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DE P ART M E NT OF INFORMATION SCIENCE & ENGINEERING COURSE DIARY

(ACADEMIC YEAR 2011-12)

V SEMESTER

Name USN

: _____________________________________________ : _____________________________________________

Semester & Section : _____________________________________________

The Mission
The mission of our institutions is to provide world class education in our chosen fields and prepare people of character, caliber and vision to build the future world

INDEX

SNO 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

SUB CODE 06IS51 06CS52 06CS53 06CS54 06CS55 06CS56 06CSL57 06CSL58

SUBJECT SOFTWARE ENGINEERING SYSTEM SOFTWARE OPERATING SYSTEMS DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS COMPUTER NETWORKS I FORMAL LANGUAGES AND AUTOMATA THEORY DATABASE APPLICATIONS LABORATORY ALGORITHMS LABORATORY

SOFTWARE ENGINEERING Subject Code: 06IS51 No. of Lecture Hrs/ Week:04 Total No. of Lecture Hours: 52 PART - A UNIT - 1 OVERVIEW: Introduction: FAQ's about software engineering, Professional and ethical responsibility. Socio-Technical systems: Emergent system properties; Systems engineering; Organizations, people and computer systems; Legacy systems. 6 Hours UNIT - 2 CRITICAL SYSTEMS, SOFTWARE PROCESSES: Critical Systems: A simple safety-critical system; System dependability; Availability and reliability. Software Processes: Models, Process iteration, Process activities; The Rational Unified Process; Computer-Aided Software Engineering. 7 Hours UNIT - 3 REQUIREMENTS: Software Requirements: Functional and Non-functional requirements; User requirements; System requirements; Interface specification; The software requirements document. Requirements Engineering Processes: Feasibility studies; Requirements elicitation and analysis; Requirements validation; Requirements management. 6 Hours UNIT - 4 System models, Project Management: System Models: Context models; Behavioral models; Data models; Object models; Structured methods. Project Management: Management activities; Project planning; Project scheduling; Risk management. 7 Hours PART - B UNIT - 5 SOFTWARE DESIGN: Architectural Design: Architectural design decisions; System organization; Modular decomposition styles; Control styles. Object-Oriented design: Objects and Object Classes; An Object-Oriented design process; Design evolution. 7 Hours UNIT - 6 DEVELOPMENT: Rapid Software Development: Agile methods; Extreme programming; Rapid application development. Software Evolution: Program evolution dynamics; Software maintenance; Evolution processes; Legacy system evolution. 6 Hours IA Marks:25 Exam Hours:03 Exam Marks:100

UNIT - 7 VERIFICATION AND VALIDATION: Verification and Validation: Planning; Software inspections; Automated static analysis; Verification and formal methods. Software testing: System testing; Component testing; Test case design; Test automation. 7 Hours

UNIT - 8

MANAGEMENT: Managing People: Selecting staff; Motivating people; Managing people; The People Capability Maturity Model. Software Cost Estimation: Productivity; Estimation techniques; Algorithmic cost modeling, Project duration and staffing. 6 Hours TEXT BOOK: 1. Software Engineering Ian Somerville, 8th Edition, Pearson Education, 2007. REFERENCE BOOKS: 1. Software Engineering: A Practitioners Approach - Roger S. Pressman, 7th Edition, McGraw-Hill, 2007. 2. Software Engineering Theory and Practice - Shari Lawrence Pfleeger, Joanne M. Atlee, 3rd Edition, Pearson Education, 2006. 3. Software Engineering Principles and Practice - Waman S Jawadekar, Tata McGraw Hill, 2004.

LESSON-PLAN

Subject Subject Code Exam Hours Total Hours

: : : :

SOFTWARE ENGINEERING 06IS51 3 52

Semester Exam Marks IA Marks

: V : 100 : 25

Sl NO 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21

Chapter

Topics to be covered Introduction: FAQs about software engineering Professional and ethical responsibility

(1) Introduction

Socio-Technical systems: Emergent system properties Systems engineering Organizations, people and computer systems Legacy systems Critical Systems: A simple safety-critical system System dependability

(2) Critical Systems,Software Processes

Availability and reliability Software Processes: Models Process iteration, Process activities The Rational Unified Process Computer-Aided Software Engineering Software Requirements: Functional and Non-functional requirements User requirements; System requirements, Interface specification

(3) Requirements

The software requirements document Requirements Engineering Processes: Feasibility studies Requirements elicitation and analysis Requirements validation; Requirements management

(4) System Models.Project Management

System Models: Context models Behavioral models

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 (8) Management (7) Verification and Validation (6) Development (5) Software Design

Data models Object models Structured methods Project Management: Management activities; Project planning Project scheduling; Risk management Architectural Design: Architectural design decisions System organization Modular decomposition styles Control styles Object-Oriented design: Objects and Object Classes An Object- Oriented design process Design evolution Rapid Software Development: Agile methods Extreme programming; Rapid application development Software Evolution: Program evolution dynamics Software maintenance Evolution processes Legacy system evolution Verification and Validation: Planning Software inspections Automated static analysis Verification and formal methods Software testing: System testing Component testing Test case design; Test automation Managing People: Selecting staff Motivating people, Managing people The People Capability Maturity Model Software Cost Estimation: Productivity Estimation techniques; Algorithmic cost modeling Project duration and staffing QUESTION BANK

Class: VI Semester Subject: 06IS51 Software Engineering IA Marks: 25 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Hours / Week: 4 Total Hours: 52 Total marks: 100

What is Requirement Engineering ? What are Functinoal and Non Functional Requirements in Software Enginering ? What is SRS ? What are the Different types of Architectures in Software Engineering ? What are use cases and class diagrams in Software Engineering ? What are sequence diagram ? What are package diagram ? What are collaboration diagram ? 7. What is a Good Software Design ? 8. What are Design patterns ? 9. What are the characteristics of good design ? Name some Design Tools ? 10. What is SDLC ? What are the various SDLC models ? Explain them 11. What is RUP and PSP ? 12. What are the Different types of Testing ? How to design a Test Case ? 13. With a neat diagram explain the different stages of Requirement Engineering process. 14. Why elicitation and analysis a difficult process. Explain giving reasons. 15. Explain in detail about View Point Oriented Elicitation. 16. Explain with examples the different types of functional and non-functional requirements. 17. Write the differences between Evolutionary and Throw-away Prototyping. 18. What is Prototyping? What are the benefits of developing a prototype? 19. Give description about the following: 1.domain requirements 2.Enduring requirements 3. Data Dictionary 4.Design abstractions 5. S/W reliability 20. Can you name some limitations of a web environment vs. a Windows environment? 21. What is rapid prototyping technique? Explain the different types of rapid prototyping techniques. 22. Explain different types of user interaction styles. Give advantages, disadvantages. 23. Write in detail about object oriented design process. 24. What are the two approaches to control models at the Architectural level? 25. What is modular decomposition? Explain dataflow model of an invoice processing system. 26. Draw and explain sequence diagram and state diagram for typical weather station. 27. What are the guidelines to be followed while using color in a user interface? 28. With an example describe the repository model and give its advantages and disadvantages. 29.Explain the structure of s/w requirement s document. 30. Illustrate with two examples for object and object class. 31. What is CASE workbench? Describe the tools included in an analysis and design workbench. 32. Write a note about user interface design principles. 33. Describe an s/w process with Throwaway prototyping. What are the problems with this approach? 34 Define Bug Life Cycles? What is Metrics? 35 What is a Test procedure? 36 What is the difference between SYSTEM testing and END-TO-END testing? 37 What is Tractability Matrix? Is there any interchangeable term for Traceability Matrix? Are Tractability Matrix and Test Matrix same or Different?

38 What is the difference between an exception and an error? 39 Correct bug tracking process - Reporting, Re-testing, Debugging? 40 What is the difference between bug and defect? 41 How much time is/should be allocated for testing out of total Development time based on industry standards? 42 What are test bugs? 43 Define Quality - bug free, Functionality working or both? 44 What is the purpose of software testings - Bug removal, Systems functionality working, quality or all? 45 What is the major difference between Web services & client server environment? 46 What is Scalability testing? Which tool is used? 47 What's your favorite Design Pattern? 48 What is custom object? What it contains. Difference between custom & standard objects. 49 Which debugging window allows you to see the methods called in the order they were called? 50 What is the difference between shadow and override? 51 What is class? What is object explain it. Describe the principles of OOPS.What is OOPS? 52 Which items do you normally place under version control? 53 How can you make sure that team members know who changed what in a software project? 54 Do you know the differences between tags and branches? When do you use which? 55 How would you manage changes to technical documentation, like the architecture of a product? 56 How do you deal with changes that a customer wants in a released product? 57 Are there differences in managing versions and releases? 58 How many of the three variables scope, time and cost can be fixed by the customer? 59 Who should make estimates for the effort of a project? Who is allowed to set the deadline? 60 Which kind of diagrams do you use to track progress in a project? 61What is the difference between iteration and an increment?

SYSTEM SOFTWARE Subject Code:06CS52 No. of Lecture Hrs./ Week:04 Total No. of Lecture Hours:52 IA Marks:25 Exam Hours:03 Exam Marks:100

PART - A UNIT - 1 MACHINE ARCHITECTURE: Introduction, System Software and Machine Architecture, Simplified Instructional Computer (SIC) - SIC Machine Architecture, SIC/XE Machine Architecture, SIC Programming Examples 6 Hours UNIT - 2 ASSEMBLERS - 1: Basic Assembler Function - A Simple SIC Assembler, Assembler Algorithm and Data Structures, Machine Dependent Assembler Features - Instruction Formats & Addressing Modes, Program Relocation. 6 Hours UNIT - 3 ASSEMBLERS - 2: Machine Independent Assembler Features Literals, Symbol-Definition Statements, Expression, Program Blocks, Control Sections and Programming Linking, Assembler Design Operations - One-Pass Assembler, Multi-Pass Assembler, Implementation Examples - MASM Assembler. 6 Hours UNIT - 4 LOADERS AND LINKERS: Basic Loader Functions - Design of an Absolute Loader, A Simple Bootstrap Loader, Machine-Dependent Loader Features Relocation, Program Linking, Algorithm and Data Structures for a Linking Loader; Machine-Independent Loader Features Automatic Library Search, Loader Options, Loader Design Options - Linkage Editor, Dynamic Linkage, Bootstrap Loaders, Implementation Examples - MS-DOS Linker. 8 Hours PART - B UNIT - 5 EDITORS AND DEBUGGING SYSTEMS: Text Editors - Overview of Editing Process, User Interface, Editor Structure, Interactive Debugging Systems - Debugging Functions and Capabilities, Relationship With Other Parts Of The System, User-Interface Criteria. 6 Hours UNIT - 6 MACRO PROCESSOR: Basic Macro Processor Functions - Macro Definitions and Expansion, Macro Processor Algorithm and Data Structures, Machine-Independent Macro Processor Features - Concatenation of Macro Parameters, Generation of Unique Labels, Conditional Macro Expansion, Keyword Macro Parameters, Macro Processor Design Options - Recursive Macro Expansion, General-Purpose Macro Processors, Macro Processing Within Language Translators, Implementation Examples - MASM Macro Processor, ANSI C Macro Processor. 8 Hours UNIT - 7 LEX AND YACC 1: Lex and Yacc - The Simplest Lex Program, Recognizing Words With LEX, Symbol Tables, Grammars, Parser-Lexer Communication, The Parts of Speech Lexer, A YACC Parser, The Rules Section, Running LEX and YACC, LEX and Hand- Written Lexers, Using LEX - Regular Expression, Examples of Regular Expressions, A Word Counting Program, Parsing a Command Line. 6 Hours

UNIT - 8 LEX AND YACC - 2: Using YACC - Grammars, Recursive Rules, Shift/Reduce Parsing, What YACC Cannot Parse, A YACC Parser - The Definition Section, The Rules Section, Symbol Values and Actions, The LEXER, Compiling and Running a Simple Parser, Arithmetic Expressions and Ambiguity, Variables and Typed Tokens. 6 Hours TEXT BOOKS: 1. System Software Leland.L.Beck, 3rd Edition, Addison-Wesley, 1997. 2. Lex and Yacc - John.R.Levine, Mason and Doug Brown, O'Reilly, SPD, 1998. REFERENCE BOOK: 1. System Programming and Operating Systems D.M.Dhamdhere, 2nd Edition, Tata McGraw - Hill, 1999.

M.V.J. COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING Department of Information Science & Engineering LESSON PLAN Class : V Semester Hours / Week: 4 Subject : System Software Sub code: 06CS52 Total Hours : 52 (62 CLASSES) IA Marks : 25 Hour. S.No CHAPTER TOPICS TO BE COVERED No PART-A 1 Machine Architecture 1 Introduction, 2 .System software and machine architecture. 3 (SIC)-Simplified Instructional computer 4 (SIC)-Simplified Instructional computer 5 SIC/XE machine architecture 6 SIC/XE machine architecture 7 SIC programming examples 8 SIC programming examples 2 Assemblers-1 9 Basic assembler function 10 A simple SIC assembler 11 Assembler algorithm and data structures 12 Assembler algorithm and data structures 13 Machine dependent assembler features 14 Instruction formats and addressing modes 15 Instruction formats and addressing modes 16 Program relocation 3 Assemblers-2 17 Machine independent assembler features-Literals 18 Symbol-Definition statements,Expressions 19 Program blocks,control sections and program linking 20 Program blocks,control sections and program linking 21 Assembler design operations-one pass assembler 22 Assembler design operations-one pass assembler 23 Multi pass assembler 24 Implementation examples-MASM assembler. 4 Loaders and linkers 25 Basic Loader Functions - Design of an Absolute Loader, 26 A Simple Bootstrap Loader, Machine-Dependent Loader Features 27 Relocation, Program Linking, Algorithm and Data Structures for a Linking Loader; 28 Relocation, Program Linking, Algorithm and Data Structures for a Linking Loader; 29 Machine-Independent Loader Features 30 Automatic Library Search, 31 Loader Options, Loader Design Options 32 Linkage Editor, Dynamic Linkage, Bootstrap Loaders, 33 Sun OS Linker, Cray MPP Linker.

Editors and debugging systems

Macro Processor

34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50

LEX and YACC-1

51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62

LEX and YACC-2

PART B Text editors-overview of editing process User interface,Editor structure User interface,Editor structure Interactive debugging systems Debugging functions and capabilities Relationships with other parts of the system User-Interface criteria Basic macro processor function-macro definitions and expansions Macro processor algorithm and data structure, machine independent macro processor featuresconcatenation of macro parameters Generation of unique labels,conditional macro expansion Keyword macro parameters Macro processor design options Recursive macro expansioon,General purpose macro processor Macro processor within language translators Implementation examples-MASM macro processor,ANSI C macro processor Implementation examples-MASM macro processor,ANSI C macro processor Lex and Yacc-The simplest Lex program,Recognizing words with Lex Symbol tables,Grammars,parser lexer communication The parts of speech Lexer,A YACC parser The rules section,Running LEX and YACC, LEX and hand written Lexes Using Lex regular expressions Examples of regular expressions A word counting program,Parsing a command line Using YACC grammars,Recursive rules Shift/Reduce parsing,What Yacc cannot parse A yacc parser-The definition section,symbol values and action The lexer,compiling and running a simple parser Arithmetic expressions and ambiguity Variables and typed tokens

Model Question Paper Class: B.E. V Semester Subject: Systems Software Subject Code: 06CS52 Total Hours: 52 Hours / week:04 IA Marks: 25

1. Explain the concept of System Software and Machine Architecture 2. Briefly explain SIC Machine Architecture 3. Briefly explain SIC/XE Machine Architecture 4. Write the instruction format of Traditional (CISC) Machines 5. Briefly explain VAX Architecture & Pentium Pro Architecture 6. Differentiate between JSUB and RSUB. 7. Write the instruction format RISC Machines with example 8. With a diagram explain Ultra SPARC Architecture 9. With a diagram explain Cray T3E Architecture. 10. Write a short note on basic assembler function 11. Briefly explain about A Simple SIC Assembler 12. With a neat example explain Assembler Algorithm and Data Structures 13. Write a short note on Machine Dependent Assembler Features 14. What is Instruction Formats & Addressing Modes in assemblers 15. With a neat diagram Explain Program Relocation 16. Write a Short on Machine Independent Assembler Features 17. Explain Literals, Symbol-Definition Statements Expression with example 18. How Program Blocks, Control Sections and Programming Linking in Assembler will work give example 19. Briefly Explain One-Pass Assembler 20. What is Multi-Pass Assembler 21. Explain about MASM Assembler, SPARC Assembler 22. Write a short note on Basic Loader Functions 23. Explain Design of an Absolute Loader 24. Write a algorithm for a Simple Bootstrap Loader and Explain detail 25. Write Machine-Dependent Loader Features 26. What is Relocation 27. What is Program Linking 28. Write Machine-Independent Loader Features 29. Explain Automatic Library Search 30. Explain Linkage Editor 31. Explain briefly Bootstrap Loaders 32. Explain Basic Macro Processor Functions 33. Briefly explain Macro Definitions and Expansion 34. Explain Macro Processor Algorithm and Data Structures 35. Explain features of Machine-Independent Macro Processor 36. Explain with example Concatenation of Macro Parameters 37. How to Generate of Unique Labels 38. Explain with example Conditional Macro Expansion 39. Describe General-Purpose Macro Processors 40. Explain Macro Processing Within Language Translators 41. Write Lex Program to find vowels and consonants 42. Define Symbol Tables 43. What is Grammars 44. Explain Parser-Lexer Communication

45. Define YACC Parser 46. Explain the sections in YAAC Parser 47. How to Run LEX and YACC 48. Explain - Regular Expression Using LEX, with Examples 49. Write a program to count words in a command line 50. What is Shift/Reduce Parsing,

OPERATING SYSTEMS Subject Code:06CS53 No. of Lecture Hrs./ Week:04 Total No. of Lecture Hours:52 PART - A UNIT - 1 INTRODUCTION TO OPERATING SYSTEMS, SYSTEM STRUCTURES: What operating systems do; Computer System organization; Computer System architecture; Operating System structure; Operating System operations; Process management; Memory management; Storage management; Protection and security; Distributed system; Special-purpose systems; Computing environments. Operating System Services; User - Operating System interface; System calls; Types of system calls; System programs; Operating System design and implementation; Operating System structure; Virtual machines; Operating System generation; System boot. 6 Hours UNIT - 2 Process Management: Process concept; Process scheduling; Operations on processes; Interprocess communication. Multi-Threaded Programming: Overview; Multithreading models; Thread Libraries; Threading issues. Process Scheduling: Basic concepts; Scheduling criteria; Scheduling algorithms; Multiple-Processor scheduling; Thread scheduling. 7 Hours UNIT - 3 PROCESS SYNCHRONIZATION: Synchronization: The Critical section problem; Petersons solution; Synchronization hardware; Semaphores; Classical problems of synchronization; Monitors. 7 Hours UNIT - 4 DEADLOCKS: Deadlocks: System model; Deadlock characterization; Methods for handling deadlocks; Deadlock prevention; Deadlock avoidance; Deadlock detection and recovery from deadlock. 6 Hours PART - B UNIT - 5 MEMORY MANAGEMENT: Memory Management Strategies: Background; Swapping; Contiguous memory allocation; Paging; Structure of page table; Segmentation. Virtual Memory Management: Background; Demand paging; Copy-on-write; Page replacement; Allocation of frames; Thrashing. 7 Hours IA Marks:25 Exam Hours:03 Exam Marks:100

UNIT - 6 FILE SYSTEM, IMPLEMENTATION OF FILE SYSTEM: File System: File concept; Access methods; Directory structure; File system mounting; File sharing; Protection. Implementing File System: File system structure; File system implementation; Directory implementation; Allocation methods; Free space management. 7 Hours UNIT - 7 SECONDARY STORAGE STRUCTURES, PROTECTION: Mass storage structures; Disk structure; Disk attachment; Disk scheduling; Disk management; Swap space management. Protection: Goals of protection, Principles of protection, Domain of protection, Access matrix, Implementation of access matrix, Access control, Revocation of access rights, Capability-Based systems. 6 Hours UNIT - 8 CASE STUDY: THE LINUX OPERATING SYSTEM: Linux history; Design principles; Kernel modules; Process management; Scheduling; Memory management; File systems, Input and output; Inter-process communication. 6 Hours TEXT BOOK: 1. Operating System Principles Abraham Silberschatz, Peter Baer Galvin, Greg Gagne, 7th edition, Wiley-India, 2006. REFERENCE BOOKS: Operating Systems: A Concept Based Approach D.M Dhamdhere, 2nd Edition, Tata McGrawHill, 2002. Operating Systems P.C.P. Bhatt, 2nd Edition, PHI, 2006. Operating Systems Harvey M Deital, 3rd Edition, Addison Wesley, 1990.

M.V.J. COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING Department of Information Science & Engineering LESSON PLAN Class: V Semester Hours / Week: 4 Subject: Operating Systems Sub code: 06CS53 Total Hours: 52 IA Marks: 25 S.NO CHAPTER Hour. No TOPICS TO BE COVERED 1 Introduction To Operating Systems, System Structures PART-A What operating systems do; Computer 1 System organization Computer System architecture; Operating 2 System structure; Operating System operations; Process management; Memory management;Storage 3 management; Protection and security; Distributed system; Special purpose systems; Computing environments . Operating System Services; User 4 - Operating System interface;; 5 System calls; Types of system calls; Systemprograms; Operating System design and implementation Operating System structure; Virtual machines; Operating System generation; System boot. Process concept; Process scheduling; Operations on Processes; Inter-process Communication. Multi-Threaded Programming: Overview; Multithreading models; Thread Libraries; Threading issues. Process Scheduling: Basic concepts Scheduling criteria; Scheduling algorithms; Multiple-Processor scheduling; Thread scheduling Synchronization: The Critical section problem; Petersons solution Synchronization hardware

6 7 2 Process Management 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 3 Process Synchronization 16 17 18 19

20 21 22 23 4 Deadlocks 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 PART B 5 Memory Management 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 6 File System, Implementation Of File System: 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46

Semaphores; Semaphores; Contind. Classical problems of synchronization Monitors. Deadlocks: System model Deadlock characterization; Methods for handling deadlocks; Deadlock prevention; Deadlock avoidance; Deadlock detection and recovery from deadlock. Deadlock detection and recovery from deadlock.contd.. Memory Management Strategies: Background; Swapping; Contiguous memory allocation; Paging; Structure of page table, Segmentation. Virtual Memory Management: Background Demand paging; Copy-on-write, Page replacement; Allocation of frames; Thrashing File System:File concept; Access methods; Directory structure; File system mounting;File sharing; Protection Implementing File System: File system structure File system implementation. Directory implementation; Allocation methods; . Free space management

Secondary Storage Structures, Protection:

47 48 49 50

Mass storage structures; Disk structure; Disk attachment Disk scheduling; Disk management; Swap space management. Protection: Goals of protection

51

Principles of protection, Domain of protection

52 53 54 8 Case Study: The Linux Operating System 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62

Access matrix, Implementation of access matrix, Access control, Revocation of access rights, Capability-Based systems. Linux history; Design principles; Kernel modules; Process management Scheduling;; Memory management File systems, Input and output; Inter-process Communication. Revision Revision

QUESTION BANK What is an Operating system? What are the functions of OS? Explain. Define the essential properties of the following types of operating systems: i. Main Frame ii. Desktop iii. Real-time iv. Multi Processor v. Distributed vi. Clustered vii. Hand-held 3. What are the five major activities of an operating system in regard to process management. 4. What are the three major activities of an operating system in regard to memory management. 5. What are the three major activities of an operating system in regard to secondarystorage management. 6. What are the five major activities of an operating system in regard to File management. 7. What is the purpose of command interpreter? Why is it usually separate form the Kernel? 8. List out the services provided by the operating system. 9. Explain the different types of CPU schedulers? 10. What are the differences between user-level threads and kernel supported threads. 11. What is purpose of system calls and system programs. 12. Describe the differences among short-term , medium-term and long term scheduling. 13. Describe the actions taken by a kernel to switch context between processes. 14. Describe the process states with the help of process transition diagram. 15. what are the benefits and demerits of each of the following. i. Direct and indirect communication ii. Symmetric and asymmetric communication iii. Automatic and explicit buffering iv. Fixed size and variable size messages. v. Send by copy and send by reference 16. Explain multithreading with examples that improve performance over single threaded solutions. 17. What are the two differences between user level threads and Kernel level threads. Under what circumstances is one type better than the other. 18. What resources are used when a thread is created. How do they differ from those used when a process is created. 19. Define the actions taken by kernel to context switch between kernel level threads. 20. Give the differences between pre-emptive and non-preemptive scheduling. 21. What is CPU scheduling and also explain CPU scheduler 22. Explain the differences in the degree to which the following scheduling algorithms discriminate in favour of short process. i. FCFS ii. RR Multilevel Feed back Queues 23. Explain priority scheduling and shortest job first scheduling with an example. 1. 2.

24. 25.

What are called as co-operating processes? Explain the necessity of mutual exclusion with an example. What is the meaning of term busy waiting ? What other kinds of waiting are there in an operating system.

What do you mean by deadlock? Give three general examples not related to computer system environment. 27. Is it possible to have a deadlock involving only one process ?Explain. 28. Define deadlock. List and elaborate the necessary conditions for deadlock to occur. 29. What is semaphore? Explain . 30. Explain the producer consumer problem related to cooperating processes 31. What are monitors ? Explain. 32. Explain the Dining Philosophers Problem with respect to Monitors. 33. Explain the differences between Physical and Logical addresses. 34. Write a brief note on overlays. 35. Explain the differences and the internal and external fragmentation. 36. Describe the following allocation algorithms. i. First-fit ii.Best fit iii.Worst fit 37. Why are segmentation and paging sometimes combined into one scheme. 38. Explain demand paging in detail. 39. Describe a mechanism by which one segment could belong to the address space of two different processes. 40. Explain why it is easier to share a re-entrant module using segmentation than it is to so when pure paging is used. 41. What is bankers algorithm? Explain. 42. Explain the 4 necessary conditions for Deadlock to occur 43. Explain Deadlock Detection Algorithm with an Example. 44. Explain the steps involved in Deadlock Recovery. 45. Discuss the following page replacement algorithm with an example. i. Optimal ii LRU 46. Explain with neat diagram the internal and external fragmentation. 47. Define file systems? Explain the different directory structure. 48. Discuss the different file protection schemes? 49. What are the different file access methods? Explain. 50. What is disk scheduling? Explain any three disk scheduling methods with e.g.? 51. Explain process and memory management in Linux? 52. Explain the design principles of Linux Operating System.

26.

DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

Subject Code: 06CS54 No. of Lecture Hrs./ Week:04 Total No. of Lecture Hours:52 PART - A

IA Marks:25 Exam Hours:03 Exam Marks:100

UNIT - 1 INTRODUCTION: Introduction; An example; Characteristics of Database approach; Actors on the screen; Workers behind the scene; Advantages of using DBMS approach; A brief history of database applications; when not to use a DBMS. Data models, schemas and instances; Three-schema architecture and data independence; Database languages and interfaces; The database system environment; Centralized and client-server architectures; Classification of Database Management systems. 6 Hours UNIT - 2 ENTITY-RELATIONSHIP MODEL: Using High-Level Conceptual Data Models for Database Design; An Example Database Application; Entity Types, Entity Sets, Attributes and Keys; Relationship types, Relationship Sets, Roles and Structural Constraints; Weak Entity Types; Refining the ER Design; ER Diagrams, Naming Conventions and Design Issues; Relationship types of degree higher than two. 6 Hours

UNIT - 3 RELATIONAL MODEL AND RELATIONAL ALGEBRA: Relational Model Concepts; Relational Model Constraints and Relational Database Schemas; Update Operations, Transactions and dealing with constraint violations; Unary Relational Operations: SELECT and PROJECT; Relational Algebra Operations from Set Theory; Binary Relational Operations : JOIN and DIVISION; Additional Relational Operations; Examples of Queries in Relational Algebra; Relational Database Design Using ER- to-Relational Mapping. 8 Hours UNIT - 4 SQL-1: SQL Data Definition and Data Types; Specifying basic constraints in SQL; Schema change statements in SQL; Basic queries in SQL; More complex SQL Queries. 6 Hours PART - B UNIT - 5 SQL-2: Insert, Delete and Update statements in SQL; Specifying constraints as Assertion and Trigger; Views (Virtual Tables) in SQL; Additional features of SQL; Database programming issues and techniques; Embedded SQL, Dynamic SQL; Database stored procedures and SQL / PSM. 6 Hours UNIT - 6 DATABASE DESIGN - 1: Informal Design Guidelines for Relation Schemas; Functional Dependencies; Normal Forms Based on Primary Keys; General Definitions of Second and Third Normal Forms; Boyce-Codd Normal Form. 6 Hours

UNIT - 7 DATABASE DESIGN: Properties of Relational Decompositions; Algorithms for Relational Database Schema Design; Multivalued Dependencies and Fourth Normal Form; Join Dependencies and Fifth Normal Form; Inclusion Dependencies; Other Dependencies and Normal Forms. 6 Hours UNIT - 8 TRANSACTION MANAGEMENT: The ACID Properties; Transactions and Schedules; Concurrent Execution of Transactions; Lock - Based Concurrency Control; Performance of locking; Transaction support in SQL; Introduction to crash recovery; 2PL, Serializability and Recoverability; Lock Management; Introduction to ARIES; The log; Other recovery-related structures; The write-ahead log protocol; Checkpointing; Recovering from a System Crash; Media Recovery; Other approaches and interaction with concurrency control. 8 Hours TEXT BOOKS: Fundamentals of Database Systems Elmasri and Navathe, 5th Edition, Addison-Wesley, 2007 Database Management Systems Raghu Ramakrishnan and Johannes Gehrke 3rd Edition, McGraw-Hill, 2003. REFERENCE BOOKS: 1. Data Base System Concepts Silberschatz, Korth and Sudharshan, 5th Edition, McGrawHill, 2006. 2. An Introduction to Database Systems C.J. Date, A. Kannan, S. Swamynatham, 8th Edition, Pearson Education, 2006.

M.V.J. COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION SCIENCE & ENGINEERING LESSON PLAN CLASS : V SEMESTER SUBJECT : DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS TOTAL HOURS: 62 PART-A PERIOD / WEEK : 5 SUB CODE : 06CS54 IA MARKS : 25

S.No

CHAPTER

Hour. No 1 2 3

TOPICS TO BE COVERED Introduction; An example, Characteristics of Database approach Actors on the screen; Workers behind the scene; Advantages of using DBMS approach Actors on the screen; Workers behind the scene; Advantages of using DBMS approach Data models, schemas and instances; Three-schema architecture and data independence Database languages and interfaces; The database system environment Centralized and client-server architectures Classification of Database Management systems Using High-Level Conceptual Data Models for Database Design An Example Database Application; Entity Types, Entity Sets, Attributes and Keys Relationship types, Relationship Sets Roles and Structural Constraints Weak Entity Types; Refining the ER Design ER Diagrams, Naming Conventions and Design Issues Relationship types of degree higher than two. Relational Model Concepts; Relational Model Constraints and Relational Database Schemas Update Operations, Transactions and dealing with constraint violations Unary Relational Operations: SELECT and PROJECT Unary Relational Operations: SELECT and PROJECT Relational Algebra Operations from Set Theory Binary Relational Operations : JOIN and DIVISION

INTRODUCTION 4 5 6 7 8 9

ENTITYRELATIONSHIP MODEL

10 11 12 13 14 15 16

RELATIONAL MODEL AND RELATIONAL ALGEBRA

17 18 19 20

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

SQL-1

Binary Relational Operations : JOIN and DIVISION Additional Relational Operations; Examples of Queries in Relational Algebra Relational Database Design Using ER- toRelational Mapping SQL Data Definition and Data Types SQL Data Definition and Data Types Specifying basic constraints in SQL Schema change statements in SQL Basic queries in SQL More complex SQL Queries More complex SQL Queries PART-B

31 32 33 5 SQL-2 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 7 DATABASE DESIGN 48 49 50 51

Insert, Delete and Update statements in SQL Specifying constraints as Assertion and Trigger Views (Virtual Tables) in SQL Additional features of SQL Database programming issues and techniques Embedded SQL, Dynamic SQL Database stored procedures and SQL / PSM Informal Design Guidelines for Relation Schemas Functional Dependencies Functional Dependencies Normal Forms Based on Primary Keys General Definitions of Second and Third Normal Forms General Definitions of Second and Third Normal Forms Boyce-Codd Normal Form Properties of Relational Decompositions Algorithms for Relational Database Schema Design Multivalued Dependencies and Fourth Normal Form Multivalued Dependencies and Fourth Normal Form Join Dependencies and Fifth Normal Form Inclusion Dependencies; Other Dependencies and Normal Forms

DATABASE DESIGN -1

52 53 54 55 56 8 TRANSACTION MANAGEMENT 57 58 59 60 61 62

The ACID Properties Transactions and Schedules Concurrent Execution of Transactions Lock Based Concurrency Control; Performance of locking; Transaction support in SQL Introduction to crash recovery; 2PL, Serializability and Recoverability Lock Management; Introduction to ARIES The log; Other recovery-related structures The write-ahead log protocol; Check pointing Recovering from a System Crash Media Recovery Other approaches and interaction with concurrency control

QUESTION BANK 1. What are the different levels of abstraction of a DBMS? 2. Write an ER diagram for a typical bus reservation system. 3. What is cardinality ratio? What are the different types of cardinality ratio in a binary relationship? 4. Define primary key. 5. Define weak entity. 6. Explain Multi valued attribute. 7. What do you mean integrity w.r.t. database? Explain entity integrity and referential integrity. 8. Define Different set operations in relation algebra. Given on example for each. 9. List of aggregate functions commonly used in relational algebra. 10. Bring out different clauses of SELECT FROM WHERE statement. 11. What is the significance of views in SQL? 12. Give the example of SQL statement to update data. 13. Use the schema shown in question 3.b and answer the queries SQL. 14. What are the anomalies if the proper design of a database Is not carrier out? 15. Illustrate them with an example for each type. 16. Give different inference rules of functional dependencies. 17. Give the algorithm to check dependency preservation and loss less join. 18. Define the terms: 4NF, BCNF. 19. Define inclusion dependency, DKNF, template dependency, 5NF. 20. Compare discretionary access control with mandatory access control. 21. Explain how strict 2-phase locking is implemented. Show them with an example. 22. What are the 3 properties of a transaction specified in SQL for locking? Define each of them. 23. Illustrate with an example how concurrency is controlled using a B+ tree. 24. Highlight different activities involved in system crash recovery. 25. Explain ER relation mapping 26. Define Embedded SQL. 27. ACID properties 28. Write note on ahead lock 29. Explain Concurrency Control and Performance of locking? 30. Define Transaction support in SQL?

31. Explain Recovering from the System Crash and Media. 32. Illustrate the interaction with concurrency control. 33. Define SQL Data Definition and Data Types. 34. Given the basic constraints in SQL? 35. Write note more complex. Queries 36. List all types of SQL Queries. 37. Illustrate the Database Languages and interface. 38. Classification of Database Management systems. 39. Give note on Centralized and client-server architectures 40. Explain Timestamp ordering with an example 41. Discuss about dead lock and starvation 42. Explain database Recovery technique based on deferred update 43. Discuss discretionary access control based on granting/revoking of privileges 44. Explain the different relational model constraints and possible violation during update operations 45. What is multi valued dependency? What type of constraints does it specify? When does it arise? 46. Why null values are considered bad? 47. Define join dependency and fifth normal form. 48. Explain two phase locking with algorithms 49. Describe the shadow paging recovery technique. Under what circumstances does it not require a log?

COMPUTER NETWORKS I Subject Code: 06CS55 No. of Lecture Hrs./ Week:04 Total No. of Lecture Hours:52 PART - A UNIT - 1 INTRODUCTION: Data Communications; Networks; the Internet; Protocols and Standards; Layered tasks; The OSI Model and the layers in the OSI model; TCP / IP Protocol Suite. 6 Hours UNIT - 2 DATA, SIGNALS, AND DIGITAL TRANSMISSION : Analog and digital signals; Transmission impairment; Data rate limits; Performance; Digital-to-Digital conversion; Analogto-Digital conversion; Transmission modes. 8 Hours UNIT - 3 ANALOG TRANSMISSION AND MULTIPLEXING: Digital - to - Analog conversion; Analog - to - Analog conversion; Multiplexing; Spread spectrum. 6 Hours UNIT - 4 TRANSMISSION MEDIA, ERROR DETECTION AND CORRECTION : Twisted pair cable, Coaxial cable, Fibre-Optic cable, Radio waves, Microwaves, Infrared. Introduction to error detection / correction; Block coding; Linear block codes; Cyclic codes, Checksum. 6 Hours PART - B UNIT - 5 DATA LINK CONTROL: Framing; Flow and Error control; Protocols; Noiseless channels; Noisy channels; HDLC; Point-to-point Protocol - framing, transition phases. 7 Hours UNIT - 6 MULTIPLE ACCESS, ETHERNET: Random Access; Controlled Access; Channelization. Ethernet: IEEE standards; Standard Ethernet and changes in the standard; Fast Ethernet; Gigabit Ethernet. 7 Hours UNIT - 7 WIRELESS LANS AND CONNECTION OF LANS: IEE 802.11; Bluetooth.Connecting devices; Backbone Networks; Virtual LANs. 6 Hours UNIT - 8 OTHER TECHNOLOGIES: Cellular telephony; SONET / SDH: Architecture, Layers, Frames; STS multiplexing. ATM: Design goals, problems, architecture, switching, layers. 6 Hours IA Marks:25 Exam Hours:03 Exam Marks:100

TEXT BOOK: Data Communications and Networking Behrouz A. Forouzan, 4th Edition, Tata McGrawHill, 2006.

REFERENCE BOOKS: Communication Networks: Fundamental Concepts and Key Architectures - Alberto Leon, Garcia and Indra Widjaja, 3rd Edition, Tata McGraw- Hill, 2004. Data and Computer Communication, William Stallings, 8th Edition, Pearson Education, 2007. Computer Networks: A Systems Approach - Larry L. Peterson and Bruce S. David, 4th Edition, Elsevier, 2007. Introduction to Data Communications and Networking Wayne Tomasi, Pearson Education, 2005. Computer and Communication Networks Nader F. Mir, Pearson Education, 2007.

M.V.J. COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING Department of Information Science & Engineering LESSON PLAN Class : V Semester Subject : Computer Networks I Total Hours : 62 Periods / Week Sub code IA Marks :4 : 06CS55 : 25

S.No

CHAPTER

Hour. No PART-A 1 2 3 4 5

TOPICS TO BE COVERED Data Communications Networks The Internet Layered tasks Protocol Suite Protocols and Standards Protocols and Standards The OSI Model and the layers in the OSI model The OSI Model and the layers in the OSI model TCP / IP Protocol Suite TCP/IP Protocol Suite TCP/IP Protocol Suite Analog and digital signals Data rate limits Data rate limits Transmission impairment Performance Digital to -Digital conversion Analog to - Digital Conversion Analog to - Digital Conversion Transmission modes Transmission modes Digital - to - Analog conversion Digital - to - Analog conversion Analog - to - Analog conversion Multiplexing Multiplexing Spread spectrum. Spread spectrum

Introduction

Data, Signals, and Digital Transmission

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

Analog Transmission and Multiplexing

Transmission Media , Error Detection and Correction

25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 PART B 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62

Twisted pair cable, Coaxial cable Fibre-Optic cable Radio waves, Microwaves, Infrared. Radio waves, Microwaves, Infrared Introduction to error detection / correction Block coding, Linear block codes Cyclic codes Checksum Framing Flow and Error control Protocols Noiseless channels, Noisy Channels HDLC Point-to-point Protocol Point-to-point Protocol Framing, transition phases. Random Access Controlled Access Channelization. Ethernet: IEEE standards; Standard Ethernet and changes in the Standard Fast Ethernet. Gigabit Ethernet. IEEE 802.11 IEEE 802.11 Blue tooth. Connecting devices Connecting devices Backbone Networks Virtual LANs. Cellular telephony Cellular telephony SONET / SDH: Architecture Layers, Frames STS Multiplexing ATM: Design goals, problems ATM architecture, switching, Layers.

Data Link Control

Multiple Access, Ethernet

Wireless LANs and Connection of LANs

Other Technologies

COMPUTER NETWORKS-I: QUESTION BANK

1. Besides bandwidth and latency, what other parameter is needed to give characterization of the quality of service offered by a network used for digitized voice traffic? 2. List two ways in which the OSI reference model and the TCP/IP reference model are the same. Now list two ways in which they differ? 3. Why does ATM use small, fixed-length cells? 4. List two advantages and two disadvantages of having international standards for network protocols? 5. What signal-to noise ratio is needed to put a 1 carrier on a 50-kHz line? 6. How much bandwidth is there in 0.1 micron of spectrum at a wavelength of 1micron? 7. In a constellation diagram, all the points lie on a circle centered on the origin. What kind of modulation is being used? 8. How many frequencies does a full-duplex QAM-64 modem use? 9. Compare the maximum data rate of a noiseless 4-kHz channel using (a)Analog encoding (e.g., QPSK) with 2 bits per sample. (b)The T1 PCM system. 10. What is the difference, if any, between the demodulator part of a modem and the coder part of a CODEC/(after all, both convert analog signals to digital ones.) 11. Consider a different way of looking at the orthogonality property of CDMA chip sequences. Each bit in a pair of sequences can match or not match. Express the orthogonality property in terms of matches and mismatches. 12. The following data fragment occurs in the middle of a data stream for which the byte stuffing algorithm described in the text is used: A B ESC C ESC FLAG FLAG D. What is the output after stuffing? 13. A block of bits with n rows and k columns uses horizontal and vertical parity bits for error detection. Suppose that exactly 4 bits are inverted due to transmission errors. Derive an expression for the probability that the error will be undetected. 14. Data link protocols almost always put the CRC in a trailer rather than in a header. Why? 15. Frames of 1000 bits are sent over a 1-Mbps channel using a geostationary satellite whose propagation time from the earth is 270msec. Acknowledgements are always piggybacked onto data frames. The headers are very short. Three-bit sequence numbers are used. What is the maximum achievable channel utilization for Stop-and-wait protocol?

16. A 100-km-long cable runs at the T1 data rate. The propagation speed in the cable is 2/3 the speed of light in vacuum. How many bits fit in the cable? 17. What is the minimum overhead to send an IP packet using PPP? Count only the overhead introduced by PPP itself, not the IP header overhead. 18. Consider the delay of pure ALOHA versus slotted ALOHA at low load. Which one is less? Explain your answer? 19. Sketch the differential Manchester encoding for the bit stream of the previous problem. Assume the line is initially in the low state. 20. How many frames per second can gigabit Ethernet handle? Think carefully and take into account all the relevant cases. Hint: the fact that it is gigabit Ethernet matters. 21. Give two reasons why networks might use an error-correcting code instead of error detection and retransmission. 22. Bluetooth supports two types of links between a master and a slave. What are they and what is each one used for? 23. Explain packets switching? 24. Explain shortest path routing? 25. Explain multicast routing? 26. Explain routing in Ad Hoc networks? 27. Explain in detail about the congestion control Algorithm? 28. Explain the elements of Transport Protocols? 29. Explain UDP? 30. Explain in detail about TCP? 31. Explain in detail about Electronic mail? 32. Explain in detail about the World Wide Web? 33. Explain in detail about cryptography? 34. What is a Cipher text 35. What is a Transposition cipher? 36. What is Symmetric key Algorithm? 37. What is crypt Analysis? 38. What are public and private keys? 39. What is a Substitution Cipher? 40. Explain Triple DES? 41. Explain RSA algorithm? 42. Explain frequency shift keying with neat diagram.

43. Explain the various Digital to analog conversion techniques with neat diagrams. 44. Why do we need Analog to analog conversion? Explain the various analog to analog conversion techniques with neat diagram 45. What is multiplexing? Explain the various multiplexing techniques with a neat diagram. 46. Explain the application of Frequency Division multiplexing and time division multiplexing with neat diagram. 47. What is spreading? Explain the various spread spectrum techniques? 48. What is framing? Explain the various techniques of framing with neat diagram. 49. Explain bit stuffing and unstuffing in bit-oriented protocol with examples. 50. What is the difference between noisy and noiseless channel? Explain. 51. Explain stop and wait protocol for noiseless channel. 52. Explain stop and wait ARQ protocol for noisy channels. What are its disambiguities if frames are unnumbered? Find a solution to the same. 53. Explain Go-Back-N ARQ protocol. What are its disadvantages and how are these disadvantages overcome by Selective Repeat ARQ? Explain with neat diagrams and algorithms. 54. Explain HDLC protocol with its frame format. 55. Explain Point to point protocol with framing and transition phases. 56. Explain pure ALOHA and derive an equation for throughput S. 57. Explain the term persistent CSMA and non persistent CSMA. 58. Explain the following with example: a. Reservation b. Slotted ALOHA c. CSMA/CA d. CDMA e. Polling f. Channelization 59. Explain the frame format for IEEE 802.3 frame. 60. Explain the various implementations of standard Ethernet at physical layer 61. Explain Fast Ethernet 62. Explain briefly the architecture, frame format, address mechanism and various implementation of IEEE 802.11 at the physical layer 63. What is blue tooth? Explain its architecture and frame format. 64. Explain back bone network. 65. Explain FDDI and its applications. 66. Explain Virtual LANs.

67. What are transparent bridges? Explain loop problem and how is it overcome using various techniques? 68. How are Hubs different from switches? 69. Write the differences between router, repeater, bridges and gateways. 70. Write a short note on DSL. 71. Explain distance vector routing algorithm by considering an example. 72. Compare data grams and virtual circuits? List the difference between them. 73. What are the different types of routing algorithm? Explain Bellman-ford algorithm with example. 74. Explain flooding algorithm with diagram. 75. Explain with sketches different scheduling approaches to MAC. 76. Explain the classification of LAN based on topology and switching techniques. 77. Describe the token ring LAN structure network along with frame structure. 78. How bridges are used for implementing LANS? 79. Write Short note on DNS. 80. What is the minimum number of bits in a PN sequence if we use FHSS with a channel bandwidth of B=5 khz and Bss=120 khz 81. If the input slot is 16 bits long (no framing bits) what is the bit stream in each output? The bits arrive at the demultiplexer as shown below:

TDM
10100000 1010101010100000 0111000001111000

82. Define the type of the following destination addresses: a. 4B:30:10:21:10:1A b. 46:20:1B:2E:08:EE c. FF:FF:FF:FF:FF:FF 83. A slotted ALOHA network transmits 200bit frames using a shared channel with 200KBPS bandwidth. Find the throughput if the system produces: a. 1000 frames/sec b. 500 frames/sec c. 250 frames/sec

84. A radio system uses a 9600B/sec channel for sending call setup requests to a base station the packets are 120 bits long the time out is 20ms and back-off is uniformly distributed between 1 and 7. What is the Smax possible with ALOHA and slotted ALOHA? What is the average delay in each case when the load is 30% of maximum S of the ALOHA.

FORMAL LANGUAGES AND AUTOMATA THEORY Subject Code: 06CS56 IA Marks:25 No. of Lecture Hrs./ Week:04 Exam Hours:03 Total No. of Lecture Hours:52 Exam Marks:100 PART - A UNIT - 1 INTRODUCTION TO FINITE AUTOMATA: Introduction to Finite Automata; The central concepts of Automata theory; Deterministic finite automata; Nondeterministic finite automata. 7 Hours UNIT - 2 FINITE AUTOMATA, REGULAR EXPRESSIONS: An application of finite automata; Finite automata with Epsilon-transitions; Regular expressions; Finite Automata and Regular Expressions; Applications of Regular Expressions. 7 Hours UNIT - 3 REGULAR LANGUAGES, PROPERTIES OF REGULAR LANGUAGES: Regular languages; Proving languages not to be regular languages; Closure properties of regular languages; Decision properties of regular languages; Equivalence and minimization of automata. 6 Hours UNIT - 4 CONTEXT-FREE GRAMMARS AND LANGUAGES: Context free grammars; Parse trees; Applications; Ambiguity in grammars and Languages. 6 Hours PART - B UNIT - 5 PUSHDOWN AUTOMATA: Definition of the Pushdown automata; The languages of a PDA; Equivalence of PDAs and CFGs; Deterministic Pushdown Automata. 7 Hours UNIT - 6 PROPERTIES OF CONTEXT-FREE LANGUAGES: Normal forms for CFGs; The pumping lemma for CFGs; Closure properties of CFL 6 Hours UNIT - 7 INTRODUCTION TO TURING MACHINE: Problems that Computers cannot solve; The turning machine; Programming techniques for Turning Machines; Extensions to the basic Turning Machines; Turing Machine and Computers. 7 Hours UNIT - 8 UNDECIDABILITY: A Language that is not recursively enumerable; An Undecidable problem that is RE; Posts Correspondence problem; Other undecidable problems. 6 Hours

TEXT BOOK: 1. Introduction to Automata Theory, Languages and Computation John E. Hopcroft, Rajeev Motwani, Jeffrey D.Ullman:, 3rd Edition, Pearson education, 2007. REFERENCE BOOKS: Fundamentals of the Theory of Computation: Principles and Practice Raymond Greenlaw, H.James Hoove, Morgan Kaufmann, 1998. Introduction to Languages and Automata Theory John C Martin, 3rd Edition, Tata McGrawHill, 2007. Introduction to Computer Theory Daniel I.A. Cohen, 2nd Edition, John Wiley & Sons, 2004. An Introduction to the Theory of Computer Science, Languages and Machines Thomas A. Sudkamp, 3rd Edition, Pearson Education, 2006.

M.V.J. COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING Department of Information Science & Engineering LESSON PLAN Class : V Semester Subject : Formal Languages and Automata Theory Total Hours : 62 Sl.No CHAPTER Hr. No 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Regular Languages, Properties of Regular Languages 8 Hrs 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 Hours / Week : 4 Sub code : 06CS56 IA Marks : 25

TOPICS TO BE COVERED Introduction to Finite Automata Introduction to Finite Automata (Contd.) The central concepts of automata theory The central concepts of automata theory (Contd.) Deterministic Finite Automata, an application Deterministic Finite Automata, an application (Contd.) Deterministic Finite Automata, an application (Contd.) Deterministic Finite Automata, an application (Contd.) An application of finite automata Finite automata with Epsilon-transitions Finite automata with Epsilon-transitions (contd) Regular expressions Regular expressions Regular expressions Finite Automata and Regular Expressions Finite Automata and Regular Expressions Finite Automata and Regular Expressions Applications of Regular Expressions Regular languages; Proving languages not to be regular languages Regular languages; Proving languages not to be regular languages Closure properties of regular languages Closure properties of regular languages Decision properties of regular languages Decision properties of regular languages Equivalence and minimization of automata Equivalence and minimization of automata Context free grammars Context free grammars Context free grammars Parse trees Parse trees Applications

Introduction To Finite Automata 8 Hrs

Finite Automata, Regular Expressions 10 Hrs

Context-Free Grammars And Languages 8 Hrs

33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62

Ambiguity in grammars and Languages Ambiguity in grammars and Languages Definition of the Pushdown automata The languages of a PDA PDA Equivalence of PDAs and CFGs Equivalence of PDAs and CFGs Deterministic Pushdown Automata Deterministic Pushdown Automata Deterministic Pushdown Automata Normal forms for CFGs Normal forms for CFGs The pumping lemma for CFGs; The pumping lemma for CFGs Closure properties of CFLs Closure properties of CFLs Problems that Computers cannot solve The turning machine; The turning machine Programming techniques for Turning Machines Extensions to the basic Turning Machines Extensions to the basic Turning Machines Turing Machine and Computers A Language that is not recursively enumerable A Language that is not recursively enumerable An Undecidable problem that is RE Posts Correspondence problem Posts Correspondence problem Other undecidable problems Other undecidable problems.

PART - B Pushdown Automata 8 Hrs

Properties of ContextFree Languages 6 Hrs

Introduction To Turing Machine 7 Hrs

Undecidability 7 Hrs

QUESTION BANK FORMAL LANGUAGES AND AUTOMATA THEORY Sub. Code: 06CS56 Hrs/Week: 04 Total Hours: 52 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. IA Marks: 25 Exam Hours: 03 Exam Marks: 100

What is DFA.Define DFA mathematically. Define Finite Automata.Metion the applications of Finite Automata. Differentiate NFA,DFA, & -NFA. Obtain DFA to accept strings starting with the ab. Obtain a DFA to accept string of 0s and 1s ending with the string 011. Obtain a DFA to accept strings of as and bs with the substring aab. What is equivalence of DFAs and NFAs?Explain. Write the algorithm for converting NFA to an equivalent DFA. Convert the following NFA into an DFA

0
Q0
Q 1

1
Q2

10.

0,1 0,1 Consider the following -NFA


p {q,r} q *r a {p } b {q } {r } c {r } {p,q}

i)Compute the -closure of each state. ii)Give all the strings of length three or less accepted by the automata. iii)Convert the automata to DFA. 11. 12. 13. Write the procedure to minimize the states of DFA. Define regular expression. Obtain the RE i)To accept add number 0s and 1s. ii)To accept even number of as and bs. Explain the eqivalence relation between Finite automata and regular Expression. Construct an NFA for the expression 01*1. Explain pumping Lemma for regular sets. Explain decision algorithms for regular sets. Explain Context free grammar and context free languages. Explain L(G) for the following V={S},T={a,b] and p={S->Sb,S->ab} Find L(G) for the grammar G=({S},{a},{S->Ss},s}

14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20.

Differentiate leftmost derivation and rightmost derivation. Define context free grammar. What are useless symbols? Explain different normal forms. Explain Chomsky classificaion of languages. For the following grammar find an equivalent grammar in CNF G=({S,A,B},{a,b},P,S) where P is S->bA/aB A->bAA/aS/a B->aBB/bS/b 27.What is pushdown automata? 28.Obtain a pda to accept the language l(M)={WCW R} 29.Is the pda to L(M)={anbn/n>=1} is deterministic or not? 30.Explain the concept of Turing machines with a neat diagram. 31. Obtain TM to accept the language L={w/w(-(0+1)*} containing the substring . 32.State and prove pumping Lemma. 33.What are distinguishable and indistinguishable states? 34.minimize the following DFA using table filling algorithm
A B *C D E *F G H *I 0 B C D E F G H I A 1 E F H H I B B C E

21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26.

35.Write DFA to accept w which is string of 0s and 1s and is w mod 3=0. 36.What language is accepted by TM? 37.What is multi-tape turing machine?Show how it can be simulated using single tape Turing machine. 38.Obtain a TM to accept the language L={ww r|w(a+b)*} 39.What are the applications of Pumping Lemma? 40.What is an instantaneous description?Expain with respect to PDA. 41.What is the procedure to convert to CFG to PDA? 42.For the grammar S aABB | aAA A aBB|a B bBB|A C a. Obtain the corresponding PDA. 43.Is the foowing grammar ambiguous? S aSb|SS| 44.Remove the unit production from the grammar S A|B|Cc A aBb|B B aB|bb C Cc|B 45.Draw a CFG to generate a language consisting of equal number of as and bs

Database Applications Laboratory Subject Code: 06CSL57 I.A. Marks : 25 Hours/Week : 03 Exam Hours: 03 Total Hours : 42 Exam Marks: 50 I. Consider the Insurance database given below. The primary keys are underlined and the data types are specified. PERSON (driver id #: String, name: string, address: strong) CAR (Regno: string, model: string, year: int) ACCIDENT (report-number: int, date: date, location: string) OWNS (driver-id #:string, Regno:string) PARTICIPATED (driver-id: string, Regno:string, report-number:int, damage amount:int) (i) Create the above tables by properly specifying the primary keys and the foreign keys. (ii) Enter at least five tuples for each relation. (iii) Demonstrate how you a. Update the damage amount for the car with a specific Regno in the accident with report number 12 to 25000. b. Add a new accident to the database. (iv) Find the total number of people who owned cars that were involved in accidents in 2008. (v) Find the number of accidents in which cars belonging to a specific model were involved. (vi) Generate suitable reports. (vii) Create suitable front end for querying and displaying the results. II. Consider the following relations for an order processing database application in a company. CUSTOMER (cust #: int , cname: string, city: string) ORDER (order #: int, odate: date, cust #: int, ord-Amt: int) ORDER ITEM (order #: int, Item #: int, qty: int) ITEM (item # : int, unit price: int) SHIPMENT (order #: int, warehouse#: int, ship-date: date) WAREHOUSE (warehouse #: int, city: string) (i) Create the above tables by properly specifying the primary keys and the foreign keys. (ii) Enter at least five tuples for each relation. (iii) Produce a listing: CUSTNAME, #oforders, AVG_ORDER_AMT, where the middle column is the total numbers of orders by the customer and the last column is the average order amount for that customer. (iv) List the order# for orders that were shipped from all the warehouses that the company has in a specific city. (v) Demonstrate how you delete item# 10 from the ITEM table and make that field null in the ORDER_ITEM table. (vi) Generate suitable reports. (vii) Create suitable front end for querying and displaying the results. III. Consider the following database of student enrollment in courses & books adopted for each course. STUDENT (regno: string, name: string, major: string, bdate:date) 13 COURSE (course #:int, cname:string, dept:string) ENROLL ( regno:string, course#:int, sem:int, marks:int) BOOK _ ADOPTION (course# :int, sem:int, book-ISBN:int)

TEXT (book-ISBN:int, book-title:string, publisher:string, author:string) (i) Create the above tables by properly specifying the primary keys and the foreign keys. (ii) Enter at least five tuples for each relation. (iii) Demonstrate how you add a new text book to the database and make this book be adopted by some department. (iv) Produce a list of text books (include Course #, Book-ISBN, Book-title) in the alphabetical order for courses offered by the CS department that use more than two books. (v) List any department that has all its adopted books published by a specific publisher. (vi) Generate suitable reports. (vii) Create suitable front end for querying and displaying the results. IV. The following tables are maintained by a book dealer. AUTHOR (author-id:int, name:string, city:string, country:string) PUBLISHER (publisher-id:int, name:string, city:string, country:string) CATALOG (book-id:int, title:string, author-id:int, publisher-id:int, category-id:int, year:int, price:int) CATEGORY (category-id:int, description:string) ORDER-DETAILS (order-no:int, book-id:int, quantity:int) (i) Create the above tables by properly specifying the primary keys and the foreign keys. (ii) Enter at least five tuples for each relation. (iii) Give the details of the authors who have 2 or more books in the catalog and the price of the books is greater than the average price of the books in the catalog and the year of publication is after 2000. (iv) Find the author of the book which has maximum sales. (v) Demonstrate how you increase the price of books published by a specific publisher by 10%. (vi) Generate suitable reports. (vii) Create suitable front end for querying and displaying the results. V. Consider the following database for a banking enterprise BRANCH(branch-name:string, branch-city:string, assets:real) ACCOUNT(accno:int, branch-name:string, balance:real) DEPOSITOR(customer-name:string, accno:int) CUSTOMER(customer-name:string, customer-street:string, customer-city:string) LOAN(loan-number:int, branch-name:string, amount:real) BORROWER(customer-name:string, loan-number:int) (i) Create the above tables by properly specifying the primary keys and the foreign keys (ii) Enter at least five tuples for each relation (iii) Find all the customers who have at least two accounts at the Main branch. (iv) Find all the customers who have an account at all the branches located in a specific city. (v) Demonstrate how you delete all account tuples at every branch located in a specific city. (vi) Generate suitable reports. 14 (vii) Create suitable front end for querying and displaying the results.

Instructions: 1. The exercises are to be solved in an RDBMS environment like Oracle or DB2. 2. Suitable tuples have to be entered so that queries are executed correctly. 3. Front end may be created using either VB or VAJ or any other similar tool. 4. The student need not create the front end in the examination. The results of the queries may be displayed directly. 5. Relevant queries other than the ones listed along with the exercises may also be asked in the examination. 6. Questions must be asked based on lots.

M.V.J COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING Department of Information Science & Engineering LESSON-PLAN Subject Subject Code Exam Hours Total Hours : : : : Database applications Laboratory 06CSL57 3 42

Hours/Week Exam Marks IA Marks

: 03 : 50 : 25

Hours

Topics to be covered (in detail) Consider the Insurance Database given below. The primary keys are underlined and the data types are specified. PERSON (driver_id # :string, name string, address string) CAR (Regno: string, model :string, year: int) ACCIDENT (report-number :int, date: Date, location: string) OWNS ( driver_id# :string, Regno:string) PARTICIPATED (driver_id# string, Regno string, report number : int, damage_amount int) 1)Create the above tables by properly specifying the primary keys and the foreign keys. 2)Enter atleast five tuples for each relation. 3)Demonstrate how you a)Update the damage amount for the car with a specific Regno in the accident with report number 12 to 25000 b)Add a new accident to the database. 4)Find the total number of people who owned cars that were involved in accidents in 2002. 5)Find the number of accidents in which cars belonging to a specific model were involved. 6)Generation of suitable reports. 7)Create suitable front end for querying and displaying the results.

1-9

Consider the following relations for an order processing database application in a company. CUSTOMER (Cust # int, Cname string, city string) ORDER (Order# int, Odate Date, Cust# int, ord_Amt int) ORDER_ITEM (Order# int, Item# int, Qty int) ITEM (item# int, unitprice int) SHIPMENT (Order# int, wearhouse# int, ship_date date) WAREHOUSE(warehouse# int, city string) 1) Create the above tables by properly specifying the primary keys and foreign 2) Enter atleast five tuples for each relation. 3) Produce a listing : Custname, #oforders, Avg_order _amt where the middle 9-17 column is the total number of orders by the customer and the last column is the average amount for that customer. 4) List the order# for orders that where shipped from all the warehouses that the company has in a specific city. 5) Demonstrate how you delete item# 10 from the Item table and make that field null in the order_item table. 6) Generation of suitable reports. 7) Create suitable front end for querying and displaying the results. Consider the following database of student enrolled in courses and books adopted for each course Student(regno string,name string ,major string,bdate date) Course(course# int,cname string ,dept string); Enroll(regno string ,course# int ,marks int,sem int) Book_adoption (course# int ,sem int,book_isbn: int) Text(book_isbn int,book-title string ,publisher string ,author string) 17-25 1) Create the above tables by properly specifying the primary keys and foreign keys. 2) Enter atleast five tuples for each relation. 3) Demonstrate how you add a new text book to the database and make this book be adopted by some department. 4) Produce a list of text books(include Course#,Book-ISBN,Book-title)in the alphabetical order for courses offered by the CS department that use more than two books. 5) List any department that has all its adopted books published by a specific publisher 6) Generation of suitable reports. 7) Create suitable front end for querying and displaying the results.

4). The following tables maintained by a book dealer Author (author_id int, name string, city string, country string) Publisher(Publisher_id int, name string, city string, country string) Catalog(bookid int,title string, author_id int, publisher_id int, category_id int, year int, price int) Category(category_id int, description string) Order_details(order_no int, book_id int, quantity int) 25-33 1) Create the above tables by properly specifying the primary keys and foreign 2) Enter atleast five tuples for each relation. 3) Give the details of the authors who have 2 or more books in the catalog and the price of the books is greater than the average price of the books in the catalog and the year of publication is after 2000. 4) Find the author of the book which has maximum sales. 5) Demonstrate how you increase the price of books published by a specific publisher by 10% 6) Generation of suitable reports. 7) Create suitable front end for quering and displaying the results.

ALGORITHMS LABORATORY (CSE and ISE) Sub Code : 06CSL58 IA Marks : 25 Hrs/Week : 03 Exam Hours : 03 Total Hrs. : 42 Exam Marks : 50 Implement the following using C/C++ Language. 1. Implement Recursive Binary search and Linear search and determine the time required to search an element. Repeat the experiment for different values of n, the number of elements in the list to be searched and plot a graph of the time taken versus n. 2. Sort a given set of elements using the Heapsort method and determine the time required to sort the elements. Repeat the experiment for different values of n, the number of elements in the list to be sorted and plot a graph of the time taken versus n. 3. Sort a given set of elements using Merge sort method and determine the time required to sort the elements. Repeat the experiment for different values of n, the number of elements in the list to be sorted and plot a graph of the time taken versus n. 4. Sort a given set of elements using Selection sort and determine the time required to sort elements. Repeat the experiment for different values of n, the number of elements in the list to be sorted and plot a graph of the time taken versus n. 5. a. Obtain the Topological ordering of vertices in a given digraph. b. Implement All Pair Shortest paths problem using Floyd's algorithm. 6. Implement 0/1 Knapsack problem using dynamic programming. 7. From a given vertex in a weighted connected graph, find shortest paths to other vertices using Dijkstra's algorithm. 8. Sort a given set of elements using Quick sort method and determine the time required sort the elements. Repeat the experiment for different values of n, the number of elements in the list to be sorted and plot a graph of the time taken versus n. 9. Find Minimum Cost Spanning Tree of a given undirected graph using Kruskal's algorithm. 10 a. Print all the nodes reachable from a given starting node in a digraph using BFS method. b. Check whether a given graph is connected or not using DFS method. 11. Find a subset of a given set S = {sl,s2,.....,sn} of n positive integers whose sum is equal to a given positive integer d. For example, if S= {1, 2, 5, 6, 8} and d = 9 there are two solutions{1,2,6} and {1,8}.A suitable message is to be displayed if the given problem instance doesn't have a solution. 12. a. Implement Horspool algorithm for String Matching. b. Find the Binomial Co-efficient using Dynamic Programming. 13. Find Minimum Cost Spanning Tree of a given undirected graph using Prims algorithm. 14. a. Implement Floyds algorithm for the All-Pairs- Shortest-Paths problem. b. Compute the transitive closure of a given directed graph using Warshall's algorithm. 15. Implement N Queen's problem using Back Tracking.

M.V.J COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING Department of Information Science & Engineering LESSON-PLAN Subject Subject Code Exam Hours Total Hours S.NO 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 : : : : ALGORITHMS LABORATORY 06CSL58 3 42

Hours/Week Exam Marks IA Marks

: 03 : 50 : 25

Hours/ Week 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

TOPICS TO BE COVERED 1)BINARY SEARCH & LINEAR SEARCH 2)HEAP SORT 3) MERGE SORT 4) SELECTION SORT 5)A.TOPOLOGICAL SORTING B. FLOYD'S ALGORITHM 6)KNAPSACK PROBLEM USING DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING 7) DIJKSTRA'S ALGORITHM. 8)QUICK SORT 9)KRUSKAL'S ALGORITHM 10 )A.BFS 10)B.DFS 11) SUBSET 12)A.HORSPOOL ALGORITHM 12)B. BINOMIAL CO-EFFICIENT 13)PRIMS ALGORITHM 14)A.FLOYDS ALGORITHM 14)B.WARSHALL'S ALGORITHM 15)N QUEEN'S PROBLEM

8 9 10 11 12 13 14

3 3 3 3 3 3 3