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DECEMBER 2013
DECEMBER 2013

DECEMBER 2013

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BaumanRareBooks.com

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Back cover image:

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TAbLe OF cONTeNTS

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Opening Selection

28

Americana

40

Literature

64

History, Science & Exploration

71

Religion

75

Art, Architecture & Music

85

Children’s Literature

91

Gift Suggestions

105

Index

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1. cloth bound in.
1.
cloth bound in.

Very rare first American edition of Lewis Carroll’s brilliant and beloved topsy-turvy fantasy—virtually the earliest obtainable edition, preceding the first published London edition, beautifully bound, with the original cloth bound in.

“The publishing history of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland has a fairy-tale quality all its own. The Clarendon Press, Oxford, printed two thousand copies of what has come to be known as the first edition of the book. On 24 May 1865 Carroll wrote to his publisher… requesting 50 copies to give to friends. On 19 July, however, he heard from John Tenniel, his illustrator, that he was ‘dissatisfied with the printing of the pictures.’ On 2 August Carroll finally decided on the re-print of Alice, and he immediately set about recalling all the copies that he had sent out earlier, promising replacements as soon as the new printing was available. The remainder of the original books were sold to Appleton, the New York publisher, and they would appear, with a new title-page, as the first American edition.” Only about 20 copies with the original London title page exist, making it virtually unobtainable (Cohen, 113-114). This American issue consisted of only 1000 copies. Williams 44. Muir, 139. Faintest text offsetting and a few spots of soiling, binding quite lovely. A beautiful about-fine copy.

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morocco gilt, custom chemises and half morocco slipcase. First editions (first issue of Volume I; first

First editions (first issue of Volume I; first printing of Volume II) of Grimms’ famous fairy tales, including “Snow White,” “Cinderella” and “Sleeping Beauty,” illustrated with two engraved title pages and 20 full-page etchings by George Cruikshank (”perhaps his best work”), with an autograph letter signed by the illustrator, beautifully bound in full morocco-gilt by Bartlett.

As early as 1805, Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm began collecting German popular tales. They published the first and second volumes of Kinder- und Hausmärchen in 1812 and 1814. Its publication brought immediate and worldwide fame to the brothers Grimm and provided the foundation for their influential and groundbreaking studies in German philology and grammar (See PMM 281). The 1823 edition in English of German Popular Stories was the “first anywhere to be fully illustrated” as well as the first to truly target children (Darton, 216). Moreover, the English translation by Edgar Taylor (and his relatives) “revolutionized the conventional English attitude to fairy tales and rehabilitated fantasy as generally acceptable reading-matter for the young… “If you ever happen to meet with the two volumes of Grimm’s German Stories,” John Ruskin once advised, “which were illustrated by Cruikshank long ago, pounce on them instantly; the etchings in them are the finest things, next to Rembrandt’s, that, as far as I know, have been done since etching was invented.” Among other famous Grimm tales, these volumes contain “Rumpel-Stilts-Kin,” “Snow- Drop” (Snow White), “Rose-Bud” (Sleeping Beauty), “Tom Thumb,” “Hansel and Gretel,” “The Golden Goose,” “The Frog-Prince” and “Ashputtel” (Cinderella). First state of the engraved title page of Volume I, without the umlaut in the word Märchen. Cohn 369. Cruikshank’s 1855 autograph letter to journalist and literary scholar Henry Morley, Jr. concerns payment in kind for work. Old dealer description laid in. Occasional light foxing. A desirable landmark in illustrated children’s literature, handsomely bound and in fine condition, with autograph letter signed by Cruikshank.

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3.
3.

First edition of one of Ackermann’s wonderful Picturesque Tours, beautifully illustrated with 24 hand-colored folio aquatints and large folding map. A lovely copy, superbly bound in full morocco-gilt by Bayntun.

In the history of book production “there is no more attractive figure than that of Rudolph Ackermann, through whose extraordinary enterprise and spirit of adventure, aquatint was successfully applied to the illustration of books” (Prideaux, 120- 23). One of Ackermann’s most lucrative projects was his remarkable Picturesque Tours, a series of seven books produced between 1820-28. This is his Tour Along the Rhine, with beautifully hand-colored aquatints by Daniel Havell and Thomas Sutherland after paintings by Christian Georg Schutz, depicting views of Mentz, the Castle of Furstenberg, the Church of Johannes, Pfalz Castle and the town of Kaub, the salmon fishery at Lurley, Coblentz, Bornhofen, Cologne and other sites along the river. The plates were pulled and hand-colored in the Ackermann studio, whose reputation for producing splendid illustrated publications and disseminating fine aquatint prints spanned over two centuries. The folding map shows the course of the Rhine from Mentz to Cologne. With accompanying text by Baron von Gerning describing the history and culture of the area (first published in German in 1819, without illustrations). Abbey, Travel 217. Prideaux, 337. Tooley 234. Plates generally fresh and beautiful. A near-fine copy, beautifully bound by Bayntun.

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$12,000.
$12,000.

Handsome Gothic text edition of the Geneva (or “Breeches”) Bible—the important translation that shaped Protestant piety for some five decades—illustrated with three woodcut title pages, printed by the prolific and prosperous publisher Christopher Barker. A magnificently bound complete copy with a contemporary edition of the venerable Book of Common Prayer.

Upon Queen Mary’s accession in 1553, “publication of the English Bible ceased in England. Many Protestants who fled to the Continent were attracted to Calvin’s Geneva. Among these exiles were eminent English Bible scholars who began work on a new translation” (The Bible: 100 Landmarks 62). First published in 1560, the Geneva Bible—often called the “Breeches Bible” for its unique rendering of Genesis 3:7—was “more scholarly than any previous translation… [It] achieved immediate popularity and exerted an extremely powerful influence… The Geneva Version included prefaces, maps and tables; and for the first time in an English Bible the verses were divided and numbered” (PMM 83). “It became the textus receptus for the Puritan element in England. It was read by Shakespeare, Bunyan and the soldiers of the Civil War, and is thus of cardinal importance for its influence on the English language, literature and thought” (Great Books and Book Collectors). Includes Apocrypha. Bound with concordances and contemporary editions of the Book of Common Prayer and Sternhold and Hopkins’ metrical psalter at rear. Prayer book without title page and first leaf, but collates as Griffiths 1590:2 (STC 16314a.5). Darlow & Moule 154. Occasional old ink marginalia. Leaf [E8] of prayer book rebacked, partly obscuring old owner annotations. Scattered light soiling. A few instances of paper restoration. Stunning restoration-style binding fine.

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n ew a cquisitions e xceptional | D ecember 2013 6 5. custom cloth clamshell box.
5. custom cloth clamshell box.
5.
custom cloth clamshell box.

Signed limited first edition, one of only 100 copies signed by the author. The scarcest of all Faulkner signed limited editions, with the first book appearance of “The Bear.”

Go Down, Moses “was a landmark volume for Faulkner… Here we have the Southern dilemma, and Faulkner has transformed it into the American” (Karl, 665-67). “So committed was Faulkner to the expansive possibilities of the short story form that in Go Down, Moses he created what he always insisted was a novel composed entirely of interrelated stories previously published separately” (Gelfant, 252). One of the most acclaimed stories, “The Bear,” had appeared, in abbreviated form, in the Saturday Evening Post the same year (Brodsky 229); the coming-of-age tale remains one of Faulkner’s most anthologized. A contemporary review in the Boston Globe said of all the stories that they “represent William Faulkner at his best. Which is equivalent to saying the best we have.” Massey 448. Petersen A23.2a. A fine signed copy.

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First edition, the important and preferred second issue, one of only 1000 copies, with the
First edition, the important and preferred second issue, one of only 1000 copies, with the first appearance of the sequel celebrating
Lincoln containing “Lilacs” and “O Captain! My Captain!” The copy of editor William Michael Rossetti, who introduced
English readers to Whitman with his edition of 1868 and was “one of the first to recognize the ‘entire originality’ of Walt
Whitman” (ODNB).
Drum-Taps “stands among the nation’s finest poems” (ANB). Upon the death of Lincoln, Whitman delayed the printing of Drum-
Taps and added “When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom’d,” a “profoundly moving dirge for the martyred Lincoln” (CHAL),
with separate pagination, table of contents, and title page. W.M. Rossetti’s published correspondence includes an 1866 letter from
Horace Scudder (a published author and longtime editor of Atlantic Magazine) which includes this passage: “Have you seen Walt
Whitman’s Drum Taps? It is just possible that you have not; and I will take the opportunity afforded by a friend’s going to London
to
send you a copy… I do not think that Mr. Lincoln’s death brought any nobler expression of the personal grief of the best natures
in
the country than ‘O Captain, My Captain!’ The lonely grief of the poet in the strong contrast which he presents was really that
felt by all.” Rossetti did not reply to Scudder’s letter until October 28, 1866—he thanked Scudder for the book, confessing that he
hadn’t had time to give it a full reading, although he did read “the long one on Lincoln’s funeral, and the one you specially mention
O
Captain My Captain; both most glorious. Whitman is a wonderful genius to me, and no less than a great poet. I am not at all
sure but that one day he will stand out as the greatest English-writing poet of this period.” Rossetti’s edition of Whitman’s Leaves
of Grass from 1868 includes many poems from Drum-Taps, but in a different sequence from Whitman’s and with minor editing
changes. Still, Rossetti’s edition introduced Whitman to British readers—Rossetti and Swinburne were early admirers of Whitman.
English readers had to rely on Rossetti’s edition until Ernest Rhys’ 1886 edition, itself abridged. Myerson A3.1a2. Wells &
Goldsmith, 11. BAL 21398. An important association copy in fine condition.

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c e m b e r 2013 | e xceptional n ew a cquisitions 9 robert

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$15,000.
$15,000.

Autograph manuscript fair copy of Frost’s renowned poem “Come In,” penned in blue ink entirely by Frost, signed by him and inscribed at the foot, “To James Murphy.” Framed with a scarce gelatin silver print portrait of the poet, photographed by Jacobi in 1959 at his Vermont farm, this print signed by Lotte Jacobi in her trademark pencil on the lower corner of the image.

Though they never met, Frost and the recipient of this handwritten poem, aspiring poet and avid collector James P.J. Murphy, corresponded for nearly a quarter of a century. “Murphy was a shy man with a passion for literature and fine printing. He found both in Frost’s books. The poet autographed Murphy’s copies of his works—often after considerable delay—and sent him his special Christmas cards” (Burch, ANQ, 13:2, 35-40). Frost has written out in blue ink the full text of his poem “Come In.”

Beneath the poem Frost has signed his name and then written, “To James Murphy.” “Come In” first appeared in book form in A Witness Tree in 1942, and was clearly esteemed enough by Frost to serve as the title poem to a larger collection of Frost’s poems that was printed in a special Armed Services Edition for U.S. soldiers in 1943. “When I was asked to photograph Robert Frost, up in Vermont at his house, the first thing he told me was ‘Don’t make me look jovial. Everyone thinks I’m a jovial old man, but I’m actually rather crotchety.” So, Jacobi noted, “I took a more serious picture of him” (Schuyler, Lotte Jacobi, 210). This scarce silver gelatin print was printed circa 1970, and comes from the Lotte Jacobi estate. Manuscript with a few faint creases along edges. Print fine; scarce signed. Fine condition.

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The desirable “Philadelphia Edition” of the separate Atlas to accompany Wilson’s important contribution to American ornithology, with 76 splendid hand-colored folio engravings made from original copperplates (plates in other editions from 1828 to 1878 were considerably reduced in size). A beautiful copy.

Influenced by naturalist William Bartram and engraver Alexander Lawson, Alexander Wilson, considered the “father of American ornithology,” cultivated his own interest in nature and in making drawings from nature. By 1805 Wilson real- ized his “great plan of depicting and describing North American birds in a large work,” resulting in American Ornithology, originally published in 1808-15. Wilson’s work was “of fundamental importance for the study of birds in North America,” representing the first significant study of birds in the New World. Wilson covered only the eastern United States, but over the next 100 years, ornithologists were able to add only 23 more indigenous land birds to his list. A decade later, Charles Bonaparte, Napoleon’s nephew and himself an accomplished ornithologist “issued his American Ornithology, or The Natural History of Birds Inhabiting the United States, Not Given by Wilson (1825-33), an in- dependent work designed on the same princi- ples as that by Wilson, and therefore regarded as a kind of sequel to that work, for which reason the two works were issued together in subsequent editions” (Anker, 212). Together these works established the foundation upon which Audubon created his own monumental work soon thereafter. Several combined octavo editions followed, culminating in this final folio edition of 1871, containing a separate Atlas volume of the original 76 folio engrav- ings of Wilson’s paintings, pulled from the original copperplates engraved by Lawson, Murray, Warnicke, and Tanner, and colored by Rider. This edition was printed on much larger paper than earlier editions, and is com- monly called the “Philadelphia Edition.” This is the plate volume only, without the three octavo text volumes. Some atlas volumes are seen with a further 27 plates by Lawson after Peale and Rider to accompany the Bonaparte supplement, for a total of 103 plates; those ad- ditional, supplemental plates, issued separate- ly, are not present in this volume. Nissen 997. See Zimmer, 686; Anker 533 note; Sitwell, 157. Notes from previous owner, dated 1964, and from conservator, dated 1963, laid in. Plates lovely and fine, with vibrant original hand- coloring. Expert cleaning to original tissue guards and the occasional margin of plates. A splendid volume.

original hand- coloring. Expert cleaning to original tissue guards and the occasional margin of plates. A

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c e m b e r 2013 | e xceptional n ew a cquisitions napoleon “Ah!

Revised and expanded illustrated edition in English of Bourrienne’s classic biography of Napoleon, three volumes very handsomely bound by Sangorski & Sutcliffe in full morocco with a Cosway-style miniature portrait of Napoleon inset into the front pastedown of Volume I. From the renowned collection of Carrie Estelle and Edward Laurence Doheny, with their bookplates in each volume.

Of contemporary accounts of Napoleon, “among the best of the French eyewitness observations are the Memoirs of Bourrienne, a schoolmate of Napoleon from their days at military school in the early 1780s. Napoleon then employed Bourrienne as his private secretary beginning in 1797, and Bourrienne accompanied Napoleon on his campaign in Egypt… the Memoirs, first published in 1829 and a popular sensation from the moment of their publication… have stood the test of time” (Tignor, Memoirs of Napoleon, Introduction). Cosway bindings (named for renowned 19th-century English miniaturist Richard Cosway) were first commissioned in the early 1900s by J.H. Stonehouse from the famous Rivière bindery, who employed Miss C.B. Currie to faithfully imitate Cosway’s detailed watercolor style of portraiture. These delicate miniature paintings, often on ivory, were set into the covers or doublures of richly-tooled bindings and protected by thin panes of glass. Cosway bindings executed by other than the original collaborators are designated as “Cosway-style” bindings—still splendid productions—by such esteemed binderies as Bayntun-Rivière, Sangorski & Sutcliffe, Morrell, and Bumpus. With the bookplates of renowned Los Angeles bibliophiles and philanthropists Edward Laurence and Carrie Estelle Doheny. Carrie Estelle Doheny was among the earliest female book collectors in the United States, having purchased her first rare book in 1931. Under the tutelage of Frank Hogan and A.S.W. Rosenbach she continued to buy books and manuscripts until her death in 1958. Her great collection, consisting of incunabula (including a Gutenberg Bible), medieval and Renaissance manuscripts, Western Americana, early printing, literature, and fine bindings, was for many years housed at the Vincentian Seminary of St. John’s in Camarillo, California. In 1987 a decision was made by the Archdiocese of Los Angeles to return many of the Doheny treasures to the market. Fine condition. A splendid set, with fine Cosway-style portrait of Napoleon, and with distinguished provenance.

market. Fine condition. A splendid set, with fine Cosway-style portrait of Napoleon, and with distinguished provenance.

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n ew a cquisitions e xceptional | D ecember 2013 12 winston churchill “This Is Not
$17,500. Octavo, original black cloth, dust jackets. First English editions of Churchill’s WWII masterpiece,
$17,500. Octavo, original black cloth, dust jackets. First English editions of Churchill’s WWII masterpiece,

First English editions of Churchill’s WWII masterpiece, part history and part memoir, written after he lost reelection as Prime Minister, in the original dust jackets, inscribed in Volume I: “Inscribed for Donald Forbes by Winston S. Churchill, 1948.”

With the Second World War, Churchill “pulled himself back from humiliating [electoral] defeat in 1945, using all his skills as a writer and politician to make his fortune, secure his reputation, and win a second term in Downing Street” (Reynolds, xxiii). “Winston himself affirmed that ‘this is not history: this is my case” (Holmes, 285). Churchill was re-elected to

the post of Prime Minister in 1951. “The Second World War is a great work of literature, combining narrative, historical imagination and moral precept in a form that bears comparison with that of the original master chronicler, Thucydides. It was wholly appropriate that in 1953 Churchill was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature” (Keegan, 175). Although preceded by the American editions, the English editions are generally preferred for their profusion of diagrams, maps, and facsimile documents. Cohen A240.4. Woods A123b. Langworth, 254. Forbes was a prominent Woodford politician and early supporter and fundraiser for Churchill, whose relation with Churchill is discussed extensively in David A. Thomas’ Churchill: The Member for Woodford (a copy of which is included). Three pages/slips of Forbes’ notes are laid in, including one on the back of a deposit slip for Forbes’ bank account. Interiors fine; some light staining to top edges of text blocks. Light toning to spines of bright dust jackets with light wear to extremities and a one-inch closed tear to spine foot of Volume I with tape repair to verso and a half-inch closed tear to spine head fold of Volume IV. A near-fine inscribed set, with notable provenance.

13 December 2013 | exceptional new acquisitions salvador dalí
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salvador dalí
An Original Etching And 12 Full-Page Color Photogravures 11. (DALÍ, Salvador) CARROLL, Lewis. Alice’s

Beautifully printed limited edition of the brilliant and beloved children’s classic, one of 2500 copies signed by Salvador Dalí, with an original etching and 12 full-page color photogravures after his paintings— as breathtakingly imaginative as the text they illustrate.

Dalí’s twisting dreamscapes and semi-hallucinatory images superbly complement Carroll’s astonishingly inventive fantasy (first published in 1865) and exemplify the artist’s entire oeuvre. This magnificent production, printed on Mandeure paper, contains an original three-color etching as a frontispiece and 12 striking full-page color photogra- vures (heliogravures) after Dali’s original gouache paint- ings. Michler & Löpsinger 321-333. Field 69-5. A fine copy.

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john f. kennedy

“Someone Was Shooting Fireworks Until We Saw The Blood On The President”:

Historic Breaking News Of The Kennedy Assassination On Original Dow Jones News Ticker Teletype Cellophane Projection Sheets, November 22 And 23, 1963

12. teletype, approximately 35 feet in length.
12.
teletype, approximately 35 feet in length.

(KENNEDY ASSASSINATION). Original Dow Jones News Ticker teletype reports of the Kennedy assassination. Dallas:

Dow Jones, November 22-23, 1963. Dow Jones News Ticker teletype printed in blue ink on transparent cellophane, 36 sheets, each

5-3/4 inches wide, length from 5-3/4 to 10-3/4 inches, a few corners rounded at top, cut from one 5-3/4-inch wide roll of cellophane

$15,000.

Rare original Dow Jones News Ticker teletype reporting the events of November 22nd from his prepared Trade Mart Speech which he never gave to the arrest of Lee Harvey Oswald—on transparent cellophane used to project the news on large screens on the floors of the Stock Exchanges as well as in stock broker offices

These historic sheets recount the events of the Kennedy assassination, as they are occurring. The Dow Jones News Ticker was printed on two types of machines, hard copies and transparent cellophane for projection machines. While hard copies of AP, UPI, and Dow Jones teletype have been on the market before, this is the only transparent cellophane copy we have ever seen, used to project the news on large screens for stock brokers in large offices and on the floors of the Exchanges. Dow Jones Wall Street news (not quoted below) is interspersed with Associated Press news about the President. All text in uppercase. Typos not corrected. A dash is used in the teletype in place of an apostrophe (e.g. Goldwater-s). There are no punctuation marks. There is more than one report per page. Fine condition.

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c e m b e r 2013 | e xceptional n ew a cquisitions john f
c e m b e r 2013 | e xceptional n ew a cquisitions john f

john f. kennedy

$16,500.
$16,500.

“A Man Does What He Must… And That Is The Basis Of All Human Morality”:

First Edition Of Profiles In Courage, Inscribed By John F. Kennedy

13.

KENNEDY, John F. Profiles in Courage. New York, 1956. Octavo, original half black cloth, dust jacket.

First edition, first printing, of Kennedy’s Pulitzer-winning examination of “that most admirable of human virtues,” inscribed: “To —, with my warmest regards—John Kennedy.”

“A series of sketches of American politicians who risked their careers in the cause of principle… ‘A man does what he must,’ Kennedy wrote, ‘—in spite of personal consequences, in spite of obstacles and dangers and pressures—and that is the basis of all human morality… The book was popular history of high order, and it received the Pulitzer Prize for biography in 1957” (DAB). Illustrated with eight pages of black-and-white photographic plates. Interior fine. Light rubbing to extremities, with some white marks to cloth spine. Dust jacket bright with shallow edge-wear. An extremely good inscribed copy.

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israels declaration of independence

We “By Virtue Of Our Natural And Historic Right And On The Strength Of The Resolution Of The United Nations General Assembly, Hereby Declare The Establishment Of A Jewish State”:

Scarce First Printing Of Israel’s Declaration Of Independence

14. BEN-GURION, David. “The Declaration of the Establishment of the State of Israel.” IN: Israel’s Provisional

Government Official Bulletin No. 1. BOUND WITH: Official Bulletins No. 2-25. Tel Aviv, 5 Iyar 5708 [May 14, 1948]-163 Iyar 5708 [October 1, 1948]. Slim tall octavo (8-1/4 by 13 inches), contemporary tan cloth. $16,500.

First printing of Israel’s Declaration of Independence, the first issue of Iton Rishmi, dated May 14, 1948, collected together in one volume with the 24 separately printed, succeeding issues (No. 2, dated May 21, 1948, to No. 25, dated October 1, 1948)—“It is rare to register with such precision the moment when historical change is inaugurated.”

May 14, 1948 was the final day of the British Mandate over Palestine, and as that day approached, various nations angled to determine the future, or lack thereof, of the proposed Jewish state. In an effort to finally bring their dream of a Jewish homeland to fruition, Jewish leaders seized the initiative and began preparations to create a government for a Zionist state. Spearheaded by David Ben-Gurion, leaders “established a 13-member National Administration and a National Council of 37 members, which would, upon the departure of the British Mandatory forces, become the provisional government and legislature of the Jewish State… A committee of five—David Remez, [Felix] Rosenblueth, Moshe Shapira, [Moshe] Shertok, and Aharon Zisling—was appointed to draft the Declaration of Independence. The draft submitted by the committee on May 13 consisted of 22 articles… It was criticized as too long and flowery, and the final wording was entrusted to Ben- Gurion, Rabbi Y. L. Fishman (Maimon), A. Zisling, and M. Shertok. During the same evening Ben-Gurion prepared a final draft, which was approved by his colleagues on the committee.” On Friday, May 14, 1948, Ben-Gurion proclaimed Israel’s inde- pendence. His recitation of Israel’s Declaration of Independence was broadcast throughout the entirety of the new state of Israel, and the nation, now a fait accompli, was quickly recognized by the United States and the USSR, assuring its ac- ceptance. This is the first Israeli government printing of the Declaration; its equivalent in U.S. history would be the John Dunlap broadside of the Declaration of Independence. Text in Hebrew. Interior generally fresh with mild ton- ing, light scattered foxing, small expertly re- paired closed tear to one leaf affecting text (63), slight soiling to cloth. A scarce extremely good collection of these important publications.

one leaf affecting text (63), slight soiling to cloth. A scarce extremely good collection of these
one leaf affecting text (63), slight soiling to cloth. A scarce extremely good collection of these

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c e m b e r 2013 | e xceptional n ew a cquisitions 17 albert
c e m b e r 2013 | e xceptional n ew a cquisitions 17 albert

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$12,500.
$12,500.

15.

First edition of Einstein’s second collection of social science-related articles, addresses, speeches, letters and papers covering the period before, during and after the Second World War, an exceptionally scarce fine copy signed and dated by him in the year of publication.

Commenting on the potential conflict of science and politics, Albert Einstein once turned to an assistant and sighed, “Yes, time has to be divided this way between politics and our equations” (DSB). In this continuation of his first collection of essays, The World As I See It (1934), Einstein offers further thoughts crossing that divide, mirroring his political, social, philosophical and scientific concerns. Drawn from articles, speeches, letters and various papers, all written from 1934 to 1950, with many published here for the first time, the book includes selections on science, ethics, public affairs, issues in Jewish history, the dilemma of modern war and tributes to figures such as Marie Curie, Isaac Newton and Mahatma Gandhi. This work was issued in a number of different cloths and dust jackets, and there continues to be bibliographic uncertainty about some points. Tiny closed tear to upper edge of scarce

dust jacket. A fine signed copy.

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16. original red cloth.
16.
original red cloth.

Extremely rare first edition, first printing, of Graham’s seminal work, considered the Bible of modern financial analysis, in fine condition.

Few published works of the 20th century have exerted the influence or had as devoted a following as Security Analysis. Prior to its publication, investors often relied on intuition or the character of a business owner to make their decisions. Writing in the wake of the catastrophic stock market crash, Graham and Dodd designed “value-oriented investment,” a disciplined, realistic approach to constructing a solid financial portfolio. Popular when it was published, it continues to shape the strategies and the training of financiers. Copies of the first edition are known to appear both in black cloth binding, with “Whittlesey House—McGraw Hill” in gilt at the foot of the spine, and in red cloth binding, with “McGraw-Hill Book Company” in gilt at the foot of the spine, as with the present copy. No priority of issue has been established; because the book is of exceeding rarity, either binding is equally desirable. Stated “First Edition” on title page, with no mention of printing on copyright page. A fine, fresh copy.

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c e m b e r 2013 | e xceptional n ew a cquisitions 19 alcoholics

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17.

$38,000.
$38,000.

First edition, first printing, of this influential work—a most desirable copy in the very rare original dust jacket.

The Alcoholics Anonymous “Big Book” was published at a particularly trying time; the Great Depression had driven many Americans to desperation, and the repeal of Prohibition in 1933 ensured that alcohol was readily available. With moving personal accounts and case histories of many original members of A.A., here is the story of countless “average Americans… [whose] feeling of having shared in a common peril is one element in the powerful cement which binds” their lives together. This extremely scarce first edition also examines the epiphanic moments in which hope for a new life is achieved, but “the later editions of the Big Book play down this expectation of ‘sudden and spectacular upheaval” in favor of a more gradual explanation for triumph over the addiction (New Yorker, 1955). The book’s publication itself represented a triumph over numerous obstacles; pre-publication shares in the newly-founded corporation proved impossible to sell until a Reader’s Digest editor promised to publish an article about the group’s efforts. The article never materialized, but the tenacity of Bill W. and friends resulted in the independent publication of the book. An alternative title, The Way Out, had strong support from members, but a check of the Library of Congress showed twelve books with that title. Bill W. remembers, “We said to ourselves, ‘We sure aren’t going to make this book the thirteenth Way Out.’ We left the title Alcoholics Anonymous in the copy that went to the printer. That is how we got the title for our book, and that is how our society got its name.” Owner signature and address. Bright, about-fine book with just a bit of soiling to rear panel. Scarce bright jacket with expert restoration. A beautiful copy.

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n ew a cquisitions e xceptional | D ecember 2013 20 ian fleming 18. “He Must
18.
18.

Scarce first edition of Fleming’s third novel, in which Bond must foil the attempt of a British industrialist to destroy London with a nuclear weapon, in first-issue dust jacket.

Considered by many to be one of the best of the Bond books, Moonraker afforded Fleming “an opportunity to wax lyrical about the England he loved—the ‘panorama full of color and excitement and romance… [Fleming also] skillfully reintroduced notes of ambiguity and realism into the life of his globe-trotting hero… Noël Coward read Moonraker in proof in Jamaica and pronounced, ‘It is the best thing he has done yet, very exciting… His observation is extraordinary and his talent for description vivid” (Lycett, 253-54, 269). The early Bond novels are quite scarce. “This title is extremely rare in fine condition” (Biondi & Pickard, 42). Made into the 1979 film of the same title with Roger Moore as Bond and Lois Chiles as Dr. Holly Goodhead. Book fine; light toning to spine and soiling to white back panel (as often) of bright, unrestored dust jacket with price-clipped front flap. A near-fine copy.

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c e m b e r 2013 | e xceptional n ew a cquisitions 21 j

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$24,000.
$24,000.

19.

First edition of Salinger’s first book—“a 20th-century classic”—in first-issue dust jacket with photograph of Salinger on the back panel. A beautiful unrestored copy.

“In American writing, there are three perfect books, which seem to speak to every reader and condition: Huckleberry Finn, The Great Gatsby and The Catcher in the Rye. Of the three, only Catcher defines an entire region of human experience: it is… the handbook of the adolescent heart” (New Yorker). “This novel is a key-work of the 1950s in that the theme of youthful rebellion is first adumbrated in it, though the hero, Holden Caulfield, is more a gentle voice of protest, unprevailing in the noise, than a militant world-changer… The Catcher in the Rye was a symptom of a need, after a ghastly war and during a ghastly pseudo-peace, for the young to raise a voice of protest against the failures of the adult world. The young used many voices—anger, contempt, self-pity—but the quietest, that of a decent perplexed American adolescent, proved the most telling” (Anthony Burgess, 99 Novels, 53-4). First printing, with “First Edition” on copyright page, in first-issue dust jacket with author’s photograph on the rear panel. Starosciak A30. Bixby A2. Book fine. Light wear to extremities of bright, unrestored dust jacket with slight toning to spine and nominal chipping to spine head. A beautiful copy, rare in this condition.

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n ew a cquisitions e xceptional | D ecember 2013 22 george gershwin “I Got Rhythm…”:
20. morocco gilt rebacked with original spine laid down.
20.
morocco gilt rebacked with original spine laid down.

First trade edition of this compilation of Gershwin’s “improvised” versions of his songs, inscribed in the year of publication by both Gershwin and illustrator Constantin Alajalov to George Balanchine’s close friend Lucia Davidova, with an original drawn “mask” of Davidova by Alajalov.

Pioneer aviatrix Lucia Davidova was a close friend of Igor Stravinsky and George Balanchine. Self-described as Balanchine’s “best platonic woman friend,” she was present at every performance, and even at classes and rehearsals. Gershwin knew her from meetings with Balanchine over their planned collaboration on a new ballet. Gershwin’s untimely death in 1937 prevented its realization. Thirty-three years later, however, Balanchine chose 17 of Gershwin’s Broadway songs for his ballet Who Cares? Gershwin’s Song-Book, inscribed to Davidova, is illustrated with full-page color lithographic plates after Alajalov, and includes such Gershwin standards as “Swanee,” “Fascinating Rhythm,” “The Man I Love,” “Strike Up the Band,” and “I Got Rhythm,” among others. “In one of his few prose writings, George provided an introduction for the song book. What is most important… is that it contained the original published version of each song, followed side by side by George’s ‘improvised’ versions of the songs” (Carnovale, 14). See Carnovale, W45. Book with only minor wear, price-clipped dust jacket soiled and worn at extremities. Inscriptions bold and fine. Very desirable inscribed.

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exceptional new acquisitions

Limited first edition in English of this lavish visual tribute to the great Nijinsky, with 12 striking full-page line blocks by George Barbier, hand-colored en pochoir. This copy one of only 50 copies signed by Barbier, Francis de Miomandre, and the editor.

“We have our despair, our sadness, our violated love and this thing, most dread of all—the passing of the days between our hands, helpless to cherish aught they give. But in the spring, the Russian Ballets and NIJINSKY return. And all is forgotten” (Francis de Miomandre). This glowing tribute is illustrated with 12 full-page, pochoir-colored line blocks of Nijinsky in his various roles by Art Deco legend George Barbier, who began his career as a costume and set designer for the Ballet Russes. Renowned for his achievement in costume and fashion illustration, his art work is epitomized by a characteristically elegant, stylized line. From a total edition of only 400 numbered copies; this copy is also much taller than the unsigned issue, which had about three inches trimmed from the lower margin. Bit of light wear and toning to fragile original wrappers, with two small stains to upper right corner of front wrapper. Plates clean and fine. A magnificent copy in original wrappers, most rare and desirable signed by Barbier.

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wrapper. Plates clean and fine. A magnificent copy in original wrappers, most rare and desirable signed
wrapper. Plates clean and fine. A magnificent copy in original wrappers, most rare and desirable signed
wrapper. Plates clean and fine. A magnificent copy in original wrappers, most rare and desirable signed
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24 December 2013 | exceptional new acquisitions

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c e m b e r 2013 | e xceptional n ew a cquisitions world war
c e m b e r 2013 | e xceptional n ew a cquisitions world war

First edition of this classified official report of the daily activities of Patton’s Third Army, with details

the famous operation “Overlord,” illustrated with

hundreds of photographs, charts and maps, marked “Secret” on every page. With a fine 1913 autograph letter to his mother signed by Patton laid in.

Under the command of Lieutenant General George S. Patton, Jr., the Third Army participated in eight major European operations throughout their 281 days of “constant battle during which we have engaged in

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every type of combat except defensive.” They “gave new meaning to ‘hard charging, hard hitting, mobile warfare.’ The Third Army’s swift and tenacious drive into and through France, Belgium, Luxembourg, Germany, Czechoslovakia, and Austria contributed immeasurably to the destruction of the Nazi war machine” (BACM Research). This official report of the daily activities of Patton’s Third Army is organized in two sections: “Operations,” combining narratives of specific operations with data on movements, casualties, and loss of materiel; and “Staff Section Reports,” which contains monthly directives, instructions, action reports, and lessons learned. As it contains far too much sensitive information, it remained classified until February 1947. There were only 289 copies of this edition produced in 1945 and at that time, in order to obtain a copy one had to have top security clearance. Laid into this copy is a three-page autograph letter (one leaf of 7-3/4 by 11-1/2 inch green paper, folded once) signed by Patton, addressed “Dear Mama,” that reads in part: “Mr. Gordon Johnston got made a captain and went away so that we have no team much left only three good men. To add to this it rained for five days straight and that made things so muddie that we could not

practice

be but it is a good thing. My hand is quite well now and I think the cuts are making the hair grow. What is California going to do about Japan? I hope they cause a war. With lots of love, George S. Patton Jr.” Near-fine condition. Scarce, desirable with an autograph letter signed by Patton.

Scarce, desirable with an autograph letter signed by Patton. After the War Department duty on a

After the War Department duty on a post is not as exciting as it might

26 joseph heller “It Was Both An Honor And A Sadness To Hear From Someone
26
joseph heller
“It Was Both An Honor And A Sadness To Hear From Someone
Who Did Leave The Country Rather Than Participate In This
War…”: Extraordinary Lengthy Letter Signed By Heller Discussing
The Composition Of Catch-22 And Dodging The Draft During The
Vietnam War, Together With Heller’s Anti-War Play, We Bombed
In New Haven, Inscribed First Edition, And A Later Autograph
Letter, Both Signed By Heller To The Same Recipient
23.
HELLER, Joseph. We Bombed in New Haven. WITH: Autograph letter
signed. WITH: Typed letter signed. New York, 1968. Octavo, original
maroon cloth, dust jacket. Two leaves of Heller’s letterhead (7-1/4 by 10-1/2
inches), one typed and signed on recto, the other in autograph manuscript
and signed on recto.
$7800.
First edition of Heller’s anti-war play produced during the Vietnam war,
inscribed by him, “To Walter —-, With admiration and sincere good wishes.”
Heller sent this inscribed book to the recipient after he had written to Heller
praising Catch-22 and implying that it was an inspiration for his decision to move to Canada to dodge the U.S. military draft.
With a lengthy typed letter signed by Heller from 1969 to the recipient praising him for his courage and discussing the composition
of Catch-22, as well as an autograph letter signed from 1999 to the same recipient.
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new acquisitions

Joseph Heller’s 1961 first novel quickly became a classic of anti-war literature. “By the mid-1960s, it had become a cult classic

among counterculture activists for its biting indictment of war” (Books of the Century). The recipient of this inscribed first edition, wrote to Heller in 1969 from Toronto, praising Catch-22, asking about the composition of the chapter entitled “The Eternal City” and mulling over his own decision to leave the United States (and thus avoid

the draft), among other topics. Heller replied with a lengthy typed letter in which he discusses the draft and his own son (who would have been 13 at the time) and remarks on his years at Time magazine and during the war. The letter reads in part: “It was both an honor and a sadness to hear from someone who did leave the country rather than participate in this war; I like to think that I would do the same if faced with a similar choice, although I’m not sure I would have the strength of character to do so, and I will certainly encourage my own son to leave when he is old enough to be threatened with military service, and leave with him if he wishes me to… The chapter THE ETERNAL CITY, if I remember correctly, was one of the easiest of all to write, the reason being, I think, that by that time in the book there was little artifice and more of a need for direct expression. By that time, too, the time spiral had sort of straightened itself out and there was a direct continuity of narrative… I’d not heard before that I was accused of selling out… If anything, I bought out, not sold out: I wrote most of the novel while I worked there and left the whole God damned industrial world altogether shortly after it was published. And, surprising as it may sound, I enjoyed myself immensely while I worked there, just as I enjoyed myself, I am almost ashamed to admit, for most of my service in the army.” Heller mentions that he is sending this copy of We Bombed in New Haven under separate cover, “on the chance that you will enjoy that too,” and closes by writing, “I wish you will be able to come back soon.” Also included is a 1999 autograph letter signed from Heller to the same recipient. Book fine, faint toning to edges of dust jacket, a fine copy with interesting correspondence regarding Heller’s classic anti-war novel, Catch-22.

edges of dust jacket, a fine copy with interesting correspondence regarding Heller’s classic anti-war novel, Catch-22
edges of dust jacket, a fine copy with interesting correspondence regarding Heller’s classic anti-war novel, Catch-22
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24.

Huitième Année. 1919. Paris, 1921. Folio, Limited first edition of Modes et Manières

Limited first edition of Modes et Manières d’Aujourd’hui, Volume VIII for the year 1919, number 4 of only 12 copies issued on Japon (of 300 copies), featuring 12 loose pochoir color plates, accompanying suite of 12 uncolored plates, and original matted watercolor (8-3/4 by 5-1/2 inches) signed by French artist Andre Edouard Marty, a leading Art Deco artist, with 12 leaves of accompanying text in French by popular playwright and novelist Tristan Bernard, rarely found complete in the original portfolio.

This original limited edition portfolio highlights the splendid Art Deco artistry of Andre Edouard Marty, who shared with Georges Barbier, Charles Martin and others a love of “elegance and luxe… They fused their styles from a heady mix: Japanese woodblock prints, classical Greek and Roman art, modern stage and costume design, and the cinema… The result of this alchemy was a new way of illustrating the figure” (Torre, 20th-Century Fashion Illustration, 33). Marty, also well known for his theatre posters, was one of an elite group of only four artists who contributed yearly to Gazette du Bon Ton (1912-25) and his images were regularly featured in Vogue, Harper’s Bazaar, Modes et Manières d’Aujord’hui and other publications. This rare complete Volume VIII of Modes et Manières d’Aujourd’hui, for the year 1919, in the original portfolio, additionally contains 12 corresponding short works by noted French author Tristan Bernard, Modes et Manières d’Aujourd’hui, which first appeared in 1912, was a highly influential Art Deco fashion periodical. Publication ceased in 1923 with a total of 7 volumes, each limited to a total of 300 copies. Complete volumes in the original portfolios are quite rare. Plates and text very fresh, small bit of early tape reinforcement to inner seams of portfolio. Near-fine.

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A meric A nA | D ecember 2 0 1 3 28 A mericANA george washington

AmericANA

A meric A nA | D ecember 2 0 1 3 28 A mericANA george washington
in calf.
in calf.

First edition of Marshall’s magisterial biography of Washington, with engraved frontispiece portrait and the companion atlas of ten strategic maps (eight double-page) depicting Washington’s major Revolutionary War campaigns. A beautiful and most desirable set in contemporary tree calf, with scarce atlas volume in original boards.

Shortly after Marshall became Chief Justice, Washington’s nephew Bushrod approached him to write the first President’s official biography. Probably no man was better suited to the task. As a personal friend of Washington, Marshall had announced the President’s death in 1799, offered the eulogy, chaired the committee that arranged the funeral rites, and led the commission to plan a monument in the capital city. When Marshall’s Life of Washington appeared, it quickly gained such authoritative status that Washington scholar Jared Sparks suggested any new biographical undertaking would be “presumptuous” (Sparks, Washington I:12). The work “is political history as well as biography… the only comprehensive account by a great statesman of the full founding of the United States—of the founding of an independent people as well as of its government… There is no other concentrated history of the essentials by such an authority on American institutions” (Robert K. Faulkner). “If George Washington founded the country, John Marshall defined it” (Jean Edward Smith). This first edition, together with the first English edition of the same years, are “the only complete editions of this indispensable work, the ‘Colonial History’ being omitted in the later American editions” (Sabin). Scarce companion atlas includes a 22-page list of subscribers. Original owner signature of Thomas Foster, dated 1804 on first page of Preface, and named in the list of subscribers, under Carlisle, Pennsylvania. Contemporary American tree calf bindings very attractive with just a bit of very minor restoration. Most desirable.

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benjamin franklin

“America’s First Great Scientific Contribution”:

First Complete Edition Of Franklin’s Illustrated Experiments And Observations On Electricity, 1769

26. FRANKLIN, Benjamin. Experiments and Observations on Electricity, Made at Philadelphia in America London, 1769.
26.
FRANKLIN, Benjamin. Experiments and Observations on Electricity, Made at Philadelphia in America
London, 1769.
Large octavo, contemporary marbled boards rebacked in half tan sheep.
$30,000.
First complete edition of “the most important scientific book of 18th-century America” and “America’s first great scientific
contribution” (PMM), with seven engraved plates (two folding). An exceptional, wide-margined copy in contemporary calf. An
important edition, edited and revised by Franklin himself, and with material and footnotes appearing here for the first time,
especially scarce in contemporary marbled boards.
This first complete edition is the fourth edition of the original work; the earlier editions, each issued in three parts as separately
published pamphlets usually bound together, were carelessly published. Franklin edited this new one-volume edition himself,
significantly revising the text, adding for the first time a number of his own philosophical letters and papers, introducing
footnotes, correcting errors, and adding an index. “Franklin’s most important scientific publication,” Experiments and
Observations contains detailed accounts of the founding father’s crucial kite and key experiment, his work with Leiden jars,
lightning rods and charged clouds (Norman 830). “The most dramatic result of Franklin’s researches was the proof that lightning
is
really an electrical phenomenon. Others had made such a suggestion before him—even Newton himself—but it was he who
provided the experimental proof” (PMM). “The lightning experiments caused Franklin’s name to become known throughout
Europe to the public at large and not merely to men of science. Joseph Priestley, in his History of Electricity, characterized the
experimental discovery that the lightning discharge is an electrical phenomenon as ‘the greatest, perhaps, since the time of Isaac
Newton… Franklin’s achievement… marked the coming of age of electrical science and the full acceptance of the new field of
specialization” (DSB). Sabin 25506. Ford 307. Text and plates generally fresh with light scattered foxing, some rubbing to boards.
A
highly desirable extremely good copy, in contemporary boards.
30 “The Southern States Had Rightfully The Power To Withdraw” 27. DAVIS, Jefferson. The Rise
30
“The Southern States Had Rightfully
The Power To Withdraw”
27.
DAVIS, Jefferson. The Rise and Fall of the Confederate
Government. New York, 1881. Two volumes. Thick octavo,
modern three-quarter brown crushed morocco gilt. $2600.
First edition of Davis’ seminal history, one of the most impor-
tant works on the Civil War written by one of the conflict’s
primary figures, and one of the major arguments for the
Constitutional basis of the war, with 18 maps (14 folding)
and 19 plates, including stipple-engraved portraits of Davis,
members of the presidential staff, General Lee and others.
“As president of the Confederate States of America, Jefferson
Davis directed the new nation’s mighty struggle for indepen-
dence… His views, which he never recanted, were enshrined in
his Rise and Fall” (Cooper). “This was not a conventional memoir
that tells the story of the subject’s life. Instead, Rise and Fall was in
large part a massive, legalistic, dense and impersonal defense of state’s rights, secession, and Southern independence”
(Swanson, 363). This is “probably the most scholarly recital of the ‘states rights’ arguments, since it was written by the leader
of the movement after mature reflection” (Channing, 2156). In Tall Cotton 34. Small owner inkstamps. Interiors generally
fresh with light marginal dampstaining. Near-fine condition.
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Rare Civil War Autograph Letter Signed By Ulysses S. Grant, Penned By Him At His Headquarters Days Before The Election That Decided Lincoln’s Second Term

28.

Virginia, October 29, 1864. One leaf (5 by 8 inches folded) in manuscript

(CIVIL WAR) GRANT, Ulysses S. Autograph letter signed. City Point,

$7500.
$7500.
Ulysses S. Autograph letter signed. City Point, $7500. hand. October 29, 1864 autograph letter signed by

hand.

October 29, 1864 autograph letter signed by Ulysses S. Grant, entirely penned by him within days of Lincoln’s re-election that came on the heels of Union victories, with Lincoln keenly aware of “how much he owed his general… Not everyone, then or later, appreciated the magnitude of the accomplishment. One who did was William T. Sherman,” whose request for a supply store at Vicksburg is the subject of Grant’s letter, written from City Point, Virginia on the letterhead of “Head-Quarters Armies of the United States.”

of “Head-Quarters Armies of the United States.” This rare Civil War letter penned and signed by

This rare Civil War letter penned and signed by Grant is dated mere days before the November 8 election that would decide Lincoln’s second term. Beneath the letterhead of “Head-Quarters Armies of the United States,” the text of Grant’s letter from City Point, Virginia, to Treasury Agent William P. Mellen, reads in part: “Gen. Sherman having expressed a willingness for Capt. O.H. Ross to keep a supply store within his command I would request that the permit be given for Vicksburg, Miss. I would limit it to what might be termed a military supply

store, that is confine it to such articles as officers, soldiers and Govt. employees would require.” It was at Vicksburg, only a year before, that Grant triumphed in “one of the war’s great campaigns,” a turning point in Lincoln’s view of Grant. A highly desirable near-fine letter.

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civil war battlefield bible, 1862

“Captured This Book Off The Rebels The First Of May 63” And “Taken… At The Foot Of Big Round Top July 1863”: 1862 Civil War New Testament Passed Between Confederate And Union Soldiers At The Battlefields Of Fredericksburg And Gettysburg

29.

BIBLE. New Testament… New York, 1862. 16mo (2-3/4 by 4-1/2 inches), disbound. Housed in a custom box.

$8500.

by 4-1/2 inches), disbound. Housed in a custom box. $8500. Extraordinary New Testament originally owned by

Extraordinary New Testament originally owned by a Confederate soldier at Fredericksburg and then evidently found and retrieved by at least three other soldiers (two Union) at Fredericksburg and then Gettysburg who carefully recorded in pencil their names and the circumstances of its acquisition. A wonderful Civil War artifact.

This New Testament is not just a Bible, but rather a battlefield remnant. Published in 1862 as a pocket Bible, it and Bibles like it represented hope to the soldiers that carried them in dangerous circumstances far from home. This Bible is unusual, not so much in that it changed hands, but that it changed hands between the Confederacy and the Union. Moreover, it bears a valuable written record of its provenance. The first inscription, likely that of its original owner, follows the last verse of the Book of Revelation and reads: “John L. Barnes Co. B 83 Regt Pen. (Vols).” Barnes appears to have been listed as “Barns” in official records. Based on his military service, he likely lost or gave away his Bible when the 83rd engaged in combat during the Battle of Fredericksburg, December 11-15, 1862. Barnes survived the war and was discharged on May 29, 1865. The second inscription, on the next page, identifies the new owner as J.W. Stephenson of the “Southern Confederacy,” who writes: “Book Taken Possession December 17th 1862 at Frederickburg Virginia.” Four months later, the book again changed hands, this time passing to an “E. Durfee” who states that he “captured this book of[f] the rebels the first of May 63.” Durfee would only retain possession for two months as the final inscription attests: “Taken by J.S. Olsen at the foot of Big Round Top July 1863.” John Samuel Olsen was a teamster for the Union and was likely retrieving the dead from the battlefield when he found the volume. (This may account for what appears to be a tiny bit of blood spatter on the title page.). A few inscriptions quite faint due to old pencil, mild embrowning to text, chipping to last few leaves, light soiling to front and rear cover pages. Very good condition. Rare.

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33 D ecember 2013 | A meric A nA john james audubon Audubon’s Birds Of America
$48,000.
$48,000.

Lockwood Audubon, the final octavo edition, containing 500 superb tinted and hand-colored lithographic plates printed by J.T. Bowen of Philadelphia, with numerous in-text anatomical wood-engravings.

One of the most spectacular collections of ornithological prints ever produced and a landmark attempt to document the birds of North America. “The most splendid book ever produced in relation to America, and certainly one of the finest ornithological works ever printed… Audubon insisted on drawing from life, never from stuffed specimens, and was much in advance of his time in portraying the birds (in many cases unrecorded species) in their natural surroundings… The courage and faith of the Audubon family is breathtaking… This immense undertaking, this unparalleled achievement, was not the production of a great and long-established publishing house, nor was it backed by a wealthy institution. It was the work of a man of relentless energy, with no private fortune… It is a story without equal in the whole history of publishing” (Great Books and Book Collectors, 210-13). The second and subsequent octavo editions differed most notably from the first octavo in the addition of tinted lithographic-wash backgrounds to the plates. “The lithographs in all of the later editions are identical and of the same value” (Clark and Bannon, Handbook of Audubon Prints). This is the final octavo edition, issued by Lockwood in 1870-1871 and here bearing the original 1839 Audubon copyright statement on the verso of the title pages. Sometime afterwards, the octavo lithographic stones were destroyed when a floor collapsed in the Philadelphia warehouse where they were stored (Tyler, Audubon’s Great National Work, 129, 165 note). Bound with half titles. Plates 155 and 156 bound in reverse order, but present. Zimmer, 25-26. Early owner ink signature to half titles. Interiors fine, plates bright and beautiful, hand-coloring vivid; minor expert restoration to one spine head. A lovely set in the original publisher’s morocco in about-fine condition.

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1756. 12mo (4 by 7 inches), late 19th-century full $29,000. Rare first edition of Franklin’s Almanack

Rare first edition of Franklin’s Almanack for 1757, with the famed woodcut of anatomical man “govern’d” by constellations and 12 woodcut panels, rarely found complete and uncut, this copy with an exceptional provenance—from the prized collection of renowned bibliophile Robert Hoe, founder of the Grolier Club, and containing the bookplate of fellow collector E. Howard Litchfield. A fine uncut copy, bound in full crushed morocco by Bedford.

Franklin first issued Poor Richard’s Almanack in 1732, using the pseudonym Richard Saunders and initiating a series that “is beyond question the most famous of almanacs, the most charming and readable of Franklin’s writings” (Ford, 11). In addition to the Almanack ’s witty proverbs, this issue for 1757, rarely found complete, especially reveals how Franklin balanced relevance and humor with vigorous science and sly puzzles. “The annual puzzles got more complicated, as with 1757’s teaser,” set in the September section. Here we are asked to “imagine three ships, each occupied independently by Christians, Jews or Muslims. Each vessel leaves the same place but travels a different route under its religiously distinct crew. All return to the original port, where ‘they shall differ so with respect to real and apparent Time, that they all shall keep their Sabbath on one and the same Day of the Week, and yet each of them separately shall believe that he keeps his Sabbath on the Day of the Week his Religion requires’… The larger point, one that exemplified Franklin’s deism and his religious toleration, was that the natural world in- spired religious sentiment in everyone.” While Franklin, after 1748, was no longer involved in the daily operations of his and Hall’s busy printing concern, Franklin scholarship clearly notes that his over-arching authorship role of the almanacs contin- ued, along with the opportune supervision of their printing. Miller 635. Ford 104. Hoe Catalogue, 280. From the collection of renowned bibliophile Robert Hoe, founder and first president of the Grolier Club. Armorial bookplate of fellow bibliophile Edward Hubert Litchfield. A fine copy with an exceptional provenance, rare complete and uncut.

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Early edition of Lossing’s American history text, distinguished by the signatures of six Presidents of the United States, collected by members of one family over four decades: John F. Kennedy, Jimmy Carter, Ronald Reagan, George H.W. Bush, Bill Clinton and Barack Obama, with extensive supporting documentation.

One of New York state’s most prominent wood-engravers, “Lossing wrote and illustrated books covering almost every possible topic in American history” (ANB). The signatures of six United States presidents, all of whom claim some Irish ancestry, distinguish the present volume. President Kennedy signed, at the center of the front free endpaper, during his June 1963 visit to Ireland. Kennedy arrived in Ireland hours after his “Ich Bin Ein Berliner” speech in West Berlin. He signed this book in Galway on June 29, the same day he left for London. Presidents Reagan and Clinton both signed the same page, Reagan at Ashford Castle in June 1984 and Clinton in Derry in November 1995. President Carter signed the verso of the front free endpaper during his visit to Ireland in June 2007. On the recto of the first leaf, President George H.W. Bush has inscribed, “Dennis McCarthy, all the best, George Bush, 9-22-06.” President Obama signed during his May 2011 visit to the United States Embassy in Dublin. Owner inscriptions, inkstamp to pastedowns. Printed invitation, business card, color photograph affixed to verso of front free endpaper and first leaf. A file of letters, photographs, photocopies, printed emails and other items establishing the signatures’ provenance accompanies the book. Scattered light foxing; light dampstaining toward end of volume. A remarkable and desirable volume boasting the signatures of six 20th and early 21st century American presidents.

volume. A remarkable and desirable volume boasting the signatures of six 20th and early 21st century

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Vintage photographic print, taken at the White House, depicting Jackie Kennedy sitting on the floor holding John Jr. and Caroline in her lap. With Shaw’s own 1963 studio stamp and “Private Print” on verso.

own 1963 studio stamp and “Private Print” on verso. Photographed early in Kennedy’s presidency, this image

Photographed early in Kennedy’s presidency, this image was evidently printed by photographer Mark Shaw in 1963, most likely in preparation for his book, The John F. Kennedys. “Just as Abraham Lincoln thought Mathew Brady’s photography won him the presidency, so Jackie Kennedy thought Mark Shaw’s pictures helped her husband win the 1960 election” (Sullivan, 492). In 1959, seeking to bolster JFK’s presidential campaign, the Kennedys agreed to let Shaw do a photo-essay for LIFE. Shaw quickly became a family friend and was a frequent guest in the Kennedy home. Allowed complete ac- cess, Shaw began to take photographs of the Kennedys in Georgetown and in Washington; on vacation; and even in the White House. In 1964, the year after this print was produced, the image appeared as a half-tone in The John F. Kennedys, a photobook that Shaw compiled just after JFK’s assassination as a tribute to the family Shaw had grown to love. As Shaw died unexpectedly in 1969 at the age of 47, Kennedy prints bearing his studio stamps are quite rare. A beautiful print.

34.
34.

“Presentation” first edition, number 507 of an undetermined limitation, signed by Lindbergh on a tipped-in leaf.

Winner of the 1954 Pulitzer Prize for Autobiography, this is Lindbergh’s riveting account of the first solo nonstop flight between the United States and Europe he undertook in 1927. “At its exciting best, this book keeps the reader cockpit close to a rare adventure” (Time). Illustrated with 16 pages of photographs, double-page map of the flight, and mechanical diagrams of the plane. Without scarce original shipping carton. A fine signed copy.

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D ecember 2013 | A meric A nA 37 martin luther king , jr . “Whose

37

First edition, presentation/association copy, of King’s last book, published the year before he was assassinated, in scarce original dust jacket, inscribed by him, “To My Dear Friends Marian & Arthur Logan, For whom I have great respect and admiration and whose consistent support is a great source of inspiration. Martin.” Inscriptions signed with King’s first name only are rare.

During her career in show
During her career in show

King’s final book was published the year before the legendary civil rights leader was assassinated in Memphis. Based upon his last address as President of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, delivered in August 1967, the book discusses issues raised by recent urban race riots, white backlash, and the 1966 shooting of James Meredith. “We have inherited a large house, a great ‘world house’ in which we have to live together—black and white, Easterner and Westerner, Gentile and Jew, Catholic and Protestant, Moslem and Hindu.” Civil rights activist Marian Bruce Logan, who had been a cabaret singer in her youth, married Duke Ellington’s physician, Arthur C. Logan. “Mrs. Logan was an associate of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and a campaign aide for several political figures, including Nelson A. Rockefeller, Robert F. Kennedy and Robert F. Wagner. Mayor Abraham D. Beame appointed Mrs. Logan to head the Commission on Human Rights in 1977. During her two-year tenure she worked to stop

the practice of redlining

Along with her husband, Dr. Arthur C. Logan, a surgeon, she was involved in efforts to stabilize the

West Side as an integrated community during urban-renewal efforts there. Mrs. Logan was a socially prominent fund-raiser who generated financial backing for both national and local civil-rights issues and causes, particularly those of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Mrs. Logan was at one time the only Northern board member of the Southern Christian Leadership

Conference. She also raised money for the Congress of Racial Equality and the Urban League

business she sang using the stage name Marian Bruce. In the 1940s and 1950s she starred in the first all-black show to be presented in a Miami Beach nightclub. She also sang in Europe” (New York Times obituary). Cloth with some wear and soiling. Bright dust

jacket with light wear to extremities and some soiling to rear panel. An extremely good copy with important provenance.

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Mixed first and early edition set of the most comprehensive anthropological work on American Indians of its time, with over 320 lithographic and steel-engraved illustrations and maps (many full-page chromolithographs, some with hand-coloring) by Seth Eastman and others. This set a scarce presentation set, inscribed in a secretarial hand in the first three volumes: “C.E. Potter, Esq, with the respects of H.R. Schoolcraft.”

In 1847 Congress authorized Schoolcraft, explorer and former superintendent of Indian Affairs in Michigan, to collect historical and statistical information on the country’s native inhabitants. “Schoolcraft’s work was intended to be a great encyclopedia of information relating to the American Aborigines… It has indeed performed a very important service for Indian history, in col- lecting and preserving an immense amount of historic data. Vocabularies of Indian languages, grammatical analyses, legends of various tribes, biographies of chiefs and warriors, narratives of captivities, histories of Indian wars, emigrations and theories of their origin, are all related and blended in an extraordinary manner. A very large number of beautiful steel engravings are contained in the work, but the most valuable of its illustrations are the drawings of weapons, domestic utensils, instruments of gaming and amusement, sorcery and medicine, objects of worship, their sculptures, paintings and fortifi- cations… and every form of antiquities, which have been discovered” (Sabin 77849). Originally published entirely by Lippincott, Grambo from 1851-57; the final two volumes are slightly later, published by J.B. Lippincott in 1868 and 1860, respectively. Bookplate. Blind embossed stamp of Manchester City Library to title pages and frontispiece (only) of Volumes V and VI. Fine condition. A lovely, complete set.

City Library to title pages and frontispiece (only) of Volumes V and VI. Fine condition. A
City Library to title pages and frontispiece (only) of Volumes V and VI. Fine condition. A
City Library to title pages and frontispiece (only) of Volumes V and VI. Fine condition. A

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$20,000.
$20,000.

37.

Rare 1776 London edition of Paine’s Common Sense, printed within months of the first American edition, a work of such paramount interest to both America and Britain that this fourth London edition was issued almost certainly before the Declaration of Independence—that founding document whose issuance on July 4, 1776 “was due more to Paine’s Common Sense than to any one other single piece of writing,” bound in one volume with the scarce second edition of Plain Truth, attributed to James Chalmers and considered “the most famous answer to Paine’s advocacy for independence in Common Sense” (Howes), along with Additions to Common Sense by various authors and featuring an early retranslated draft of the Articles of Confederation.

This scarce fourth British edition of Common Sense, issued in 1776, the same year as the first, contains Paine’s additions, increasing the original work by one-third. Like most English editions, this contains hiatuses deleting material critical of the English crown and government to avoid prosecution. This copy is notably bound, as issued, with the second British edition of Plain Truth (initially issued in March of 1776), “one of the better known attacks on Common Sense. In addition, this copy is bound with Additions to Common Sense: a collection of ten essays responding to Common Sense. All 1776 editions of Common Sense are rare and desirable and increasingly difficult to obtain. Adams, American Independence 222y; 208f; 223d. Text clean and fine. A rare and important 1776 American Revolutionary collection.

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L iterature | D ecember 2013 40 L iTer ATure cervantes Important Second Edition, And First

LiTer ATure

L iterature | D ecember 2013 40 L iTer ATure cervantes Important Second Edition, And First
L iterature | D ecember 2013 40 L iTer ATure cervantes Important Second Edition, And First

cervantes

Important Second Edition, And First Folio Edition, Of The First English Translation Of Don Quixote, 1652

38.
38.

CERVANTES SAAVEDRA, Miguel de. The History of The Valorous and Witty Knight Errant, Don-Quixote,

$16,000.

Of the Mancha. London, 1652. Small folio, early full dark brown calf.

Second edition of the first English translation of this “universal classic and arguably the greatest book ever written in Spanish” (Folger’s Choice 30). The first folio edition, preceded only by the exceptionally rare 1612-20 small quarto first edition by the same translator (Thomas Shelton).

The Spanish first edition appeared in two parts in 1605 and 1614, and the first part of Thomas Shelton’s English version was published in 1612 and is very rare; the second part was added in 1620, both published in quarto. This is the first single-volume Shelton edition, and is the first folio edition. “It is interesting to realize that the first modern novel was composed by a sick, aged and impoverished man, who believed that a satirical tale might produce more revenue than the poems and plays that he regarded as his more serious mission. Under the guise of a parody on romances of chivalry, Cervantes created a study of reality and illusion, madness and sanity, that links him with such acute 16th-century students of psychology as Erasmus, Rabelais, Montaigne, and Shakespeare” (Folger’s Choice 30). Wing C1776. Iconografia de las Ediciones del Quijote, 399. Sedó 1152. Rio y Rico 440. See PMM 111. Discreet early owner signature on title page. Closed tear to leaf Nn, just touching woodcut ornament. Restoration to extremities of binding. An extremely good copy of this scarce early English edition.

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D e c e m b e r 2013 | L iterature “Holmes!… Is It Really

Preferred first English edition, considered far more desirable and valuable than the American printing (which preceded it by only one month), illustrated by Sidney Paget.

Having tired of his popular sleuth, Conan Doyle sent Sherlock Holmes over the Reichenbach Falls at the close of The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes (1893). Although Holmes returned in The Hound of the Baskervilles (1902), the author took care to set that adventure prior to the detective’s demise, leaving Holmes—so Conan Doyle hoped—to rest forever in peace. The author was, however, “persuaded to revive Sherlock Holmes by the generous offers made by the proprietors of [Collier’s Weekly Magazine]: $25,000 for six stories, $30,000 for eight or $45,000 for 13. No conditions were attached. He replied on a postcard:

‘Very well. A.C.D.… The plots did come and 13 stories were written” (Green & Gibson, 140-41). The first of the new series, “The Adventure of the Empty House,” debuted in October 1903. “When the story went on sale, the bookstores and stalls in London were mobbed by thousands of purchasers who literally fought for copies” (Nash, 1016). The game was once more afoot, and the great detective would don his deerstalker for 20 more short stories and one novel before Conan Doyle retired him permanently in 1927. This copy with duplicates of two plates bound in. Green & Gibson A29a. Near-fine condition.

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First Edition Of Dickens’ Hard Times, In Original Cloth

40. DICKENS, Charles. Hard Times. For These Times. London,

1854. Octavo, original olive cloth, custom half morocco clamshell

box.

$4000.

First edition in book form of Dickens’ attack on the conditions of life in England’s industrial cities, in original cloth.

First published serially in Household Words from April to August, 1854, followed immediately by this first edition in book form, Hard Times focuses on the inadequacy of a lifestyle that emphasizes only the human intellect at the expense of the imagination and “the heart.” Dickens also attacked the conditions of life in England’s industrial cities, which produced the wealth that made his country the foremost industrial power in the mid-19th century—but at a great cost to human happiness. Hard Times was viewed as a departure from the author’s previous tales, presenting what was to become an increasingly somber picture of contemporary society in Dickens’ works. With half title. Eckel, 131. Bookplate of book collector and Grolier Club member Myrtle A. Crummer. Morocco bookplate. Interior fine, extremities toned to brown. A desirable near-fine copy.

Club member Myrtle A. Crummer. Morocco bookplate. Interior fine, extremities toned to brown. A desirable near-fine

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L iterature | D ecember 2013 42 arthur conan doyle 41. gilt-stamped red cloth. “Not Such
41. gilt-stamped red cloth.
41.
gilt-stamped red cloth.

First edition, first issue, of the third Sherlock Holmes novel, widely regarded as the best of the series and “one of the most gripping stories in the English language,” wth 16 illustrations by Sidney Paget. A beautiful copy.

Although Conan Doyle had killed off his most famous character by sending him over the Reichenbach Falls while grappling with Professor Moriarty in “The Final Problem” (December 1893), his readership demanded the sleuth’s return. The author obliged with this, the third—and still considered by many the best—Sherlock Holmes novel, carefully positioned on the title page as “another adventure” of Holmes. “But,” as Howard Haycraft notes, “the seed of doubt was planted”; and while the novel proved an immediate success, readers continued to press for more. Conan Doyle finally relented and engineered Holmes’ “resurrection” in 1903. The Hound of the Baskervilles remains “one of the most gripping books in the language” (Crime & Mystery 100 Best 6). “The supernatural is handled with great effect and no letdown. The plot and subplots are thoroughly integrated and the false clues put in and removed with a master hand. The criminal is superb… and the secondary figures each contribute to the total effect of brilliancy and grandeur combined. One wishes one could be reading it for the first time” (Barzun & Taylor 1142). Green & Gibson A26a. A fine, beautiful copy.

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contemporary three-quarter red $18,500. morocco gilt. Important “New York Edition” (trade issue) of Henry

Important “New York Edition” (trade issue) of Henry James’ works, with 26 beautiful frontispiece photogravures by Alvin Langdon Coburn and special prefaces prepared by James specifically for this edition, handsomely bound in contemporary morocco-gilt.

this edition, handsomely bound in contemporary morocco-gilt. “While James had contemplated a collected edition of his

“While James had contemplated a collected edition of his works as early as 1900, serious discussions of the idea did not start until 1904… A number of publishers were considered… but James ‘cherished’ the idea of Scribners,” likely because they had published or were publishing the collected works of Robert Louis Stevenson, George Meredith and other authors James admired. The collection was to be “a ‘testamentary act,’ an edition definitive, one that would… ensure James’ place as a master of fiction on the level of Balzac.” A tumultuous publication history ensued, and “it is not an exaggeration to say that the public reception of The New York Edition… was a financial and emotional disaster for James” (Supino, 397-400). Time has, however, viewed this edition far more favorably, prizing it for not only for James’ specially prepared, insightful prefaces but also Coburn’s photogravure frontispieces. Selected by James himself, they include landscape and architectural views, and a portrait of the author in the first volume. Recognized for his distinctive photographs of cities and people, Coburn helped found the Photo-Secession Group of photographers. He won renown for his works’ misty atmosphere and his portraits of prominent artists and writers; those of Henry James rank among his most memorable. This set includes the final two volumes called for in a complete, 26-volume set. Because they were published posthumously, eight years after the last of the rest, they are scarce and often missing and contain the last of James’ writings before his death. About-fine condition.

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First editions of Kipling’s classic Jungle Books, “replete with adventure and excitement.”

“Among the 15 stories in [these volumes] are some of Kipling’s most memorable narratives” (Abraham, 36). “The child who has never run with Mowgli’s wolf pack, or stood with Parnesius and Pertinax to defend the Northern Wall… has missed something that he will not get from any other writer” (Carpenter & Prichard, 297). Illustrated largely by W.H. Drake and Kipling’s father, J. Lockwood Kipling, “this most desirable pair… will always fill an honorable place in any library of children’s books” (Quayle 87). Livingston 104, 116. Bookplates. Previous owner’s blindstamp in Jungle Book, pencil owner signature in Second Jungle Book. A couple of minor instances of light foxing to Second Jungle Book. Jungle Book with expert inner paper hinge reinforcement, light expert color restoration to cloth. Both volumes exceptional with bright gilt. A lovely about-fine set.

Illustrated Works Of Shakespeare, Beautifully Bound In Full Vellum-Gilt, One Of Only 175 Sets 44.
Illustrated Works Of Shakespeare, Beautifully Bound In Full Vellum-Gilt,
One Of Only 175 Sets
44.
SHAKESPEARE, William. The Works. London, 1899. Twelve volumes. Octavo, publisher’s
full vellum gilt.
$7500.
Fine set of the “Larger Temple Shakespeare,” one of only 175 sets printed on handmade paper,
beautifully illustrated with 40 full-page plates (30 hand-tinted), and copious in-text line cuts.
This splendid edition of Shakespeare’s
Works “aims at the elucidation of the
text by means of illustrative drawings
from old books, broadsides, antiquarian
objects, [and] maps, belonging for the
most part, to the poet’s own times.”
With a biography of Shakespeare,
“newly discovered” frontispiece portrait
published for the first time, a folding
view of London during Shakespeare’s
day, facsimile title and preliminary
pages from the First Folio, and glossa-
ries of Shakespearian English. Chapter
headings printed in red. Early gift in-
scription. Interior generally fine, beauti-
ful publisher’s vellum with only very
mild soiling, gilt exceptionally bright. A
lovely set.

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45 D e c e m b e r 2013 | L iterature john milton “The

First folio edition and first illustrated edition of Milton’s magnum opus, Paradise Lost, featuring 13 copper-engraved plates, including frontispiece portrait of Milton and 12 beautiful copper-engraved plates, one for each of the 12 books, the “crowning effort” of renowned publisher Tonson, rarely found together in one volume with the same year’s elegant folio edition of Paradise Regain’d and Samson Agonistes, from the library of famed bibliophile Estelle Doheny with her gilt morocco bookplate, in contemporary paneled calf.

Dryden referred to Paradise Lost as “one of the greatest, most noble and sub- lime poems which either this age or nation has produced.” This rare volume contains the splendid “first folio edition of Paradise Lost and the first to be illustrated” (Wither to Prior 607), with a copper-plate engraved frontispiece of Milton by R. White that contains the first publication of Dryden’s lines on Milton, and 12 full-page copper-plate engravings: ten signed by Burgesse, who also appears in the subscriber’s list, one signed by P.P. Bouche, and “the eighth plate, one of the best, is anonymous” (Pforzheimer 720). This is “the earliest serious effort to illustrate an important work of English poetry” (Hodnet, 63). In one volume with this handsomely illustrated first folio edition of Paradise Lost and is the same year’s Paradise Regain’d and Samson Agonistes, “for which purpose it seems to have been published.” Tonson, London’s foremost publisher, “considered this publication his crowning effort” (Wither to Prior 615, 607). He “was a great admirer of Paradise Lost, and he would eventually acquire Milton’s corrected manuscript… which eventually led to the publica- tion of [this] lavish folio edition in 1688” (Bristol, 58). Paradise Lost first published in 1667. Paradise Regain’d and Samson Agonistes first published in 1671. From the library of renowned bibliophile Estelle Doheney, with her gilt morocco bookplate. Text and plates generally fresh, frontispiece mounted, Paradise Lost title page with expert archival repair to small hole minimally affecting one letter, a few other expertly repaired marginal tears to text, minor rubbing to boards. An excellent copy with fine impressions of plates.

expertly repaired marginal tears to text, minor rubbing to boards. An excellent copy with fine impressions

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First edition, first issue, of this collection of 63 humorous pieces by Twain, in very scarce publisher’s morocco binding.

Sketches, New and Old gathered 63 writings and originally sold by subscription for $3 to $6… [and] offered a dazzling variety of subjects, from time to tourism to taxes, from national prejudices to politics, from mock romance to domestic comedy… Includes enough humor, satire, social criticism, and philosophy to engage any reader and to in- crease the growth of Mark Twain’s reputation” (LeMaster & Wilson, 685). With wood-engraved frontispiece and numerous in-text engrav- ings by the most prolific of Twain illustrators, True Williams. Copies bound in the publisher’s three-quarter morocco are exceedingly scarce:

four years after publication 25,445 cloth copies had been sold, com- pared to 5145 in sheep and a mere 298 in three-quarter morocco. Contemporary ink presentation inscription dated in the year of publi- cation. Bookplate. Minor and expert restoration to spine ends only. A beautiful copy.

and expert restoration to spine ends only. A beautiful copy. 47. portrait. “None Genuine Without This
47. portrait.
47.
portrait.

Autograph note signed by Mark Twain. The humorous note, entirely in Twain’s hand, reads: “None genuine without this label on the bottle: Mark Twain. Jan. ‘85.”

A delightful, humorous inscription by Twain, written the same month that Huckleberry Finn was first published. Fine condition, handsomely framed.

“A Window Opened Into This Unexplored Abyss” 47 48. VERNE, Jules. Twenty Thousand Leagues Under
“A Window Opened Into This Unexplored Abyss”
47
48.
VERNE, Jules. Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Seas…
Boston, 1873. Octavo, original green cloth. $6200.
First American edition, second and usual issue, of Verne’s classic,
preceded by the very rare Osgood issue, known only in as few as 30
copies. With 110 splendid full-page woodcut illustrations.
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Originally published in France in 1869-1870, 20,000 Leagues Under
the Sea has a complex publishing history in English, and particularly
in the United States. It was originally published in English by Sampson
Low in London, late in 1872. In November, 1872, James R.
Osgood published the first American edition in Boston, using
the sheets from the London edition and with a new title page.
Shortly thereafter, George M. Smith published this edition in
a format and binding very similar to the Osgood edition, and,
curiously, with the imprint “Edition of James R. Osgood” on
the title page. For an unknown reason, copies of Osgood’s
edition were quickly unavailable. There is some speculation
that the majority of copies were destroyed in the Great Boston
Fire (November 9-10, 1872). It is also possible that Osgood’s
issue was only available by subscription, making Smith’s edi-
tion the first trade edition of the title to be sold in America.
As few as thirty copies of the Osgood edition are known to
exist, making the true first American edition an incredibly
scarce publication and making this Smith issue a very desir-
able collector’s edition. Myers 56. Bookplate, early owner ink
signature. Front inner hinge expertly reinforced. Minor soil-
ing, gilt bright. A near-fine copy.
Most Important Foundation… Of The Science Fiction Genre” 49. WELLS, H.G. The Time Machine. London, 1895.
$6000.
$6000.

Preferred first English edition of H.G. Wells’ first, groundbreaking “scientific romance,” in original cloth.

In 1894 Wells “began writing what he called ‘single sitting stories’ using his special knowledge of science, culminating in the publication of his novella The Time Machine in 1895… It was an immediate success” (Gunn, Gilgamesh to Wells, 337). Its earliest readers grasped its significance: as one contemporary review states, “So far as our knowledge goes [Wells] has produced that rarity which Solomon declared to be not merely rare but non-existent—a ‘new thing under the sun” (Bergonzi, 41). Important not only for establishing Wells as a popular author but also for its “crucial breakthrough in narrative technology, providing science fiction with one of its most significant facilitating devices” (Clute & Nicholls, 1227), “it is the most important foundation stone of British scientific romance and the science fiction genre in general” (Anatomy of Wonder II:1232). This edition retains more of the text from the novel’s 1895 New Review serial appearance than the American edition (published in May of the same year; the English edition published in May and August of the same year), and is thus preferred. Currey, 424. Bookplate. Very nearly fine condition, far nicer than usually found.

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w.h. auden

“Mussolini May Stamp As Hitler May Shout/ But Lies In The End Will Always Come Out”:

Autograph Manuscript Of Auden’s Enduring Poem On The Holocaust, Refugee Blues, Signed By Him And With Two Unpublished Stanzas

50. AUDEN, W.H. Autograph manuscript poem signed. No place, no date. Octavo, two leaves, each written on one

side only, 42 lines, 14 verses in blue ink. $15,000. Autograph manuscript of the poem
side only, 42 lines, 14 verses in blue ink.
$15,000.
Autograph manuscript of the poem “Refugee Blues” (here entitled “Song”) in Auden’s hand, signed by him and with his
corrections, showing numerous interesting variations from the published poem, including an additional two stanzas
apparently unpublished.
In 1939 W.H. Auden and Christopher Isherwood
made the momentous decision to emigrate to
America. Auden had experienced first-hand the
growing force of Nazi Germany. In the 1920s he
had visited Berlin, when the threat of Nazism
was already rising. In 1935 he married Erika
Mann, the daughter of the German novelist
Thomas Mann and an ardent anti-Nazi, in order
to provide her with a British passport to escape
from Nazi Germany. In departing England,
Auden did not turn from the war, but instead in
a burst of creative energy composed in his first
months in America some of his most powerful
and prophetic poetry, including one of the great
poems of World War II, “September 1, 1939,”
and this, his haunting testament to the
Holocaust, “Refugee Blues.” The poem clearly
and poignantly addressed the annihilation of
the Jews in Germany. The narrator, in a song-
like cadence, says:
“Say this city has ten million souls,
Some are living in mansions, some are living
in holes:
Yet there’s no place for us, my dear, yet there’s
no place for us…
“The consul banged the table and said,
‘If you’ve got no passport you’re officially dead’:
But we are still alive, my dear, but we are still alive…”
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There are several interesting variations in this manuscript version from the version printed in Collected Poems, as well as four corrections by Auden in which he crosses out and rewrites words or phrases. Of greatest significance is the inclusion in this manuscript version of two stanzas not included in the published version. In verse 12 the narrator refers to train coaches that are full:

“Ran down to the station to catch the express Asked for two tickets to happiness But every coach was full, my dear, but every coach was full.”

49

And the final, hopeful verse, which also does not appear in published versions of the poem, reads:

“Mussolini may stamp as Hitler may shout But lies in the end will always come out No matter what they do, my dear, no matter what they do.”

Minor paper clip rust mark to margin of one leaf. Auden’s writing clear and bold. An extremely desirable signed manu- script poem in fine condition.

Vintage gelatin silver print by Lotte Jacobi, signed by her with her embossed “New York” studio stamp in the lower right corner of print recto, her famed 1946 portrait of poet W.H. Auden, his face half in shadow, half in soft light, quietly intent on the open book in his hands.

in soft light, quietly intent on the open book in his hands. The photographs of Lotte

The photographs of Lotte Jacobi, one of the 20th- century’s finest portraitists, “are celebrated for their directness, their penetrating immediacy, and their ability to convey the essence of the subject before her camera.” (Sundstrom, 1). Jacobi’s photographs cap- tured the vibrancy of Berlin’s Weimar culture before she was forced to flee Nazi Germany in the 1930s. In the 1940s her New York studio became a second home to many, like her, exiled by force or choice from their native lands. That sensitivity resonates in

this famous portrait of British poet W.H. Auden, who often “depicted himself as a voyager” and in 1946, when this was taken, had just returned from “a visit to the war ruins of Europe” (Davenport-Hines, 1, 228). With Jacobi’s trademark penciled signature at the lower right corner of the

print recto, immediately beneath her embossed stamp: “Lotte Jacobi, New York.” From the estate of Lotte Jacobi. A fine signed print.

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Signed limited first edition, one of only 250 copies signed by Faulkner, with scarce original acetate dust wrapper.

The first novel in the acclaimed and popular Snopes trilogy, The Hamlet was the only novel Faulkner published between Absalom, Absalom! in 1936 and Knight’s Gambit in 1949. The critical re- sponse was very positive: Malcolm Cowley considered it Faulkner’s best work since Sanctuary, while The New York Times hailed it as “nothing short of superb—subtle and yet direct, hu- morous, homely, brilliantly evocative of a decaying South in the generation after the Civil War… In this book he is unsurpassable” (Blotner, 416). Petersen A.22.1a. Brodsky 210. Fine condition. Scarce and desirable.

A.22.1a. Brodsky 210. Fine condition. Scarce and desirable. 53. “Faulkner Knows Exactly What He Is Doing”
53.
53.

Signed limited first edition, one of only 250 specially bound copies, signed by Faulkner.

This collection of seven interconnected stories about the Sartoris family includes six previously published stories and one new story, “An Odor of Verbena.” “The stories are full of action… and its outdoor scenes of fights with Yankees and highwaymen, its pictures of the transformation of well-bred Southern boys to horse thieves and killers, give The Unvanquished something of the air of Two Little Confederates as it might have been written by an

author aware of the race problem, economics, and Freudian psychology… Faulkner knows exactly what he is doing in tracing the New South to its origins in the Old” (Time magazine, see In Tall Cotton 55). No dust jacket or slipcase was issued with this edition. Petersen A19.1. Brodsky 193. Fine condition.

54.

Signed limited first edition, one of only 500 copies signed by Frost, with frontispiece photograph of the poet. Scarce in original glassine.

“The most highly esteemed American poet of the 20th century… T.S. Eliot [in 1959] toasted Frost as ‘perhaps the most eminent, the most distinguished Anglo-American poet now living,’ whose ‘kind of local feeling in poetry… can go without universality: the relation of Dante to Florence… of Robert Frost to New England” (ANB). Comprehensive through 1949, this edition includes “Mending Wall,” “The Death of a Hired Man,” “The Road Not Taken” and “Storm Fear.” Crane A35. A fine copy with the scarcely seen glassine.

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the scarcely seen glassine. 51 December 2013 | Literature Inscribed Presentation Copy Of Hemingway’s Classic The

Early printing, a scarce presentation copy of Hemingway’s masterful tale of “a fishing adventure… as close to tragedy as fishing may be” (New York Times), inscribed: “To James — with sincere best wishes always, Ernest Hemingway.”

— with sincere best wishes always, Ernest Hemingway.” William Faulkner, who reviewed The Old Man and

William Faulkner, who reviewed The Old Man and the Sea for the magazine Shenandoah, called the novel Hemingway’s best: “Time may show it to be the best single piece of any of us. I mean his and my con- temporaries” (Baker, 593-94). “Here is the master technician once more at the top of his form, doing superbly what he can do better than anyone else” (New York Times). The Old Man and the Sea is among the most desirable and scarcest of Hemingway’s works to obtain inscribed. Early printing, with no date on title page and without Scribner “A” beneath copyright no- tice, with publisher’s code M-7.56[H] indicating this this is the 13th printing, printed in July, 1956. Later-issue dust jacket as well, with mention of the Nobel Prize for Literature 1954 on the rear panel, and with scarce publisher’s printed belly band also mentioning the Nobel Prize. See Hanneman A24a. Book fine, minor creasing to dust jacket spine head. A lovely inscribed copy in very nearly fine condition.

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L iterature | D ecember 2013 52 ernest hemingway Association First Edition Of For Whom The
Association First Edition Of For Whom The Bell Tolls, Inscribed By Hemingway 56. HEMINGWAY, Ernest.
Association First Edition Of For Whom The Bell Tolls, Inscribed By Hemingway
56.
HEMINGWAY, Ernest. For Whom the Bell Tolls. New York, 1940. Octavo, original beige cloth, dust
jacket.
$14,000.
First edition of this classic Hemingway novel, inscribed: “To Gregg Sinclair, with all good wishes, Ernest
Hemingway.”
“This is the best book Ernest Hemingway has written, the fullest, the
deepest, the truest. It will, I think, be one of the major novels of
American literature… Hemingway has struck universal chords, and
he has struck them vibrantly” (J. Donald Adams). Binding is a variant
with lettering on white panels on the spine, as opposed to on red
panels, as usually seen. Hanneman A18a. Inscribed to Gregg Sinclair,
the University of Hawaii professor who hosted a luncheon for
Hemingway at the Willows Restaurant during his Hawaiian vacation
in February 1941. Book with light staining to endpapers; rear inner
paper hinge split; light soiling to spine. Light restoration to dust jacket.
Minor water spot to inscription. A nice inscribed copy.
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$22,500.
$22,500.

57.

Signed limited first edition of Hemingway’s “consummate masterpiece,” one of only 510 copies signed by him, a splendid copy, uncut and entirely unopened, in scarce original slipcase.

“Probably [Hemingway’s] best… Its success was so enormous… After it one could no more imitate that musical crystal- clear style; blown like glass from the white-heat of violence… the beginning, like all his beginnings, seems effortless and magical” (Connally 60). “A Farewell to Arms was the novel that placed Hemingway, early, among the American masters… [it is], in fact, the most satisfying and most sustained, the consummate masterpiece, among Hemingway’s novels. It bears the mark of Hemingway’s best gifts as a writer” (Mellow, 377-79). The only signed limited first edition of any of Hemingway’s works. Without rarely found glassine. Hanneman A8b. An almost perfect copy with only very slight soiling to vellum spine ends; slipcase expertly restored.

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Beautiful First Edition Of Heinlein’s Classic Stranger In A Strange Land

58. HEINLEIN, Robert. Stranger in a Strange Land. New York, 1961.

$8500.

Octavo, original green cloth, dust jacket.

First edition of Heinlein’s most famous and influential novel.

“An amazing, iconoclastic and complex satire of hypocrisy in sex and religion… A radical departure from conventional science fiction” (Patterson, 29, 48). “It reached large audiences farther away from his science fiction roots than anything else [Heinlein] wrote, and inspired insurgencies both right and left” (Anatomy of Wonder II-518). The novel won Heinlein his third Hugo Award—and while it strikes many readers as wildly divergent from his previous Hugo-winning book, Starship Troopers (1959), the author once claimed that the two works explored the same theme: “love and duty—and how they are related to the survival of our race.” Currey, 193. Smiley, 36. Book fine, only very light wear to extremities of bright dust jacket. An about-fine copy of this science-fiction landmark.

jacket. An about-fine copy of this science-fiction landmark. 59. “Yes, Everybody’s Happy Now”: First Edition Of
59.
59.

First trade edition of Huxley’s haunting dystopian classic, this copy inscribed in the year of publication by William Theodore Golden, the prominent American statesman and entrepreneur who forged a path for science in America, initiating the creation of a national science adviser under Truman, and pivotal in the creation of the National Science Foundation—“an icon in the American scientific community” (Washington Post).

“After the success of his first three novels, Huxley abandoned the fictional milieu of literary London and directed his satire toward an imagined future. He admitted that the original idea of Brave New World was to challenge H.G. Wells’ Utopian vision… The book was immediately successful” (Parker & Kermode, 161-62). It remains the “seminal dystopia… As argument and as satire, Brave New World is a compendium of usable points and quotable jibes… and has provided material for much subsequent fiction,” not only within speculative fiction but also beyond it (Clute & Nicholls, 606). Preceded by the signed limited edition of 324 copies. Owner inscription of William Theodore Golden, a prominent American statesman and entrepreneur “who earned a fortune in the 1930s through canny Wall Street investments, spent more than 50 years bringing the foremost minds of science together with presidents, mayors and international leaders… Golden became a consultant to President Truman in 1950 and recommended that he hire a scientist to monitor the nation’s research efforts. Every president since has had an official science adviser. Golden also helped launch the National Science Foundation… At his death in 2007, Golden was remembered as “an icon in the American scientific community” (Washington Post). Text fine, lightest edge-wear to bright gilt cloth; chipping to spine head of dust jacket minimally affecting spine title. A highly desirable near-fine copy.

gilt cloth; chipping to spine head of dust jacket minimally affecting spine title. A highly desirable

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D e c e m b e r 2013 | L iterature margaret mitchell 55 “My

55

“My Dear, I Don’t Give A Damn”: First Edition Of Gone With The Wind, Signed
“My Dear, I Don’t Give A Damn”: First Edition Of Gone With The Wind,
Signed By Margaret Mitchell
60.
MITCHELL, Margaret. Gone with the Wind. New York, 1936. Thick octavo, original gray cloth, dust jacket, custom
box.
$20,000.
First edition, first printing, of this American classic, in original dust
jacket, signed by the author.
“This is beyond doubt one of the most remarkable first novels produced
by an American writer. It is also one of the best… It has been a long
while since the American public has been offered such a bounteous
feast of excellent story-telling” (New York Times Book Review, 1936).
Said to be the fastest selling novel in the history of American publishing (50,000 copies in a single day), Gone with the
Wind won Mitchell the Pulitzer Prize. Bookplate with owner’s name eradicated pasted down beneath Mitchell’s signature.
Occasional scattered light foxing to interior; light rubbing to extremities of original cloth. Scarce original dust jacket
extremely good with light wear to extremities and a one-inch closed tear to spine head, light soiling to spine, and tape
residue to verso. Scarce signed.

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61.
61.

First edition of Michener’s first—and Pulitzer-winning—professional writing effort, the basis of the classic musical “South Pacific,” inscribed by the author to a colleague at Macmillan, “Dear Van: This would be ten times as good if I could used [sic] 1% of the real stories you’ve told me in the last few years. Jim Michener.”

“In 1940 Michener began a nine-year association, interrupted by World War II, with the Macmillan publishing firm as a social-science editor. In October 1942 Michener enlisted in the U.S. Navy reserve, was commissioned the following February, served for a year at desk assignments in Washington, D.C. and Philadelphia, and in April 1944 was sent to the Pacific theater of operations. He was partly an aviator inspector but mostly a publications officer. His visits to some 50 islands inspired his Tales of the South Pacific (1947)… Although the

book won a Pulitzer Prize for fiction, it remained little known until South Pacific, the 1949 musical by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II, made him famous and rich. Then he began to write full time” (ANB). “Macmillan apparently had little faith in the book, because the first edition was cheaply produced, with a flimsy dust wrapper and a high-acid-content text stock that has browned badly over the years” (Groseclose, 21). Groseclose A.003. Inscribed to George Lippincott Van Curan, colleague and good friend of Michener in the school textbook division of Macmillan in the late 1940s. Book with slight rubbing to spine ends and extremities. Dust jacket lightly rubbed with three tape repairs to verso. A near-fine inscribed presentation/association copy.

Later printing of Rand’s best-selling and unforgettable celebration of the individual spirit, inscribed by the author: “To Frank N. Skinner— Cordially—Ayn Rand, 5/28/70.”

“To Frank N. Skinner— Cordially—Ayn Rand, 5/28/70.” From 1935 to 1943, Rand worked as a secretary
“To Frank N. Skinner— Cordially—Ayn Rand, 5/28/70.” From 1935 to 1943, Rand worked as a secretary

From 1935 to 1943, Rand worked as a secretary in an architectural firm, and while there wrote The Fountainhead, her first Objectivist novel and her first bestseller. “Reviews of her third novel were generally unfavor- able, but it still became a word-of-mouth bestseller. It is the story of Howard Roark, an architect who is such an individualist and so honor- able (that is, so true to himself) that when one of his designs is modified (in his view, adulterated) by mediocre minds, he destroys his own work. For the rest of her life Rand expanded on this theme” (ANB). “Rand has taken her stand against collectivism, ‘the rule of the second-hander, the ancient monster,’ which has brought men ‘to a level of intellectual inde- cency never equalled on earth.’ She has written a hymn in praise of the individual” (Lorine Pruette). Rand would also write the screenplay for the film version of the novel, released in 1949 and starring Gary Cooper and Patricia Neal. Later printing, without listing of printing number on copyright page, in second-

state dust jacket. Perinn A3. Interior fine; light rubbing to cloth extremities. Light wear to ex- tremities of dust jacket with toning to spine and some expert coloring to spine. An extremely good inscribed copy.

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$19,000.
$19,000.

63.

Scarce first edition of Rand’s first novel, one of only 3000 copies printed, inscribed by the author in the year of publication: “To Mary Virginia Inloes—with the very best wishes of the author. Ayn Rand. June 17, 1936.”

We The Living, Rand’s first novel, was first published in April 1936 in a very small edition of 3000 copies. It details the heroine’s struggle for individualism under Soviet communism and is the most autobiographical of Rand’s novels, published ten years after she fled the Soviet Union for the United States. When the work was re-issued in 1959, Rand noted in the book’s forward that “for those readers who have expressed a personal curiousity about me, I want to say that We the Living is as near to an autobiography as I will ever write.” Without scarce original dust jacket. Perinn A1a. Inloes was a Hollywood literary agent, representing Rand’s play Night of January 16th, which ran on Broadway from September 1935 through April 1936. In a letter to Inloes dated June 18, 1936, one day after the inscription in this copy, Rand wrote: “I have just sent you a copy of my book, for I certainly do not want you to wait for it at a lending library… I am quite happy and proud about the book, much more so that about the unfortunate Night of January 16th. Speaking of Night, I must report that it is doing very well in summer stock. There are several companies doing it now and many more planned. The London production is tentatively scheduled for September. I understand also that a road tour of the big cities is planned for this fall” (Berliner, 31). Interior fine; light soiling to boards and light toning to spine. An extremely good copy, scarce inscribed and with such exceptional provenance.

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First edition of Sinclair’s muckraking classic, warmly inscribed by him to his patron, the social reformer and millionaire philanthropist Geoffrey D. Herron: “To Geo. D. Herron with sincerest gratitude & affection from The Author. Princeton N.J. Feb 17th ’06.”

Sinclair’s famous exposé of Chicago meatpacking practices led to the im- mediate passage of food-inspection laws, but failed to generate the ground- swell of sympathy for the International Socialist cause for the author had hoped would follow. Rohde, 38. This copy is inscribed to George D. Herron “an early important figure in the rise of the Social Gospel in American Protestantism… Herron subsidized Sinclair while he wrote Manassas:

Herron subsidized Sinclair while he wrote Manassas: A Novel of the War (1904), a well- researched

A Novel of the War (1904), a well- researched novel combining history and politics” (ANB). Bookplate and inventory log of Willard S. Morse, an avid collector of Americana, with particularly large collections of Bret Harte, Howard Pyle, and Upton Sinclair. Bookplate of Dr. and Mrs. Elmer Belt, known for their spectacular collections of Florence Nightingale, Leonardo da Vinci, and Upton Sinclair. Early bookseller advertisement. Text leaf detached, inner pa- per hinge split, only light rubbing to cloth extremities. An attractive, near-fine presenta- tion/association copy, with an outstanding provenance.

65.
65.

First trade edition of Steinbeck’s fourth novel, published at the height of the Great Depression and hailed as “the best strike and labor novel to come out of our contemporary economic and social unrest” (New York Times), in scarce dust jacket.

“Among Steinbeck’s best novels, the least known is probably In Dubious Battle… It furnishes a handle by which one can grasp the larger intentions of Steinbeck’s work” (New York Times Book Review). Steinbeck’s fourth novel, this was the first of his to examine the lives of migrant workers. On publication it was praised as “one of the most courageous and desperately honest books that has appeared in a long time. It is also, both dramatically and realistically, the best strike and labor novel to come out of our contemporary economic and social unrest” (New York Times). “Considered one of the great strike novels of the Depression years, In Dubious Battle has as its setting Watsonville, California, only a few miles from Salinas and the home of [Steinbeck’s] sister, Esther Rodgers. It was awarded the Commonwealth Club of California Medal for 1936” (Salinas, 23). In October 2008, the New York Times asked President Barack Obama to provide a list of books and writers that were significant to him; In Dubious Battle was one of the president’s selections. Preceded only by the signed limited edition of 99 copies. Goldstone & Payne A5b. An exceptionally fine copy.

Signed limited first edition of Steinbeck’s epic and moving story of a modern Cain and Abel, one of 1500 copies signed by the author.

Steinbeck wrote of East of Eden, his masterful modern reworking of the tale of Cain and Abel, that it “has everything in it I have been able to learn about my art or craft or profession in all these years… I think everything else I have written has been, in a sense, practice for this” (Salinas Public Library, 45). As a contemporary reviewer put it, “Steinbeck is never dull and, even if you miss his message, you’ll not be bored. There is only one Steinbeck and no one writes about ‘his people’ as well” (W. Max Gordon). Without original cardboard slipcase, original acetate dust jacket. Goldstone & Payne A32a. Light foxing to endpapers. Fine condition.

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67.
67.

Limited first edition, one of 3200 copies printed for friends of the author and the publisher of Steinbeck’s Nobel Prize speech, with striking photographic frontispiece portrait by Paul Farber. A fine copy, signed by Steinbeck on the title page.

Farber. A fine copy, signed by Steinbeck on the title page. “On the morning of October

“On the morning of October 25, 1962, Elaine was cooking breakfast in the house at Sag Harbor when John, dressed in pajamas and robe, padded over to the television set in the adjoining sitting room to turn on the news. It was the period of the Cuban missile crisis and John wanted to see, as he muttered to Elaine, ‘if the world was still turning.’ The first words that came from the set were, ‘John Steinbeck has been awarded the Nobel Prize for literature.’ John was thunderstruck—he had absolutely no idea that he had even been under consideration that year… As his reputation with the literary establishment [had] faded [since his first nomination in 1945]… the idea that he might get the prize had long ago left his mind.” Indeed, the press largely responded with faint and tepid praise, questioning the Nobel committee’s judgment. “Because

of the opposition, [Steinbeck] felt he was under particular pressure to come up with the best possible speech… He worried and fretted and stormed about the house, trying draft after draft… ‘I don’t know whether or not it’s good but at least it’s me… Now they can take it or leave it. Only I hope I get the money first” (Benson,

914-18). Valentine 269. Morroco-gilt bookplate inside clamshell. A fine copy of a speech seldom found signed.

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68.
68.

Scarce first edition, first issue, one of a scant 650 copies sold, of Steinbeck’s lyrical and incisive portrait of the verdant heart of California and its people—“points the way to most of his subsequent writing”—a beautiful copy in original dust jacket.

The Pastures of Heaven, Steinbeck’s second-published book, “began as an idea for a volume of interconnected short stories… The setting was also prepared for the writing of Pastures by Steinbeck’s interest in family history, continuity and inheritance, particularly in father-son relationships.” Shortly after submitting the completed manuscript, Steinbeck wrote, “‘If the reader will take them for what they are, and will not be governed by what a short story should be (for they are not short stories at all, but tiny novels) then they should be charming… There is no grand writing nor any grand theme, but I love the stories very much” (Benson, 209, 219). Critics praised The Pastures of Heaven on publication as “the first flight of a fine writing talent” (Nation), especially “noteworthy for its originality of phrase and image and a strongly poetic feeling” (New York Times Book Review). Among other achievements, it “represents Steinbeck’s first effective use of local color and legend” (Salinas Public Library, 19). “Today The Pastures of Heaven is the most popular of Steinbeck’s three early books. It points the way to most of his subsequent writing” (Valentine 14). “Brewer, Warren & Putnam printed 2500 sets of sheets, of which 1650 were bound and about 650 copies sold. The remainder were sold to Robert O. Ballou in 1932” (Goldstone & Payne, 22). Goldstone & Payne A2a. Bruccoli & Clark I:353. Valentine 14. Near-fine dust jacket lightly rubbed with minor abrasions to spine, light wear to edges. Book fine. A lovely, desirable copy of an elusive and significant Steinbeck first edition.

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D e c e m b e r 2013 | L iterature “The Imagination Is The

Limited first edition of Stevens’ Pulitzer Prize-winning collection, one of 2500 copies, this copy inscribed by the poet within two weeks of publication:

“The imagination is the power of the mind over the possibilities of things. Nec. Angel, 136. To —. Wallace Stevens. Oct. 14, 1954.”

Critically praised as “a triumph of the imagination,” Stevens’ Collected Poems, which he wanted to call The Whole Harmonium and resisted publishing because “a collected volume seemed final,” was specially published in his honor, on his 75th birthday. “They are proof, as their author has said, that Poetry is one of the sanctions of life” (New York Times). Containing the complete poems of seminal works such as Harmonium (1931), Ideas of Order (1935) and Transport to Summer (1923), among others. Awarded the 1955 Pulitzer Prize for Poetry. With the exception of six poems, “all those in ‘The Rock’ appear here for the first time in book form.” This limited first edition published October 1, 1954. Morse A19. Edelstein 23.a.1. A fine copy.

October 1, 1954. Morse A19. Edelstein 23.a.1. A fine copy. 61 70. Inscribed By Wallace Stevens,

61

70.
70.
$5500.
$5500.

First edition of Stevens’s classic collection, one of 1000 copies, signed and dated by him, “Wallace Stevens, June 10, 1954,” only one year before he won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry, scarce in second state dust jacket. A beautiful copy.

To critic Harold Bloom, “Blue Guitar is a very American poem, and deliberately so. Its precursor poem is [Whitman’s] Song of Myself.” In this volume’s title poem, together with “A Thought Revolved,” “The Men That Are Falling” and the poet’s revised version of “Owl’s Clover” (1936), Stevens continues his goal to emphasize “the opposition between things as they are and things imagined; in short, to isolate poetry.” Awarded the 1955 Pulitzer Prize for Poetry, “no poet gives us more to think about or greater reward for thinking” (Chiasson, New York Review of Books). A fine inscribed copy.

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First trade edition, published only one year before Thomas’ death, signed and dated 1953 by Thomas, in scarce dust jacket.

Dylan Thomas’ last collection of new poetry includes “Poem on His Birthday,” the famed villanelle “Do Not Go Gentle into that Good Night,” “Lament” and “In Country Sleep.” Interviewed just before the book’s publication, Thomas said, “I’ve never seen what a poem really looks like. But I keep trying” (Ferris, 274). He died the following year. With photograph of Thomas mounted on the title page. The first trade edition was published the same year as the signed limited first edition of only 100 copies. Rolph B15. Maud, 18. Book fine; only slight wear to extremities of scarce, unrestored dust jacket. A fine signed copy.

of scarce, unrestored dust jacket. A fine signed copy. 72. Signed By Hunter S. Thompson: First
72.
72.

First edition of Thompson’s edgy journey into the American dream, boldly signed by him with his characteristic “H.S. Thompson,” and additionally dated SF/7.18,84” by him.

Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas “cemented Mr. Thompson’s place as a

singular presence in American journalism or, as he once called himself, ‘a connoisseur of edge work” (New York Times). Thompson’s

second book, the embodiment of Gonzo journalism, “is a custom-crafted study of paranoia… a desperate and impor- tant book, a wired nightmare, the funniest piece of American prose since Naked Lunch” (Books of the Century, 278-80). Illustrated by Ralph Steadman, Thompson’s hallu- cinogenic saga became “a metaphor for the state of the American nation” (Stringer, 666). Made into the movie of the same title in 1998, directed by Terry Gilliam and star- ring Johnny Depp. Evidence of bookplate removal on the front pastedown. Interior fine; light toning and wear to binding edges. Price-clipped dust jacket bright and fine. A near-fine copy, scarce signed.

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D e c e m b e r 2013 | L iterature First Edition Of The

63

First edition of Williams’ Tony Award-winning play—his “celebration of the inebriate god,” boldly inscribed: “Sincerely, Tennessee Williams.”

Williams wrote of his play, “The Rose Tattoo is the Dionysian element in human life… the lyric as well as the Bacchantic impulse… the transcen- dence of life over the instruments it uses… a celebration of the inebriate god” (Spoto, The Kindness of Strangers, 170). In his Memoirs he called it “my love-play to the world.” Williams wrote the play following his 1948 trip to Italy. It opened in New York on February 3, 1951, and ran for 306 perfor- mances, winning five Tony Awards, in- cluding Best Play, and was adapted to the screen in 1955, earning three Oscars, in- cluding Best Actress for Anna Magnani. Crandell A10.1.a. Book fine, bright dust jacket near-fine with a few small closed tears to edges. A lovely inscribed copy.

a few small closed tears to edges. A lovely inscribed copy. Signed By Tennessee Williams, Very
a few small closed tears to edges. A lovely inscribed copy. Signed By Tennessee Williams, Very
1955. $6500. Octavo, original salmon cloth, dust jacket. First edition, first printing, of the play for

First edition, first printing, of the play for which Williams won his second Pulitzer Prize, signed by the playwright.

In 1973 Williams admitted, “Though Glass Menagerie may be my best play, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof is still my favorite” (Devlin, 244). Includes both the Broadway and the original version of the Third Act, which Williams reluctantly rewrote at director Elia Kazan’s request. First printing, with no acknowledge- ment on the verso of the title page and no credit for scenic and cos- tume design on page xii. Crandell A15.I.a. Only lightest edge-wear to pristine dust jacket. A fine signed copy.

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H istory , s cience & e xploration | D ecember 2013 64 H iSTOry ,

HiSTOry, ScieNce & expLOr ATiON

D ecember 2013 64 H iSTOry , S cieNce & e xpLOr ATiON 75. tan calf
D ecember 2013 64 H iSTOry , S cieNce & e xpLOr ATiON 75. tan calf
D ecember 2013 64 H iSTOry , S cieNce & e xpLOr ATiON 75. tan calf
75. tan calf gilt, custom slipcase.
75.
tan calf gilt, custom slipcase.

First edition, first issue, of Darwin’s landmark treatise, in which the word “evolution” is used to describe his theory for the first time in any of his works, handsomely bound.

“The book, in its first edition, contains two parts, the descent of man itself, and selection in relation to sex. The word ‘evolution’ occurs [Volume I, p. 2] for the first time in any of Darwin’s works” (Freeman, 128-29). “In the Origin Darwin had avoided discussing the place occupied by Homo sapiens in the scheme of natural selection, stating only that ‘light will be thrown on the origin of man and his history.’ Twelve years later he made good his promise with The Descent of Man” (Norman 599). Freeman 937. Garrison & Morton 170. Norman 599. Armorial bookplates. Occasional light pencil marginalia. Bindings lightly rubbed. A very nearly fine copy, handsomely bound.

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H istory, science & exploration

76.
76.

First edition of a major collection of Einstein writings, signed and date by him in the year of publication, revealing the “many facets of the mind and personality of the greatest scientist of our time” (New York Times), featuring some works never before published in book form.

In this important and wide-ranging collection of Einstein’s writings, the “many facets of the mind and personality of the greatest scientist of our time are presented in a distinguished translation… Here one finds Einstein’s views on the nature and methods of science, his own contributions to physics, his reminiscences about scientific colleagues, and his evaluations of the achievements of great scientists of the past—Kepler, Copernicus, Newton, Maxwell,” as well as his thoughts on subjects ranging from world peace to fascism. “The reader gains an insight into the unique character of Einstein’s thinking in science and begins to sense the grounds of Einstein’s basic satisfaction ‘with the mystery of the eternity of life” (New York Times). Book fine; lightest edge-wear to scarce about-fine dust jacket.

65

Intriguing typed letter signed by Jung to an American correspondent answering a request to sign books, and also discussing Napoleon, theoso- phists, and the “many people suffering from phantasies” who “don’t want to be cured.”

The text of the letter, written on Prof. Dr. C.G. Jung’s letterhead with the address of Küsnacht- Zürich Seestrasse 228 and dated May 11, 1955, reads in full: “Dear Sir, No objection against signing your books! It is quite indif- ferent to old Napoleon whether anybody calls him a genius. Thus it is immaterial what I call him; when I talk of him, I talk of Napoleon I, and according to the prevailing mood, I may call him a great nuisance or a scoundrel or a hell of a fellow. The the- osophists claim many things beside rebirth. Nobody can hinder them. There are many people suffering from phantasies and don’t want to be cured. Sincerely yours, [signed] C.G. Jung.” At the time he wrote this letter, the world-renowned psychologist was nearly 85 years old, continuing to write and publish articles and books. Single fold line. Fine condition.

was nearly 85 years old, continuing to write and publish articles and books. Single fold line.
66 “The Place Of Any Star In The Primitive Sphere”: First Edition Of Isaac Newton’s
66
“The Place Of Any Star In The Primitive Sphere”: First
Edition Of Isaac Newton’s Chronology, 1728, With
Three Folding Plates, Scarce Large-Paper Copy
78.
NEWTON, Isaac. Chronology of Ancient Kingdoms
Amended. London, 1728. Quarto, contemporary full brown
calf rebacked in elaborately gilt-decorated calf. $4500.
First edition, large paper copy, of Newton’s posthumously pub-
lished work, demonstrating the value of the Ptolemaic system in
his “startling revision of long accepted historical dates,” with
three folding diagrams of Solomon’s Temple.
Published posthumously, Newton’s Chronology expresses his
long pursuit of “a new system of ancient chronology,” poten-
tially heretical in its “startling revision of long accepted his-
torical dates.” Here Newton attempts to calculate the dates of
ancient events using astronomical considerations that dem-
onstrate the value of the Ptolemaic system. Newton had spent
years on the work when the 1725 publication of a pirated ver-
sion in French, which also refuted its conclusions, motivated him
to complete his text, a task occupying him until his final days.
Shortly before Newton died in 1727 Bishop Pearce wrote that “‘I found him writing over his Chronology… He read to me two
or three sheets of what he had written” (Christianson, 564-5). Babson 214. Bookplate. Text and plates generally fresh.
Contemporary calf boards expertly restored. Quite handsome.
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Second edition of Barrow’s important account, enlarged with the addition of eight hand-colored aquatints not present in the first edition. With a large folding map of Southern Africa outlined in color and eight folding plans (two hand-colored), as in the first edition. Handsome in contemporary calf.

as in the first edition. Handsome in contemporary calf. At the time Barrow began collecting information
as in the first edition. Handsome in contemporary calf. At the time Barrow began collecting information

At the time Barrow began collecting information for this work less than a tenth of the British colony of South Africa had been accurately mapped. During the course of his travels he visited the Boers, Hottentots, and the Bosjemen, performing “a journey exceeding one thousand miles on horseback, on foot, and very rarely in a covered wagon, and full half the distance as a pedestrian, and never except for a few nights sleeping under a roof.” The result was the most compre- hensive work on the region published to date, with a map that at upon appearance was unrivalled in its accuracy and scope. “Highly valu- able for its variety and extent of information, both political and scien- tific” (Lowndes, 122-23). The first edition of 1801-04 only included one view, a folding hand-tinted aquatint view of Cape Town not re- tained in this second edition, which has been enlarged with the addition of eight hand-colored engravings illustrating Boers, natives, and fauna of South Africa not present in the first edition. Bookplate. Text and plates generally clean, hand-coloring fine. Extremely good in nicely restored contemporary calf.

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H istory, science & exploration

b e r 2013 | H istory , s cience & e xploration crick and watson

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Rare collection of three offprints documenting the discovery of DNA, featuring the exceedingly scarce first offprint of the first Watson and Crick article on DNA, the revolutionary 1953 work announcing its double helix structure, whose scientific impact is comparable “to the breakthroughs that led to the splitting of the atom and the invention of the computer” (Sylvia Nassar). Accompanied by the very scarce offprints of Crick’s 1954 Structure of the Hereditary Material and his 1957 Nucleic Acids, the latter with one of his earliest published statements on his “Central Dogma,” proposing “a startling vision of life… the ‘philosophy’ of the new science.” Also with facsimiles of 1957 correspondence be- tween Crick and Linus Pauling, and a 1985 typed letter signed by Maurice Wilkins, who shared the Nobel Prize with Watson and Crick, together housed in a custom morocco clamshell box.

In 1962 Crick, Watson and Wilkins received the Nobel Prize “for their discoveries concerning the molecular structure of nuclear acids and its significance for infor- mation transfer in living material.” The publication of their joint 1953 paper in Nature revolutionized biochemistry and the other life sciences, and profoundly affected the study of molecular biology. The final paper as it appears here was a complete work—Watson and Crick did not reveal their work to the scientific community in stages—making its impact all the greater. This scarce offprint contains the three papers that appeared in the issue of Nature for April, 1953. The offprint was printed from the standing type (rather than the electrotype plate used for the journal), and is, in effect, a galley proof, issued in a small number for distribu- tion among the scientists involved. Crick’s article Structure of the Hereditary Material offers insight into the investigative processes he and Watson followed; in his 1957 article, Nucleic Acids, he makes one of his very first published statements about “the Central Dogma,” which would prove “a turning point in the history of the life sciences… came to replace another theory, the three-dimensional template theo- ry… advocated by Linus Pauling” (Strasser). A landmark collection in the history of science, in fine condition.

theo- ry… advocated by Linus Pauling” (Strasser). A landmark collection in the history of science, in

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December 2013

68 H istory , s cience & e xploration | D ecember 2013 richard f .
81. green beveled cloth gilt.
81.
green beveled cloth gilt.

Third edition, revised, of “a most remarkable work of the highest value” (T.E. Lawrence), Burton’s scarce and important illustrated narrative of his journey to Mecca, inscribed by Burton: “In memory of our pleasant hours at Trieste with affect[ionate] regards. Richard & Isabel, 22. Dec 1881.” With three folding plans, one color folding map, and 27 in-text illustrations.

After years of studying Oriental customs and manners, Burton offered his services to the Royal Geographical Society “for the purpose of removing that opprobrium to modern adventure, the huge white blot which in our maps still notes the Eastern and Central Regions of Arabia” (Penzer, 44). Burton resolved to wend his way to Mecca to observe Muslim rites witnessed by few westerners. Donning a variety of disguises and learning the mannerisms common to Islam—how to dress, eat, sit, sleep, pray, etc.—Burton was accepted as a native. In his bibliography of Burton’s works, Norman Penzer remarks, “I questioned Colonel Lawrence [i.e., “Lawrence of Arabia”] about the accuracy of Burton’s description of the journey to Mecca and Medina, and he said that it was absolutely correct in every detail” (Penzer, 7). First published in 1855-56 as Personal Narrative of a Pilgrimage to El- Medinah and Mecca. “The map in this edition is colored, in which state it has not appeared before” (Penzer, 54). Penzer, 44-54. In 1872, Burton was made consul at Trieste, Italy, a post he held until his death there in 1890. Isabel, cited in the inscription, was Burton’s wife. Bookseller ticket. Occasional scattered light foxing to interior. Expert repairs to folding plan of El Medinah and inner paper hinges. Light rubbing to extremities of bright original cloth. A near-fine copy, most scarce inscribed.

First edition, with engraved frontispiece, engraved portrait of the author by Vertue and nine double-page maps by famous Dutch mapmaker Herman Moll, bound in handsome contem- porary calf boards.

“The first British authority which sought to achieve the bold and perilous undertaking of chronicling occurrences afloat from the earliest accounts of time” (Allibone, 285). A one-time clerk of Samuel Pepys, Burchett’s tenure as Secretary of the Admiralty “included the whole French war during the reigns of William III and Anne, during which every document of importance passed through his hands” (DNB). His comprehensive volume spans na- val history from ancient Egypt to the early 18th century. “The last half… has exceptional value. Writing of events concerning which he had very full and accurate information… his expressions of opinion carry great weight” (DNB). With woodcut historiated initials, head- and tailpieces; title page printed in red and black; and nine double-page engraved maps by Herman Moll. “It was in the 18th century that [Moll] made his mark, becoming in the second two decades the foremost map publisher in England” (Tooley Africa, 77). Bookplate. Four maps with mild foxing, remaining maps and text remarkably clean and fresh. An excellent, handsome copy.

69 December 2013 | H istory, science & exploration