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PED 2145 A Primary/Junior Personal & Social Studies

Instructor Name: Bryan Smith. Email: bryan.smith@uottawa.ca. Office Hours: 12 1 Fri., LMX 342B. Website: http://bryanabsmith.com/ped2145. Description and Course Focus Description Principles of curriculum design and evaluation; analysis of the Common Curriculum and other Ministry support documents; identification of specific skills and representative learning experiences in Personal and Social Studies and Health and Physical Education; preparation and utilization of resource. Course Focus This course will help familiarize students with the Ontario Social Studies (1-6) curriculum and provide them with the knowledge and resources required to implement and meet its requirements. Over the coming weeks, we will be engaging with ideas pertinent to social studies as a discipline and how one might go about applying these in the classroom. These will be covered in relation to the strands and expectations as they are laid out in the curriculum. Over the next five weeks, were going to work together to make social studies exciting, provoking and a great vehicle for fostering critical thinking and awareness. Over the next five weeks, we will not be looking at how to read a social studies textbook nor will we exclusively learn the familiar notions of history, geography or citizenship. Indeed, critically informed social studies is anything but the familiar. Consequently, we are going to be doing two things over the coming weeks. First, were going to explore what it means to learn and understand the social studies curricular areas. Primarily, this will involve learning the methods of social studies thinking (p. 58-60 of the curriculum documents) and apply these to the curricular topics as we move through the course. The second thing that we will be doing involves rethinking what social studies means and what we hope to achieve in teaching it. A good social studies classroom is anything but prescriptive; it is inherently a space of inquiry. Students (and teachers) need to feel free to get their hands messy and be prepared to (un)learn the complexities of the everyday. While this may seem complex for our youngest of students, encouraging them to think differently about the world when they are young is the most crucial steps in fostering equity, social justice and well-informed citizenship. The course is designed to address the following: The relationship between history, geography, citizenship and global perspectives. Explore various social studies issues through the use of critical thinking. 1 Course Info Room: LMX 105. Time: Friday, 8:30 12:00. Dates: January 10th February 7th.

Weekly Schedule Week One Social Studies and Critical Thinking: Inseparable Concepts History, geography, citizenship, civics, environmental education, global education, peace educationwhere does it end? Suffice it to say, social studies is multifaceted and focuses on the issues important to understanding our world. Does this sound like a lot for our youngest students? Theres an easy way to start: develop critical thinking skills and use this to develop the values needed to improve the world. In this lecture, well be focusing on the idea of critical thinking and why it is so important to social studies. We will look at some theories of social studies and its counterpart citizenship education (more on this specifically in week four). And, as with any introductory lecture, we will go over the course and what we will be doing together over the course of PED 2145. Readings Case, R., & Daniels, L. (2013). Teaching Elementary Students the Tools to Think Critically. In R. Case & P. Clark (Eds.), The Anthology of Social Studies: Issues and Strategies for Elementary Teachers (Updated ed., pp. 5364). Vancouver, BC: Pacific Educational Press. Ministry of Education. (2013). The Ontario Curriculum, Social Studies (Grades 1 to 6), History and Geography (Grades 7 and 8) Revised. Toronto, ON: Queens Printer for Ontario. (Familiarize yourself with this). Note: The curriculum document we will be looking at in this course is the 2013 version, which only comes into effect in September of 2014. Thus, if you are teaching social studies in your practicum placement or as a supply teacher (if your certification comes in before the summer and you get on the supply list), you will need to familiarize yourself with the current document. It can be found here: http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/ curriculum/elementary/sshg.html. If you want a hard copy of the 2013 version, you can order it here for free: https://www.publications.serviceontario.ca/pubont/servlet/ecom/ SearchServlet?reqCode=prodView&iN=232890&JavaScript=y. Week Two Land is Just Land Right? Not Quite. Geography, beyond just understanding space, is about understanding where we live, how we live there and how all humans interact with the Earth. Thus, in this lecture, were going to go beyond just learning about the land below our feet and explore how it is that we understand our relation to that land and others. In this lecture, we will explore critical geography and look at how we can use stories in our classrooms to teach our students about the places that we live in and share. Readings Lintner, T. (2009). Using Childrens Literature to Promote Critical Geographic Awareness in Elementary Classrooms. The Social Studies, 101(1), 1721.

Macken, C. T. (2003). What in the World Do Second Graders Know about Geography? Using Picture Books to Teach Geography. The Social Studies, 94(2), 6368. McCall, A. L. (2011). Promoting Critical Thinking and Inquiry through Maps in Elementary Classrooms. The Social Studies, 102(3), 132138. Wasta, S. (2010). Be My Neighbor: Exploring Sense of Place Through Childrens Literature. The Social Studies, 101(5), 189193. Special guest lecturer: Ellen Curtis, Canadian Geographic. Week Three History: Wait, Why Didnt We Learn That? Modern technology and history, however seemingly disparate, go together quite well. This week, we are going to explore how digital technologies can be used to teach the methods of historical thinking. Through this, we will explore how primary sources, historical significance and other history concepts can help make history an inquiry based endeavour. At the same time, we will also be complicating our understandings of what constitutes history. Specifically, we are going to explore one particular (disturbing) historical narrative: the history of residential schools and Canadas historic and on-going colonialism. Through this, were going to rethink the stories that we tell each other, our students and ourselves. For this exploration, we will be using the mobile application RNMobile (available in the Google Play Store and the Apple App Store) as part of our lesson (if you dont have a compatible device, it is also available as a web application: http://bryanabsmith.com/drnp/rnweb.html). Through this, we will come to appreciate the storied nature of history. Readings Lvesque, S. (2006). Learning by Playing: Engaging Students in Digital History. Canadian Issues, 6871. Seixas, P. (2006). Doing History With Wah Chongs Washing and Ironing. Canadian Issues, 5860. (A clearer copy of the picture discussed can be found here:
http://www.civilization.ca/cmc/exhibitions/hist/phase2/images/mod5_01b.jpg)

Tupper, J. (2005). We Interrupt This Moment: Education and the Teaching of History. Canadian Social Studies, 39(2). Special guest lecturer: Nicholas Ng-A-Fook, Associate Professor, Faculty of Education Week Four Voting and Community Service Dont Equal Citizenship Citizenship is often presented as a legal right and an obligation to voice your opinion. To be a good citizen in this conception is to be prudent and activeevery four years. In this lecture, were going to rethink what good citizenship means by reconceptualizing it as something that involves an obligation to be better members of the community.

Readings McGuire, M. E., & Cole, B. (2008). Using the Storypath Approach to Make Local Government Understandable. The Social Studies, 99(2), 8590. Ponder, J., & Lewis-Ferrell, G. (2009). The Butterfly Effect: The Impact of Citizenship Education. The Social Studies, 100(3), 129135. Week Five Bringing the World to the Classroom Part of good social studies teaching is recognizing that the global context lives in the local context. How we live as people in our communities is intimately tied to the world that is unobservable but most certainly important. In this class, well be looking at the global context and how you can bring important understandings of the world into your classroom. Case, R., Sensoy, ., & Ling, M. (2013). Infusing Global and Multicultural Perspectives in Elementary Social Studies. In R. Case & P. Clark (Eds.), The Anthology of Social Studies: Issues and Strategies for Elementary Teachers (Updated ed., pp. 249258). Vancouver, BC: Pacific Educational Press. Schweisfurth, M. (2006). Education for Global Citizenship: Teacher Agency and Curricular Structure in Ontario Schools. Educational Review, 58(1), 4150. Assignments The course is comprised of two assignments, both of which are worth 25% of your final grade. Dates Assignment Big Questions Discussion Paper Complicating Social Studies Resource Due Date Week Five Week Four

Big Questions Discussion Paper


Over the course of this program, youre likely to come up against the notion of a big idea. Social studies is no different. For example, we might all agree that history is the systematic exploration of the past and the consequences of this for the current moment but what is the stuff of history? What are we teaching to our students and why? This assignment is designed to get you to explore, confront and wrestle with similarly big and complex questions about the nature of social studies in relation to your pedagogy. In this assignment, you are required to answer three of these big questions in a short (3 pages double spaced) paper. There is no format for the paper the only requirements are 4

that you reference material properly (style is irrelevant) and that you have headings for each of the three questions (e.g., question one, question two, question three or social studies, history, geography). The Questions Answering big questions can be difficult so to help, the questions will be given to you in advance through an online discussion forum. Each week, you will be expected to login to the class discussion forum (link and schedule below) and respond to the question that I post. You are required to answer at least once per question/week and you are expected to respond to another student at least once. In this way, you are urged to think of this as a discussion space to develop your understandings and support your peers so as to strengthen and prepare your answers for the paper. The questions posted each week will not be marked they are a space to explore, debate and offer feedback. In effect, the discussions are a way for each of you to formatively assess and learn from each other over the length of the course to help prepare for the final paper. Thus, just before week four when the final discussion forum closes, you will have already developed a rough draft for each answer and received feedback from your peers. You will then have a week to make changes and write the final paper. Technical Details Your username is your first name and the first letter of your last name (mine is bryans for example) and your password is your student number. URL: http://bryanabsmith.com/ped2145/bq/. Schedule Here are the dates on which the questions will be posted and when the conversation will be locked (at this point, you will be unable to respond). Question Question One Question Two Question Three Question Posted Friday Jan. 10 by 5PM Friday Jan. 17 by 5PM Friday Jan. 24 by 5PM Question Closed Thurs. Jan. 16 at 9PM Thurs. Jan. 23 at 9PM Thurs. Jan. 30 at 9PM

Evaluation As with any big question, there are no right or wrong answers. Use this as a forum to explore your conceptualizations of the basic building blocks of social studies and their relationship to your own pedagogy. As such, you will not be evaluated solely on your ability to regurgitate content (although this certainly has to be present) and instead, evaluation will emphasize thought, critical thinking, application to ones pedagogy and communication. The paper will be evaluated based on the above criteria and done so in relation to the following questions: 5

Did you engage with the concepts and ideas brought up in the question? (participation) Did you think beyond simple answers and push your own thinking? (critical thinking) Did you attempt to tie your answers to the pedagogical context? (ties to pedagogy) Did you tie your answers to the readings? (ties to the readings) Did you argue a point or simply present information found elsewhere? (argumentation)

See Appendix A for the rubric. You must reference at least one reading per question from that week. The readings that correspond to the question will be posted in the discussion forum. NOTE: Although the discussion takes place through an online medium, you are expected to use professional language as you would on any other assignment. You are also required to sufficiently and properly reference any material that you refer to in any of your answers or responses.

Complicating Social Studies


There are two trends in social studies teaching that you are going to address in this second assignment. First, social studies tends to be limited in scope and exclusionary it frequently excludes the stories and histories of various groups and/or it trivializes them (think teaching about Aboriginal people by making totem poles). This would seem to contradict research that shows how students like challenging and fun social studies but feel as if it is neither of those things. In this assignment, youre going to address both by creating a pedagogical resource that can be used to push student thinking about the unknown that is also fun and challenging (age appropriate of course). In short, you will be complicating the stories told through our curriculum in the hopes of not only broadening student knowledge but also the ways that they inquire. Criteria In groups of three, you will be creating a pedagogical resource that you can use to teach about a set of curriculum expectations that pushes student thinking (see the example at the bottom of the explanation). This resource can be anything a piece of art, a booklet, a video, etc. Be creative. The only requirement is that you make it. In a separate write-up (5 pages double spaced max) to accompany your resource, you are expected to include the following: - Grade, strand and expectations to be covered. - Description of the resource itself and how you will use it.

o What is it? How do you plan to use it? Social studies thinking concepts covered with justification (at least two). o Which social studies concepts do you plan to address with the resource? Why? Elements of critical thinking with sample questions (at least four). o How do you apply/extend/address the attributes of critical thinking? Purpose of the resource. o What do you hope to accomplish with the resource? How does this push the stories that we tell/are told in the curriculum? Assessment o How will you assess student engagement? Why this form and not others? How will be you be assessing for/of/as learning (you dont need all three but you do need to describe why you are assessing what you are)?

Example NOTE: This example is provided only to clarify the expectations. You will need to be more elaborate than what is provided here. Grade: 6 (Heritage and Identity) Expectations: - Overall: demonstrate an understanding of significant experiences of, and major changes and aspects of life in, various historical and contemporary communities in Canada (p. 120) - Specific: formulate questions to guide investigations into different perspectives on the historical and/or contemporary experience of two or more distinct communities in Canada (p. 121). - Specific: interpret and analyse information and evidence relevant to their investigations, using a variety of tools (p. 121). - Specific: evaluate evidence and draw conclusions about perspectives on the historical and/or contemporary experience of two or more distinct communities in Canada (p. 122). Resource: - A small binder/booklet with a collection of primary sources, all of which talk about/illustrate experiences for different groups in Canada and how certain groups had a more difficult time than others. - The booklet will be used as part of a unit on communities in Canada. In small groups, students will read a vignette from someone in one particular community in Canada (so, one group will read the vignette(s) written by individuals from a Chinese-Canadian community, one group will read the vignettes written by someone from an Aboriginal community, etc.) o In your project, this will be made.

Social Studies Thinking Concepts: - Perspective: students, through this exercise, will be encouraged to take the perspective of those involved in the booklet. In so doing, we will be encouraging students to explore the different experiences of different groups in Canada and how this made life difficult for some and easier for others. - Interrelationships: with this booklet, we will have students look at how different groups interact and what the consequences were. - Continuity and Change: this resource will also be followed up with further activities that encourage students to explore how the experiences of certain groups have changed or stayed the same over time. - Significance: the resource will encourage students to consider what is deemed a significant story in Canada and how significance may differ from community to community Elements of Critical Thinking: - This resource will be used in class to get students to think about Canada as not just a culturally rich country but as a country that has had to (and continues to) work with different communities. - By providing different opinions and viewpoints of life in Canada, the booklet explores how differences of culture and opinion sometimes led to (and continue to lead to) tension. - Sample questions: o How do the stories in the booklet portray Canada? o Do you think that one community had difficulty in Canada? Why or why not? o Has one group always had it easy? Why or why not? o Are the experiences of all new communities the same? How might the European experience in Canada been different from the Afro-Caribbean or Chinese experience both in the past and now? - Attributes of critical thinking: o Habits of mind: the purpose of the booklet is to open students up to new ideas of how people perceive and live within the communities of Canada. It also encourages students to think about the multiple stories that make up who we are. o Thinking strategies: students will ask questions about their community, seeking to understand why certain stories are told and not others. They will also look for differences/similarities between what we do know and what we dont know. o Background knowledge: students will look at the ways in which different groups have shaped different communities around Canada. o Vocabulary: multiple perspectives, generalizing (can any one story be generalized to explain communities in Canada?). o Criteria for judgment: the booklet is built around primary source stories and

students will be required to evaluate the content of the stories in relation to the background knowledge that they have. Purpose: - In asking these questions, the booklet and class discussions will encourage students to think about how, despite everyone being equal in the eyes of the law (in grade 5, they will have learned what rights and responsibilities are), experiences and perceptions of communities differ. Assessment: - Students will pretend to write a letter to relatives back home about their experiences in an early Canadian town made up of distinct communities. - This will be formative assessment, focused on assessment for learning to support student learning of both their language skills and knowledge of communities in Canada.

Evaluation The assignment will be assessed based on the rubric. See Appendix B. Grading A+ Exceptiona l 90-100% An exceptional grade in a course or on an assignment is given for a response that demonstrates a thorough knowledge of all relevant concepts and techniques. The response is complete in content and presented in a clear, coherent and effective manner. In addition an exceptional response adds something novel and original which distinguishes an A+ from an A. Exceptional responses are rarely encountered as they are, by definition, outstanding among other responses. An exemplary grade in a course or on an assignment is given for a response that demonstrates a thorough knowledge of all relevant concepts and techniques. The response is complete in its content, with a clear and coherent presentation designed to communicate effectively.

A Exemplary 85-89%

AExcellent 80-84%

An excellent grade in a course or on an assignment is given for a response that demonstrates a thorough knowledge of relevant concepts and techniques. The response is largely complete in its content and clearly presented. However, some minor aspect of the assignment which may pertain to content or effective communication is lacking. A very good grade in a course or on an assignment is given for a response that demonstrates adequate knowledge of relevant concepts and techniques. The response is both informative and clearly presented. However, the response is incomplete as some substantive aspect of the assignment has been overlooked. A good grade in a course or on an assignment is given for a response that demonstrates adequate knowledge of relevant concepts and techniques. However, the response is incomplete as some substantive aspect of the assignment has been overlooked. In addition, there are difficulties with effective communication. A satisfactory grade in a course or on an assignment is given for a response that demonstrates basic knowledge of relevant concepts and techniques. A substantive aspect of the assignment has been overlooked. In addition, the difficulties with effective communication result in a lack of clarity such that readers or listeners struggle to get the information. A pass grade in a course or on an assignment is given for a response that demonstrates incomplete knowledge of relevant concepts and techniques. A substantive aspect of the assignment has been overlooked. In addition, the difficulties with effective communication result in a lack of clarity such that readers or listeners struggle to get the information. The category of redeemable failure demonstrates an unacceptable level of knowledge of concepts and/or techniques to satisfy the requirements of an assignment or course. student teachers receiving a redeemable failure have the right to one supplemental examination in which they must obtain 60% standing to be successful. Supplemental examinations consist of a written examination or additional assignments.

B+ Very Good 75-79%

B Good 70-74%

C+ Satisfactory 66-69%

C Pass 60-65%

E Redeemabl e Failure 50 59%

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Nonredeemabl e Failure 0-49% (F)

A non-redeemable failure demonstrates an unacceptable level of knowledge of concepts and/or techniques to satisfy the requirements of an assignment or course. No supplemental examination and/or assignments are offered.

A grade of E (failure with the right to a make-up) means that the students must pass the make-up assignment(s) or examination as determined by the professor in consultation with the Director of Teacher Education. If the student passes the make-up assignment(s) or examination, the new mark will be entered on the transcript. If the student fails, an F (failure with no makeup) will be entered on the transcript. A grade of F (failure with no make-up) for a course results in the compulsory withdrawal of the student from the program and the Faculty. Policies Special Needs: Students with special learning needs are encouraged to speak with the instructor as soon as possible so that appropriate accommodations can be arranged. Consultation: At their sole discretion, instructors may choose to consult with any member of the faculty and/or administration concerning a students development in the course. Attendance: Due to the concentrated nature of the Teacher Education Program and the considerable public responsibility inherent in the profession of teaching, attendance of all classes in the B. Ed. program is compulsory. Many of the objectives for this course are achieved during class time. Most classes include activities or discussions that enable students to contribute to the professional development of everyone in the class. As required by the Ontario College of Teachers and indicated in the Teacher Education Calendar, attendance is mandatory in the teacher education program and will be recorded at the beginning of each class. Of course, circumstances may occasionally arise which make attendance impossible. In the event that you must be absent, students must inform the professor by telephone or email either prior to the class or as soon after the class as possible. The professor will provide an assignment designed to ensure that the student meets the objectives of that class and he/she will require a written response from the student. The nature of this assignment and the due date for submission will be determined by the professor. Students who are absent on the submission date for an assignment are expected to submit assignment through an alternative means on the due date (i.e. email). Assignments received after due date will be considered late assignments (see below). Students who exhibit a pattern of irregular attendance will be brought to the attention of the Program

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Director and will be required to show cause why they should be allowed to undertake practicum and/or continue in the program. If you miss a class, you are expected to write a one to two page summary of the readings for that week. Academic Fraud: The University of Ottawas regulations concerning academic fraud as stated in the Teacher Education Calendar apply to this course: http://web5.uottawa.ca/ mcs-smc/academicintegrity/regulation_definition.php Plagiarism is one type of academic fraud. A student found guilty of committing plagiarism will be subject to sanctions, which range from receiving a mark of F for the work in question, to being expelled from the University, and even the revocation of a degree, diploma, or certificate already awarded. For more information about University regulations related to plagiarism and other types of academic fraud, please see the section entitled Academic Fraud in the Teacher Education Calendar, the Professional Development Programs Calendar, or the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies Calendar." For useful guidelines to help you avoid plagiarism, please consult the following web page: http://web5.uottawa.ca/mcs-smc/academicintegrity/regulation.php. Time-Lines and Deadlines/Due-Dates: Assignments which are submitted after the due date without an agreed-upon extension are considered late assignments. The penalty on late assignments in all courses in the Teacher Education Program amounts to a grade loss of 5% per day up to a maximum of 10 days, after which time assignments will not be accepted. Failure to submit assignments results in a grade of EIN (Failure/Incomplete). Such symbol is equivalent to a grade of F (failure with no make-up). Please speak to me if an assignment is to be handed in late. Writing Competency: Students are responsible for ensuring that their written assignments meet the standards outlined in this document as writing quality is considered as part of the assessment of assignments. Because I will not be able to offer extended assistance with remedial writing problems, students who encounter significant writing problems should make early and extensive use of the University of Ottawas Academic Writing Help Centre. Faculty of Education Regulation on Professional Ethics: As future teachers, graduates of the Faculty of Educations Bachelor of Education and Certificate of Education programs will be responsible for the physical safety, the psychological health and educational well being of students (children, adolescent or adult) in schools. In Ontario, teacher candidates are associate members of the Ontario Teachers Federation and subject to its standards of professional ethics during their practicum. Under the Ethical Standards for the Teaching 12

Profession of the Ontario College of Teachers, teachers must also demonstrate care, integrity, respect and trust in all of their interactions with students, parents, other teachers, school personnel and with members of the public. While the Faculty of Education recognizes that its teacher candidates are learning their professional responsibilities as teachers, it expects all of its teacher candidates to demonstrate that they have the knowledge, attitudes and capacities needed to be responsible for the physical safety, the psychological health and educational well being of students (children, adolescent or adult) before they are placed in a school or other practice teaching situation. It further expects that they will at all times demonstrate care, integrity, respect and trust in their interactions with each other, with the representatives of the Faculty of Education and during their practicum with students (children, adolescent or adult), parents, other teachers, principals, other school personnel and with members of the public. The following procedures apply to this regulation: 1. Publicity This regulation will be publicized to all Baccalaureate and Certificate of Education students, to all teaching and administrative personnel of the Faculty of Education and to all school-based personnel involved in a teacher candidates practicum. To be admitted to these programs, all candidates must demonstrate that they are aware of its contents and that they have the ability to live up to its requirements. 2. Prior to the Practicum a. Only those teacher candidates who demonstrate that they can act with care, respect, integrity and trust and that they have the knowledge, attitudes and capacities needed to be responsible for the physical safety, the psychological health and educational well being of students (children, adolescent or adult) will be placed in the practicum. b. If a teacher candidate has not demonstrated the required qualities (care, integrity, respect or trust), or if the Faculty has well founded reason to believe that the teacher candidate may endanger the physical safety, psychological health or educational well being of students (children, adolescent or adult), the Director of the Teacher Education or Formation lenseignement program may deny a practicum placement to the teacher candidate. In the absence of the program director, the decision to refuse a practicum must be made by the Vice-Dean Academic Programs or the Dean. The teacher candidate must be informed in writing of this determination and the reasons for it within five working days.

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3. During the Practicum a. A teacher candidate will be immediately withdrawn from the practicum if he or she puts at risk the physical safety, the psychological health or educational well being of students (children, adolescent or adult), or otherwise demonstrates an absence of care, respect, integrity or trust. b. Such determination may be made by the school principal, by another school board official such as a director of education, or by the Director of Teacher Education or of Formation lenseignement, the Vice Dean (Academic Programs) or the Dean of Education. The teacher candidate must be informed in writing of this determination and the reasons for it, normally within five working days of the withdrawal from the practicum. c. In the event of such a determination, the teacher candidate will only be placed in another practicum by the Director of Teacher Education or of Formation lenseignement, [or in his or her absence the Vice-Dean (Academic Programs) or the Dean of Education], when the teacher candidate demonstrates that he or she i. no longer poses a risk to students (children, adolescent or adult); ii. is capable of acting with care, respect, integrity and trust, and; iii. has the knowledge, attitudes and capacities needed to be responsible for their physical safety, psychological health and educational well being. 4. Denial or Withdrawal from Practicum In the event that a teacher candidate is denied or withdrawn from the practicum under this regulation, a committee consisting of three regular professors will examine the case. a. The committee must normally meet within ten working days of the written notification to the teacher candidate of the decision to deny a practicum. b. The committee may make one of three decisions: i. it may uphold the denial of a practicum placement; ii. it may identify conditions that the teacher candidate must satisfy before being placed in a practicum; or, iii. it may authorize the placement of the teacher candidate in another practicum. c. The teacher candidate may make a written submission to the committee and may request to appear before it. d. The committee must provide written reasons for its decision. e. In the event that the committee upholds the decision to bar the teacher candidate from the practicum, a grade of F will be noted on the teacher candidates transcript for the practicum and the teacher candidate will be withdrawn from the program. f. In the event that the committee identifies conditions that the teacher candidate must satisfy before being placed in a practicum, a grade of E will be noted on the teacher candidates transcript for the practicum.

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5. Right of Appeal The teacher candidate may appeal the decision of the committee through the normal procedures associated with a grade appeal as defined by the Senate of the University of Ottawa. Extra Readings Britt, J., & LaFontaine, G. (2009). Google Earth: A Virtual Globe for Elementary Geography. Social Studies and the Young Learner, 21(4), 2023. Butt, G. (2000). The Continuum Guide to Geography Education. New York, NY: Continuum. Case, R., & Clark, P. (Eds.). (2013). The Anthology of Social Studies: Issues and Strategies for Elementary Teachers (Updated ed.). Vancouver, BC: Pacific Educational Press. Darling, L. F. (2004). Teaching Human Rights in Elementary Classrooms: A Literary Approach. Canadian Social Studies, 39(1). Ensminger, D. C., & Fry, M. L. (2012). A Conceptual Framework for Primary Source Practices. The Educational Forum, 76(1), 118128. Gaudelli, W., & Fernekes, W. R. (2004). Teaching about Global Human Rights for Global Citizenship: Action Research in the Social Studies Curriculum. The Social Studies, 95(1), 1626. Gibson, S. (2012). Why do we Learn This Stuff? Students Views on the Purpose of Social Studies. Canadian Social Studies, 45(1), 4358. Heilman, E. E. (2008). Including Voices from the World Through Global Citizenship Education. Social Studies and the Young Learner, 20(4), 3032. Hinde, E. R. (2012). Geography for Our Youngest Learners. The Geography Teacher, 9(2), 4952. Kelly, D. M., & Brandes, G. M. (2001). Shifting out of Neutral: Beginning Teachers Struggles with Teaching for Social Justice. Canadian Journal of Education, 26(4), 437 454. Kirman, J. M. (2008). Elementary Social Studies: Creative Classroom Ideas (4th ed.). Toronto, ON: Pearson Prentice Hall. McLean, L. R., Cook, S. A., & Crowe, T. (2008). Imagining Global Citizens: Teaching Peace and Global Education in a Teacher-Education Programme. Citizenship Teaching and Learning, 4(1), 5064. Metzger, S. A. (2007). Pedagogy and the Historical Feature Film: Toward Historical Literacy. Film & History: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Film and Television Studies, 37(2), 6775. Morton, T. (2011). Historical Thinking in Provincial History and Social Studies Curricula. Cycle (p. 55). Vancouver, BC. Sears, A. M., & Wright, I. (1997). Trends & Issues in Canadian Social Studies. Vancouver, BC: Pacific Educational Press. Singleton, L. R., & Giese, J. R. (1999). Using Online Primary Sources with Students. The Social Studies, 90(4), 148151. 15

Stanley, T. J. (2000). Why I Killed Canadian History: Towards an Anti-Racist History in Canada. Histoire Sociale/Social History, 33(65), 79103. Steinberg, S., & Bar-On, D. (2009). The Other Side of the Story: Israeli and Palestinian Teachers Write a History Textbook Together. Harvard Educational Review, 79(1), 104112. Westheimer, J., & Kahne, J. (2004). What Kind of Citizen? The Politics of Educating for Democracy. American Educational Research Journal, 41(2), 237269.

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