Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 84

Bomb ID 101

CCF
Frames
Suicide
ByCop
Data Pumping
The Thorazine
Shuffle
FOCUS:
Slings
Knives
Frangible Slugs
Zeiss Binos
Littleton Lessons:
ACTIVE SHOOTERS
Bomb ID 101
$5.95
IN CANADA
$9.50
WWW.AMERICANCOPMAGAZINE.COM
Significance Of S.H.I.T.T.
CCF
Frames
Suicide
ByCop
Data Pumping
The Thorazine
Shuffle
FOCUS:
Slings
Knives
Frangible Slugs
Zeiss Binos
Littleton Lessons:
ACTIVE SHOOTERS
WIN!
A KIMBER
CUSTOM TLE II
WIN!
A KIMBER
CUSTOM TLE II
TM
SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2006
AC S-O cover revised 8/7/06 4:32 PM Page 1
S-O c2,c3,c4 8/8/06 2:27 PM Page c2
SeptOct Section 1 8/8/06 2:14 PM Page 3
2006
40 A SILK PURSE GARY PAUL JOHNSTON
Stainless Perfection For Glocks.
46 EXPLOSIVE TIMES SCOTT ANDERSON
Identifying Things That Go Boom.
49 A HOLSTER FOR PROFESSIONALS GARY PAUL JOHNSTON
Has The Perfect Duty Holster Arrived?
51 LEARN TO LOVE THAT RUSH ROB LEATHAM
Stress Inoculation By Competition.
52 KA-BAR TDI BACKUP KNIFE CHARLES E. HUMES, JR.
When Fighting Gets Up Close And Personal.
55 SUICIDE-BY-COP D.P. VAN BLARICOM
Adding Options To Deadly Force.
57 ACTIVE SHOOTER C.W. BLACK
Expanding On Lessons Learned.
59 OFF DUTY CARRY KEVIN MCPHERSON
Should It Be An Option?
Volume 2, Number 7
SEPT OCT
16
ON THE COVER
40
Photos: Ichiro Nagata
WWW.AMERICANCOPMAGAZINE.COM
4 AMERI CAN COP SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2006
SeptOct Section 1 8/7/06 4:20 PM Page 4
18 CARRY OPTIONS MARK HANTEN
20 CORRECTIONS BRIAN DAWE
22 HIGH TECH BOB DAVIS
24 OFFICER SURVIVAL SAMMY REESE
26 EVOC ANTHONY RICCI
30 HARD TOOLS PAUL MARKEL
32 PRIVATE SECURITY PAUL MARKEL
34 STREET LEVEL JOHN MORRISON
36 REALITY CHECK II CLINT SMITH
38 RESERVES CHARLES E. PETTY
COLUMNS
AMERICAN COP

(ISSN 1557-2609) is published bi-monthly by Publishers Development Corp., 12345 World Trade Drive, San Diego, CA 92128. Periodical postage paid at San Diego CA 92128, and at addi-
tional entry ofces. Subscriptions: One year (six issues) $24.95. Single copies $5.95 (in Canada $9.50). Change of address: four weeks notice required on all changes. Send old address as well as new. Con-
tributors submitting manuscripts, photographs or drawings do so at their own risk. Material cannot be returned unless accompanied by sufcient postage. Payment is for all world rights for the material. The act
of mailing a manuscript constitutes the authors certication of originality of material. Opinions expressed are those of the bylined authors and do not necessarily represent those of the magazine or it's adver-
tisers. Advertising rates furnished on request. Reproduction or use of any portion of this magazine in any manner, without written permission, is prohibited. Entire contents Copyright 2006 Publishers Devel-
opment Corp. All rights reserved. Title to this publication passes to subscriber only on delivery to his address. SUBSCRIPTION PROBLEMS: For immediate action, write Subscription Dept., 12345 World Trade
Drive, San Diego, CA 92128.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to AMERICAN COP

, 12345 World Trade Drive, San Diego, CA 92128.


WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM 5
RESOURCES
72 WEB SITE SHOWCASE
79 SPOTLIGHT
80 CLASSIFIEDS
80 AD INDEX
76
W
I
N
!
W
I
N
!
8 RETURN FIRE
16 LEAA
28 ON THE JOB
82 INSIDER RUMINATIONS
DEPARTMENTS
KIMBER CUSTOM TLE II
24
Also Includes four Kim-Pro Mags and a Model 55 Milt Sparks Holster!
38
51
46
20
SeptOct Section 1 8/7/06 4:21 PM Page 5
6 AMERI CAN COP SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2006
AMERICAN COP
WARNING: Firearms are dangerous if used improperly, and may
cause serious injury or death. Due to the inherent variables in the
reloading of metallic cartridges, verify all published loads with manufac-
turers data. Consult a professional gunsmith when modifying any rearm.
PRODUCED IN THE UNITED STATES.
PUBLISHER
THOMAS von ROSEN
SUBSCRIPTION (858) 605-0253
subs@americancopmagazine.com
EDITORIAL (858) 605-0243
ed@americancopmagazine.com
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING (858) 605-0235
class@americancopmagazine.com
PRODUCTION (858) 605-0202
production@americancopmagazine.com
INTERNET www.americancopmagazine.com
ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT
ACCOUNT MANAGERS DELANO AMAGUIN/BRIAN FRIESEN
ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE STEVE EVATT
ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE ANITA CARSON
ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE DENNY FALLON
NATIONAL ADVERTISING:
12345 World Trade Dr., San Diego, CA 92128
(858) 605-0206; Fax: (858) 605-0208
email: delano@americancopmagazine.com
GENERAL COUNSEL: STEELE N. GILLASPEY
EAST COAST ADVERTISING:
SIG BUCHMAYR
Buchmayr Associates,28 Great Hill Rd.,
Darien, CT 06820; (203) 662-9740
PRINTING SERVICES: QUEBECOR WORLD
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR ROY HUNTINGTON
EDITOR DAVE DOUGLAS
ART DIRECTOR RICHARD STAHLHUT
MANAGING EDITOR ROCHELLE CANFIELD
EDITORIAL ASSISTANT ROXANNE SMITH
ART ASSISTANT ANDY LOY
PRODUCTION MANAGER LINDA PETERSON
ADVERTISING PRODUCTION REBEKAH EVELAND
PROMOTIONS DIRECTOR RANDY MOLDE
PROMOTIONS COORDINATOR LORINDA MASSEY
CONTRIBUTING EDITORS
FIREARMS TRAINING EDITOR CLINT SMITH
CCW/DUTY CARRY EDITOR MARK HANTEN
TECHNOLOGY EDITOR BOB DAVIS
VEHICLE/EVOC EDITOR ANTHONY RICCI
OFFICER SAFETY EDITOR SAMMY REESE
PROFFESIONAL SECURITY EDITOR PAUL MARKEL
SUPERVISORY SKILLS EDITOR JOHN MORRISON
LEAA ISSUES EDITOR JAMES J. FOTIS
EDGED WEAPONS EDITOR ERNEST EMERSON
COMPETITION EDITOR ROB LEATHAM
RESERVES EDITOR CHARLES E. PETTY
LEGAL ISSUES EDITOR JEREMY D. CLOUGH
PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR ICHIRO NAGATA
PSYCHOLOGY EDITOR JOLEE BRUNTON
CONTRIBUTING EDITORS WES DOSS, STEVE ALBRECHT,
RICH DEPARIS, SHEP KELLY, BRIAN HOFFNER, RICH GRASSI, FRANK BORELLI
FMG PUBLICATION EDITORS
AMERICAN HANDGUNNER ROY HUNTINGTON
GUNS MAGAZINE JEFF JOHN
SHOOTING INDUSTRY RUSS THURMAN

SeptOct Section 1 8/7/06 4:21 PM Page 6


SeptOct Section 1 8/7/06 4:21 PM Page 7
theres no doubt a forthright and thor-
ough job was done.
Mr. Smith should know the ofcer is
now being brought before a second
Grand Jury after the original indictment
was No Billed in March of 2006. The
incident took place in August 2005 and
the ofcer was placed on Administrative
Leave for months during the investiga-
tion, then demoted and suspended for
thirty days. Also, in Georgia, any sus-
pension of thirty days or longer automat-
ically triggers a full review by the POST
Council, to determine if the ofcer may
retain his certication. While he awaits
his fate again on criminal charges, he
still faces the real possibility that he may
never be able to perform as a law
RETURNFIRE

Clint Touches A Nerve


I am writing about Clint Smiths
article in the July/August issue. I am a
32-year veteran of the same department
that employs the instructor Clint vilied.
In fact I was his rst patrol supervisor.
Let me say what happened was an
unforgivable tragedy that I will not con-
done. It would have been helpful if Mr.
Smith included a few more facts (if
available). The academy in question is a
regional academy serving dozens of
agencies and has never had sufficient
resources to provide red or blue guns for
training. The Director when interviewed
initially didnt know what the policy
was regarding weapons. No doubt poli-
tics can get questionable; but knowing
the Homicide Detectives involved,
enforcement ofcer again.
I weep for the loss of the young
ofcer, it is a tragedy; her life ended long
before it should have and her family is
entitled to all the anger they feel and to
whatever compensation may be awarded
or negotiated. But Clint, does destroying
the life of a second individual make
everything better? He has lost his rank,
lost his teaching position, lost his
standing in our community and lost
friends; will his losing his freedom make
you feel better? Who the f**$ are you to
make that determination? Your long-dis-
tance attack on an incident you do not
have rsthand knowledge of is a bit god-
like. If you want to punish people for
tragic mistakes in Cobb County, Georgia,

But Clint, does destroying


the life of a second individual
make everything better?
8 AMERI CAN COP SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2006

The Black Hills Ammunition test re crew, waiting for the rest of the industry to catch up.
BLACK HILLS AMMUNITION INC. PO BOX 3090 RAPID CITY, SD 57709-3090 Phone: 605-348-5150 Fax: 605-348-9827
?. -t !/--/ ?//. ~~.~t-~. . ~-/
-~~- t/ -t/. ,.. --~ -~/ .-~ -t-.t.
SeptOct Section 1 8/7/06 5:20 PM Page 8
Ior oomp|ete nformaton on Kmber
rearms, aooessores and dea|er
|ooatons, p|ease send $2 to:
Kmber, Uept. 895,
0ne Lawton 5treet, Yonkers, NY 10705
oa|| (800) 880-2418
or vst www.kmberameroa.oom
From left, the Ultra CDP II

.45 ACP, Aegis II

9mm and Ultra RCP II

.45 ACP
along with the new Kimber LifeAct

Guardian Angel

non-lethal self defense device.


The best carry pistol is a Kimber 1911. Powerful, accurate, safe and fast
1011 pistols point naturally and ht almost any hand. Their dependability is
legendary. Kimber

is the world leader in 1911 quality, and nowhere is quality


more important than in a carry pistol.
The Ultra CDF II is Kimber`s hnest, featuring a carry bevel treatment for
rounded edges that will not snag, frontstrap checkering for a positive grip,
a stainless steel slide and ni,ht si,hts. The new RCF II is lurther rehned lor
concealability with a trough sight, bobbed hammer and safeties, rounded butt
and black matte KimPro II

hnish. The new Ae,is II 0mm is loaded with


Custom Shop leatures like a hat top slide, Tactical Wed,e

night sights, carry


bevel and bobbed small parts. Each weighs just 25 ounces, and 3-inch barrels
make them easy to carry and conceal.
All Kimber 1011 pistols are proudly made in America, and leature match ,rade
barrels, chambers and trigger groups for accuracy and absolute dependability.
Kimber. Carry the best.
Kimber Carry Pistols.
Powerful. Dependable. Accurate.
The Ultra Carry II .45 ACP has
a 3-inch barrel and weighs just
25 ounces. It is also available
with optional night sights and
Crimson Trace Lasergrips.
The Ultra Raptor II .45 ACP has
night sights, a fat top slide with
back-cut row of scales, special
serrations, ambidextrous safety
and logo grips.
SeptOct Section 1 8/8/06 2:05 PM Page 9
10 AMERI CAN COP SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2006
move here and run for DA.
Now for the reason I really wrote,
shame on you for being ashamed to
have been a law enforcement ofcer. I
have worn my badge honorably for 32
years and 2 months and have never
done anything to dishonor it or my pro-
fession. I do not feel shame for the
stupid, negligent or criminal acts of
other officers and the act of a Grand
Jury in this jurisdiction damn sure
doesnt make me feel shame. As for
being ashamed of being a firearms
instructor, only you can speak to that;
but other instructors I know have only
redoubled their efforts to do it the right
way. Thats what rational people do; see
a problem-x it and dont let it happen
again. Your last statement is completely
off base... I am truly embarrassed we
are not gonna do a damn thing about it.
What was your plan, are you going to
organize the readership to March on
Marietta? Do you recommend vigilante
justice? Shall we drag this young man
out in the street and lynch him; will
blood for blood satisfy you?
By the way, are any of you aware
this has happened over 20 times in the
past 25 years and only a handful of
officers have been prosecuted? Lets
put away our outrage and pray for
wisdom. Let us mourn our dead and
offer a hand to their families.
But, I will never turn my back on a
man of integrity and real moral char-
acter, who has suffered in silence for
10months, offered no justification for
his actions, accepted his punishment
gracefully and tries every day to make
peace with his inner demons with the
help of God and family. So, American
COP, keep up the good work. Clint ,
grow some compassion, tragedies are
not one sided. And to all my brothers
and sisters standing on that thin blue
line, God speed and stay safe.
James
via Internet
James: Thanks for your letter. At rst I
was a bit concerned with Clints column,
too. Like you, I cannot remember a time
in my 30 years when I was ashamed of
being a cop. Clint asked me to re-read the
article and point out where he used the
word ashamed. I read it again, then
again. I also used the nd feature in
MS Word nothing. He never wrote he
was ashamed. Embarrassed yes but
never ashamed. I dont know about you
but I can remember a number of times I
was embarrassed by the actions of some
peers. Most of those ofcers were quickly
looking for another line of work and
rightfully so. Some even explored the
license plate manufacturing industry.
What Clint had to say needed to be
said and frankly I agree with him. Amer-
RETURNFIRE
ican COP is going to give differing views
on subjects vital to our profession. Its up
to the readers to form their own opinion
but at least the formation of the opinion
will be made from a good foundation.
The issue of a Regional Academy not
having enough money to buy red or blue
guns is a non-starter for me. I have a
Rings Blue gun catalog in front of me.
There isnt a handgun in there for over
$40. If I were king, Id make the decree
that henceforth from this day all
firearms instructors when conducting
any firearms training will upon their
persons have a Rings Blue Gun or a
Red Gun. Any violation of the decree
will result in immediate dismissal.
Firearms Instructors in general and
Law Enforcement Firearms Instructors
specifically cannot tolerate within our
ranks people prone to lapses in judg-
ment or attention that all to often kill
our students. Dave
Think That Was Harsh?
Aw, come-on Clint, dont you think a
30-day suspension and demotion from
When U.S. Special Operations Forces go to
work they trust in the advantage of Insight
Shouldnt you?
When U.S. Special Operations Forces go to
work they trust in the advantage of Insight
Shouldnt you?
Insight engineers the finest Thermal and Infrared
night vision equipment and weapon mounted
aiming/illumination tools available. Today, Insight is
the worlds leading provider of Mil-Spec laser aiming
and illumination systems to the U.S. Special
Operations Forces and U.S. Military.
NOW ACCEPTING DIRECT DISTRIBUTOR INQUIRIES
INSIGHTTECHNOLOGY.COM
877.744.4802
t
SeptOct Section 1 8/7/06 4:21 PM Page 10
WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM 11
the Sergeant is enough punishment?
Im ashamed to say Im a deputy
working for the same Sheriffs Ofce as
the rearms instructor who killed the
police recruit. I can honestly tell you
theres been a good bit of grumbling
among my fellow deputies about this
incident. I passed this article around at
our shift meeting and the general con-
sensus was Clint hit the nail on the head.
Were pretty much shocked at the very
minor slap-on-the-wrist punishment this
deputy got for what was no less than
negligent homicide. I am also ashamed
this instructor conducted the same drill
when I was in the academy and it both-
ered me too, but I didnt know enough at
the time, being a fresh recruit, to say
something about the unsafe practice.
For those who may not know the
final conclusion of how this homicide
happened; the instructor and students
were using snap caps, the kind with real
brass and an orange plastic bullet. Some
how one live FMJ round got into the
mix and was unknowingly loaded into
the instructors gun. But, none of that
matters because as Clint Smith points
out, real guns should never be pointed at
someone we are not willing to kill
regardless of what its loaded with.
It really bothers me that a young and
promising recruit is gone forever and
this former rearms instructor gets to
nish out his last few years until retire-
ment in a cushy admin job. Granted I
wouldnt want to have wake up and put
his shoes on everyday, but if you ask
me he got off easy.
Deputy Anonymous
Cobb County, S.O.
Deputy: Dont be ashamed. Be
embarrassed. But, from that embarrass-
ment let there grow a determination to
strive for excellence. And dont let
anyone tell you we shouldnt judge our
own. Thats the mantra of the feel-good
crowd and look how well its worked out
in our schools. We should judge and, in
some circumstances, judge harshly. It
can cost lives when we tolerate sub-
standard behavior. Dave
Fundamental Crap
Clint: Keep teaching that Boring
Fundamental Crap. It saves more
people than the Stupids can kill. As
a retired Federal Aviation Inspector I
know about frustration when it comes
to preaching basic fundamental safety.
Sometimes we feel as though were
pissing into the wind, but you have to
keep preaching and practicing what
you preach.
It is indeed a shame some people are
placed in responsible positions and
never learn what responsibility really
is. Keep up the great work.
Great magazine! I read my issue and
give it to my son. Hes a Police Ofcer.
I never get them back as they make the
rounds of the department.
Bill Neely
Lexington, S.C.
Bill, Tell your sons buddies to break
out a crow bar, open their wallets and
subscribe. Its only $19.95 for a one-year
subscription and $25 for a two-year if
they sign up on the Web site. More sub-
scriptions mean more advertising, which
means more pages, which means more
articles. Besides, around here, subscrip-
tions are like trafc citations, the more I
get, the closer I am to winning the
toaster oven and qualifying for the
drawing for the trip to Tahiti. Dave
Crossing Over
I just received the newest edition of
America COP thanks to the great ser-
vice of your subscription department,
opened it up, and everything changed.
Clint Smith finally crossed the line.

S
Negligible Parallax, 2 MOA Red Dot Sight
Co-aligned (with Red Dot) Visible Aiming Laser
Co-aligned (with Red Dot) Infrared Aiming Laser
Focusable Infrared Laser Illuminator
Smallest footprint available, Mil-Spec & under 11 oz.
Day or Night, Active or Passive capability
M S I the worlds only fully Integrated Sighting Module.
No other single-targeting system provides the level of
integration of the all new I.S.M.
SeptOct Section 1 8/7/06 4:21 PM Page 11
TLR-1

RAIL MOUNTED TACTICAL LIGHT


TLR-2

WITH LASER SIGHT


Streamlights new TLR-1 and TLR-2 Tactical Rail Lights set new standards for
dependability and indestructibility. The super-bright, 3-watt, shock-proof
Luxeon

LED has an intense, blinding hotspot and bright side-lighting. It


shines for up to 2 1/2 hours. It wont break, wont burn-out and will never
let you down. Its powered by two lithium batteries with a 10-year storage
life, so its always ready to go.
The unique rail clamp mechanism attaches quickly and securely to most
pistol and long gun rails. Your hand never has to pass in front of the muzzle.
These powerful lights give you every advantage in any low-light situation.
//GO AHEAD. SLAM EM
,
SMASH EM
,
DROP EM
,
CRASH EM
,
LOCK EM
AWAY FOR 10 YEARS.
30 Eagleville Road Eagleville, PA 19403 (800) 523-7488
www.streamlight.com 2006 Streamlight, Inc.
THE NEW TLR TACTICAL LIGHTS WILL TAKE ALL THE
PUNISHMENT YOU CAN DISH OUT, AND KEEP ON SHINING.
SeptOct Section 1 8/7/06 4:21 PM Page 12
WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM 13
RETURNFIRE
Ive been reading everything hes
written in Cop, Guns and Handgunner,
and I always thought he was an opin-
ionated, take no b.s., give no b.s.
crotchety pain in the rear.
And now he sinks even deeper with
his condemnation of the firearms
instructor who shot and killed his cadet.
Clint, in my own humble opinion, you
crossed the line into true character and
respect. You are spot on in everything
you said. Your disgust and disdain with
not only what happened, but the fact that
no one was willing to do anything about
the inexcusable death of a young police
cadet and that events stain on instruc-
tors, police, Americans, and human
beings shows to me your head, heart, and
conscience are in the place everyones
should be. As a graduate of a municipal
police academy in Pennsylvania last
year, there were only four rules drilled
into our heads before the rst time hand
touched rearm.
All four rules are exactly, nearly to
the word, the four rules that not only
were printed on your pages, but the four
rules that would have saved respect,
pride, and life. I thank you for bringing
this sad and horrific event to national
attention, and I pray everyone will learn
the lessons it teaches. Perhaps then, we
can once again respect and be proud to
be who we are. It may be the only way.
Patrick Tarrant
Souderton, Pa.
Ignorant Moron
Dear Mr. Douglas: I just read your
column in the March/April 2006 issue of
American COP Magazine. I notice that
the magazine, as a whole is not just pro-
cop, it is anti-public. Your response to
Mr. Ron Spradlin for example, was not
clever repartee nor was it honest. Your
comment cops, as a whole, are ethical is
a lie. Mr. Spradlin is telling the truth
when he says that cops lie on a regular
basis and cover for other police ofcers.
Examples are numerous. Police of-
cers do not write themselves tickets
when they speed off duty but have no
compunction about doing so to other cit-
izen drivers. Police have a daily practice
of not writing tickets to other cops
whom speed or run stop signs. One ash
of a badge and the ticket book gets
closed if the trafc offender was a cop.
In Ohio this means they dont pay the
minimum court costs of $75 nor do they
pick up the mandatory penalty 2-points
on their license. Cops dont ticket them-
selves or fellow cops with the $100
ticket that comes with driving in Ohio
without your seat belt on, either. Off-
duty police ofcers take their guns into
post ofces, banks and bars in violation
of Ohio law and do not penalize other
ALL-NEW for 2006!
* Ruger
* SlgSouer
* Klmber
* CZ
* Smllh & Vesson
* Vollher
* Brownlng
I AI HeoIh Porkvoy, SIe. #I ForI
Collins, CC 8052A - (800) 58. A3I5
(Z0) A0Z.0A2 - Fo (Z0) AI.I208
W W W. H l V l Z S l G H T S . C C M
SeptOct Section 1 8/7/06 4:21 PM Page 13
SeptOct Section 1 8/7/06 4:21 PM Page 14
RETURNFIRE
cops who do so. Of course, state citizens
without a badge pick up an Improper
Carry felony charge when caught on
the spot. To quote Steve Seagals first
movie, "cops and politicians think they
are above the law."
Cops are not moral heroes who took
a job to save society from crime. All
police ofcers are hired, work for and
protect the government entity that hired
them, not the people who live in any
city or state.
Thats why the United States
Supreme Court has said for 200 years
that the police cannot be charged crimi-
nally nor can they be sued for failing to
protect citizens from crime. And in July
2005, the US Supreme Court said that
no police officer or agency could be
civilly sued for failing to come to the
assistance of someone who has a civil
protection order, either.
Police officers are forgiven for
killing private citizens due to mistaken
identity, improperly executed warrants,
failing to obey police commands, etc.
Prosecutors and the court system afford
no such lax attitude to citizens who kill
cops in self-defense or due to uninten-
tional negligence. The costs of
defending oneself or paying off civil
suits comes out of a citizens own
pocket, also. Cops and prosecutors get
to use city tax treasuries to nance and
protect themselves from their misdeeds.
Mr. Spradlin was not the Ignorant
Moron you claimed he was.
Sincerely,
Michael Ruppert
Director, Renott Training & Supplies
email: renott@aol.com
Mike: Anytime someone quotes from
a Seagal movie I just have to stand up
and take notice. Shakespeare has
nothing on that guy. But heres a secret.
Now dont tell anyone, okay. All the
money we save from getting out of those
tickets and of course a portion of the
bribes we get go into a fund for the
maintenance and fuel costs of the black
helicopters we use to spy on people.
Additionally, the fund covers a portion
of the cost of research and development
into methods of defeating the aluminum
foil folks put in their baseball caps to
keep us from reading their thoughts. So,
its necessary. Keep this under your hat
if theres room. Dave
WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM 15
AMERICAN COP

welcomes letters to the editor for the Return


Fire column. Letters should be typewritten or emailed but leg-
ible handwriting is acceptable. We reserve the right to edit all
published letters for clarity and length. Due to the volume of
mail, we are unable to individually answer either written cor-
respondence or e-mail. Send your letters to Return Fire, Amer-
ican COP, 12345 World Trade Drive, San Diego, CA 92128;
internet: www.americancopmagazine.com
SeptOct Section 1 8/7/06 4:21 PM Page 15
16 AMERI CAN COP SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2006
still be on the job if you punched a
city council member or state leg-
islator as you rushed in to
work? What would your
career outlook be if you
crashed your car into the
police station at three
AM and appeared
drunk or intoxicated to
observers? If you
found yourself knee
deep in an investiga-
tion for bribery,
facing possible
felony charges,
would your Chief
protest loudly if Con-
gressional Investiga-
tors executed a court
ordered search of your
taxpayer provided
ofce or patrol car?
F
or those of us on the job
and working the streets,
every day brings
countless threats to
our safety. Back at the
office, an equal number
of threats can endanger
our careers from
counter productive
politically correct
policies, to an ill-
informed media that
has no hesitation
calling an officer
guilty until proven
innocent. The reality
of the job we do has
little in common with
the lives of members
of Congress.
For instance, how
many of you would
LEAA JAMES J. FOTI S
THE LAW ENFORCEMENT ALLIANCE OF AMERICA.
James J. Fotis is a retired ofcer from New York and the Executive Director of the Law Enforcement Alliance of America (LEAA). LEAA works to promote ofcer safety issues, defend law enforcement in the media and promote the
belief that gun control is not crime control. You can nd out more or become a member of the hard-hitting, conservative, unabashedly pro-cop, pro-gun, pro-self defense LEAA by visiting their Web site at www.leaa.org
No One is Above the Law
Except, of Course, Members of Congress
M
ore than likely, youd
be at the unemploy-
ment line or behind
bars if any of the above
events happened to you thats
because youre not a member of
Congress. At press time, the grand
jury has been out for nine weeks
with no action against Democrat
Congresswoman Cynthia McKinney,
who is accused of punching a U.S.
Capitol Police Officer who was
enforcing the security rules set up to
protect members of Congress from
terrorism and violence.
When Democrat Congressman
Patrick Kennedy crashed his car into
a vehicle barrier outside a Congres-
sional office building, he was given
a courtesy ride home, without any
criminal investigation being per-
formed, even though officers on the
scene apparently reported he
appeared intoxicated and at the time
he crashed his vehicle, and was
being pursued with lights and sirens
by another U.S. Capitol Police car.
When a Justice Department inves-
tigation of Democrat Congressman
William Jefferson reportedly turned
up videotape of the Congressman
taking money allegedly offered as a
bribe, and a raid on his home found
over a hundred thousand dollars
stashed in the freezer, a judge swore
out a search warrant for the Con-
gressmans office. House Speaker
Denny Hastert, a Republican, loudly
protested the search, claiming it vio-
lated the Constitution. Members of
Congress were quick to point out the
separation of powers notions
inherent in the Constitution, conve-
niently forgetting the rationale was
to establish a system of checks and
balances and by any reasonable
measure, the power of Members of
Congress is way out of balance.
L
aw Enforcement ofcers, as public
servants, work in one of the strictest
environments of accountability of
almost any representative of gov-
ernment. Given the incredible responsi-
bility and authority we are entrusted with
by the public, this accountability is nec-
essary. But its time for Congress to be
held more accountable perhaps their
Congressional lapel pins should be
equipped with video cameras so the
public can review their actions when
necessary. How about civilian review
boards to replace the Congressional
ethics committees? Or maybe even a
consent decree to force Congressmen to
document every action on scantron
bubble reports so we can have them
studied by some university professor for
any instances of political proling? The
next time some politician spouts off
about holding police accountable for
their actions, lets wholeheartedly agree,
with one condition: every measure of
accountability expected of law enforce-
ment must also be met by
those very same politicians.
Accountability
*
HYPOCRITES
SeptOct Section 1 8/7/06 4:22 PM Page 16
WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM 17
I take pride in knowing
every barrel lives up
to our reputation.
Ray Silva, Barrel Straightener, 4 years
The new 10FP HS Precision with AccuTrigger
AccuTrigger is a trademark of Savage Sports Corporation. U.S. Pat. No. 6,553,706
SAVAGE SPORTS CORPORATION, 118 MOUNTAIN ROAD, SUFFIELD, CT 06078
www. s a va ge a r ms . c om
SeptOct Section 1 8/7/06 4:22 PM Page 17
18 AMERI CAN COP SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2006
MARK HANTEN CARRYOPTIONS
FROM HOLSTERS TO HAVERSACKS.
S
ince were talking about shotguns here, I have to
mention a great new tactical shotgun stock. Its a col-
lapsible and adjustable pistol-grip stock with two
built-in recoil reduction systems which reduce recoil
by up to 95 percent. The Knoxx Industries Spec Ops Stock
is a great enhancement to the versatility of a versatile and
devastating weapon.
With an adjustment range of 4", the collapsible stock ts vir-
tually anyone with or without body armor. The primary recoil
reduction system is a piston type shock absorber allowing con-
trolled compression of the stock. The result is truly dramatic.
You can shoot heavy slugs with no discomfort whatsoever. Like
all the gear I talk about here, this stock is rugged. The polymer
and alloy construction is durable and low maintenance. If you
carry a shotgun, this is one carry option you need to try. The
Spec Ops Stock is currently available for several Remington,
Mossberg, Winchester and FN tactical shotguns. Remington has
recently partnered with Knoxx to make this stock
available on shotguns in the Remington LE line.
For More Info: www.usgalco.com; www.knoxx.com
*
B
y the time I rst entered the tactical shooting
world I was very comfortable carrying my long
guns on a conventional strap sling over my
shoulder. I frequently carried my long guns on
my off shoulder with the barrel down for quick deploy-
ment and thought this was the best way to do it. The rst
time I saw an H&K MP5 three-point sling, with its over-
the-torso-hang-down-the-front carry style, I was com-
pletely unimpressed. It looked like a rigger had built a
web to catch unsuspecting tactical types. After carrying
an MP5 for several years, I came to appreciate the benet
of having a sling that allows a quick handgun transition
without worrying about dropping the primary long gun.
Over the years, several companies have created
improvements on the H&K Style sling and there are some
excellent variations on the market today. One of my
favorites is Galco Internationals BATTLSling. BATTL
is a clever acronym for Bilateral Ambidextrous Tactical
Transition for Longarms. This name suits it well as it high-
lights one of the primary advantages over the old H&K sling:
it allows for the effective deployment of the gun on both the
strong side and weak side.
S
ome serious thought went into the design of the
BATTL sling, and like other Galco products,
the materials and workmanship are first rate.
The injection molded Fastex buckles are from
YKK, the seams are all double or quadruple stitched,
and the ends of the webbing are all melted so they
wont fray. The Main strap of the BATTL Sling is 2"
webbing and does a good job of spreading the load and
improving comfort when carrying heavy guns. The
main strap also has a Fastex release buckle enabling the
user to instantly remove the sling and the weapon. This
could be critical in the event the user needs to extricate
themselves from a vehicle, aircraft or just to squeeze
through a tight passage. A smaller buckle forward of
the main strap attachment point allows the sling to slide
back and provide enough slack to move the weapon to
the weak side firing position. This allows the user to
maximize available cover by switching the gun back
and forth from strong and weak sides.
The BATTL sling is available for most shotguns
with a fixed stock and a front sling swivel. Three
models are available for tactical rifles including AR-15,
M1A and AK variants.
Serious Design
The Knoxx Spec Ops Stock
The Galco BATTL Sling
SeptOct Section 1 8/7/06 4:22 PM Page 18
SeptOct Section 1 8/8/06 2:09 PM Page 19
20 AMERI CAN COP SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2006
BRI AN DAWE CORRECTIONS
BEHINDTHE FENCE.
T
he American Psychiatric Association
reports up to 20 percent of the inmates cur-
rently in our prisons and jails are seriously
mentally ill. That equates to over 300,000
inmates and represents a rate of mental illness four
times higher than the general population. Con-
gressman Ted Strictland (D-Ohio), a member of the
House Committee on Crime, reports between 25 and
40 percent of all mentally ill Americans will become
involved in the criminal justice system during their
lives. A1999 report by the National Alliance for the
Mentally Ill found the number of seriously mentally
ill individuals incarcerated was three times higher
then those being hospitalized for the same illnesses.
According to the Consensus Project, The Los
Angeles County Jail, the Cook County Jail
(Chicago) and Rikers Island (New York City) each
hold more people with mental illness on any given day than
any hospital in the United States. Research has also found
that behind the walls, nearly half of the inmates with mental
illness were convicted of non-violent crimes.
The Colorado Department of Corrections found, of 31
states reporting, 19 saw a disproportionate increase in the
number of mentally ill inmates in relation to the overall
increase in the inmate population. In Connecticut, from 1993
to 1998, the number of inmates classied as seriously men-
tally ill increased from 5.2 percent to 12.3 percent. In Missis-
sippi the number of seriously mentally ill inmates doubled, in
the District of Columbia it rose by 30 percent and in Okla-
homa, the number of inmates on psychiatric medications
more than tripled between 1998 to 2005. And the number of
inmates appearing on the mental health caseload in New
York rose an astounding 73 percent, a rate ve times higher
than the increase in the overall inmate population.
I
s the safety of our neighborhoods, the safety of the law
enforcement community, and the well being of our most
vulnerable citizens, the mentally ill, being compro-
mised? Are our Correctional Ofcers and Police Ofcers
being thrust into the role of mental health caretakers, with
virtually no training or experience? If they are to assume that
role, who will provide the training and who will accept the
liability? Our political leaders seem hell bent on locking
them up and throwing away the key. No one dares to wear
the label of being soft on crime. Is compassion being soft on
crime? Is looking out for the weakest and most vulnerable
among us being soft on crime? Is recognizing someone with
a severe mental illness may not understand the consequences
of their actions being soft on crime?
Whats caused this phenomenon and what are the implica-
tions for Correctional Ofcers? Peter Early author of Crazy: A
Fathers Search Through Americas Mental Health Madness
writes, Jails and prisons have become our new asylums. Dein-
stitutionalization the closing of state mental hospitals and
dumping of patients into the streets in the 70s and 80s
began the migration from hospital wards to jail cells. He asks,
Why are we choosing cells over beds? The cost of a psychi-
atric bed exceeds $500 per day. The price of a Virginia jail cell
is $89 a day. Is the safety of our prisons and jails, the men and
women who work there, and the inmates themselves being
compromised yet again to save a buck?
N
umerous problems result from placing the mentally ill
in our correctional systems. An inmate who knows
the difference between right and wrong and who
chooses wrong is dealt with according to established
procedure. Its an entirely different issue when dealing with an
inmate who has no concept of this moral imperative. Consis-
tency is a critical component in maintaining care, custody and
control in a prison environment. If one inmate is being treated
differently from another, everyone takes notice and there may
be a perception by others that he is snitch. This can quickly
become very dangerous for everyone involved. Its especially
so for the inmate who is dealing with mental illness and as a
result may not understand the rules and regulations of prison
life, or the concept of right and wrong. It puts the ofcers
directly in the line of re, often with little or no training on how
to deal with mentally ill inmates and the resultant problems.
RIGHT Versus WRONG
Vacant Looks
Vulnerable Citizens
I
ran a housing unit for eight of 16 years as a state Correc-
tional Ofcer. I was the only Ofcer in a unit of between
40 and 60 inmates and not once did I receive as much as
15 minutes of training on how to deal with inmates with
mental disorders. How can you succeed in such an environ-
ment? All we ever knew was what we could observe. We
THORAZINESHUFFLE
THORAZINESHUFFLE
Our jails and prisons are our largest
mental-health facilities now.
United States Senator Michael DeWine (R-Ohio)
SeptOct Section 1 8/7/06 4:22 PM Page 20
would identify the inmates doing the
Thorazine shufe: exhibiting a vacant
look, slouched posture, slow respon-
siveness and an inability to articulate.
We could identify them but we were
never trained to deal with them.
Amentally ill inmates inability to
comply with orders often leads to a
poor disciplinary record and results in
their failure to be paroled. Many men-
tally ill inmates will max-out their
term or will serve up to 85 percent of
their total sentence. According to the
Consensus Project, In Pennsylvania
state prisons, during the year 2000,
inmates with serious mental illness
were three times as likely to serve their
maximum sentences as other inmates.
In our jails the situation is just as bad.
The project reports the average length
of stay for an inmate at Rikers Island
is 42 days its 215 days for a men-
tally ill inmate.
Understafng
Two other factors contribute to this
ongoing problem. One is the under-
stafng of mental health personnel and
the quality of those who are hired. Of
17,640 prison mental health workers
only 18 percent are either psychiatrists
or psychologists. According to the
2001 Corrections Yearbook 58.6 per-
cent of all mental health staff held
titles that did not require them to have
a mental health degree or any special-
ized training. The Corrections
Forum reported that 12 percent of
correctional facilities had no Mental
Health Programs whatsoever. Funding
is also very problematic. According to
a survey in the Corrections Forum,
73 percent of correctional agencies
appropriate less than $500,000 for
their entire mental health program.
Our nations prisons and jails are
neither designed nor equipped to deal
with this population. Correctional Of-
cers are not mental health profes-
sionals. We arent trained to deal with
the mentally ill. We may be able to
keep them medicated; we may be be
able to keep them segregated; we may
even be able to protect them from
becoming prey, but we cant solve this
problem. Mentally ill inmates should
be in facilities designed with one pur-
pose: to address their needs and pro-
vide a safe, stable environment in
which they can hopefully get better.
This isnt to imply they should be
immune from prosecution for the
crimes they commit. But, the insanity
of the Insanity Plea is another
issue for another day. *
WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM 21
Oc I o b e r 2 4 - 2 5 , 2 0 0 6
OnIario ConvenIion CenIer
OnIario, CaIifornia
Oc I o b e r 2 6 , 2 0 0 6
AnnuaI LA CounIy 5heriff's
PoIice VehicIe TesI Day
fairpIex, Pomona, CaIifornia
vvv.copsvesI.com (916) 263-5525
$!0 (pre-regislered) $!5 (al lhe door)
produced by |he
CaIifornia Peace Officers' AssociaIion
A M L P l C A ' S P P L M l L P L L A W L N l O P C L M L N T L X P O
Full-face CBRN gas masks and riot-control
masks require* quantitative fit testing with a
precision instrument. Qualitative methods like
Saccharin, Bitrex and Irritant Smoke are not permitted.
The PORTACOUNT

Plus Respirator Fit Tester makes quantita-


tive fit testing fast, accurate and user-friendly.
Flexibility to fit test any tightfitting respirator
Fast and accurate fit factors
Unmatched software that runs tests for you
Comprehensive recordkeeping and available fit test card printer
Authorized Homeland Security Grant Program equipment-
AEL Ref. 1.1.5.1 Tester, Mask Leak/Fit
* OSHA 29CFR1910.134, ANSI Z88.10, NFPA 1500
PORTACOUNT

Plusabsolutely the easiest way to fit test.


Any other way is the hard way!
1 800 874 2811
Consider the advantages...
Visit www.tsi.com/CBRNfittest today.
Back issues are still available!
At REGULAR cover price of $5.95!
GET THEM ONLINE AT:
www.americancopmagazine.com
OR CALL: 888-732-2299
LIKE WHAT YOU SEE?
SeptOct Section 1 8/7/06 4:22 PM Page 21
9
BOB DAVI S HIGHTECH
CUTTING EDGE WIDGETS AND OTHER NEW STUFF.
P
ublic safety applications, sometimes called broadband at
vehicular speeds, (Geek Speak for the digital informa-
tion being pumped into your police car) have become a
basic requirement for agencies in cities and towns like it or
not. The need for instant access to information has increased expo-
nentially as Homeland Security becomes an ever-growing concern. Our
voice radio systems, the backbone of public safety for decades, no longer
provide the tools to do our jobs efciently. We require a virtual pipeline to
pump data to our cars. In the recent past, attempts to bring wireless broadband
solutions have been suspect or very expensive. Adding to the confusion is the
alphabet soup of acronyms and the lack of so-called standards. Some liken it to the
BETAversus VHS controversy of the early 70s. Today its
called Interoperability issues. Well one vendor, Alvarion, a
recognized leader with wireless broadband technology world-
wide, has developed an innovative solution to bring full
broadband access to agencies like yours.
R
emember, the vast majority of police departments consist
of 50 or fewer ofcers, covering anywhere from a few to
more than 20,000 square miles. Thats right, the Navajo
Nation Police force covers a huge area, with just a few
ofcers and they use Alvarions wireless broadband solutions.
Their solution is simple and it begins with changing the
mindset of decision makers. Although typically not an easy
task, it can be accomplished with a word thats becoming
more familiar to our vocabulary: Hybridization. Nowadays
when we think of Hybrids most of us think of gasoline
prices and high-mileage cars. But the concept to reduce costs
by combining two technologies into one can be used in the
same fashion for managing information. Today, government
ofcials believe they must design, develop and pay for pubic
safety systems with coverage everywhere says Alvarions
Pat Leary. Our approach is get coverage where the police
cars are located, moving or not. When handling incidents,
we believe ofcers rarely stray more that a few hundred feet
from their patrol cars. Why not use the car as a wireless node
on the network?
22 AMERI CAN COP SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2006
Navajo Nation Police
Y
ep, theres nothing more frustrating to any user then a
slow computer. Throughput or data rates come close to
reaching T-1 speeds or 1.5 megabits per second thats
much faster than todays CDPD systems. I like
describing it this way, think of a T-1 as 25 phone lines and
everyone is talking at the same time thats a lot
of information being exchanged all at once.
For more info: www.alvarion.com
What About Speed ?
*
Data Pumping
C
I
ntegration of Alvarions public safety system
works well because police cars have huge 12-volt
systems compared with handheld devices using
only microvolts of energy. This vast transmitting
power increases the coverage capability. And, using
cars as nodes is a cost-effective alternative to the so-
called mesh networks requiring less than one-tenth
the infrastructure. In other words, higher transmitting
power means fewer receiving stations are necessary for
the same coverage.
Adding Hybrid technologies permits departments to
leverage the low cost and mass-market availability of
Wi-Fi enabled devices within a 300' zone around each
vehicle. Thats an enormous array of 802.11 standard,
low cost, off-the-shelf products, such as GPS, IP cam-
eras, wireless printers and PDAs. All can be used
because youre rarely ever more than a few yards away
from your link to the rest of the world.
Furthermore 900Mhz systems provide larger cov-
erage areas then 802.11 equipment and cut through
ambient interference or background noise. Under
normal geographic conditions you should expect get
coverage over an eight-mile radius. Its not unusual,
under unique conditions such as the Navajo Nations
open prairies to receive coverage ranging up to 200
miles. But like any other wireless technology, line of
sight impacts usage. If youre in a highly populated
urban or densely wooded area, youll need to increase
the number of receiving stations as these obstacles
attenuate signal strength.
Power To Spare
SeptOct Section 1 8/7/06 5:21 PM Page 22
C
The new Taurus PT 1911 has an in store price of $599 for the stainless model,
less for the blued version. Check out the features list at retail value compiled
by famous firearms experts as an average of parts and fitting charges from
five U.S. pistolsmiths based on a Mil-spec Model 1911 pistol as a starting point.
Not only is the Taurus 1911 destined to become the standard that
all 1911 pistols are compared against for quality, they are an
UNBEATABLE VALUE. They have EVERYTHING.
Full length guide rod & reverse plug $ 35
Heinie Straight Eight Sights $150
Serrated slide rear and front $100
Checkered 30-lpi trigger guard $ 50
Checkered 30-lpi mainspring housing $ 60
Checkered 30-lpi frontstrap $150
Ambidextrous safety $125
Beavertail grip safety with memory pad $120
Target hammer $ 60
Skeleton serrated trigger $100
Trigger job $100
Custom t barrel (air-gauged bushing) $100
Custom slide to frame t $100
Polished feedramp and barrel throat $ 50
Lowered and ared ejection port $ 60
Custom internal extractor $ 75
Extended mag release button $ 35
Beveled mag well $100
Extra 8-round magazine $ 30
SUBTOTAL $1600
Basic Mil-Spec Model 1911 pistol $ 500
TOTAL $2100
TAURUS PT 1911 FEATURES AT RETAIL VALUE
Whats so great about
the Taurus PT 1911?
EVERYTHING
A bold statement we know, but the new Taurus 1911
does have everything and then some.
WWW.TAURUSUSA.COM
FREE one-year NRA membership with
the purchase of any new Taurus rearm.
SeptOct Section 1 8/7/06 4:22 PM Page 23
#
1
I
t was part way through the graveyard brieng when
the watch commander came storming in. He strutted
through the middle of the brieng with his boots
untied, yelling that cops today are getting soft.
I remember the group ass-chewing like it was
five minutes ago. You all call for cover way too
much! Back when I worked patrol we just took care of
business. No second unit, just hard-nosed cops doing
the same job you have to do today. I dont want to hear
all these requests for 87s and 88s (second unit and
cover unit).
After his motivational speech, he stormed out. The two
sergeants who were running the brieng were speechless.
They were so under his thumb they dared not say a word.
One of them simply said, You heard him, now go 10-8.
My fellow patrol grunts and I couldnt believe our ears.
Some were FTOs who had trainees assigned to them. The
confusion on their rookie faces was painful to look at.
They had just witnessed a blatant contradiction of hard and
fast ofcer safety rules.
Was rule number one Everyone goes home safe at the
end of the shift not rule number one anymore? It still was
for my fellow cops and me.
24 AMERI CAN COP SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2006
N
ow the ofcer hits the emergency button or calls for code three
cover. The entire shift drops whatever theyre doing and hauls butt
to help. That big L word now shows its ugly head. Liability.
Responding cops running code now have to hang it out and create
ulcers for the Sergeants listening to it on their radios. So much for the Watch
Commanders idiotic babblings about not calling for cover units!
Why wait for the K9? We all know that Mr. Land Shark is much better at
searching for bad guys than well ever be. Most K9 Officers are very pas-
sionate about what the dog can do to help keep cops safe. The dog is not
perfect but if ones available, why not wait? Make sure your perimeter is
tight and wait for the dog to arrive and do its job.
Why wait for SWAT? I know theres been a bazillion articles written on
whether law enforcement really needs SWAT. The answer is yes, unless
youre my old watch commander who thinks all you need is a handgun,
some cuffs and a strong right foot to boot the door in. SWAT is a specialty
unit and is better trained for high-risk situations. When the average citizen
calls 911 for help, a cop comes. When a police officer calls for help, SWAT
comes. Its not about ego; its about safely accomplishing the task. Thats
what SWAT does.
If you made it this far through my ranting and raving and you think that
the crazy old watch commander was right, I have one
thing to say to you. Retire now why wait?
SAMMY REESE OFFICERSURVIVAL
*
It Only
Makes Sense
Liability
GETTING HOME IN THE SAME CONDITION YOU WENT TO WORK IN.
W
hy wait? I asked myself.
Why not just do it the old
Texas Ranger way One
Ranger, one riot? Because
thats the old way. And my job, other
than whats in the department mission
statement, is simple go home to my
family at the end of the shift, and make
sure my partners do the same.
Why wait for cover? Sometimes, shit
hits the fan. Active shooter and 11-99
(ofcer needs assistance) are two situa-
tions that call for immediate action. I
dont think anyone would debate that.
Having a plan, or several plans, com-
bined with a cool head, proper training
and experience improves our odds of a
successful outcome in a spontaneous oh
shit situation.
Two ofcer cars have a distinct
advantage over single ofcer cars. You
take your cover with you. The single
ofcer, who decides to go it alone when
he has cover units available, or worse,
has cover en route and decides for some
reason to take action and goes hands on
when it could have waited, is just asking
for trouble. Some bad guys gure the
one-on-one odds are pretty good.
A
r
t
:

B
a
d
g
e
r
Why wait?
Rule #1 Still Applies
SeptOct Section 1 8/7/06 4:22 PM Page 24
RELIABILITY FOR LIFE & LIBERTY

MEET THE M&P FAMILY FROM SMITH & WESSON.


Smith & Wesson, the global leader in Safety, Security, Protection and Sport
invites you to meet the M&P Family.
M&P Pistols are available in 40S&W, 9mm and .357.
M&P15 Series available in standard and tactical configuration.
www.smith-wesson.com 1-800-331-0852 NASDAQ: MADE IN U.S.A.
M&P40
.40 S&W
M&P15T
5. 56mm
SWHC
SeptOct Section 1 8/7/06 4:22 PM Page 25
ANTHONY RI CCI EVOC
SURVIVING IN YOUR MOBILE OFFICE.
26 AMERI CAN COP SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2006
Anthony Ricci is the owner and president of Advanced Driving and Security (ADSI). Hes been teaching cops to drive for over 10 years. www.1adsi.com.
R
outine driving includes three
basic functions: go, stop and
turn. Anytime the driver uses
the gas pedal, brake pedal or
steering wheel a weight shift takes
place. If this weight shift is caused
from the vehicle accelerating or decel-
erating in a straight line, a longitu-
dinal force is acting on the cars sus-
pension system and eventually ends
up pressing down into the front or rear
tire patches pressing into the ground.
When the driver turns the steering
most important part of every vehicle.
They connect you and your vehicle to the
ground. They control turning, braking and
support the vehicle while bouncing over
curbs, hitting those beloved potholes, turning
around on a soft shoulder and all other routine
driving throughout your shift.
Tire Talk
Use The Force
wheel, a lateral force is applied to
the vehicle. These lateral forces also
end up traveling through the
vehicles suspension and down into
the tires contact patches. Its very
important to remember speed is one
of the most important factors when
measuring the force acting on the
tires, as well as the radius of the
curve if measuring lateral forces.
One important rule would be that if
we double our speed we quadruple
the forces acting on the vehicle.
O
ne of the tires most basic func-
tions is to hold the vehicle on
the road, however everything
has limits. The highest quality
tire made can only be asked to perform
at 100 percent of their capabilities.
Once the force acting on the vehicle
P 205/65R15 94V
P refers to passenger tire
R indicates radial construction.
205 is the section width from sidewall to sidewall in millimeters
65 is equal to the aspect ratio height to width (65 percent
as high as its wide)
15 is the wheel diameter in inches
94 tells the load index
V describes the speed rating.
The speed rating is a claim made by the
manufacturer that the tire will go a
certain speed for the manufacturers
specied life of the tire providing it has
no defects, punctures or patches.
Q 99mph
S 112mph
Y 118mph
U 124mph
H 130mph
V 149mph
Z above 150mph
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
v
TIRES Overlooked
And Underrated
I
d bet when thinking of your duty
equipment very few of you would
include your cruisers tires. Most
people take tires for granted. They
happen to be connected to the car so most
cops dont ever think to inspect them
prior to their shift. Fact is, tires are the
SeptOct Section 1 8/7/06 4:22 PM Page 26
vehicle exceeds the
tires capabilities, it
loses adhesion.
In order to better
understand tire capabili-
ties, we should be able to
read the side of the tire. The
following numbers and signs
are an example of what may be
visible on the sidewall of the tire: P
205/65R15 94V. While this may
appear to be a jumble of numbers,
each number and letter refers to a
characteristic of the tire. Take a look
at the chart.
The tire also shows you the wear,
traction and temperature rating. A
wear rate of 100 is baseline, while
fewer than 100 is poor and over 100 is
better. Both the traction and tempera-
ture ratings are rated A-C, where A is
the best, C is acceptable. Ideally you
would want a 300-340, A, A, rated tire
with a speed rating of H or V for your
Patrol Vehicle.
Ination
Checking tire inflation weekly is
the single most important thing you
can do to provide yourself with better
traction. If you look very closely at the
small print on the tire youll see a sec-
tion for example that reads 1,477 lbs.
at 51 PSI. We all know what the PSI
stands for but not many people know
what the 1,477 lbs is 1,477lbs is the
amount of vertical load a tire can hold
back before it starts to overload and
slide. The lower the PSI the less
weight the tire will hold back and the
sooner it will lose adhesion. So, for
performance reasons only the closer
you inflate the tire to the PSI limit, the
more support it will provide. An under
inflated tire will roll under during
aggressive driving and the rim could
catch the pavement. This is the fastest
way to blow out the tire and worse,
flip the vehicle. Tire roll can be mag-
nified for those of you driving trucks
and SUVs. Above all else remember to
always check the tire pressure prior to
every shift and dont underestimate the
importance of your tires.
You just may need them.
*
WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM 27
v
Adding a light to your weapon increases bulk and weight, so you dont want your holster to do the same.
For that reason weve introduced the Luminator

duty holster using AccuMold

technology. Its a rugged


custom molded holster that is actually lighter than many standard duty holsters and compact in design. Plus
weve included features such as an open muzzle/covered bezel design and our ErgoTek

padded belt loop.


Available in AccuMold

ballistic and our AccuMold

Elite

leather look nishes.


T & E samples available to qualied departments. Call (800) 477-8545.

2
0
0
6
A
r
m
o
r
H
o
l
d
i
n
g
s
,
I
n
c
.
THIS IS YOUR HOLSTER.
IF YOU USE A LIGHT,
bianchi-intl.com

SeptOct Section 1 8/7/06 5:22 PM Page 27


28 AMERI CAN COP SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2006
I
ts a trial, conviction and punish-
ment, too. South African
inventor Sonette Ehlers says
shes designed a rape-prevention
device she hopes will help in dealing
with that countrys growing epidemic
of sexual assaults.
The tampon-like device is worn
internally, and is said to be fairly com-
fortable for the user. Its not meant to
be very comfy for a rapist. Once an
attackers private equipment is
inserted, the device springs shut, trap-
ping the offending member with sev-
eral small hooks kinda like fish
hooks; you know, pointy, razor sharp
and barbed on the end, so if one tries
to withdraw, they only dig in deeper
and harder. The device pulls out
but not OFF. Removal requires sur-
gical intervention careful surgical
intervention. Were thinking interroga-
tions of suspects while theyre being
treated might be kinda
interesting, too.
H
ow often do you get the
chance to shut down a drug
operation and be serenaded by
the neighborhood while youre
doing it? As city, county and state
police officers served a warrant in
Gloversville, New York, dozens of
local residents gathered around,
laughing, clapping, and singing the
TV theme, Bad boys, bad boys;
whatcha gonna do? Whatcha gonna
do when they come for you?
Neighbors had complained about
unusual activity at the Hollenbeck
Funeral Home like, large numbers
of crackheads wandering in and out at
all hours, while partly nude corpses
were left in plain view. It wasnt dif-
ficult to guess that caring for the
COMMANDER GI LMORE ONTHEJOB
A CAREFULLY SELECTED COLLECTION OF SLAPSHOTS AND SNOT-FLINGIN FUNNY STUFF FROM FELLOW COPS.
Got something to share? Send it to me at OnTheJobStuff@Yahoo.com and if I use it, Ill fish around in my desk and find some kinda cheap gizmo to send you.
*
Its Not Just
A Rape
Deterrent
Thats What We Call
Community Support
dear departed wasnt the primary
commercial business there espe-
cially when more caskets than bodies
moved outta the place.
When a raid was finally executed,
officers reported their entry was like
firing a fox into a chicken coop. Dirt-
bags and dopers were jamming bags of
crack into caskets, caroming off
corpses, and trying to slither through
windows four at a time. Atotal of 16
suspects were hauled out in handcuffs,
including the owner of the funeral
home and his girlfriend, as well as
sacks full of crack, cocaine, marijuana
and weapons. Cops said the block
party went on, with applause, until
the last bus pulled away not a bad
ending to a day on the job.
O
fficers investigating a single-
car accident on Highway 71 in
Kansas City, Missouri were
stumped for the appropriate
entry as cause of accident in their
report. Somehow, Lost control while
launching a logey didnt quite provide
a full explanation.
Robin Doolin, 31, was driving along in trafc when she was overcome by the
need to expectorate that is, to spit. Being well aware of the fact that wind tends
to shift, sometimes blowin that window-red mucous-missile right back in your
face, she opened her door, leaned `way out, and fell right out on the road. Wit-
nesses reported she hit the pavement, rolled, and then sprang back up running after
her runaway ride. Unfortunately, she couldnt catch up to it before it ran off the
highway, down a slope, and sorta parked itself hard. We dont think her insur-
ance is gonna cover it.
SO WHAT
DO WE PUT
IN THE
CAUSE OF
ACCIDENT
BOX?
A
r
t
:

B
a
d
g
e
r
SeptOct Section 1 8/7/06 4:22 PM Page 28
SeptOct Section 1 8/7/06 5:24 PM Page 29
Ill admit I was a bit disap-
pointed and a little concerned. The class
was lled with cops and pump shotguns are still in the inven-
tory of most departments. It was bad enough we rarely got to
practice with the shotgun at home, but here I was at a big time
shooting school and wouldnt be able to train with it in an
MOUT scenario. Dont get me wrong, I had a great time and
learned a lot. I just felt the school missed an opportunity to
give the students something they could not get from their
meager ranges back home.
Y
ou can use either your service pistol or your
AR in the shoot house, just not the shotgun,
the Range Master instructed. We dont have
frangible ammo for the shotguns and normal
ammo tears up the bullet traps.
I was a student at arguably one of the top three shooting
schools in the nation. Wed spent the rst day at the square
range practicing with handguns and ries. The morning of the
second day, we focused on handling the shotgun and during
our afternoon session, wed put our shooting skills into prac-
tice by negotiating the live-re shoot house. Frangible ammu-
nition for 9mm, .40 or .45 pistols and .223 was available.
PAUL MARKEL HARDTOOLS
ESSENTIAL TOOLS FOR THE JOB.
F
irearms training must be practical. It
should replicate circumstances
were likely to face on the street. If
we cant engage reactive steel tar-
gets closer than 25 yards for fear of back-
splash or cant use our shotguns inside a
shoot house, how practical is that?
Two big advantages ICC frangible
ammo gives you is a non-toxic, frangible
projectile for use on indoor ranges and
shoot houses and the ability to safely
engage reactive steel targets at distances
up to and including contact. The shooter
and coach can train without having to
pick fragments out of their arms and
legs. What a novel idea!
We know cops use guns in extremely
close quarters in all manner of awkward
situations and conned spaces. If we truly
wish to succeed we need to train like its
for real. Static, square range shooting on
paper will only take us so far.
Tactical shotgun training has come a
long way. No more do we have to
choose between training with magnum
velocity 00 buck or the mild #9 bird-
shot. As for training with the pump
gun, the folks at ICC
have got you covered.
For More Info:
www.internationalcartridge.com
L
ast year during a trip up to the SiGARMS Academy I met Dan Smith, Pro-
ject Coordinator for International Cartridge Corporation, ICC for short.
Dan explained the ins and outs of ICC non-toxic, frangible ammunition.
What really intrigued me was their frangible 12-gauge 00 buck and slugs.
ICCs frangible projectiles are made from powdered electrical grade copper
with an emulsier to hold it all together until they strike something substantial.
Dan demonstrated the 00 buck by walking straight into a steel silhouette
target. Firing as he moved, he covered ten yards down to contact range. The
buckshot pellets instantly turned to copper dust when they hit the steel.
Dont try this with lead or copper jacketed buck. Youll end up picking pieces
out of yourself. More to the point, fellow ofcers on the range will not be too
happy with you while picking lead and jacket pieces out of themselves too.
The ICC frangible slug and OO buck ammunition should still be used on rie-
grade steel targets. On softer steel youll end up with dings and pock marks on the
surface. They both have factory spec velocities of around 1,400 feet per second.
30 AMERI CAN COP SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2006
GREEN AND FRANGIBLE
*
Reality Based
Training
Frangible Slugs From ICC
Effective
and Safe
SeptOct Section 1 8/7/06 4:23 PM Page 30
d
SeptOct Section 1 8/7/06 4:23 PM Page 31
if their insur-
ance com-
pany would
let them get
away with it.
If youve
had such a
client or
employer, you
might be won-
dering why you
stay in such a
thankless position.
Let me tell you, Ive had
more than my share of
ungrateful clients. On the other
hand, Ive worked for people who
truly appreciated the time and effort
put into keeping them safe. Rather
than dwell on the negative, I
thought Id highlight some of the
good security jobs out there for edu-
cated, mature professionals.

32 AMERI CAN COP SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2006


I
f youve been in the professional
security business for any amount
of time you likely will have expe-
rienced the Rodney Dangereld
Syndrome. That is, you get no
respect. Too many clients and
employers view security as a neces-
sary evil, one they would do without
PRIVATESECURITY
Paul Markel has been a cop since 1991. He's served several communities in his native Ohio. Paul also provides executive protection in the US and overseas.
E
very hospital I know of has a security staff
of some kind. Facilities with 50 to 100 beds
will likely have a single person per shift. Larger
hospitals have an entire security department with mul-
tiple ofcers on duty. Afew years ago I provided training for a
major heart center. That particular hospital had four to ve
ofcers on duty every shift and a security staff of nearly 40.
Those numbers rival many police departments.
There are many reasons hospital security jobs are attrac-
tive, not the least of which is if youre injured on the job
theres no better place to be. Seriously though, we all know
professional security can become tedious, if not completely
boring. Not so in a hospital. The Emergency Room at most
metropolitan hospitals is hopping 24 hours a day and pro-
tecting the ER staff is a big part of the security mission.
Hospitals are akin to small communities; they have the
same problems any community has. Youll deal with theft,
threats and assaults, drug problems, emotionally disturbed
people, and average whiners and complainers. Each shift you
work brings challenges.
If you are looking for real world experience dealing with
crisis, try working in the ER during a code or a multiple
code. Even though you arent a medical person you will be
helping lift, carry, and sometimes restrain patients.
At a health care facility youll come in to contact with
people in every stage of mental trauma from just stressed-out
to those completely out of control.
The nancial benets are attractive too. If youre a staff
member at the facility, versus a contractor, you can expect to
earn a very competitive wage. I know guys working security
for hospitals that make more than local patrolmen.
Health insurance is another big plus, especially for you
family guys out there. Youll have to look long and hard to
nd better health, dental, and vision insurance plans than
what most hospitals offer. Many facilities also offer retire-
ment programs as well.
P
roviding professional security in a major
hotel can be a rewarding experience. Im
talking about true multi-level hotel chains,
not the ones with numbers or colors in their names.
A large metropolitan hotel is a hub of activity. Most
have numerous ballrooms and conference areas. Like
healthcare facilities, you have a small community
inhabited by hundreds, if not thousands, of staff and
guests. Again youll have challenges ranging from
theft, both employee and intruder, sexual and physical
assaults, domestic violence, drunks and druggies, and
of course, plain old annoying people.
As a security officer in a hotel you have the chal-
lenge of determining whos a legitimate guest and who
is a trespassing troublemaker. Your interpersonal skills
will be put to the test every day.
Periodically you may have VIPs and celebrities
staying at your facility. Such occasions provide more of
a test for your professional security skills. Special
events are also unique affairs giving you the chance to
really strut your professional protection stuff.
While the wage scale will vary, large corporate
hotels often provide benefit packages and perks to their
staff. If you like to travel you get the employee dis-
count when staying at company hotels. For single
people or anyone looking for a change of scenery,
many hotels allow and even encourage inter-company
transfers. Bored in Boston? Perhaps you could transfer
to Miami Beach.
The security business like any other has its ups and
downs. There are good jobs and there are crappy jobs.
If you have a good reputation, an education and some
experience theres no reason you cant land
and keep one of the good ones.
*
HOTELS
HOSPITALS
PAUL MARKEL
ISSUES AND TRENDS ON THE PRIVATE SIDE OF LAW ENFORCEMENT.
Cream Of The
Crop Gigs
There Are Security
Jobs Worth Having
SeptOct Section 1 8/7/06 4:23 PM Page 32
SeptOct Section 1 8/8/06 2:11 PM Page 33
34 AMERI CAN COP SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2006
JOHN MORRI SON STREETLEVEL
STRAIGHT TALK ON SUPERVISION & LEADERSHIP ON THE FRONT LINES THE STREETS.
John Morrison served in combat as a Marine sergeant, and retired as a senior lieutenant from the San Diego Police Department, having served there as Director of Training, Commanding Officer of SWAT and division execu-
tive officer. He has taught, written and lectured widely on training, tactics and leadership. Contact him at StreetLevelOne@yahoo.com.
P
erhaps the most gratifying
thing a police supervisor can
hear is one of his officers
telling another, Yeah, the
sarge really has his shit together, or
any of those other scatological allu-
sions which convey the message that
you are a master of your craft and
your troops recognize and respect it.
Y
ou dont have to get crazy with this, or try to
include a slice of more than one or two cate-
gories in each brieng. Just establish a pattern
of giving something above and beyond, no
matter how small, every time. Then occasionally, and
with advance notice, give em something a little more in
depth, more formally.
Skills
I
ts a sad fact that most ofcers
today know very little about their
issue sidearm, and almost
nothing about the guns they often
seize and impound. Horror stories
and near-tragedies are epidemic. Do
your ofcers know how to render-
safe a loaded cap-and-ball revolver?
An UZI? Anon-ejector box-lock
shotgun? An HK MP-5?
Do they know how to tie and use
a blind rescue bowline, to hoist
themselves or a victim on a rope? It
could be worth their lives. How to
start up and move some common
forms of heavy equipment, like trac-
tors, backhoes, a diesel semi? In the
dark, can they orient themselves by
the stars or use the Mil Scale on mili-
tary/police binoculars?
Are your people up to speed
with the use of HemCon and Quik
Clot hemorrhage control prepara-
tions? They should be, and you too.
For every one skill taught in the
Academy or In-Service Training,
there are 50 unaddressed. Thats
your job, and your honor.
Humor
T
he more professionally demanding you are with
your troops, the more you owe them some
laughs when they come to work. The news ser-
vices and Internet (and Commander Gilmores
column, On The Job, in this magazine) abound with sto-
ries of stupid crooks, like officers in Turkmenistan who
How many times have
you heard that state-
ment applied to
anyone during your
career? Pretty rare,
isnt it?
The best thing
about wearing three
stripes is leading
people you respect,
and having them
respect you. The best
way to achieve that is
to constantly strive for
greater knowledge and
prociency yourself
and then to religiously
pass it on. Its a funda-
mental function of
leadership tough to
make time for between
paper-pushing and
jumping to react to
emergent situations
but the difference
between a cookie-cutter
standard sergeant and a
real supervisor/mentor lies in
delivering more than whats required,
and doing it in an intelligent and rea-
soned fashion.
I rely on formulae and method-
ology to lend some structure and
sanity to the sergeants role. One of
the most successful was one I called
S.H.I.T.T. Whatever you call that
block of time you have with your
The Signicance
Of S.H.I.T.T.
troops line-up, squad briefing,
team conference, whatever you can
use S.H.I.T.T. to add substance to the
usual lifeless litany of beat assign-
ments, department orders and info-
crap. It stands for Skills, Humor,
Information, Tactics and Technology.
Getting Your
S.H.I.T.T. Wired
SeptOct Section 1 8/7/06 4:23 PM Page 34
WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM 35
were ordered to sniff peoples breath
to detect if theyre chewing a popular
narcotic made from tobacco, lime and
chicken feces; or the two German cops
in Stuttgart who were cornered in a
shed by a vicious nine-pound rat and
had to put a dozen rounds in him
before he dropped.
When you face your ofcers and
say, And our Stupid Crook of the
Week is, or So you guys think youve
got it bad? and they visibly relax
and smile in anticipation then you
know youve got it right.
Information
Payroll policies, injury and illness
reporting, overtime and vacation
accounting, and on and on these
ever-changing bureaucratic booby-traps
cause street cops more grief than taking
a kick in the zipper from a crook. Of-
cers are bombarded with this crap, and
they need someone to digest and inter-
pret it for them. Thats you.
Go over all incoming materials
with two highlighters one to mark
the critical points for you, and one to
highlight the bullets for them. Yeah,
theyre supposed to read, absorb, and
memorize reams of administrative info
and we both know thats not hap-
pening. Give em the bullets at Line-
Up with, You all got copies of
AdminReg 18-A. Read it when you
can, but heres the dog thatll bite you
if youre not careful, okay? Be a
resource. Keep your own library of
rules & regs up to date, but also orga-
nized and available for your officers.
Tactics
Things you cant go over enough
include high-risk vehicle stops, felony
pedestrian take-downs, handgun reten-
tion, clearing stairwells, coordinated
room-to-room searches, two-ofcer
suspect control and the list goes on.
Tactical reviews are like the best medi-
cines: even small doses can save lives.
Technology
Even if your agency doesnt have
the gear or only SWAT has it, your
people should be familiar with night
vision devices, thermal imaging and
biothermal locating equipment, laser
and infrared sighting and targeting sys-
tems and youre the one guy to
introduce them. Do you even know
what the Remington Eye Ball is? If
you dont, then nd out, pal
it has to do with super-vision.
*
ELITE TARGET SYSTEMS
www.elitetargetsystems.com 970/731-7070
TAC II
Two-Stage Rotating Target System
Wireless
1000 Range
Compact
Weighs 26 lbs.
Self-Energized
Stable to 30mph
The TAC II is the perfect active
target system for LE training and
practice for all rearms including
sniper ries. Ideal for shared ranges
and smaller agencies.
N
E
W

f
o
r

2
0
0
6
!
Utilized by NTOA training
CSI TRAINING
HANDS-ON, HOME STUDY
Courses of Study include:
Fundamentals of Forensic Investigation, Criminal Investigation,
Firearms ID, Questioned Documents, Latent Print ID, Arson &
Explosion Investigation, and much more! Dantes and VA
approved. Accredited by the Accrediting Commission of the
Distance Education & Training Council. If you are interested in
CSI, either as a career or hobby, go to our website at
www.aiasinc.com or call 800-354-5134 for a free catalog.
American Institute of Applied Science,
100 Hunter Place, Youngsville, NC 27596
CALL 1(800)SA2-1911 the MAG GUIDE people
when only the BEST will do!
ORDER DIRECT and SAVE!
Color Catalog Available
Same Day Shipping
Appropriate shipping charges
Dealers Welcome
100% Customer Satisfaction
Lanyard Loop
Mag Guide
Govt Model &
Officers Model.
Stainless or Blue
Flat or Arched
20LPI
Smooth available
in flat only.
$84.95
$34.95
E-Z Fit Hi
Grip

Safety
.250 radius-Series
70 & 80 .220 radius
S70 for Springfield
Mil-Spec
PalmSwel/Standard
(jig available)
Prices starting at $16.50
S & A Custom 1911 Grips
Exotic Woods & Micarta
Standard & Slim Line
DD, FC & Smooth
P.O. Box 299 Copeville, Texas USA 75121
(800) SA2-1911 Fax (972) 853-0526
www.smithandalexander.com
Hours: M-F, 9am-5pm CST
Lanyard Loop
Mainspring Housing
Govt Model &
Officers Model.
Stainless or Blue
Flat or Arched
20LPI
Smooth available
in flat only.
$44.95
SeptOct Section 1 8/7/06 4:23 PM Page 35
T
O
P
S
E
C
R
E
T
The problem with some
people is they are often not
trusting. Added to this, they
often think somebody is getting something
theyre not. In August of 2002, we sponsored three classes
for local law enforcement ofcers only. I get this phone call
from a guy who wants to know, What shooting secrets are
you teaching the cops you arent showing us civilians? I
told him theres nothing secret, but some people just dont
get it. So here, as I see it, are the Secrets of Shooting. But
remember theyre secret dont tell anyone.
36 AMERI CAN COP SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2006
CLI NT SMI TH REALITYCHECKI I
COUNSEL, WISDOM, GUIDANCE AND TEACHING.
I
n many years of teaching Ive taken great pride in
the fact the largest percentage of my instruction has
not been discriminatory. Discriminatory in the sense
of having only law enforcement or civilian partici-
pants in classes I teach. Mixing these two groups provides a
better understanding of what the other must deal with, plus,
its been good for each to see how the other handles things.
Clint originaly wrote this for the
May/June 2004 issue of American
Handgunner. I remember reading
it and thought American COP
readers need to see this. Editor
S
E
C
R
E
T
S
O
F
S
H
O
O
T
I
N
G
Have A Gun With You If There
Is Going To Be A Fight.
Then again, if I knew there was going to be a ght I
should have scheduled a dentist appointment. I dont
know anyone who likes to go the dentist, so that should
give you an idea about how much fun a gunght is.
If I Have A Gun I Should
Probably Have Two.
Guns are like ashlights, one is none and two is one.
Flashlights run out of batteries, guns run out of ammuni-
tion. So at minimum have extra ammunition.
Look At, For Or Through
The Sights.
Sighted re is best for optimum marksmanship.
Sighted re is not possible if the bad guy is choking you
to death so un-sighted re will be good to use in that
predicament. When you solve the choking predicament
and the bad guy lets go of your neck, back up and use
sighted re so he doesnt choke anybody in the future.
Press The Trigger As
Smoothly As Possible.
If you yank on the trigger you often wont hit the target,
even at close range. Then you need to be extra-careful. The
doctrine of Hes so close I cant miss should be replaced
with Hes so close, Id better not miss.
Keep The Muzzle Between
You And The Threat.
We are all going to die, so why make it easy by having
your muzzle pointed at your feet or the sky? You might as
well point it at him, them or it. And, youre all smart
enough to know you shouldnt lead with the muzzle
around corners or through doorways, right?
Use Cover And Wear Your Armor.
You will never know if cover, concealment or your body
armor will work if you dont use it. People shoot you
because they see you and they see you because you let
them. Use cover to help break-up incoming projectiles and
the armor will help to stop the rest of the bits.
Load Your Gun When Its Empty.
An empty gun is not bad luck, its only a reality of
ghting. What you do with the gun when its empty can be
bad luck. Train to keep the weapon between you and the
threat, then load the gun and shoot back.
Clear Your Sights.
On all guns but especially rifles clear the
muzzle, then clear the sights, before you engage a target.
Many a best intention has been spoiled by an obstruction
in front of the muzzle. In training, it may not be a big
deal when your bullet hits a 2x4 window frame. In the
real world a concrete ledge 3" from the muzzle could,
indeed, be very exciting.
Create Distance From The Threat.
Distance is your friend it creates time, which can help
to create better marksmanship. Its in vogue to close with
opponents, but mostly in SWAT applications. Mr. and Mrs.
Homeowner (as well as most law enforcement ofcers) are
better served to open the ground. It gives you more time to
shoot if you have to, and time to make different or better
decisions concerning the mess youre in.
Dont Put Your Head Up.
Curiosity killed the cat and if its good enough for a
cat it ought to be good enough for us. Your head and high
velocity bullets dont mix. Shoot around protective cover
not over it. If you have to shoot over, come up, shoot
well and then get your head down and
dont dally about it. *
SeptOct Section 1 8/7/06 5:27 PM Page 36
The Butler Creek

LULA

Speed Loader/Unloader.
The fastest, most comfortable
loading experience possible. The
lever engages a spring, so rounds
slide in and out effortlessly no
finger or mag abuse. Its the best
switch youll ever flip.
7 models M-16/AR-15,
AK-47/GALIL, MP5, Colt 9
SMG, UZI, M1A/M14/AR10 and FN FAL
www. but l ercreek. com
2006 BOP
SeptOct Section 1 8/7/06 5:28 PM Page 37
could not come give them a ride, or yes
maam weve lined all our windows
with aluminum foil.
38 AMERI CAN COP SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2006
T
he closest thing to political suicide
for a reserve is to get on the wrong
side of a dispatcher. They can
without lifting a nger make
your life a living hell.
Remember Im of the old school
and back when dirt was new dis-
patchers were police officers
either retired or someone on light
duty for one reason or another and
even when the switch to civilian
employees began, the radio room was
W
e operated a separate radio
channel where the troops
could call in for registration
information, warrants and
the like. And it was here I learned how
satisfying it was to help the street cops
and how easy it was for the computer
to go down when one of them failed
the attitude test. The channel was usu-
ally busy but it wasnt long before I
began to recognize voices and learn
who the real hard workers were. It was
also fun to hear compliments or a
thank you.
Cops can find humor in the
strangest things and one of the major
ways to get laughed at was to flub up
on the radio for all to hear. A car
was involved in a chase and the
officer was doing a great job of
reporting progress as they twisted and
turned through a succession of neigh-
borhood streets. This went on for sev-
eral minutes and then we heard, Oh
fuck! He wrecked. You could tell by
his voice that the officer was not
entirely disappointed in the outcome
and he was rewarded with a long
series of radio clicks as cars pushed
mike buttons in appreciation. You
heard the same thing when somebody
made an error. Getting clicked wasnt
always a bad thing. Sometimes it was
polite applause.
W
hen President Reagan fired the air traffic controllers a bunch of
them became police dispatchers. Those guys were great. Their
radio procedures were impeccable and no matter how hectic
things became they were unflappable. So one of our goals
became a contest to see who could get one of them to crack up on the radio.
One night I got my chance.
The dispatcher called my number, one shot at ve points. Less than a
minute later he called again, medic and re in route. I kicked it up a notch.
Step it up, he said, weve had ten calls about a shooting.
So I did and arrived in a cloud of brake dust and hot oil. There was a
crowd in the middle of the street and sirens are coming from all compass
points. But nobody was lying in the street no blood running in the gut-
ters. I started asking the spectators and got the same story. Somebody said
somebody got shot and they wanted to see. Finally I saw the victim, a
teenage boy holding a bath towel to the side of his head. He was obviously
in distress and kept saying, Im shot. I got him to stand still and carefully
peeled the bloodless towel away. Sure enough there, in one ear lobe, was a
single shotgun pellet.
By now there are two re trucks, an ambulance and a herd of police cars.
Do you need any other assistance asked the dispatcher. Negative, cancel any
other units.
Of course hes gotten calls every few seconds and probably thinks WWIII is
underway, Is anyone shot out there he asks.
Armative, one but just barely.
Ah, 10 ... 4 and then theres this giggle and then a full-blown laugh. Hes
forgotten to take his foot off the switch and now you can hear a chorus of
laughter as the rest of the radio room gets in on the joke. Finally
the radio goes silent followed by an ovation of radio clicks.
CHARLES E. PETTY RESERVES
*
Just Screw
Up Once
TIN PUSHERS
often a place to go
heal up a bit.
Sure enough, I was
involved in a wreck
and while not seri-
ously injured was
pretty well bruised
and sore and accepted
an invitation to work
in the radio room
awhile. It was a reve-
lation. After a few
nights on the phones
they thought I might
do better somewhere
else after I told one
citizen, I aint got
time for your whining
and shit or something like that.
That was only after saintly patience on
my part politely telling callers no we
Be nice to your
dispatcher
Be nice to your
dispatcher
DEDICATION AND PROFESSIONALISM THAT GOES BEYOND PAY.
SeptOct Section 1 8/7/06 4:23 PM Page 38
SeptOct Section 1 8/7/06 5:29 PM Page 39
40 AMERI CAN COP SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2006
Section2 8/7/06 4:26 PM Page 40
A SILK
PURSE
A SILK
PURSE
I
f youre a student of rearms, you continue to be
amazed at the technical, design and production
breakthroughs emerging at an ever-increasing
pace. One of these is the use of plastic in rearms.
The very idea of this seems a paradox, but the truth
is, plastic is king or is it?
When the Glock 17 rst rocked the rearms industry
nearly 25 years ago, a friend of mine, Reiner Ruhnke, a
German police officer in what was then West Berlin
wrote me as follows: I have red this new Glock pistol
ugly, but works. Remember, we had it rst. The last
words of this were a quip Rainer threw at me on a reg-
ular basis. You know, the German stuff is better thing.
Whats more, he was almost always right almost.
The Glock has always been an impressive pistol and
has taken simplicity and reliability to new levels, at least
in its 9x19mm platform. I bought my rst 9mm Glock 17
in the early 1980s and both my wife, Nancy, and I car-
ried it and shot it for many years (mostly Nancy, who
was on it like a frog on a June bug from the start). Since
then Ive owned and tested a couple dozen Glock pistols
(factory and custom) and have had good results from
most of them.
However, as with anything in this world the Glock is
not perfect, in my opinion. Well, maybe not anything.
My wife is perfect (yes, honey, I swear its true), being a
cop for 28 years was the perfect job (wasnt it?); being
born in the USA was perfect. Well, you get the drift.
Now where was I? Oh, yeah, the Glock.
Gary Paul Johnston
Photos: Ichiro Nagata
Over the years I have written a number of times about my
amazement of a man with little or no experience in the
firearms business developing a design such as the Glock.
Think about it, this pistol incorporates rock solid principles
together with the most modern technology. If youre not
impressed, consider the overwhelming number of police
agencies, abroad and U.S., that have adopted or approved the
Glock for carry. Its accurate, reliable and has metallurgy
thats nearly indestructible.
WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM 41
Redening Perfection?
Section2 8/7/06 4:26 PM Page 41
A SILK
PURSE
A SILK
PURSE
Section2 8/7/06 4:26 PM Page 42
Section2 8/7/06 4:26 PM Page 43
Al l t hi s
being said, I still
fi nd probl ems. OK,
guilty as charged, I cant
hel p compari ng i t wi t h t he
most perfect pistol on earth, the
Model of 1911, but lets not argue, at
least not yet.
For 99.999 percent of those Ive
instructed in the use of the Glock, it
points high. Huh? Okay, heres
the drill, hold the Glock in a
close-in, low ready, or
whatever ready hold
you love. Now look at
the target, close your
eyes and bring the
pistol up to eye
level. Now tell me
your front sight is not
at least one degree high
as compared with your
rear sight. Is it more like
two degrees? Is this a
problem? You decide. If
you can, compare the angle
of the Glocks grip to the P08
(German Luger) feels good,
but points high. Very inter-
esting, but lets get serious.
Realizing the Glock pistol is
potentially a true 21st-century
personal protection handgun, Mr.
Ray Harms and Mr. Larry Gaglio, of
CCF/Raceframes, decided to take the
bull by the horns to bring the Glock all
the way. With a background in the
AeroSpace Industry and firearms,
Harms and Gaglio saw a number of
areas for improvement in the Glock
pistol in particular the frame. And
Harms had an idea on how to accom-
plish them. They began with the Glock
17 and 22, which use essentially the
same frame. The Raceframe is also
compatible with Glocks 17L, 24, 31,
34, 35 and 37 pistols.
Metal What A Concept
To begin with, the CCF/Raceframe
would be made of metal, not plastic,
and three kinds of metal would be
offered aircraft quality aluminum
alloy, titanium and stainless steel. While
rearms designers have proven much
can be done using plastic, CCF
was well aware that the latest
advancements in invest-
ment casting and preci-
sion machining
amount to a
quantum leap
in what can
be done
w i t h
metal. The
r es ul t i ng
i mp r o v e -
ments in the
CCF / Ra c e -
frame are more
than a few.
The tang of the new
frame is more of a
beavertail and is upswept to
allow getting on the pistol faster
when the balloon goes up. It also pro-
tects big hands from slide bite. Theres
an increase in the front strap undercut to
allow the gun to sit lower in the hand,
and this high-cut feature also eliminates
knuckle pressure in the middle nger of
the strong hand. A relieved area around
the magazine release provides the
access of an extended release without
the negatives of such a part being acci-
dentally depressed.
A welcome change is the absence of
the hooked triggerguard and the bottom
of the triggerguard is also smooth, as is
the inside surface to eliminate fingers
rubbed sore from lots of shooting in
practice (you do practice a lot ... right?)
The inside of the trigger-
guard is also relieved to
eliminate trigger nger
pinch. With the
CCF/ Ra c e f r a me
there are also no
(one-size-ts-no-one)
nger grooves on the
front strap, but
instead, deep check-
ering for more posi-
tive purchase for
everyone.
CCFs thumbrests
are shallower than those
on Glocks polymer frame
and they include a 1911A1 for-
ward relief to strengthen your
natural grip. This also results in
improved trigger reach due to
44 AMERI CAN COP SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2006
Section2 8/7/06 4:27 PM Page 44
better ergonomics. In fact, several law
enforcement agencies are evaluating the
CCF/Raceframe as a possible solution to
issues pertaining to the American Dis-
abilities Act with ofcers having dif-
culty qualifying due to grip size and
trigger reach.
The beveled magazine well entry is
also slightly enlarged and the magazine
well is of straight taper eliminating the
hour-glassing found inside the
polymer frame (from shrinkage in man-
ufacture), which tends to grab the mag-
azine. The result is magazines insert
more easily and really drop free.
Match-grade accuracy has been
achieved with CCFs machined locking
block, which is supplied with the frame,
and holes are put into the locking block
and frame at the same time. This block
also significantly improves lockup,
which to me spells safety.
Reduced felt recoil is accomplished
not only by improved ergonomics, but
also by the CCF/Raceframes lower
bore-to-hand ratio and increased
weight. With the components housed in
rigid metal, the trigger reset distance is
reduced and more positive, and the
trigger pull is not only greatly
improved, but is also consistent. Whats
more, the spongy feeling and over-
travel are eliminated. With an integral
metal frame, rail to slide surface is
increased, resulting in durability
improvement and smoothness of travel.
Lumen Aid
Integral with the dust cover portion
of the frame is a true M1913 rail
(often, but mistakenly referred to as a
Picatinny rail sorry, but Picatinny
Arsenal had nothing to do with it.)
Unlike the M1913 style rail on
vi rt ual l y al l pol ymer
frames, t hi s one
will accom-
modate mounting
any M1913 accessory.
Big deal? Maybe not, but its
there if you need it. If so, the
C. C. F. / Raceframes rai l i s
friendly to virtually all tactical
weapon lights, lasers, etc. We
found that a Streamlight weapon
light was ex-Stream-ly happy
on the CCF/Raceframes rail.
Speaking of lasers, the CCF/Race-
frame will also accept the internal
LaserMax laser sight. Housed in the
frame, this laser replaces the standard
recoil spring guide and is activated by
pushing the takedown lever from
either side. LaserMaxs intimi-
dating pulsating laser beam is next
to impossible for the operator to
lose sight of. Crimson Trace is
considering designing a new ver-
sion of its Crimson Trace exterior
laser for the CCF/Raceframe.
Now for the big one. The
CCF/Raceframe is available
with two interchangeable back-
strap inserts. Made of soft black
polymer (the only things that are
polymer on this frame), these back-
straps slide into a vertical dovetail on
the frame. One of these (the more
Luger-like rounded insert) duplicates
the factory Glock grip angle. The other
insert is more at, resulting in the pistol
pointing lower, and gives the gun a feel
more like a 1911 pistol. For the vast
majority this insert causes the sights to
be aligned right on target when the gun
is brought to eye level.
Thumb Safety
While the standard CCF/Raceframe
is a drop-in part, which accepts
WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM 45
Continued on page 65
Section2 8/7/06 4:27 PM Page 45
46 AMERI CAN COP SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2006
I
ts nearly impossible to go through an entire day
without a newspaper in any major city detailing a
new bombing somewhere in the world. The inci-
dent usually involves multiple fatalities and
wounded thats just the nature of bombs. So far
the vast majority occur on foreign soil. But, dont get com-
placent, because thats not going to remain the case. Even
prior to September 11th, the FBI recognized the potential
dangers and began gearing up local bomb squads. Theyve
provided increased levels of training and some of the latest
equipment. Police bomb squads are now at their highest ever
level of training and expertise.
One area needs improvement. Its how the bomb squad
folks communicate with patrol cops or road officers. Some
info is actually secret stuff but theres a lot that can and should
be shared especially in the area of what cops should be
looking for. Nobody can tell you what an IED (Improvised
Explosive Device) looks like. The skilled and highly skilled
bomb makers build them to look like anything or nothing at
all. Just look at the devices built in Iraq.
A skilled bomb-maker starts with the concept of making his
bomb look harmless, allowing it to be concealed until detona-
EXPLOSIVE T
Section2 8/7/06 5:32 PM Page 46
WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM 47
Scott Anderson
tion. But if we know what to look for, we
may be able to nd the bomb under con-
struction and hopefully the bomb-makers.
The Explosives
There are millions of pounds of high
explosive and tens of thousands of
blasting caps used every year in this
country. So, theres bound to be leakage;
the odd few pounds of explosives or
blasting supplies that walk off the job
site. Or the half case of dynamite Uncle
Farnquart bought for blasting stumps that
turns up missing from the barn. What do
explosives look like? More bad news
they can look like lots of stuff.
Take dynamite out of the wrapper
and it looks like oily, grainy sawdust.
But the wrappers are identifiable and
have traceable information on them.
They dont look like road flares. Most
wrappers will be brown to tan in color
and have an oily look. Theyll also
have manufacture information and a
traceable day/date code.
I look for discarded containers as my
clue for that kind of material. I also look
at how the material is stored. This stuff
is valuable to the bomber and hes going
to attach importance to it. So, if you nd
something you cant identify but its
placed somewhere indicating its valu-
able, look into it very carefully.
Keep Your
Eyes Open
E TIMES
Section2 8/7/06 5:33 PM Page 47
Some explosive can be a white paste
and come in a plastic tube or a hard-
ened block like C4. Some TNT comes
in cylindrical blocks with a white
wrapper and ammonium nitrate looks
like a big bag of fertilizer.
Blasting Caps
The blasting caps youll encounter
are likely to be electric. There are some
old time fuse caps around but theyre
getting harder to find. The caps them-
selves are very identifiable. But also
look for the little labels packed with
each cap that read explosive and tags
indicating the time delay of the cap, or
the shunt. The shunt is installed by the
factory to short out the leg wires pre-
venting static electricity from acciden-
tally setting the cap off. These are often
found on the bombers workbench, or in
his trash its a clue.
Keep your eyes open for extra wire
from the caps. The caps can have leg
wires 20' long. Our patrol officers
found one such young lad had used
hi s ext ra wi re t o hook up hi s car
st ereo, t hey recogni zed t he col or
combo from earlier training. It was
top-notch observation netting illegal
explosives and resulting in a charge
that stuck in court.
Sometimes the blasting caps, almost
essential to initiating a bomb electrically,
are the most difcult part of a bomb to
come up with. Note I said almost.
Rocket motors bought in hobby shops
can be used two-fold. First they come
with an electric match designed to ignite
the rocket motor. It can be used to do the
same thing for a bomb. The rocket
motor itself provides a potential source
of improvised ller for something like a
pipe bomb. Now, it would not be pru-
dent to assume every purchaser of rocket
motors needs to be spread eagled and
make snow angels on the asphalt, but the
guy that doesnt fit the profile of
someone in the model rocket club might
deserve a little extra scrutiny.
Improvised Explosives
Improvised explosives can be a
little easier to uncover. Explosives
require an oxidizer and a fuel. Dont
throw up your hands and tell me chem-
istry is beyond you, we arent going
into rocket science here. Oxidizers are
things like ammonium nitrate. Fuels
are things like diesel oil. Sound
familiar? Those are the ingredients
used to turn the Federal Building in
Oklahoma City into rubble. Once
mixed with diesel or fuel oil, it smells
like diesel or fuel oil and thats worth
checking out. Chemical bottles labeled
as nitrates, chlorates or perchlorates
are potentially part of the bomb
makers formula. Powdered metals,
iron, magnesium, aluminum and some
other exotic stuff are often added to
explosives to increase the heat and
energy generated in the explosion. No
ones asking you to brush up on your
chemistry before you hit the street, but
be a little curious if you nd chemicals
not related to drug manufacture in the
hands of someone that needs instruc-
tions to pour dirt out of a boot. Enough
fertilizer to farm 200 acres of tomatoes
in your downtown district might be a
clue that somethings amiss too.
Let us look at initiating the bomb.
Bombers in Iraq depend on command det-
onation, or some action taken by the vic-
tims to trigger the blast. Something as
simple as a long wire to a battery or
switch controlled by the bomber is
working well. Look for the rolls of wire as
a part of your bombers kit. Theyre also
using remote detonation in the form of
cell phones, radios and pagers. Look for
equipment on the workbench to rewire
those kinds of devices to accept blasting
caps. Look for micro switches either pur-
chased new or salvaged from old elec-
48 AMERI CAN COP SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2006
trical equipment. Look for common bat-
teries or improvised power sources like
the credit card-sized battery found in each
discarded pack of Polaroid lm.
I also look for the directions or
plans. The most obvious form of infor-
mation these days is the Internet.
Downloaded and printed info on how to
make a nuke would be considered a
clue. But also be alert for the copies of
military field training manuals on
booby traps and improvised explosive
devices. And who could forget the old
standby of the 60s and 70s, The
Anarchists Cookbook. A fair per-
centage of the recipes noted in this and
other such books stand an excellent
chance of blowing up the nimrod who
mixes them up. Just hope youre not
there when it happens.
Pros And Not So Pros
Some of the people we deal with
will be professionals. They are difcult
to catch, and it may depend on a chance
observation by someone who can put
the clues together. There are others who
are not so bright. I know of two
brothers taught to make pipe bombs by
their father. In two separate incidents
they each used recracker fuse to ignite
a pipe bomb. Both lost parts of a hand
one right and one left. Now they
have to sit next to each other in a movie
if they want to clap at the end. Guys
like that we can catch, and
if we dont, its our fault.
Scott retired after 25 years with
Salem PD in Oregon. He spent the
last 11 years of his career heading up
their Bomb Squad and the 10 years
before that on their SWAT Team. If
that wasnt dangerous enough he is
now an adjunct instructor for Clint
Smith at Thunder Ranch. The mans a
glutton for punishment.
*
Section2 8/7/06 5:33 PM Page 48
However, just as Gary cuffed one of the
suspects hands, his partner holstered
his gun without securing it and moved
in to cuff the other suspect. After real-
izing the two rookies were alone, Jose
Alcantara, one of the senior officers, was
running toward their location and only seconds away.
Suddenly, after looking back at the other ofcer, the second
suspect pushed himself away from the wall, reached back for
the ofcers holstered gun and got it. The shooting began with
Gary McDonald getting hit in the thigh and upper abdomen.
Gary drew and red, fatally wounding his assailant. As Alcan-
T
he two
r o o k i e s
arrived on
scene in
s e pa r a t e
LAPD A-units with
their two senior part-
ners. It was a simple
burglar-alarm call on
Menlo Avenue not far
from the Los Angeles
Coliseum in Univer-
sity Division, now
Southwest Division.
As bad luck would
have it, the two new
officers ended up
together at the rear of
the building with both
senior ofcers in the front.
The rookies immediately apprehended two burglars in
the act and positioned them for a wall search. They
employed the Contact and Cover technique both learned
at LAPDs Academy; one officer, Gary McDonald, hol-
stered and secured his handgun and moved in to handcuff
suspect number one while the other officer covered him.
WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM 49
Gary Paul Johnston
A HOLSTER FOR
PROFESSIONALS
Has the
perfect
duty
holster
arrived?
Section2 8/7/06 4:27 PM Page 49
50 AMERI CAN COP SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2006
assailant. As Alcantara rounded the
corner of the building, he was hit in the
hand and the hip as one of the suspects
rounds ricocheted off his baton.
My partner Joe Petticrew and I
arrived only seconds after the shooting
had stopped. We ran to the rear of the
building and saw Alcantaras bleeding
hand. Jose motioned us westbound in
the direction the other suspect had run.
Neither Joe nor I noticed the dark blue
gure lying on the concrete in the dark
alley a few yards behind him.
Minutes later, dozens of cops had
saturated the area and Petticrew and I
returned to the scene to find John
Chris Christensen kneeling over
Gary McDonald, holding his hand and
talking to him. Youre gonna be
okay, Chris said.
Di d I get hi m? Gary asked.
Yeah, you got him good, hes dead,
John replied. I saw the hint of relief
on Garys face.
It hurts, he said.
I know, said Chris, The ambu-
lance will be here any minute. Gary
looked pale and his face relaxed, as he
seemed to go limp.
Hold on! Chris insisted, shaking
Garys hand, and he came back, panting
through his mouth. Then they put him
in the ambulance.
The second suspect, the one with
Garys handcuffs still dangling from his
wrist, was never apprehended. Acouple
hours later communications broadcast,
The suspect wanted for 217 P.C. of a
police officer is now wanted for 187
P.C. of a police ofcer.
Gary was dead. He was only twenty-
two. His wife, Linda Rae, was pregnant.
100 Percenter
Everybody on our platoon loved the
guy. If ever there was a cop
approaching perfection, it was Gary. He
was a 100 percenter. Earlier hed con-
ded in me his worry about making his
rst year probation. I just laughed and
told him he had nothing to worry about
but in the end he was right.
Garys was the largest of the far too
many police funerals Ive attended. I
think about him all the time and, after
over 40 years I still miss him.
Man With A Gun Calls
In classes on Patrol Procedures I ask
my students what percentage of calls
they handle are man (or woman) with
a gun calls? After writing down their
guesstimations on a blackboard, I tell
them the answer. One hundred percent
of calls officers respond to are man
with a gun calls. Youre that man.
Your pistol is in plain sight and may be
within easy access of anyone who
wants it. The answer to another of my
questions is the best weapon retention
system is between your ears. Main-
Continued on page 66
Gary
McDonald,
L.A.P.D.
Section2 8/7/06 5:33 PM Page 50
that I get ner-
vous every
time. I dont like it but I
dont fear it. I have learned how to per-
form well while in that world. This
exposure, combined with my training has
made me a confident and aggressive com-
petitor. Condence in my ability to execute trained skills has
come from performing in a testing environment. Practicing
alone at the range is great for building skills, but it doesnt let
me know what I can do under pressure. You must separate skill
building (practice) from testing (competition). A tournament is
nothing more than the test. I need that match environment to
test my powers of concentration and execution under stress.
Inoculation
Some will point out that shooting competition is not an
S
tress is stress,
though people
look at it and
handle it very
differently. For many,
stress limits their
ability to perform.
How can a pro golfer,
who never misses a 3-
foot putt in practice, not sink
the same shot while leading
a major tournament in the
final round? What happened?
What changed? The putt didnt
become more difcult, but the circumstances involved
did. It became more important, and much more stressful.
Id assume being shot at is very stressful. Having never
been there, I can only guess what its like. I have, how-
ever, red a gun in stressful situations many times. Im
not trying to equate a shooting tournament with a life
and death encounter, but there are some similari-
ties: You have little time to make decisions; you
dont want to miss; and you dont
want to lose. Having shot thou-
sands of events against the
clock I can tell you
Rob Leatham
Inoculate
Yourself
From
STRESS
L
e
a
r
n
T
o

L
o
v
e

T
h
a
t
R
u
s
h
L
e
a
r
n
T
o

L
o
v
e

T
h
a
t
R
u
s
h
Continued on page 69
WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM 51
Section2 8/7/06 4:27 PM Page 51
52 AMERI CAN COP SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2006
T
ake an enraged thug that outweighs you by a hun-
dred pounds or more. Hes four times stronger
than you from a few years on the prison-
yard bench press and hes two hours into
whats likely to be a three-day crystal
meth and PCP cocktail high. Hes
latched onto your holstered gun, and with
what seems to be superhuman strength
starts flopping you around like a
dishrag in a Chinese kitchen. You
catch a glimpse of his facial
expression and theres no
doubt hes dead-set on
killing you with your own
gun. To be extremely
blunt about a deadly
serious subject, regardless of
what martial art or defensive tactics
system you may have trained in. Youre in deep Kimchi
serious trouble.
New Force Option?
Some trainers and individual cops are turning to edged
weapons as a logical force option in such a close-quarters
deadly altercation. The biggest problem is nding a knife you
can actually access and effectively use with your reaction-side
hand, while retaining your rearm with your strong hand. Many
ofcers are carrying a ghting folder for this purpose. Now
UP CLOSE
AND PERSONAL
KNIFE WORK
UP CLOSE
AND PERSONAL
KNIFE WORK
Ka-Bar TDI
Continued on page 63
Section2 8/7/06 5:35 PM Page 52
WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM 53
Charles E. Humes, Jr.
I Backup Knife
Charles E. Humes, Jr.
Section2 8/7/06 5:35 PM Page 53
S
Section2 8/7/06 4:27 PM Page 54
WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM 55
he phenomenon of suicide-by-cop (victim pre-
cipitated homicide) is a serious police problem
you may suddenly be confronted with in the
field. A successful end to such a confrontation
requires both special training and equipment.
The goal, of course, is to avoid being an
unwilling participant in someone elses death wish, while
not taking unnecessary risks.
An example from an actual officer-involved shooting
shows how these incidents can occur. A fifteen-year-old
boy had been drinking and was depressed over being so
fat other kids constantly teased him. He called 911 and
reported a prowler breaking into his home but gave his
own description as the suspect. He armed himself with a
large butcher knife and went outside to await the police.
When they saw the suspect, they ordered him to go down
on the ground but he refused and threatened them with
the knife. The officers pointed their guns at the boy and
repeatedly ordered him to drop the knife but he ignored
them. He slowly advanced and calmly told them, Youll
have to kill me. When he was within 12 feet of them,
one officer fired twice. Was the shooting justified?
Absolutely. Could it have been avoided? Maybe.
The key elements the officers should have been
trained to recognize were: Failing to comply with orders
and directions; advancing toward the officers with a
weapon; forcing a confrontation and escalating the situa-
tion; not attempting to escape; surrender or retreat; and
demanding that the officers kill him.
Time, Tactics And Equipment
Had the officers been trained to recognize those signs
of suicide-by-cop, they may have been able to use time,
talk and tactics to avoid the immediate need for deadly
force. Cops are trained that, before using deadly force,
they must be faced with the risks of ability, opportunity
and jeopardy. By keeping a safe distance or an obstacle
between themselves and the knife, they can delay both
opportunity and jeopardy, while they gain the time to talk
and use other tactics to defuse an otherwise deadly
encounter. Less-lethal weapons backed up by deadly-
force options are reasonable alternatives. Those, which
are readily available and in widespread use, include stun
bags or batons launched from 12 gauge, 37mm or 40mm
D.P. Van Blaricom
T
S
U
I
C
I
D
E
-
B
Y
-
C
O
P

CAN YOU AVOID IT?
CAN YOU AVOID IT?
Section2 8/7/06 4:28 PM Page 55
56 AMERI CAN COP SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2006
projectors, or the Taser. However,
some believe cops are predisposed to
use their handguns as their primary
problem-solving tool. Scenario based
training is essential to give officers
other choices.
Training
As with most improvements in
police training, the first step is to rec-
ognize the problem and suicide-by-
cop has been acknowledged by now.
In fact, its been conservatively esti-
mat ed t hat 11 percent of al l Los
Angeles County Sheriffs Department
officer-involved shootings are sui-
cides-by-cop and 33 percent of sus-
pect s were armed wi t h edged
weapons. Although a suicidal person
armed wi t h a fi rearm present s a
great er ri sk, t here are l ess-l et hal
options that can be used for disarming
a person with a knife. The second step
is to develop tactics and adopt equip-
ment to cope with the problem. Fortu-
nately, the tactical and equipment
issues have already been addressed by
such recognized professional organi-
zations as the International Associa-
tion of Chiefs of Police (IACP) and
the American Society of Law Enforce-
ment Trainers (ASLET). The third
st ep i s t o provi de t he necessary
training and equipment to every uni-
formed officer and supervisor. Line
officers daily duties include the like-
lihood of being suddenly faced with
and having to defuse a suicide-by-cop
situation. Finally, actual incidents
should be reviewed by training units
to identify what was done well and
what could have been done better.
Training can always be improved
from actual experience.
Slow It Down
Many of the guidelines for success-
fully taking the mentally ill into cus-
t ody can appl y t o sui ci de-by-cop
encounters too but some further sug-
gestions include containing the area,
while staying aware that too close a
containment may allow a deadly con-
frontation to be provoked; isolate the
individual; if possible, ask the person
if hes trying to die; where possible,
slow down the situation; constantly
reevaluate; be aware that too early or
unsuccessful use of a l ess-l et hal
weapon may escalate the situation;
neutralize the persons ability to force
a deadly confrontation by isolation,
distance and cover; and always be
prepared t o use deadl y force i n
defense of self or others.
Besides training and equipment,
the two most important personal qual-
ities for successfully resolving one of
these encounters are alertness and
patience. You have to be ready for
anything and there are no shortcuts. If
you take your time and do not unnec-
essarily place yourself in jeopardy,
your suicide-by-cop encounter can be
successfully ended without loss of
life. Officers who have achieved that
result find the experience to have
been very professionally satisfying.
Cops do not want to participate in
an officer-involved death of any kind
or the litigation that is almost certain
to follow. It is far better to prevent
such tragedies than to live with the
lingering aftermath. Your next call
may bring you face to face with a
person bent on suicide-by-cop. Think
about that before it happens, have
options and be prepared
to use them.
D.P. Van Blaricom is a retired Chief
of Police for Bellevue, Wash. and
serves as a police practices consultant
throughout the U.S. Hes reviewed over
250 ofcer-involved shootings, many of
which were suicide-by-cop.
*
Section2 8/7/06 4:28 PM Page 56
to aggressively stop violent civil disorder can make things
worse. North Hollywood brought us back to individual courage
and that rie thing again.
At the conclusion of these events, and Columbine was no
exception, experts appeared in the media telling us in law
enforcement we woulda, shoulda, coulda done this or that.
Police from other parts of the country say, Well, it couldnt
have happened here in Jerksville because we would do X-Y-
Z. And then we have the training whores who have
come up with the perfect solution to your screw-up.
For only $595 and a week of your time, theyll teach
you the secret as if it were some football play. And
for an additional $395 theyll make you a certified
instructor/trainer.
Dont get me wrong, its extremely important to
debrief these incidents with all ofcers involved, to
learn from the mistakes and make changes if theyre
warranted. But change should be based on common
sense tactics. Clint Smith of Thunder Ranch says, We
learn tactics not because we want to use them but
because we may have to. So our tactics should be
developed using sound principles common in all ghts.
Rapid deployments time as a strategy has come.
In truth it should have always been taught and used
by cops but it took Columbine to bring it back to our aware-
ness. I know there are agencies that have previously
planned and trained for situations requiring an immediate
response to save lives.
My own theory is that since the advent of SWAT in the 70s
weve relied so much on SWATs role that patrols emphasis has
been isolate, contain and wait for SWAT. Prior to SWAT, if
patrol didnt do it, it didnt get done. Some jurisdictions without
I
n the aftermath of the tragedy at Columbine High School,
a lot of time has been spent analyzing the strategy and tac-
tics of the law enforcement agencies involved. Indeed,
when history looks at this incident further, it will probably
be a watershed event in law enforcement. During 27 years
as a cop, I remember other incidents that by their seriousness,
shocking loss of life, remarkable tactics used by the suspects, or
lack of effective tactics by the police, have caused us to embark
down new avenues in the areas of
training and equipment some
good, some bad.
Events like Newhall, the Norco
bank robbery, the Miami FBI
shootout, the Rodney King riots
and the North Hollywood bank
robbery were so signicant they
precipitated major changes in law
enforcement. Analysis of these is
good. It causes us to nd better,
more effective ways to do our jobs
and to protect the public and us.
However (and theres always a
however), change must be tacti-
cally logical, well thought out and
not a knee-jerk reaction.
Newhall taught us you do in a ght what you do in training.
If your heads down and you save the empty brass, because
thats what you did at the range, its very easy to be anked
and killed. Norco and the FBI Miami shootout taught us
ghting against ries when you dont have one is tough. The
Rodney King riots showed us courage comes from individual
ofcers, not departments, and the lack of a command decision
WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM 57
Common Sense
Active Shooter
Response
C.W. Black
Long guns are the
weapon of choice
in the active
shooter scenario.
Detailed planning is a luxury, sometimes
you just got-to-go right now.
Right down the
middle of the hall is
just stupid. Increase
your survivability.
Section2 8/7/06 4:28 PM Page 57
lives of those in proximity of the
shooters, save the lives of police ofcers
and then contain the situation.
Non-Traditional Response
The resolution will most likely be by
patrol using a non-traditional response.
Whats a non-traditional response? It
means being flexible adapting the
array of tactics at your disposal to a uid
and dynamic situation. To base your tac-
tics solely on the Columbine High
School massacre is like basing all U.S.
Cavalry Tactics on the Battle of the Little
Big Horn not a good idea.
The resolution will usually begin with
58 AMERI CAN COP SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2006
SWAT train patrol for that eventuality.
Thats the way it should be for us all.
Active shooter situations are generally
not SWAT problems. Lets see if we can
come to some commonality to all active
shooter situations and then develop tac-
tics that will t the situation not the
other way around.
Whats an active shooter? NTOAs
definition is the suspects activity is
immediately causing death and serious
bodily injury. The activity is not con-
tained and there is immediate risk of
death or serious injury to potential vic-
tims. Police priorities should be to stop
the killing as soon as possible, save the
a minimum number of ofcers. It may be
as few as one. Stupid you say, ill advised?
If its your kids school or your wifes
business, youd go by yourself. To say
that youll wait until you have minimum
of three ofcers isnt realistic. The reality
of an Active Shooter Situation is; if you
dont go right now, people will die.
If youre lucky enough to have a
partner, your partner must also have the
will to resolve the situation. Not all cops
have the mindset to fight. Hopefully,
through effective training and observable
behavior in real situations, youll know
who will go with you and who should
stay back to hold the horses.
Prior to Active Shooter Training the
mindset was evident in men like former
Austin, Texas cop, Ramiro Martinez. In
1966 Martinez responded to the Texas
Tower Massacre armed with a .38
revolver and instead of directing trafc
as he was told, closed the ground with
Charles Whitman and shot him. He
recounts in his autobiography, They Call
Me Ranger Ray, The gunre was very
intense from all around and I had to
make a decision. So I decided that my
mission as a police officer was to get
into the Tower and assist in putting an
end to his shooting.
Immedi at e i nt ervent i on i s
extremely hazardous without proper
training and equipment. Action should
be taken only after careful deliberation
as to the chances of success. Again, I
quote Clint Smith, Youre gonna go,
so go smart. At Columbine only two
of the initial entry team had SWAT
equipment with them.
Whats our strategy? What are our
tactics? Charles Sid Heal in his excel-
lent book, Sound Doctrine: A Tactical
Primer, says, Where strategy provides
the overall direction, tactics provide the
precision. Our strategy is shooting,
moving and communicating. Our tactics
are how we do these.
Shooting
If I have poor shooting skills, if I
dont shoot regularly in realistic and rele-
vant situational training, what am I doing
inserting myself into a situation that
requires me to shoot with a great deal of
skill so I dont needlessly endanger
others? It is gut check time. Just because
we sent a monkey into space doesnt
make him an astronaut. Just because a
cop has a gun doesnt mean he knows
how to ght with it. This is one of the
building blocks that support any active
shooter or critical incident training
you have to be able to shoot well.
Moving
We move to cover ground. We move
to close with the suspects. We move to
cover. We move to nd better cover. In
an active shooter situation, we stop the
killing by moving to the threat. In the
Continued on page 74
Section2 8/8/06 2:17 PM Page 58
OFF DUTY
CARRY
Kevin McPherson
often, but
when you need
it, you darn sure
better have it. And you
better be good with it. Just squeaking by on your qualica-
tions and only shooting when you have to dont cut it. You owe
it to your family, your fellow ofcers, and society to be highly
procient with your guns. You also owe it to them to carry it
even when its not convenient. Would you let a Doctor perform a
vasectomy or tubaligation on you if you knew he just squeaked
by in medical school and only did surgery three times a year?
Would you let him do it with a weapon or cutting instrument of
opportunity instead of his scalpel, laser or laparoscope?
So Its Inconvenient
You should carry your gun off duty wherever you are
legally permitted to do so. Yes, I mean to church and when you
pick up your kids at school or daycare. I realize its hard to
wear your gear with your church clothes. Make the adjust-
ments. Shop for your suit pants by the width of the belt loops
and keep your jacket on. Buy one of those stealth cases that
look like a planner or a Bible with a zippered case. You can put
a full size Glock or Commander in one with a spare mag. What
better place for a terrorist attack than in a crowded church? If
we have learned nothing else in the last 10 years, we should
have learned to have our guns when we are at a school. The
same applies to a daycare. If you cant go someplace because
you are wearing a gun, maybe you shouldnt be there anyway. I
hope I am preaching to the choir and you feel like I do about it.
I know a lot of ofcers who dont.
H. R. 218 was codied as Chapter 44 of title 18, United
States Code, Sections 926B and 926C. The elected representa-
tives of the United States didnt pass this legislation for our
personal security. They passed it because were police ofcers
no matter what state were in. They recognized our obligation
to society does not end when we leave our jurisdiction. They
expect us to act when a violent felony is committed in our
presence; they empowered us by permitting us to carry guns
so we can act. A secondary reason for this legislation is the
M
y rst duty sta-
tion with the
New Mexico
State Police was a
small mountain vil-
lage named Capitan. (Home of
Smokey Bear, Pop. 716). Id been
there a year and a half when my veteran
partner transferred out to be replaced by a rookie. The new guy
was sharp and rapidly matured into a great cop. On a day off, he
drove down to the closest big town, Ruidoso, (Pop. 12,000)
about 20 miles away to have lunch with a PD Ofcer. At the
restaurant, he left his pistol in his truck. He wouldnt need it
anyway and it was always a hassle.
While eating, they were confronted by some wacko who,
for no apparent reason, closed distance on them brandishing a
large bowie knife. The PD ofcer was able to draw and give a
few quickly ignored verbal commands. He was forced to
shoot the subject at near contact distance. My rookie had
pulled the table over and armed himself with a fork. When he
nally got home, he could barely articulate the helplessness
felt during the encounter. But, it was a valuable lesson for
both of us. That was small town, New Mexico in 1993 its
gotten a lot worse since.
Are We Sheep?
If youve never heard Lt. Col. Dave Grossman speak you
need to. Hes retired now but spent his U.S. Army career
studying killing and combat. Part of his Bullet Proof Mind
presentation to cops deals with carrying firearms off duty.
Depending on your habits, his presentation will either afrm or
convict you. He considers not carrying an off-duty gun simply a
denial denial of very possible events, denial of reality, denial
of duty. He likens police ofcers to sheep dogs tasked with pro-
tecting the sheep of society from the wolves. Grossman makes a
powerful one-word statement to those cops who would walk out
of their home unarmed BAAAAAAA! Why would you
choose to become a sheep just because you are off the clock?
Guns are tools of our trade. True, we dont use them very
WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM 59
OFF DUTY CARRY
Is It Really
Optional?
Section2 8/7/06 4:28 PM Page 59
and the sight radius is acceptable.
Beretta, HK and Sig offer compact ver-
sions of their full-size guns in service
calibers. For those who carry revolvers,
the S&Wmodel 65 3" .357 holds its own
with all these autos.
The civilian concealed carry market
has contributed to the surge in supply of
concealment holsters. Scores of quality
rigs are available for full-size guns in
leather or kydex. You might need to look
a little harder, but revolver holsters are
well represented too. You can hide a big
gun with a well-designed holster and
minor adjustments to your wardrobe.
Your Sig 229 is never going to be as
comfortable to carry concealed as your
Walther PPK. Which would you rather
fight with when things get bad?
Remember your obligation and deal with
the discomfort. Minimize it by buying the
best holster that you can afford. Better to
buy a good holster once then several
budget ones that wont get the job done.
60 AMERI CAN COP SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2006
force multiplier benet it provides for
working cops. You can help your brother
officer while on vacation if necessary,
but you need your gun.
The days when you can go off duty
and be a regular Joe are behind you. If
you take this job seriously, you should
carry a full-power handgun, spare ammo
and a ashlight. Would you go to work
armed only with a J-frame? But how
many of us throw one in a pocket to go
to the movies or the store? You cant do
any better then the J-frame for a back-up
gun but its a back-up gun.
Carry Guns And Holsters
Ideally, your off-duty gun is the same
one you carry to work. If your duty gun
is too big to conceal, get a smaller one
but dont overdo it. You have lots of
choices in downsizing, be smart about it.
Baby Glocks and Micro 1911s are in the
bare minimum category, here. Theyre in
that twilight zone of almost too big to be
a back up, almost too small to be a viable
off-duty gun. I like the mid-size Glocks
for off-duty guns. If you cant hide your
Govt. Model, consider the smaller ver-
sions that combine the Officers ACP
frame with the Commander slide. They
hide ne and are much easier to shoot
well then the micro .45s and the 4" barrel
generates enough velocity to make a .45
ACP act like a .45 ACP. You only lose
one round from your duty-gun capacity
When should and shouldnt you get
involved off duty? Use your head.
Were hired for our ability to think and
problem-solve. Be the best witness you
can be, if the situation allows it, walk
away from the minor stuff when appro-
priate. Carefully become involved in
those situations where you have a
moral obligation, if not a legal one, to
act. If you dont intervene, people are
likely to die. The things you swore an
oath to try to prevent. Carrying off-duty
is being prepared, not paranoid.
Grossman brings up another com-
pelling point; our soldiers deployed
around the world fighting the war on
terror dont ask us for much they
expect and truly deserve that we protect
their families in their absence. Were their
homeland security. If you agree, you
dont have the right to carry that PPK as
your off-duty gun just because its conve-
nient. My hope is well all be
prepared when our day comes.
*
ADCO Sales Inc.
4 Draper Street
Woburn, MA 01801
800-775-3687
781-935-1799
www.adcosales.com
Tactical
sights at
practical
prices
Tactical Red Dot Sight
- Goose Neck Mount Included
- Fits all Weaver Style Bases
- Bright 3 M.O.A. Dot
- 12 Position Intensity Knob
- 35 mm Objective Lens
- Simply Brilliant
5 I k E E I G E A k F O k 5 I k E E I C O P 5
| nt roduci ng "The St reet Cr i me Li ne"
Devel oped f or t he of f - dut y Of f i cer and
St reet Cop/UC Of f i cer who want t r ue
per f or mance and st yl e f rom t act i cal
and cover t cl ot hi ng.
8ui l t i n conceal ment pocket s f or Gun,
Spare Mags, Handcuf f s, Pepper Spray,
Col l apsi bl e 8aton and Pl ashl i ght .
Al l cl ot hi ng and pocket pl acement
tested by under cover pol i ce of f i cer s i n
real t i me combat i ve ar rest envi ronment s.
The i nner pocket was tested f or of f - dut y
use, comf or t and conceal ment . No more
bul ky hol ster or f anny packs. The onl y
t act i cal cl ot hi ng company t hat hi t s t he
st reet s as hard
as you do.
Made i n t he U. S. A.
Company i nf or mat i on:
www . bul l et 50. com
l( 800) 5ll- 0l2l
Pax: ( 925) 776- 7578
Dcn't |cw
ycur Ccver|
Now available on line at u.s. cavalry .com
Section2 8/7/06 4:28 PM Page 60
lNTR0DUClNG TH NW
AUT0MATlC L0CKlNG SVSTM
FR0M SAFARlLAND.
Lets keep it simple: Your weapons got to stay put
and draw fast. No questions. No doubts. And thats
why the new Automatic Locking System (ALS

)
may just be the best tactical decision you make.
The next evolution in the renowned Safariland
tactical series
Secures weapon in all directions just by
reholstering
Keeps weapon secure when running, rappelling,
parachuting and moreeven with SLS hood open
Ergonomically designed release levers
Thumb-only operation and instinctive draw
Available in Model 6304 and Model 6305
congurations
See your Safariland distributor or contact us today.

CUS1OmNSNVICt (8) 347-12(USA0nly) (99) 923-73 www.satariland.oom


INNOVATION NOT IMITATION.
TM

2
0
0
6

A
r
m
o
r

H
o
l
d
i
n
g
s
,

I
n
c
.
1
2
ALS'Be|ease Lever
SLS'Botat|ng Hood
Patented and patents pending.
1
2
1H NX1 GNNA1ION
OF 1AC1ICAL HOLS1NS
1H NX1 GNNA1ION
OF 1AC1ICAL HOLS1NS
Section2 8/8/06 2:19 PM Page 61
Section2 8/7/06 4:28 PM Page 62
WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM 63
with lots of practice, you might be able
to access a folder in a retention situation
if its clipped to your reaction-side
pocket. But if its deep in your pants
pocket when Mongo starts tossing you
around trying to take your thunder-
blaster, its extremely unlikely youll be
able to access the knife.
Try this exercise. Unload your gun,
put all the ammo in another room, check
its unloaded about 30 times and have
your beat partner, spouse, significant
other, mother-in-law or someone you
actually trust do a gun grab. Try to get
your folding knife out of your reaction-
side pocket. Its awkward but a doable
gross motor skill. Now, while they are
aggressively trying to remove your gun
from the holster and moving you
around, try to open the knife. Youll be
surprised how much trouble youll have.
Auto openers are slightly easier than
one-handed or assisted opening knives,
but it takes a ne motor skill to open the
knife. Therein lies the rub.
Tactical Defense Institute
John Benner, the owner of Southern
Ohios TDI (Tactical Defense Institute),
realized this accessibility problem was a
serious lacking in current knife design
and has submitted the best solution Ive
seen to date. He designed the TDI Law
Enforcement Knife, and then teamed up
with KA-BAR knives to build them.
The knife comes with a kydex, fric-
tion lock sheath. Its unique pistol grip
and draw design makes it instantly
accessible when your ne motor skills
diminish under life-threatening stress and
you need close-quarters deadly force
right now. The handle is a textured
plastic, and designed to prevent ride up
of your hand onto the blade if it comes to
a sudden stop. Even if your hand is cov-
ered with blood, the retention qualities of
this knife are far superior to most con-
ventional designs. The unique design
doesnt require a great deal of exotic
training. Just a punch with this knife in
hand will increase the force from
bruising to deadly force levels instantly.
If you practice punching, and then rotate
your hand inward after your forward
momentum stops (clockwise for a left-
handed punch) just before you rip the
knife out, you can increase rapid inca-
pacitation even more.
Ka-Bar also builds a must have
red-handled trainer version of the TDI
knife that will allow you to train at rea-
sonably dynamic levels in simulation-
based training. Overall, if youre really
serious about carrying a knife as a
backup weapon, you need to train with
that knife. The TDI Back Up knife
makes sense and deserves
your consideration.
*
KA-BAR TDI KNIFE
Continued from page 52
CLLL 4-2oL
:8O
bnchmao.com
2OOc Lerchnace rie Cc. Crecr Ci,, C, L/
TH!S SEEMS
UNNECESSARY.
THlS KNlFE lS OVERPUlLT. VE L/SER CUT
THE PL/DE FROM 54CM, / TYPE OF STEEL
DEVELOPED FOR TURPlNE PL/DES lN JET
ENGlNES. VE /LSO M/DE THE MODlFlED
LOCKlNG LlNER EXTR/ THlCK. YES, THE
TECHNOLOGY PEHlND / PENCHM/DE
M/KES lT F/R STRONGER TH/N YOU VlLL
PROP/PLY EVER USE. PUT lN OUR OPlNlON,
TH/T'S NEVER MORE TH/N YOU NEED.
Section2 8/7/06 4:28 PM Page 63
BULLET TRAPS
SHOOT HOUSES
TURNING TARGETS
MOVING TARGETS
REACTIVE STEEL
PORTABLE TARGETS
SAFETY BAFFLES
INDOOR RANGES
RANGE VENTILATION
SOUND CONTROL
CARDBOARD & PAPER
RANGE MAINTENANCE
ACADEMY TRAINING
FREE MULTIMEDIA CD
(call today to get one)
888-377-8033 WWW.ACTIONTARGET.COM
The Night Sentry
Fits between your mattress & boxspring!
The sound of window glass breaking or the car
alarm in the driveway...How fast can you prepare to
defend your loved ones and your property?
The Night Sentry will work with most any size
or type of holster you provide, while your flash-
light is always within easy reach. Also great for
cell phones, mace or stun guns.
The Night Sentry can be a lifesaver!
Makes AGreat Gift!
To order your Night Sentry visit our web site at
www.diamondsentrydistributors.com
Diamond Sentry Distributors
PO Box 195
Black Diamond, WA 98010-0195
Email us at:
customerservice@diamondsentrydistributors.com
(206) 604-2203
$29.95 check/M.O., 1st Class Postage Paid to:
64 AMERI CAN COP SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2006
Section2 8/7/06 4:28 PM Page 64
WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM 65
Glock factory frame parts, theres an
opt i onal versi on, whi ch uses t he
Cominolli Thumb Safety. This thumb
safety was originally designed by
Glock and patented in Europe, but
never put into production (maybe it
was j ust t oo much perfect i on).
Whatever the case, former cop Joe
Cominolli patented the safety in the
U.S. and has joined with CCF to make
it available on their Raceframe.
Holster Friendly
While the CCF/Raceframe improves
the Glocks performance immensely, it
doesnt affect the holsters. All points
used by any holster to secure the Glock
are preserved by the improvements in
the CCF/Raceframe. Thus, if your fac-
tory full-size Glock works in it so will
one converted with a CCF/Raceframe.
The Choices
Although CCF/Raceframes antici-
pated the aircraft aluminum alloy frame
would be the most popular, they were
wrong, as requests for the stainless
steel frame have been ten to one. The
tough lightweight aluminum alloy with
its hard-anodized gray finish is great
where weight is a prime concern, but
the additional weight of the matte n-
ished stainless steel frame is what
everyone seems to want. The alloy
frame weighs only 3 ounces more than
the factory polymer frame and the
stainless steel frame weighs 16 ounces
more and feels like a 1911, especially
with a Glock long slide. In 9mm, this is
almost like ring a pellet gun.
Trigger Time
The handling of the stainless
CCF/Raceframe is as superb as with the
alloy frame introduced at the 2006
SHOT Show. With either version the
trigger let-off seems improved about
300 percent and operation is as smooth
as proverbial silk. The pistol fits per-
fectly in my hand and theres no doubt
Im holding onto a real gun!
After each shot, the pistol stays put
in your grip and recovery time is sur-
prisingly better because it comes back
pointing at the target not over it
and also due to the slight increase in
weight. As with the many Glocks I have
red, malfunctions are about never.
If you carry a Glock 17, 22, or other
full size model, I predict youll jump on
the CCF/Raceframe. Look
for other models to follow.
For More Info:
www.ccfraceframes.com;
www.streamlight.com;
www.lasermax.com;
www.crimsontrace.com
*
A SILK PURSE
Continued from page 45
The
world
is a
dirty
place.
Kleen-Bore offers a complete line of
tactical rearm cleaning kits for use in
the eld, on the beat or wherever you
run into dirt and foulingthe enemy
of your rearm. Each kit is designed
to be indestructible despite the rigors
of tactical use. See all the Kleen-Bore
tactical items at:
Field Kit
Tactical Kit
Section2 8/7/06 4:28 PM Page 65
allowing easy and instant access to the
weapon. What if, at the same time,
access to the weapon by others was
next to impossible? Sound like a pipe
dream? Its here.
While attending the 2003 annual
National Tactical Officers Association
(NTOA) conference in Denver, I was
invited to look at a new concept in hol-
sters. The holster was like no other I
had ever seen or heard of before; totally
simple, it was also totally secure and
lightning fast.
Called the Professional Holster,
the new rig is truly a performance
duty holster. Conceived by former
law enforcement officer and SWAT
cop, Mi chael Lowe, Presi dent of
Tact i cal Desi gn Labs ( TDL) , of
Boi se, I daho, t he hol st er was
extremely well thought out. It was
explained to me and demonstrated in
answer to all of my devils advo-
cate questions. After being shown
how to retrieve the pistol from the
Professi onal I fel t l i ke an expert
after just two tries. Although it was
not on display it was the most inter-
esting product at the NTOA product
show at least for me.
The Professional Holster was for-
mally introduced at the 2004 SHOT
Show in Las Vegas. Soon I was pre-
sented with the first production Pro-
fessional rig by Mike when he and his
staff drove down to see me on their
way to demonstrate the rig in Denver.
The finished product was everything I
envisioned, but there are two points I
must make from the start. First, it
wouldnt be prudent to divulge how
the Professional works. You never
know who coul d read t hi s. The
second point is the holster is currently
made only for the Glock pistols, but
more on that later.
What I can tell you is the propri-
etary blend of nylon combined with
custom stainless steel components
and construction materials can be
classified as Space Age, but that
should come as no surprise. The Pro-
fessional also has a channel for the
index finger to enter, but there are no
hi-tech electronics in this rig; no bat-
teries; nothing fancy and nothing to
go wrong, excepting for those who
may try to snatch your pistol.
I dont believe an assailant could get
the pistol from this rig in the proverbial
million years, but as the TDL staff jok-
ingly says, a cop could start a finger
collection of those who tried. At the
same time, theres no such danger for
the officer and when the pistol is
drawn the index finger is right
where it should be, straight along the
side of the frame and not on the trigger.
Lightning Fast
The ofcer can instantly remove the
pistol from the Professional without
having to find any straps to unsnap,
unlock or rotate. Just as important is the
gun can instantly be shoved back into
the holster in order to fight with or
pursue a running suspect, and it will
remain locked in the holster. No more
officers getting shot with another
officers gun, or their own due to gun
grab, or losing their pistol while chasing
or ghting a suspect to the ground.
How many officers forget and leave
their duty gun within reach of their
kids? A child, or one of their friends,
not instructed in the removal tech-
nique, may never figure it out and
taining a position of advantage
including the use of Contact and Cover
is essential, but what if all that fails?
With a myriad of security holsters
on the market today boasting different
weapon retention levels, the situation
borders on mass confusion for the
average officer, but what if all that
could go away almost overnight?
What if there was a holster that solved
the problem of weapon security while
66 AMERI CAN COP SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2006
PROFESSIONAL HOLSTER
Continued from page 50
ORDER TODAY CALL TOLL FREE 1-888-747-4332
www.iosso.com iossoproducts@iosso.com
AR-15 CLEANING KIT
Police Officer Special -$24.00 ($35 value) includes shipping.
REMOVES COPPER, LEAD, CARBON
REDUCES CLEANING TIME
N
E
W
POLICE OFFICER SPECIAL
Precision fit brushes for the upper
receiver, chamber & bolt carrier. The
brushes are durable and reusable.
Made with Nyflex, our own thick &
stiff nylon composite fiber.
Iosso Bore Cleaner, 1.5 oz. tube.
Special offer includes:

Iosso Gun Oil, 4 oz. bottle.

1305 wes t 11t h s t r eet . mi l a n . i l . 61264 c a l l 309. 787. 7151 or v i s i t www. l e wi s machi ne. net
.W: D0:`.! `IW0.I.``. I00` ` 1WII \III. IWD :! ` 3I::.W1: 0I I.3``
`0 0:I\: IWD 0 I0:`.``. D0 0DI.W IWD :`I3I.: `.: !0W:`.``.0W I0
` W. ` D :` I` : 0I I . ! I.
\. ` I0II 0I ` W.`D :`I`:. .W 0D `0 I0 I 0 II!` W.0W.
:`I3I.:1:`.!
Section2 8/7/06 4:28 PM Page 66
WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM 67
would almost certainly become frus-
trated and give up. Whats the secret?
Dont ask, because I wont tell you.
Knowing Isnt Enough
Even when the secret of the Profes-
sional Holster gets out and it will it
still wont be easy for an unauthorized
person to take an ofcers pistol. This is
because the hardware is designed for
instant access by the wearer not the bad
guy. Its not nearly as easy to remove the
gun when the rig is not worn, much less
by an assailant approaching from a dif-
ferent angle. Then theres the nger col-
lection thing. The bad guy must insert a
digit of some sort in the receptacle and
that puts him at a great disadvantage.
The officer can and probably should
cause major damage up to and including
removal of the unauthorized digit.
I am so impressed with TDLs Pro-
fessional so totally sold on it
that Im going to make a statement
some may think is over the top. If I
were still a working cop authorized to
carry the pistol of my choice, Id buy
a Glock in order to be able to use this
hol st er. It s t hat good. Ive onl y
switched duty guns because of a hol-
ster one time in my career. That was a
great rig, but it was nowhere as safe
as the Professional.
With the proliferation of Glock pis-
tols in law enforcement, chances are
you wont have to change pistols, but
you may not have to in any event.
This is because Tactical Design Labs
is now developing the Professional
Holster for other popular autopistols
used by law enforcement, including
the 1911. Make no mistake, this hol-
ster is totally dedicated to the weapon
it is made for, and there is no one size
fits all with this rig.
Made with a black basket weave pat-
tern complimented with matte black
texture on some surfaces, the Profes-
sional is lightweight yet super strong.
While I am tempted to label it as inde-
structible, I know that such isnt the
case. Fire will destroy it, as will a
power saw, but Im not sure if even
these methods would allow the pistol to
be removed from the holster and used.
New Models
With preliminary tests indicating
some ofcers like the nger channel of
the Professional while some dont, TDL
recently introduced a version without it.
Called the Traditional Soft Cover (TSC),
this holster is available in the same syn-
thetic basket weave, plain, gloss or
nylon; the new version operates in
exactly the same way to provide
optimum security for your factory Glock.
In addition to patrol ofcers, a ver-
sion of the TSC will soon be available
for plain-clothes officers and another
variation is being designed
for SWAT cops. *
LAW ENFORCEMENT
GRADE SOLVENTS
& LUBRICANTS
OUR SPECIALTY!
CLEAN
MC#7 Weapons Cleaner
and Conditioner
The only one-step concentrated
formula necessary for cleaning
and maintaining your arsenal of
handguns, rifles, shotguns &
gasguns. Quickly removes powder,
carbon, lead, copper and plastic
wad fowling from shotguns.
DEGREASE
Polymer Safe Degreaser (P.S.D.)
Harmless to polymers, plastics,
rubber and camo finishes. Quickly
flushes away grime and fouling
from actions and trigger assemblies
without field stripping. Stop
lubricating over contaminated
lubricants! Degrease before you
lubricate.
LUBRICATE
FP-10 Lubricant Elite C.L.P.
The ultimate in semi-synthetic
technology. FP-10 SIGNIFICANTLY
out performs teflon based lubricants,
offering extraordinary lubricating
performance. Its also an excellent
cleaner and protectant. CLP now in
one convenient package.
PROTECT
S.C. Rust Prevent
Protect your armory from
the elements, moisture displacing
anti-oxidant Rust Prevent is
specifically engineered to preserve
all types of gun metals. Get the
protection youre paying for.
Count on Shooters Choice for
cutting edge products and
technical assistance, online
or on the phone.
www.shooters-choice.com
800-232-1991
Sold at shooting sports retailers nationwide.
MADE
IN USA
Since
1983
Now Available at
Factory Direct Savings!
Call for pricing!
Section2 8/7/06 4:28 PM Page 67
The P99QA is designed with a
Quick Action trigger mechanism and is
the pistol of choice for both law enforcement
tactical teams and competitive shooters. Quick
Action means the
striker is partially
pre-cocked, and
when the trigger is pulled the striker
is fully cocked and released,
firing the pistol.
The short pull and quick reset allow
for quick shot delivery resulting in
superior readiness for both law
enforcement and competitive
shooting.
Equipped with both a Cocking Indicator and Loaded
Chamber Indicator, the P99QA clearly shows the firing
condition for ultimate safety and preparedness.
Ambidextrous controls give both right
AND left-handed shooters easy
operation without having to reposition
the pistol in your hand. More
importantly, if ever a law officer
Ambidextrous
Magazine Release
Cocking Indicator Loaded Chamber
Indicator
CHOATE
CHOATE
Ma c h i n e &
T o o l , I n c .
www.riflestock.com
This stock was designed to be the strongest,
toughest AR stock on the market. It will
withstand the recoil from hundreds of rounds of
12 ga. 3 inch magnum buckshot, slugs and
magnum caliber ARs.
Sold as a kit which includes the recoil spring,
recoil buffer, buffer tube, butt pad, locking nut
and stock.
Also available to fit Mil-Spec tubes
for people who want to upgrade their stock
without removing the recoil buffer tube.
This stock was designed to be the strongest,
toughest AR stock on the market. It will
withstand the recoil from hundreds of rounds of
12 ga. 3 inch magnum buckshot, slugs and
magnum caliber ARs.
Sold as a kit which includes the recoil spring,
recoil buffer, buffer tube, butt pad, locking nut
and stock.
Also available to fit Mil-Spec tubes
for people who want to upgrade their stock
without removing the recoil buffer tube.
Phone: 1.800.972.6390 Fax: 1.501.724.5873
M4
Ta c t i c a l St o ck
Five position telescoping stock.
Two water tight storage compart-
ments will hold two AA or three 123
Lithium batteries.
Stock has a non-slip hard rubber
butt pad.
Three sling attachment options.
Made of 25% fiberglass reinforced
Rynite.
Backed by our Lifetime Warranty
Section2 8/7/06 4:28 PM Page 68
ght
ion
needs to switch hands due to injury they are never at a
disadvantage. The P99QA is ready for any situation!
For maximum comfort the P99QA has an
Interchangeable Backstrap, made
from a recoil-dampening compound,
for a customized fit and feel.
Whether full-size or compact, the P99QA with its
advanced technology, delivers superior performance in the field
and on the range...every time. Thats Walther performance!
P99QA
Interchangeable
Backstrap
P99QA
Compact
accurate simulation of a gunght. They
are absolutely right as no structured
event can be. Only a gunght faithfully
represents a gunght. The connection I
make is stress is present in both situa-
tions. As cops, you should be very inter-
ested in learning how youll perform
when exposed to stress and strain. More
to the point, how you can become accus-
tomed to dealing with pressure and actu-
ally use it to excel.
In a traditional match, your decision-
making processes are not being tested.
Your ability to shoot on demand is.
Your training and preparation are under
scrutiny. Most of us could afford to be
faster and more accurate shots under
pressure. We need to hone physical
skills, develop mental focus and the
concentration necessary to excel when
under duress. A match is the place to
develop this potential.
You can develop condence in your
ability to perform at a high level by
repeated exposure to stress and trying to
execute correctly during that time.
Thats why I enter so many events. Its
necessary to desensitize myself to the
negative effects of stress. You cant
eliminate the stress, but it will become
much more manageable when youre
LEARN TO LOVE STRESS
Continued from page 51
On a hot day, there's nothing more uncomfortable than having to
wear a T-shirt soaked in sweat under a bulletproof vest. CoolCop
snaps into your police vehicle's A/C and directs cold air behind
your vest where the A/C can't reach! ou stay cool, dry, energized
and ready to face the heat on the street.
0l $49.90I 4088JI00I
WWW.000l00.t0N
l88 t0 80
l88 t0 l8t8ll
$t8 t00lI
000l00
-
808 fN0f lf 008ltl0l#
0h0tk 0t WWW.t00lk9.t0Nl0f 08l8l k00l t00ll#.
See Your Local Retailer
Section2 8/7/06 4:28 PM Page 69
70 AMERI CAN COP SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2006
accustomed to its effects.
In a typical competition, you know
ahead of time whats going to happen
and the decision to shoot has been made
long before the actual time to shoot
arrives. This makes it unrealistic when
compared to a real-life situation. Some
events can be run as a surprise to test
problem solving, but then you must
determine if the success or failure was
due to mechanical skills or the cognitive
ability to use those skills. Thats compli-
cates the learning process so lets
just start with a match where everyone
knows whats expected.
Look at each individual stage as
something that matters. In your mind,
you should want to excel every time.
This should cause some nervousness.
Thats okay. It just means its important.
Focus on executing your plan for the
course of fire. Leave no detail out.
Know where you want to be, which tar-
gets you need to shoot and the order in
which you want to engage them. Also,
gure out a backup plan. Now memorize
your course of action. When it comes
time to actually shoot the stage, focus on
what you want to do and see all that is
happening around you. Make the shots
as quickly as you can hitting the
intended targets. How well did you exe-
cute the plan? If mistakes were made,
what were they and how could they have
been avoided? What must you do to
improve next time? Make mental notes
on what to practice and go on to your
next stage and do it all over again.
Dont cheat yourself. You must go into
a shooting competition with the right out-
look and objective. If youre at an IPSC
match, and you play the role of tactical
master and shoot slowly or use cover not
required by the event, you are not taking
advantage of the opportunity to test your-
self against other competitors. If the stage
or drill is being timed and you do any-
thing unnecessary that adds time to the
clock, you are not getting the point. It
doesnt matter if its tactically sound or
realistic or practical. Practical shooting
isnt always practical! So what. Use it to
learn. Use it to train. Yeah, you can go
back and say, I would have done better,
but I did tactical reloads and took full use
of cover. But, if you werent required
based on the stage procedure, youre
missing the point. You have to be able to
compare equally or the results mean
nothing and you wont learn a thing.
Always try to follow up your match
with a practice session and work on
your problem areas.
Weakest Link
For the beginning shooter the weak
link is the lack of technical shooting
skill, but as time goes by and your skill
set improves, mental mistakes start
making bigger differences. The mind
becomes the weakest link. While it has
the ability to process information very
Section2 8/7/06 4:28 PM Page 70
opportunity to perform is whats
important. It is just a game.
However, the lessons learned and
skills developed can be applied to more
serious occasions. And therein lies the
value. At a competitive event, you can
gain experience from repeatedly
shooting under pressure.
Improving marksmanship is easy. It
just takes time at the range and execution
of fundamentals. However, your brain is
tricky and teaching it to deal with pres-
sure can be daunting. Pressure can make
you do stupid things things you
wouldnt normally do. It can also, if used
correctly, allow you to perform well in
tough situations. This heightened state of
awareness can make you move quicker
and act sharper than normal. Use the ner-
vousness to your advantage. When I feel
nervous in a match, I know what Im
about to do matters to me. I become
highly focused and completely unaware
of other distractions. This allows me to
perform better than when Im in a relaxed
state of mind. I want to be nervous.
Executing well under match pressure
is all a matter of conditioning. Use the
energy of stress to allow yourself to per-
form better. Competition demands that
you deal with pressure, physically and
mentally. Youre programming yourself
to focus. This is ultimately the point:
train yourself to execute cor-
rectly when the heat is on.
WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM 71
fast, under stress, this processing speed
can slow to a crawl or stop completely. I
know shooters who are very good shots
but fall to pieces when exposed to the
match environment. It is no longer
relaxed and fun. This is fine for the
casual shooter, but not for someone
whose life depends on it.
Thinking Versus Shooting
Hitting targets in a match isnt very
hard. What makes it difcult is the desire
to do it in a very short time frame. The
biggest mistakes are due to mental pro-
cessing. Over-analyzing delays the
action progress. When the mind says,
Whoaaaa slow down and see whats
happening, the elements that allow the
gun to be fired are also slowed or
stopped. Then, when you catch up with
whats happening, you start rushing and
re bad shots. When this happens, its an
indication youre not able to shoot as
quickly as you can think. Some shooters
get sloppy. Some actually slow down
and perform way below their mechanical
ability. Try to focus the mind.
Match Results
Your ability to survive on the street
is hard to test and quantify too
many variables. Your ability to shoot
however isnt hard to test. It can and
should be done regularly. What you get
out of the test and how you look at the *
AND YOU THOUGHT
YOUR GUN
WAS
CLEAN.
THINK YOUR GUNS ARE CLEAN?
UNLESS YOURE USING
BLUE WONDER, THINK AGAIN.
The Blue Wonder Gun Care Kit includes
an entire range of revolutionary cleaners,
lubricants and protectants to put your
guns in better shape than ever. Period.
Check them out at your favorite dealer or
online at www.bluewonder.us. One try,
and youll know theres no clean like a
Blue Wonder clean.
MAD lN
TH USA
2006Armor Holdings, Inc.
(800) 433-2909
www.bluewonder.us
.:-:
.::.
--:-:
-:.
Fast. Easy. Effective. Powder Blast is a high-pressure cleaner that
instantly blows out powder residue, plastic streaking, grease and oil
build-up. Just spray, wipe and lubricate with Break-Free LP, Collector

or CLP

. No more scrubbingever! Its your fastest, easiest, surest


shot at a cleaner shotgun. Look for it and other Break-Free products
at your favorite rearms or sporting goods store.
2006 Armor Holdings, Inc.
8909 Forum Way
Fort Worth, TX 76140
(800) 433-2909
www.break-free.com
Section2 8/7/06 4:28 PM Page 71
w
Aimpoint
www.aimpoint.com
5.11 Tactical
www.511tactical.com
BlackHawk
www.blackhawk.com
GUNS Magazine
www.gunsmagazine.com
Glock
www.glock.com
American Handgunner
www.americanhandgunner.com
72 AMERI CAN COP SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2006
Section2 8/7/06 5:38 PM Page 72
Pentagon Light
www.pentagonlight.com
LaserMax Inc.
Safariland
www.safariland.com
STI International
www.stiguns.com
SHOT Show
www.shotshow.org
Streamlight
www.streamlight.com
Smith & Wesson
www.smith-wesson.com
Springfield
www.springeldarmory.com
Taurus
www.taurususa.com
Walther USA
www.waltheramerica.com
Kimber
www.kimberamerica.com
Insight Technology
www.insighttechnology.com www.lasermax.com
WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM 73
Section2 8/7/06 5:39 PM Page 73
J
U
S
P
F
c
w
o
classic sense, we attack. Mao said,
Attack is the chief means of destroying
the enemy, but defense cannot be dis-
pensed with. The immediate and pri-
mary objective is to close with the threat
and stop the killing, but at the same time
we must consider self-preservation. The
key to our movement is minimizing our-
self as a target, by the use of cover, and
maximizing the distance between us and
the threat or threat area. This last part is
tough, as we have to move toward the
threat. But the intent here is to use move-
ment in a way that maximizes our dis-
tance to any possible threat we may
encounter. An example would be to pie a
corner from the far wall as opposed to
hugging the close wall and doing a
quick peek. Distance is your friend.
Ive always been amazed at those
trainers who advocate moving down the
middle of a hallway using some forma-
tion, Diamond, Box, take your pick. An
adversary doesnt have to be good to
attack this. Several rounds red down the
hallway have a good chance of hitting
someone in your formation. When an
officer goes down, this formation now
becomes one of chaos and evacuation.
What about doing some quick terrain
analysis down the hallway you plan to
move? Try to use cover between where
you are and where you want to go. It
may not be a terrain feature like a tree
of rock but a doorway, alcove or locker.
Use a leapfrog or bounding over
watch method.
Communicating
We need to communicate with our
partners especially if we are required to
shoot. Without communication we
become separate entities instead of a uni-
ed force. Communication gives us more
eyes and ears. Theoretically we cover
more ground, ght more effectively and
become safer in an unsafe environment.
Beyond communicating with our
partners, we must communicate with
suspects and the public. Although negoti-
ations wont usually be a deciding factor
as in a Harris/Klebold attack, we must be
ready to effectively communicate with a
threat if it can be done safely. Think
of it as using physical skills with verbal
alternatives. Effective communications
might avoid using deadly force just
dont bet your life on it.
These are our force multipliers; will,
skill (skill at arms, movement and com-
munication), timing and initiative.
These are not new concepts in law
enforcement but somehow weve either
forgotten or misplaced them. Dont get
me wrong; this is dangerous stuff when
applied to an active shooter situation.
But if nothing is done,
people will die.
*
ACTIVE SHOOTER
Continued from page 58
74 AMERI CAN COP SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2006
Section2 8/7/06 4:29 PM Page 74
Join us in Orlando for law enforcements show of support.
UNITED WE STAND.
SHOT SHOW 2007 JANUARY 11-14, 2007 ORANGE COUNTY CONVENTION CENTER ORLANDO, FL
P
rofessionals from all walks of law enforcement
converge on the SHOT Show for the most
advanced duty, tactical, and mil-spec gear.
Firearms, advanced weapon systems, optics, cutlery,
clothing, and body armor its all here. And anyone
who serves and protects, from routine patrol to special
operations, should be here too.
With 1,900 exhibitors in 650,000 square feet this years
SHOT Show delivers over 250 law enforcement specific
companies in over 100,000 square feet of dedicated
floor space. Show specials, discounts and buying
opportunities it makes good mission sense and good
business sense.
Get mission ready. Experience the law enforcement
show that supports everything you stand for. Reunite
this year in Orlando at SHOT Show 2007.
Produced and Managed by: Owned and Sponsored by:
Register now at: www.shotshow.org
AC
Priority
Code:
Section2 8/7/06 4:29 PM Page 75
76 AMERI CAN COP J ULY/AUGUST 2006
76 AMERI CAN COP SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2006
THIS PACKAGE
WIN!
WIN!
PACKAGE IN
KIM-PRO MA
A MODEL 55
SPARKS HO
Section2 8/7/06 4:29 PM Page 76
WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM 77 WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM 77
TO ENTER CONTEST: Use a postcard (no envelopes, please) and follow the sample
shown. Send to AMERICAN COP Dept. X9, P.O. Box 501930, San Diego, CA 92150-
1930. Entries must be received before Nov 1, 2006.
Limit 1 entry per household. This contest is open to individuals who are resi-
dents of the United States and its territories only. Agents and employees of Pub-
lishers Development Corporation and their families are excluded from
entering. Contest void where prohibited or restricted by law. Winners must meet
all local laws and regulations. Taxes and compliance with rearms regulations
will be the responsibility of the winners. Winners will be notied by CERTIFIED
MAIL on ofcial letterhead. No purchase necessary to enter.
Sample
COP SEPT/OCT 2006:
Name ___________________________________
Address _____________ City, State, Zip____________
Email Address _______________________
If I win, please ship my prize through:
Dealer ___________________________________
Address _____________ City, State, Zip____________
Phone ( ) ____ - ________ Store hours __ am __ pm
L
APDs SWAT Team chose the Kimber Custom II
after extensive testing and competition. They
added only night sights and front strap check-
ering. To commemorate the selection, Kimber
introduced the Custom TLE II .45 ACP. Other than mark-
ings, this pistol is an exact duplicate of the teams gun.
Like all Kimber pistols, the Custom TLE II features a
match-grade barrel, chamber and trigger group, high-
ride beavertail grip safety, beveled magazine well, and
a lowered and ared ejection port. It comes with one
standard magazine.
The one-piece match-grade barrel is machined
from one piece of solid steel for both accuracy and
long life. The sights are green Meprolight Tritium three-
dot night sights to aid in low-light engagements. The
30 lines-per-inch front strap checkering is aggressive
enough to help the gun stick in your hand on recoil but
not so aggressive as to scrape off hunks of hide.
Kim-Pro
Included in this package are four of Kimbers
new Kim-Pro Tac-Mags. These premium quality mags
have the exclusive (patent pending) quick-change
oorplates for unequaled versatility. Each Kim-Pro
Tac-Mag comes with three oorplates. Choose from a
standard stainless steel base, add a slim bumper pad
for carry or a thick bumper pad for competition or
use with magazine well extensions. An internal metal
plate retains spring as plates are changed.
The high-polished solid stainless steel body is heat
treated for dimensional integrity and incredible
strength. A long skirt stainless steel follower prevents
tipping and rocking even under heavy recoil and is
coated in self-lubricating black Teon.
Milt Sparks Holster
The Milt Sparks Model 55 is truly a classic. Its one
of their best designs for range work and everyday
carry. The gun is pulled tightly into the body for better
concealability and control with the combination belt
loop and slot system. Long lasting rigidity and stability
are ensured by a metal reinforced top band. Sight rails
are provided to protect the front sight.
Kimber
Custom TLE II
GE INCLUDES
RO MAGS AND
DEL 55 MILT
KS HOLSTER
Section2 8/7/06 4:29 PM Page 77
Section2 8/7/06 4:29 PM Page 78
SUPER TALON
Advanced Weapons Technology
The Super Talon net gun system provides a
non-lethal response option. The system fires
a 16-square foot Kevlar/nylon net at over 15
feet per second and up to 40 away. The
net immobilizes the suspect, reducing the
need for physical contact from the officer.
The Super Talon is powered by com-
pressed air and is reusable and reloadable.
www.lawenforcementmall.com
(760) 777-7229
For more information on seeing your product featured in Spotlight, contact Delano Amaguin (888) 732-6461.
ELITE MIDWEIGHT GLOVES
Woolrich Elite Series
These new gloves
from the Woolrich
Elite Series
feature water-
resistant
goatskin
leather palms
for maximum
dexterity and
grip. The three-
layer construction is
ideal for year-round
use and uses WIND-
STOPPER N2S thermal
management. This
eliminates the need for
separate wicking and wind-
blocking layers, giving you versatility and conve-
nience. Windproof, water resistant and breathable, this highly
flexible glove offers performance from the inside out. The Elite
Series line also includes hats and socks.
www.woolrichelite.com
(800) 972-2421
A/C ATTACHMENT
Cool K9
CoolK9 gives your dog relief from hot weather. CoolK9
attaches to your vehicles A/C and directs cool air to the
K9 kennel, enclosure or dog crate. Its extremely easy to
install, requires no tools, and comes with a 6 crush-
proof hose and can be installed in most common police
vehicles and SUVs. Also available is the CoolCop which
directs A/C behind your vest.
www.coolcop.com
(408) 832-0602
POCKET BADGE
Classline
The Pocket Badge offers the ability to create cus-
tomized badges for law enforcement and other emer-
gency personnel. Pocket Badges are available in four
styles SP-3, 2x3 with a long back for dress shirts,
RB-1, 2x3 with a shorter back, RB-2, 3x4 and the
FS-2 flat style. Name badges and a variety of acces-
sories are also available. The Pocket Badge easily
slips into and out of pockets, can be hung on a chain
for neck wear and some styles can be worn with mag-
nets or pins. Badge stands for display are also avail-
able. The badges can be easily changed to reflect pro-
motions or title changes.
www.pocketbadge.com
(800) 783-8762
NIGHT SENTRY
Diamond Sentry Distributors
The Night Sentry slides easily between your
beds mattress and box spring to offer instant
access to your handgun, flashlight, cell phone,
stun gun, mace or any other important self- or
home-defense item. No tools necessary. Just
$29.95, which includes First Class USPS pri-
ority mail shipping. Contact John Hawkes at
Diamond Sentry Distributors, P.O. Box 195,
Black Diamond, WA 98010-0195. E-mail: cus-
tomerservice@diamondsentrydistributors.com.
www.diamondsentrydistributors.com
(206) 604-2203
SPOTLIGHT
WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM 79
PORTABLE TRAINER
AIS
PRISim Portable Trainer, an economical, safe, effective, real-
istic, non-coded judgment and force option simulator. The
system is designed for portability and 5-minute set-up in any
room with controlled lighting. The system comes with a drop-in
laser, trigger kit, carrying case, and 100+ branching sce-
narios. Additional training tools can be added.
www.ais-sim.com
(800) 441-4487
AR GAS BLOCK OPTIONS
J&T Distributing
Designed for AR shooters who prefer removable front sights, the gas blocks are available in three sizes, .937 for stainless
bull barrels, .750 for H-Bar barrels and .625 for A-1 barrels. The blocks are machined from T6 aluminum, hard-coat
anodized and incorporate a Picatinny rail. Retail price is $29.95 and they ship with three set screws.
www.jtdistributing.com
(888) 736-7725
Section2 8/7/06 4:30 PM Page 79
ACCESSORIES
Classified ads $2.00 per-word per insertion. ($1.50 per-word per insertion for 3 or more) including name, address and phone number (20 word min-
imum). Minimum charge $40.00. Bold words add $1.00 per word. Copy and rerun orders must be accompanied by PAYMENT IN ADVANCE. NO AGENCY
OR CASH DISCOUNTS ON LISTING OR DISPLAY CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING. All ads must be received with advance payment BY NO LATER THAN THE 1st of
each month. Ads received after closing will appear in the following issue. Please type or print clearly. PLEASE NOTE*** NO PROOFS WILL BE FURNISHED.
Include name, address, post office, city, state and zip code as counted words. Abbreviations count as one word each. Mail to AMERICAN COP CLASSI-
FIEDS, 12345 World Trade Drive, San Diego, California 92128. NOTE: WE NOW HAVE DISPLAY CLASSIFIED ADS IN BOTH GUNS MAGAZINE AND AMER-
ICAN HANDGUNNER. ASK FOR OUR NEW RATE CARD, Or call (858) 605-0235.
AMERICAN COP
80 AMERI CAN COP SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2006
COMBAT STOCKS & ACCESSORIES. OVER 100
REPLACEMENT GUNSTOCKS.
WWW.KENARNOLDCSA.COM/AC1. 888-443-8507.
APPAREL
CONFIDENTLY CARRY CONCEALED! Visit
www.concealedcarry.com or call 888-959-4500 for
a FREE catalog. GSA contract GS-07F-9165S
BOOKS
COLLECTORS
EMBLEMS & INSIGNIA
GUNSMITHING
GUNS FOR SALE
POLICE EQUIPMENT
5.11 Challenge 14
Action Target 64
Adco Sales 60
Aimpoint 39
Al Mar Knives 74
Am. Institute of Applied Science 35
Benchmade 63
Bianchi Intl. 27
Black Hills Ammunition 8
BlackHawk Products Group 29
Blade-Tech Industries 63
Blue Wonder Gun Care 71
Break-Free 71
B-Square 65
Bullet 50 60
Butler Creek 37
C.O.P.S. West 21
Choate Machine & Tool, Inc. 68
CoolCop 69
CorBon/Glaser 58
Crimson Trace Corp. 13
Cylinder & Slide 58
DeSantis Holster 6
Diamond Sentry Distributors 64
Elite Target Systems 35
Glock 33
Gun Vault/Cannon Safe 6
Hi-Viz 13
Insight Technology 10-11
Iosso Products 66
Kimber 9,84
Kleen-Bore, Inc. 65
LaserMax, Inc. 2
Lewis Machine & Tool Co. 66
Midway USA 17
Pearce Grip 27
Pentagon Light 3
Phoenix Distributors 70
Rock River Arms 56
Safariland 61
Savage Arms 17
Shooters Choice/Ventco 67
SHOT Show 75
Sigarms 7,15
Smith & Alexander 35
Smith & Wesson 25
SOG Knives 67
Springeld 83
STI International 31
Streamlight 12
Taurus 23
Truglo 37
TSI, Inc. 21
VisuaLock 15
Walther 68-69
Wilson Combat 74
XS Sight Systems 63
INDEX
OF ADVERTISERS
www.deltatactical.com
Delta Tactical
PATROL BAG
This is a piece of equipment designed
by working cops, for working cops.
This is no ordinary, generic bag.
tenring.comemail:tenring@texas.net
210.494.3063FAX 210.494.3066
1449 Blue Crest Lane, San Antonio, TX 78232
Fine custom revolvers and semiautomatic handguns.
Glock Thumb Safety
Installed $115 + shipping
TEN-RING PRECISION, INC.
Dedicated to the metallic art of the spiral tube.
www.maxsell.com
1-B77-332-2343
Maseii corporation
4400 W. HiIIsboro BIvd. #2
Coconut Creek, FL 33073
NATIONAL
CONCBALBD CABBY
AGENCY ID
REQUIRED
$49.00
11 $!. !/E
8|ze
2 " x 1 3/4"
LlLK
LL
The H.R. 218 law
allows current and
retired law
enforcement
personnel to carry
a concealed weapon
nationwide.
OII Duty or RetIred

Money Back
Guaranteed
Section2 8/8/06 2:21 PM Page 80
CoolCop
Ever since we started wearing ballistic vests for protection weve been
coming up with excuses not to. One of the main snivels is; its too hot. Get
over it and wear the thing. Remember, it can save your life when you have a
real bad day.
The rst time I saw CoolCop I was underwhelmed but I tried it anyway.
Damned if the thing doesnt work and work well to boot. You hook one end
to your air conditioner vent and the other end hooks under your vest.
CoolCop was invented by a San Jose, California cop. His beat partners snick-
ered at rst but later sheepishly asked for one of their own. The system is
now also available as CoolK9 for you dog handlers out there.
For More Info: www.coolcop.com.
Safe Direction
All but one accidental discharge I ever saw were caused by operator head space
and timing. Usually it was someone proficient with the weapon but for that split
second lost concentration and focus. How bad would you feel if your round went
through your locker and struck another cop?
Safe Direction LLC has come up with a solution for your locker room. Its
their Ballistic Containment System. You hang the bright red Cordura covered
composite armor board on a secluded wall and designate that space as your safe
gun handling area. Simply point your gun at the silver safe direction emblem and
if bad things happen, after you stop holding your ears from the pain and cursing,
you can go over and dig the round out of the NIJ-IIIA rated board. Use it at home
for dry fire practice too.
For More Info: www.safedirection.com.
Zeiss 8X30 B T* Binoculars
In order to properly snoop and poop on graveyard, a patrol
cop needs a good set of binoculars. I dont know how many
times Ive seen street cops go out and buy $50 glass and then
snivel about them fogging up on rainy nights or about not
doing a decent job of light gathering. You got to spend decent
money to get decent glass. But, you dont have to spend a for-
tune either.
Zeiss Conquest series 8X30 B T* binoculars are water and
dust-proof and even with rough use, totally reliable. They easily
withstand the extremely high and low temperatures experienced
sitting in your patrol car. Theyre built with a durable, non-slip
rubber armor housing and are nitrogen lled to prevent internal
fogging. Conquest series binoculars are equipped with high-eye-
point eyepieces and folding eyecups to help eye-
glass wearers get the full eld of view.
For More Info: www.zeiss.com/sports.
I
N
S
I
D
E
R
R
U
M
I
N
A
T
I
O
N
S
I NSI DERRUMINATIONS Continued from page 82
*
terror of having their homes invaded
while theyre sleeping.
First off, damn near everything has
gone up 1,300 percent in the last 25
years now including my blood pres-
sure. Secondly, how do we know the
subjects of the raids are nonviolent?
Guess what Radley, sometimes bad
guys can fool ya. Balkos reasoning
reminds me of a city council member
who suggested we only dispatch
reserve re engines to the false alarms.
Balko points to 150 examples of doc-
umented botched raids. Using his
gure of 40,000 per year and then cutting
that number in half, as it has no basis in
reality, it comes out to half a million raids
in the past 25 years. The botched raid
percentage is .03 percent not bad for
government work. Those involving death
was estimated at 36 or .0072 percent.
Thats not to diminish the fact any inno-
cent life lost is truly a tragedy.
Suiting up and going through the
door is one of the most dangerous jobs
cops do. It takes a special mindset and
a special person to do it. One thing we
dont need is a toro caca spewing
pundit who couldnt qualify to carry
a SWAT cops jockstrap sniveling over
the tactics and equipment necessary to
bring the officers home at the end of
their shift.
Toro Caca (cont..)
WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM 81
A COMPLETELY SUBJECTIVE LOOK AT THINGS I LIKE
Section2 8/7/06 4:30 PM Page 81
Chirac, unless of course the death
penalty applies for taking bribes in the
oil-for-food scandal.
So, if youre ever in Philly, stop by
Genos Steaks, bring a department
patch for his collection and enjoy
what, in my opinion, is the best steak
sandwich on the planet. He supports
us so we should support him. And by
the way, be prepared to order in Eng-
lish. A sign in the window reads,
This is America When ordering,
speak English.
82 AMERI CAN COP SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2006
A
few weeks back I attended a
trade show in Atlantic City,
New Jersey. It was a short
drive from where I grew up; a
suburb of Philadelphia called Spring-
eld Township. There really isnt much
there for me now a days but I felt com-
pelled to visit the old stompin
grounds anyway and besides, a couple
of the guys with me had never seen
Independence Hall, the Liberty Bell,
Ben Franklins house or where Betsy
Ross handcrafted our rst ag.
If you ever talk to a displaced
Philadelphian, ask him if he misses any-
thing from the old neighborhood. Id bet
you wouldnt hear the weather, the bugs,
the smells or the trafc. The one thing
you will hear is the food specically
steak sandwiches.
To the Philly steak sandwich "fan",
the corner of 9th and Passyunk Avenue
in South Philadelphia, the home of
Genos Steaks, is Mecca, Wrigley
Field, the Empire State Building and
Saint Peters Basilica all rolled into
one. Joe Vento started Genos in 1966
and built the business into the icon of
thinly sliced rib eye and cheese whiz it
is today.
Ask any Philly cop about Genos
and especially Joe and theyll tell you,
theres no other like him. Hes as pro-
cop as you can get. No, its not a free
T
he monumental level of sheer unadulterated igno-
rance exhibited by academics and journalists never
ceases to amaze me. Even though they have never
done the job of a law enforcement officer they
believe they can make broad sweeping comments on how
its performed or should be performed based solely on
research. So it is with Radley Balko of the Cato Institute, a
Libertarian think tank based in Washington D.C. and
DAVE DOUGLAS
I NSI DERRUMINATIONS Continues on page 81
started in San Francisco. On his blog, Balko describes him-
self as a 31-year-old Classical Liberal or Libertarian. Fur-
ther he states he likes to write, is a music buff, sports nut
and political junkie. Id bet he also enjoys long walks on the
beach and puppies too. But one things evident; he doesnt
like cops, especially SWAT cops.
Balko states the last 25 years have seen an increase of
1,300 percent in the number of paramilitary raids on
American homes. He states, These raids, 40,000 per year
by one estimate, are needlessly subjecting nonviolent drug
offenders, bystanders and wrongly targeted civilians to the
INSIDER
RUMINATIONS
sandwi ch or a free
Coke on a hot day;
its a commitment to
the cop community in
general. If theres a
fundraiser for a hurt
cop, Joes first in line
helping out.
Genos is the unof-
cial home of the Jus-
tice for Daniel
Faulkner folks. Joe has
supported the group for
years. Mumia Abu-
Jamal murdered
Philadelphia Police
Officer Daniel
Faulkner, badge #4699,
December 9, 1981 near
the corner of 13th and
Locust. Abu-Jamal was
convicted and sentenced to death July 3,
1982. The case has been tied up in court
with appeal after appeal since.
Susan Sarandon, Paul Newman,
Ossie Davis, Ed Asner, Tim Robbins,
Alec Baldwin, Whoopi Goldberg and
Oliver Stone, the usual anti-death
penalty Hollywood crowd, have raised
funds and generally lent aid, comfort
and support to the murderer for years.
Frances Jacques Chirac demands
his release so you know the reprobate
should be executed Abu-Jamal not
Toro Caca
I
N
S
I
D
E
R
R
U
M
I
N
A
T
I
O
N
S
This Is America When
Ordering, Speak English.
Section2 8/7/06 4:30 PM Page 82
S-O c2,c3,c4 8/7/06 4:33 PM Page c3
Ior oomp|ete nformaton on Kmber
rearms, aooessores and dea|er
|ooatons, p|ease send $2 to:
Kmber, Uept. 896,
0ne Lawton 5treet, Yonkers, NY 10705
oa|| (800) 880-2418
or vst www.kmberameroa.oom
From left, the Custom CDP II, Desert Warrior and Team Match II, each in .45 ACP.
Also pictured, the new Kimber LifeAct Guardian Angel non-lethal self defense device.
Kimber

builds the world`s hnest production 1011 pistols. A bold statement, maybe, but backed
by the actions ol elite tactical law enlorcement units, military lorces and competition shooters.
The Desert Warrior is modeled alter the pistol selected by the Marine Detachment assi,ned to
U.S. Special Cperations Command. Enhancements include a Tactical Rail, Service Melt treatment,
G-10 Tactical Grips, bumped ,rip salety and the premium Dark Earth KimPro II

hnish.
The Custom CDP II is a li,htwei,ht Custom Shop carry pistol loaded with perlormance leatures
like carry bevel treatment, checkered lront strap and tri,,er ,uard, ni,ht si,hts and ambidextrous
thumb salety.
Team Match II pistols are used by the U.S.A. Shootin, Rapid Iire Pistol Team members when
they compete on the action shootin, circuit a,ainst America`s lastest ,uns. Ieatures include
stainless steel slide and lrame, lrontstrap checkerin, and Team lo,o ,rips.
All Kimber 1011 pistols are proudly made in America, and leature match ,rade barrels,
chambers and tri,,er ,roups lor accuracy and absolute dependability. Kimber. Carry the best.
Kimber 1911pistols. Unequaledquality.
Unprecedented performance.
The Custom TLE II .45 ACP is identical
to the pistol selected by LAPD SWAT
for duty carry. Features include night sights
and frontstrap checkering.
Kimber Rimfre Target Conversion Kits in .22 LR
easily install on most 1911 pistol brands.
They are available through dealers or
direct from Kimber.
S-O c2,c3,c4 8/8/06 2:28 PM Page c4