Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 12

747-400F DIFFERENCES 13 - 1

747-400F DIFFERENCES TABLE OF CONTENTS


SUBJECT PAGE

AIR CONDITIONING / PRESSURIZATION..........................................................3


Overview .................................................................................................................................................... 3 Cabin Temperature ..................................................................................................................................... 3 Recirculation Fans ...................................................................................................................................... 4 Gasper Operation........................................................................................................................................ 4 Humidifier: ................................................................................................................................................. 4

ELECTRICAL SYSTEM DIFFERENCES .............................................................5


Overview .................................................................................................................................................... 5 APU / External Power ................................................................................................................................ 5 Utility and Galley Busses ........................................................................................................................... 5 Bus Equipment Overview........................................................................................................................... 5 Ground Handling Bus................................................................................................................................. 5

ENGINES AND ENGINE SYSTEM DIFFERENCES ............................................6


Overview: ................................................................................................................................................... 6

FUEL SYSTEM.....................................................................................................7
Overview .................................................................................................................................................... 7 Fuel Pump Systems .................................................................................................................................... 7 Fuel Management ....................................................................................................................................... 7

OTHER GENERAL DIFFERENCES.....................................................................8


Center Pedestal ........................................................................................................................................... 8

CARGO GROUND OPERATIONS .....................................................................10


Overview .................................................................................................................................................. 10 Cargo Doors: ............................................................................................................................................ 10 Operating the Main Deck Cargo Doors:................................................................................................... 10 Cargo Loaders: ......................................................................................................................................... 11

PMDG 747-400/400F AOM

DO NOT DUPLICATE

Revision 26FEB06

13 - 2 747-400F DIFFERENCES

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

Revision 26FEB06

DO NOT DUPLICATE

PMDG 747-400/400F AOM

747-400F DIFFERENCES 13 - 3

AIR CONDITIONING / PRESSURIZATION DIFFERENCES


Overview: The Environmental Control System on the 747-400F varies slightly in operation from the passenger configured aircraft. Specifically there are five temperature zone temperature control knobs, each providing direct temperature control to a specific part of the airplane. The conditioned air recirculation system used on the passenger configured aircraft has been removed, although the remaining function of the ECS system remains largely the same. ECS Overhead Panel 747-400F Temperature control is managed by adjusting the temperature of the air conditioned output from the packs to each of seven zones. Unless manually set, the temperature control selectors will target an average cabin temperature of 24C. Individual control of all seven temperature zones is only possible when the LLCCFR (not modeled on this aircraft due to the location of the control switches on the flight deck) is set to allow manual control of Lower Lobe temperatures. For the purpose of this 747-400F the LLCCFR system is modeled in its usual OFF condition. In this configuration, the Lower Lobe temperature knobs are not active, although temperature is still controlled on the lower lobe of the aircraft. The forward Lower Lobe is heated by the equipment cooling air exhaust from the flight compartment and the equipment center. The aft cargo compartment takes hot bleed air directly from the center bleed air duct. Temperature is regulated by a temperature sensing probe and a regulator valve. Control of aft cargo heat can be effected through use of the Aft Cargo Heat switch on the overhead ECS panel. (Again, please note that the LLCCFR system is rarely activated on the 747-400F due to the dramatic increase in fuel burn, and in this simulation it is modeled in the OFF configuration, thus the two lower lobe temperature knobs do not affect temperature control on the lower lobes!) The forward and aft main deck temperature zones are controlled using the Main Deck FWD/AFT temperature knobs, provided that conditioned air is being provided to the airplane. The upper deck temperature zones are controlled using the Flight Deck Temperature knob.

Cabin Temperature: Cabin temperature is controlled by air conditioning in seven independent temperature control zones: Three on the upper deck, two on the main cargo deck and two in the lower lobe cargo areas. Conditioned air is provided by three air conditioning packs located below decks in the center section of the airplane. Pack control, fault protection and overheat protection are all automatic. The primary method for temperature control within the aircraft is via automatic modulation based upon temperature knob settings. Each of five temperature control knobs maintains temperature for a unique area of the aircraft. A backup mode of temperature control is available in the event of system failures. The air conditioning packs can operate using pressurized bleed air from the engines, APU or an external pneumatic ground source. PMDG 747-400/400F AOM

DO NOT DUPLICATE

Revision 26FEB06

13 - 4 747-400F DIFFERENCES

The air conditioning system synoptic provides an overview of the aircraft temperature control zones in the upper left corner. This overview includes the master temperature setting, target and average temperature for each zone, plus the current temperature of the forward and aft cargo compartments.

Recirculation Fans: Recirculation fans are not present in the 747-400F. Gasper Operation: The gasper system is not present in the 747-400F. Humidifier: In order to improve humidity levels which are traditionally very low in pack conditioned air, operation of the humidification system can be controlled using the HUMID switch on the overhead ECS panel. The humidification system reintroduces moisture to the airflow rather than routing it through the evaporator. Humidification levels will vary depending on the number of packs in operation. Not all 747-400F operators have selected humidification as an option on their aircraft, but we have elected to model its presence in this simulation.

Revision 26FEB06

DO NOT DUPLICATE

PMDG 747-400/400F AOM

747-400F DIFFERENCES 13 - 5

ELECTRICAL SYSTEM DIFFERENCES


Overview: The electrical system on the 747-400F is identical to the 747-400 in the passenger configuration. We want to highlight one very important aspect of the 747-400F electrical system as it relates to the operation of the main deck Nose Cargo Door and Main Deck Cargo Door. Ground Handling Bus: In order to power the Nose Cargo Door, the Main Deck Cargo Door and the cargo handling systems on the main deck of the aircraft, the GROUND HANDLING BUS must be powered. There are two ways that the ground handling bus can be powered and in order to operate these doors, it is important that this procedure be understood. To power the Ground Handling Bus: APU GEN 2 must show AVAIL. AND/OR EXT PWR 2 must show AVAIL. Please note that the Ground Handling Bus is very specific about either of these sources showing AVAIL. (i.e.: AVAIL but not ON) used simultaneously on different portions of the electrical system. Two non-paralleled 90KVA generators are driven by the APU and are capable of providing 115 Volt, 400 hertz AC power to each AC system while the aircraft is on the ground. To simulate differences in various airport facilities around the world, PMDG has included a logic parameter that will provide External Ground Power for EXT1 when selected from the PMDG/OPTIONS/VARIOUS menu. (See Chapter 00 Introduction for more information.) Occasionally, the ground power will also be made available on EXT2. To simulate the fact that most cargo operators recognize that the 400F is more dependent upon a secondary source of power, we have increased the percentage of times that you will have EXT1/2 power available upon request from ground crews. If you see only EXT1 connected, its time to start the APU!

Utility and Galley Busses: Each main AC bus provides power to a utility bus. Note that the 747-400F does not have galley busses, and as such they are not shown on the lower EICAS ELEC display. Bus Equipment Overview: Following lists the DIFFERENCES between the buses on the 747-400F and the 747-400 passenger configuration:

With either of these sources showing AVAIL, the Ground Handling Bus will be powered, thus allowing operation of the nose cargo door and the main deck cargo door. If both of these power sources is OFF or ON, and neither shows AVAIL, you will be unable to operate the doors. APU / External Power: While on the ground, it is possible to provide AC power to the 747-400 via an external power source or the Auxiliary Power Unit generator. The electrical system is designed so that both methods of providing electrical power can be

Ground Handling Bus: Main Deck Cargo Door Nose Cargo Door Galley Buses: Deleted on the 747-400F aircraft.

PMDG 747-400/400F AOM

DO NOT DUPLICATE

Revision 26FEB06

13 - 6 747-400F DIFFERENCES

ENGINES AND ENGINE SYSTEM DIFFERENCES


Overview: The 747-400 has three engine variants certified for the airframe. General Electric CF6-80C2BF1F @62,100lbs thrust. Rolls Royce RB211- 524H2T @59,500lbs thrust. Pratt & Whitney PW4062 @ 63,300 lbs thrust. When you select a Pratt & Whitney or Rolls Royce engine airplane model from within the Select Aircraft menu, the correct engine performance data will be displayed on the upper/lower EICAS displays automatically and the FMC/CDU will operate using the correct engine performance data. Likewise, switching between any of the three engine types will cause the correct engine displays and FMC/CDU performance information to be used by the simulation. The Rolls Royce and Pratt & Whitney engines are instrumented significantly differently than the GE engine offering. (The RR engine is a three spool engine, for example, and both the RR and PW engines uses EPR rather than N1% for thrust control) Please note that there are a few minor differences between the RR/PW/GE powered airplanes that we have not yet added to the simulation. For continuity, we have based our cockpit on a layout commonly found on GE powered airplanes. There are two differences between the GE and PW/RR powered airplanes that you will not yet see in our simulation: 1) RR powered airplanes carry 4 fire bottles per wing, rather than 2 as on the GE airplane. We have not modeled this additional capability. 2) PW powered airplanes have individual autostart switches for each engine. We have retained on the single autostart switch used on the GE/RR engined airplanes.

Note that there are an array of engine variants by each manufacturer currently flying on the wings of 747-400s. As various engine offerings have been improved upon to match the needs of 747-400 operators, engine model variant availability has changed over time. Operationally the differences between model variants is generally quite small. With the introduction of the PMDG 747400F, we have added two new mathematical engine model derivations in order to include both the Pratt and Whitney and Rolls Royce engine options for your use. Engine specific performance data has been added to the performance chapters of this manual in order to assist you with operating these new engine models. In order to model these new engine models within the simulator we have added extensive engine performance data tables for use by the FMC/CDU and AFDS. Additionally, the requisite changes have been made to the upper/lower engine EICAS displays in order to realistically represent the displayed information for 747400 aircraft powered by PW/RR engine types. The EPR values displayed are mathematically derived from publicly available data and may vary slightly from real world performance figures and published data for these engine types. Extensive engine performance data was used to produce an engine thrust and operative model that most closely resembles its real world counterpart.

Revision 26FEB06

DO NOT DUPLICATE

PMDG 747-400/400F AOM

747-400F DIFFERENCES 13 - 7

FUEL SYSTEM DIFFERENCES


Overview: The fuel system on the 747-400F differs slightly from the fuel system on the passenger configured aircraft due to the removal of the stabilizer fuel tanks and controls. The reduction in storage capability is reflected in a slightly lower total fuel capacity for the aircraft. The fuel system on the 747-400F is capable of holding 53,915 gallons of Jet-A fuel. At a fuel density of 6.7lbs, this provides a maximum fuel weight of 361,200 pounds. We recommend that under no circumstance should you use the default MSFS fuel loading menu, as this will create unpredictable and undesired results with the airplane.

Fuel Pump Systems: The overhead fuel control panel differs from the 747-400 Passenger configuration with the removal of the stabilizer tank fuel pump control switches. Reference to stabilizer fuel capacity has subsequently been deleted from the lower EICAS FUEL display. Fuel Management: Fuel management logic on the 747-400F remains identical to that used on the 747-400 passenger configuration.

The fuel system on the PMDG 747-400 is easily the most complex part of the airplane from a behavior and logic standpoint. This portion of the airplane took more than 10 weeks to program because of its complexity and automation behaviors, and because of the severe limitations imposed on fuel usage by the primitive fuel tank model used by Microsoft Flight Simulator 9. In order to accurately simulate the fuel system on the 747-400, it was necessary to develop tools to allow the user to change the fuel load in the airplane without using the default MSFS fuel menu. To change the fuel load in the airplane, use the PMDG/OPTIONS/VARIOUS menu, and scroll your mouse wheel over the fuel figure to increase or decrease the figure to suit your needs. When you then hit OK the fuel requested will be loaded on the aircraft, properly configured for the correct tanks based upon the quantity loaded. The PMDG 747-400 fuel system maintains a perpetual fuel figure, so leaving the simulator and returning (at the end of a flight, for example) will instruct the simulator to reload the fuel-on-board figure from when you left the simulator.

PMDG 747-400/400F AOM

DO NOT DUPLICATE

Revision 26FEB06

13 - 8 747-400F DIFFERENCES

OTHER GENERAL DIFFERENCES


Center Pedestal: There only significant difference between the 747-400F and the 747-400 Passenger configuration is the removal of the Flight Deck Door Lock control switch. Main Panel: There are three primary differences that pilots will notice on the 747400F. Addition of a modern LCD Autopilot Mode Control Panel, updated frames around the cockpit displays, and the replacement of all standby gauges with an Integrated Standby Flight Display. The new, LCD Mode Control Panel retains identical functionality to the analogue MCP located on the flight deck of the 747-400 Passenger configuration aircraft. The primary benefits are easy of maintenance, digital technology and a cleaner design for the flight deck. By using much of the same display symbology and information as the main primary flight display, pilots are better able to perform critical flight maneuvers in the event of a display failure on the flight deck. Crews should not mistake the ISFD as simply a repeater for the primary flight display, however. Detailed understanding of it operation is important to the successful use of its capabilities. ISFD APP Button: Pressing the APP button on the top left of the ISFD will rotate the current mode between OFF (normal standby mode), APP (VOR/ILS mode) and BCRS (back course VOR/ILS mode). The Integrated Standby Flight Display (ISFD) is a highly integrated device designed to reduce pilot workload in the event of a complete loss of the primary flight displays.

The 747-400F uses newer technology flat panel displays, thus simplifying the otherwise complex maintenance requirements of the traditional CRT displays in use on most passenger configuration 747400s.

Pressing APP will cycle the ISFD through each mode in succession. When in APP mode, the G/S and LOC scales will be displayed, although the course deviation indicators will not be present until a valid

Revision 26FEB06

DO NOT DUPLICATE

PMDG 747-400/400F AOM

747-400F DIFFERENCES 13 - 9

signal is received by the unit while in APP mode. When placed in BCRS mode, the BCRS LOC deviation scale will be displayed, but the course deviation indications will not be present until a valid signal is received.

options from within the maintenance menu system that is not modeled on the ISFD. Pressing the RST key on the lower left side of the ISFD will cause the system to reset the attitude display. An amber flag with a count down timer will be present while the reset is taking place.

ISFD HP/IN Button: The HP/IN button allows the user to switch between a barometric setting based upon IN HG or millibars based on personal preference. To set the desired barometric altimeter setting, simply press the large white knob on the lower right until the barometric setting is displayed on the upper right portion of the ISFD.

TO/GA Click-Spots in the Virtual Cockpit: In the PMDG 747-400 Queen of the Skies, we included the TOGA switches in the Virtual Cockpit. These switches are fully clickable and operate as they do on the actual airplane. As a result of the mouse/click/screen interface, they are not exactly the simplest interface to use, however. In the 2D cockpit, we have traditionally included a magic click spot that allows the user to trigger a TO/GA response from the autothrottle. Based upon customer feedback, we have added this click spot to the VC as well. While in VC mode, simply click on the screw located here on the MCP to activate TOGA.

Rotate the white knob left/right until the desired setting is achieved. To return the indication to STANDARD setting, simply press the white knob and STD will be displayed on the upper right corner of the ISFD.

The + and - keys located along the left side of the ISFD are for use when selecting

PMDG 747-400/400F AOM

DO NOT DUPLICATE

Revision 26FEB06

13 - 10 747-400F DIFFERENCES

CARGO GROUND OPERATIONS


Overview: This section of the manual is intended to assist you with the operation of the cargo doors, cargo loaders and tail stand that are included as part of the 747-400F model. Cargo Doors: To operate the main deck cargo doors, we generally advise that you link their operation to specific key commands using the PMDG/GENERAL/KEYBOARD COMMANDS menu found in your Flight Simulator Menu bar. (Note: OFF or ON will not work. Either APU GEN 2 or EXT PWR 2 must show an AVAIL indication in order to have the proper bus configuration to run the Ground Handling Equipment on the airplane. See the electrical system differences above for an explanation.) Once you have the correct power configuration available to open the MAIN DECK cargo doors, simply press your key combination as desired, and you will see the associated door begin to open. From within the menu, use the pull-down to select 747-Cargo, then assign keyboard commands to the various activities displayed in the window as desired. Cargo doors on the 747-400F are very large, and are raised and lowered by electrically driven jacks screws. These screws produce a significant amount of rotational torque with the minimum of moving parts, and are able to open extremely heavy doors, although the process does take some time. To open the nose cargo door takes 32 seconds. The main deck side cargo door takes 21 seconds. The lower lobe cargo doors take approximately 15 seconds to open.

Now that you have established keyboard commands to operate the various animation aspects of your PMDG 747-400F, you are ready to load up and go! Operating the Main Deck Cargo Doors: To operate the MAIN DECK cargo doors, you must have either APU GEN2 or EXT PWR 2 showing AVAIL as shown here:

While in the cockpit, you will be able to hear the jackscrew opening/closing the nose cargo door, as this jack screw is located just PMDG 747-400/400F AOM

Revision 26FEB06

DO NOT DUPLICATE

747-400F DIFFERENCES 13 - 11

forward of your toes! You will not hear any of the other doors open/close, as they are located too far from the cockpit to be heard. Cargo Loaders: Using the same process of assigning key commands, you can place cargo loaders adjacent to the nose/side cargo doors. There are four cargo loader positions that can be populated during the loading/unloading of your PMDG 747-400F: Lower Lobe Forward:

Main Deck Cargo Loader:

Nose Cargo Loader:

Lower Lobe Aft:

For safety, it is not uncommon to place a tail stand under the rear fuselage of the 747400F during loading. The tail stand is used when the loading/unloading process requires a substantial amount of weight to be placed in the back of the airplane without weight in the front. All of these loaders are typical FMC style wide body container loaders that are used in cargo and passenger operations the world over. These loaders are capable of lifting and inserting containers (cans) and palettes of various standardized sizes with minimum of effort. If you use the PMDG 747-400F Load Manager to specify cargo weight in your 747-400F, you will see the cargo animated within the airplane. If the cargo on the main and/or lower deck exceeds 5,000lbs in weight, then you will see animated cargo on the main/lower deck as appropriate. If the weight is less than 5,000lbs, the respective deck will appear empty! PMDG 747-400/400F AOM

For crew access, a passenger stair can also be made to appear adjacent to the 1L side door. Revision 26FEB06

DO NOT DUPLICATE

13 - 12 747-400F DIFFERENCES

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

Revision 26FEB06

DO NOT DUPLICATE

PMDG 747-400/400F AOM