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Application Guide

for Multi-Unit
Residential Buildings
For New Construction &
Major Retrots
LEED

Canada-NC
Version 1.0
September 2005
Canada Green Building Council
2
Foreword
The Canada Green Building Council established a special Task Force to address
important issues arising from the market uptake of the LEED

Canada-NC Green
Building Rating System. The CaGBC instructed the Multi-unit Residential Building
(MURB) Task Force to develop a discussion paper outlining key issues for MURBs,
to assist users with the special challenges and non-technical questions of this
building type with LEED Canada Prerequisites and Credits.
The MURB Task Force prepared an Actions and Recommendations paper for the
CaGBC that set out additional strategies for LEED Credits as they relate to LEED
Canada-NC 1.0. The Task Force recommended the creation of a Low- and High-
rise Residential Application Guide to supplement LEED Canada-NC.
The Low- and High-rise Residential Application Guide
This LEED Canada-NC 1.0 Application Guide was prepared to provide additional
clarication on Requirements and Submittals for low- and high-rise multi-
unit residential buildings as they relate to particular LEED Credits. This guide
highlights only those alternate compliance Requirements and Submittals for specic
Prerequisites and Credits that required clarication for these building types, and
for mixed-use buildings that include residential occupancies. Any Requirements
outlined in this document are in addition to those already documented in LEED
Canada-NC 1.0 for specic Credits; and should not be used for other occupancies,
except as noted for mixed-use buildings with a residential component. The existing
compliance paths described in the LEED Canada-NC 1.0 rating system are still
available to MURB projects; the alternative compliance paths described herein are
in addition to those compliance paths.
As well, this Application Guide provides some common denitions and terms, and
renes others for the low- and high-rise multi-unit residential context.
Acknowledgements
The MURB Task Force and the preparation of the Application Guide could not have
been undertaken without the nancial support of the Greater Vancouver Regional
District and the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation. The CaGBC is greatly
indebted for the unagging support of these organizations.
The CaGBC would also like to acknowledge the efforts of the CaGBCs Product
Steering Committee and the LEED Technical Advisory Group for their input into
the preparation of this Application Guide.
The Application Guide process was managed by BuildGreen Developments Inc.
with assistance from CaGBC staff, and included the review and suggestions of
many TAG members.
We extend our deepest gratitude to all these individuals and the MURB Task Force
for their volunteer efforts and constant support of CaGBCs mission.
Application Guide for Multi-Unit Residential Buildings
3
MURB Task Force
Task Force Chair:
Joe Van Belleghem BuildGreen Consulting Inc.
Members of the MURB Task Force:
Andrew Pape-Salmon BC Government, Ministry of Energy and Mines
Andrew Pride Minto Urban Communities Inc.
Bill Semple Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC)
Bruce Hadden Hotson Bakker Architects
Cameron Thorn Urban Development Institute, Municipal Affairs
Chris Jones EnerSys Analytics
Curt Hepting EnerSys Analytics
Dale Mikkelsen City of Vancouver
Elizabeth Johnston BC Hydro
Jamie James Tridel
Jim Clark Natural Resources Canada (NRCan)
Lindsay Cole BuildGreen Consulting Inc.
John Robertson City of Vancouver
Jonathan Westeinde Windmill Development Group Ltd.
Martine Desbois Consultant
Michael Geller Burnaby Mountain Community Corp.
Natty Urquizo City of Ottawa
Pamela Lippe e4 Inc.
Ralph DiNola Green Building Services
Robert Brown ReSource Rethinking Buildings/Chesterman Property Group
Steve Carpenter Enermodal Engineering Ltd.
Thomas Mueller Greater Vancouver Regional District (GVRD)
Disclosure
The Canada Green Building Council (CaGBC) has been ofcially established as
a national not-for-prot corporation and it has signed a Licensing Agreement with
the US Green Building Council (USGBC) for the exclusive implementation of the
LEED Green Building Rating System in Canada.
LEED Canada is a derivative work of the USGBCs LEED Green Building
Rating System. LEED Canada and its companion LEED Canada Reference Guide
are intended to facilitate the use of the LEED Green Building Rating System in
Canada.
The LEED Canada-NC Rating System and its companion LEED Canada-NC
Reference Guide serve two distinct roles:
1. Where appropriate, they provide a set of equivalent Canadian LEED Prerequisite
and Credit Requirements, including references to relevant Canadian standards and
resource material.
Canada Green Building Council
4
2. They provide guidelines to assist Canadian organizations and jurisdictions in the
creation of Supplements that provide a further level of renement specic to their
specialized needs.
LEED Canada-NC version 1.0 is modeled on the USGBCs LEED NC-2.1, and
is applicable to new designs and major renovations of new commercial buildings,
institutional buildings and low- and high-rise multi-unit residential buildings.
Through its use as a design guideline and third-party certication tool, LEED
aims to improve the occupant well-being, environmental performance and
economic return of buildings using established and innovative practices, standards
and technologies. It provides a denition, widely accepted by industry, for what
currently constitutes a green building. LEED Canada consists of an explicit set
of environmental performance criteria, organized within ve (5) key performance
categories: Sustainable Sites; Water Efciency; Energy and Atmosphere; Materials
and Resources; and Indoor Environmental Quality. A sixth category, Innovation
& Design Process, rewards exceptional environmental performance or innovation
over and above that explicitly covered in the basic LEED Credits.
LEED Canada lays out the basic Intent, Requirements and Submittals that are
necessary to achieve each Prerequisite and voluntary Credit. Projects earn one or
more points toward certication by meeting or exceeding each Credits technical
Requirements. All Prerequisites must be achieved in order to qualify for certication.
Points for each Credit contribute to a nal score that relates to one of four possible
levels of certication: LEED CERTIFIED, SILVER, GOLD or PLATINUM. The
LEED Canada Checklist is a summary of Credit topics and point values crafted to
assist users to track progress in greening their projects.
A short description of technologies and strategies is included for each Credit to
briey inform those who are unfamiliar with the particular topic. The LEED Canada-
NC 1.0 Reference Guidethe technical companion to the Rating System and Letter
Templateprovides further background, explanation and instruction.
Disclaimer and Notices
The Canada Green Building Council authorizes you to view the Application Guide
for Multi-Unit Residential Buildings for your individual use and to copy as is, or in
part, if you reference the original document. No content may be altered. In exchange
for this authorization you agree to retain all copyright and other proprietary notices
contained in the original LEED

Canada Green Building Rating System. You


also agree not to sell or modify the Application Guide, or to reproduce, display or
distribute the Application Guide in any way, for any public or commercial purpose,
including display on a web site or in a networked environment.
Unauthorized use of the Application Guide and LEED

Canada Green Building


Rating System violates copyright, trademark, and other laws and is prohibited.
All text, graphics, layout and other elements of content contained in the Guide are
owned by the Canada Green Building Council and are protected by copyright under
Application Guide for Multi-Unit Residential Buildings
5
Canadian, United States and foreign laws.
Note that none of the parties involved in the funding or creation of the Application
Guide and the LEED

Canada Green Building Rating System, including the Canada


and U.S. Green Building Councils or their directors or members make any warranty
(express or implied) or assume any liability or responsibility, to you or any third
parties for the accuracy, completeness or use of, or reliance on any information
contained in the Application Guide, or for any injuries, losses or damages (including,
without limitation, equitable relief) arising out of such use or reliance.
As a condition of use, you covenant not to sue, and agree to waive and release the
Canada Green Building Council and its Directors or members from any and all
claims, demands and causes of action for any injuries, losses or damages (including,
without limitation, equitable relief) that you may now or hereafter have a right to
assert against such parties as a result of your use of, or reliance on, the LEED


Canada Green Building Rating System and the Application Guide.
ISBN 0-9736610-2-X
Copyright
Copyright

2005 by the Canada Green Building Council. All rights reserved.


Trademark
LEED

is a registered trademark of the U.S. Green Building Council.


LEED

Canada is a registered trademark of the Canada Green Building Council


1 Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Rating System Version 2.1, US
Green Building Council, June 2001, US Green Building Council, Washington DC:
www.usgbc.org
Canada Green Building Council
6
Introduction
Denitions
Multi-Unit Residential Buildings (MURBs) and Low- and High-
Rise Residential Buildings (LHRRBs):
Low- and high-rise buildings are dened as in Part 3 (Group C) of the Nation-
al Building Code, but specically exclude Part 9 (Group C) buildings (typically
single-family dwellings, duplexes or row-housing). For mixed-use buildings, the
residential portion of the building falling under Part 3 of the Code will utilize the
MURB Application Guide, while the commercial portion will be subject to the
existing LEED Canada for New Construction & Major Renovations version 1.0
(LEED Canada-NC 1.0) Intents, Requirements and Submittals.
The CaGBC wishes to recognize and encourage mixed-use buildings since they
offer a wide range of potential environmental benets. It is recognized that mixed-
use buildings attempting LEED certication may require additional effort, which is
often complicated by the commercial components that may be developed as base
shell space (core and shell space).
Mixed-use projects that contain only core and shell commercial elements are re-
quired to address LEED Credits based on the base-building systems installed within
the scope of the original construction contract. Lease commitments can be included
in demonstrating LEED Credit compliance provided that prospective tenants are re-
quired to meet such requirements in their lease or purchase contracts. Project teams
are encouraged to gain guidance from the CaGBCs LEED Canada-NC 1.0 and
USGBC LEED Core and Shell LEED Rating Systems in achieving specic Credits.
If a core and shell commercial component is unable to earn a specic LEED Credit
because the work necessary to achieve such Credit falls outside of the scope of the
project, some specic LEED Credits can be earned for the entire project if the resi-
dential portion of the building meets the Requirements of the specic Credit. This
applies only to Credits WEc2, WEc3, EQc1, EQc2, EQc5, EQc6.2 and EQc7.2.
Residential Occupancy
The following occupancy densities should be used for residential dwelling units:
1 bedroom/bachelor = 1 occupant
2 bedrooms = 2 occupants
3 bedrooms = 3 occupants
It is recognized that occupancy may vary considerably depending on the location
of the project, the type (for example, affordable housing or premium projects) and
the type of occupancy (owners/renters). A standardized occupancy methodology
provides consistency in documenting specic LEED Credit compliance between
projects.
Application Guide for Multi-Unit Residential Buildings
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Alternative occupancy methodology will be accepted if a strong case is made to
justify a different calculation, with appropriate documentation and justication.
Regularly Occupied Areas
Zones or spaces normally occupied during typical building operating hours.
Examples of regularly and non-regularly occupied spaces include:
Regularly occupied areas:
kitchen
dining room
living room
bedrooms
ofce/den/studio
building tness room
Non-regularly occupied areas:
bathroom
hallways
laundry
mechanical
closets/storage rooms
entry ways/lobbies
elevator
Outside Air
Air taken from the external atmosphere and, therefore, not previously circulated
through the ventilation system.
Ventilation Air
That portion of supply air that is outdoor air plus any re-circulated air that has been
treated for the purpose of maintaining acceptable indoor air quality.
Specic LEED Credit Requirements
The basic Intents, Requirements and Submittals of Credits and Prerequisites in
LEED Canada-NC 1.0 are unchanged in this MURB Application Guide. This
MURB Application Guide is meant to supplement and be read in conjunction with
the LEED Canada-NC 1.0 Rating System and Reference Guide.
The following sections clarify existing LEED Canada-NC Requirements and Sub-
mittals, and often offer alternate Requirement and Submittal compliance paths
deemed to demonstrate MURB compliance for a particular LEED Canada Credit
or Prerequisite. Only those Prerequisites and Credits that require clarication, or
alternate Requirements that will meet that Credits Intent, are addressed in this Ap-
plication Guide.
Canada Green Building Council
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Table of Contents
Sustainable Sites
Credit 2 Development Density 9
Credit 4.2 Alternative Transportation:
Bicycle Storage and Changing Rooms 10
Credit 4.3 Alternative Transportation:
Hybrid and Alternative Fuel Vehicles 11
Credit 4.4 Alternative Transportation:
Parking Capacity 13
Water Efciency
Credit 2 Innovative Wastewater Technologies 15

Energy & Atmosphere
Prerequisite 2 Minimum Energy Performance 16
Credit 5 Measurement and Verication 18
Indoor Environmental Quality
Prerequisite 2 Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS) Control 19
Credit 1 Carbon Dioxide (CO
2
) Monitoring 21
Credit 2 Ventilation Effectiveness 22
Credit 3.2 Construction IAQ Management Plan:
Testing Before Occupancy 23
Credit 5 Indoor Chemical & Pollutant Source Control 25
Credit 6.1 Controllability of Systems: Perimeter Spaces 27
Credit 6.2 Controllability of Systems: Non-Perimeter 28
Credit 7.2 Thermal Comfort: Monitoring 29
Application Guide for Multi-Unit Residential Buildings
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Development Density
Intent
Channel development to urban areas with existing infrastructure, protect greenelds
and preserve habitat and natural resources.
Requirements
Alternate Compliance Path for Multi-Unit Residential Buildings Only:
Where a project meets the 13,800m
2
per hectare Requirement (60,000 square feet
per acre) but the surrounding site does not, then 6 of the 12 amenities listed below
must be located either in the project or within 800 metres (1/2 mile) of the project:
a. Community Centre and/or Youth Activity Centre
b. General Ofce
c. Supermarket
d. School
e. Restaurant
f. Post Ofce
g. Pharmacy
h. Park/Recreational Facility
i. Senior Care
j. Medical/Dental
k. Lawyer
l. Caf/Bakery
Submittals
Provide the LEED Letter Template, signed by the civil engineer, architect or
other responsible party, declaring that the project has the required number of
amenities in or within 800 metres of the project;
AND
Provide an area plan with the project location highlighted, indicating the type
and locations of all relevant amenities listed above. Include a scale bar for
distance.
Summary of Referenced Standard
There is no standard referenced for this Credit.
Interpretation
With respect to amenities, they must already exist or be under construction to satisfy
the above Requirements. Amenities planned in the area are not to be included.
Sustainable Sites
1 Point
Credit 2
WE EA MR EQ ID SS
Canada Green Building Council
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Credit 4.2
1 Point Alternative Transportation:
Bicycle Storage & Changing Rooms
Intent
Reduce pollution and land development impacts from automobile use.
Requirements
No change to Requirements.
Strategies
There is no Requirement for where bicycle storage may be located in a residential
or mixed-use building. Unfortunately, many buildings locate bike storage facilities
in the underground parking, making getting bikes to the surface a challenge.
This Application Guide encourages MURB projects to locate bike storage facilities
at or close to grade and near entrances/exits to the building, with easy passage be-
tween the storage and entry/exit, so as to easily accommodate bike movement and
encourage bike use.

WE EA MR EQ ID SS
Application Guide for Multi-Unit Residential Buildings
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Credit 4.3
WE EA MR EQ ID SS
Alternative Transportation:
Hybrid and Alternative Fuel Vehicles
Intent
Reduce pollution and land development impacts from automobile use.
Requirements
Alternate Compliance Path for Multi-Unit Residential Buildings Only:
Hybrid, alternative fuel and/or highly fuel-efcient vehicles will be accessible to at
least 3% of building occupants through a car share or car co-op facility. The facility
must be located within 800m of the project site (either on- or off-site).
Submittals
Provide the LEED Letter Template with a drawing indicating the project
site, the car share/car co-op parking location and a scale bar for distance.
Provide a copy of the contract with the car share/car co-op indicating that
their infrastructure will be actively marketed to project residents for at least
two years after occupancy and that they have acquired the required number
of hybrid, alternative fuel and/or highly fuel-efcient vehicles to service the
project;
OR,
Provide a copy of the buildings car share/car co-op management program
and proof of vehicle ownership of, or minimum 2 year lease agreement(s) for
the hybrid, alternative fuel and/or highly fuel-efcient vehicle(s). Provide
calculations indicating that at least 3% of building occupants will be serviced
by the car share/car co-op facility.
Calculation
1. Identify the number of occupants in the building. Multiply the number
of occupants by 3% to obtain the number of people to be served by the car
sharing program (PPCSP).
2. Divide PPCSP by 20 (the number of estimated shared cars required to
meet the demand) to obtain the number of shared vehicles required to
service 3% of the buildings occupants.
3. Round decimal amounts up to the nearest whole number.
Interpretation
In mixed-use projects the commercial component can also use the above
Requirements and Submittals to demonstrate compliance for residential portions of
the project. Non-residential portions of mixed-use developments should follow
1 Point
Canada Green Building Council
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Credit 4.3
WE EA MR EQ ID SS
Alternative Transportation:
Hybrid and Alternative Fuel Vehicles (continued)
the procedures noted in the Reference Guide to estimate full-time equivalent (FTE)
occupant load for non-residential areas.
Electrical refueling stations that service Neighbourhood Electric Vehicles (NEVs,
also known as Low Speed Vehicles or LSVs) meet the Intent of this Credit.

NEVs are dened as follows:
Any four wheeled electric vehicle with an attainable speed of more than
32 km/h (20 mph) and not more than 40 km/h (25 mph).
NEVs/LSVs should not be confused with golf carts, which commonly have a lower
maximum speed, or all terrain vehicles that are primarily intended for off-road
use.
Highly fuel-efcient vehicles are dened as:
Any fossil fuel powered four wheeled vehicle that meets or exceeds 25
km/liter (60 mpg).
Application Guide for Multi-Unit Residential Buildings
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Credit 4.4
1 Point Alternative Transportation: Parking Capacity
Intent
Reduce pollution and land development impacts from single occupancy vehicle
use.
Requirements
Alternate Compliance Path for Multi-Unit Residential Buildings Only:
For residential projects, size parking capacity to meet, but not exceed, minimum
local zoning requirements;
AND EITHER
Participate in an existing car sharing or car co-op program that can accommodate at
least 5% of the building occupants, with parking for these vehicles located within 800
metres (1/2 mile) of the project (can be either on- or off-site) OR provide vehicles
with dedicated parking on-site for car co-operatives or car sharing programs that
can accommodate at least 5% of the building occupants;
OR
For residential projects, provide 20% less parking than required by the standard
local zoning by-law requirements for residential projects in the general area of the
development.
Submittals
For residential projects provide:
- The LEED Letter Template, signed by the civil engineer or other
responsible party, stating any relevant minimum zoning requirements
and declaring that parking capacity is designed to meet, but not exceed
them.
In the event of an audit of this Credit, provide a description of the car co-op
or car sharing strategy, a copy of a car share or co-op contract, AND provide a
highlighted area plan that shows the project at the centre of a circle of 800 metres
(1/2 mile) radius, and car sharing or car co-op parking sites within this radius that
can accommodate at least 5% of the building occupants OR provide vehicles with
preferred parking on-site for car co-ops or car sharing that service at least 5% of
the total building occupants. Show calculations indicating target percentages have
been met.
OR
For residential projects provide:
- The LEED Letter Template, signed by the civil engineer or other
responsible party, stating any relevant minimum zoning requirements in
WE EA MR EQ ID SS
Canada Green Building Council
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Credit 4.4
WE EA MR EQ ID SS
Alternative Transportation: Parking Capacity
(continued)
the general surrounding area and declaring that parking capacity is designed
to be at least 20% less than this requirement.

Calculation
The following is the calculation methodology to be used in determining the amount
of vehicles required for a car share program whether provided on-site or through
participation in a car share program.
1. Identify the number of occupants in the building. Multiply the number
of occupants by 5% and divide by two to obtain the number of people to
be served by the car sharing program (CSP).
2. Divide CSP by 20 (the number of estimated car share cars required to
meet the demand) to obtain the number of car share vehicles required to
service 3% of the buildings occupants.
3. Round decimal amounts up to the nearest whole number to obtain the
number of vehicles and parking required.
Interpretation
In mixed-use projects the commercial component can also use the above Require-
ments and Submittals to demonstrate compliance for residential portions of the
project. Non-residential portions of mixed-use developments should follow the
procedure noted in the Reference Guide to estimate full-time equivalent (FTE) oc-
cupant load for non-residential areas.
In achieving the 20% less requirement it is understood that some projects may be
able to convince local zoning authorities to reduce the parking zoning bylaw re-
quirements for a particular site as compared to nearby surrounding sites. As such,
those projects that can demonstrate a 20% reduction to statutory parking require-
ments as compared to these surrounding areas can earn this Credit.
Application Guide for Multi-Unit Residential Buildings
15
1 Point Innovative Wastewater Technologies
Intent
Reduce generation of wastewater and potable water demand while increasing the
local aquifer recharge.
Requirements
For Multi-Unit Residential Buildings only:
Reduce the use of municipally provided potable water for building sewage
conveyance by a minimum of 40%.
Submittals
Provide the LEED Letter Template, signed by the architect, mechanical
or plumbing engineer or other responsible party, declaring that water for
building sewage conveyance will be reduced by at least 40% for residential
projects. Include the spreadsheet calculation and a narrative demonstrating
the measures used to reduce wastewater by at least 40% for residential
projects from baseline conditions.
Calculation
In calculating residential wastewater reductions there will likely be no urinals in
the baseline or design case as these xtures are typically not provided in residential
building design. Therefore, assume building occupants are 50% male and 50%
female with usage of toilets once a day for solids and twice a day for urine for both
male and female.
The calculations should be based on a 365 day period for both the design and
baseline case.

Credit 2
EA MR EQ ID WE SS
Water Efciency
Canada Green Building Council
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Required
WE MR EQ ID EA
Prerequisite 2
SS
Energy & Atmosphere
Minimum Energy Performance
Intent
Establish the minimum level of energy efciency for the base building and
systems.
Requirements
Option 3 - Low- and High-rise Multi-unit Residential Buildings:
EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31, 2006:
The project must be registered under LEED Canada on or before December 31st,
2006, AND a building permit must be issued within 12 months of December 31st,
2006 in order to be eligible for this option;
EFFECTIVE JANUARY 1, 2007:
Starting January 1st, 2007, the existing LEED Canada-NC 1.0 Requirements for
new and existing buildings as described in Options 1 and 2 will come into effect
for low- and high-rise residential buildings. Option 3 for low- and high-rise multi-
unit residential projects will no longer be available.
Design the building to comply with ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-1999
(without amendments) or 10% better than the Model National Energy Code for
Buildings - 1997 (MNECB), based on energy consumption or the local energy
code, whichever is more stringent. A modeling path (not the prescriptive
path) must be used to demonstrate compliance. To establish savings relative
to the MNECB, the calculation of percentage energy reduction shall be in
accordance with the procedures used in CBIP (i.e. includes non-regulated
plug loads but excludes process equipment);
AND
Computer modeling should follow the procedures in Part 8 of the MNECB
1997 for projects using MNECB compliance, and the procedures described
in ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1-1999 for projects using ASHRAE compliance. All
projects shall follow the modeling guidelines in the most recent version of
Natural Resources Canada Procedures for Modeling Buildings to CBIP and
MNECB.
Submittals
Provide a LEED Letter Template, signed by a licensed professional engineer
or architect, stating that the building complies with the appropriate energy
performance level (dened above);.
AND
Application Guide for Multi-Unit Residential Buildings
17
Required
WE MR EQ ID EA
Prerequisite 2
SS
Minimum Energy Performance
(continued)
For CBIP Projects reviewed and approved by Natural Resources Canada:
Provide a copy of the letter from Natural Resources Canada indicating
that the building qualies for the CBIP program and passes LEED EAp2
requirements.
For CBIP Projects not reviewed by NRCan or ineligible CBIP Projects:
Provide a review report by an independent CBIP Design Assessor indicating
that the design meets the Requirements of this Prerequisite;
OR
Provide an electronic copy of the computer simulation les, checklist of
mandatory items met and documentation supporting the claimed energy
savings, including architectural, mechanical and electrical drawings and
specications in electronic form.
For ASHRAE 90.1 Projects:
Provide an electronic copy of the Energy Cost Budget and nal Proposed
Design computer simulation les, checklist of mandatory items met
and documentation supporting the claimed energy savings, including
architectural, mechanical and electrical drawings and specications in
electronic form.
Canada Green Building Council
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1 Point
WE MR EQ ID EA
Credit 5
SS
Measurement and Verication
Intent
Provide for the ongoing accountability and optimization of building energy and
water consumption performance over time.
Requirements
For Multi-Unit Residential Buildings only:
Measurement and verication will rely on building level information. Continuous
metering equipment should be installed to measure and verify the following:
Total annual building energy consumption (including all energy sources for
both common and private/suite spaces)
Annual energy consumed (by source) including:
- Natural Gas
- Fuel Oil
- Electricity
Common energy consuming equipment including:
- Central boiler
- Chiller/air conditioning
- Make-up air unit
- Total common area electricity including lighting, elevators, etc.
- Signicant base-building process loads such as indoor swimming pool
and hot tubs (if included)
Annual whole building water consumption.
Submittals
Provide the LEED Letter Template, signed by the licensed engineer or other
responsible party, indicating that metering equipment has been installed and
the measurement and verication option to be followed under IPMVP version
2001.
In the event of an audit of this Credit, provide a copy of the M&V plan following
IPMVP, version 2001, including an executive summary.
Interpretations
The sources of this information should be on-site meters and utility data, recogniz-
ing that suite level information will not be available for privately owned or rental
dwelling units with separate utility billing. As such, M&V information on common
areas is sufcient.
The analysis of this information should be done annually and include energy con-
sumption, normalized energy consumption by square metres of conditioned oor
area and degree-days, water consumption and normalized water consumption by
square metres of conditioned oor area.
Application Guide for Multi-Unit Residential Buildings
19
Required
WE MR EQ ID EA
Prerequisite 2
SS
Indoor Environmental Quality
Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS) Control
Intent
Prevent or minimize exposure of building occupants, indoor surfaces and systems
to Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS).
Requirements
Choose one of the following compliance options for residential buildings:
Option 2 - Establish negative pressure in the rooms with smoking.
Prohibit smoking in the building except in designated smoking areas.
Locate any exterior designated smoking areas at least 7.5 metres (25 feet)
away from entries, outdoor air intakes and operable windows.
Provide one or more designated smoking rooms (including individual
residential suites) designed to effectively contain, capture and remove ETS
from the building. At a minimum, the smoking room/suite must be directly
exhausted to the outdoors with no re-circulation of ETS-containing air to the
non-smoking area of the building, enclosed with impermeable deck-to-deck
partitions; and operated at a negative pressure compared with the surrounding
spaces of at least 5 Pa (0.02 inches of water gauge) with a minimum of 1Pa
(0.004 inches of water) when the door(s) to the smoking room/suite are
closed.
Performance of the smoking room/suite differential air pressures shall be
veried by conducting 15 minutes of measurement, with a minimum of one
measurement every 10 seconds, of the differential pressure in the smoking
room/suite with respect to each adjacent area and in each adjacent vertical
chase with the doors to the smoking room/suite closed. The testing will be
conducted with each space congured for worst case conditions of transport
of air from the smoking rooms/suites to adjacent spaces.
Option 3 - Reduce air leakage between rooms with smoking and non-smoking areas
in residential buildings.
Prohibit smoking in all common areas of the building.
Locate any exterior designated smoking areas at least 7.5 metres (25 feet)
away from entries, outdoor air intakes and operable windows opening to
common areas.
Minimize uncontrolled pathways for ETS transfer between individual
residential units by sealing penetrations in walls, ceilings and oors in the
residential units, and by sealing vertical chases adjacent to the units. In
addition, all doors in the residential units leading to common hallways shall be
weather-stripped to minimize air leakage into the hallway. Acceptable sealing
of residential units shall be demonstrated by blower door tests conducted
in accordance with ANSI/ASTM-779-99 using the progressive sampling
Canada Green Building Council
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Required
Prerequisite 2
WE EA MR ID EQ SS
methodology dened in Chapter 7 (Home Energy Rating Systems (HERS)
Required Verication and Diagnostic Testing) of the California Low-rise
Residential Alternative Calculation Method Approval Manual. Residential
units must demonstrate less than 0.875cm of leakage per square metre of
enclosure area (1.25 square inches leakage area per 100 square feet).
Submittals
For Option 1, provide the LEED Letter Template, signed by the building
owner or other responsible party, declaring that the building will be operated
under a policy prohibiting smoking except in designated areas.
OR,
For Options 2 and 3, provide the LEED Letter Template, signed by the
responsible design professional, declaring and demonstrating that the design
criteria described in the Credit Requirements have been met and performance
has been veried using the method described in the Credit Requirements.
In the event of an audit of this Prerequisite, Submittals should include:
Drawings and a narrative describing how partition openings are sealed, and
how the independent ventilation systems are designed for designated smoking
rooms.
For Option 2, test records of differential pressure performance for designated
smoking rooms including records of differential pressures between each
adjacent space or vertical chase.
For Option 3, records of blower door tests conducted in accordance with the
referenced standards for at least 10% of the rst 100 dwelling units in the
building and 5% of any additional units. (For example, a 150 unit building
would be required to test a total of 10+2.5=13 dwelling units.) Distribution
of the tested units should reect wind and buoyancy conditions experienced
by the building, i.e. on different faces and elevations in the building; test
records should include the normalized leakage area calculated and test
reference pressure for each dwelling unit tested, as well as indoor and outdoor
temperatures and wind speeds during the tests. For high-rise buildings
constructed during cold outdoor temperatures, summarize measures used to
ensure accurate blower door test results.
Application Guide for Multi-Unit Residential Buildings
21
Carbon Dioxide (CO
2
) Monitoring
Intent
Provide capacity for indoor air quality (IAQ) monitoring to help sustain long-term
occupant comfort and well-being.
Requirements
For Multi-Unit Residential Buildings only:
Carbon monoxide (CO) alarms installed in suite and common spaces near combustion
equipment;
AND
IAQ testing of all suites at the end of construction and immediately prior to
occupancy to develop a baseline indoor air quality prole. The indoor air quality
prole will be conducted for a representative sample of suites using the progressive
sampling methodology dened below. Sampling will be performed by either a
certied industrial hygienist or a licensed engineer and meet the following criteria:
< 5 mg/m3 of formaldehyde (State of Washington Program and IAQ
Standards)
< 5 mg/m3 of total volatile organics (State of Washington Program and
IAQ Standards)
< outside air level + 700 ppm of carbon dioxide (ASHRAE 62-2001)
< 9 ppm of carbon monoxide (NAAQS 8hr)
< 5 mg/m3 of airborne particulates (OSHA PEL)
Submittals
For low- and high-rise residential projects, provide the LEED Letter Template,
signed by the mechanical engineer, certied industrial hygienist or other
responsible party, declaring and summarizing the installation, and the CO
alarm system in appropriate areas. Provide baseline testing results indicating
pollutant limits were met.
In the event of an audit of this Credit, Submittals should include:
Tests conducted in accordance with the referenced standards for at least
10% of the rst 100 dwelling units in the building and 5% of any additional
units. (For example, a 150 unit building would be required to test a total of
10+2.5=13 dwelling units.) Distribution of the tested units should reect
wind and buoyancy conditions experienced by the building, i.e. on different
faces and elevations in the building and oors.
1 Point
Credit 1
WE EA MR ID EQ SS
Canada Green Building Council
22
1 Point Ventilation Effectiveness
Intent
Provide for the effective delivery and mixing of supply air to support the safety,
comfort and well-being of building occupants.
Requirements
Alternate Compliance Path for Multi-Unit Residential Buildings Only:
For mechanically ventilated low- and high-rise residential buildings, design
ventilation systems to provide outside air through a central or individual system,
ducted directly to the suite with air distributed to all regularly occupied areas in the
suite.
Submittals
For mechanically ventilated low- and high-rise residential projects, provide
the LEED Letter Template, signed by the mechanical engineer or other
responsible party, declaring that outside air provided is ducted directly to the
suite, with air distributed to all regularly occupied areas in each suite. Include
a narrative describing the ventilation system(s) and air delivery within the
suites.
Provide a report summarizing airow (CFD or nodal airow) simulation results
for each regularly-occupied zone type in both heating and cooling modes.
The report should include a brief narrative describing system operational
modes, graphics showing zone and building airow patterns with local winds
in each cardinal and prevailing direction, and identify the computational uid
dynamics or network airow modeling program used.
Potential Strategies
This proposed alternate compliance path for MURBs encourages the direct ducting
of outside air into each suite through a central or individual system. This Credit
further requires the movement of this outside air through to all regularly occupied
areas of the suite. Central and individual HRVs are a technology that can jointly
meet this Credit as well as earn energy efciency points under EAc1. Many low-
and high-rise residential projects do not give due attention to ventilation issues and
this Credit will encourage more developers to improve ventilation performance.
WE EA MR ID EQ
Credit 2
SS
Application Guide for Multi-Unit Residential Buildings
23
1 Point
WE EA MR ID EQ
Credit 3.2
SS
Contruction IAQ Management Plan:
Testing Before Occupancy
Intent
Minimize indoor air quality problems resulting from the construction/renovation
process in order to help sustain the comfort and well-being of construction workers
and building occupants.
Requirements
Alternate Compliance Path for Multi-Unit Residential Buildings Only:
Develop and implement an Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) Management Plan for the
pre-occupancy phase that follows one of the two options below:
Conduct baseline IAQ testing, after construction ends and prior to occupancy,
using testing protocols consistent with the United States Environmental
Protection Agency Compendium of Methods for the Determination of Air
Pollutants in Indoor Air, and as additionally detailed in the LEED Canada-
NC Reference Guide;
OR,
Demonstrate that the contaminants listed below are not exceeded; remediate
causes and repeat procedure until all requirements have been met.
Contaminant Maximum Concentration
Particulate Matter (PM10) 50 ug/m
3
Formaldehyde 50 parts per billion
Total Volatile Organic Compounds 500 ug/m
3
Carbon Monoxide 9 PPM and no greater than 2 PPM above outdoors
4-Phenycyclohexene (4-PC) * 6.5 ug/m
3
* Required only if carpets with Styrene Butadiene (SB) latex backing material are installed.
Submittals
Provide a copy of the IAQ testing results indicating that the air quality testing
has been completed and maximum chemical contaminant concentration
requirements are not exceeded in the areas tested.
Calculations
The tests should be done for at least 10% of the rst 100 dwelling units in the
building and 5% of any additional units. (For example, a 150 unit building
would be required to test a total of 10+2.5=13 dwelling units.) Distribution
of the tested units should attempt to be a relative selection of different units
with different elevations in the building and on different oors.
Canada Green Building Council
24
1 Point
WE EA MR ID EQ
Credit 3.2
SS
Contruction IAQ Management Plan:
Testing Before Occupancy (continued)
Interpretations
The Option 1 and Option 2 compliance paths for building ush procedures of
LEED Canada-NC 1.0 are also acceptable compliance paths.
Application Guide for Multi-Unit Residential Buildings
25
1 Point
Credit 5
WE EA MR ID EQ SS
Indoor Chemical & Pollutant Source Control
Intent
Minimize exposure of building occupants to potentially hazardous particulates,
biological contaminants and chemical pollutants that adversely impact air and water
quality.
Requirements
Alternate Compliance Path for Multi-Unit Residential Buildings Only:
Design to minimize pollutant cross-contamination of regularly occupied areas:
Employ permanent entryway systems (grilles, grates, etc.) to capture dirt,
particulates, etc. from entering the building at all high volume entryways.
Where hazardous gases or chemicals may be present or used (including
garages, high-volume housekeeping/laundry areas and copying/printing
rooms), provide segregated areas with deck-to-deck partitions with separate
outside exhaust at a rate of at least 9.2 cubic metres per hour per square
metre (0.50 cubic feet per minute per square foot), no air re-circulation, and
operated at a negative pressure compared with the surrounding spaces of at
least an average of 5 Pa (0.02 inches of water gauge) and with a minimum of
1 Pa (0.004 inches of water) when the door(s) to the room(s) are closed.
Provide containment drains plumbed for appropriate disposal of hazardous
liquid wastes in places where water and chemical concentrate mixing occurs
for maintenance or laboratory purposes.
Replace all ltration media immediately prior to occupancy. Filtration
media shall have a Minimum Efciency Reporting Value (MERV) of 13,
as determined by ASHRAE 52.2-1999 for media installed at the end of
construction.
Submittals
Provide the LEED Letter Template, signed by the architect or other responsible
party, declaring that:
Permanent entryway systems (grilles, grates, etc.) to capture dirt,
particulates, etc. are provided at all high volume entryways.
Chemical-use areas and copy rooms have been physically separated with
deck-to-deck partitions and self-closing doors, and independent exhaust
ventilation has been installed that meets Credit Requirements.
In spaces where water and chemical concentrate mixing occurs, drains
are plumbed for environmentally appropriate disposal of liquid waste as
determined by applicable regulations and standards.
Canada Green Building Council
26
1 Point
WE EA MR ID EQ
Credit 5
SS
Indoor Chemical & Pollutant Source Control
(continued)
Interpretations
For low- and high-rise residential projects using 100% fresh air systems with
no re-circulated air, the MERV 13 ltration requirement is not required for
systems serving dwelling units only.
Selection of HVAC equipment serving a single dwelling unit, including heat
recovery ventilators, should specify that the best available ltration media
shall be provided for the initial installation.
For mixed-use buildings, where the residential component is the primary
use in the building, and mechanical equipment in commercial building
spaces each supply less than 283L/s (600 CFM) of recirculated air, HVAC
equipment serving such commercial spaces do not need to meet the MERV 13
requirement .However, the best available ltration media shall be provided
with the initial installation of HVAC equipment.
Strategies
The practice of ducting air directly to suites, using central or individual ventilation
systems that encourage heat recovery, is encouraged in residential design rather
than corridor pressurization. Individual heat recovery systems to residential units
brings fresh air directly to suites, exhausts that air and recovers heat as it leaves
the building. Utilizing these strategies, outdoor air is not recirculated within the
building and the MERV 13 is not required.
Application Guide for Multi-Unit Residential Buildings
27
1 Point
Credit 6.1
WE EA MR ID EQ SS
Controllability of Systems: Perimeter Spaces
Intent
Provide a high level of thermal, ventilation and lighting system control by individual
occupants or specic groups in multi-occupant spaces (i.e. classrooms or conference
areas) to promote the productivity, comfort and well-being of building occupants.
Requirements
Alternate Compliance Path for Multi-Unit Residential Buildings Only:
Provide at least an average of one operable window and one lighting control zone
per 18.5m
2
(200 ft
2
) for all regularly occupied areas within 5 metres (15 feet) of the
perimeter wall.
Submittals
Provide the LEED Letter Template, signed by the architect or other responsible
party, demonstrating and declaring that for regularly occupied perimeter areas
of the building, a minimum of one operable window and one lighting control
zone are provided per 18.5m
2
(200 ft
2
) on average.
Interpretations
For low- and high-rise residential projects, sliding glass and other doors leading to
exterior balconies should also be included as an operable window for this Credit
as they serve the same function as a window in terms of ventilation control.
Canada Green Building Council
28
1 Point
WE EA MR ID EQ
Credit 6.2
SS
Controllability of Systems: Non-Perimeter Spaces
Intent
Provide a high level of thermal, ventilation and lighting system control by individual
occupants or specic groups in multi-occupant spaces (i.e. classrooms or conference
areas) to promote the productivity, comfort and well-being of building occupants.
Requirements
Alternate Compliance Path for Multi-Unit Residential Buildings Only:
Provide at least one control for airow and lighting for each regularly occupied
non-perimeter area. If there are no regularly occupied non-perimeter spaces, the
project meets the Intent of this Credit and earns this point, providing that EQc6.1
is met.
Submittals
For low- and high-rise residential projects, provide the LEED Letter Template,
signed by the architect or other responsible party, demonstrating and declaring
that at least one control for individual airow and lighting are provided for each
regularly occupied non-perimeter area.
Application Guide for Multi-Unit Residential Buildings
29
Thermal Comfort: Monitoring
Intent
Provide a thermally comfortable environment that supports the productivity and
well-being of building occupants.
Requirements
Alternate Compliance Path for Multi-Unit Residential Buildings Only:
Provide a permanent monitoring system to ensure building performance to the desired
comfort criteria as determined by EQ Credit 7.1, Thermal Comfort - Compliance.
Submittals
Provide the LEED Letter Template, signed by the engineer or other responsible
party, identifying the comfort criteria, strategy for ensuring performance
to the comfort criteria, description of the permanent monitoring system
implemented and process for corrective action as may be appropriate;
AND EITHER
Conrm that the temperature, airow and humidity controls (if applicable)
were (or will be) tested as part of the scope of work for Energy and Atmosphere
Prerequisite 1, Fundamental Building Systems Commissioning. Include
the document name and section number where the commissioning work is
listed;
OR
Where humidity control is not provided, provide the LEED Letter Template,
signed by the engineer or responsible party, declaring that humidication/
dehumidication equipment is neither required nor installed.
Interpretation
Where Humidity control is required, it can be addressed by providing humidistats
in bathroom and kitchen spaces to remove excess humidity. Each residential unit
will then be able to control their comfort through removing excess humidity with
the humidistat, with temperature controlled as per Credit Requirements. With
increasingly tight residential building envelopes, and with residential uses, adding
humidity is not recommended as an appropriate strategy. Excess humidity exhausting
strategies are the norm and are encouraged to improve thermal comfort.
1 Point
in addition to
EQ 7.1
Credit 7.2
WE EA MR ID EQ SS

J uly 2007 Errata to Application Guide for Multi-Unit Residential Buildings
1
LEED
Changes and Errata for LEED Canada-NC 1.0
Application Guide for Multi-Unit Residential Buildings
Date: July 2007

Credit Page Change / Erratum
Introduction 7 Add to end of first paragraph under Specific LEED Credit
Requirements:
Where reference standards are referred to in this MURB Application
Guide, readers should consult the current version of the LEED
Canada-NC Rating System and its addendums for updated references
to ensure consistency.
SSc2 9 Remove MURB application pathway for SSc2 (Development
Density). Alternative pathway is now incorporated into the LEED
Canada for NC - Rating System Addendum 1.0, dated March 2007.
SSc4.3 11 Under Requirements, replace:
Hybrid, alternative fuel and/or highly fuel-efficient vehicles will be
accessible
With:
Hybrid, alternative fuel and/or low consumption vehicles will be
accessible
SSc4.3 11 Under Submittals, replace:
the required number of hybrid, alternative fuel and/or highly fuel-
efficient vehicles to service the project
With:
the required number of hybrid, alternative fuel and/or low
consumption vehicles to service the project
SSc4.3 11 Under Submittals, replace:
minimum 2 year lease agreement(s) for the hybrid, alternative fuel
and/or highly fuel-efficient vehicle(s).
With:
minimum 2 year lease agreement(s) for the hybrid, alternative fuel
and/or low consumption vehicle(s).
SSc4.3 12 Replace:
Highly fuel-efficient vehicles are defined as 25 km/liter (60 mpg).
With:
Hybrid Vehicles
High efficiency hybrids in LEED Canada-NC are defined as those that
meet the classification of Full Hybrid classification in Table 1 under
credit Sustainable Sites credit 4.3 of the LEED Canada-NC Reference
Guide, and which have Energuides fuel consumption of 5 L/100 km
(average of City and Highway rating).
Low Consumption Vehicle
Low consumption vehicles in LEED Canada-NC 1.0 are defined as
those which have Energuides fuel consumption of 5 L/100 km
(average of City and Highway rating) or less. In addition for diesel,
emissions of 120 g/km of CO
2
or less and meet at least Euro 4 level of
particulates at 0.025 g/km.

Canada Green Building Council
2
LEED



Credit Page Change / Erratum
EQc1 21 Under Requirements, replace:
Carbon monoxide (CO) alarms installed in suite and common spaces
near combustion equipment.
With:
Carbon monoxide (CO) alarms are required in suites and common
spaces that are adjacent to or contain combustion equipment. If there
is no combustion equipment in or near suites or common spaces, no
CO alarm is required.
EQc1 21 Under Requirements, replace IAQ testing of all suites with IAQ
testing of sampled suites
EQc1 21 Under Requirements replace:
<5 mg/m
3
of formaldehyde (State of Washington Program
and IAQ Standards)
<5 mg/m
3
of total volatile organics (State of Washington
Program and IAQ Standards)
<outside air level +700 ppm of carbon dioxide (ASHRAE
62-2001)
<9 ppm of carbon monoxide (NAAQS 8hr)
<5 mg/m
3
of airborne particulates (OSHA PEL)
With:
Contaminant Maximum Concentration
Particulate Matter (PM10) 50 ug/m
3

Formaldehyde 50 parts per billion
Total Volatile Organic
Compounds (TVOC)
500 ug/m
3

Carbon Monoxide 9 PPM and no greater than 2
PPM above outdoors
4-Phenycyclohexene (4-PC) * 6.5 ug/m
3

* Required only if carpets with Styrene Butadiene (SB) latex backing
material are installed.
EQc2 22 Under Submittals, delete Provide a report summarizing airflow
modeling program used.

J uly 2007 Errata to Application Guide for Multi-Unit Residential Buildings
3
LEED
Credit Page Change / Erratum
EQc3.2 23 Under Requirements, replace:
Develop and implement an Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) Management
Plan for the pre-occupancy phase that follows one of the two options
below:
Conduct baseline IAQ testing, after construction ends and
prior to occupancy, using testing protocols consistent with
the United States Environmental Protection Agency
Compendium of Methods for the Determination of Air
Pollutants in Indoor Air, and as additionally detailed in the
LEED Canada NC Reference Guide;
OR
Demonstrate that the contaminants listed below are not
exceeded; remediate causes and repeat procedure until all
requirements have been met.
With:
Develop and implement an Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) Management
Plan for the pre-occupancy phase that includes conducting baseline
IAQ testing, after construction ends and prior to occupancy, using
testing protocols consistent with the United States Environmental
Protection Agency Compendium of Methods for the Determination
of Air Pollutants in Indoor Air, and as additionally detailed in the
LEED Canada NC Reference Guide. Demonstrate that the
contaminants listed below are not exceeded; remediate causes and
repeat procedure until all requirements have been met.
EQc7.2 29 Under Interpretation, replace:
Where Humidity control is required to remove excess humidity.
With:
Humidity control is required in bathrooms and can be addressed by
providing humidistat control or continuous exhaust to remove excess
humidity. For kitchen spaces provide kitchen exhaust (to the outside)
either manually controlled or continuous. As a point of clarification,
humidity control and monitoring is only required if humidity control is
needed in a building under EQ Credit 7.1 Thermal Comfort
Compliance, with the exceptions of kitchens and bathrooms.