMENT
3.1 INTRODUCTION
Daboh has attained regional importance as an urban centre. The town is well connected to the district
headquarter Bhind (80 km) in north and Bhander in south through SH 45. It is also well connected to
other urban centres of the district like Alampur (9 km), Lahar (23 km), Mau (36 km) and Mehgaon
(75 km) respectively. The town is bound to expand in the future with impetus given to development
of economic activities. Thus it is important to understand the spatial growth characteristics in the
town with respect to its natural growth pattern and the planning efforts undertaken for the same.
This chapter deals with the study of the natural spatial growth trends and planning efforts undertaken
in Daboh. An attempt has been made to understand the future growth trends and issues related to
urban development. The chapter has been divided into eight sections. The first section introduces the
chapter and the second describes the constituents of the Daboh Nagar Parishad (DNP). The third
section presents a description of the evolution of the town. The next section describes the efforts taken
for planned development. The future growth scenario of Daboh has been assessed as part of the fifth
section also includes assessment of physical constraints for growth and future growth direction. The
issues of the town are discussed in the sixth section. A SWOT analysis for the urban growth of the
town has been done as part of the seventh section while strategy has been formulated for management
of urban growth in the last section.
3.2 CONSTITUENTS OF DABOH NAGAR PARISHAD
Daboh was a village before attaining the level of Nagar Panchayat in 1979. Daboh Nagar Parishad
(DNP) was constituted in 2011. Presently DNP comprises 15 wards. Figure 3.1 shows the planning
area boundary and the present DNP boundary along with the ward details.
Figure 3.1: Administrative Map: Daboh

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3.3 EVOLUTION AND GROWTH OF DABOH
The evolution and the history of spatial development of a town plays an important role in deciding the
growth nodes and the future growth pattern. An attempt has been made to construct the spatial growth
history of Daboh based on the historical events of constitution of the town and its development.
Daboh was a village before attaining the level of Nagar Panchayat in 1979. The spatial growth of the
town was observed within limited boundary of Nagar Panchayat. The ribbon development of the town
along the main roads was undertaken. In this process drainage (8km) and roads were upgraded. Piped
water supply was given to citizens. Schools and health centres were established. Post office, police
station and crematorium were developed. Most of this development took place in the decade 1981 to
1990 and 1991 to 2000.
Recently in October 2011 Nagar Panchayat was transformed into a Nagar Parishad with amendment
in the Municipal Act as an initiative to strengthen municipal bodies.
3.4 EFFORTS FOR PLANNED DEVELOPMENT
The town lacks regulations for development as no effort has been taken for organised or planned
development of the town in past. As a result physical development of the town was not regulated and
organic development took place in inorganic manner and haphazard growth took place. However, the
recent effort of Government of Madhya Pradesh to prepare the City Development Plan (CDP) for
Daboh is the first planned development initiative. The CDP is a vision document to stream line the
development of the town for horizon year 2035.
3.5 LANDUSE CHARACTERISTICS
The assessment of land use has been carried out based on analysis of the secondary information, land
use mapping, and superimposition of the Google image on the base map and identification of the
major landuse. In this context with the help of Google Earth as well as site study, broad land use was
delineated and finalized for the town. Table 3.1 illustrates the assessment of the landuse for the town.
Area under agricultural use is highest and therefore ranks first comprising 5.43 sq.km area (42.67%),
followed by residential (37.79%), green (6.06%) and institutional (3.85%). The landuse for
commercial (2.24%), industrial (0.37%) and water body (1.82%) also plays an important role in the
town development. The land use for water body (0.23%) and institutional (0.49%) also plays an
important role in the town development. Hence, considering the land use in terms of agricultural and
non-agricultural area, it is observed that only 7.29 sq.km. area of the Daboh Nagar Parishad can be
considered as gross developed area of the DNP.
Table 3.1: Assessment of landuse for Daboh
S. No. Land use Area (Sq Km) %
1 Residential 4.81 37.79
2 Commercial 0.29 2.24
3 Industrial 0.05 0.37
4 Institutional 0.49 3.85
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S. No. Land use Area (Sq Km) %
5 Green 0.77 6.06
6 Water body 0.23 1.82
7 Agricultural 5.43 42.67
8 Roads 0.65 5.20

Total 12.72

Source: ICT Estimate 2012
Figure 3.2 demonstrates the land use for the town.
Figure 3.2: Landuse Map Daboh
3.6 COMPARISION WITH UDPFI STANDARDS
The total developed area of Daboh is 7.29 SqKm (total area excluding agriculture area) and out of that
65.98 % area is under residential which is at the higher end to the standard of UDPFI guidelines, but
the percentage of area under industrial uses is very less (0.69%), which is to be looked upon for the
proper and planned development of the town. Table 3.2 shows the comparison of developed landuse
under various uses with UDPFI guidelines.
Table 3.2: Comparison of developed area under various uses with UDPFI guidelines
S. No Land use Area (Sq Km) Area in % UDPFI Standards (%)
1 Residential 4.81 65.98 45-50
2 Commercial 0.29 3.98 2-3
3 Institutional 0.49 6.72 6-8
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S. No Land use Area (Sq Km) Area in % UDPFI Standards (%)
4 Green 0.77 10.56 12-14
5 Water body 0.23 3.16 Balance
6 Roads 0.65 8.92 10-12
7 Industrial 0.05 0.69 8-10
Total 7.29 100.00 100
3.7 FUTURE GROWTH SCENARIO
The proposed land use, the physical constraints and pull factors like proximity to work centres, etc.
determines the physical growth direction of the town. This section discusses the location of the
physical growth constraints which play a key role in shaping the urban land use pattern and
subsequently deciding the future growth directions.
In this context growth of the town along Bhander-Bhind State Highway 45 and Konch road has been
studied.
3.7.1 Future Growth Assessment
Out of the total area of 12.72 sq.km of Daboh Nagar Parishad, town has physically developed only in
7.29 sq.km i.e. 57% area, whereas remaining 5.43 sq.km i.e. 43% of the total area of Nagar Parishad
is still under agriculture use. The current population density of the town is only 2,549 persons per
sq.km and population is 18534 (Census 2011). For planning purpose in City Development Plan of
Daboh it has been estimated that the existing will increase by 55% making it 38,878 persons for the
vision year 2035. Based on standard population density of 10,000 persons per sq. km for small town,
an additional area of 2.03 sq. km will be required to accommodate the additional population of 20344
persons, in view of the above, to accommodate the projected population the requirement of total
developable area for the town has been estimated as 9.30 sq. km. This includes present developed area
and proposed additional area required for development Table 3.3 describes the estimates for future
growth of the town.
Table 3.3: Planning Calculation for Future of Daboh Town
Description Quantity Units
Total Area of Daboh Nagar Parishad 12.7 Sq.km.
Area Under Agriculture 5.43 Sq.km.
% of Agriculture Area 43 %
Present Developed Area 7.29 Sq.km.
Population (2011census estimate) 18534 Nos.
Existing Gross Density 1457 Persons per Sq.km.
Existing Gross Density on the Developed Area 2542 Persons per Sq.km.
Existing Net Density 3853 Persons per Sq.km.
Estimated Population for 2035 38878 Nos.
Additional Population till 2035 20344 Nos.
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Description Quantity Units
Density considered for Additional Population 10000 Persons per Sq.km.
Additional Developable Area required to accommodate the
additional population 2.03
Sq.km.
Total Developable Area for 2035 9.30 Sq.km.
Source: ICT Estimate 2012
3.7.2 Physical Growth Constraints
The location of the Irrigation Canal towards SW of the city at SH 45 act as a physical constraint for
development of the town in this direction. Error! Reference source not found. shows the physical
growth constraints.
3.7.3 Future Growth Directions
The future growth is envisaged along the state highway 45 towards Bhander (SW direction) and
Bhind (NE direction). Similarly growth of the town along Konch road (SE Direction) has also been
assessed. Figure 3.3shows the directions of future growth of Daboh. As studied most of the residential
development has been assessed along the Konch road where as institutional development was found
towards Bhander on SH 45.
Figure 3.3: Physical Growth Constraints and Future Growth Directions of Daboh
3.8 ISSUES
There are three major issues related to urban growth and management in the town. These include:
No landuse regulation;
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Unplanned spatial development of the town
Cluster development in peripheral areas
Town planning inefficient in promoting the planned development
3.9 SWOT ANALYSIS
A SWOT assessment has been done in the present section with respect to spatial growth (Table 3.4).
Table 3.4: Daboh- Urban Growth
Strengths Weaknesses
Presence of efficient local body as DNP .Unauthorized development without supporting
infrastructure.
Opportunities Threats
Private Sector real estate development of
new colonies with adequate infrastructure.
Dominance of private sector marginalizes
affordability for housing for poor.
3.10 STRATEGY AND ACTION PLAN FOR URBAN GROWTH MANAGEMENT
Urban growth management strategies take into account the spatial growth, land requirement for future
and environmental concerns in developing the town. The strategies are to facilitate a balanced growth
with an efficient urban form devoid of congestion and conflicting land uses.
Preparation of master plan for the town and ensuring planned development of the town.
Implementation of building byelaws and zoning regulation.
Developing town in phased manner as proposed in City Development Plan.
Discourage urban sprawl.
Demarcation of hawking zones and regularization of informal market.
Removal of encroachment.


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4. PHYSICAL INFRASTRUCTURE
4.1 INTRODUCTION
The assessment of the physical infrastructure services (water supply, sewerage, storm water drainage,
solid waste management, electricity and streetlight and traffic and transportation) has been conducted
in this chapter. The chapter describes the existing status of services (coverage, quantity, quality, etc.),
infrastructure details (OHT, pipeline, sanitation facility, drainage length, road lengths with type, etc.),
demand gap assessment, short-term benchmark, issues, Strength Weakness Opportunity and Threat
(SWOT) analysis, issues and their strategy for improvement.
4.2 WATER SUPPLY
4.2.1 Water Supply Existing Status
The supply of water in the town dates back to 1960s. The piped water supply was given to citizens by
creating the infrastructure of OHT (1), Tube Well (pumping facility 5) and laying the distribution line
8 km), In addition to this hand pumps remained the secondary source of water. But currently the OHT
is damaged and not in use. The other source of water for the town has been assessed as tube well, well
and spring. Table 4.1 summarises the existing status of water supply for the town.
Table 4.1: Present Status of Water Supply, Daboh Town
S. No Present Status Status
SERVICE LEVEL
1 Supply/Capita (LPCD)-Existing 22 LPCD
2 Supply Hours (twice daily) 3 hours
3 Storage Capacity to total Supply (%) Nil
4 % of Treatment Capacity Available
No treatment other than
Chlorination
5 Population Coverage (piped water supply) (%) 43
6 Number of House Connections 916
7 Public hand pump 84
8 Tube well (pumping facility) 5
9 Distribution Network (length of pipe line in km) 8
10 Source of water supply Ground water
11 Water Tankers 2
12 Water charges Rs. 30/Month for residential
Source: DNP 2012
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4.2.1.1 Source and Coverage of Water Supply
The ground water is the main source of water for the town. Water is supplied through tube wells (5)
through pumping facility. As per the census of India 2001, 58.77 % of the total households have tap
accessibility, 11% have hand pump accessibility. Table 4.2 describes the distribution of households by
source of drinking water and its location.
Table 4.2: Distribution of Households by source of drinking water and its location
Location Houses
Source of Drinking Water
Tap Hand-pump Tube-well Well Spring
Within Premises 1,020 766 151 2 101 0
Near Premises 1,118 571 64 0 483 0
Away 343 121 58 0 163 1
Total 2,481 1,458 273 2 747 1
% 100 58.77 11.00 0.08 30.11 0.04
Source: Census of India, 2001
The coverage (population) of water supply has been estimated 43% by DNP. However, the
geographical coverage of piped water in town delineates ward5, 7, 8, 9, and 14 (33%)as fully and
ward 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 10, 11, & 15 (53%)as partially covered wards of the town. The ward 12 and 13 is
deprived from piped water supply. Figure 4.1 illustrates the geographical spread of piped water supply
in the town.



Photo 1: Sources of water- Well and Hand pump in Daboh
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Da
bo
h
Bhi
nd
Figure 4.1: Coverage of Pipe Water Supply
4.2.1.2 Status of Groundwater
As shown in Figure 4.2, the ground water map of Madhya Pradesh indicates that ground water table
is lowest in the Bhind district and within the district it is lowest in the area around Daboh. Water
table is more than 20m below the ground level in the area around Daboh. Therefore, it may be
concluded that water is scarce in the town and in the surrounding areas.
Figure 4.2: Depth of water level map (January, 2007) of MP
Source: (http://cgwb.gov.in/ncr/maps/GWmonitoring/NCR_DTWJan2007.jpg)
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4.2.1.3 Groundwater Depth and Quality
The quality of groundwater here is generally good in most of the places in the town as told by various
stakeholders during consultations. As told by municipal official, the depth of water table is very low
with an average depth of 130 feet.
4.2.1.4 Quantity of Water Supply
The daily water supply has been assessed 4 lakh litre for the town. Water is supplied daily for 6 hours
(3 hours in the morning and 3 hours in the evening). The per capita supply has been estimated 22
LPCD, which is very less compare to the CPHEEO Manuals minimum requirement (70 LPCD). As
per CPHEEO Manual on water supply and treatment, the desired level of water supply for a town size
of Daboh is 135 LPCD (exclusive of UFW) along with 45 LPCD for the floating population, whereas
70 LPCD is absolute minimum requirement as per CPHEEO but the future water demand has been
calculated at the rate of 135 LPCD excluding the UFW and demand of floating population as given in
Table 4.3.
4.2.2 Components of water supply
4.2.2.1 Source of water supply
As stated above the underground water is the only source of water supply in the town. Total 5 tube
wells have been installed across the town for supply of water. Water is given to citizens directly from
tube wells.
4.2.2.2 Storage of water
There is only one overhead water tank (OHT) for storage of water. The capacity of OHT has been
estimated 20000 litres. However, because of the age (constructed in 1965) and poor maintenance
presently it is not functional. The town requires immediate OHT for storage and distribution of water.
Figure 4.3 shows the location of overhead tank in the town.
4.2.2.3 Distribution System
The total length of pipe line has been estimated 8 km. As assessed it covers 43% of the population of
the town. The ward wise coverage of water supply delineates ward 5, 7, 8, 9, and 14 as fully and ward
1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 10, 11, & 15 as partially covered wards of the town. The ward 12 and 13 is deprived from
piped water supply.
4.2.2.4 Operation and Maintenance
Currently the operation and maintenance is done by the municipality. There is one water supply
engineer (sub engineer) along with 2 line men, who is responsible for the operation and maintenance
of the water supply system in the town. Since there is no storage facilities and water is supplied
directly from the tube wells. Water supply is dependent upon the availability of electricity. As told by
different stakeholders, there should be an exclusive electricity transformer for water supply along with
generators.
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4.2.2.5 Present Demand and Supply Gap
Presently, as per DNP supplies approximately 0.4 MLD including un-accounted for water (UFW) at
the rate of 22 litres water per capita per day through the piped water supply system. As told by the
stakeholders during field surveys, actual water supply in some of the households is more as these
people have installed illegal additional electricity motor pump and get more water than other. As per
CPHEEO Manual on water supply and treatment, the desired level of water supply for a town size of
Daboh is 135 LPCD (exclusive of UFW) along with 45 LPCD for the floating population (as a thumb
rule 10% of the towns population is the floating population is considered for any town) i.e.
(135+20.25+4.5) LPCD. Therefore the available water supply per capita per day is less than the
desired norm. As per these standards the current demand of water in the city is 3 MLD (Table 4.3) and
therefore the existing gap is around 2.6 MLD.
As mentioned in Table 4.2, around 41.11% population (1020 persons, Census 2011) gets water from
different sources. As per Census of India, 2001, there are 766 taps, 151 hand pumps, 2 tube wells, 101
wells in the town. The same table shows that around 11% population is dependent upon hand pumps
and if the same criterion of 50 LPCD taken for hand pumps then total water supplied from hand
pumps is around 0.102 MLD. The source of water supply in town is ground water. Therefore the total
estimated water supply is Daboh is 0.78 MLD.
4.2.3 Projected Water Demand and Supply Gap
As shown in Table 4.3 the water requirement for year 2011 has been calculated @ 135 lpcd+ 20.25
LPCDUFW+ 45lpcd of floating population (which has been taken 10% of the total towns
population). Water supply proposals are given in Chapter 12. As explained earlier, the current source
of water supply is ground water but for a sustainable water supply system in long run, surface water is
proposed from Pahuj River near Asnet village. The proposed water supply system from Pahuj River
has been proposed as a combined water supply schemes two towns viz. Daboh and Alampur to make
it cost effective. There will be combined WTP for these two towns at a central location nearer to
Pahuj river at Asnet village; and the cost of construction of WTP and distribution line till the
boundary of ULB will depend on the total water demand and distance of ULB from the WTP. To
operate and maintain the WTP and offsite distribution line a Water Distribution Committee is
proposed at district level. The chairman of this committee will be District collector. Members of this
committee include CMOs of each ULBs and concerned sub-engineers of PHED for ULBs, these
members would report to Chief Engineer PHED. PHED will work in coordination with Planning
Officer, District Urban Development Authority (PO-DUDA).
It is observed that the establishment of combined WTP for group of towns will be more economic
than individual WTP as it reduces the cost due to lower expenditures on Procurement of equipments,
DPR studies, Civil work for WTP & mechanical work, O&M and Transmission/Rising line cost.
The proposed water requirement for the horizon year 2035 is 6.2 MLD.
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Table 4.3: Future Requirement of Domestic Water in Daboh Town
Year Projected Population (Ratio Method) Water Demand in MLD
1

2011 18,534 3.0
2015 22974 3.7
2020 26203 4.2
2025 29886 4.8
2030 34087 5.4
2035 38878 6.2
Source: ICT Estimation 2012
4.2.4 Service Level Benchmarking
The service level benchmarking of water supply has been proposed for next five year from 2012-13 to
2017-18 as given in the Table 4.4
Table 4.4: Service level benchmarking of water supply is Daboh town
S.
No.
Service/
Indicator
Ultimate
Benchmark as
per MOUD, Gol
Guidelines
Present
Status
Commitment for the Fiscal Year
2011
-12
2012-
13
2013
-14
2014
-15
2015
-16
1
Coverage of
Water
Supply
Connections
100% 43% 60% 65% 75% 90% 100%
2
Per capita
availability
of water at
consumer
end
135 LPCD
22
LPCD
55
LPCD
65
LPCD
75
LPCD
100
LPCD
135
LPCD
3
Extent of
metering of
water
connections
100% 0% 20% 50% 60% 80% 100%
4
Extent of
non-revenue
water
20% 50% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20%
5
Continuity
of Water
Supply
10 hrs 6hrs 6hrs 10hrs 10hrs 10hrs 10hrs
6
Adequacy of
Treatment
and
Disinfection
and Quality
of Water
100%
0%
(only
Chlorin
ation)
0% 0% 100% 100% 100%

1
Norms of per capita water supply is taken 135 lpcd+ 15 % UFW+ 45lpcd of floating population (which has been taken
10% of the total towns population)
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S.
No.
Service/
Indicator
Ultimate
Benchmark as
per MOUD, Gol
Guidelines
Present
Status
Commitment for the Fiscal Year
2011
-12
2012-
13
2013
-14
2014
-15
2015
-16
Supplied
7
Efficiency in
redressal of
customer
complaints
80% 25% 30% 40% 50% 80% 100%
8
Cost
recovery in
water supply
services
100% O & M O & M O & M O & M O & M O & M
9
Efficiency in
collection of
water supply
related
charges
90% 50% 55% 60% 70% 80% 90%
Source: DNP and ICT Estimation
4.2.5 Issues:
Depleting ground water level because of extraction of water for supply
Inadequate piped water supply in terms of coverage
Inadequate infrastructure for water supply
Erratic electricity supply leads to disrupted water supply
Poor revenue from water supply
Quality of water is getting affected by soak pits and due to lack of sewerage system in town.
4.2.6 SWOT Analysis
The SWOT analysis of water supply has been done by analysing the strengths, weaknesses,
opportunities and threats of the water supply system in Daboh town.
Table 4.5: SWOT Analysis
Strengths Weaknesses
Current water supply scheme can be
augmented to provide water supply to whole
town as a short term measure
Good Natural slope can be used to provide
water directly through minimum storage for
near term
Ground water quality of good at some places
in the town


Only 43% of the existing population is served
by piped water supply. Inadequate technical
staff to manage the water supply system in
town. The whole water supply system is
operated and managed by one sub engineer
Lack of funds to upgrade the current piped
water supply scheme
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Opportunities Threats
In long terms as a sustainable water source,
water can be brought from perennial Pahuj
River near Asnet village (15km from town)
Water supply scheme from Pahuj River can be
combined with Alampur towns water supply
scheme
In the town, water table is lowest in the district
(>20m)
Ground water is scarce in the area and cannot
fulfil the long term future requirement after
population growth
57% towns population (mostly poor) forced
to drink unsafe water extracted through
shallow hand pump and bore well without any
treatment
Source: ICT Assessment 2012
4.2.7 Strategy and Action Plan for Water Supply
Current source augmentation as a short term measure
Strengthening of the existing water supply system through repairing of Pipe line, OHT and
tube wells
Development of new surface water source from Pahuj River (15km from town) as a long term
sustainable measure
Preparation of DPR on comprehensive water supply system under UIDSSMT or other
relevant schemes
PPP in implementation, operation and maintenance of integrated water supply system for the
town
Water Resource Management through innovative technologies
Implementation of Water Sector Reforms
Water harvesting to be made mandatory in all government buildings and new buildings
4.3 SEWERAGE AND SANITATION
4.3.1 Status of Sewerage
There is no sewerage system in town. Most of the houses have adopted the practice of onsite disposal
by constructing septic tank with effluent discharge into soak-pits or open surface drains.
Economically weaker section generally defecates into the open field which is higher as compared to
other means of defecation. In many areas of the town sewerage discharge and drain is combined.
4.3.2 Status of Sanitation Services
Type of Toilets: As per Census of India 2001, 30.43% of the houses have pit latrine, 8.06% houses
have other latrine and 2.34% houses have water closet latrine. Whereas as high as 59.17% of the
households have no latrine facility in house and they defecate in open. Table 4.6 and Figure 4.3
present the type of sanitation facilities in the town.
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Table 4.6: Type of Latrine within the House
Pit Latrine Water Closet Other Latrine No Latrine Total Houses
Number 755 58 200 1468 2481
% 30.43 2.34 8.06 59.17 100
Source: Census of India, 2001
Figure 4.3: Type of Latrine in Daboh

Community Toilet: The number of community toilets has been estimated 7 by DNP. Out of total
community toilets 4 community toilets have double seat and 3 community toilets have single seat. In
addition to this the number of urinal has been assessed 1 for the town. These toilets and urinal are not
maintained properly and insufficient considering the size of the town.
4.3.3 Citizen Report Card on sanitation (Based on Sanitation Survey, 2008, UADD, MP)
Based on sanitation survey (2462 HH) only 60% of houses have toilet facility. The remaining 40%
HHs are lacking the facility of toilet. However the comparison of the toilet facility shows
improvement in the sanitary condition of the town from year 2001 to year 2008. The status of access
to toilet facility has been illustrated in Table 4.7.
Table 4.7 Status of availability of toilet within house in Daboh

No. of House with Toilet No. of House without Toilet
Total Households
Surveyed
Number 1478 984 2462
% 60.06 39.94 100
Source: Sanitation Survey, 2008, UADD, MP
The sanitation survey ranks individual toilets as first preference (97.9%) followed by public (1.1%)
and no toilet (1%). Table 4.8 describes the preferences for toilets.
Table 4.8: Preference of toilet (who dont have toilet)
Toilet Type Surveyed HH (Number) %
Individual 963 97.9
Public 11 1.1
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Toilet Type Surveyed HH (Number) %
No 10 1.0
Total 984 100.0
Source: Sanitation Survey, 2008, UADD, MP
As shown in the Table 4.9, out of total toilet (1474), majority of toilet are of soak pit (72.1%)
followed by Septic Tank type (27.8%). There are some other types of toilet but these are insignificant
as shown in the above table.
Table 4.9: Type of Toilet
Type of Toilet No %
Sewage disposed into open drain 0 0.0
Septic Tank 410 27.8
Soak pit 1063 72.1
Public Toilet 0 0.0
Other 1 0.1
Total 1474 100.0
Source: Sanitation Survey, 2008, UADD, MP
Public Toilet: As shown in Table 4.10, 99.6% respondents reported that there is no public toilet in the
area and only 0.4% respondents reported to have a public toilet in the area. It may be concluded that
there is a complete lack of public toilet in the town.
Table 4.10 Availability of Public Toilet in area
Response Numbers %
Yes 9 0.4
No 2453 99.6
Total Respondents 2462 100.0
Source: Sanitation Survey, 2008, UADD, MP
Willingness to Pay: The sanitation survey also examined the willingness of local people regarding
the payment for the construction and O & M of public toilet in the town. As shown in the Table 4.11
and Table 4.12, very high majority of respondents reported not to contribute for construction and O &
M of public toilet in the town.
Table 4.11: Willingness to contribute in toilet construction
Response Numbers %
Yes 91 3.7
No 2371 96.3
Total 2462 100.0
Source: Sanitation Survey, 2008, UADD, MP
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Table 4.12: Willingness to Contribute in the O & M of toilet
Response Numbers %
Yes 211 8.6
No 2251 91.4
Total 2462 100.0
Source: Sanitation Survey, 2008, UADD, MP
Table 4.13: Status of Sewerage and Sanitation System in Daboh town
S.No Service Level Indicators Status
1 Quantity of Sewage generated in MLD No sewer system in town
2 Sewer Length (km) NA
3 Treatment Capacity (MLD) NA
4 Number of Connections NA
5 % of households having individual toilets 60.06
6 %age of households using public shared toilets NA
7 % age of households practicing open defecation 39.94
Source: Census of India, 2001, Sanitation Survey, 2008, UADD, MP and DNP
4.3.4 Projected Sewage Generation
As given in below table, the total sewage generation for the horizon year is 5 MLD. The sewage
generation has been taken as the 80% of total water supply in the town.
Table 4.14: Projected Sewage Generation in Daboh
Year Population
Water demand in
MLD
Waste water generated in MLD (80% of the
total water supplied)
2011 18,534 3.0 2.4
2015 22,974 3.7 2.9
2020 26,203 4.2 3.3
2025 29,886 4.8 3.8
2030 34,087 5.4 4.4
2035 38,878 6.2 5.0
Source: Consultants
From the above table it is clear that significant quatity of waste water would be generated (5 MLD) by
2035, which need to be treated. For treating this waste water either we can opt for city level sewerage
treatment plant (STP) or Decentralised Waste water Treatment System (DEWATS). The city level
STP concept is traditional and involve high amount of cost while establishing the system as well as
O&M, whereas DEWATS are viable, long term alternatives to centralised waste water treatment
facilities particularly in small towns where they are often most cost effective. In general DEWATS
cost from 20,000 30,000 Rs. per Kilo Litre Per Day (KLD) depending upon size for whole system.
Maximum feasible size of single DEWATS unit is 1000 KLD i.e. in case of Daboh minimum 5
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DEWATS units would be required for horizon year 2035. The total broad cost for DEWATS would
be Rs.12.5 crore (based on Rs 25,000 per KLD).
However, we have provided the costing for sewerage based upon centralised sewerage treatment
system which is given in Chapter 12, which is much higher than DEWATS and at the time of
implementation, decision can be taken based on the availability of funds and local requirements.
4.3.5 Service Level Benchmarking
The service level benchmarking of sewerage and sanitation has been proposed for next five year from
2012-13 to 2017-18 as given in the below table.
Table 4.15: Service level Benchmarking of Sewerage and Sanitation System, DNP
S.
No.
Service/ Indicator
Ultimate
Benchmark as
per MoUD,
GOI guidelines
Present
Status
Commitment for the Fiscal year
2012
-13
2013
-14
2014
-15
2015
-16
2016
-17
1 Coverage of Toilets 100% 60% 60% 80% 90% 95%
100
%
2
Coverage of Public
Toilets
100% 0% 30% 60% 80% 90%
100
%
3
Coverage of Sewerage
Network Services
50% 0% 0% 0% 0% 50% 80%
4
Collection Efficiency
of Sewerage Network
100% NA NA NA NA
100
%
100
%
5
Adequacy of Sewage
treatment capacity
100% NA NA NA NA 70%
100
%
6
Quality of sewage
treatment
100% NA NA NA NA 70%
100
%
7
Extent of reuse and
recycling of sewage
20% NA NA NA NA 10% 50%
8
Efficiency in redressal
of customer complaints
80% NA 30% 40% 50% 60% 80%
9
Extent of cost recovery
in sewage management
100% NA NA NA NA 70%
100
%
10
Efficiency in collection
of sewerage charges
90% NA NA NA NA 80% 90%
Source: DNP and ICT Estimates
4.3.6 Issues
Absence of a sewerage system in the city
Poor sanitation condition for the town
Inadequate individual and public toilets
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Improper means of disposal of wastewater resulting in environmental pollution and
unhygienic conditions.
40% of population do not have access to sanitary latrine and go for open defecation
4.3.7 SWOT Analysis
Table 4.16: SWOT Analysis of Sewerage and Sanitation
Strength Weakness
The proposed water supply would ensure
higher capacity of water supply required for
functioning of the sewerage system
Currently no sewer system is present currently in
the town
Around 40% of the total population go for open
defecation
ULB does not have funds for sewer system
ULB incapable of O & M of public toilets
Opportunities Threats
Good northeast natural slope to construct
the sewer system in town
40% population who defecate in open which
causes environmental pollution
Open defecation is unhygienic creating health
problems
Of total toilets in town 72.1% toilet are soak pit,
which are polluting ground water
4.3.8 Strategy for better sewerage & sanitation facilities
Awareness campaign to discourage open defecation practice
As short term solution toilets facilities for every house under ILCS Scheme
2

Provision of public toilets
Development of sewer system in the town
O & M of sewer system through modern equipment
4.4 STORM WATER DRAINAGE
4.4.1 Status of Storm Water Drainage
As assessed 75% of the towns road length have drains. Due to the lack of integrated drainage system
there is water logging in the town quite often. The existing drainage system in Daboh is piecemeal
construction of open drain as per local and temporary requirements without proper whole to part
designs. The Table 4.17 and Figure 4.4 show that out of total houses 76.4% houses have connectivity

2
Integrated Low Cost Sanitation (ILCS) Scheme: The Centrally sponsored scheme of Urban Low Cost Sanitation for
liberation of the Scavengers operates through the Ministry of Urban Employment & Poverty Alleviation. Priority is given to
those towns which have a predominance of dry latrines or where widespread open defecation takes place and having a
population not exceeding 5 lakhs as per 1981 Census. Financing pattern being followed is as follows; Central Subsidy 75%,
State Subsidy 15% and beneficiary share10%. A separate cell has been set up in HUDCO for the implementation of this
programme.
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to some kind of waste water outlet facility (Census, 2001) and 23.58% houses do not have
connectivity to drains.
Table 4.17: Type of Connectivity for waste water outlet

Total No. of
Household
Closed
Drainage
Open Drainage No Drainage
Numbers 2481 94 1802 585
% 100 3.79 72.63 23.58
Source: Census of India, 2001
Figure 4.4: Type of Connectivity for waste water outlet
The total existing road length is around 37km and around 75% (31km) of the roads are covered with
drains including main drains (4 main drains with 8km length). Most of the drains are on one side of
the roads. The total drain length is approximately 31 km excluding the main drains.
4.4.2 Main Drains
There are 4 main drains in Daboh town as given below:
1. Kardhan Nala (natural drain) from Kardhan talab to Khajuri marg, natural drain (3km length),
2. Richha nala from two sides (from Bhujarya and from Gatahi nala) (2 km length),
3. Hospital nala from hospital to Kardhan talab (2 km length),
4. Konch road nala from Konch road to Kardhan talab (1 km length)
Following the natural slope towards north-east, all the main drains fall into Mriga River (5km away
from the main town). Figure 4.5 illustrates the major drains of the town.
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Figure 4.5: Major Drains of the Town
4.4.3 Major Water Bodies
Apart from the natural drain, there are two ponds in Daboh, namely, Kardhan Talab and Gathai Talab.
These Talabs were found in the poor condition because of poor maintenance. Disposal of sewerage of
the town in Kardhan Talab through natural drain was also observed. These water bodies are shown in
Figure 4.6.



Photo 2: Water logging in the town
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Figure 4.6: Major water Bodies of Daboh
4.4.4 Flood Prone Areas
The last flood came in 1990, which was very sever in this region, water from west and south direction
flooded the town area. After that there is no major flood in the area but flood like situation arises
because of inadequate drainage system at some places during rainy season. Water logging is also a
frequent phenomenon due to the inadequate drainage system. As shown in Figure 4.5, parts of ward
1,2,3 and 6 gets affected by with water logging.
If a bypass is constructed in west and parallel drain along bypass is created then this temporary
problem of flood like situation and water logging will be solved. As the existing are choked and silted
therefore de-siltation of all the drains is also required to make the existing drains functional.
4.4.5 Service Level Benchmarking
The service level benchmarking of drainage system has been proposed for next five year from 2012-
13 to 2017-18 as given in the below table.
Table 4.18: Service level benchmarking of Storm Water Drainage, Daboh
S.
No.
Service/ Indicator
Ultimate
Benchmark as
per MOUD, Gol
Guidelines
Present
Status
Commitment for the Fiscal Year

2012-
13
2013
-14
2014
-15
2015-
16
2016
-17
1
Coverage of Storm
Water Drainage
Network
100% 75% 75% 75% 80% 90% 100%
2 Incidence of water 0% 40% 40% 30% 0% 0% 0%
Major Water
Bodies
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S.
No.
Service/ Indicator
Ultimate
Benchmark as
per MOUD, Gol
Guidelines
Present
Status
Commitment for the Fiscal Year

2012-
13
2013
-14
2014
-15
2015-
16
2016
-17
logging/ flooding
Source: DNP and ICT Estimates 2012
4.4.6 Issues
Most of the drains in the commercial areas of the city are being encroached by the shopkeepers
by extending their shops or making steps towards their shops. This affects the cleaning services
by the respective agencies involved in the service provision.
Most of the drainage lines being open and the municipal solid waste like garbage, polythene,
plastic carry bags, etc. are littered in the drains, thereby affecting their flow capacity.
Outfall in many of these drains is not proper and is discharged in open
The construction of unplanned colonies in the town has been further aggravating the water
logging in the recent past.
Piecemeal construction of drain and water logging due to lack of integrated drainage system
4.4.7 SWOT Analysis
Table 4.19: SWOT Analysis of Storm Water Drainage
Strength Weakness
Good natural slope toward north east
Presence of natural drains in the city that
make it easier to dispose water
No separate drainage network exists. Rain
water drains along sewerage disposal drains
Opportunities Threats
Good drainage system could be developed
using natural slope of the city
Open drains are susceptible to chocking due to
accumulation of solid wastes and only covered
drains would work in the towns
4.4.8 Strategies and Action Plan
Preparation of drainage master plan
Involve public participation in the implementation , operation and maintenance of drainage
master plan
Rainwater harvesting in government buildings and new private construction
Measures for repairing and de-silting covering of existing drains
Photo 3: Drains in the town
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Encroachment removal
O & M of drainage system through modern equipment
4.5 SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT
4.5.1 Introduction
Management of solid waste is the obligatory function of DNP. DNP is responsible for collection,
transportation and disposal of solid waste. There are 31 sanitation workers (17 permanent and 14
contract basis) involved in making the city clean, hygienic and beautiful. As assessed, out of 23
sanctioned posts of sanitary workers, only 74% is working as permanent workers.
The town generates 4.6 MT of solid waste every day, of which, the DNP collects 2.76 MT. The waste
is collected from internal roads with the help of handcart and stored at main roads. Table 4.20
summarises the existing situation of SWM in the town.
Table 4.20: SWM Existing Situation
S. No Status Description
1 Total Waste Generated per day (MT) 4.6
2 Waste Generated per capita (kg) 0.25
3 Waste Collected (tons) 2.76 (60% of total)
4 Number of Vehicles 1- Tractor; 15- Handcarts
5 Number of Trips per day 2
6 No. of Dustbin Nil
7 Landfill Disposal Sites 1 (2.5 acre land but undeveloped)
8 Type of Disposal Disposal on both sides of the main city roads
9 Conservancy Staff 31
10 Agencies Involved DNP
Source: DNP
4.5.2 Generation of SW
The generation of solid waste has been estimated 4.6 MT per day for the town. In this context
generation of SW per person has been assessed 0.25 kg/day. Solid waste management is in miserable
state in the town. Presently the solid waste is not segregated at any level. The residents dump the
waste in the nearby collection points or on the nearest vacant land here and there or in the drains
before the houses.
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Photo 4: A view of unsafe disposal of the solid waste
4.5.3 Primary and Secondary Collection
In DNP door to door collection of solid waste is not in practice. The solid waste is dumped by the
individuals either at the nearest collection point or in the low lying areas which is then picked up by
the local body who collects the garbage on the trolley, handcart and dumps the waste in an
unorganized manner into the roadside. The waste is kept open at the collection points, which leads to
subsequent foul smell, water, air pollution and unhygienic conditions. It also chokes the drains during
rainy season and lead to water logging in the low-lying / surrounding area.
4.5.4 Transportation of Solid Waste
Transportation of the garbage is done by tractor trolley and hand carts. The equipments used in
managing the solid waste are 1 tractor trolley and 15 handcarts. There are 31 sweepers engaged in the
sweeping of streets and which is managed by one Safai Daroga.
4.5.5 Disposal of Garbage
There is one landfill site of 2.5 acre earmarked for SWM but not developed and not being used to
dispose the garbage. As a result, everyday tons of waste disposed at open land or ditches in and
outside the city.











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Figure 4.7: Location of Landfill Site

4.5.6 Citizen Report Card on SWM: Sanitation Survey, UADD MP, 2008
As shown in the Table 4.21, 95.8% households dispose garbage in open and only 4.1% dispose into
garbage container, as per the Sanitation Survey 2008 but at present there is no garbage container in
the town. As told by municipal officials, land is available for landfill site in the south of the town (see
Figure 4.7) but this site has not been developed and not in use.
Table 4.21: Disposal of Garbage
Disposal No. of Respondents %
Garbage Container 101 4.1
Open 2359 95.8
in Drain 0 0.0
To be collected by designated person/ agency 2 0.1
Total 2462 100.0
Source: Sanitation Survey, 2008, UADD, MP
4.5.7 Distance to the Storage Site (Dhalao/Garbage collection centre)
As shown in the Table 4.22, 50% of the storage sites (Dhalao/Garbage collection centre) are within
the distance of 50 feet to 100 feet, 27.4% site are less than 50 feet, 13.2% sites within the distance of
200 feet to 500 feet. The data shows that majority of the household dispose garbage very near to their
houses (less than 100 feet).
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Table 4.22: Distance to the storage Site
Distance No. of Respondents %
Less than 50 feet 674 27.4
50 to 100 feet 1230 50.0
100 -200 feet 229 9.3
200-500 feet 326 13.2
500-1000 feet 3 0.1
Total 2462 100.0
Source: Sanitation Survey, 2008, UADD, MP
4.5.8 Designated place for storage of the garbage
As surveyed 93.9% people complained about no designated place for storage of the waste. Only 6.1%
respondents have confirmed the storage arrangement of the garbage in the town. Table 4.23 illustrates
the respondents feedback on storage facility.
Table 4.23: Place designated to store the garbage
Place designated No. of Respondents %
Yes 151 6.1
No 2311 93.9
Total 2462 100.0
Source: Sanitation Survey, 2008, UADD, MP
4.5.9 Frequency of garbage collection
As studied 85.9% of respondents confirmed the collection of solid waste once daily, 5.7 %
respondents said that the time and days of collection of garbage is not fixed. Table 4.24 presents the
respondents feedback on frequency of garbage collection.
Table 4.24: Frequency of Garbage collection by Municipality
Frequency of Garbage collection No. of Respondents %
2 times a day 53 2.2
once daily 2114 85.9
once in 2 days 83 3.4
Any time/ not fixed 141 5.7
no collection at all 71 2.9
Total 2462 100.0
Source: Sanitation Survey, 2008, UADD, MP
4.5.10 Disposal of Waste Generated by Domestic Animals
As shown in the Table 4.25, 42% households have domestic animals in Daboh town. The waste
generated from domestic animals is disposed-off separately (Table 4.26). As far as disposal of
garbage generated from domestic animals is concerned, 62.8 respondents told it is used for self-
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purposes, 33.1% respondents told to dispose the garbage into open and 2.3% respondents dispose it
outside the city boundary.
Table 4.25: Availability of Domestic Animals
Domestic Animals No. of Respondents %
Yes 1035 42.0
No 1427 58.0
Total 2462 100.0
Source: Sanitation Survey, 2008, UADD, MP
Table 4.26: Disposal of Garbage Generated by Domestic Animal
Disposal of Garbage No. of Respondents %
In Open 343 33.1
Outside city boundary 24 2.3
Self-use 650 62.8
Other 18 1.7
Total 1035 100
Source: Sanitation Survey, 2008, UADD, MP
4.5.11 SWM Compliance with MSW Rules 2000
The SMC functions were evaluated for management of solid waste based on compliance criteria
mentioned under MSW Rule 2000. As given in table below, the compliance is low and several criteria
are not attended at all (Table 4.27).
Table 4.27: SWM Compliance with MSW Rules 2000
Parameters Compliance Criteria Present Status in Daboh
Collection of
Municipal Solid
Waste
1. Prohibition on Littering of municipal
solid waste through following steps:

Organising house-to-house collection of
municipal solid wastes;
House to house collection facility
is not available
Devising collection of waste from slums
and squatter areas or localities including
hotels, restaurants, office complexes and
commercial areas;
Waste is dumped on the collection
points along the road sides.
Collection of these wastes are not
regular
Wastes from slaughter houses, meat and
fish markets, fruits and vegetable markets,
which are biodegradable in nature, shall be
managed to make use of such wastes;
No waste segregation, hence no
separate mechanism for disposal
Bio-medical wastes and industrial wastes Not followed
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Parameters Compliance Criteria Present Status in Daboh
shall not be mixed with municipal solid
wastes and such wastes shall follow the
rules separately specified for the purpose;
Collected waste from residential and other
areas shall be transferred to community bin
by hand-driven containerised carts or other
small vehicles;
1 tractor trolley and 15 handcarts
are used to transport the waste to
disposal point
Horticultural and construction or demolition
wastes or debris shall be separately
collected and disposed off following proper
norms. Similarly, wastes generated at
dairies shall be regulated in accordance
with the State laws;
Horticultural waste is collected by
the municipal council on weekly
basis.
Waste (garbage, dry leaves) shall not be
burnt;
Not followed
Stray animals shall not be allowed to move
around waste storage facilities or at any
other place in the city or town and shall be
managed in accordance with the State laws.
No Enforcement mechanism in
place.
2. Notification by Municipal Authority
about the waste collection schedule and
likely method for public benefit.
Not followed
3. Responsibility of generators to avoid
littering and ensure wastes in accordance
with the system notified by the Municipal
Authority.
Not followed
Segregation of
Municipal Solid
Waste
Organize awareness programmes among
citizens for encouraging segregation and
recycling of waste
Not followed
Not followed
Regular Meetings of municipal authorities
with representatives of local associations
for ensuring community participation.
Not followed
Storage of
Municipal Solid
Waste
Establish and Maintain storage facilities
for hygiene and sanitary conditions around
them with following steps:
Not followed
Storage facilities shall be created and No dustbins are available
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Parameters Compliance Criteria Present Status in Daboh
established by taking into account
quantities of waste generation in a given
area and the population densities. A storage
facility shall be so placed that it is
accessible to users;
Storage facilities to be set up by municipal
authorities or any other agency shall be so
designed that wastes stored are not exposed
to open atmosphere and shall be
aesthetically acceptable and user-friendly;
Not adhered with
Storage facilities or bins shall have easy
to operate design for handling, transfer and
transportation of waste. Bins for storage of
bio-degradable wastes shall be painted
green, those for storage of recyclable
wastes shall be printed white and those for
storage of other wastes shall be printed
black;
Not adhered with

Manual handling of waste shall be
prohibited. If unavoidable due to
constraints, manual handling shall be
carried out under proper precaution with
due care for safety of workers.
Manual Handling still present and
safety issues of workers not
adhered with
Transportation of
Municipal Waste
Vehicles used for transportation of wastes
shall be covered. Waste should not be
visible to public, nor exposed to open
environment preventing their scattering
and overflowing;
Not followed
The storage facilities set up by municipal
authorities shall be daily attended for
clearing of wastes. The bins or containers
wherever placed shall be cleaned before
they start overflowing
Not followed. Collection system is
not regular.
Transportation vehicles shall be so designed
that multiple handling of wastes, prior to
final disposal, is avoided
Multiple handling not done
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Parameters Compliance Criteria Present Status in Daboh
Processing of
Municipal Solid
Wastes
Municipal authorities shall adopt suitable
technology or combination of such
technologies to make use of wastes so as to
minimize burden on landfill.
No such technology is been
adopted so far.
Disposal of
Municipal wastes
Land filling shall be restricted to non-
biodegradable, inert waste and other waste
those are not suitable either for recycling or
for biological processing. Land filling shall
also be carried out for residues of waste
processing facilities as well as pre-
processing rejects from waste processing
facilities. Land filling of mixed waste shall
be avoided unless the same is found
unsuitable for waste processing. Under
unavoidable circumstances or till
installation of alternate facilities, land-
filling shall be done following proper
norms. Landfill sites shall meet the
specifications as given in Schedule III.
Segregation of waste is not been
done at dumping site.
4.5.12 Solid Waste Generation
As shown in the table below, the current (2011) waste generation is 4.6 MT and waste generation for
the horizon year 2035 is 9.7MT has been estimated.
Table 4.28: Solid waste generation
Year Population Per Capita (g) SW generated (MT)
2011 18534 250 4.6
2015 22974 250 5.7
2020 26203 250 6.6
2025 29886 250 7.5
2030 34087 250 8.5
2035 38878 250 9.7
Source: ICT Estimation 2012
4.5.13 Service Level Benchmarking
The service level benchmarking of SWM has been proposed for next five year from 2012-13 to 2017-
18 as given in the below table.
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Table 4.29: Service Level Benchmarking of Solid Waste Management, DNP
S.
No.
Service/ Indicator
Ultimate
Benchmark as
per MOUD,
Gol Guidelines
Present
Status
Commitment for the Fiscal Year
2012-
13
2013-
14
2014-
15
2016-
17
2017-
18
1
Household level
coverage of Solid
Waste Management
services
100% 0% 10% 30% 60% 80% 100%
2
Efficiency of
collection of
municipal solid
waste
100% 60% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100%
3
Extent of
segregation of
municipal solid
waste
100% 0% 30% 50% 70% 80% 100%
4
Extent of municipal
solid waste
recovered
80% 0% % % % % 80%
5
Extent of scientific
disposal of
municipal solid
waste
100% 0% 30% 50% 70% 80% 100%
6
Efficiency in
redressal of
customer
complaints
80% 40% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80%
7
Extent of cost
recovery in SWM
services
100% 0% 0% 50% 70% 80% 100%
8
Efficiency in
collection of user
charges
3

90% 42%
4
45% 60% 70% 80% 90%
Source: DNP and Consultant
4.5.14 Issues
Unsafe storage, collection, transportation and disposal of solid waste
Inadequate storage, collection, transportation and disposal of solid waste
Inadequate infrastructure for collection, transportation and disposal of municipal solid waste.
Absence of segregation practice at any level
Undeveloped landfill site for waste disposal
Transportation of the waste is done in open carriers.

3
User charges exclusively for solid waste is not collected and currently it is collected as a part of Consolidated Tax which
include sanitation, street light and solid waste
4
Proportion of property tax collected
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Due to the lack of proper SWM, waste is dumped into open drain causing water logging in the
town
4.5.15 SWOT Analysis
Table 4.30: SWOT Analysis of SWM
Strength Weakness
Availability of landfill site and the
site has been identified
Available cleaning staffs are of
sufficient number
Poor and improper disposal of solid waste along roads
and open grounds e.g. ground in front of the hospital,
open ground in wards, etc.
No waste segregation mechanism
Collection is not regular
Drains are in poor condition; blocked due to dumping of
solid wastes
Opportunities Threats
Development of landfill site
Exploring waste recycling methods
and management practices
Probability of Health hazards and unhygienic living
condition in the city.
No waste segregation mechanism
Source: Consultants
4.5.16 Strategies and Action Plan
Preparation of master plan for integrated SWM
Adhere the guidelines of MSW Handing and Management Rule 2000
Involve PSP in management of solid waste for the town
Development of Landfill site through PSP
IEC activity for better SWM
4.6 TRAFFIC AND TRANSPORTATION
An efficient transportation system is a prerequisite for the proper growth and functioning of the city.
An appropriate circulation pattern enhances the linkages of the town with other settlements in the
regional context and it also improves the connectivity within the town. The transportation system has
been assessed in terms of road transport, rail transport and air transport.
4.6.1 Road Transport
As far as road connectivity of Daboh town is concerned, it is well connected with other roads of the
state. The State Highway 45 connects the town with Datia in the south and Bhind in the north (Bhind-
Bhander road). It is also well connected with Gwalior with district roads.
Within the municipal area of town, main roads are reasonably wide and provide good intra-city
connectivity, considering the current size of town. The two main internal roads, namely Bhander-
Bhind Road and Konch Road carry the maximum inter-city and intra-city traffic. The total
approximately length of road within municipal area is 37km. Out of the total road length of 37km,
23km are main roads owned by municipality and 3 km roads owned by PWD (Bhind-Bhander Road
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and Konch Road). Remaining 11km are internal roads or streets. The existing road network is shown
in figure below.
Figure 4.8: Existing Road Network
4.6.2 Rail Transport
The town is not connected with railway line. The nearest railway station is at Datia, which is 67km
from the town.
4.6.3 Air Transport
The nearest airport is at Gwalior, which is around 90km from Daboh town.
4.6.4 Public Transport
As far as public transport is concerned bus and tempos are main means of transport. But there is no
proper bus stand in the town. Buses are parked along the road to carry the passengers.
4.6.4.1 Parking Status
Currently there is no off-street parking facility available
in town and people park vehicles along the roadside in
the market area which is along the main road. The parked
vehicle reduces the functional space of roads and this
leads to traffic jam in town.
Photo 5: Parking in the town
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4.6.5 Vehicles
As shown in Table 4.31, there are total 73408 vehicles (commercial-2245 and non-commercial-
71163) registered in Bhind district. The data shows that out of total vehicle registered in Bhind
district, very high majority of vehicles are non-commercial vehicle (96.9%) compare to commercial
vehicles (3.1%). These include all types of goods and passenger vehicles. Since these vehicles are
registered in whole district including urban and rural areas. Daboh is one of the 11 Municipal
Councils (Bhind, Mehgaon, Gohad, Mihona, Lahar, Mau, Phupkalan, Akoda, Gormi, Daboh and
Alampur) of Bhind district. Apart from 11 towns there are 933 villages in the district. Road transport
is the main mode of transportation in Bhind. The total extend of road length in the district is about
1319 Kms. Out of total district roads length, 37 km road length roads fall within the municipal
boundary of Daboh town. Since the town data for vehicle registration is not available therefore it has
been calculated based on the proportion of total road length. It may be concluded that although this is
not the correct way but in absence of factual data it is assumed that there are total around 3230
vehicles registered in Daboh town (4.4% of the total district vehicles). Following the district trends, it
is estimated that out of total estimated registered vehicle in Daboh, 3130 vehicles are non-commercial
and 100 vehicles are commercial.
Table 4.31: Registered Motor Vehicles As on 31st March 2009 in Bhind District
S No. Vehicle Bhind District
1 Goods
Multi Axles Articulated 5
Medium & Heavy Truck Lorries 538
L.C.V. Four Wheeler 342

Three Wheeler 133
2 Full Buses 30+1 Above
M.P.R.T.C
Ordinary 16
Deluxe

Other
Ordinary 149
Private

Deluxe 9
3 Mini Buses
Up to
573
12+1
12+1 To 30+1 101
4
Motor
77
Cabs
5 Tempo
Up to
124
6+1
6+1 above 8
6
Auto
170
Rick Shaw
7 Two Wheelers
Moped 1596
Motor Cycles/Scooter 45302
8 Car 898
9 Jeep 229
10 Tractor 16281
11 Trailers 6653
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S No. Vehicle Bhind District
12 Other Vehicles 204

Total 73408
Source: Motor Transport Statistics of Madhya Pradesh,Year-2008-2009
(http://mptransport.org/TPtstatics0228009.pdf)
4.6.6 Issues
Poor road condition
Improper junction cause frequent accidents
Lack parking facilities have resulted in significant bottlenecks in the inner city commercial
areas.
No bus stand in the town
Poor periodic road maintenance.
Absence of pedestrian facilities
4.6.7 SWOT Analysis
Table 4.32: SWOT Analysis of Traffic & Transportation
Strength Weakness
Good road connectivity through NH 45
Good availability of Right of Way
(RoW) of existing main roads
No direct rail connectivity
Inadequate O & M arrangement of existing roads
infrastructure
Lack of pedestrian facilities
Opportunities Threats
Good width of existing roads to be used
to extend existing road
Poor condition of roads
Earthen roads causing dust in air creating air pollution
Absence of parking spaces forcing people to park
vehicles on road creating
Source: Consultants
4.6.8 Strategies and Action Plan
Creating road infrastructure like bus stand, footpath, parking and signage through PSP
Improvement of existing main road junction
Re-strengthening of the existing city roads
Development of new roads
4.7 ELECTRICTY AND STREET LIGHTING
4.7.1 Status of Electricity
Electricity is supplied to Daboh town from sub-station (132KV) located at Seondha Sub-station of
220 KV and 400KA are located at Mehgaon and Gwalior respectively (http://www.mptransco.nic.in).
The town has one 11 KV sub station which supply power to whole town area. As far as electricity
connections are concerned, most of the houses have illegal electricity connections in the town. Power
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supply is not regular and there are frequent power cuts. The average power supply in the area is
approximately 6-8 hour daily and most of the time voltage is very low. .
4.7.2 Status of Street Light
Streetlight is one of the important and basic urban needs which play important role in functioning of
city at night. There is a general inadequacy in terms of availability of street lights on main road
stretches and even where provided, many of them are non-functional for lack of proper maintenance
and replacements. There are total 433 electricity poles including 3 high mast poles in the town but all
are not functional.
4.7.3 Issues
Illegal electricity connections causing the load shedding and low voltage
Inadequate electricity supply in the area
Whole town is not covered by street lights
Inadequate maintenance of street lights
4.7.4 SWOT Analysis
Table 4.33: SWOT Analysis of Electricity and Street Lighting
Strength Weakness
Power Network present in the city. Inadequate power supply
Lack of willingness to pay the bill
Lack of O & M system of street lights
Opportunities Threats
Continuous power supply will
ensure development of industries
and reliability in water supply and
safety in the town
Water supply becomes problematic because it is
dependent upon electricity which is scarce
Oil mill production becomes more costly
Electricity theft is common in the town
Theft of street light equipment is also common
4.7.5 Strategies and Action Plan
Installation of Solar street light system
Efficient O & M system for street lights


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5. SOCIAL INFRASTRUCTURE
5.1 INTRODUCTION
The quality of life of the people is determined by the availability of social infrastructure services in
the town. Social infrastructure facilities include health, education, recreation facilities, socio-cultural
activities, communications, security and safety and other community facilities, religious activities,
social congregations and community events, cremation / burial grounds etc. These are generally
planned in terms of population norms with stipulated permissibility conditions and development
controls. The chapter describes the facilities of Health, Education, Recreation and Community
facilities in Daboh.
5.2 EXISTING SITUATION OF SOCIAL INFRASTRUCTURE
The existing situation of social infrastructure has been studied for health, education, recreation and
community facilities in the town. The details of the same are given below in the sub sections and in
Figure 5.1.
Figure 5.1: Social Infrastructure Service in the town


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5.2.1 Health Facilities
As assessed health facilities are not satisfactory in the town. Primary Health Centre (PHC) is the only
treatment facility in the town. The average number of OPD patient has been accounted 47 per day.
The bed occupancy ratio has been estimated 87%. PHC lacks Blood test, Urine test, X-ray
examination and Sonography facilities.
Therefore citizens go to Datia (67km), Bhind (80km) and Gwalior (88km) to avail higher ordered
health services. Gwalior is main regional center for good quality health facilities in the region. There
is no female doctor in the Primary Health Centre. Table 5.1 describes the available health facilities in
the town.
Table 5.1: Status of Health Facilities in Daboh
S. No Item No
1 Government Primary Health Center 1
2 Government Maternity Home 1
3 Private Clinic 10
Total 12
Source: DNP, 2012

5.2.2 Demand Gap Assessment
Based on UDPFI guidelines town requires 3 dispensaries for vision year 2035. The number of
dispensaries for short and intermediate term has been assessed as two (2). Table 5.2 illustrates the
demand gap assessment for health service of the town.
Table 5.2: Demand Estimation of Health Facilities of Daboh
H
e
a
l
t
h

f
a
c
i
l
i
t
i
e
s

Year 2011 2015 2025 2035
Population 18534 22974 29886 38878
N
o
r
m
s

(
N
o
/

P
e
r
s
o
n
s
)

Existing
D
e
m
a
n
d

G
a
p

D
e
m
a
n
d

G
a
p

D
e
m
a
n
d

G
a
p

S
u
p
p
l
y

D
e
m
a
n
d

G
a
p

Dispensary/PHC 15000 1 1 0 2 1 2 1 3 2
Nursing Home 45000 1 0 +1 0 +1 0 +1 0 +1
Source: Estimate ICT 2012
Photo 1: Health Facilities in Daboh
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5.2.3 Education
The educational facilities have been studied as primary school (27) government, government aided
and private, Middle School (16) both private and government, Government Higher Secondary school
(2) and Degree College (1) for the town. Town is rich in educational facilities and serves the nearby
villages too. As assessed there is adequate government school for secondary and higher secondary
education. The detail description of educational facilities has been given in the Table 5.3.
Table 5.3: Status of Education Facilities in Daboh
S. No Item No
1 Government Primary School 4
2 Private Primary School (government aided) 3
3 Private Primary school 20
4 Government Middle School 15
5 Private Middle School (government aided) 1
6 Government Higher Secondary School 2
7 Degree College 1
Total 46
Source: DNP 2012
However the building of many secondary schools was found in the poor condition. These schools lack
the basic facilities of water supply and sanitation.
5.2.3.1 Basic Education/Literacy Indicators
The basic education indicators such as Early Childhood Care and Development, Primary Education,
Enrolment Ratio, admission rate, attendance rate, out-of-school children, Learning Achievements and
Outcomes and Adult Literacy was found satisfactory for the town.
5.2.4 Demand Gap Assessment
Based on UDPFI guidelines town requires 8 primary and 5 senior secondary schools for vision year
2035. However the number of secondary school has been assessed adequate for the town. Table 5.4
illustrates the demand gap assessment for educational facilities of the town.


Photo 2: School in Daboh
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Table 5.4: Demand Estimation of Educational Facilities of Daboh
E
d
u
c
a
t
i
o
n
a
l

f
a
c
i
l
i
t
i
e
s

Year 2011 2015 2025 2035
Population 18534 22974 29886 38878
Norms (No/
Persons)
Existing
S
u
p
p
l
y

D
e
m
a
n
d

G
a
p
/
S
u
r
p
l
u
s

D
e
m
a
n
d

G
a
p

D
e
m
a
n
d

G
a
p

D
e
m
a
n
d

G
a
p

Primary school 5000 7 4 +3 5 +2 6 +1 8 1
Senior secondary school 7500 18 3 +15 3 +15 4 +14 5 +13
Source: ICT Estimation 2012
As shown in Table 5.4, educational facilities are adequate. There are sufficient numbers of Senior
Secondary schools available but there is a need to upgrade the educational facilities in the town. There
is a gap of 1 additional primary school in 2035.
5.2.5 Recreation Facilities
Daboh town grossly lacks parks and open spaces. As far as recreational facilities are concerned, there
is no major park and playground in the town apart from some undeveloped playgrounds of schools
and college. There is one Karyan Pond in an area of 65 bighas, owned by irrigation department. It is
not developed properly.
5.2.6 Demand Gap Assessment
Based on UDPFI guidelines town requires Housing Cluster Park and Neighbourhood Park. The
estimated number of housing cluster park and neighbourhood park for vision year 2035 accounts 8
and 3 respectively. Table 5.5 presents the demand gap assessment for recreational facilities of the
town.
Table 5.5: Demand Estimation for Recreational Facilities of Daboh
R
e
c
r
e
a
t
i
o
n
a
l

f
a
c
i
l
i
t
i
e
s

Year 2011 2015 2025 2035
Population 18534 22974 29886 38878
Norms (No/
Persons)
Existing
S
u
p
p
l
y

D
e
m
a
n
d

G
a
p

D
e
m
a
n
d

G
a
p

D
e
m
a
n
d

G
a
p

D
e
m
a
n
d

G
a
p

Housing Cluster Park 5000 0 4 4 5 5 6 6 8 8
Neighborhood Park 15000 0 1 1 2 2 2 2 3 3
Source: ICT Estimation 2012
5.2.7 Community Facilities
Police Station: Police is required to maintain peace and order in the society and therefore it is also an
important aspect of city life. In Daboh town, there is one police station functioning.
Fire Station: Fire services play pivotal role in protecting people from fire hazards, building collapses,
road accidents and other unforeseen emergencies etc. The aim of providing fire safety service is to
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ensure that the fire fighting department is fully equipped to cater for the city level requirements with
latest machines and vehicles and trained officials.
In Daboh town there is one fire tender which is run by daily wage employees as and when there is any
emergency. There is no permanent and trained staff available for fire fighting in town. The numbers of
employees hired depend upon the gravity of situation.
Community Hall: there is no community hall in Daboh.
Cremation Ground: There are total two cremation grounds and one graveyard in the town. As
revealed during discussion with key stakeholders, all these cremation grounds are not maintained
properly and there is a need to develop these properly.
Public Library: There is no public library in Daboh
5.3 DEMAND GAP ASSESSMENT
Police Station: As per the standards prescribed by the UDPFI standards, 1 police station is required
for 90,000 population, thus quantity wise one police station is more than sufficient in Daboh.
Fire Station: As per the standards prescribed by the UDPFI standards, 1 fire station is required for 1
to 2 lakh population, thus quantity wise one fire station is more than sufficient in Daboh. But so far
the infrastructure in terms of number of fire tenders and staff is concerned this department is lagging
behind.
Community Hall: As per UDPFI guidelines, one community hall is required for 15000 population.
So as per the population projection of 2035, there is a need of 3 community hall in Daboh Town.
Public Library: As per UDPFI guidelines, one public library is required for 15000 population. So as
per the population projection of 2035, there is a need of 3 Public Library in Daboh Town.
5.4 ISSUES
The health institutions lack specialized doctors and other support staff, which can otherwise
prevent the patient to going to Gwalior for treatment.
The government medical facility is inaccessible to poors in the city.
Lack of lady doctors
In slums or among urban poors most of the children are either drop outs or dont go to school
because of the fees.
Lack of parks and poor maintenance
5.5 SWOT ANALYSIS
Table 5.6: SWOT Analysis for Social Infrastructure
Strength Weakness
Number of educational institutes are more
than any other towns in the vicinity
Vacant lands available with Nagar Parishad
for future development various purposes, like,
No hospital and only PHC is present in the city
There is no building of its own for high school/
inter-school
Degree College needs to be properly established
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recreation, housing for economically weaker
section, old age home, etc.
No Parks and Playground are present in the town
Opportunities Threats
Technical education facilities needs to be
established
The city can be developed as a local
educational hub, since, major cities providing
better educational facilities are at a quite
distance from Daboh
Ample scope for city beautification as no
initiative has been taken place before
If sanitation is not improved, health condition of
the people will be affected
Maintenance of city public recreation facilities
could be difficult due to lack of consciousness
among the people of Daboh
5.6 STRATEGY AND ACTION PLAN FOR SOCIAL INFRASTRUCTURE
Provision of education facilities for girls
Awareness generation about girl education
Development of Vocational Institutions
Up gradation of health facilities in the PHC
Procurement of required test equipment and medicines in the PHC
Human Resource Development for PHC
Introduction of the monitoring cell for PHC
Development of Parks and play grounds
Provision of Community Halls
Provision of public library
Development of existing crematorium


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6. URBAN POOR AND SLUMS
6.1 INTRODUCTION
This chapter describes dimension of poverty and slum in the town. After an introductory section, the
chapter gives a description of the poverty profile of the town in the second section. The third section
reviews the status of slums in Daboh with respect to its location, the social profile of its people,
housing status and access to infrastructure and basic facilities. This chapter also includes the
identification of major issues with respect to urban poverty and slum upgradation and formulation of
strategies and action plan for improving the living condition of poor and slum dwellers has been done.
6.2 TOWN POVERTY PROFILE
6.2.1 Poverty Estimates
Town has 58% persons (1467 HH) living below poverty line (BPL). As assessed ward 8 houses
highest number of BPL HHs followed by ward 6 (134 HH), ward 2 (124 HH), ward 3 (124 HH) and
ward 15 (120 HH). Table 6.1 shows the distribution of BPL HH in the wards of the town.
Table 6.1: BPL HH in Daboh
Ward BPL HH
1 99
2 124
3 124
4 70
5 43
6 134
7 59
8 138
9 40
10 117
11 84
12 124
13 87
14 104
15 120
Total BPL 1467
Source: DNP 2012
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6.2.2 Poverty Alleviation Programmes
The GoI and the GoMP through poverty alleviation programmes have taken several initiatives for
urban poverty alleviation has also been benefited from various poverty alleviation programmes which
are discussed in this section.
6.2.2.1 Swarna J ayanti Sahari Rojgar Yojana (SJ SRY) Daboh
DNP has been able to achieve the target under SJSRY. However since last three financial year, Nagar
Parishad has not received grant for the financial assistance of the selected beneficiaries (Table 6.2)
Table 6.2: Description of Loan Benefits to BPL under SJSRY
Year
Number of Beneficiaries
Loan sanctioned (in lakhs Rs.)
Target Achievement
2009-10 27 36 -
2010-11 10 09 -
2011-12 06 06 -
TOTAL 43 51 -
Source: DNP, 2012
6.2.3 Social Welfare Schemes
Social welfare schemes have been introduced with the objective of benefiting various marginalised
sections of the society. There are many schemes in place with central and state assistance in Daboh.
These schemes give ample support to aged, handicapped or orphan people, by way of pension
provisions, insurance coverage and other benefits. The schemes which are being implemented in
Daboh are discussed in this section.
6.2.3.1 Samajik Suraksha Pension Scheme
Samajik Suraksha Pension Scheme (SSPS) is for old, handicapped and orphan persons who are
identified as those living below poverty level. A financial assistance of Rs. 150 per month is given to
the identified beneficiary under this scheme. A total number of 217 persons have been benefited from
the Scheme since 2009-12 and a total amount of Rs. 3.90 lakh has been spent for the same (Table 6.3).
Table 6.3: Description of Samajik Suraksha Pension Scheme
Year Number of Beneficiaries Total Pension Disbursed (in Rs. Lakh)
2009-10 116 2.088
2010-11 70 1.26
2011-12 31 0.558
TOTAL 217 3.906
Source: DNP, 2012
6.2.3.2 Rashtriya Pariwar Sahayata Scheme
Under this scheme, a financial assistance of Rs. 10000 is given on the death of the earning member of
the beneficiary family. This scheme shields the dependents from undue hardship. Altogether 7
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families have been benefited from the scheme in the financial year 2011-12 and the total outlay of the
scheme has been recorded as Rs.70000 (Table 6.4).
Table 6.4: Description of Rashtriya Pariwar Sahayata Scheme
Year Number of Beneficiaries Total Assistance (In INR)
2010-11 7 70000
TOTAL 7 70000
Source: DNP, 2012
6.2.3.3 I ndira Gandhi National Old Age Pension Scheme
The programme has been launched on 19
th
November 2007. It covers all senior citizens with more
than 65 years of age and belonging to BPL families. The pension amount is credited, wherever
possible, into a post office or bank account of the beneficiary. Under this scheme a pension of Rs.275
per month has been distributed. The Scheme has benefited 314 persons since 2009-12 with a total
budget outlay of Rs.10.36 lakh (Table 6.5).
Table 6.5: Description of Indira Gandhi National Old Pension Scheme
Year Number of Beneficiaries Total Pension Disbursed (In Rs Lakh)
2009-10 99 3.267
2010-11 81 2.673
2011-12 134 4.422
TOTAL 314 10.362

6.2.3.4 I ndira Gandhi National Widow Pension Scheme
The scheme was launched in February 2009 by the Government of India. The scheme provides
pension of Rs.200 per month to widows between the age group of 40-64 years. The scheme has
benefited 81 individuals and the total outlay of the scheme has been recorded as Rs.1.45 lakh (Table
6.6).
Table 6.6: Description of Indira Gandhi Widow Pension Scheme
Year Number of Beneficiaries Total Pension Disbursed (In Rs Lakh)
2010-11 29 0.696
2011-12 52 1.248
TOTAL 81 1.944
6.2.3.5 I ndira Gandhi National Disability Pension Scheme
The scheme has been launched in February 2009 by the Government of India. The scheme aims to
provide pension to severely disabled persons. A pension amount of Rs.200 per disabled person every
month is disbursed as per the scheme. During 2010-2012, 21 disabled persons have benefited from the
scheme. Municipal Council has spent Rs.0.50 lakh (Table 6.7).


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Table 6.7: Description of Indira Gandhi National Disability Pension Scheme
Year Number of Beneficiaries Total Pension Disbursed(In Rs Lakh )
2010-11 10 0.24
2011-12 11 0.264
TOTAL 21 0.504
6.3 SLUMS
6.3.1 Location and Distribution of Slums
As assessed out of 15 wards 2 wards (ward 3 and ward 6) are notified as slum
1
wards. These wards
were notified as slum ward in the year 1996. The total population of these wards have been estimated
2301 and accounts 12.37% (370 HH) of the total population of the town. Figure 6.1shows the location
of the slums in the town.
Figure 6.1: Slum location map

1
As per census of India 2001, a slum is defined as
1) All specified area notified as slum by state / local body or union territory administration under any act.
2) All area recognized as slum by state/ local body or UT administration which may not have been formally notified as slum
under any act.
3) A compact area of at least 300 populations or about 60-70 households of poorly built congested tenements in unhygienic
environment usually with inadequate infrastructure and lacking in proper sanitary and drinking water facilities.
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6.3.2 Land Ownership and Tenure
The problem of land ownership and tenure was found in these slum wards. As assessed majority
(70%) of the houses are on encroached government land. The private and patta land is the other
category of land in these wards. Based on DNP estimate in the year 1998 patta land was given to 255
households out of which 70% were slum dwellers.
6.3.3 Access to Housing
Most of the houses are kutcha or semi pucca in these slum wards. The number of these houses in ward
3 and 6 has been estimated as 203 and 197 respectively. These houses require renovation.
6.3.4 Access to Infrastructure Facilities
Water Supply
The piped water supply is not available in these slum wards. As a result citizen depends on water post
and hand pump for water. Total number of water post and hand pumps in these wards has been
assessed 3 and 6 respectively.
Drainage
The slum wards (Ward 3 and Ward 6) are deprived from the facility of drainage. As a result water
logging is the common phenomenon in these wards.
Sanitation
Most of the houses are without sanitation facilities and open defecation is palpable in these wards.
The present community toilet (1) is poorly maintained as a result it is not used properly by the
residents.
Solid Waste Collection
The facility of solid waste collection is very poor in these wards. Waste is not collected at regular
basis. Usually it is collected at the interval of 15 days and more. As a result citizen dumps the waste
on road and street.
Street Light
There is no street light facility provided in slums or poor colonies.
Roads
At many places there is no approach road. Where there are roads, they are very narrow and un- paved.
6.4 BASIC SERVICES MAPPING IN SLUMS- COMMUNITY PERCEPTION
Assessment of basic services has been carried out through consultation and Focus Group Discussion
with various residents of slum pockets. In total 7 such consultations were carried out in different slum
pockets. The findings of such consultation have been given in Table 6.8.
Table 6.8: Status of Infrastructure and Services
Indicator Existing Situation
Access to Water Supply
No piped water supply;
Hand pumps (6) are the major source of water.
There are 3 water post present
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Indicator Existing Situation
Access to Sewerage and
Sanitation
Non-existent sewerage facility;
Open defecation is common.
Public Toilet - 1
Access to SWM
Waste disposal bins-Nil;
Open dumping of waste;
Lack of awareness amongst people.
Housing
About 203 in ward 3 and 197 in ward 6houses are either kutchha or
semi pucca;
Approach Roads Unpaved roads.
Drainage No drainage facility.
Economic Status
Majority engaged in informal activities like agriculture labour,
construction labour, animal rearing and pottery etc.;
Source: DNP, 2012 and Reconnaissance Visit, 2012
The situation assessment for the mentioned basic services has been carried out based on parameters
set by the Draft National Slum Policy. The task has been carried out by analysis of secondary
information given by DNP and reconnaissance of slum pockets Table 6.9.
Table 6.9: Situation Assessment for Infrastructure Facilities in Slums
S. No. Basic Services Aspects Standard Current Situation
1 Water
Quantity 135 LPCD No piped water supply
No. of Stand
Post
One Stand Post for 25
people in absence of
individual supply
Only 3 stand posts,
inadequate to serve the slum
population.
Provision for
Emergency
Community Supply
and Storage Facility
Private storage mechanism
and supply through tankers
during summer season
2 Sanitation
Individual
Toilet
Access to all
80% HHs do not have access
to individual toilets
Public Toilet One Seat for 50
persons
Only 1 community toilets;
prevalent open defecation.
3 Waste Disposal
Method of
Disposal
Provision of
community bin in
absence of door to
door collection
No bins
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S. No. Basic Services Aspects Standard Current Situation
4
Storm water
Drains
Proper
Drainage
System
Drains integrated with
main city drainage
system
100% of the slum pockets do
not have storm water drains.
5 Road
Access Roads Paved Access ways
90% of the slum pockets do
not have paved access roads.
6 Housing
Quality of
Dwelling
Units
Accessibility to good
housing
Only few houses are pucca.
Source: DNP, 2012
6.5 ISSUES
Lack of pucca houses for the urban poor and slums.
These wards lack basic infrastructure facilities.
Garbage disposal is another major issue for the urban poor, as the current mechanisms are not
adequate.
Lack of awareness regarding Government Schemes. The urban poor do not have the required
documents for availing benefits under Government schemes. Hence, procurement of loans and
availing benefits under Government schemes should be made easier for the urban poor.
6.6 SWOT ANALYSIS
SWOT analysis describes strength, weakness, opportunity and threat of this sector.
Table 6.10: Urban Poverty and Social Equity
Strength Weakness
Existence of programmes and allocations that
are the framework for planning and
implementing programmes for poverty
alleviation and slum development
Lack of awareness & poor access to information on
Government schemes
Inadequate social and physical infrastructure facilities
Unhealthy & Unhygienic living conditions
Opportunities Threats
The initiation of the preparation of the City
Development Plan is an opportunity for
improvement in infrastructure facilities and
basic amenities in the city
Migration of BPL and slum people to relatively larger
cities providing better infrastructure facilities and
economic opportunities
Crime and social unrest might increase due to inequity
6.7 STRATEGY FOR URBAN POOR AND SLUMS
The strategy for urban poor and slum has been formulated to ensure housing and basic amenities in
slum areas. The present status of slum areas has been assessed in this process.
Universalization of basic services in slum areas and urban poor
Improvement of housing conditions
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Awareness regarding Government Schemes
Slum improvement and rehabilitation program to cover urban poor


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7. ENVIRONMENT AND TOURISM
7.1 INTRODUCTION
The Chapter below presents a brief caricature of the study areas environment, its main tourist
attractions and existing heritage, their spatial scope and related key issues. It also provides a glimpse
of the major attractions of these spots and the type of tourism (heritage tourism, religious and cultural
tourism etc.).
7.2 ENVIRONMENT
The town's environment can essentially be seen in terms of two components of urban management-
the environment of the habitat and services management. The former pertains to the natural features
and resources including: the elements of air and noise, water (water bodies-river, lakes, drains and
ponds and ground water) and land with reference to open spaces, green areas and other surface and
sub-surface conditions. The later is related to the built environment and includes the environmental
infrastructure, i.e. the water supply, sewerage, solid waste disposal, and the transportation network.
7.2.1 Natural Environment Baseline
This section elaborates the natural environment baseline within the Daboh planning area. Aspects
including land, water, forest resources and the vulnerability to natural hazards have been discussed.
7.2.1.1 Land Resources
Topography
Daboh is situated at an altitude of 161 m (528 ft.) above mean sea level. The general direction of slope
is towards north-east side of the city. Daboh lie in the Sindh-Pahuj doab, which form the southern
margin of the Gangetic valley.
Drainage
The natural drainage of the city is from West to East. There are 4 main drains; one starts from
Kardhan talab to Khajuri marg (8km length), second Richha nala from two sides (from Bhujarya and
from Gatahi nala) (2 km length), third starts from hospital and lastly meets in Kardhan talab (1.5 km
length), fourth starts from Konch road and meet Kardhan talab (2 km length); and lastly these all
drains in Mriga river (5km away from the main town).
7.2.1.2 Water Resources
Surface water
Daboh has three ponds which include two major ponds (Kardhan talab & Gatahi talab) and a small
pond. Kardhan Talab is spread in an area of 12.6 Ha, though originally the talab had a water spread of
more than 20 Ha with maximum depth of 15 feet. Gathai is spread in an area of 3.2 Ha. Kardhan talab
and Gatahi talab have catchment area of about 50 Ha and 20 Ha respectively, and acts as main source
of ground water recharge in the city.
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7.2.1.3 Forests- Flora and Fauna
There is no forest area within the boundary of Daboh town. Daboh is falling in the tropical climatic
condition. Therefore all kinds of tropical flora and fauna are found in the region as given below:
Tropical vegetation found in Daboh region are Kardhai, Khair, Hingot, Reunjha, Ber, Birbira,
Chhenkur and Proopis are main vegetation along with Neem, and Babul (Divisional Forest Office,
Bhind). According to Census of India 2001, 71.62% of the total houses use firewood as cooking fuel,
therefore people cut trees for firewood at large scale and damaging the environment due to the lack of
other fuel option or due to the lack of capability to use other options (Table 7.1).
Table 7.1: Distribution of households by availability of separate kitchen and type of fuel used
for cooking

Total
number
of HH
Type of fuel used for cooking
Fire-
wood
Crop
residue
Cow-dung
cake
Kerosene LPG Electricity Biogas
No
cooki
ng
N 2,481 1,777 177 283 47 177 12 2 6
% 100 71.62 7.13 11.41 1.89 7.13 0.48 0.08 0.24
Census of India, 2001
The common wild life found in the region are common Langur, Monkey (Rhesus Macaque), Sloth
Bear, Jackal, Indian Fox, Indian Wild Boar, Common Indian (Sehi), Blue Bull, Common Mongoose
etc. (Divisional Forest Office, Bhind)
7.2.1.4 Natural Hazards
Earthquake
Daboh lies in the Seismic Zone II as per the Bureau of Indian Standards. This means lower to medium
seismic intensity.
Flood
Though Madhya Pradesh is not a flood-prone state, but the main rivers of the state do get flooded for
a brief period annually. The planning area is having rolling terrain which has the possibility of getting
flooded during monsoon due to low level of the alignment and choking of drains. In 1990 flood was
very sever in this region, water from west and south direction flooded the area.
7.2.2 Environment Issues
7.2.2.1 Land Pollution
The main causes of land pollution in Daboh are the sewerage system and improper solid waste
management system. Indiscriminate dumping of garbage and the absence of an undeveloped sanitary
landfill site are among the reasons for increasing leachate contamination and land pollution.
The large number of septic tanks most of which are unlined or do not have soak pits are also one of
the main reasons of land pollution in the city. Wastewater is also disposed of directly into open drains
from where it percolates into the ground and pollutes land.
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7.2.2.2 Water Pollution
The surface water of the city is polluted; water resources in the city are polluted due to disposal of
sewerage directly into the surface drains or surface water bodies.
7.2.2.3 Fire Hazards
Although it is difficult to predict and prevent natural hazards, manmade hazards can be avoided or
mitigated through preventive actions. Dabohs vulnerability to fire hazard is likely to increase with
increasing population density and as the urban fabric becomes denser, chances of fire incidences
would also increase.
7.2.2.4 Poverty
Poverty has been identified as one of the indicator to assess environment quality. Poverty forces
people to exploit natural resources and cause various form of air water and land pollution. The poor
do not have access to safe drinking water, sanitation and sewerage system. In Daboh, the slum
population has access to pit latrines which are unhygienic and a breeding ground for several diseases.
The solid waste generated by the families is disposed-off in open dumps, which pollutes land and
water. Trees are being cut to meet the need of firewood, shelter and food.
7.2.2.5 Solid Waste Management
At present, solid waste management is one of the most critical issues in Daboh. Solid waste
management has been identified as one of the most pressing urban environment issues by the
stakeholders during consultations. People have asked for proper SWM facilities and infrastructure,
especially efficient waste collection system. Absence of a sanitary landfill site is another critical issue
related to sanitary land filling which rears its ugly head in most urban centres of India. It results in the
leachates seeping down into the ground water and worsening its quality.
7.2.2.6 Water Logging
Water logging and improper drainage has been identified as one of the urban environmental issues
during stakeholder consultations. Chocking of roadside drains due to garbage disposal, inadequate
design etc. are the causes of improper drainage in the city.
7.2.3 SWOT Analysis
The assessment of natural and manmade environment is prerequisite for sustainable urban
development. The climate, topography, water bodies and vegetation are integral part of urban
environment. The development efforts of the city have degraded the urban environment by polluting
the water bodies. Table 7.2 presents these strengths and weaknesses for urban environment in Daboh.
Table 7.2: SWOT Analysis of Environment
Strength Weakness
Vacant lands available with Nagar Parishad
for future development various purposes, like,
recreation, housing for economically weaker
section, old age home, etc.
Unplanned and haphazard development of
the city
Bus-stand, public toilets, community toilets,
etc. are currently not there in the city
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Crematorium (4nos.) and Graveyards (4nos.)
needs boundary walls
Opportunities Threats
Scope for city beautification as no initiative
has been taken place in past
Unplanned development
Encroachment on government lands
7.3 TOURISM
7.3.1 Major Tourist Spots
Daboh is not a tourist destination of the region. It does not have any significant tourist attraction spots
in the town. Few old temples are present in the town which is significant in the local region. The only
attraction in the city is Kardhan Talab which can be developed as a recreational zone for the
residents of the town, through its beautification and preservation. Vacant land adjacent to the
Kardhan Talab is currently being used as Mela ground.
7.3.2 Tourist Infrastructure
At present there is no tourist infrastructure in the city. There is no public toilet near the Talab which
is required as the area is being used as a recreational zone by the locals and the adjacent ground holds
Mela once in a year. The existing ghats are damaged.
7.3.3 Tourism Related Issues
The only tourist attraction, for locals and people living in region in Daboh is Kardhan Talaband it is
in poor condition. It has not been maintained properly and currently the whole water body is covered
in weeds. The natural condition of the Talab needs to be restored and regular maintenance is utmost
requirement. The water body is being used to bath the household animal which further pollutes it by
bacterial contamination. The ghats also need to be repaired. Currently waste is being dumped beside
the approach road towards the Talab which has made the environment worst. This large water body
gives ample space for community life but due to lack of care, this is gradually vanishing.
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Photo 1: Existing Situation of Kardhan Talab
7.4 STRATEGY FOR ENVIRONMENT
Following strategy has been formulated for conserve the environment of the town.
Reforms for clean green and solar town
Encourage afforestation along main roads and open spaces
Renovation and beautification of water bodies and ponds
Conservation of ponds through central ground water board


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8. URBAN GOVERNANCE AND
INSTITUTIONAL SETUP
8.1 INTRODUCTION
This chapter describes in detail the institutional framework operational in the town. The chapter is
divided into seven sections. Section 1 introduces the chapter. The structure of the Daboh Nagar
Parishad (DNP) is described in section 2. Section 3 describes the personal strength and functions of
DNP and institutional framework for urban development and service delivery have been illustrated in
Section 4. An overview of the recent urban reforms has been given in section 5. The issues related to
urban governance have been summarized in section 6. Section 7 gives a SWOT assessment of the
urban governance situation in the town and last section presents strategy or better governance in the
town.
8.2 CONSTITUTION AND COMPOSITION OF DABOH NAGAR PARISHAD
The Madhya Pradesh Municipalities Act (1961) enables the Daboh Nagar Parishad to work as a local
level governing institution as envisaged in the 74th Constitutional Amendment Act (CAA). The recent
amendment (Oct 2011) in this act (The Madhya Pradesh Municipalities Act 1961) known as Madhya
Pradesh Nagar Palika Vidhi (Sansodhan) Adhiniyam 2011 has brought the change in the classification
of municipalities from 3 (Municipal Corporation, Municipal Council and Nagar Panchayat) to 2
(Municipal Corporation and Municipal Council). This led to the formation of 337 urban bodies in the
state. Amongst these 14 are Municipal Corporations, and 323 are Municipal Councils. Daboh is one
of the 323 Municipal Councils. The Daboh Nagar Parishad (DNP) has both a political and executive
wing and their composition and role have been discussed in the ensuing paragraphs.
8.2.1 Political Wing
The Council is constituted by elected councillors (15) and president (1). The political wing functions
by way of committees and there are six committees. The details of these have been given in the Table
8.1 below.
Table 8.1: List of Committees of Political Wing of DNP
S. No. List of Committees Members
1 President in Council 5
2 Lok Nirman Samiti 2
3 Rajaswa Bazar Samiti 2
4 Mahila Bal Vikas Kanya Shiksha Samiti 2
5 Samanya Prashashan, Bidhi and Bidheyak Samiti 2
6 Jal Karya Samiti 2
Source: DNP, 2012
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8.2.2 Executive Wing
The principal executive officer for the council is the Chief Municipal Officer (CMO), who is
appointed by the State Government. The DNP is empowered with specific financial and substantive
powers under the said municipal act of the state. Three consecutive elections to Daboh Nagar Parishad
have been conducted since the implementation of 74
th
CAA in the state.
The CMO heads sections such as establishment and administration, revenue, water supply and public
health. Each section is headed by the personnel as mentioned in the Madhya Pradesh Municipal Act,
1961.
General Administration Department: The Administration is responsible for a wide variety of
functions including General Administration, Emergency Measures Coordination, Bylaw Enforcement,
Property Maintenance, and Human Resource Management. Supervision of this department is the
responsibility of the Supervisor of Administration. He provides logistical support to all departments
and ensures quality control over administrative expenditures in support of line departments. This
department is responsible for all human resource functions and some general administrative functions
in the Municipality. The total sanctioned posts are 10 but there are 2 additional staff working under
this department is 12.
Water Supply Department: Water supply department deals with the supply of drinking water to
Daboh and is also responsible for implementation of projects involving supply of drinking water. The
present employee strength has been assessed 2 for this department.
Sanitation Department: The department is responsible for collection, transportation and hygienic
disposal of solid waste generated in residential, commercial, institutional and recreational spaces. The
department is headed by a sanitary inspector (1) and sanitary worker (16). Besides this 14 sweepers
are also engaged on contract to make the town clean and hygienic. Cleaning of roads and roadside
drains is another task of the department. Department ensures sweeping of public streets every day and
arrange for removing the rubbish, dirt and garbage from streets.
Revenue Department: Department is accountable for management of revenue and capital account of
municipality. Total number of staff strength has been assessed as 3 for this department.
8.3 STAFF STRENGTH OF DNP
The total sanctioned post for DNP is 42. However, currently only 34 posts (81% of all posts) are
filled. Details of posts vacant under various departments have been given in Table 8.2.
Table 8.2: Assessment of Staff Strength
S. No. Department Sanctioned Post Filled Post Vacant Post Vacant Post in %
1
General
Administration
10 12 - 0
2 Revenue 3 3 - 0
3 Water Supply 3 2 1 33
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S. No. Department Sanctioned Post Filled Post Vacant Post Vacant Post in %
4 Sanitation
1
23 17 6 26
5 Street Light 1 - 1 100
6 Fire services 2 - 2 100
Total

42 34 12 29
Source: DNP, 2012
As per letter No. F 4-140/2011/18-1 dated 21.08.2012, under municipal (health) service re-
organization, the following posts have sanctioned by the State Government:
1. Sanitation Supervisor: 1 Post (up to 50000 population)
2. Accountant: 1 Post (one per ULB)
3. CMO C Grade: 1 Post (one per ULB)
4. Sub-Engineer: 1 Post (for population less than 20000)
It may be noted here that the above-mentioned posts will filled considering the available staff on these
posts.
8.3.1 Functions of the Daboh Nagar Parishad
1. The State Municipal Act have categorized the functions to be carried out by the municipal council
as mandatory and discretionary functions.
2. The duty of Daboh Municipal Council is to undertake and make reasonable and adequate
provision for the following matters within the limits of the Municipality.
Lighting public streets, places and buildings.
Cleansing public streets, places and sewers, and all places, not being private property, which
are open to the enjoyment of the public whether such places are vested in the Council or not.
Removing noxious vegetation, and abating all public nuisances.
Disposing of night-soil and rubbish and preparation of compost manure from night-soil and
rubbish.
Extinguishing fire and protecting life and property when fire occurs.
Regulating or abating offensive or dangerous trades or practices.
Removing obstructing and projection in public streets or places and in spaces not being private
property, which are open to the enjoyment of public, whether such spaces are vested in the
Council or in the State Government.
Acquiring, maintaining, changing and regulating places for the disposal of the dead.
Taking special measures as may be required by the prescribed authority or any other authority
empowered to issue a direction in this behalf under any law for the time being in force for
disposal of dead bodies during epidemics and other unforeseen emergencies.
Securing or removing dangerous building or places, and reclaiming unhealthy localities.

1
Additional 14 sanitation workers are working on contract.
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Constructing, altering and maintaining public streets, culverts, Municipal boundary marks,
markets, hats, slaughter - houses, latrines, privies, urinals, drains, sewers, drainage works,
sewerage works, baths, washing places, drinking fountains, tanks, wells, and dams.
Establishing and managing cattle pounds, including, where the Cattle Trespass Act, 1871, is in
operation, all the functions of the State Government and the Magistrate of the district under
sections 4, 5, 6, 7, 12, 14, 17 and 19 of that Act.
Obtaining a supply or an additional supply of water, proper and sufficient, for preventing
danger to the health of the inhabitants and domestic cattle on account of insufficiency or
unwholesomeness, of the current supply when such supply or additional supply can be
obtained at a reasonable cost and having such water analyzed periodically.
Naming streets and parks and numbering houses.
Registering births, marriages and deaths.
Public vaccination.
Providing suitable accommodation for any calves, cows and buffaloes required within the
Municipal limits for the supply of animal lymph.
Registration of cattle and carrying out the census of agricultural cattle at such intervals as may
be prescribed.
Taking such measures as may be required to prevent the outbreak or spread or recurrence of
infectious disease.
Preparing such annual reports on the Municipal administration as the State Government may,
by general or special orders, require the Council to submit.
Erecting substantial boundary marks of such description and in such position as shall be
approved by the Collector, defining the limits or any alteration in the limits of the
Municipality.
Constructing and maintaining residential quarters for the conservancy staff of the Council.
Establishing and maintaining primary schools.
3. As envisaged in 12
th
Schedule of 74
th
CAA, out of 18 functions, 17 have been transferred to
municipalities. The function of urban planning including town planning is not transferred to
municipality. It lies with Town and Country Planning Organization (TCPO).
In addition to the duties imposed under sub-section (1) a Council shall, in times of distress such as
out-break of an epidemic or famine or other natural calamity, render such assistance and co-operation
as the State Government may require for the following matters, namely:-
(a) Providing special medical aid and accommodation for the sick;
(b) Giving relief to, and establishing and maintaining relief works for destitute persons within the
limits of Municipality.
No suit for damages or for specific performance shall be maintainable against any
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Council or any officer or Councillor thereof, on the ground that any of the duties specified in this
section has not been performed.
Discretionary functions of Council
A Council may, at its discretion provide, either wholly or partly out of the Municipal property and
fund, for all or any of the following matters namely:-
Reclaiming unhealthy localities, laying out, whether in areas previously built upon or not, new
public streets, and acquiring land for that purpose, including plots of land for building to abut on
such streets.
Constructing, establishing or maintaining public parks, gardens play-grounds and open spaces,
libraries, museums, lunatic asylums, halls, offices, dharamshalas, rest-house and other public
buildings;
Furthering educational objects;
Planting and maintaining roadside and other trees;
Watering public streets and places;
Playing of music in squares, gardens or other places of public resort;
Taking a census, for local purposes and granting rewards for information which may tend to
secure the correct registration of vital statistics;
Making a survey;
Paying the salaries and allowances, rent and other charges incidental to the maintenance of the
Court of any stipendiary of honorary Magistrate, or any portion of any such charges;
Destruction or the detention of dogs and pigs which may be destroyed or detained under the
provision of this Act or under any other enactment for the time being in force in the State.
Securing or assisting to secure suitable places for the carrying on of the dangerous and offensive
trades specified by or under this Act;
Supplying, constructing and maintaining receptacles, fittings, pipes and other appliances
whatsoever, on or for the use of private premises for receiving and conducting the sewage thereof
into sewers under control of the Council;
Establishing and maintaining a farm or factory for the disposal of sewage;
Promoting the well-being of Municipal employees or class of employees and of their dependents;
Providing housing accommodation for any class of employees of the Council other than the
conservancy staff;
The construction of sanitary dwelling houses for the poorer classes;
Making contribution towards the construction establishment or maintenance of educational
institutions including libraries and museums, hospitals, dispensaries or similar institutions
providing public medical relief or engages in social work or other institutions of a charitable
nature;
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The acquisition and maintenance of pasture lands or grazing grounds and the establishment and
maintenance of dairy farms and breeding stud;
The setting up of dairies or farms for the supply, distribution and processing of milk or milk
products for the benefits of the inhabitants of the Municipal area;
Securing and distributing either free or at reduced price, particularly for the use of expectant and
nursing mothers, children and invalids, full-cream or skimmed milk, condensed milk, evaporated
milk, milk powder and synthetic and so
Establishing and running lodging and boarding houses;
Establishing and running eating houses such as refreshment rooms tea shops, sweetmeat shops,
restaurants, cafes, canteens, hotels and any such place where food and drinks are served;
Providing and maintaining public bathing places or swimming pools with sheds, booths and other
conveniences;
Undertaking any commercial enterprises;
Constructing and maintaining such roads, buildings and other Government works other than
irrigation works, as the State Government may, in accordance with rules made under this Act,
transfer to the Council;
Providing for the maintenance and treatment of lunatics and lepers residing within or removal
from the Municipal area at an asylum, hospital or house approved by the State Government;
Arranging for the removal of lunatics, lepers and persons needing anti-rabic treatment to an
asylum, hospital or house whether within or without the Municipal limits set up for the treatment
of such persons;
Holding melas and fairs;
Establishing ashrams for destitute, blind, crippled, lame, disabled and old persons;
Establishing and maintaining veterinary dispensaries;
Any public reception, ceremony, entertainment or exhibition within the Municipality at a cost not
exceeding such amount as may be prescribed by rules in this behalf; Provided that a resolution in
that behalf is passed by the Council at an ordinary meeting;
Any matter likely to promote the public health, education, safety and convenience of the public
not otherwise provided for;
Establishing and maintaining hospitals and dispensaries;
Establishing and maintaining poor houses; and
Urban planning including town planning;
Regulation of land use and construction of buildings;
Planning for economic and social development;
Urban forestry, protection of the environment and promotion of ecological aspects;
Safeguarding the interest of weaker sections of society including the handicapped and mentally
retarded; and
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Urban poverty alleviation.
Any other matter with the previous approval of the State Government
In addition, the State Government may entrust other functions to ULBs to be carried out on its behalf.
8.3.2 Taxation Powers of Daboh Nagar Parishad
The Nagar Parishad can impose in the whole or in any part of the Municipal Area, the following
taxes.
A tax payable by the owners of buildings or lands situated within the town with reference to the
gross annual letting value of the buildings or lands, called the property tax, subject to the
provisions of Sections 126, 127-A and 129.
A water tax, in respect of lands and buildings to which a water supply is furnished from or which
are connected by means of pipe with municipal water works.
A general sanitary cess, for the construction and maintenance of public latrines and for removal
and disposal of refuse and general cleanliness of the town.
A general lighting tax, where the lighting of public streets and places is undertaken by the
Council.
A general fire tax, for the conduct and management of the fire service and for the protection of
life and property in the case of fire.
A local body tax on the entry of such goods as may be declared by the State Government by
notification in the official Gazette into the municipal area for consumption use or sale therein at a
rate not exceeding four percent of the value of goods.
In addition to the taxes specified in sub-section (1), the Council may, for the purpose of this Act,
subject to any general or special order which the State Government may make in this behalf,
impose any of the following taxes.
a) A latrine or conservancy tax payable by the occupier or owner upon private latrines, privies or
cesspools or open premises or compounds cleansed by Council agency.
b) A drainage tax, where a system of drainage has been introduced.
c) A tax on persons exercising any profession or art or carrying on any trade or calling within
the town.
d) A tax payable by the owners on all or any vehicles or animals used for riding, driving draught
or burden or on dogs, where such vehicles, animals or dogs are used within the town, whether
they are actually kept within the town or not.
e) A toll on vehicles and animals used as aforesaid entering the town but not liable to taxation
under clause (d).
f) Fees on the registration of cattle sold within the town.
g) Market dues on persons exposing goods for sale in any market or in any place belonging to or
under the control of the Government or of the Council.
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h) A betterment tax on properties whose value may have improved as a result of town planning
scheme undertaken by the Council.
i) A tax on pilgrims resorting periodically to a shrine within the limits of the Council.
j) A tax on persons occupying, houses, buildings or lands within the limits of the council
according to their circumstances and property.
k) A toll on new bridge constructed by the Council.
l) A tax on advertisements other than advertisements published in newspapers.
m) A tax on theatres, theatrical performances and other shows for public amusement.
n) A terminal tax on goods or animals exported from the limits of the Council
o) Any other tax which the State Government has power to impose under the Constitution of
India, with the prior approval of the State Government.
8.4 INSTITUTIONAL FRAMEWORK FOR URBAN DEVELOPMENT AND SERVICE
DELIVERY
The state, district and town level agencies are responsible for holistic development of the town. The
agencies involved in urban management and development in Daboh are listed in Table 8.3. These
agencies are responsible for planning, implementation, operation and maintenance of services for the
town. The given matrix illustrates the role of various agencies in provision of services in the town.
The responsibilities of these agencies have been demonstrated in the Table 8.4
Table 8.3: Institutions and Urban Governance
State Government Agencies
(MP)
Urban Administration and Development Department (UADD)
District Level Agencies
(Bhind District)
Revenue Department
Town and Country Planning Organization (TCPO)
Public Health Engineering Department (PHED)
Public Works Department
Madhya Pradesh Road Development Corporation (MPRDC)
Madhya Pradesh Housing Board (MPHB)
Madhya Pradesh Electricity Board
Town Level Agencies
(Daboh)
Daboh Nagar Parishad (DNP)
Health Department
Education Department
Public Works Department
MP Madhya KshetraVidhyutVitaran Company
Source: DNP, 2012


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Table 8.4: Institutions in Service Delivery
S. No. Service Planning & Design Implementation Operation & Maintenance
1 Water Supply PHED PHED/DNP DNP
2
Sewerage and
Sanitation
PHED PHED/DNP DNP
3
Storm Water
Drainage
PHED DNP DNP
4
Solid Waste
Management
UADD / DNP DNP DNP
5 Roads PWD PWD/DNP DNP
6 Street Lighting UADD / DNP DNP DNP
7 Health GoMP*/ HD* HD* HD*
8 Education GoMP*/ ED*

ED*
9 Fire Services GoMP* DNP DNP

GoMP*-Government of Madhya
Pradesh
HD*-Health Department

ED*-Education Department
Source: DNP, 2012
8.5 RECENT URBAN REFORMS
Complaint Monitoring System: At the Municipal Council level all complaints are lodged in a
register in person. Complaints and its mitigation are carried out within a specific time period i.e. in a
minimum of 24 hrs with upper limit as a week. The municipal council has a facility called Jan Sunwai
through which residents of the region share their experiences towards justice for them.
74
th
Constitution Amendment Act: The state has introduced the provisions of 74
th
CAA in existing
Madhya Pradesh Municipal Act, 1961. The classification of municipalities as Nagar Parishad, and
Municipal Corporation, provision of elected and nominated members, devolution of powers and
functions, regular elections in municipalities, promotion to financial power of municipalities,
constitution of State Election Commission (SEC), constitution of State Finance Commission (SFC)
and constitution of District Planning Committee (DPC) is obvious result of implementation of 74th
CAA.
Maximizing the collection of property tax: On an average property tax account for 23.74 % of total
revenue income of the DNP. DNP requires orientation and capacity building for maximizing the
collection of property tax. Since data related to total numbers of properties is not available, therefore,
numbers of census houses of 2001 census have been extrapolated for 2011. In 2001, there were total
2539 houses and based on 2011 population, total houses are estimated to be 2960. Based on the data
provided by DNP, only around 14.7% (based on collected property tax of last year and current
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demand) of the total property tax is being collected. Therefore it can be concluded that tax is not being
collected from around 2525
2
.
The following measures have been suggested for maximization of property tax in DNP:
1. Improve collection efficiency (for next 5 year- 25% in 1
st
year; 30% in 2
nd
year; 50% in 3
rd
year;
60% in 4
th
year and 80% in 5
th
year)
2. Bringing the State Government Properties (building and land) into the property tax bracket
3. Handing over all vacant land of State Government to the ULB so that these land parcels can be
developed (shops, market, guest houses, mandi, etc.) to generate additional revenue.
4. Increasing the unit rate of property tax
Computerization of DNP: DNP has introduced computer in account and revenue departments.
However most of the works are carried out manually. The municipal officers require proper training
and system for optimum use of computers. The inadequate number of computer and lack of skill for
proper use of computer has been found as bottleneck in computerization of municipal council Daboh.
Levy of user charges: Levy of reasonable user charges for water supply and sanitation including
street light is collected by DNP in the form of water tax and samekit tax. These charges should be
revised in light of the respective cost for these services.
8.6 ISSUES
The major issues related to urban governance include:
Inadequacy of number and technical capacity of staff with respect to duties assigned;
Multiple agencies performing overlapping functions with little inter departmental coordination;
Inadequate financial capacity of the Municipal Council;
Citizen non-involvement in decision making in civic affairs.
8.7 SWOT ANALYSIS
Institutional capacity would determine the successful implementation of all the proposed projects in
the town. Initiatives have been undertaken by the DNP to strengthen urban governance in keeping
with 74
th
CAA and other acts/laws such as public disclosure law, etc. However, several weaknesses
persist that affect the efficient functioning of the Municipal Council. Table 8.5 presents a SWOT
assessment of the institutional set up.
Table 8.5: SWOT Analysis of Urban Governance & Institutional Setup
Strengths Weaknesses
Elected body in place as per the provisions of
74
th
CAA.
Statutory local body under the MP Municipal
Act.
Efforts for Responsive, responsible and
Inadequate staffs coupled with lack of
technical personals.
Lack of coordination between administrative
and political wing.
Lack of awareness in political wing towards

2
This figure has been calculated by using indirect method of extrapolation in the absence of data and hence is not actual.
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Strengths Weaknesses
improved governance
Conducive work environment of the DNP
Committed DNP functionaries for town
development.
Partial Reform undertaken for property tax, user
charge collections and computerization.
their role and responsibilities.
Poor Financial Management System
Overdependence on grants
Opportunities Threats
Best practices in the state can be transferred
through training.
Streamline the administrative procedures ward
wise.
Adoption of modern data management tools
like (GIS) for decision making.
Expansion of private sector participation.
Computerization of municipal functions and
introduction of citizen centres.
E-governance and computerization to result in
better project implementation.
Inefficient data base management is a threat
for operation and maintenance of services.
Poor sanitation hygiene service may invite
epidemic in the town
Migration of citizens from the town because
of poor service
Lack of citizen participation leads to
unrealistic plan
8.8 STRATEGIES FOR URBAN GOVERNANCE AND INSTITUTIONAL SETUP
The strategy for urban governance has been formulated to ensure better local governance system. The
present system of local governance has been analysed and assessed while formulating the strategy and
action plan.
Ensure accountable, transparent and efficient local governance system.
Capacity building of technical, non-technical and political wing of DNP.
Involve public participation in decision making process.
A separate Public Information wing to help spread information about projects and to increase civil
society participation.


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9. MUNICIPAL FINANCE
9.1 INTRODUCTION
The finances of Daboh Nagar Parishad (DNP) has been analysed in this chapter. Following the
introductory section, the overall structure of municipal finance including receipts, expenditure and
surplus/deficit is given in section 2. Revenue account details are given in section 3 and capital account
details are presented in section 4. Assessment of financial indicators is elucidated in section 5. Section
6 presents the critical issues and section 7 gives the outcome of SWOT analysis. The last section
presents the strategy for better financial health of DNP.
9.2 OVERALL STRUCTURE OF MUNICIPAL FINANCE
Municipal finance includes income and expenditure of revenue and capital account. The analysis of
the finance of the past four years reveals that the DNP has shown surplus amount at the end of every
Financial Year (FY) except for FY-2008-09 (refer Table 9.1).
Table 9.1: Overview of Municipal Finance in DNP (in Rs Lakhs)
Item 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10
Grand Total Income 83.10 135.55 146.77 175.73
Grand Total Expenditure 60.96 88.18 157.06 123.20
Surplus/Deficit 22.14 47.37 -10.29 52.53
Source: Daboh Nagar Parishad 2012
9.2.1 Municipal Receipts
The overall receipts status of DNP from Financial Year (FY) 2006-07 to FY 2009-10 (refer Table 9.2)
reveals increase under both revenue and capital accounts. The revenue income of Nagar Parishad has
increased from Rs 81.94 lakhs in FY 2006-07 to Rs 111.76 lakhs in FY 2009-10, whereas the capital
income has increased from Rs 1.16 lakhs in FY 2006-07 to Rs 63.96 lakhs in FY 2009-10 (refer
Figure 9.1).
Table 9.2: Trend of Overall Municipal Income in DNP (in Rs Lakhs)
Year Revenue Receipts Capital Receipts
2006-07 81.94 1.16
2007-08 78.47 57.07
2008-09 78.82 67.95
2009-10 111.76 63.96
Source: Daboh Nagar Parishad 2012
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Figure 9.1: Revenue Receipts and Capital Receipts (in Rs in lakhs), 2006-2010
9.2.2 Municipal Expenditure
The expenditure pattern of DNP over the past four financial years is presented in Table 9.3 and Figure
9.2. It is evident that revenue expenditure has increased from Rs 59.10 lakhs in FY 2006-07 to Rs
79.64 lakhs in FY 2009-10, whereas the capital expenditure has increased from Rs 1.86 lakhs in FY
2006-07 to Rs 43.56 lakhs in FY 2009-10.
Table 9.3: Overall Municipal Expenditure Pattern of DNP (in Rs Lakhs)
Year Revenue Expenditure Capital Expenditure
2006-07 59.10 1.86
2007-08 61.44 26.74
2008-09 69.17 87.89
2009-10 79.64 43.56
Source: Daboh Nagar Parishad 2012
Figure 9.2: Revenue Expenditure and Capital Expenditure (in Rs lakhs), 2006-10
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9.2.3 Municipal Surplus/Deficit Pattern
The trend analysis of municipal surplus and deficit of DNP reveals a large surplus in revenue account.
Also, there has been has surplus in capital account in FY 2007-08 and FY 2009-10 indicating that this
surplus can be utilized for carrying out development works in town. Operating Ratio, which is
calculated on the basis of ratio of revenue expenditure to revenue income, shows the possibility to
utilize revenue income in capital works (refer Table 9.4).
Table 9.4: Overall Surplus/Deficit Pattern in DNP (in Rs Lakhs)
Year Revenue Capital Operating Ratio
2006-07 22.84 -0.69 0.72
2007-08 17.03 30.34 0.78
2008-09 9.65 -19.94 0.88
2009-10 32.12 20.40 0.71
Source: Daboh Nagar Parishad 2012
9.3 REVENUE ACCOUNT
Under this head all the recurring items of Income and Expenditure are included i.e. Income from Tax,
Non Tax and transfers including Grants, Establishments (Wages and Salaries), Operations and
Maintenance and interest payments etc. This can be categorized in two major subheads i.e. Revenue
Income and Revenue Expenditure.
9.3.1 Revenue Income
The revenue income sources for DNP can be broadly categorized into three different categories i.e.
Tax, Non-tax and Transfers including grants etc. These include income from property tax, Education
Tax, Taxes from shops, Public Health, revenue earned from making provision for parking, Bus stands
etc., income from remunerative enterprises, stamp duty and registration fees and grants from central
and state government under various schemes.
As shown in Table 9.5 and Figure 9.3 based on average figures of last four FYs over 67% of revenue
income of DNP is generated through Assigned Revenues & Compensation. The other major source of
income is through non-tax sources which include fees & user charges (18.13%), rental income from
municipal properties (1.62%) and sale & hire charges (0.48%).
Table 9.5: Summary of Revenue Income of Daboh Nagar Parishad (in Rs)
Head 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 Average %
1 Rates and Tax Revenue 5,66,719 7,94,696 5,21,294 12,98,216 7,95,231 9.06
2
Assigned Revenues &
Compensation
51,93,702 51,15,050 53,04,040 81,12,530 59,31,331 67.59
3
Rental Income from
Municipal Properties
2,21,704 1,13,394 1,27,211 1,07,165 1,42,369 1.62
4 Fees & User Charges 18,23,473 16,92,770 16,55,517 11,91,082 15,90,711 18.13
5 Sale & Hire Charges 42,492 16,879 24,434 84,417 42,056 0.48
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Head 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 Average %
6
Revenue Grants,
Contribution and Subsidies
0 6,000 15,000 0 5,250 0.06
7 Interest Earned 3,16,111 61,016 2,17,486 2,83,402 2,19,504 2.50
8 Other Income 29,798 47,325 17,154 99,361 48,410 0.55
Total 81,93,999 78,47,130 78,82,136 1,11,76,173 87,74,860 100
Source: Daboh Nagar Parishad 2012
Figure 9.3: Average Revenue Income from different sources (2006-10)
9.3.2 Revenue Expenditure
The major heads of revenue expenditure includes establishment, administrative and operation and
maintenance (O&M) expenditure. The O&M expenditure comprises administration and recovery of
taxes, water supply, sewerage, drainage, public health, safety, street lighting, sanitation, solid waste
management and others. Based on average figures of last four FYs establishment expenditure
accounts for 38.89% of the total revenue expenditure, administrative expenditure is 31.19% and the
O&M expenditure is 24.7% of the Nagar Parishad (refer Table 9.6 and Figure 9.4).
Table 9.6: Summary of Revenue Expenditure in DNP (in Rs)
Head 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 Average %
1 Establishment Expenses 15,97,494 25,20,475 26,58,976 36,97,515 26,18,615 38.89
2 Administrative Expenses 25,51,590 15,40,218 23,20,284 19,89,779 21,00,468 31.19
3 O & M 16,29,050 15,67,088 16,61,749 17,95,069 16,63,239 24.70
4 Programme Expenses 8,929 2,63,690 59,314 83,277 1,03,803 1.54
5
Revenue Grants,
Contribution and Subsidies 0 67,000 60,000 0 31,750 0.47
6 Miscellaneous Expenses 1,23,219 1,85,804 1,56,563 3,98,230 2,15,954 3.21
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Head 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 Average %
Total 5910282 6144275 6916886 7963870 6733828 100
Source: Daboh Nagar Parishad 2012
Figure 9.4: Average Revenue Expenditure from different sources (2006-10)
9.4 CAPITAL ACCOUNT
Non-recurring items like income and expenditures in respect of loans, Grants and contributions from
State and Central Governments under various schemes are categorized under this head. The capital
account comprises of two components capital income and capital expenditure.
9.4.1 Capital Income
Capital income comprises of loans, grants and own contributions. Own contributions could be in form
of sale of properties and rent of building/shop or land. Loans & grants given by State and Central
Governments under various schemes for development & improvement of state assets such as roads,
drains etc. would be considered as capital income. Based on average figures of last four FYs
government grants accounts for 94.67% of capital income, this indicates that the Nagar Parishad is
more dependent on government funds rather on its own (refer Table 9.7 Figure 9.5).
Table 9.7: Summary of Capital Income in DNP (in Rs)
Head 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 Average %
1
Grants, Contribution for
specific purposes
0 50,73,000 66,02,220 63,26,535 45,00,439 94.67
2 Unsecured Loans 1,16,460 3,28,700 95,900 0 1,35,265 2.85
3 Deposits 0 3,05,700 97,100 69,800 1,18,150 2.49
Total 1,16,460 57,07,400 6795220 63,96,335 47,53,854 100
Source: Daboh Nagar Parishad 2012
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Figure 9.5: Average Capital Receipts from different sources (2006-10)
9.4.2 Capital Expenditure
Capital expenditures are mainly towards development works like development of roads, sanitation
system etc. and towards asset creation. It also involves the amount, which is being spent on slum up
gradation. Average Capital Expenditure on different heads from FY 2006-07 to FY 2009-10 has been
shown in Figure 9.6. The detail of capital expenditure is given in table below.
Table 9.8: Summary of Capital Expenditure in DNP (in Rs)
Head 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 Average %
1 Fixed Assets 1,81,518 1,55,295 4,770 19,908 90,373 2.26
2 Capital Work-in-Progress 0 18,41,885 85,61,879 37,55,463 35,39,807 88.47
3 Investments -General Fund 0 2,09,975 92,836 5,38,962 2,10,443 5.26
4
Loans, Advances and
Deposits
0 3,65,500 1,14,000 33,000 1,28,125 3.20
5 Other Assets 4,335 1,01,002 15,486 8,680 32,376 0.81
Total 1,85,853 26,73,657 87,88,971 43,56,013 40,01,124 100
Source: Daboh Nagar Parishad 2012
Figure 9.6: Average Capital Expenditure on different heads (2006-10)
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9.5 FINANCIAL INDICATORS
The assessment of the fiscal health of DNP has been conducted based on the mentioned indicators
(Table 9.9). The high expenditure on administration, less expenditure on infrastructure services, low
revenue generation from own sources and property tax require remedial measures. However the
contribution of non-tax revenue to total tax revenue was found significant and requires promotion.
Similarly the revenue account balance shows positive trends for all the analysed years, which means
that DNP is able to generate the revenue to meet its administrative expenditures. The capital account
balance is in positive for all the analysed year, except 2006-07 and 2008-09, which means
municipality is using the revenue generated from capital account to non-capital avenues. The total
fiscal balance is negative for 1 financial year and positive for 3 financial years. Therefore it may be
concluded that financial status of DNP is not in moderate condition and corrective measures must be
done to rectify the problems for better functioning of municipality. The detailed description of the
financial assessment has been given in Table 9.9.
Table 9.9: Fiscal Health Indicators of Daboh Nagar Parishad

Head 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 Average Remarks
1
Revenue account balance
(Revenue Receipt-Revenue Exp
in Rs Lakh)
22.8 17.0 9.7 32.1 20.4
High expenditure
on administration
2
Capital account balance (Capital
Receipt-Capital Expenditure in
Rs Lakh)
-0.7 30.3 -19.9 20.4 7.5
Very less capital
expenditure on
basic infrastructure
services
3
Total fiscal balance (Revenue
account balance-Capital account
balance in Rs Lakh)
23.5 -13.3 29.6 11.7 12.9
Generation of
revenue from own
sources is
moderate
4
Proportion of expenditure on
operation and maintenance to
total municipal expenditure (O
&M Exp/ Total Exp*100; in %)
26.72 17.77 10.58 14.57 15.49
Reasonable
proportion of total
revenue is spent on
salaries and wages
5
Proportion of own revenues to
total municipal revenues (Own
Revenue/Total Revenue*100; in
%)
36.25 34.14 32.30 26.52 31.79
Reasonable
proportion of total
revenue is spent on
O & M.
6
Proportion of tax revenue to total
own revenues (Tax Revenue/
Total Revenue*100; in %)
6.92 10.13 6.61 11.62 9.06
Revenue
generation from
own sources is low
7
Revenues from property tax as a
proportion of tax revenues
(Property Tax/ Total Tax
Revenue*100; in %)
20.55 23.07 16.44 23.74 21.81
Generation of
revenue from
Property tax is low
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Head 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 Average Remarks
8
Proportion of non-tax revenue to
total own revenues (Non Tax
Revenue/ Total Own
Revenue*100; in %)
80.92 70.33 79.52 56.20 71.50
Non-tax revenue
contribute
substantially to
total tax revenue
9
Proportion of externally-
provided, i.e. state resources to
total municipal revenues (Grants/
Total Municipal Revenue*100; in
%)
1.40 42.15 46.40 36.40 35.18
High dependence
on government
grants
10
Per capita Revenue (Total
Income/ Total Population of
2011; in Rs)
448.39 731.33 791.92 948.12 729.94
High per capita
revenue
11
Per capita expenditure (Total
Expenditure/ Total Population of
2011; in Rs)
328.92 475.77 847.41 664.72 579.20
High per capita
expenditure
12
Per capita own tax receipts (Own
Tax Receipts/ Total Population
2011; in Rs)
30.58 42.88 28.13 70.05 42.91 Per capita low own
tax collection
13
Per capita own non tax receipts
(Own Non-Tax Receipts/ Total
Population 2011; in Rs)
129.70 101.65 109.24 89.89 107.62
Per capita low own
non-tax collection
14
Income Per Employee (Total
Receipts/No. of Employee; in Rs
Lakh)
2.44 3.99 4.32 5.17 3.98
High per employee
income
15
Per capita level of Capital
expenditure (Capital Exp/Total
Population of 2011; in Rs)
10.03 144.26 474.21 235.03 215.88
Per capita capital
expenditure is
Moderate
16
Expenditure Per Employee (Total
Expenditure/No. of Employee; in
Rs Lakh)
1.79 2.59 4.62 3.62 3.16
High per employee
Expenditure
Source: Generated by consultants
9.6 ISSUES
Based on the data analysis of municipal finance and discussions with DNP officials, the following
issues have emerged:
Inadequate base for property tax and low collection
High Dependency on Grant for development;
Municipal income not being utilized for developments works upto its potential.
Unskilled municipal staff to handle municipal finance
Lack of training in modern municipal finance, budgeting and double entry accounting system
Lack of public participation in budget preparation and allocation of resources
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9.7 SWOT ANALYSIS
Effective financial management is a key to sustainable urban management. Table 9.10 presents these
strengths and weaknesses for financial management in Daboh.
Table 9.10: SWOT Analysis - Municipal Finance
Strengths Weaknesses
Constant increase in income in last four
consecutive years.
The CAGR of increase in revenue income is
10.9% over the last four FYs.
Per-capita income, which is increasing
shows the earning power of municipality.
Per capita expenditure on an average is less
than per capita income
High Dependency on Grant for development.
High dependency on capital income for
developmental works.
Lack of public participation in budget
preparation and allocation of resources
Opportunities Threats
Surplus of Revenue Account which can be
used for development works
Modernization of accounting system and
budgeting procedure.
Increasing tax income by adding more staff
and strict tax recovery is possible.
Develop efficient data base for land and tax
to enhance the collection performance.
Regulation of illegal constructions. There
would be increase in the income by
collecting tax and regularization fee
Possibility of income from illegal
construction.
Adoption of modern technology like
Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for
property tax and user charge collection.
Side stepping in observation of rules and
regulations may occur.
Willingness of Municipal officials in
implementation of reforms.
Acceptance of Reforms and Tax burden by
Public.

9.8 STRATEGY FOR MUNICIPAL FINANCE
The strategy for municipal finance has been formulated for generation of own resources to sustain the
city in long run with the initial help of government.
Implement financial reforms suggested under JNNURM
Modernize budgeting and accounting system.
Modernize tax collection system.
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Introduce private sector participation and user charges for cost effective delivery of services
Increase public participation in budget preparation.
Restructuring tariff rates and need to identify more programs to augment the revenue of DNP.
Increasing the tax base and collection performance.
Proper monitoring of funds, their disbursement and utilization.
Imposing new municipal tax.


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10. STAKEHOLDERS CONSULTATION
10.1 INTRODUCTION
Consultation is a process in the project cycle in which an attempt is made to involve the public as
stakeholders in project preparation through consultation and focus group discussion meetings.
Stakeholders participation and consultation have been viewed as a continual course of action, which
promote public understanding and help eradicate hurdles in the way of the project. Consultation
during the project preparation stage as an integral part of the social assessment process not only
minimizes the risks and unwanted propaganda against the project but also removes the gap between
the community and the project formulators, which helps in the timely completion of the project and
making the project people-friendly.
The CDP Report has been prepared keeping in mind the ethos of the city. The main purpose of a city
development plan is to build consensus among key stakeholders. The stakeholders were involved
through meetings and interviews to gauge the situation in terms of urban infrastructure, services,
overall management etc. The key stakeholders of the city have been identified as under:
Primary stakeholders, beneficiaries of a development intervention or those directly affected
(positively or negatively) by it. They include local populations (resource persons, community,
students) in the project/program area, in particular, poor and marginalized groups who have
traditionally been excluded from participating in development efforts such as squatter and slum
dwellers, and organizations such as traders organizations, hoteliers, transporters and other
associations.
Secondary stakeholders, those who influence a development intervention or are indirectly
affected by it. They include the project staff, implementing agencies, local governments, civil
society organizations, private sector firms, and other development agencies. Executive Officer,
line departments such as PHED, PWD etc were amongst the stakeholders consulted.
10.2 STAKEHOLDERS CONSULTATION
The CDP has emerged out of the inputs provided by the stakeholders. All the stakeholders were met
for possible dates and places of meeting and the concept of CDP and purpose of meeting was
indicated to them. On the appointed date and time the Consultants carried out the consultations,
including focus group discussions with shopkeepers, market association members, and other
stakeholders at a number of places. The participants shared their ideas, views to discuss the problems
and to come out with solutions. In most cases the discussions took a form of debate, later exchanged
their views. Consultations with local people were conducted in presence of male and female members
of different social communities. The problems or issues came out of consultation has been
incorporated in report at appropriate place.
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In order to prepare the City Development Plan, stakeholder consultations have been undertaken in the
in the form of workshops, group discussions and one to one discussion as mentioned in below Table
10.1.
Table 10.1: List of Stakeholders Consultations
S. No. Description Dates Remarks
1 1st Workshop : Kick-off Workshop 15
th
November 2011 Annexure 10.1
2 2
nd
Workshop on vision, sectoral strategies and
priority projects
23
rd
January 2012 Annexure 10.2
3. 3
rd
City Level Workshop 27
th
March 2012 Annexure 10.3
4 State Level Workshop (Review of Interim Report) 21
st
May 2012 Annexure 10.4
5. State Level Workshop (Review of Draft Report) 13
th
December 2012 Annexure 10.5

1
st
Workshop (Kick-off) on 15-11-2011

2
nd
Workshop on 23-01-2012

3
rd
City Level Workshop on 27
th
March 2012

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11. VISION AND SECTOR STRATEGIES
11.1 INTRODUCTION
Formulation of vision and goals for city development helps in defining its growth direction and
pattern. A series of workshops were organized with the aim to develop a vision, sector goals and
strategy for achieving the goal based on participatory approaches. The present chapter discusses in
detail the vision formulation, sector level goals and strategies to meet the needs of the people. This
chapter has been divided into three sections. Following this section on introduction, section 2
describes the vision formulation process and the vision and the third section lists the sector level goals
and strategies.
11.2 VISION FORMULATION
Visioning is the most important phase of CDP preparation. Primarily, it is a statement reflecting the
potentials and strengths of the city. Visioning is often expressed as a final expectation or as a goal. In
this process, the unique attributes of the city are captured in terms of comparative and competitive
advantages, values and preferences, relationship of the city to the state and its history and the physical
characteristics of the city. The vision formulation was undertaken through the process of city wise
stakeholder consultation and series of workshops. The brief of the same has been given in following
paragraphs.
Participatory planning is the key to CDP. Therefore focus group discussions (FGD), meetings,
consultations, workshops and seminars were considered a prerequisite for assessment, visioning,
strategy determination, prioritisation of projects and preparation of city investment plan under CDP.
The stakeholders consultation was initiated from the inception stage of the project and it helped in
identifying the key stakeholders in the project city. At the city level situation assessment stage,
meetings with the officers of the municipal council, the Public Works Department (PWD), the Public
Health Engineering Department (PHED), Health and Education were carried out. In addition to this,
consultations with the steering group members, citizen leaders and social workers were also organized
to understand the sectoral issues and suitable solutions.
Workshops were organized to appraise the CDP preparation details, findings of the study and to
identify the project needs.
The sector analysis, which has led to the identification of SWOT for the town provided the town
stakeholders with a list of actions that must be undertaken to achieve accelerated and equitable
development. In order to prioritize its actions, within the constraints of limited resources, its citizens
must evolve a common Vision. The Vision thus derived out of the workshop is given below.
To develop Daboh as an Agro-industrial town without compromising the basic needs and
services.
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11.3 SECTOR LEVEL GOAL AND STRATEGIES
11.3.1 Sector Goals
Sector specific goals have been set after formulation of the City Vision. The sector specific goals have
targeted the outcomes such as universal access to a minimum level of services, establishment of city-
wide framework for planning and governance, financial sustainability, transparency and
accountability in urban service delivery and management. The next stage after developing the sector
specific goals, an exercise was carried out with respect to outlining of strategies that are required to
move towards the Vision of 2035. The sector goals and their strategies have been presented in Table
11.1.
Table 11.1: Sector, Goals and Strategies
S. No. Sector Goal Strategy
1 Water Supply
To ensure 24 X 7 safe
drinking water supply
for all citizen.
Current source augmentation as a short term
measure
Preparation of DPR on comprehensive
water supply system under UIDSSMT or
other relevant schemes
PPP in implementation, operation and
maintenance of integrated water supply
system for the town
Strengthening of the existing water supply
system through repairing of Pipe line, OHT
and tube wells
Development of new surface water source
from Pahuj River as a long term measure
Water Resource Management through
innovative technologies
Implementation of Water Sector Reforms
2
Sewerage
and
Sanitation
100% access to
sanitation facilities and
to eradicate open
defecation.
Development of sewer system in the town
Awareness campaign for sanitation practice
Toilets facilities for every house through
low cost sanitation schemes of central
government
Provision of public toilets
O & M of sewer system through modern
equipment
3
Solid Waste
Management
100% management of
solid wastes with proper
Preparation of master plan for integrated
SWM
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S. No. Sector Goal Strategy
segregation and
treatment.
Adhere the guidelines of MSW Handing and
Management Rule 2000
Involve PSP in management of solid waste
for the town
Development of Landfill site through PSP
IEC activity for better SWM
4
Storm Water
Drainage
100% coverage by storm
water drainage to
prevent water logging.
Preparation of drainage master plan
Involve public participation in the
implementation , operation and maintenance
of drainage master plan
Conservation of rainwater
Rainwater harvesting in government
buildings and new private construction
Measures for repairing and de-silting
covering of existing drains
Encroachment removal
O & M of drainage system through modern
equipment
5
Traffic &
Transportatio
n
Well managed city
traffic with a proper road
network and traffic &
transportation facilities
and smooth mobility of
people and goods.
Creating road infrastructure like bus stand,
footpath, parking and signage through PSP
Improvement of existing main road junction
Re-strengthening of the existing city roads
Development of new roads
6
Urban Poor
and Slums
To make the city slum-
free by promoting
planned development
and ensuring
infrastructure facilities to
all.
Universalization of basic services in slum
areas and among urban poor
Improvement of housing conditions
Slum improvement and rehabilitation
program to cover urban poor
Awareness regarding Government Schemes
7
Environment
and Tourism
To ensure clean, green
and hygienic living
environment and
promote the local
tourism.
Reforms for clean green and solar town
PSP in clean green and solar town
Introduce community participation in
making the town clean, green and solar
Encourage afforestation along main roads
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S. No. Sector Goal Strategy
and open spaces
Renovation and beautification of water
bodies and ponds
Introduce remedial and punitive measures
for making the town clean green and solar
8 Education
To ensure education for
all.
Provision of education facilities for girls
Awareness generation about girl education
Development of Vocational Institutions
9 Health
To ensure adequately
equipped health centres
with medicines, staffs
and equipments.
Up gradation of health facilities in the PHC
Procurement of required test equipment and
medicines in the PHC
Human Resource Development for PHC
Introduction of the monitoring cell for PHC
10
Recreation
and
community
facilities
To ensure socio cultural
and recreational facilities
for all
Development of Parks and play grounds
Provision of Community Halls
Provision of public library
Development of existing crematorium
11 Street light
Coverage of whole city
area by street light to
make the city safe.
Installation of street light system with
sustainable source of energy
Efficient O & M system for street lights
12
Urban
renewal and
Growth
To ensure new
development in a
planned way and old
area to be managed
properly.
Preparation of Master Plan / Development
Plan for the town
Enforce development plan proposals for the
expansion of the town and for growth
management within the town.
Discourage excessive urban sprawl by
establishing appropriate building and
density regulations for selected areas.
Ensure planned development of the town
13
Economic
Development
To make city
economically sustainable
by creating more
employment
opportunities.
Develop the city as a logistics hub for
agriculture produce and trading;
Development of small/medium agro based
industries as the region has a rich and
diverse agricultural base. Also, agro based
industries labour intensive (will provide
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S. No. Sector Goal Strategy
more employment), require less capital and
also comparatively lower level of skills;
Easy loan facilities and promotional
activities for Agro-based Small/household
industry and identified value chains;
Improve regional connectivity of the town;
14
Institutional
setup
Implementation of
Institutional reforms and
clear cut division of
responsibilities & proper
co-ordination among
various departments.
Ensure accountable, transparent and
efficient local governance system.
Capacity building of technical, non-
technical and political wing of DNP.
Involve public participation in decision
making process.
A separate Public Information wing to help
spread information about projects and to
increase civil society participation
15
Municipal
Finance
Generation of municipal
own resources to sustain
the city in long run with
the initial help of
government.
Implement financial reforms suggested
under JNNURM
Modernize budgeting and accounting
system.
Modernize tax collection system.
Introduce private sector participation and
user charges for cost effective delivery of
services
Increase public participation in budget
preparation


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12. PROJECT PRIORITISATION AND
CAPITAL INVESTMENT PLAN, 2035
12.1 INTRODUCTION
The identification of projects, prioritization and preparation of Capital Investment Plan (CIP) is an
important step of CDP. The identification and prioritization of projects has been carried out with help
of stakeholder consultations, infrastructure gap analysis and situation assessment for the town.
However estimation of these projects have been done following the national standards and norms as
well as state rate of schedule -PHED 2011 and rate of schedule PWD 2011.
12.2 PROJECT PRIORITISATION
The projects have been identified based on detailed assessment of all sectors, stakeholders workshop,
discussions and meetings carried out with various officials, local authorities, and local people.
The priority for various sectors have been categorised in very high, high, medium and low based on
consultations with stakeholders. Further very high category sectors have been ranked between 1 to 5
based on their priority for the town. Similarly high category sectors has been reprioritized between 6
to 9, medium category sectors has been reclassified between 10 to 12 and low category sectors have
been regrouped into 13 and 14 rank. The lower rank means high priority for each category (very high,
high, medium and low). Based on these criteria Table 12.1 shows the priority and ranking of the
projects.
Table 12.1: Priority and Ranking of Projects
S No Sector/Projects Priority Ranking
Core Focused Sectors of Economic Development
1 Agro based industrial development Very High -
Other Focused Sectors for Development
1 Solid Waste Management Very High 1
2 Storm Water Drainage Very High 2
3 Sewerage and Sanitation Very High 3
4 Water Supply Very High 4
5 Traffic and Transportation High 5
6 Social Infrastructure & Other Projects High 6
7 Housing for Urban Poor High 7
8 Electricity and Street Light High 8
9 Education High 9
10 Health Medium 10
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S No Sector/Projects Priority Ranking
11 Environment and Tourism Medium 11
12 Urban Planning and Growth Medium 12
13 Municipal Finance Low 13
14 Urban Governance and Institutional Setup Low 14
Source: Generated by consultant with the help of stakeholders
Since many of the development works are interrelated to each other and hold a positive bearing on
other sectors. Therefore consultant proposes implementation of projects in more cost effective and
practical manner considering peoples priority and immediate need. For example construction of
drainage can be integrated with road construction and should be done simultaneously. Proposed
strategies aim to shape the envisioned goals for the overall development of the town within the time
horizon of 25 years period from 2010 to 2035.
12.3 SECTOR INVESTMENT NEEDS FOR 2035
This section presents the summary of infrastructure investment requirement for the town till the
horizon period of 2035. It represents an investment road map for the horizon year. The total estimated
capital investment required for providing efficient services is Rs. 207.163 Crore up to 2035.
Table 12.2 to 12.15 presents the summary of infrastructure investment need in various sectors for the
city up to 2035on priority basis.
Table 12.2: Economic Development Investment Needs, 2035 (Rs. Crore)
Projects/ Programs Quantity Unit
Total
Investment
Phase-I
Till 2015
Phase-II
2015-25
Phase-
III
2025-35
Development of Vegetable
mandi near Hospital road
1 Nos 0.500 0.500 0.000 0.000
Development of some market
complexs in Patara bag area
1 Nos 2.000 1.000 1.000 0.000
Development of vending
zones (each for 100 vendors)
2 Nos 1.000 0.500 0.000 0.500
Sub Total 3.500 2.000 1.000 0.500

Table 12.3: SWM Investment Needs, 2035 (Rs. Crore)
Projects/ Programs Quantity Unit
Total
Investment
Phase-I
Till 2015
Phase-II
2015-25
Phase-
III
2025-35
Distribution of Community
Dustbins (Segregated Format)
@ 300m
310 Nos 1.085 0.651 0.217 0.217
Purchase of 1 refuse compactor 1 Nos 0.210 0.210 0.000 0.000
Purchase of 1 Cess Pool Emptier 1 Nos 0.160 0.160 0.000 0.000
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Projects/ Programs Quantity Unit
Total
Investment
Phase-I
Till 2015
Phase-II
2015-25
Phase-
III
2025-35
(covered)
Purchase of Tractors 2 Nos 0.080 0.040 0.040 0.000
Purchase of Covered trolley for
vehicles
2 Nos 0.014 0.007 0.007 0.000
Purchase of Tricycles
(Containerized Mechanized Tri-
cycles of 200 ltr. capacity and
fully closed type)
54 Nos 0.092 0.055 0.018 0.018
Development of Landfill site 2.5 Acre 1.000 0.500 0.500 0.000
Purchase of Equipments for
Landfill site Management
1 Nos 0.200 0.200 0.000 0.000
Awareness programme for
segregation of waste at source
and for solid waste management
system in general and
importance of community
participation.
4 Nos 0.100 0.100 0.000 0.000
Composting and Vermiculture 1 Nos 0.500 0.500 0.000 0.000
Sub Total 3.441 2.423 0.782 0.235

Table 12.4: Storm Water Drainage Investment Needs, 2035 (Rs. Crore)
Projects/ Programs Quantity Unit
Total
Investment
Phase-I
Till
2015
Phase-
II
2015-25
Phase-
III
2025-35
Preparation of Drainage Master
Plan considering the city level
slope
9.3 Sqkm 0.200 0.200 0.000 0.000
Construction of Primary drains
where there is missing link
32 Kms 4.800 2.880 0.960 0.960
Construction of Secondary drains
where there is missing link
21 Kms 8.400 5.040 1.680 1.680
Repairing/widening/de-silting of
existing primary and secondary
drains
31 Kms 0.279 0.279 0.000 0.000
Repairing/widening/de-silting of
existing main drains
8 Kms 0.435 0.435 0.000 0.000
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Projects/ Programs Quantity Unit
Total
Investment
Phase-I
Till
2015
Phase-
II
2015-25
Phase-
III
2025-35
Construction of Main Drain with
integration of other drains
11 Kms 7.150 4.290 2.860 0.000
Removing the encroachment on
drains mainly in market area ,
public areas and water logging
low line areas
1 Nos 0.100 0.100 0.000 0.000
Jeep Mounted Excavator 1 Nos 0.300 0.180 0.120 0.000
Regular dozer 1 Nos 0.070 0.042 0.028 0.000
JCB 1 Nos 0.225 0.135 0.090 0.000
Dumper Truck 1 Nos 0.090 0.054 0.036 0.000
Sub Total 22.049 13.635 5.774 2.640

Table 12.5: Sewerage Investment Needs, 2035 (Rs. Crore)
Projects/ Programs Quantity Unit
Total
Investment
Phase-I
Till 2015
Phase-II
2015-25
Phase-
III
2025-35
Laying down Sewer line with
pumping for entire city by 2035
(long term)
57 Km 22.800 13.680 4.560 4.560
Construction of Sewerage
Treatment Plant by 2020 with
upgradation till 2025 keeping in
mind the population for 2035
5 MLD 3.750 1.875 1.875 0.000
Sewer cleaning equipments -
Sewer Jetting Machine, High
Pressure Water Tanke & Sludge
Vacuum tanker
3 Nos 0.120 0.060 0.060 0.000
Sub Total 26.670 15.615 6.495 4,560

Table 12.6: Sanitation Investment Needs, 2035 (Rs. Crore)
Projects/ Programs Quantity Unit
Total
Investment
Phase-I
Till 2015
Phase-II
2015-25
Phase-
III
2025-35
IEC measures for sanitation
practice
1 Nos 0.100 0.100 0.000 0.000
Community toilets for slum or
BPL population( Per toilet 50
29.3 Nos 2.934 1.467 1.467 0.000
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Projects/ Programs Quantity Unit
Total
Investment
Phase-I
Till 2015
Phase-II
2015-25
Phase-
III
2025-35
families)
Public Convenience mainly in
main market, institutional area,
etc
5 Nos 0.500 0.500 0.000 0.000
Sub Total 3.534 2.067 1.467 0.000

Table 12.7: Water Supply Investment Needs, 2035 (Rs. Crore)
Projects/ Programs Quantity Unit
Total
Investment
Phase-I
Till
2015
Phase-II
2015-25
Phase-
III
2025-35
Instalation of new tubewells
(short Term)
5 Nos 0.300 0.300 0.000 0.000
Construction of Over Head
Tanks (capacity 2 lakhs liter)
5 Nos 0.500 0.250 0.250 0.000
Repairing the existing OHT 1 Nos 0.050 0.050 0.000 0.000
Repair of old pipe lines where
ever is needed
8 Kms 0.400 0.400 0.000 0.000
Laying down New Pipe lines 49 Kms 10.780 6.468 2.156 2.156
Source development and intake 6.2 MLD 3.100 3.100 0.000 0.000
Water to be brought through
canal from Pahuj river and
supply of portable water from
integrated WTP constructed near
Asnet village (long-term).
Contribution of cost as per the
population share
6.2 MLD 4.340 2.170 2.170 0.000
Supply and installation of bulk
water meters
8 Nos 0.038 0.038 0.000 0.000
Technological up-gradation of
the Pumping Station
5 LS 0.050 0.050 0.000 0.000
Installation of vacuum feed
chlorinators (short-term)
10 Nos 0.050 0.050 0.000 0.000
Supply and installation of
consumer water meters
6480 Nos 1.944 1.166 0.389 0.389
Community Taps in major
market and institutional areas
10 Nos 0.010 0.005 0.005 0.000
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Projects/ Programs Quantity Unit
Total
Investment
Phase-I
Till
2015
Phase-II
2015-25
Phase-
III
2025-35
Awareness program among the
people for the use of protected
and unprotected sources of
water and about the water
conservation
4 Nos 0.200 0.200 0.000 0.000
Implementation of effective
water tarrif and billing system
Administrative
decesion
0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000
Computerization of Billing
System
1 Nos 0.100 0.100 0.000 0.000
Sub Total 21.862 14.347 4.970 2.545

Table 12.8: Traffic & Transportation Investment Needs, 2035 (Rs. Crore)
Projects/ Programs Quantity Unit
Total
Investment
Phase-
I
Till
2015
Phase-II
2015-25
Phase-
III
2025-35
Development of new bus stand 1 Nos 2.000 2.000 0.000 0.000
Parking 5 Nos 0.500 0.250 0.175 0.075
Junction Improvement and
beautification
6 Nos 0.900 0.540 0.360 0.000
Widening and improvements of
other city roads
33 Kms 33.000 19.800 13.200 0.000
Construction of new city road 18 Kms 36.000 21.600 7.200 7.200
Improvement of major roads and
construction of footpath on
major city roads
4 Kms 8.000 4.800 3.200 0.000
Construction of bypass 2 Kms 6.000 3.600 2.400 0.000
Installing Signage for
pedestrians as well as vehicular
traffic on the roads 6
Kms 0.006 0.006 0.000 0.000
Sub Total

86.406 52.596 26.535 7.275

Table 12.9: Social Infrastructure & Other Projects Investment Needs, 2035 (Rs. Crore)
Projects/ Programs Quantity Unit
Total
Investment
Phase-I
Till 2015
Phase-II
2015-25
Phase-
III
2025-35
Redevelopment and 4 Nos 2.000 1.000 1.000 0.000
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Projects/ Programs Quantity Unit
Total
Investment
Phase-I
Till 2015
Phase-II
2015-25
Phase-
III
2025-35
beautification of existing parks
Development of new parks 5 Nos 5.000 3.000 1.000 1.000
Development of Community
Hall (area 2000 sqm)
3 Nos 0.600 0.300 0.210 0.090
Development of Public Library
(area 500sqm)
3 Nos 0.480 0.240 0.168 0.072
Development of Proper
Crematorium 5
Nos 1.000 0.500 0.350 0.150
Sub Total 9.080 5.040 2.728 1.312

Table 12.10: Housing for Urban Poor Investment Needs, 2035 (Rs. Crore)
Projects/ Programs Quantity Unit
Total
Investment
Phase-I
Till 2015
Phase-II
2015-25
Phase-
III
2025-
35
Housing for slum
dwellers/urban poor (40 sqm
plot Site)
370 Nos 5.550 5.550 0.000 0.000
Sub Total 5.550 5.550 0.000 0.000

Table 12.11: Electricity and Street lighting Investment Needs, 2035 (Rs. Crore)
Projects/ Programs Quantity Unit
Total
Investment
Phase-I
Till 2015
Phase-II
2015-25
Phase-
III
2025-35
Installing Street Light poles
with solar street ligths (@ 30m)
2670 Nos 8.010 4.806 1.602 1.602
Implanting High mast Poles
(14m Height)
6 Nos 0.036 0.018 0.018 0.000
Sub Total 8.046 4.824 1.620 1.602

Table 12.12: Education Facilities Investment Needs, 2035 (Rs. Crore)
Projects/ Programs Quantity Unit
Total
Investment
Phase-I
Till 2015
Phase-II
2015-25
Phase-
III
2025-35
Primary school 1 Nos 2.00 1.00 1.000 0.000
Sub Total 2.00 1.00 1.00 0.00

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Table 12.13: Health Facilities Investment Needs, 2035 (Rs. Crore)
Projects/ Programs Quantity Unit
Total
Investment
Phase-I
Till 2015
Phase-II
2015-25
Phase-
III
2025-35
IEC for health awareness 5 Nos 0.250 0.150 0.050 0.050
Dispensary 2 Nos 1.600 0.800 0.000 0.800
Sub Total

1.850 0.950 0.050 0.850

Table 12.14: Environment & Tourism Investment Needs, 2035 (Rs. Crore)
Projects/ Programs Quantity Unit
Total
Investment
Phase-I
Till 2015
Phase-II
2015-25
Phase-
III
2025-35
Tree Plantation along major
roads
6 Km 0.060 0.030 0.021 0.009
Renovation of Existing ponds 1 Nos 0.500 0.500 0.000 0.000
Construction of Rain Water
harvesting Structures
10 Nos 0.200 0.100 0.100 0.000
Development of Mela ground
& community facilities for
recreation and organised mela
during festivals near Kardhan
Talav
1 Nos 3.000 1.500 1.500 0.000
Sub Total 3.760 2.130 1.621 0.009
Table 12.15: Urban Governance and Institutional Setup Investment Needs, 2035 (Rs. Crore)
Projects/ Programs Quantity Unit
Total
Investment
Phase-I
Till 2015
Phase-II
2015-25
Phase-
III
2025-35
Training of DNP staff and
Implementation Double entry
system
1

0.100 0.100 0.000 0.000
Implementation of Double
Entry Accrual Based
Accounting
2

0.100 0.050 0.050 0.000
Training and Institutional
Strengthening
5

1.500 0.900 0.300 0.300
Communication and Citizen
Participation Programme
5

0.250 0.150 0.050 0.050
Modernizing Office
Infrastructure
1

1.000 0.600 0.200 0.200
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Projects/ Programs Quantity Unit
Total
Investment
Phase-I
Till 2015
Phase-II
2015-25
Phase-
III
2025-35
E-Governance System for
Municipal Services
1

6.000 3.000 3.000 0.000
Asset Management System
(GIS Mapping of Property Tax
System, Water Pipe line,
Sewer Syatem, Drainage
System)
9.3 Sqkm 0.465 0.465 0.000 0.000
Sub Total

9.415 5.265 3.600 0.550
12.4 FINAL INVESTMENT NEEDS FOR 2035
Table 12.16 presents the summary of infrastructure investment need for the city up to 2035 in
different phases. The need assessment has been carried out for the projected population for year 2015,
2015-25 and 2025-35.
Table 12.16: Sector wise total investment needs, 2035 (Rs. Crore)
Projects
Amount in
Rs. Crore
Phase I
Till 2015
Phase II
2015-25
Phase III
2025-35
%
Water Supply 21.862 14.347 4.970 2.545 10.55
Sewerage 26.670 15.615 6.495 4.560 12.87
Sanitation 3.534 2.067 1.467 0.000 1.71
Storm Water Drainage 22.049 13.635 5.774 2.640 10.64
Solid Waste Management 3.441 2.423 0.782 0.235 1.66
Traffic and Transportation 86.406 52.596 26.535 7.275 41.71
Electricity & Street Lighting 8.046 4.824 1.620 1.602 3.88
Health 1.850 0.950 0.050 0.850 0.89
Education 2.000 1.000 1.000 0.000 0.97
Social Infrastructure & Other
Projects
9.080 5.040 2.728 1.312 4.38
Housing for Urban Poor 5.550 5.550 0.000 0.000 2.68
Environment and Tourism 3.760 2.130 1.621 0.009 1.81
Economic Growth 3.500 2.000 1.000 0.500 1.69
Urban Governance and
Institutional Setup
9.415 5.265 3.600 0.550 4.54
Total Cost 207.163 127.442 57.642 22.078 100.00

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Figure 12.1: Sector wise total investment needs, 2035 (Rs. Crore)
Analysis of above table and figure indicates that out of the total investment proposed nearly 41.71 %
has been earmarked for development of Traffic & Transportation facilities as currently the town has
very bad condition of Traffic & Transportation infrastructures. Apart from the Traffic &
Transportation facilities next important investment is required in Sewerage facilities (12.87%)
followed by Storm Water Drainage (10.64%), Water Supply (10.55%), etc. Phase wise investment
needs in different sectors indicates that around 62% of total investment is required in 1
st
phase
followed by 27.8% in 2
nd
phase and 11% in 3
rd
phase. Main cause of higher investment in 1
st
phase
indicates that there is a huge gap between existing infrastructure facilities in the town and what it has
to be as per standards/guidelines of UDPFI.


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13. PROFILE OF SHORT TERM PROJECTS
13.1 INTRODUCTION
The chapter describes the profile of priority projects (short term sub projects) shortlisted based on
stakeholder consultation, assessment and sharing of the capital investment plan with various
stakeholders. The project profile illustrates objectives, project rationale, location, suggested capacity /
size, estimated indicative cost, project description / components, implementation plan as well as
environmental and social impact of the project.
13.2 PROFILE OF PRIORITY PROJECTS
The priority projects have been presented as short term projects for various sectors. Based on priority
ranking these projects have been given for studied sectors. Details of short term prioritized sub-project
vis--vis the rational for their selection, components, cost estimates, implementation plan and social
and environmental impacts have been presented in Table 13.1 to Table 13.11.
Table 13.1: Water Supply Short Term Sub-Project Profile
Priority: 1
Objectives:
To ensure regular water supply to all residents
Project Rationale:
Irregular and inadequate water supply
High UFW and illegal connections
Shrinking Ground Water Level
Location:
Daboh Municipal Council
Suggested capacity/size:
New tube wells-5, Renovation of OHT-1 (Capacity-2 Lakh Liters), Renovation of pipe lines -8
km, Laying New Pipe lines- 49 km, Source development and intake-6.2 MLD, Construction of
WTP-6.2 MLD
Up-gradation of the Pumping Station-1, Community Taps in major market and institutional areas-
5
Estimated Indicative Cost: Rs. 21.862 Crores
Project Description / Components:
Installation of 5 new tube wells
Repairing of the existing OHT of capacity 2 Lakh liters
Repairing of 8 km old pipe lines
Laying 49 km New Pipe lines (uPVC pipelines)
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Source development and intake for 6.2 MLD water supply
Construction of WTP for 6.2 MLD water supply
Supply and installation of bulk water meters
Up-gradation of the Pumping Station
Supply and installation of consumer water meters
Community Taps in major market and institutional areas
Implementation Plan:
Environmental Impacts
Nuisance due to stockpiling of construction materials, generation of dust due to silt-
laden run-off from construction sites.
Temporary loss of access, traffic congestion, disruption of business activities in
commercial areas, during laying of distribution networks
Environmental
Category:
E2
Social Impacts
Temporary loss of access, traffic congestion, disruption of business activities in
commercial areas, during laying of distribution networks.
No permanent resettlement and livelihood loss caused
Social Category:
S2
Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4
WS-1
Instalation of new tubewells 0.3
WS-2 Construction of 5 Over Head Tanks 0.5
WS-3 Repairing the existing OHT 0.05
WS-4 Repair of old pipe lines where ever is needed 0.4
WS-5 Laying down New Pipe lines 10.78
WS-6 Source development and intake 3.1
WS-7 Construction of WTP 4.34
WS-8 Supply and installation of bulk water meters 0.038
WS-9 Technological up-gradation of the Pumping Station 0.05
WS-10 Installation of vacuum feed chlorinators (short-term) 0.05
WS-11 Supply and installation of consumer water meters 1.944
WS-12 Community Taps in major market and institutional areas 0.01
WS-13 Awareness program on water conservation 0.2
WS-14 Computerization of Billing System 0.1
Total 21.862
Selection of DPR Consultant
DPR Preparation and Clearance
Bidding and Selection of Contractors/Suppliers
Project Implementation
Year1 Year2 Year4 Sub
Project ID
Sub Project
Cost (Rs. In
Crores)
Year3
Sub Projects and Components
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Figure 13.1 Water Supply Proposals
Table 13.2: Sewerage Short Term Sub-Project Profile
Priority: 2
Objectives:
To ensure hygienic disposal of waste water at household level
To ensure access to toilet facilities to all
Project Rationale:
Unhygienic disposal of waste water
Unsanitary practices in slums and wards
Lack of sewerage system in the city
Lack of mechanism for water treatment plants
Locations:
All wards of the City
Suggested capacity/size:
Laying 57 km Sewer line, 5 MLD STP, 29 Community toilets , 5 Public Convenience in main market, 3
Sewer cleaning equipment - Sewer Jetting Machine, High Pressure Water Tank & Sludge Vacuum tanker
Estimated Indicative Cost: Rs. 44.604 Crore
Project Description / Components:
Laying down 57 km Sewer line with pumping facility for entire town
Construction of 5 MLD Sewerage Treatment Plant
Construction of 29 Community toilets for slum or BPL population
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Construction of 5 Public Convenience mainly in main market, institutional area, etc
Procurement of Sewer cleaning equipments - Sewer Jetting Machine, High Pressure Water Tank & Sludge
Vacuum tanker
IEC measures for sanitation practice
Implementation Plan:
Environmental Impacts:
Nuisance due to stockpiling of construction materials, generation of dust due to
silt-laden run-off from construction sites.
Temporary loss of access, traffic congestion, disruption of business activities in
commercial areas, during laying of distribution networks
Environmental
Category:
E2
Social Impacts:
Temporary loss of access, traffic congestion, disruption of business activities in
commercial areas, during laying of distribution networks.
No permanent resettlement and livelihood loss caused
Social Category:
S2
Important Scheme for Project:
Low cost sanitation scheme: The Centrally sponsored scheme of Urban Low Cost
Sanitation for liberation of the Scavengers operates through the Ministry of Urban
Affairs & Employment (MOUA& E). Priority is given to those towns which have a
predominance of dry latrines or where widespread open defecation takes place and
having a population not exceeding 5 lakhs as per 1981 Census. Financing pattern
being followed is as follows; EWS- 45% subsidy, 50% loan and 5% beneficiary
contribution; LIG - 25% subsidy, 60% loan and 15% beneficiary contribution; MIG
& HIG - Nil subsidy, 75% loan and 25% beneficiary contribution. A separate cell
has been set up in HUDCO for the implementation of this programme.
Percentage of eligible
households - 39.94
Innovative techniques:
For treating the waste water on the place of STP an Integrated Decentralised
Wastewater Treatment System can be adopted which is based on several natural
physical treatment techniques, put together in different combinations according to
the needs and the financial budgets of users. The different devices cover primary,
secondary and tertiary treatment stages. This system is relatively of low cost and
based on the principle of minimal maintenance.
Alternate option of
STP


Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4
SS-1 Laying down Sewer line with pumping for entire city 22.800
SS-2 Construction of Sewerage Treatment Plant 3.750
SS-3 Community toilets for slum or BPL population 2.934
SS-4 Public Convenience mainly in main market, institutional area, etc 0.500
SS-5
Sewer cleaning equipments - Sewer Jetting Machine, High
Pressure Water Tanke & Sludge Vacuum tanker
0.120
SS-6 IEC measures for sanitation practice 0.1
Total 30.204
Selection of DPR Consultant
DPR Preparation and Clearance
Bidding and Selection of Contractors/Suppliers
Project Implementation
Year1 Sub
Project ID Sub Projects and Components
Sub Project
Cost (Rs. In
Crores)
Year3 Year2 Year4
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Figure 13.2: Location of Proposed Sewerage Short Term Sub-Project
Table 13.3: Traffic and Transportation Short Term Sub-Project Profile
Priority: 3
Objectives:
To lay an efficient transport structure for the town that facilitates local tourism and economy
To improve mobility of goods and people
Project Rationale:
Majority of the roads are very narrow
The proposed components can help achieving in safe and reliable accessibility to all tourist and local areas
Locations:
Across the town
Suggested capacity/size:
New bus stand (1), Parking-5 locations, Junction Improvement -6 Nos., Road improvements -33 km, New
city road-18 km, Major roads-4 km, Footpath-4 km, Bypass-2 km, Installing Signage -6 km
Estimated Indicative Cost: Rs. 86.406 Crore
Project Description / Components:
Development of new bus stand with basic facilities
Development of parking at 5 identified locations of the town
Junction Improvement and beautification for 6 identified junctions of the town
Widening and improvements of 33 km other city roads
Construction of new city road 11 km
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Improvement of major roads and construction of footpath on major city roads for 4 km
Construction of 2 km bypass for the town
Installing Signage along 6 km of major roads for pedestrians as well as vehicular traffic on the roads
Implementation Plan:
Environmental Impacts:
Air and noise pollution. Piling of construction materials, bituminous layers and debris
causing nuisance and traffic blockage.
Surface watercourses and water bodies along the alignment. Encroachment onto water
bodies and clearance of vegetation, and spill over of construction wastes onto the water
bodies
Disruption in traffic and amenities.
Environmental
Category:
E2
Social Impacts:
Temporary loss of access, traffic congestion, disruption of business activities in
commercial areas, during construction. No permanent resettlement and livelihood loss
caused.
Social
Category:
S2

Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4
T-1
Development of new bus stand 2
T-2
Parking 0.5
T-3
Junction Improvement and beautification 0.9
T-4
Widening and improvements of other city roads 33
T-5
Construction of new city road 36
T-6
Improvement of major roads and construction of
footpath on major city roads
8
T-7
Construction of bypass 6
T-8
Installing Signage for pedestrians as well as
vehicular traffic on the roads
0.006
Total 86.406
Selection of DPR Consultant
DPR Preparation and Clearance
Bidding and Selection of Contractors/Suppliers
Project Implementation
Sub
Project
ID Sub Projects and Components
Sub Project Cost
(Rs. In Crores)
Year1 Year2 Year3 Year4
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Figure 13.3: Location of Proposed Traffic &Transportation Short Term Sub-Project
Table 13.4: Storm Water Drainage Short Term Sub-Project Profile
Priority: 4
Objectives:
To promote safe and environmentally friendly city by ensuring effective disposal of rain water
To eliminate submerge of low lying areas and damage to property and roads
Project Rationale:
Inadequate drainage system in the city
Long durations of water logging
Locations:
Uncovered wards of the city
Suggested capacity/size:
Drainage Master Plan -9.6 Sq km, New Primary drains 32 km, New Secondary drains- 21 km, Existing
primary and secondary drains-31 km, Existing main drains-8 km, New Main Drain -11 km
Estimated Indicative Cost: Rs 22.049 Crore
Project Description / Components:
Preparation of Drainage Master Plan for 9.6 sqkm of town area
Construction of 32 km new primary drains
Construction of 21 km new secondary drains
Repairing/widening/de-silting of 31 km existing primary and secondary drains
Repairing/widening/de-silting of 8 km existing main drains
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Construction of 11 km New Main Drain
Removing the encroachment on drains mainly in market area , public areas and water logging low line areas
Procurement of Jeep Mounted Excavator, Regular dozer, JCB and Dumper Truck
Implementation Plan:
Environmental Impacts:
Odour nuisance to surrounding areas from grit chambers, fine screening, and sludge
dewatering system
Impacts on soil and ground water quality from leaching of sanitation facilities.
Increased vulnerability to floods due to construction works, excavation, and cutting
and trenching for laying of sewer lines.
Dust generation from handling of materials, wind erosion of stockpiles, and increase
in noise level due to construction works and movement of vehicles
Environmental
Category:
E2
Social Impacts:
Temporary loss of access, traffic congestion, disruption of business activities in
commercial areas, during laying of distribution networks.
No permanent resettlement and livelihood loss caused.
Social Category:
S2

Table 13.5: Environment and Tourism
Priority: 5
Objectives:
To safeguard urban environment and promotion of tourism
Project Rationale:
Conservation of natural beauty of the town
Protection of natural resources
Productive use of natural resources
Location:
Across the town
Suggested Capacity / Size:
Tree Plantation-6km, Renovation of pond-1, Rain Water harvesting Structures -10, Development of Mela
ground-1
Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4
SWD-1 Preparation of Drainage Master Plan 0.2
SWD-2 Construction of Primary drains 4.8
SWD-3 Construction of Secondary drains 8.4
SWD-4
Repairing/widening/de-silting of existing primary and
secondary drains
0.279
SWD-5 Repairing/widening/de-silting of existing main drains 0.435
SWD-6 Construction of Main Drain 7.15
SWD-7
Removing the encroachment on drains mainly in market
area , public areas and water logging low line areas
0.1
SWD-8
Procurement of Jeep Mounted Excavator , Regular
dozer, JCB and Dumper Truck
0.685
Total 22.049
Selection of DPR Consultant
DPR Preparation and Clearance
Bidding and Selection of Contractors/Suppliers
Project Implementation
Year1 Year2
Sub Project ID Sub Projects and Components
Sub Project
Cost (Rs. In
Crores)
Year3 Year4
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Estimated Indicative Cost: Rs 3.76 Crore
Project Description / Components:
Tree Plantation along major roads for 6 km
Renovation of Existing pond (1) of the town
Construction of 10 Rain Water harvesting Structures
Development of Mela ground & community facilities for recreation and organised mela during festivals near
Kardhan Talav
Implementation Plan:
Environmental Impacts:
Any improvement measure related to heritage properties requires consent from
a large number of stakeholders and thus these might fall under category E1
Environmental
Category:
E2
Social Impacts:
Temporary loss of access, traffic congestion, disruption of business activities in
commercial areas, during construction of heritage improvement measures.
No permanent resettlement or large scale loss of livelihood is anticipated
Social Category:
S2
Table 13.6: Slum Improvement Short Term Sub-Project Profile
Priority: 6
Objectives:
To provide equal opportunities for basic services to the poor and slum dwellers
Project Rationale:
About 85% of the slum population lives in kutchha or semi pucca structures.
Non-existent infrastructure facilities
The proposed components shall help achieving in enhancement of living environment of the poor and slum
dwellers
Locations: All slum pockets of the town
Suggested Capacity / Size:
Provision of 370 households of select slum dwellers having dilapidated housing
Estimated Indicative Cost: Rs 5.55 Crore
Project Description / Components:
Construction of 370 nos of EWS house of RCC structure each of 40 SQM with provisions of 1Bed room,
Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4
UE-1 Tree Plantation along major roads 0.06
UE-2 Renovation of Existing ponds 0.5
UE-3
Construction of Rain Water
harvesting Structures
0.2
UE-4
Development of Mela ground &
community facilities for recreation
and organised mela during festivals
near Kardhan Talav
3
Total 3.76
Selection of DPR Consultant
DPR Preparation and Clearance
Bidding and Selection of Contractors/Suppliers
Project Implementation
Sub
Project
ID
Year4
Sub Projects and Components
Sub Project
Cost (Rs. In
Crores)
Year1 Year2 Year3
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drawing room, kitchen and toilet facilities for slum dwellers
Implementation Plan:
Environmental Impacts:
Nuisance due to stockpiling of construction materials, generation of dust due to
silt-laden run-off from construction sites.
Temporary loss of access, traffic congestion, disruption of business activities in
commercial areas, during laying of distribution networks
Environmental
Category:
E2
Social Impacts:
Temporary loss of access, traffic congestion, disruption of business activities in
commercial areas, during laying of distribution networks.
No permanent resettlement and livelihood loss caused
Social Category:
S2
Table 13.7: Solid Waste Management Short Term Sub-Project Profile
Priority: 7
Objectives:
To ensure hygienic collection, transportation and disposal of solid waste
Project Rationale:
Absence of house to house collection of solid waste
Unhygienic collection, transportation and disposal of solid waste
Locations:
Across the city
Suggested capacity/size:
Community Dustbins-310, Refuse compactor-1, Cess Pool Emptier (covered)-1, Tractors -2, Trolley 2,
Tricycles-54, Landfill site-2.5 Acre,
Estimated Indicative Cost: Rs. 3.441 Crore
Project Description / Components:
Distribution of Community Dustbins (Segregated Format) @ 300m
Purchase of 1 refuse compactor
Purchase of 1 Cess Pool Emptier (covered)
Purchase of Tractors
Purchase of Covered trolley for vehicles
Purchase of Tricycles (Containerized Mechanized Tri-cycles of 200 ltr. capacity and fully closed type)
Development of Landfill site
Purchase of Equipments for Landfill site Management
Awareness programme for segregation of waste at source and for solid waste management system in general
Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4
SI-1 Housing Scheme for Slum Dwellers 5.55
Total 5.55
Selection of DPR Consultant
DPR Preparation and Clearance
Bidding and Selection of Contractors/Suppliers
Project Implementation
Sub Projects and Components
Sub
Project
Cost (Rs.
Sub
Project
ID
Year4 Year1 Year2 Year3
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and importance of community participation.
Composting and Vermiculture
Implementation Plan:
Environmental Impacts:
No major impact
Environmental Category:
E2
Social Impacts:
No permanent resettlement and livelihood loss caused during construction of
landfill site
Social Category:
S2

Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4
SWM-1
Distribution of Community Dustbins
(Segregated Format) @ 300m
1.085
SWM-2 Purchase of 1 refuse compactor 0.21
SWM-3
Purchase of 1 Cess Pool Emptier
(covered)
0.16
SWM-4 Purchase of Tractors 0.08
SWM-5
Purchase of Covered trolley for
vehicles
0.014
SWM-6
Purchase of Tricycles (Containerized
Mechanized Tri-cycles of 200 ltr.
capacity and fully closed type)
0.092
SWM-7 Development of Landfill site 1
SWM-8
Purchase of Equipments for Landfill
site Management
0.2
SWM-9
Awareness programme for segregation
of waste at source and for solid waste
management system in general and
importance of community participation.
0.1
SWM-10 Composting and Vermiculture 0.5
Total 3.441
Selection of DPR Consultant
DPR Preparation and Clearance
Bidding and Selection of Contractors/Suppliers
Project Implementation
Year5 Year1 Year2 Sub
Project ID Sub Projects and Components
Sub Project
Cost (Rs. In
Crores)
Year3 Year4
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Figure 13.4 Solid Waste Management Proposals
Table 13.8: Social Infrastructure Short Term Sub-Project Profile
Priority: 8
Objectives:
To promote and enhance the social quality of life
Project Rationale:
Limited social infrastructure facilities
Suggested Capacity / Size:
Educational facilities: Primary school- 1, Health Facilities: Dispensary -2, Community Facilities: Library 3,
Community Hall 5, Neighbourhood Level Park 4, Crematorium-5
Estimated Indicative Cost: Rs 12.93 Crore
Project Description / Components:
Provision of 1 primary school
Provision of 2 nos. of Dispensary
Redevelopment and beautification of existing parks -4
Development of 5 new parks
Development of 3 Community Hall (area 2000 sqm)
Development of 3 Public Library (area 500sqm)
Development of 5 Crematorium
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Implementation Plan:
Environmental Impacts:
Nuisance due to stockpiling of construction materials, generation of dust due to
silt-laden run-off from construction sites.
Temporary loss of access, traffic congestion, disruption of business activities in
commercial areas, during laying of distribution networks
Environmental
Category:
E2
Social Impacts:
Temporary loss of access, traffic congestion, disruption of business activities in
commercial areas, during laying of distribution networks.
No permanent resettlement and livelihood loss caused
Social Category:
S2
Figure 13.5 Social Infrastructure Proposals

Table 13.9: Electricity and Street Lighting Short Term Sub-Project Profile
Priority: 9
Objectives:
To provide street light in the whole town
Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4
SOI-1 Improvement in Educational Facilities 2
SOI-2 Improvement in Health Facilities 1.85
SOI-3
Improvement in Recreation and Community
Facilities 9.08
Total 12.93
Selection of DPR Consultant
DPR Preparation and Clearance
Bidding and Selection of Contractors/Suppliers
Project Implementation
Sub
Project ID Sub Projects and Components
Year4
Sub
Project
Cost (Rs. In
Year3 Year2 Year1
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Project Rationale:
Lack of street light in the town
The proposed components shall help achieving in improvement of living street light and safety in the town
Locations: All slum pockets of the town
Estimated Indicative Cost: Rs 8.046 Crore
Project Description / Components:
Installing 2670 Street Light poles with solar street ligths (at distance of 30m)
Implanting 6 High mast Poles (14m Height)
Implementation Plan:
Environmental Impacts:
Temporary loss of access, traffic congestion, disruption of business activities
in commercial areas, during installation of Street lights
Environmental Category:
E2
Social Impacts:
No permanent resettlement and livelihood loss caused
Social Category:
S2
Table 13.10: Economic Development
Priority: 10
Objectives:
Mainstreaming economic development of the town
Project Rationale:
Plagued economic growth of the town
More dependency on primary activities like agriculture
Poor livelihood of the citizen
Location: Municipal Council, Daboh
Suggested Capacity / Size:
Vegetable mandi -1, Market complex-1, Vending zones (each for 100 vendors)-2
Estimated Indicative Cost: Rs. 3.5 Crore
Project Description / Components:
Development of Vegetable mandi near Hospital road
Development of some market complexs in Patara bag area
Development of vending zones (each for 100 vendors)
Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4
E-9
Installation of Hi Mast and other street lights 8.046
Selection of DPR Consultant
DPR Preparation and Clearance
Bidding and Selection of Contractors/Suppliers
Project Implementation
Year3 Year4 Sub
Project Sub Projects and Components
Sub Project Cost
(Rs. In Crores)
Year1 Year2
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Implementation Plan:
Table 13.11: Urban Governance & Institutional Setup Short Term Sub-Project Profile
Priority: 11
Objectives:
To build the capacity of municipality for effective implementation of projects.
To guarantee accountable and transparent municipal governance system
Project Rationale:
Inefficiency of municipal council in project implementation, operation and maintenance
Weak municipal governance system
The proposed components shall help achieving:
Building the capacity of municipal council for effective implementation of projects
Guarantee accountable and transparent municipal governance system
Location: Municipal Council, Daboh
Suggested Capacity / Size:
Training of DNP staff on Double entry system-1 , Double Entry Accrual Based Accounting -2, Institutional
Strengthening-5, Communication and Citizen Participation Programme -5, Modernizing Office
Infrastructure, E-Governance System for Municipal Services
Estimated Indicative Cost: Rs. 9.415 Crore
Project Description / Components:
Training of DNP staff and Implementation Double entry system
Implementation of Double Entry Accrual Based Accounting
Training and Institutional Strengthening
Communication and Citizen Participation Programme
Modernizing Office Infrastructure
E-Governance System for Municipal Services
Asset Management System (GIS Mapping of Property Tax System, Water Pipe line, Sewer Syatem,
Drainage System)
Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4
ED1
Development of
Vegetable mandi near
Hospital road
0.5
ED2
Development of some
market complexs in
Patara bag area
2
ED3
Development of vending
zones (each for 100
vendors)
1
TOTAL 3.5
Selection of DPR Consultant
DPR Preparation and Clearance
Bidding and Selection of Contractors/Suppliers
Project Implementation
Year4 Sub
Project
Sub Projects and
Components
Sub
Project
Year1 Year2 Year3
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Implementation Plan:


*****

Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4
UG1
Training of DNP staff and
Implementation Double entry system
0.1
UG2
Implementation of Double Entry Accrual
Based Accounting
0.1
UG3 Training and Institutional Strengthening 1.5
UG4
Communication and Citizen Participation
Programme
0.25
UG5 Modernizing Office Infrastructure 1
UG6
E-Governance System for Municipal
Services
6
UG7
Asset Management System (GIS
Mapping of Property Tax System, Water
Pipe line, Sewer Syatem, Drainage
System)
0.465
Total 9.415
Selection of Consultant
Software Preparation and Acceptance
Project Implementation
Year5
Sub
Project
ID
Year1
Sub Projects and Components
Sub
Project
Cost (Rs.
Year2 Year3 Year4
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14. ANALYSIS OF GOVERNANCE FRAMEWORK
AND REFORM ACTION PLAN
14.1 INTRODUCTION
The urban services are managed multiple institutions in Daboh. Daboh Nagar Parishad (DNP) has the
constitutional mandate of planning and management of urban services besides host of other
responsibilities as per the provisions of the MP Municipalities Act, 1961. Water supply is the
responsibility of DNP. Solid waste management, slum development, urban poverty alleviation related
services are delivered by DNP. However PWD is responsible for those state highways, which traverse
through the town where as town roads are developed and maintained by DNP. Madhya Pradesh Rural
Road Development Authority (MPRRDA) also involved in development and maintenance of select
roads.
14.2 GOVERNANCE FRAMEWORK
The summary of the analysis of the governance framework was carried out by studying quality and
quantity of human resources available, use of latest technology, transparency and accountability and
financial management capabilities. The findings of the assessment of both the administrative and
political wings have been presented in Table 14.1.
Table 14.1: Assessment of Governance Capacity, DNP
Focus Areas
Present Status
Remarks
Administrative Wing Political Wing
Human Resources
Staff Strength
Inadequate staff
strength (29% vacant
post)
Not Applicable
Immediate need for filling
vacancies
Technical
Capacity
Inadequate technical
capacity of staff
Do not have technical
know how
Increase capacity of staff by
providing training on skill
development for Councillors to
undergo training on technical
aspects of urban development,
for better decision making.
Efficiency
Reduced efficiency due
to over burdening and
inadequate office
facilities
Lack of knowledge
about city needs, urban
development issues,
programmes and other
infrastructure schemes;
Lack of awareness on
roles and
responsibilities
Need to assess the training needs
of present staff.
Review of recruitment policy
and guidelines for future.
Management Information system
Mapping
Do not have
infrastructure for
Not Applicable
Need to create separate mapping
and inventory division
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Focus Areas
Present Status
Remarks
Administrative Wing Political Wing
mapping urban
infrastructure
Computerisation
Initiated
computerisation
process.
Majority of the staff
lack computing skills
Not Applicable
Computerisation process to be
strengthened further and to
impart computer operations
training to all departments
Information
Dissemination
Very less dissemination
of information about
various programmes
and projects
Lack of awareness
To have information
dissemination strategy.
Involvement of elected
representative in the process.
Transparency and Accountability
Personal
Management
Weak personal
management system.
Absence of performance
monitoring system.
Absence of performance
management system.
To have performance based
incentives.
Inter-
departmental
coordination
Weak inter
departmental
coordination.
Delay in
implementation of
programme and
projects.
More involvement in
facilitation of inter-
departmental
coordination.
Frequent inter-departmental
stock taking meetings.
Citizen
Involvement
No citizen involvement
Does not involve citizen
in urban development
and management.
Creation of citizen forum.
Community involvement in
infrastructure needs assessment.
Strengthening NGO operation in
service delivery.
Financial Management
Accounting system
Single entry, cash based
system, liable to errors.
Not Applicable
Publication of financial
statement for citizens review.
Accrual based double entry
accounting system.
Record
Maintenance
Records are manually
maintained and not
recorded in regular
format.
Not Applicable
Computerisation of accounting
and budgeting procedures.
Auditing System
No regular auditing.
Last auditing was done
in 2008
Not Applicable
Budgeting system Less transparent.
Does not involve
citizens in budget
preparation.
Implementation of social audit
Decentralization
Centralized decision
making in place in spite
of implementation of
74th CAA.
Weak grass root level
decision-making.
Less community
involvement in planning
and programme
implementation.


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The major issues related to urban governance include, after the situation assessment:
a. Lack of interaction between the administrative and political wing
b. Inadequacy of number and technical capacity of staff with respect to duties assigned;
c. Multiple agencies performing overlapping functions with little inter departmental coordination;
d. Inadequate financial capacity of the Nagar Parishad;
e. Non-involvement of citizen in decision making.
14.3 REFORMS ACTION PLAN
The DNP has initiated very limited reforms outlined under the JNNURM program. One of them
includes the Single Window System and complaints handling mechanism through earmarking every
Tuesday for complaints resolution of citizens. The current status and action required on pending
reforms are given in Table 14.2.
Table 14.2: Summary of JNNURM Mandatory Reforms undertaken by DNP, 2012
S. No. Reforms Action taken by DNP Further Action required by DNP
Mandatory Reforms Under CDP as per JNNURM
1
Adoption of modern
accrual-based double
entry system of
accounting
Single entry accounting
system is in place since
inception of municipal
governance in the town.
Record of municipal income
and expenditure are
maintained through balance
sheets prepared
electronically;
Adoption of Double Entry
Accounting System targeted
in financial year 2013-14
Procurement and installation of
computer and software by 2013-14
Training of staff 2013-14
2
Introduction of e-
governance using IT
applications, such as
GIS and MIS for various
services provided by
ULB
Limited computerisation
facility, accessible only to
Accounts Department;
Implementation planned by
financial year 2010-11
Computerization of all the
departments, by 2013-14
Centralized Database Management
System 2013-14
IT applications like GIS and MIS
should be implemented-2014-15
System of e-governance should be
comprehensively installed 2014-15
3
Reform of property tax
with GIS, to make it a
major revenue source
and arrangements for its
effective implementation
Manual Assessment of
property tax on the basis of
annual valuation of the
properties.
Property taxes account for
GIS based property tax system to be
quickly implemented 2014-15
Revision of tax by 10% for every 2
years
Arrear collection 60%
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S. No. Reforms Action taken by DNP Further Action required by DNP
so that collection
efficiency reaches at
least 85% within next
7years
nearly 26.79% of the tax
income of the DNP
Implementation planned by
financial year 2013-14
Current collection:80% of current
average whichever is higher by 2014-
15
4
Levy of reasonable user
charges by ULBs /
Parastatals with the
objective that full cost of
operation and
maintenance or recurring
cost is collected within
next seven years
DNP has introduced water
tax and Samekit tax as user
charges for sanitation and
other services.
However DNP showed
willingness to introduce
user charges for SWM in
financial year 2013-14
Finalise proposed revision of water
tax with state government
Ensure implementation in financial
year 2013-14
5
Internal earmarking of
budgets for basic
services to the urban
poor
No such provision; basic
services to the poor are
provided under the slum
development programs;
Targeted for 2013-14
Ensure implementation in financial
year 2013-14.
6
Provision of basic
services at affordable
prices, to urban poor
including security of
tenure along with social
security
Water supply, Drainage,
Street Lights and Roads are
provided in few slums
Targeted for 2013-14
Ensure implementation in financial
year 2013-14
Optional Reforms Under CDP
1
Revision of bye-laws to
streamline the approval
process for construction
of buildings,
development of sites etc
Not undertaken Revision should be carried out
2
Simplification of legal
and procedural
frameworks for
conversion of
agricultural land for
non-agricultural
purposes.
Not Applicable Ensure implementation
3
Introduction of Property
Title Certification
System in ULBs.
Not undertaken Ensure implementation
4 Earmarking at least 20- Not undertaken Ensure implementation
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S. No. Reforms Action taken by DNP Further Action required by DNP
25% of developed land
in all housing projects
(both Public and Private
Agencies) for EWS/LIG
category with a system
of cross subsidization
5
Introduction of
computerized process of
registration of land and
property
Not undertaken Ensure implementation
6
Revision of bye-laws to
make rain water
harvesting mandatory in
all buildings and
adoption of water
conservation measures
Not undertaken Ensure implementation
7
Bye-laws for reuse of
recycled water
Not undertaken Ensure implementation
8
Administrative reforms
i.e. reduction in
establishment cost by
voluntary retirement
schemes, non-filling up
of posts falling vacant
due to retirement etc.,
and achieving specified
milestones in this regard
Not Taken up Should be taken up for better
functioning of local body
9 Structural reforms
Not Taken up Should be taken up for better
functioning of local body
10
Encouraging Public
Private Partnership
Not undertaken Strengthening of present efforts
Source: Consultation with DNP, 2012


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15 FINANCIAL OPERATING PLAN
15.1 INTRODUCTION
The Financial Operating Plan (FOP) is essentially a multi-year forecast of finances of the urban local
body for a term of 5 to 20 years (plan period). It needs mention that the identified investment is
phased from 2012-13 to 2034-35. Also as requirement of TOR an investment plan is prepared for first
five year i.e. from 2012-13 to 2017-18 and the FOP has also been generated for the same plan period.
This five yearly FOP is prepared considering only the core functions of ULB. A salient feature of the
FOP is that all outstanding dues including debt and non-debt liabilities have been taken into account
and the repayment has been scheduled accordingly.
The FOP is basically generated to assess the investment sustaining capacity of the ULB adopting a
project funding structure comprising, funds from the State Government under various government
schemes and direct funding through budgetary allocation; ULB and Private Sector. The major criteria
for ascertaining the investment sustaining capacity of DNP is that, it should have year-to-year positive
Opening Balance during the plan period.
The approach adopted by consultants is an integrated one, which is inter-twined together in terms of
financial, institutional and legal reforms into one combined synergistic strategy with components both
at the state level as well as the municipal level.
15.2 INVESTMENT REQUIREMENTS
With a continuous increase in the population of Daboh city over a period of time, the demand for the
infrastructure has grown several-folds. If we continue with the present growth rate, we would find that
after few years, the existing infrastructure in terms of solid waste management, drainage, sewerage,
drinking water, parking, public conveniences etc. would fall short way beyond the requirement.
After democratic decentralization of urban local governments through the Madhya Pradesh
Municipalities Act, 1961, the range of functions and responsibilities of urban bodies have broadened
which require additional funds and staff.
15.2.1 Sector-wise Investment Requirements
It is proposed that DNP shall primarily concentrate on essential urban services such as water supply,
sewerage, drainage and solid waste disposal and so on. Whereas provision of services like education,
health care, electricity etc. is responsibility of State and will be dealt by state government with
effective participation of private sector. The cost of providing these services is substantial which is
beyond the capacity of municipality. DNP will concentrate only on providing core municipal services.
The following Table 15.1 & Table 15.2 summarizes the sectorwise investment requirement for core
functions of DNP other than health and education. The total investment required would be 203.313
crore out of which 125.492 crore would be required in first five years.
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Table 15.1: Broad Investment Plan (Amount in Crore )
Projects Amount 2015 2015-25 2025-35 %
Water Supply 21.862 14.347 4.970 2.545 10.75
Sewerage 26.670 15.615 6.495 4.560 13.12
Sanitation 3.534 2.067 1.467 0.000 1.74
Storm Water Drainage 22.049 13.635 5.774 2.640 10.84
Solid Waste Management 3.441 2.423 0.782 0.235 1.69
Traffic and Transportation 86.406 52.596 26.535 7.275 42.50
Electricity & Street Lighting 8.046 4.824 1.620 1.602 3.96
Social Infrastructure & Other Projects 9.080 5.040 2.728 1.312 4.47
Housing for Urban Poor 5.550 5.550 0.000 0.000 2.73
Environment and Tourism 3.760 2.130 1.621 0.009 1.85
Economic Growth 3.500 2.000 1.000 0.500 1.72
Urban Governance and Institutional Setup 9.415 5.265 3.600 0.550 4.63
Total Cost 203.313 125.492 56.592 21.228 100.00
Source: ICT estimates, 2012.
Table 15.2: Annual Investment Plan 2012-2015 (Amount in crore)
Projects 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16 Total Amount
Water Supply 4.304 4.304 2.869 2.869 14.347
Sewerage 4.685 4.685 3.123 3.123 15.615
Sanitation 0.620 0.620 0.413 0.413 2.067
Storm Water Drainage 4.091 4.091 2.727 2.727 13.635
Solid Waste Management 0.727 0.727 0.485 0.485 2.423
Traffic and Transportation 15.779 15.779 10.519 10.519 52.596
Street Lighting 1.447 1.447 0.965 0.965 4.824
Other Social Infrastructure 1.512 1.512 1.008 1.008 5.040
Housing for Urban Poor 1.665 1.665 1.110 1.110 5.550
Environment 0.639 0.639 0.426 0.426 2.130
Economic Growth 0.600 0.600 0.400 0.400 2.000
Urban Governance and Institutional Setup 1.580 1.580 1.053 1.053 5.265
Total Cost 37.649 37.649 25.098 25.098 125.49
Source: ICT estimates, 2012.
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15.2.2 Operation and Maintenance (O&M) Expenditure
A major burden on the service provider is the costs of operating and maintenance (O&M). The
assumptions for computing the additional O & M commitments
1
are presented in Table 15.3.
Table 15.3: Additional O & M Sector-wise ( Crores)
Sector Investment
Required in Phase-1
O&M on New Investment Total Investment
Required in Phase-1 (%) Assumed Amount
Water Supply 14.347 2% 0.3 14.634
Sewerage 15.615 2% 0.3 15.927
Sanitation 2.067 2% 0.0 2.108
Storm Water Drainage 13.635 2% 0.3 13.908
Solid Waste
Management
2.423 3% 0.0 2.471
Traffic and
Transportation
52.596 2% 1.1 53.648
Street Lighting 4.824 2% 0.1 4.920
Other Social
Infrastructure
5.04 2% 0.1 5.141
Housing for Urban
Poor
5.55 1% 0.1 5.661
Environment 2.13 2% 0.0 2.173
Economic Growth 2 1% 0.0 2.040
Urban Governance and
Institutional Setup
5.265 1% 0.1 5.370
Total 125.49 2% 2.5 128.002
Source: ICT estimates, 2012.
The total infrastructure requirement for first five years including additional 2.5 crore for O&M
requirement for proposed infrastructure and services would be 128.002 crore.
15.3 PROPOSED STRUCTURE AND FUNDING
Since DNP is not covered by any central government scheme (like JNNURM and UIDSSMT),
therefore, investment plan cannot be prepared in the line of these scheme. The quantum of investment
is quite substantial largely because there has been significant backlog in investment over the year.
Currently the ULB can only access infrastructure fund from central and state government as
earmarked in the 13
th
Finance Commission (Central Government) and 4
th
State Finance Commission

1
The additional O & M cost is estimated in terms of percentage of capital cost, these figures are arrived based on various
DPR and similar studies undertaken by the consultants.
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(State Government). But the availability of funds under these schemes will be grossly insufficient
2

considering the huge amount required for implementation of CDP. Considering all the limitation as
mentioned above, a viable, practical and innovative funding structure has been suggested below:
Funding Structure through State Government and PPP
Since the funding of CDP of Daboh cannot be covered under any of the major central government
scheme, therefore the onus lies with state government to fund the CDP implementation process. A
possible funding model is outlined in the ensuing paragraphs. However, the state government may not
be in a position to fund due to the paucity of fund. Further, the state government, through various
innovative funding mechanisms can fund the CDP investment. Table 15.4 below shows that project
related to solid waste management, street lighting, other social infrastructure can be done through PPP
and rest all projects will be done through direct state funding, by initially injecting funds for backlog
investment in phases. The projects, which cannot be taken by PPP completely, the government has to
do the viability gap funding.
Table 15.4: Funding Pattern of CDP by State Government and PPP
Projects
Source of Funding
PPP
Additional Assistance for PPP
Through (IL & FS -PMDO)
Government
Environment PPP PMDO State Government
Traffic and Transportation State Government
Tourism State Government
Storm Water Drainage State Government
Sewer System State Government
Solid Waste Management PPP PMDO State Government
Water Supply State Government
Housing for Urban Poor PPP PMDO
Central Government
(through Rajiv Awas Yojna)
Social Infrastructure PPP PMDO State Government
Street Lighting PPP PMDO State Government
Urban Planning and Growth State Government
Urban Governance and
Institutional Setup State Government
15.3.1.1 PPP Funding:
Experience the world over has shown that private sector participation (PSP) results in cost savings and
improvement in efficiency and effectiveness in service delivery mainly due to financial and

2
13
th
Finance Commission- 676.39 crore (under general basic grant) for year 2012-15 has been allocated and it will
increase by adding the performance grant of 462.02 crore.to 1138.41 crore After adding the performance grants DNP
may get approximately 1 crore (2012-13 to 2014-15) under this scheme
State Finance Commission- 30 per person has been allocated under 3
rd
SFC along with octroi compensation for all ULBs
of Madhya Pradesh.
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managerial autonomy and accountability in private sector operations. Besides, it brings in new
investment and better technologies. (P.U.Asnani). Therefore, PPP model must be explored on various
projects wherever possible.
The private agencies may be contacted for the projects of solid waste management, other social
infrastructure and street lighting for PPP. For PPP projects Pooled Municipal Debt Obligation
(PMDO) Facility of IL & FS group may be contacted. A brief about PMDO is given below:
PMDO
IL & FS has created an asset management company by the name of IL & FS Urban Infrastructure
Managers Limited (IUIML) to avail the PMDO Facility. Under PMDO the project finance
requirements in the urban sector will be funded from the corpus of 27.50 billion. It will provide long
tenure financing upto a period of 13 years. Contributions to this facility have come from leading
banks and financial institutions in the country.
Eligible Borrower:
Urban Local bodies, Special Purpose Vehicles and BOT Operator, who are implementing urban
infrastructure projects, are eligible to access this.
Advantage of PMDO
Service of professional asset manager with urban experience
Assistance to borrower for viability and bankability of projects
Structuring the PMDO assistance to suite the project needs
Common loan documentation
Project specific security creation
Disbursement under one roof
Post disbursement follow up
Activities
Project Identification
Assisting the borrower in structuring projects and internal rating
Placing of the projects for sanction
Issue of disbursement memo and follow up
Loan asset management
Project Approved- Project related to water supply, sewerage scheme, city infrastructure, solid waste
management, urban transport, health care, slum rehabilitation, area development have been approved
in many ULBs in India viz. Madurai, Gwalior, Nagpur, Nanded, Daldia, Karim Nagar, Jaipur,
Ichalkaranji, Kagal, Surat etc.
15.3.1.2 I nternational Donor
The ULBs cannot access fund directly from international donors like DFID, USAID, CIDA, GTZ etc.
due to the procedural difficulties. But the state government with the help of central government may
arrange fund for ULB for the CDP implementation.
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15.3.1.3 Formation Project Management Unit and SPVs
The state government must form a PMU and SPVs for the implementation of CDP. These are required
for PPP projects and Non-PPP projects. PMUs and SPVs should consist of a professional team of
technical, financial, business development, administrative & institutional specialists so that all
projects can be implemented on a time. An indicative structure of PMU and SPV has been shown in
Figure 15.1.
Figure 15.1: Indicative Structure of PMU and SPV
15.3.2 Other Suggestions for Innovative Fundings
Water Management Fund
Among other source of fund for water supply projects, one could come from creating a Water
Management Fund. It is suggested for consideration that a Water Management Fund may be created


Project Management Unit
GOI Grants
GOB Grants
Institutional
Loans
Market Debts
Infrastructure
bonds
International Aid
receipts
From selling
equity in SPVs
Non PPP Projects PPP Projects
Direct Bidding
Pooling Financial
Resources
Project
1
Project
2
Project
3
Daboh Development Fund
The Holding Company
SPVs for Various Sectors
User charges
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through levy of a minimal tax of say, 10 paisa per litre, on bottled water and soft drinks sold by the
manufacturer / distributors in the State. The levy so collected could be directly deposited in the
proposed Water Management Fund and allocated among implementing agencies in all project cities.
Apart from using this fund for implementing water supply project, a substantial fix proportion may
also be allotted to Water Resource Department of Madhya Pradesh. Some amount also can be spent
for the institutional strengthening of water sector in the state. The Fund could be managed by a Board
consisting of senior representatives from the State Government and independent expert professionals
under the administrative supervision and control of the State Government.
It may be mentioned in this context that a study carried out by Dr. Manoj Nadkarni, Programme
Coordinator at the centre for Communication and Development Studies, Pune, estimates that in India
the market for packaged water to be between 800 crore and 1000 crore and is growing at a rate of
nearly 40% per annum. Further, Beverage Marketing Corporation, USA, reports that though packaged
water accounts for only 5% of the total beverage market in India, branded bottled water is the fastest
growing industry in the beverage sector.
Levy of tax on bottled water and soft drinks would help to build up a dedicated fund for water
management similar to that of road fund created through levy on fuel and in force in several countries,
and at the national level in this country.
This would require suitable legislation and could be implemented over a medium term period.
PPP for Street Light through Energy Service Company (ESCO)
The problems faced by ULB with respect to street lighting can be resolved through the appointment of
an ESCO. A typical ESCO can be defined as a consultancy group engaged in a performance-based
contract with a client firm to implement measures which reduce energy consumption and costs in a
technically and financially viable manner
3
. Main functions of ESCO are reducing the energy usage by
using innovative energy saving lights and energy efficient devices, reducing wastage by proper
monitoring by using modern devices. ESCOs offer complete energy project management services
including energy auditing, design, turnkey installation, financing, marketing, maintenance and
monitoring.
Carbon Credits: The ESCO can qualify for registering with the United Nations Framework
Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) under the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) for
adopting energy-efficiency and energy saving measures. The project can be submitted for approval
and certification under the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) regime of the Kyoto Protocol and
the certified emission reductions generated can be sold. The revenues accruing from such CDM
transactions and the expenses incurred can be shared between the Concessionaire and the ULB.
A series of public-private partnerships (PPP) in provision of municipal services have emerged in
different cities and towns. A few examples of such activities are given below:

3
Source: Bureau of Energy Efficiency
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Rajkot Municipal Corporation (RMC) has contracted out maintenance of street lights, solid waste
removal and transportation, cleaning of public toilets, maintenance of gardens, a forestation etc.
RMC has also undertaken various entertainment projects with the help of private entrepreneur.
By using the services of the private sector, RMC has been able to save a significant amount of
money and has been able to close the gap between demand and supply by improving service
provision. Huge investments that are needed for acquiring capital equipments such as tractors,
trollies, etc. have now been given over to private contractor. However, RMC has not retrenched
any of its staff but has stopped new recruitment. RMC continues to use its present manpower as
well as equipment in certain areas in the city. This also serves as contingency plan in case of
service disruption due to problems with the private contractor.
In Pali (Rajasthan), the municipal body has given the maintenance of street light to the private
sector. In doing so it has been able to maintain the streetlights at one-fifth the cost it would have
incurred had it maintained the service itself.
Exnora is an NGO in Chennai, started by NRIs to improve civic amenities in Chennai. The NGO
helps in garbage removal not only in well off localities but also in slums. The households pay a
nominal charge of 10 to 20 per month for the service. In the slums, the households pay less
but provide labour instead. Exmore has directly employed rage pickers for garbage removal.
Exmore has been successful in its attempt to help keep the city clean and has extended its services
to many localities in the city.
In Indore in the garden in the roundabouts on city roads are developed and maintained by the local
resident association/market association/community under overall supervision of ward committee.
15.4 FINANCIAL OPERATING PLAN OF DNP
The finance data for the financial year 2006-07 to 2010-11 of DNP have been used as the base to
prepare the FOP. As mentioned in chapter 4, the municipality maintains its account on a cash basis
accounting system. The main items of income and expenditure have been classified into two accounts
for assessing the financial position of the council namely revenue account and capital account. The
same has been adopted for the FOP and further revenue account receipts and expenditure were
projected under following broad categories.
Income
Revenue Receipt
Own Sources- Revenue
Own Sources- Taxes
Own Sources- Non Taxes
New Taxes
Assigned Revenues
Revenue Grants
Include salary
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Matching grants
Other revenue grants
Other Income (Miscellaneous)
Capital Receipts
Expenditure
Revenue Expenditure
Total Establishment Expenditure
O & M Expenditure
Programme Expenditure
Administration Expenditure
Finance & Interest Expenditure
Misc. Expenditure
15.5 FOP Scenarios
The capital investment required for the identified five year high priority interventions are to be
initiated from financial year 2011-12. The FOP is worked out for three scenarios, viz:
Business As Usual
The growth rate for forecasting municipal income and expenditure for Business as Usual are based
on past trends (5-year compound annual growth rate CAGR).
Alternate Scenario 1 - Reforms Implementation (Partially) without New investment
The assumptions for forecasting municipal income and expenditure for the alternate scenario-1
adopted are primarily based on past trends (5-year compound annual growth rate CAGR and
municipal tax collected) taking into consideration implementation of 3-4 Reforms.
Alternate Scenario 2 - Reform Implementation(Partially) along with New Investment
The assumptions for forecasting municipal income and expenditure for the alternate scenario-2
adopted are primarily based on past trends (5-year compound annual growth rate CAGR and
municipal tax collected) and new investment requirements for first five years, taking into
consideration implementation of 3-4 Reforms.
Alternate Scenario 3 - Reforms Implementation without New investment
The assumptions for forecasting municipal income and expenditure for the alternate scenario-1
adopted are primarily based on past trends (5-year compound annual growth rate CAGR and
municipal tax collected) taking into consideration implementation of all the Reforms.
Alternate Scenario 4 - Reforms Implementation along with New investment
The assumptions for forecasting municipal income and expenditure for the alternate scenario-2
adopted are primarily based on past trends (5-year compound annual growth rate CAGR and
municipal tax collected) and new investment requirements for first five years, taking into
consideration implementation of all the Reforms
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15.5.1 Business as Usual Scenario
In Business As Usual, the finances of DNP are forecasted in do nothing, wherein the revenue and
expenditure account of municipality is forecasted based on existing trend (proposed growth rate of
both income and expenditure is considered same as growth rate of past five years). Since the FOP
model is developed to ascertain the high priority investment sustaining capacity, the base case
scenario is developed assuming that there will be no new capital transaction and this will indicate the
DNPs capacity to generate surplus to service capital expenditure. The following Table 15.5 presents
the projected income and expenditure of DNP for next five years on business as usual scenario.


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Table 15.5: Business As Usual Scenario - DNPs Income and Expenditure

2006-
07
2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11
CAGR
(in %)
2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
Total Receipts 83.10 135.55 146.77 175.73 186.56 204.08 344.10 705.99 1,673.46 4,304.59 11,514.29
Revenue Receipts 81.94 78.47 78.82 111.76 119.40 133.17 148.70 167.53 189.61 215.52 245.93
(A) Own Sources- Taxes 5.67 7.95 5.21 12.98 13.63
24.54 16.98 21.14 26.33 32.79 40.83 50.85
Growth Rate 40.23% -34.40% 149.04% 5.00%
(B) Own Sources- Non-Taxes 24.04 18.84 20.25 16.66 19.95
-4.56 19.04 18.2 17.3 16.6 15.8 15.1
Growth Rate -21.62% 7.46% -17.71% 19.72%
(C) Assigned Revenues 51.94 51.15 53.04 81.13 85.18
13.17 96.40 109.1 123.5 139.7 158.1 178.9
Growth Rate -1.51% 3.69% 52.95%
(D)
Revenue Grants (Include.
Salary and Matching grants)
0.00 0.06 0.15 0.00 0.16
37.95 0.22 0.3 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.1
Growth Rate 150.00%
(E) Other Income 0.30 0.47 0.17 0.99 0.48
12.90 0.55 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.0
Growth Rate 58.82% 479.23% -51.28%
Capital Receipts 1.16 57.07 67.95 63.96 67.16
175.57 70.91 195.4 538.5 1,483.8 4,089.1 11,268.4
Growth Rate 4800.74% 19.06% -5.87% 5.00%
Revenue Expenditure 59.10 61.44 69.17 79.64 84.75 120.96 142.72 171.13 208.74 259.43 329.34
(A)
Total Establishment
Expenditure
15.97 25.20 26.59 36.98 38.82
24.86 72.71 90.8 113.4 141.5 176.7 220.6
Growth Rate 57.78% 5.50% 39.06% 5.00%
(B) O & M Expenditure 16.29 15.67 16.62 17.95 19.75
4.93 20.72 21.7 22.8 23.9 25.1 26.4
Growth Rate -3.80% 6.04% 8.02% 10.00%
(C) Programme Expenditure 0.09 2.64 0.59 0.83 1.04
84.65 1.92 3.5 6.5 12.1 22.3 41.1
Growth Rate 2853.19% -77.51% 40.40% 24.65%
(D) Administration Expenditure 25.52 15.40 23.20 19.90 21.00
-4.75 20.01 19.1 18.2 17.3 16.5 15.7
Growth Rate -39.64% 50.65% -14.24% 5.56%
(E) Misc Expenditure 1.23 2.53 2.17 3.98 4.14
35.40 5.61 7.6 10.3 13.9 18.8 25.5
Growth Rate 105.17% -14.34% 83.89% 4.00%
Surplus/Deficit (Revenue) 22.84 17.03 9.65 32.12 34.65 12.21 5.98 -3.60 -19.13 -43.91 -83.41
As shown in Table 15.5, if the income and expenditure of DNP are projected on the CAGR of past five FYs, then it will have a deficit of 83.41 lakhs in next five FYs.
Projecting the income expenditure on CAGR is impractical mainly because of the reason that municipality does not work in a systematic way. This can be seen by the fact
that CAGR for different heads of income & expenditure are negative in some heads and are very high in others. Therefore alternative scenarios based on practical proposed
growth rates have been proposed below.
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15.5.2 Alternate Scenarios
After analyzing the above scenario it is felt that DNP can not only enhance its income but also bridge
this gap by:
Private sector participation in implementation of proposed projects;
Prioritizing and phasing of investment
Implementing property tax reforms to increase revenue;
Increasing user charges for water and other urban services
Imposing new taxes
Therefore, consultant proposes alternate scenarios with conservative approach for projecting future
expenditure and liberal approach for projecting future income.
15.5.2.1 Alternate Scenario 1- Reforms Implementation (Partially) without new investment
The alternate scenario is presented in Table 15.6 and is based on the following assumptions.
Income
Income by ULBs own tax sources by 15% per annum.
Income by ULBs own non-tax sources by 20% per annum
Income from Assigned Revenue sources increase by 5% per annum
Income from Revenue Grants (Include. Salary and Matching grants) increase by 5% per annum
Income from other sources increase by 5% per annum
Income from capital receipt increase by 5% per annum
Expenditure
Total Establishment Expenditure by 4% growth per annum
Operation and maintenance expenditure increase by 10% per annum
Programme expenditure increase by 10% per annum
Administration expenditure increase by 5% per annum
Misc. Expenditure increase by 5% annually.
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Table 15.6: Alternate Scenario 1 - Reforms Implementation (Partially) without new investment (in Lakhs)
2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11
Proposed
Growth
Rate (in %)
2011-
12
2012-
13
2013-14
2014-
15
2015-
16
2016-
17
Total Receipts 83.10 135.55 146.77 175.73 186.56 204.08 218.84 235.16 253.27 273.45 296.02
Revenue Receipts 81.94 78.47 78.82 111.76 119.40 133.17 144.39 156.98 171.19 187.27 205.52
(A) Own Sources- Taxes 5.67 7.95 5.21 12.98 13.63
20.0 16.98 20.37 24.45 29.33 35.20 42.24
Growth Rate 40.23% -34.40% 149.04% 5.00%
(B) Own Sources- Non-Taxes 24.04 18.84 20.25 16.66 19.95
20.0 19.04 22.8 27.4 32.9 39.5 47.4
Growth Rate -21.62% 7.46% -17.71% 19.72%
(C) Assigned Revenues 51.94 51.15 53.04 81.13 85.18
5.0 96.40 101.2 106.3 111.6 117.2 123.0
Growth Rate -1.51% 3.69% 52.95%
(D)
Revenue Grants (Include.
Salary and Matching grants)
0.00 0.06 0.15 0.00 0.16
5.0 0.22 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3
Growth Rate
150.00
%

(E) Other Income 0.30 0.47 0.17 0.99 0.48
5.0 0.55 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.7 0.7
Growth Rate 58.82% 479.23%
-
51.28%
Capital Receipts 1.16 57.07 67.95 63.96 67.16
5.0 70.91 74.5 78.2 82.1 86.2 90.5
Growth Rate 4800.74% 19.06% -5.87% 5.00%
Revenue Expenditure 59.10 61.44 69.17 79.64 84.75 120.96 127.42 134.27 141.57 149.34 157.61
(A)
Total Establishment
Expenditure
15.97 25.20 26.59 36.98 38.82
5.0 72.7 75.6 78.6 81.8 85.1 88.5
Growth Rate 57.78% 5.50% 39.06% 5.00%
(B) O & M Expenditure 16.29 15.67 16.62 17.95 19.75
10.0 20.7 22.8 25.1 27.6 30.3 33.4
Growth Rate -3.80% 6.04% 8.02% 10.00%
(C) Programme Expenditure 0.09 2.64 0.59 0.83 1.04
10.0 1.9 2.1 2.3 2.6 2.8 3.1
Growth Rate 2853.19% -77.51% 40.40% 24.65%
(D) Administration Expenditure 25.52 15.40 23.20 19.90 21.00
5.0 20.0 21.0 22.1 23.2 24.3 25.5
Growth Rate -39.64% 50.65% -14.24% 5.56%
(E) Misc Expenditure 1.23 2.53 2.17 3.98 4.14
5.0 5.6 5.9 6.2 6.5 6.8 7.2
Growth Rate 105.17% -14.34% 83.89% 4.00%
Surplus/Deficit (Revenue) 22.84 17.03 9.65 32.12 34.65 12.21 17.82 24.70 33.13 43.44 56.00
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15.5.2.2 Alternate Scenario 2- Reforms Implementation (Partially) along with new investment
Financially DNP is not in a condition to support even 10% of cost of new infrastructure but can
generate O & M expenditure for new investment
The alternate scenario 2 is presented in Table 15.7 and is based on the following assumptions.
Income
Income by ULBs own tax sources by 20% per annum.
Income by ULBs own non-tax sources by 20% per annum
Income from Assigned Revenue sources increase by 5% per annum
Income from Revenue Grants (Include. Salary and Matching grants) increase by 5% per annum
Income from other sources increase by 5% per annum
Income from capital receipt increase by 5% per annum
Expenditure
Total Establishment Expenditure by 4% growth per annum
Operation and maintenance expenditure increase by 10% per annum
Programme expenditure increase by 10% per annum
Administration expenditure increase by 5% per annum
Misc. Expenditure increase by 5% annually.
O & M of new investment to be 2% of new investment requirement.
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Table 15.7: Alternate Scenario 2 - Reforms Implementation (Partially) along with new investment (in Lakhs)
2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11
Proposed Growth
Rate (in %)
2011-12
2012-
13
2013-
14
2014-15 2015-16
2016-
17
Total Receipts 83.10 135.55 146.77 175.73 186.56 204.08 219.69 237.15 256.79 278.96 304.11
Revenue Receipts 81.94 78.47 78.82 111.76 119.40 133.17 145.23 158.98 174.71 192.78 213.62
(A) Own Sources- Taxes 5.67 7.95 5.21 12.98 13.63
50.0 16.98 20.37 24.45 29.33 35.20 42.24
Growth Rate 40.23% -34.40% 149.04% 5.00%
(B) Own Sources- Non-Taxes 24.04 18.84 20.25 16.66 19.95
20.0 19.04 22.84 27.41 32.90 39.48 47.37
Growth Rate -21.62% 7.46% -17.71% 19.72%
(C) Assigned Revenues 51.94 51.15 53.04 81.13 85.18
5.0 96.40 101.22 106.28 111.59 117.17 123.03
Growth Rate -1.51% 3.69% 52.95%
(D)
Revenue Grants (Include.
Salary and Matching grants)
0.00 0.06 0.15 0.00 0.16
5.0 0.22 0.23 0.24 0.25 0.26 0.28
Growth Rate 150.00%
(E) Other Income 0.30 0.47 0.17 0.99 0.48
5.0 0.55 0.57 0.60 0.63 0.66 0.70
Growth Rate 58.82% 479.23% -51.28%
Capital Receipts 1.16 57.07 67.95 63.96 67.16
5.0 70.91 74.45 78.17 82.08 86.19 90.50
Growth Rate
4800.74
%
19.06% -5.87% 5.00%
Revenue Expenditure 59.10 61.44 69.17 79.64 84.75 120.96 152.63 172.09 192.00 212.37 233.25
(A)
Total Establishment
Expenditure
15.97 25.20 26.59 36.98 38.82
4.0 72.7 75.62 78.65 81.79 85.06 88.47
Growth Rate 57.78% 5.50% 39.06% 5.00%
(B) O & M Expenditure 16.29 15.67 16.62 17.95 19.75
5.0 20.7 22.79 25.07 27.58 30.33 33.37
Growth Rate -3.80% 6.04% 8.02% 10.00%
(C) Programme Expenditure 0.09 2.64 0.59 0.83 1.04
5.0 1.9 2.11 2.32 2.55 2.81 3.09
Growth Rate
2853.19
%
-77.51% 40.40% 24.65%
(D) Administration Expenditure 25.52 15.40 23.20 19.90 21.00
5.0 20.0 21.01 22.06 23.16 24.32 25.54
Growth Rate -39.64% 50.65% -14.24% 5.56%
(E) Misc Expenditure 1.23 2.53 2.17 3.98 4.14
5.0 5.6 5.89 6.18 6.49 6.82 7.16
Growth Rate 105.17% -14.34% 83.89% 4.00%
(F)
O & M Expenditure (New
Investment)
25.21 37.82 50.42 63.03 75.64
Surplus/Deficit (Revenue) 22.84 17.03 9.65 32.12 34.65 12.21 -7.39 -13.11 -17.29 -19.59 -19.63
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15.5.2.3 Alternate Scenario 3- Reforms Implementation without new investment
The alternate scenario 3 is presented in Table 15.8 and is based on the following assumptions.
Income
Income by ULBs own tax sources by 50% per annum.
Income by ULBs own non-tax sources by 20% per annum
Income from Assigned Revenue sources increase by 5% per annum
Income from Revenue Grants (Include. Salary and Matching grants) increase by 5% per annum
Income from other sources increase by 5% per annum
Income from capital receipt increase by 5% per annum
Expenditure
Total Establishment Expenditure by 4% growth per annum
Operation and maintenance expenditure increase by 10% per annum
Programme expenditure increase by 10% per annum
Administration expenditure increase by 5% per annum
Misc. Expenditure increase by 5% annually.
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Table 15.8: Alternate Scenario 3 - Reforms Implementation without new investment (in Lakhs)

2006-
07
2007-
08
2008-09 2009-10 2010-11
Proposed Growth
Rate (in %)
2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
2015-
16
2016-17
Total Receipts 83.10 135.55 146.77 175.73 186.56 204.08 224.78 250.90 284.75 329.70 390.78
Revenue Receipts 81.94 78.47 78.82 111.76 119.40 133.17 150.33 172.73 202.67 243.51 300.28
(A) Own Sources- Taxes 5.67 7.95 5.21 12.98 13.63
50.0 16.98 25.46 38.20 57.29 85.94 128.91
Growth Rate
40.23
%
-
34.40%
149.04
%
5.00%
(C)
Own Sources- Non-
Taxes
24.04 18.84 20.25 16.66 19.95
20.0 19.04 22.84 27.41 32.90 39.48 47.37
Growth Rate
-
21.62
%
7.46% -17.71% 19.72%
(D) Assigned Revenues 51.94 51.15 53.04 81.13 85.18
5.0 96.40 101.22 106.28 111.59 117.17 123.03
Growth Rate -1.51% 3.69% 52.95%
(E)
Revenue Grants
(Include. Salary and
Matching grants)
0.00 0.06 0.15 0.00 0.16
5.0 0.22 0.23 0.24 0.25 0.26 0.28
Growth Rate
150.00
%

(F) Other Income 0.30 0.47 0.17 0.99 0.48
5.0 0.55 0.57 0.60 0.63 0.66 0.70
Growth Rate
58.82
%

479.23
%
-
51.28%
Capital Receipts 1.16 57.07 67.95 63.96 67.16
5.0 70.91 74.45 78.17 82.08 86.19 90.50
Growth Rate
4800.7
4%
19.06% -5.87% 5.00%
Revenue Expenditure 59.10 61.44 69.17 79.64 84.75 120.96 127.42 134.27 141.57 149.34 157.61
(A)
Total Establishment
Expenditure
15.97 25.20 26.59 36.98 38.82
5.0 72.7 75.62 78.65 81.79 85.06 88.47
Growth Rate
57.78
%
5.50% 39.06% 5.00%
(B) O & M Expenditure 16.29 15.67 16.62 17.95 19.75
10.0 20.7 22.79 25.07 27.58 30.33 33.37
Growth Rate -3.80% 6.04% 8.02% 10.00%
(C)
Programme
Expenditure
0.09 2.64 0.59 0.83 1.04
10.0 1.9 2.11 2.32 2.55 2.81 3.09
Growth Rate
2853.1
9%
-
77.51%
40.40% 24.65%
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2006-
07
2007-
08
2008-09 2009-10 2010-11
Proposed Growth
Rate (in %)
2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
2015-
16
2016-17
(D)
Administration
Expenditure
25.52 15.40 23.20 19.90 21.00
5.0 20.0 21.01 22.06 23.16 24.32 25.54
Growth Rate
-
39.64
%
50.65% -14.24% 5.56%
(E) Misc Expenditure 1.23 2.53 2.17 3.98 4.14
5.0 5.6 5.89 6.18 6.49 6.82 7.16
Growth Rate
105.17
%
-
14.34%
83.89% 4.00%

Surplus/Deficit
(Revenue)
22.84 17.03 9.65 32.12 34.65 12.21 22.91 38.45 61.09 94.18 142.67
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15.5.2.4 Alternate Scenario 4- Reforms Implementation along with new investment
Financially DNP is not in a condition to support even 10% of cost of new infrastructure but can
generate O & M expenditure for new investment
The alternate scenario 4 is presented in Table 15.9 and is based on the following assumptions.
Income
Income by ULBs own non-tax sources by 50% per annum
Income from Assigned Revenue sources increase by 20% per annum
Income from Revenue Grants (Include. Salary and Matching grants) increase by 5% per annum
Income from other sources increase by 5% per annum
Income from capital receipt increase by 5% per annum
Expenditure
Total Establishment Expenditure by 4% growth per annum
Operation and maintenance expenditure increase by 5% per annum
Programme expenditure increase by 5% per annum
Administration expenditure increase by 5% per annum
Misc. Expenditure increase by 5% annually.
O & M of new investment to be 2% of new investment requirement.
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Table 15.9: Alternate Scenario 4 - Reforms Implementation along with new investment (in Lakhs)
2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11
Proposed
Growth
Rate (in %)
2011-
12
2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16
2016-
17
Total Receipts 83.10 135.55 146.77 175.73 186.56 204.08 224.78 250.90 284.75 329.70 390.78
Revenue Receipts 81.94 78.47 78.82 111.76 119.40 133.17 150.33 172.73 202.67 243.51 300.28
(A) Own Sources- Taxes 5.67 7.95 5.21 12.98 13.63
50.0 16.98 25.46 38.20 57.29 85.94 128.91
Growth Rate 40.23% -34.40% 149.04% 5.00%
(C)
Own Sources- Non-
Taxes
24.04 18.84 20.25 16.66 19.95
20.0 19.04 22.84 27.41 32.90 39.48 47.37
Growth Rate -21.62% 7.46% -17.71% 19.72%
(D) Assigned Revenues 51.94 51.15 53.04 81.13 85.18
5.0 96.40 101.22 106.28 111.59 117.17 123.03
Growth Rate -1.51% 3.69% 52.95%
(E)
Revenue Grants
(Include. Salary and
Matching grants)
0.00 0.06 0.15 0.00 0.16
5.0 0.22 0.23 0.24 0.25 0.26 0.28
Growth Rate 150.00%
(F) Other Income 0.30 0.47 0.17 0.99 0.48
5.0 0.55 0.57 0.60 0.63 0.66 0.70
Growth Rate 58.82% 479.23% -51.28%
Capital Receipts 1.16 57.07 67.95 63.96 67.16
5.0 70.91 74.45 78.17 82.08 86.19 90.50
Growth Rate
4800.74
%
19.06% -5.87% 5.00%
Revenue Expenditure 59.10 61.44 69.17 79.64 84.75 120.96 152.63 172.09 192.00 212.37 233.25
(A)
Total Establishment
Expenditure
15.97 25.20 26.59 36.98 38.82
5.0 72.7 75.62 78.65 81.79 85.06 88.47
Growth Rate 57.78% 5.50% 39.06% 5.00%
(B) O & M Expenditure 16.29 15.67 16.62 17.95 19.75
10.0 20.7 22.79 25.07 27.58 30.33 33.37
Growth Rate -3.80% 6.04% 8.02% 10.00%
(C) Programme Expenditure 0.09 2.64 0.59 0.83 1.04
10.0 1.9 2.11 2.32 2.55 2.81 3.09
Growth Rate
2853.19
%
-77.51% 40.40% 24.65%
(D)
Administration
Expenditure
25.52 15.40 23.20 19.90 21.00
5.0 20.0 21.01 22.06 23.16 24.32 25.54
Growth Rate -39.64% 50.65% -14.24% 5.56%
(E) Misc Expenditure 1.23 2.53 2.17 3.98 4.14
5.0 5.6 5.89 6.18 6.49 6.82 7.16
Growth Rate 105.17% -14.34% 83.89% 4.00%
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2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11
Proposed
Growth
Rate (in %)
2011-
12
2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16
2016-
17
(F)
O & M Expenditure
(New Investment)
25.21 37.82 50.42 63.03 75.64

Surplus/Deficit
(Revenue)
22.84 17.03 9.65 32.12 34.65 12.21 -2.30 0.64 10.67 31.15 67.04

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15.5.3 Selection of Alternative
Among all options discussed above, the Consultants suggest to opt for alternative Scenario 4 (Table
15.11). The above Table 15.9 reflects that by undertaking proposed fiscal measures and reforms the
DNP is able to enhance its revenue from the current level of surplus of 34.65 lakh (2010-11) to
surplus of 67.04 lakhs in 2016-17. In this scenario it is able to meet the requirement of O&M cost of
the assets created under CDP for first five year.
15.6 Financial Sustainability of DNP
As can be seen, the financial position of DNP is not strong. It is assumed that the surplus which is
expected to occur in the future years could be utilized for Operation and Maintenance (O&M) of the
projects. This way, their reliability on grants will reduce and maintenance of the infrastructure can be
done and thus on this account at least it can slowly and gradually become self-sustainable.
However, the consultants strongly believes that the above analysis could be supplemented by looking
at different revenue and expenditure sources such as water tax, fire tax, surcharge on entertainment
tax, surcharge on electricity consumption within the municipal area, tax on congregations, tax on
pilgrims and tourists, and toll on heavy trucks which shall be heavy goods vehicles, and buses, which
shall be heavy passenger motor vehicles, within the meaning of the Motor Vehicles Act, 1988, plying
on a public street etc. Similarly, some expenditures could be increasing consistently and would
looking into whether it was an increase due to inflation, increase in operations or due to some other
reasons.
15.6.1 Analysis of Accounting, Budgeting and MIS with a View to Identify Weaknesses
The present system of accounting is quite rudimentary and does not provide for any significant
transparency. As the DNPs staff will been trained in using double entry system, it is expected that
soon it may launch computerized accounting system based on double entry accounting, yet it is
difficult to anticipate its immediate results since the system would require restructuring of the finance
and accounts department and also institutional strengthening of the existing manpower.
15.7 INSTITUTIONAL FRAMEWORK
The following Table 15.10 presents the institutions involved in implementing the identified projects.
Table 15.10: Institutional Framework
S. No. Sectors Implementing Agency
1 Economic Growth of the City DNP/Pvt. Agency
2 Environment, Tourism, and Heritage conservation DNP/Pvt. Agency
3 Traffic and Transportation DNP/PWD/Pvt. Agency
4 Electricity Electricity Department
5 Other Social Infrastructure and Facilities DNP/Pvt. Agency
6 Street Light DNP/ Pvt. Agency
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S. No. Sectors Implementing Agency
7 Urban Governance and Institutional Setup DNP
8 Housing/Basic Services for Urban Poor
Housing Board/DNP/Private Agency/
PHED/PWD
9 Education Education Department
10 Health Health Department
11 Fire Services DNP


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ANNEXURE 10.1
A. INTRODUCTION
The objective of the Kickoff Workshop was to familiarize the key stakeholders such aselected
representatives, officials from various other line departments, and representatives of community based
organisations and civil society organisations etc. with the purpose, process and expected outcomes of
the CDP and build enthusiasm, understanding and commitment to the CDP. The kick off workshop
was oriented towards deriving a consensus among the stakeholders on firming the process and
agreeing upon a structured program to take the CDP forward. The important features of the kick-off-
workshop was formulation of Steering Committee, identification of key development sectors and
identification of one special paper.
B. PROCEEDING OF WORKSHOP
As articulated in the ToR, a kick-off Workshop was organised on
15.11.2011at municipal office. Invitations were given to elected
representatives and representatives of the line departments. A copy of
the invitation letter issued to various resource persons and stakeholders
is attached as Annexure. The main aim of the workshop was to
familiarize the stakeholders with the purpose, process and expected outcomes of the CDP, and build
enthusiasm, understanding and commitment to the CDP. The kickoff workshop helped the team in
deriving the consensus along with the stakeholders firming the process and agreeing upon a structured
programme to take the CDP forward. The steering committee was formed and announced. one special
paper on a specific setor was also identified.
C. CONTENT OF WORKSHOP
The workshop started with the welcome note of CMO, Daboh, and the introduction of ICT team to all
the participants. The consultanting team explained the importance of the kickoff workshop. Posters
were displayed and the stages of preparing the City Development Plan were explained in detail. The
presentation material was translated into hindi and prepared in the form of poster, which was
displayed on walls. The hand outs in the form of presentation and other relevant material were
distributed to all the participants . In the workshop, the CDP process has been explained under the
following headings:
Introduction about the City Development Plan
Process of preparing a City Development Plan
Assessment of the city and analysis of the existing situation
Development of a Vision for the city
Working on Strategies
City Investment Plan and Financing Strategies
All participants expressed their views about the issues and problems faced by the town. The
participants specified the critical issues of the Daboh town which are listed in section 4.6 of this
Photo 5.1: Workshop Poster for display for participants
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chapter. After a detailed discussion with participants, the vote of thanks was given by the consulting
team.
D. PARTICIPANTS
Around 15 participants attended the workshop and the list of participants who attended the kick-off
workshop in Daboh. The attendance sheet of participants is attached in Annexure.
E. STEERING GROUP
The steering committee was formed in consultation with the key stakeholder in the kick-off workshop.
The names of the steering group member are given in below table.
List of Steering Committe Members
S. No. Name
1 President
2 Vice-President
3 CMO
4 Sub Engineer, Water Resource Department
5 Block Education Officer, Education Department
6 Chief Medical Officer, PHC
7 Arvind Gupta, Ward Councilor
8 Mrs. Sushila Dhore, Ward Councilor
9 Mrs. Tiwari, Ward Councilor
10 Mr. Nitin Gupta, Ward Councilor
11 Mr. M. Lakhand, Resident
12 Mr. Harvilash, Resident
13 President, Trader Association
14 Eminent Citizen 1 (to be named
15 Eminent Citizen 2 (to be named)
F. OBSERVATION AND ISSUES
After giving the orientation on the CDP, the participants were asked to talk on the issue which they
felt nacessary to be addressed in the City Development Plan. People came up with lots of
observations, ideas and issues which are as follows:
Most of the population is dependent mainly on agriculture sector
Distant from main cities like Gwalior, Datia and Bhind, is a hindrance for development of the
town
Karyan Pond which is almost of 65 bighas, needs beautification
Renovation of Shankar Mandir, which of 300 years old
Over-head tank, which was made in 1965, is not functional currently and needs to be repaired
Primary Health Centre (PHC) needs Female doctor, as claimed by most of the residents
Number of solid-waste management staffs is less than required
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Fire-brigade is present but no staff is employed to operate it
Inadequate staff to maintain the street lighting
Electricity supplied only for 6-8 hours a day
More tractors required for solid-waste collection and disposal
No trenching ground is present currently. Solid-waste is being dumped over various places in
the city
Parks, playground and community halls are not present in the city
There is a need for organized place for Sabji Mandi
Crematorium for Hindus and graveyard for Muslims are currently not maintained properly.
There no proper boundary to demarcate these places
Shopping Complex is required in the town
No proper place for bus stand
Sulabh toilet complex is required at bus stand and other places in the town
Shortage of staffs in Nagar Panchayat
There is no building for high school/ inter school
Water is supplied for two hours per day for two times
Problems exist for basic sanitation and hygiene in the town. Poor solid waste management in-
spite of 30 SWM workers and also people are not cautious about hygiene
All drains are in poor condition and blocked either due to dumping of solid waste
management or due to development the natural flow has been blocked
Sewer drains are not cleaned at all or over a regular interval of time
Main metal roads are in very poor condition




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G. WORKSHOP PHOTOGRAPHS

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H. WORKSHOP INVITATION LETTER


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I. WORKSHOP ATTENDANCE


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ANNEXURE 10.2
A. INTRODUCTION
Consultation is a process in the project cycle in which an attempt is made to involve the public as
stakeholders in project preparation through focus group discussion meetings. Stakeholders
participation and consultation have been viewed as a continual course of action, which promote public
understanding and help eradicate hurdles in the way of the project. Consultation during the project
preparation stage as an integral part of the social assessment process not only minimizes the risks and
unwanted propaganda against the project but also removes the gap between the community and the
project formulators, which helps in the timely completion of the project and making the project
people-friendly.
A preliminary discussion was held with some of the stakeholders on the concept of CDP and purpose
of meeting was indicated to them. The participants shared their ideas, views on the existing
developmental issues. The issues emerged out of consultation has been summed -up in the subsequent
section of this chapter.
B. STAKEHOLDER CONSULTATION
The stakeholder consultation was carried out with officials of DNP, councillors, citizen, shopkeepers,
private workers and other resident groups. These consultations were undertaken from 20 January to
23rd January. Below table presents the issue and suggestion given during stakeholder consultation.
Stakeholder Consultation, Issues and Suggestion
S.No Stakeholder Issue/ Suggestion Photographs
1 CMO, DNP Connectivity to major cities
needs to be improved, like
Datia, Gwalior and Bhind. The
only means of transportation
are buses and shared trekker,
hence, other means like
railway connectivity, needs to
be developed
Congested slum condition
needs to be improved
Town beautification needs to
be done
The town has good education
facilities as per the
requirement, hence, in future
the town could be developed
as an educational hub of the

Discussion with CMO, NP, Daboh
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S.No Stakeholder Issue/ Suggestion Photographs
region
Women participation in town
development should be
encouraged
2 Kalyan Singh
Dohre,
Businessman,
Ward-11
Major problem faced due to
shortage of supply of
electricity, which remains for
only 2-3 hours a day in the
town
Water could be available
through hand-pumps only, as
the timing of Nagar Parishad
piped water supply is not fixed
due to electricity issue
Issues for sanitation and
hygiene for the overall town
Roads are not cleaned and are
in bad condition

3 Malkan Singh,
Loacl
Residents,
Ward-11
No solid waste management is
being done in the overall town
In the hospital no medicines
are available and no lady
doctor is present along with
primary facilities. For simple
medical tests also people
needs to visit nearest bigger
city, like Lahar
Connectivity of the town to
major cities needs to be
improved
No bus-stand in the town
Too many private schools,
which is resulting in
degradation of the quality of
the government school
Streets and drains are very
dirty and not cleaned at all

Discussion with Business Group
Discussion with Local Residents
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S.No Stakeholder Issue/ Suggestion Photographs
4 Jabar Singh
Kushwaha,
Mechanic,
Ward-9
Drains are also not cleaned
regularly
Too many mosquitoes and
flies, which hampers the
health condition of the people
of the town. Malaria is a
common disease
No doctor is present in the
hospital. The hospital is also
not cleaned, hence, people
goes to Gwalior for treatment.

5 Anil Kumar
Kushwaha,
Sweet-shop
Owner,
Ward 9
No parks and playgrounds of
any kind in the town
In the town, the open area in
front of the hospital is used for
cremation. This needs to be
restricted and a boundary
needs to be created for
hospital compound.
Cremation ground needs to be
established with proper
boundary wall and cement
beds.
Poor solid waste management
of the town

6 FGD (Vinod
Kumar
Bhijpuria,
Ward 9,
Ramvilas
Sharma, Ward-
9
Sukhdev
Yadav, Ward-
10)
Talab is in bad condition and
never being maintained
Karyan Talab needs
beautification
Electricity is a major concern
as it is not supplied continuous
for 36 hours sometimes in the
town


Discussion with Mechanic
Discussion with Shopkeeper
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C. CONDUCT OF WORKSHOP ON VISION, SECTORAL STRATEGIES AND PRIORITY
PROJECTS
A workshop was organised on 23rd January 2012 on vision, sectoral strategies and priority projects at
meeting hall of DPN. Total 25 people participated in this meeting.
Proceedings of the workshop
The workshops were conceptualised based on the framework of CDP. Therefore, a timeframe of CDP
was followed for organisation of the same. The CMO was informed about the impending workshops
one week in advance for fixing up of the time and venue. The next task was intimating various
stakeholders - steering committee members, councilors, NGOs, personnel from line departments
(irrigation department, PWD, Health Department, Education Department), regarding the workshop.
The workshop agendas were prepared based on the ToR. The sequence of events included opening
remark by the CMO, presentation by the consultants, open discussion with and among the present
audience and finally a vote of thanks by the CMO.
List of participants
The participants were members of Steering Group, Ward Members and other Citizens. The Invitation
letter and the attendence sheet is given as Annexures.
Content of the Workshop
The workshop started with the welcome note of CMO, Daboh, and the introduction of ICT team to all
the participants. The consultant explained the importance of the 2
nd
workshop. The sector strategies in
the form of handouts were distributed to the participants. Sectoral strategies and project related to all
sectors like water supply, sanitation, sewer, solid waste management, traffic and transportation,
health, education, electricity, street light, urban growth, economic development, urban environment,
heritage and tourism were presented to the stakeholders and finalized after the discussion. During the
workshop sectoral strategies and projects were presented and finalized for the mentioned sector.
Below table describes issues and suggestions for the above mentioned sectors.
Issue and Suggestion of the workshop
Categories Issues and suggestions
Town economy There is no existing vegetable mandi but it can be proposed on hospital road.
There is Galla mandi on private land but there is 3Ha govt. land on which galla
mandi can be developed on Bhind Bhande road.
There is need of agro based industry in this region.
Water Supply In ward no-12 & 13 there is no water supply pipe line; in ward no-1,2,6,10 &
15 pipe line is partially covered and in rest wards there is pipe line but they are
40 years old and not properly functional.
There are 5 tube wells and 5 more is needed.
There is need of separate transformer for water supply.
There is need of 2 OHTs.
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Categories Issues and suggestions
Location of WTP on either Pahuj river in Asnet village or on Sindh River in
Ajnar village
Sewerage and
sanitation
Location of STP
Drainage There are 4 main drains; one starts from Kardha talab to Khajuri marg (4km
length), second Richha nala from two sides (from Bhujarya and from Gatahi
nala) (2 km length), third starts from hospital and lastly meets in Kardhan talab
(1.5 km length), fourth starts from Konch road and meet Kardhan talab (2 km
length); and lastly these all drains in Mriga river (5km away from the main
town).
In 1990 flood was very sever in this region, water from west and south
direction flooded the area. If a bypass will be constructed in west and parallel
drain along bypass is created then this problem will be solved.
Roads and
transportation
New Bus stand can be proposed near Nagar Parishad office (available area is
around 4000 sq feet).
Junctions for beautification and improvement are Konch Chauraha, Tehsil
chauraha, Meat market Tiraha, Samthar Road Tiraha, Khajari Marg Tiraha,
near proposed Bus stand.
There is need of approach road to crematorium in ward no-15.
Social
Infrastructure
Kardhan talab and its adjoining area can be developed properly with all
community facilities, parks, etc for recreation and local tourism. Mela ground
can also be developed here.
In ward no-2 & 6 there are community hall but they are not properly used and
developed, it can be developed properly.
In ward no-8, 1,2,12, and 15 there are Kabristan and crematorium but not
developed properly. Kabristan of ward no-8 is encroached, crematorium of
ward no-2 is water logged, so all crematorium and Kabristan should be
developed properly.
Slums Notified slums are in ward no-3 and 6. Around 80% population is very poor, so
for rest of population government grants are needed for construction of toilets
in houses.






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D. Workshop on vision, sectoral strategies and priority projects































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E. WORKSHOP INVITATION LETTER


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F. WORKSHOP ATTENDANCE

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ANNEXURE 10.3
A. PROCEEDINGS OF THE WORKSHOP
The 3
rd
workshop in Daboh was conducted on 27
th
March 2012.The objective of this workshop was to
invite the feedback of various stakeholders on the proposals and capital investment plan of the CDP.
The workshops were conceptualised based on the framework of CDP. Therefore, a timeframe of CDP
was followed for organisation of the same. The CMO was informed about the impending workshops
one week in advance for fixing up of the time and venue. The next task was intimating various
stakeholders- steering committee members, councillors, NGOs, personnel from line departments
(irrigation department, PWD, Health Department, Education Department), regarding the workshop.
The workshop agendas were prepared based on the ToR. The sequence of events included opening
remark by the CMO, presentation by the consultants, open discussion with and among the present
audience and finally a vote of thanks by the CMO.
B. LIST OF PARTICIPANTS
The participants of this workshop include Municipal Officials, Steering Group Members, Ward
Members and other Citizens. Total 11 persons participated in this workshop. The Invitation letter and
the attendance sheet is given as Annexure 10.3 and Annexure 10.4 respectively.
C. CONTENT OF THE WORKSHOP
The workshop started with the welcome note of CMO, Daboh and the introduction of ICT team to all
the participants. The consultants presented the draft CDP report encompassing situation assessment,
vision, goal, strategy, project identification, capital investment plan and financial operating plan. The
broad cost estimates for various sectors like water supply, sewerage and sanitation, solid waste
management, drainage, traffic and transportation, health, education, electricity, street light, urban
growth, economic development, urban environment, heritage and tourism, housing for poor, etc were
discussed and corresponding suggestions were noted. For better understanding of participants hand-
outs was given to them. A copy of the hand-outs is given in Annexure 10.5. (Refer to workshop
photographs).
D. PARTICIPANT COMMENT
All the identified projects, strategies, and project costing were accepted by the participants (strategies,
projects and costing are given in Chapter 12). The participants suggested that all projects identified
under the CDP must be implemented as soon as possible.
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E. WORKSHOP PHOTOGRAPHS


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F. WORKSHOP INVITATION LETTER


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G. WORKSHOP ATTENDANCE

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ANNEXURE 10.4
A. WORKSHOP PRESENTATION



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B. WORKSHOP PROCEEDINGS

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ANNEXURE 10.5
A. WORKSHOP PRESENTATIONS



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B. WORKSHOP PROCEEDINGS



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2.
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Technocrats
Pvt. Ltd.
Checklists must be completely filled
Check feasibility of commercially viable projects
Include the new cadre management proposals in the CDP
Property tax information should be dealt in detail

Akoda
1) Sex ratio of the town is improving. The policies behind this
improvement should be discussed
2) Discuss importance of brick kilns. Whether it is going to boost up
the town economy in any manner or it would deteriorate the
environmental condition
3) Feasibility of Cluster based water supply in all the towns of Bhind
should be checked.
4) Low cost sewerage system should be proposed
5) All the government land should be identified for commercial
projects

Lahar
1) Tentative location of Bye pass should be shown on the map
2) PHC should be corrected to CHC.

Alampur
1) Direction of nallahs should be checked and marked on map
2) Financial data for the year 2011 & 2012 should be given
3) Information regarding property tax must be included in the checklist
4) Heritage and environment must be focused.

Daboh
1) ULB was constituted in 1979; date should be corrected in the report.
2) Correct area as developed area
3) Check information on water supply
4) Direction of nallah should be marked on the map

Gormi
1) Reason behind decline in population growth rate should be analysed
2) Sarso and milk potential should be explored
3) Ward map requires correction
4) Location of nallah should be marked on the map

Mihona
1) Other than the above mentioned points, issues regarding Bye pass
and bus stand must be discussed

Sevda
1) The report mentions Sevda and Seondha. One name should be used
at every place.

Satisfactory

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List of members and experts participated in the meeting:-
1. Shri Sanjay Kumar Shukla, Commissioner, UADD, GoMP
2. Shri Ashok Khare, Chief Engineer, UADD, GoMP
3. Shri M.K. Shrivastava, D.P.D, Project Uday
4. Shri S.C. Batham, Superintending Engineer, Project Uday
5. Shri S.K. Mudgal, Project Uday
6. ShriPravinBhagwat, Senior Urban Planner & State-Coordinator, CMAMP
7. Shri Vijay Kumar Sharma, CMO, Nagar ParishadPipalrawa
8. ShriMaqsood Ali Saiyad, CMO, Nagar ParishadKhategaon
9. ShriKamlesh Sharma, CMO, Nagar ParishadBhaurasa
10. Shri Raja Yadav, CMO, Nagar ParishadBagli
11. ShriRakeshChauhan, CMO, Nagar ParishadTonkhurd
12. Shri Sanjeev Ghanvari, CMO, Nagar ParishadKantaphod
13. Shri K.N.S. Chauhan, CMO, Nagar ParishadHatpipalya
14. Shri K.K. Dwivedi, Sub Engineer, Division Office Gwalior
15. Shri Ashok Sharma, Sub Engineer, Division Office Gwalior
16. ShriHarnarayan Sharma, Sub Engineer, Division Office Gwalior
17. ShriSurendra Sharma, CMO, Nagar ParishadMehgaon
18. Shri Mahesh Purohit, CMO, Nagar ParishadGormi
19. Shri Ramesh Yadav, CMO, Nagar Parishad Mau (Bhind)
20. Shri H.S. Bhadoria, CMO, Nagar ParishadPhuphkalan
21. Shri Ram Vilas Gupta, CMO, Nagar ParishadAlampur
22. Shri B.D. Karolia, CMO, Nagar Parishad Lahar
23. ShriRakeshDubey, CMO, Nagar ParishadShahpur-Burhanpur
24. Shri P.N. Piploniya, CMO, Nagar ParishadPandhana
25. ShriPradeepSakalle, CMO, Nagar Parishad Mundi
26. Shri G.S. Rajput, CMO, Nagar ParishadTendukheda-Narsighpur
27. ShriHimanshu Bhatt, CMO, Nagar ParishadKareli
28. ShriSiddharthKhare, Sub Engineer, Nagar ParishadKareli
29. Shri R.D. Chaube, CMO, Nagar ParishadSohagpur
30. Shri H.R. Khande, Sub Engineer, Nagar ParishadSohagpur
31. Shri P.K. Tiwari, A.E., Nagar PalikaGotegaon
32. Shri N.S. Raghuwanshi, CMO, Nagar ParishadBabai
33. Shri H. Malviya, RSI, Nagar ParishadBabai
34. ShriRambabuNayak, CMO, Nagar ParishadRajnagar
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35. ShriMithleshGiriGoswami, CMO, Nagar ParishadShahgarh
36. ShriDevendra Kumar Uderiya, Sub Engineer, Nagar Parishad Newton Chikhli
37. Shri H.A. Khan, CMO, Nagar ParishadAthner
38. ShriNarendra Kumar Mishra, CMO, Nagar ParishadChandia
39. ShriShriniwas Sharma, CMO, Nagar ParishadBurhar
40. Shri Chandra PrakashPandey, Sub Engineer, Nagar ParishadBurhar
41. Shri D.L. Singh, CMO, Nagar ParishadBeohari
42. ShriTaresh Kumar Shukla, Sub Engineer, Nagar ParishadBeohari
43. ShriOmkar Prasad Gupta, CMO, Nagar ParishadKhand
44. Shri J.N. Pandey, CMO, Nagar ParishadJaisinghnagar
45. Shri R.S. Tripathi, CMO, Nagar ParishadPali
46. ShriManojShrivastava, Sub Engineer, Nagar ParishadPali



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SPECIAL PAPER FOR DABOH TOWN
Traffic and Transportation
1. Theme of the Special Paper
Civic Infrastructure in terms of water supply, sewerage, drainage is inadequate and poor in Daboh
City. There is accumulated backlog of investments in civic infrastructure and need for further
investments to meet future demands. The total estimated investment requirement for all projects,
including Traffic and Transportation, prioritized in the city development plan amounts to 207.163
crore. Traffic and Transportation is very important aspect of the urban services in the town. Hence,
this special paper is an attempt to resolve the problems related to Traffic and Transportation and
provide comprehensive strategies for whole town.
An efficient transportation system is a prerequisite for the proper growth and functioning of the city.
An appropriate circulation pattern enhances the linkages of the town with other settlements in the
regional context and it also improves the connectivity within the town. The transportation system has
been assessed in terms of road transport, rail transport and air transport.
2. City Profile
The total area of Daboh town is 12.72 sqkm. The town is divided into 15 municipal wards with the
total population of 18534 as per 2011 Census. As per 2001 Census, the literacy rate of the town is
72.2% (Female-56.7%; Male: 85.1%) and sex ratio is 848.
3. Status of Traffic and Transportation
An efficient transportation system is a prerequisite for the proper growth and functioning of the city.
An appropriate circulation pattern enhances the linkages of the town with other settlements in the
regional context and it also improves the connectivity within the town. The transportation system has
been assessed in terms of road transport, rail transport and air transport.
3.1. Road Transport
As far as road connectivity of Daboh town is concerned, it is well connected with other roads of the
state. The State Highway 45 connects the town with Datia in the south and Bhind in the north (Bhind-
Bhander road). It is also well connected with Gwalior with district roads.
Within the municipal area of town, main roads are reasonably wide and provide good intra-city
connectivity, considering the current size of town. The two main internal roads, namely Bhander-
Bhind Road and Konch Road carry the maximum inter-city and intra-city traffic. The total
approximately length of road l within municipal area is 37km. Out of the total road length of 37km,
23km are main roads owned by municipality and 3 km roads owned by PWD (Bhind-Bhander Road
and Konch Road). Remaining 11km are internal roads or streets. The existing road network is shown
in figure below.
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Figure 1: Existing Road Network

3.2. Rail Transport
The town is not connected with railway line. The nearest railway station is at Datia, which is 67km
from the town.
3.3. Air Transport
The nearest airport is at Gwalior, which is around 90km from Daboh town.
3.4. Public Transport
As far as public transport is concerned bus and tempos are main means of transport. But there is no
proper bus stand in the town. Buses are parked along the road to carry the passengers.
3.5. Parking Status
Currently there is no off-street parking facility
available in town and people park vehicles along
the roadside in the market area which is along the
main road. The parked vehicle reduces the
functional space of roads and this leads to traffic
jam in town.
3.6. Vehicles
As shown in Error! Reference source not
found., there are total 73408 vehicles
(commercial-2245 and non-commercial-71163)
Photo 1: Parking in the town
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registered in Bhind district. The data shows that out of total vehicle registered in Bhind district, very
high majority of vehicles are non-commercial vehicle (96.9%) compare to commercial vehicles
(3.1%). These include all types of goods and passenger vehicles. Since these vehicles are registered in
whole district including urban and rural areas. Daboh is one of the 11 Municipal Councils (Bhind,
Mehgaon, Gohad, Mihona, Lahar, Mau, Phupkalan, Akoda, Gormi, Daboh and Alampur) of Bhind
district. Apart from 11 towns there are 933 villages in the district. Road transport is the main mode of
transportation in Bhind. The total extend of road length in the district is about 1319 Kms. Out of total
district roads length, 37 km road length roads fall within the municipal boundary of Daboh town.
Since the town data for vehicle registration is not available therefore it has been calculated based on
the proportion of total road length. It may be concluded that although this is not the correct way but in
absence of factual data it is assumed that there are total around 3230 vehicles registered in Daboh
town (4.4% of the total district vehicles). Following the district trends, it is estimated that out of total
estimated registered vehicle in Daboh, 3130 vehicles are non-commercial and 100 vehicles are
commercial.
Table 1: Registered Motor Vehicles As on 31st March 2009 in Bhind District
S No. Vehicle Bhind District
1 Goods
Multi Axles Articulated 5
Medium & Heavy Truck Lorries 538
L.C.V. Four Wheeler 342

Three Wheeler 133
2 Full Buses 30+1 Above
M.P.R.T.C
Ordinary 16
Deluxe

Other
Ordinary 149
Private

Deluxe 9
3 Mini Buses
Up to
573
12+1
12+1 To 30+1 101
4
Motor
77
Cabs
5 Tempo
Up to
124
6+1
6+1 above 8
6
Auto
170
Rick Shaw
7 Two Wheelers
Moped 1596
Motor Cycles/Scooter 45302
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S No. Vehicle Bhind District
8 Car 898
9 Jeep 229
10 Tractor 16281
11 Trailers 6653
12 Other Vehicles 204

Total 73408
Source: Motor Transport Statistics of Madhya Pradesh,Year-2008-2009
(http://mptransport.org/TPtstatics0228009.pdf)
4. Issues
Poor road condition
Improper junction cause frequent accidents
Lack parking facilities have resulted in significant bottlenecks in the inner city commercial
areas.
No bus stand in the town
Poor periodic road maintenance.
Absence of pedestrian facilities
5. SWOT Analysis
Table 2: SWOT Analysis of Traffic & Transportation
Strength Weakness
Good road connectivity through NH 45
Good availability of Right of Way (RoW) of
existing main roads
No direct rail connectivity
Inadequate O & M arrangement of existing
roads infrastructure
Lack of pedestrian facilities
Opportunities Threats
Good width of existing roads to be used to
extend existing road
Poor condition of roads
Earthen roads causing dust in air creating air
pollution
Absence of parking spaces forcing people to
park vehicles on road creating
Source: Consultants
6. Strategies and Action Plan
Creating road infrastructure like bus stand, footpath, parking and signage through PSP
Improvement of existing main road junction
Re-strengthening of the existing city roads
Development of new roads
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7. Project and Investment for 2035
The summary of projects and infrastructure investment requirement of Traffic and Transportation for
the town till the horizon period of 2035 is given in Table 3 and some of the proposed projects are
shown is Figure 2. The total estimated capital investment required for Traffic and Transportation is
Rs. 86.406 crore which is 41.71% of the total investment cost. The details regarding the projects
related to Traffic and Transportation can be referred to the Chapter 12 of the main report. The costing
under Traffic and Transportation is given in the table below:
Table 3: Traffic & Transportation Investment Needs, 2035 (Rs. Crore)
Projects/ Programs
Total
Investment
Phase-I
Till 2015
Phase-II
2015-25
Phase-III
2025-35
Traffic and Transportation 86.406 52.596 26.535 7.275

Figure 2: Proposed Proposals for Traffic and Transportation


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SPECIAL PAPER FOR DABOH TOWN
Storm Water Drainage
1. Theme of the Special Paper
Civic Infrastructure in terms of water supply, sewerage, drainage is inadequate and poor in Daboh
Town. There is accumulated backlog of investments in civic infrastructure and need for further
investments to meet future demands. The total estimated investment requirement for all projects,
including storm water drainage, prioritized in the city development plan amounts to 207.163 crore.
Storm Water Drainage is very important aspect of the urban services in the town. Hence, this special
paper is an attempt to resolve the problems related to Storm Water Drainage and provide
comprehensive strategies for whole town.
2. City Profile
The total area of Daboh town is 12.72 sqkm. The town is divided into 15 municipal wards with the
total population of 18534 as per 2011 Census. As per 2001 Census, the literacy rate of the town is
72.2% (Female-56.7%; Male: 85.1%) and sex ratio is 848.
3. Status of Storm Water Drainage
Storm water drainage is expressed in terms of its coverage with respect to the total road length.
Ideally, the length of the storm water drain should be twice that of the total road length.
The existing drainage system in Daboh is piecemeal construction of open drains as per local and
temporary requirements without proper whole to part designs. The town has mainly open drains. The
waste water along with sewage is discharged into open fields. The uncollected solid waste gets its way
into drains and chocks the drainage system.
As assessed 75% of the town have drains (31km). Due to the lack of integrated drainage system there
is water logging in the town quite often. The Table 1 and Figure.1 shows that out of total houses
76.4% houses have connectivity to some kind of waste water outlet facility (Census, 2001) and
23.58% houses do not have connectivity to drains.
Table 1: Type of Connectivity for waste water outlet

Total No. of Household Closed Drainage Open Drainage No Drainage
Numbers 2481 94 1802 585
% 100 3.79 72.63 23.58
Source: Census of India, 2001
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Figure.1: Type of Connectivity for waste water outlet
The total existing road length is around 37km and around 75% (31km) of the roads are covered with
drains including main drains (4 main drains with 8km length). Most of the drains are on one side of
the roads. The total drain length is approximately 31 km excluding the main drains.
4. Main Drains
There are 4 main drains in Daboh town as given below:
1. Kardhan Nala (natural drain) from Kardhan talab to Khajuri marg, natural drain (3km length),
2. Richha nala from two sides (from Bhujarya and from Gatahi nala) (2 km length),
3. Hospital nala from hospital to Kardhan talab (2 km length),
4. Konch road nala from Konch road to Kardhan talab (1 km length)
Following the natural slope towards north-east, all the main drains fall into Mriga River (5km away
from the main town). Figure.2 illustrates the major drains of the town.
Figure.2: Major Drains of the Town
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5. Major Water Bodies
Apart from the natural drain, there are two ponds in Daboh, namely, Kardhan Talab and Gathai Talab.
These Talabs were found in the poor condition because of poor maintenance. Disposal of sewerage of
the town in Kardhan Talab through natural drain was also observed. These water bodies are shown in
Figure.3
Figure.3: Major water Bodies

6. Flood Prone Areas
The last flood came in 1990, which was very sever in this region, water from west and south direction
flooded the town area. After that there is no major flood in the area but flood like situation arises
Major Water
Bodies
Photo 1: Water logging in the town
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because of inadequate drainage system at some places during rainy season. Water logging is also a
frequent phenomenon due to the inadequate drainage system. As shown in Figure.2, parts of ward
1,2,3 and 6 gets affected by with water logging.
If a bypass is constructed in west and parallel drain along bypass is created then this temporary
problem of flood like situation and water logging will be solved. As the existing are choked and silted
therefore de-siltation of all the drains is also required to make the existing drains functional.
7. Service Level Benchmarking
The service level benchmarking of drainage system has been proposed for next five years from 2012-
13 to 2017-18 as given in the below table.
Table 2: Service level benchmarking, Daboh
S.
No.
Service/ Indicator
Ultimate
Benchmark as
per MOUD, Gol
Guidelines
Present
Status
Commitment for the Fiscal Year

2012
-13
2013
-14
2014
-15
2015-
16
2016
-17
1
Coverage of Storm
Water Drainage
Network
100% 75% 75% 75% 80% 90%
100
%
2
Incidence of water
logging/ flooding
0% 40% 40% 30% 0% 0% 0%
Source: DNP and ICT Estimates 2012
8. Issues
Most of the drains in the commercial areas of the city are being encroached by the shopkeepers
by extending their shops or making steps towards their shops. This affects the cleaning services
by the respective agencies involved in the service provision.
Most of the drainage lines being open and the municipal solid waste like garbage, polythene,
plastic carry bags, etc. are littered in the drains, thereby affecting their flow capacity.
Outfall in many of these drains is not proper and is discharged in open
The construction of unplanned colonies in the town has been further aggravating the water
logging in the recent past.
Piecemeal construction of drain and water logging due to lack of integrated drainage system
Photo 2: Drains in the town
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9. SWOT Analysis
Table 3: SWOT Analysis
Strength Weakness
Good natural slope toward north east
Presence of natural drains in the city that
make it easier to dispose water
No separate drainage network exists. Rain
water drains along sewerage disposal drains
Opportunities Threats
Good drainage system could be developed
using natural slope of the city
Open drains are susceptible to chocking due to
accumulation of solid wastes and only covered
drains would work in the towns
10. Strategies and Action Plan
Preparation of drainage master plan
Involve public participation in the implementation , operation and maintenance of drainage
master plan
Rainwater harvesting in government buildings and new private construction
Measures for repairing and de-silting covering of existing drains
Encroachment removal
O & M of drainage system through modern equipment
11. Project and Investment for 2035
The summary of projects and infrastructure investment requirement of Storm Water Drainage for the
town till the horizon period of 2035 is given in Table 4 and some of the proposed projects are shown
is Figure.4. The total estimated capital investment required for providing efficient and integrated
storm water service is Rs. 22.749 crore. The costs of some of the environment projects are also
included as they will have a direct impact on the storm water drainage improvement in the town. The
details regarding the projects related to storm water drainage and environment can be referred to the
Chapter 12 of the main report. The costing related to storm water drainage is given in the table below.
Table 4: Investment Needs, 2035 (Rs. Crore)
Projects/ Programs Total Investment
Phase-I
Till 2015
Phase-II
2015-25
Phase-III
2025-35
Storm water Drainage 22.049 13.635 5.774 2.640
Environment 0.700 0.600 0.100 0.000
TOTAL 22.749 14.235 5.874 2.640



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Figure.4: Proposal for Storm Water Drainage Improvement in the town


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