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2008
38 EVIL LURKS DAVE DOUGLAS
Rejuvenate Your AR.
46 GUNSMITHS, ARMORERS AND PARTS CHANGERS JOHN RUSSO
Who's Working On Your Guns?
49 THE TACTICS OF LIGHT CLINT SMITH
Real World Use Of Flash Lights.
52 THE ART OF SUBTLE BREACHING RALPH MROZ
Get In Quietly.
55 PROTECTION FOR LE SPOUSES RICHARD MANN
What They Need To Know.
Volume 4, Number 3, Issue 17
MAY • JUNE
4 AMERI CAN COP • MAY/J UNE 2008
58
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FEATURES
Clint Smith
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AMERICAN COP

(ISSN 1557-2609) is published bi-monthly by Publishers’ Development Corp., 12345 World Trade Drive, San Diego, CA 92128. Periodical postage paid at San Diego CA 92128, and at additional
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8 RETURN FIRE
58 ON THE JOB
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16 LEAA JAMES J. FOTIS
18 CORRECTIONS BRIAN DAWE
20 HIGH TECH BOB DAVIS
22 OFFICER SURVIVAL SAMMY REESE
24 EVOC ANTHONY RICCI
26 PRIVATE SECURITY ED PALUMBO
28 RESERVES PERRY W. HORNBARGER
30 STREET LEVEL JOHN MORRISON
32 REALITY CHECK II CLINT SMITH
34 CARRY OPTIONS MARK HANTEN
36 HARD TOOLS PAUL MARKEL
COLUMNS
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ON THE COVER:
38 BEAT THE BAN
24 HIGH RISK TRANSPORT
30 CULTURED CAVEMEN
34 126 STRIPPER
36 SAFARILAND RLS
46 WHO'S WORKING ON YOUR GUNS
52 DOOR KICKING US: LOCK PICKING
55 SAVVY SPOUSES
70 WEB SITE SHOW CASE
77 WICKED GRIPS
MJ08sec1 3/27/08 6:01 PM Page 5
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MJ08sec1 3/26/08 4:18 AM Page 7
RETURNFIRE
Reserves Suck
Dave, I stand by my statement that
“wannabees” are just that and don’t
reflect the training and professional
attitudes paid LEOs have must. (Return
Fire, American COP. March April
2008) Anyone that wants to play at
being a LEO often gets the chance, due
to some moron’s idea that it’s a good
idea? Where, pray tell, can a civilian
get the hundreds of hours needed to do
the “job”? And, as proof it cannot and
8 AMERI CAN COP • MAY/J UNE 2008
should not be done by volunteers, look
at any State Police organization. Where
are their volunteers? Does that give you
pause to ponder why volunteers aren’t
allowed to do that job. Is it just possible
the states want to avoid a lawsuit or do
they just hate freebies? We know they
love freebies, so what does that leave
for an answer?
If you stand by your motto “By
Cops For Cops” then either you’re pan-
dering or just don’t see the truth. This
isn’t the first time you’ve used the title
“Cops” to sell your magazine. There
are a number of articles about correc-
tions, volunteers and authors that aren’t
cops and have never been.
The idea of a magazine for and by
cops was cool — too bad you couldn’t
stay the course. And, if you believe vol-
unteer firemen are as good as the pros, I
hope your house and property, as well as


I stand by my statement
that “wannabees” are
just that and don’t
reflect the training and
professional attitudes
paid LEOs have.
Reserve Deputy Sheriff Patrick Back
Hero rr
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MJ08sec1 3/27/08 6:02 PM Page 8
RETURNFIRE
your person, are protected by volunteers.
Oh and where are the volunteer C.O.s?
I was involved as a D/T and firearms
trainer for over 20 years and have never
seen the volunteers get one tenth the
training the real cops get. Even that’s not
enough. I’m sad there are even those
that want to play at doing such a noble
job. I am sadder yet you don’t stay your
stated course —“By Cops For Cops.”
Steven Baum
Steven, I appreciate your opinion on
the matter and recognize there are
some out there that share it. I don’t.
But, that’s neither here nor there. I
haven’t had any other readers express
an opinion similar to yours. If I did, I’d
print them as well.
I have no answer to you question
regarding the lack of State Police or
Correctional department reserve pro-
grams. Maybe they just aren’t as enlight-
ened as the “locals” or they have got
enough money so as not to need the help.
As for the “By Cops For Cops”
issue, again, we’re at polar opposites
on that issue too. Here is an excerpt
from my column in the very first issue
of American COP:
We have that “Concept of Cop.”
We wanted a cop magazine actu-
ally written By COPS For COPS.
That’s what we’re going to give you.
If you see a writer who isn’t, they’re
probably a preeminent expert in that
particular field, and they work with
cops every day. Not some free-lancer
who usually specializes in “social
issues for today’s urban woman” —
who just happens to also know some-
body on a SWAT team. Now how does
that qualify them to write an article on
“high risk building entries”? I don’t
know either.
I’ll do everything I can to keep
American COP relevant for all of us —
no matter where your patrol area is
located. Toward that goal, we’ve
twisted arms on a cross-section of cop
writers from all across America. And,
we were pleasantly surprised at how
anxious they were to come aboard.
I hope the rest of the magazine gives
you something decent to read; we actu-
ally do try pretty hard to keep it rele-
vant even if you don’t agree with parts
of it. At the very least, thanks for your
emails. Even though we don’t agree, it
gives me and the other readers some-
thing to ponder and a differing opinion
to consider. Dave
Dave, first off I’d like to say GREAT
Magazine! I’m writing in response to
Reserves column comments by Steven
Baum. (Return Fire, American COP.
B
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Car windows are tough.
Breaking them with
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Punches carry your hand
through a shower of glass.
The ASP Breakaway
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Rescue or arrest.
Nothing comes close.

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WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM 9
MJ08sec1 3/27/08 6:03 PM Page 9
MJ08sec1 3/26/08 4:19 AM Page 10
Baum. (Return Fire, American COP.
March/April 2008) I took exception to
Mr. Baum’s view on reserve officers. I
can’t speak for all reserves, but I don’t
do it “for fun”. I’m on active duty with
the US Military and I’m preparing for
my next career. I do it for the same
reason I’m a Volunteer Firefighter — if
I don’t, who will?
It’s a win/win for me and the city I
work for. I get experience and they get
protection. As for the “smattering of
training,” I don’t know how they do
things in Niagara Falls, but here in
Texas I had to go through the same
training and have to keep up the same
continuing education as regular full
time officers. I definitely don’t dress
up, play the cop thing or make a joke
out of the job.
I’m more proud of being a cop than
you’ll ever know. I don’t call it the
“Real Police” because I am the real
police. Mr. Baum, while I find your
attitude offensive, thank God I haven’t
run across any officers like you. Rest
assured I’d still show up to cover your
back when you need help. Why? It’s
because I’m a professional.
Bryan Crasher
Mr. Baum, I’m a professional pilot
and work one week on — one week
off. It’s a lot of time off. I was born in
France and became a naturalized US
citizen three years ago. I wanted to do
something good for my country of
choice, so I went and knocked at the
Nye County Sheriff’s Office’s door.
It took two years to go through the
720 hours required by our Sheriff’s
Office before I could take the Nevada
POST test. I went (part-time) through
two academy classes; I had to make up
classes after hours, and took some
home study courses. When I couldn’t
study, I rode along as an observer to
learn the practical side of the job.
RETURNFIRE
If you really want to “play
brain surgeon” just
remember to get fully
educated, pass every
exam, and graduate from
your hospital internship
— similar to what we
reserves have to do.
B
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A
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Car windows are tough.
Breaking them with
a baton is tougher.
Punches carry your hand
through a shower of glass.
The ASP Breakaway
makes a car window
disappear...like magic.
Rescue or arrest.
Nothing comes close.

3 Ceramic Pins

Positioned under
the Baton cap

Fits any ASP Baton
WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM 11
MJ08sec1 3/26/08 4:19 AM Page 11
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MJ08sec1 3/26/08 4:19 AM Page 12
WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM 13
which is identical to the full time
Deputy FTO program. In addition to
my FTO homework, I’m taking every
class from the TheBackup.com, which
is similar to the basic academy training.
It keeps me current in my basic knowl-
edge. You’re welcome to quiz me any-
time about just anything related to my
Nevada Category 1 POST certificate.
I plan to continue my studies and
obtain my intermediate and advanced
certificates after I graduate from FTO.
We are required to go to the range
three times a year. Over the last two
years, my scores were 98%, 98%, 98%,
98%, 98%, and 100%. I am in good
shape at 50 years of age.
If any cop calls for help, I’ll come
respond with as much heart as I hope
you would Mr. Baum. And as a second
year rookie, not yet released solo on the
streets, I will be a better asset than
some of the full timers who’ve been on
the job as long as you have.
If you really want to “play brain sur-
geon” just remember to get fully edu-
cated, pass every exam, and graduate
from your hospital internship — similar
to what we reserves have to do.
Reserve Deputy Sheriff,
Patrick Back
Dave, I’d like to respond to Steven
Baum’s comments about reserve offi-
cers. He stated, “They’d get a smat-
tering of the training and go do it for
free.” I’m assuming the Niagara Falls
PD — when they had reserves — sup-
plied all the equipment. The depart-
ments I’ve worked for, full-time and as
a reserve didn’t supply my equipment.
I was al so wonderi ng why t he
union would pressure a department to
drop their reserve program. The Fra-
ternal Order Of Police Union in Okla-
homa allows reserves to join. The only
difference is the reserve isn’t a voting
member. I also agree with Dave’s
statement about the OT. The Sheriff
department where I reserved for nine
years allowed reserves to patrol in two
man units.
Along with parades, crowd control
and man hunts, we took most of the
Emergency Detention Orders and sat
in the Hospital for hours waiting for
the person to be evaluated, this must
be the “fun and OT” part Steven was
speaking about.
I did everything a paid officer did
except request a warrant, I couldn’t do
that due to state law. I’ve had child
molesters confess on the investigation I
did, not as a field officer but as a
reserve. I’ve had the opportunity to get
more training as a reserve than some of
the full-timers I know.
If not for reserves, full time offi-
cers with my sheriff ’s department
P
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RETURNFIRE
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14 AMERI CAN COP • MAY/J UNE 2008
MJ08sec1 3/26/08 4:19 AM Page 14
cers with my sheriff ’s department
couldn’t have attended some of the in-
service training.
A final comment, the reserves in
Oklahoma are received by all agencies
local, county and state as equal
brothers in blue.
Steven W. Brown,
Reserve Cherokee Nation Marshal,
Will Rogers Downs
Plain Brown Wrapper
Dave, this is in response to the
March/ Apri l 2008 i ssue where a
reader asked for a way to have Amer-
ican COP delivered in a more discreet
manner. Many of my wood working
magazines come with a heavy paper
outer cover (kind of like construction
paper) to help keep them from getting
damaged. The outer cover typically
has the same graphics/text as the
actual cover of the magazine, but you
could easily use this outer cover idea
leaving off the text/graphics (using
either a plain brown or white). Or, put
something else on the cover to make it
not so obvious — maybe make it look
l i ke an “adul t ” magazi ne so t hat
nobody would bother looking into it
any further.
Wm. Eric Brunsen
AMERICAN COP
TM
welcomes letters to the editor. We reserve
the right to edit all published letters for clarity and length. Due
to the volume of mail, we are unable to individually answer your
letters or e-mail. In sending a letter to American COP, you agree
to provide Publishers Development Corp. such copyright as is
required for publishing and redistributing the contents of your
letter in any format. Send your letters to Return Fire, American
COP, 12345 World Trade Dr., San Diego, CA 92128;
www.americancopmagazine.com;
e-mail: ed@americancopmagazine.com.
*
RETURNFIRE
WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM 15
Eric, I do believe you struck on
something here. But unfortunately, the
“adult” magazine false cover is a non-
starter for us. Kids pilfer adult maga-
zines all the time and Lord knows we
wouldn’t want them to open COP to the
centerfold and see a gun. It could do
permanent damage to their little psy-
ches. Boobs, tattoos and shaved and
waxed pubic hair are just fine — but
not a gun — nooooooo.
Maybe titles like, American Metro-
Sexual Male — Poodle Round-Up Edi-
tion, American Reality TV Weekly —
Britney, Jessica, Lindsey and Paris
Debate The North American Free Trade
Agreement or American Concrete
Worker — What Really Happened To
Jimmy Hoffa?
I think I’d stay with the cop thing.
Dave
Corrections
Brian, I’m a newly promoted correc-
tions sergeant at a large county jail.
I’ve been reading with interest your
articles on corrections — and Brian,
you’re right on the money. It’s
refreshing to read pro-corrections
article in a publication other than one
specifically targeted at corrections —
even those target state facilities.
I just read your article in the
March/April 2008 issue, and appreciate
the kudos for those of us in county cor-
rections. Every one of the “super bads”
in state and federal institutions spent
time in a county jail while their case
was adjudicated. The individual who
shot and killed a state corrections trans-
port officer at the hospital is currently
awaiting trial in our facility.
Those of us in the county appre-
ciate the attention American COP
Magazine gives us and many of the
road deputies who used to turn their
noses down at us — “you’re just a
jailer” — are looking at us through
different eyes. After all, they catch
them one at a time; we keep them
2000 at a time. Thanks for the valu-
able information, and the attention.
Sgt. M. Naumann
When you’re left with no other option, count on Ranger to get the job done. Winchester
Ranger Ammunition delivers unparalleled performance in every conceivable scenario
or situation and for a wide range of law enforcement applications. With over 140 years
of experience in developing true state-of-the-art handgun, rifle and shotgun ammunition
for American law enforcement, Winchester also backs Ranger with the industry’s most
comprehensive testing and training program. Winchester Ranger.
Trust it to perform at its best—even when things are at their worst.
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MJ08sec1 3/26/08 4:19 AM Page 15
16 AMERI CAN COP • MAY/J UNE 2008
LEAA JAMES J. FOTI S
THE LAW ENFORCEMENT ALLIANCE OF AMERICA.
James J. Fotis is a retired officer from New York and the Executive Director of the Law Enforcement Alliance of America (LEAA). LEAA works to promote officer safety issues, defend law enforcement in the media and promote
the belief that gun control is not crime control. You can find out more or become a member of the hard-hitting, conservative, unabashedly pro-cop, pro-gun, pro-self defense LEAA by visiting their Web site at www.leaa.org
POLITICAL COP GROUPS
I
n the pivotal case before the Supreme Court, the
Brady Center to Prevent Gun Violence prepared a
brief supporting bans and undercutting the Second
Amendment. Seven groups lent their names (and
influence) to the Brady brief: International Association of
Chiefs of Police (IACP); Major Cities Chiefs; Interna-
tional Brotherhood of Police Officers, National Organiza-
tion of Black Law Enforcement Executives (NOBLE);
Hispanic American Police Command Officers Associa-
tion; National Latino Peace Officers Association and the
Police Executive Research Forum (PERF).
A dishonest media is helping drive the anti-gun
frenzy. They enable the rabid anti-gunners to use a few
police chief’s groups to convince America (and members
of the Supreme Court and Congress) that cops hate the
Second Amendment.
I
n the pivotal case before the Supreme Court, the
Brady Center to Prevent Gun Violence prepared a
brief supporting bans and undercutting the
Second Amendment. Seven groups lent their
names (and influence) to the Brady brief: Interna-
tional Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP); Major
Cities Chiefs; International Brotherhood of Police
Officers, National Organization of Black Law
Enforcement Executives (NOBLE); Hispanic Amer-
ican Police Command Officers Association; National
Latino Peace Officers Association and the Police
Executive Research Forum (PERF).
Adishonest media is helping drive the anti-gun
G
un Control. Are you tired of
hearing about it? Well hold on
cause it’s going to be in the press
an awful lot between now and this
fall’s election.
The Supreme Court has before it a
case called “Heller.” With oral argu-
ments in March, a decision is expected
sometime this summer. It’s a fight
over questions like: Do bans on
having guns for self-defense violate
the Second
Amendment?
Does the Second
Amendment apply
to you? Does it
give YOU any
protections?
Those who hate
the Second Amendment want to take
away all guns; they don’t even want
law enforcement to have guns. Ironi-
Twelve groups and 29 DAs were willing
to put their names on the line along with
LEAA to defend these principles:
International Law Enforcement Educators \
and Trainers Association (ILEETA)
International Association of Law Enforcement
Firearms Instructors (IALEFI)
National Police Defense Foundation (NPDF)
Maryland State Lodge
Fraternal Order of Police
Southern States Police Benevolent Association (SSPBA)
Texas Police Chiefs Association
San Francisco Veteran Police Officers Association
Long Beach Police Officers Association
New York State Association of Auxiliary Police
Texas Municipal Police Association
Mendocino County, California, Sheriff Thomas D. Allman
along with 29 elected California District Attorneys.
REAL COPS
VERSUS
POLITICAL
COP GROUPS
REAL COPS
cally they’re using the “law enforce-
ment banner” to try and kill your
Second Amendment protections!
Continued on page 67
N
p
s
e
fr
C
th

w
a

is
K
O
©
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MJ08sec1 3/26/08 4:19 AM Page 16
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?
?
BRI AN DAWE CORRECTIONS
BEHINDTHE FENCE.
T
here’s quite a difference between the kept and the
keepers. Ethnically, 69.5 percent of correctional offi-
cers are white, 20.8 percent are black, and 5.7 percent
are of Hispanic origin. Compared to the inmate popu-
lation of 40 percent white, 41.6 percent black and 15.5 percent
Hispanic and 2.9 percent of other origin. The dynamics of these
differences can add stress to an already very stressful environ-
ment and be a source of additional violence in our world.
We face some incredible challenges. According to the
Bureau of Justice Statistics recent bulletin Prisoners in 2006
(Dec 2007 NCJ 21946) the inmate population saw its largest
increase in 5 years. State inmate populations grew by 37,504
inmates, our local jails by 18,481 inmates and our federal
counterparts grew by 5,428. State, federal and county correc-
tional authorities held jurisdiction over 2,258,983 prisoners at
year-end 2006 according to the study. Only four states saw a
decrease in their inmate populations, New York (-2.2 percent),
New Jersey (-1.7 percent), Maryland (-0.7 percent) and Illi-
nois (-0.2 percent). Of those inmates in custody 45 percent of
all federal, 56 percent of all state and 64 percent of all county
inmates had mental health issues. 15 percent of state inmates
and nearly a quarter, 24 percent, of jail inmates were diag-
nosed with a psychotic disorder.
W
e have a life expectancy of 58 years and have
the second highest mortality rate of any profes-
sion. We also have a 39 percent higher suicide
rate than any other occupation and on average
only live 18 months after we retire.
Most importantly, remember the brave men and
women who put their lives on the line everyday to
protect you and your families are your neighbors,
your friends, your fellow citizens. They attend your
churches and your children go to school together.
They coach little league and soccer teams and shop
at the local supermarket. Without the men and
women who go into our nation’s hell-holes everyday
where would we be? They maybe a little braver then
most, and they may be willing to put more on the
line to protect our communities. But at their core
they are just like every other citizen in this great
country, no better or no worse. COs are just
trying to do their jobs as best they can.
JUST LIKE EVERYONE ELSE?
18 AMERI CAN COP • MAY/J UNE 2008
Kept AND Keepers
?
I
’ve often been asked,
“Why did you become a
guard?” First off, we’re not
guards and never have
been. One eight-hour shift behind the walls would leave no doubt on that subject.
Guards watch warehouses and help children cross the street. We’re correctional offi-
cers and we do the most thankless job in law enforcement. We are professionally
sworn law enforcement officers. Our brothers and sisters on the street catch crimi-
nals — we have to live with them. We help keep our communities safe by dealing
with the worst society has to offer and we do it 24 hours a day 365 days a year.
No one I’ve ever met wanted to work in a prison. Virtually all of us come to this
job for one or two reasons. The first is economic and second is to use corrections as a
stepping-stone to other law enforcement positions.
That begs the question — “Who are you guys?” We are 78 percent male and 22
percent female, 80 percent of us are between the ages of 30 and 44. Aquarter of us
have a college degree and 4.5 percent of those have a Masters or Ph.D. We are not
knuckle draggers as Hollywood portrays us. If you want to find out about who we are
and what we do throw out anything you’ve seen at the movies or on television. OZ,
Prison Break and Shawshank Redemption are all pure fantasy. We’re outnumbered 40
or 60 to 1 behind those walls. The fools you see portrayed on the screen wouldn’t last
a week in a real correctional setting.
WHO ARE
THOSE
GUYS?
WHO ARE
THOSE
GUYS?
*
MJ08sec1 3/26/08 4:20 AM Page 18
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MJ08sec1 3/26/08 4:20 AM Page 19
BOB DAVI S HIGHTECH
CUTTING EDGE WIDGETS — AND OTHER NEW STUFF.
O
ne of the units I recent
got my hands on is
OPTIM Inc.’s Freedom
View LED Fiberscope.
This ruggedized device is designed
as a simple-to-use non-destructive
inspection system, used to look into
areas generally inaccessible to
normal viewing techniques. Huh?
It means you can look around cor-
ners and into closed containers, if
it’s safe to do so, without disturbing
T
his technology uses color CCD, or
Charges Couple Devices, providing the
viewer with a superior quality picture
through an opening no bigger than an
opening you make pushing a number 2 pencil
through a piece of cardboard. Combine the
miniature camera with optical fibers which are
long, thin strands of very pure glass about the
diameter of a human hair and you have a sophis-
ticated surveillance device. Arrange these fibers
into bundles called optical cables, use a low power
transmitter sending light over distances because signals
in optical fibers degrade less and you have the makings of
wiz-bang James Bond type tools.
But remember, first and foremost it’s only a tool; it
does not replace good safety practices. If you’re
foolish enough to tamper with suspicious pack-
ages without having the necessary knowl-
edge and skills then I hope you have
plenty of life insurance and your
premiums are current. Those
guys on the bomb squads are
thoroughly trained and have the
experience necessary to make
the right decisions.
It’s The Glass
W
hen we hear about
fiber optics most
of us think of
telephones,
cable TV, or the Internet.
But advances in camera
technologies have also
given law enforcement a
new tool; Fiber Optic
cameras to combat
sophisticated criminals
who use every method pos-
sible to avoid detection.
During this past year I’ve received an
ever-increasing number of safety alerts. Many
refer to booby-trapped or suspicious packages and
some for new ways of concealing dope. One of the
ways we can be more successful in combating this
type concealment is by using surveillance
tools such as “snake” or fiber
optic cameras to give us the
information we need
before we act.
EYES
EYES
PRYING
PRYING
Freedom
View
20 AMERI CAN COP • MAY/J UNE 2008
MJ08sec1 3/26/08 4:20 AM Page 20
the contents or making the person
aware of your presence.
The Freedom View scope comes in
three flexible optical cable shafts in
lengths of 40, 60 or 80 inches and 6mm
in diameter. At the end of each cable is
a 2" articulating section capable moving
120 degrees. The camera has a field of
view of approximately 60 degrees and
is designed to see object close up from
.4" to 4" but is capable of giving clear
images on objects as far away as 15'.
The cable has been tested and functions
immersed in certain fluids such as
water, gasoline and diesel fuel. How-
ever you should consult the manufac-
ture when working with caustic chemi-
cals as severe damage may occur.
It’s powered by rechargeable
Lithium Ion battery making the unit
self contained and completely portable.
Afully charged battery will last
between two and four hours depending
on light source. The scope itself pro-
vides visual status cues of red, yellow
and green LEDs indicating the approxi-
mate amount of time left before the bat-
tery is drained. Adrained battery takes
between three and four hours to fully
recharge. In more controlled environ-
ments, the unit can be plugged into a
standard AC power source or the 12-
volt DC electrical system via your car’s
cigarette lighter.
Low Light Or No Light
The camera works in very low light
situations of approximately 1or 2
LUX. To equate this to something
more understandable, a single candle
gives off 10 LUX of light at a distance
of about a foot. But in situations
where there is no light, let’s say the
inside of a closed container, the scope
has two white LEDs embedded into
the tip of the articulating section adja-
cent to the camera. The default bright-
ness power is set at 20 percent when
the light source is turned on. Two but-
tons allows intensity adjustment the
LEDs. Obviously, there will be times
when you wouldn’t want two bright
LEDs glowing as you passed the
camera shaft over the threshold of
some dirtbag’s doorway or while
peering around the corner of a drug
dealer’s cutting room.
For longer-term undercover surveil-
lance work, an optional flexible guide
tube may be obtained to help position
the camera shaft into hard-to-reach loca-
tions. Once the unit is set, the Freedom
View scope can also be configured to
capture still and video images.
As we continue to battle in the wars
against drugs, crime and terror, having
the proper tools is a necessity. But,
using solid safety practices and appro-
priate searches should always
be our first concern.
For more info: www.optimnet.com.
*
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MJ08sec1 3/26/08 4:23 AM Page 21
OFFICERSURVIVAL
22 AMERI CAN COP • MAY/J UNE 2008
into a position
where they can deliver the first strike.
If I am physically attacked, I will
immediately counter attack and defeat
my attacker — never give up! The
counter attack will work better for you if
you are training in a realistic form of
combative arts. The four hours of D-Tac
training you did four months ago won’t
be enough.
No warm up, no do-overs, and no
time outs. Are you ready? You better be.
Front sight, smooth press, shoot until
the threat stops, watch your six and
communicate. When was the last time
you trained at the range? As Clint
Smith says over and over in class —
you will not acquire new skills in the
middle of a fight for your life. Train
like your life depends on it. And get
your mind right. People are
depending on you.
friend. I went
from being the biggest kid in the
house to giving off a vibe saying stay
away from me.
The following are some of the quotes
from the laminated card I carried in my
uniform pocket.
The first line at the top of the card
written in bold print — I’m not going to
f-ing die today. If I am always ready, I
don’t have to get ready. I have a family
who is depending on me to get home
safe and I have partners families
depending on me to make sure their
loved ones get home also.
I pay attention to everyone and every-
thing around me — don’t get ambushed.
Stay in Condition Yellow — all shift. I let
no one slip through my guard. Always
watch the hands and don’t let anyone get
O
ne of my FTOs was
known as the
poster boy for
officer safety. It
was often said he
would sleep in Condition
Orange. He reminded me
a lot of a Marine Corps DI
— always squared away
and his facial expression
never changed from
“pissed off.”
I never forgot his words
from our first meeting, “Your
reputation as an officer starts
now, and your officer safety or
lack thereof will set the tone
for how other officers, crooks
and citizens look at you.” He
went on to say, “No one other
than stat counters will care how
many arrests you make if you’re
a lousy cover officer.”
It wasn’t a conscious deci-
sion, but the foundation for my
passion/obsession for officer
safety was set in concrete that
very moment. I was determined never
be the one everyone hated to have
come cover them.
Over a period of time, I started to
write down little quotes I found. All of
them were motivational blurbs I’d read
before leaving the house. Reading the
quotes before going on shift would help
transform me from husband, dad and
friend into what I called “I see every-
thing mode.”
The transformation was brought to my
attention by one of my wife’s friends. I
had been playing with a house full of
kids before I went into my office to
change into my uniform. After I drove off
in my patrol car my wife called me and
told me I had scared the hell out of her
*

I’m
not going to f-ing die today.

If I am
alw
ays
ready, I don’t have to get
ready.

I pay attention to everyone and everything around m
e.

Don’t get am
bushed.

I let no one slip through m
y guard.

If physically attacked, I’ll im
m
ediately counter attack
and defeat m
y attacker.

Never give up!

No w
arm
up, no do-overs, and no tim
e outs.

Front sight, sm
ooth press, shoot until the threat stops.

W
atch your six and com
m
unicate.

Are you ready? You better be.
GETTING HOME IN THE SAME CONDITION YOU WENT TO WORK IN.
SAMMY REESE
MENTAL AND
PHYSICAL
PREPARATION
MJ08sec1 3/26/08 4:23 AM Page 22
MJ08sec1 3/26/08 4:23 AM Page 23
HIGH RISK TRANSPORT —
A Couple Things To Think About?
What is the risk level?
What is the threat?
Who is the person in transport?
Who are they connected to?
Do they realistically have the power and
following to facilitate a hit or escape?
Where could the attack take place?
What are the attack points?
How many vehicles, and what kind of
weapons do you have?
How many vehicles, and what kind of
weapons do they have?
How many officers will be needed?
What are the local traffic patterns?
Is anything unusual (parades, construc-
tion) going on during your transport?
What are vulnerable points and zones of
predictability in your routes.
How fast can backup be there if the
shit hits the fan?
Be ready and alert especially in areas
where the bad guys can have the
upper hand.
Know the environment and route
better than them.
24 AMERI CAN COP • MAY/J UNE 2008
S
everal liability issues come to
mind when transporting pris-
oners; such as their safety
during transport, the ability to
provide adequate emergency medical
treatment, maintaining a minimum of
two good forms of communications and
being ready for the possibility of a life
threatening situation such as an escape
attempt — or worse — a hit on a target
you’re responsible for transporting.
The likelihood of an escape attempt
or hit is much less than a van breaking
down or getting stuck in traffic. How-
ever, the situation does present serious
repercussions. Most of us would think
an attack of this nature would never take
place in this day and age since the bad
guys wouldn’t have a chance. Why,
because attacks on high-profile prison
motorcades have to be planned meticu-
lously. In-depth surveillance would be
required to learn the motorcade’s routes,
movement and vulnerabilities.
Many good prisoner transport compa-
nies don’t even share the route with the
drivers or guards until the transport
vehicle leaves. The problem is the human
factor; information leaks and even if you
plan four possible transport routes — the
bad guys can too. With a half decent
Internet connection, bad guys can do 80
percent of the research with a laptop.
If an attack of this nature happens
you can bet your ass it’ll be damn
serious. The bad guys will hit hard and
fast with definite intent to cause harm to
whoever gets in the way. These are not
necessarily stupid people; they are crimi-
nals committed and accepting of the risk
of killing cops. This type of thing
doesn’t happen every day — it may
never happen to you — but we still need
to prepare and adequately train for the
possibility — especially if your job is
transporting high-profile prisoners.
Dave Halloway, President of Force
1 Prisoner Transport, Inc., a nationally
known company working with Police,
PRISONER
TRANSPORT
Anthony Ricci is the owner and president of Advanced Driving and Security (ADSI). He’s been teaching cops to drive for over 10 years. www.1adsi.com.
ANTHONY RI CCI EVOC
SURVIVING IN YOUR MOBILE OFFICE.
MJ08sec1 3/27/08 6:03 PM Page 24
WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM 25
Sheriff Departments and Department of
Correction facilities, was kind enough
to shed some light on the threats
involved in transporting prisoners.
Dave lists accident avoidance and
traffic situations as problem number
one. Although most employees come to
Force 1 with some prior law enforce-
ment background, it’s mandatory all
new hires go through a minimum of
220 hours of specialized training.
The repercussion of an accident while
in transport has several possible out-
comes and not one is good. It could get
the prisoners injured or it could prompt
an escape attempt if not correctly con-
trolled. It could also be a staged accident
for a prisoner extract. In any case, it
would definitely throw a curve ball at
your time line and increase vulnerabili-
ties on a long-distance transport.
What happens if your team has to
change a vehicle due to mechanical
breakdown? How vulnerable would offi-
cers be if any of these situations hap-
pened without prior preparation and real-
life training? Drivers and guards must be
alert and ready to react to situations
handed to them as they drive their route.
In the event first aid must be adminis-
tered a good transport team must be pre-
pared and have a plan. Halloway says, at
a minimum, always have two guards on
a transport, even when transporting one
prisoner. In the event of a medical emer-
gency one would guard the prisoner and
one administer first aid. Obviously, the
first action would be to alert the call
center through either verbal communica-
tion or a panic switch installed in every
vehicle. Each van is equipped with pri-
mary and backup communications. In a
crash, the system automatically sends an
alert to police, fire and ambulance
alerting them to the situation and to the
fact this may not be a typical crash. Their
communications system can also re-route
drivers due to known traffic situations or
unforeseen problems that
may arise.
For More Info: www.force1.us
*
Many goodprisoner
transport companies
don’t even share the
routewith the drivers or
guards until the trans-
port vehicle leaves.
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export under the International
Traffic in Arms Regulations
(22 C.F.R.120-130) and require
U.S. Government authorization
prior to the export or transfer
to a non-U.S. Person.
MJ08sec1 3/26/08 4:23 AM Page 25
PRIVATESECURITY ED PALUMBO
ISSUES AND TRENDS ON THE PRIVATE SIDE OF LAW ENFORCEMENT.
26 AMERI CAN COP • MAY/J UNE 2008
T
here may be some reason, some defined and substantial cause for
alarm, along with the faint hope it’s recognized. Not the usual,
media-generated alarmist reporting designed to shock for the pur-
pose of selling newspapers, or garnering viewers. I mean alarm at
a true, natural level: a clearly delivered, aptly designed warning allowing sen-
sible people to take appropriate actions. Is that too much to ask?
What constitutes an alarm loud enough to resonate? The 9/11 attacks against
this nation were — or should have been — the most catastrophic alarm signal
ever to sound, yet we live in a place populated by people who are clueless and
sightless when it comes to securing this country. Cormac McCarthy told us the
remorseless arroyos and escarpments of southwestern Texas are no country for
old men, and we may extrapolate, America, on a vastly larger plain, is no
country for old fools — yet here they are blissfully unalarmed and unafraid.
A
t the risk of sounding defeatist, there’s a lot of
work to be done to secure the United States of
America. An understated position point, perhaps,
but not by too much — you can never be too
straightforward when espousing a central truth.
Assuming for a moment the “truth” of the position is
self-evident, is it alarming? Did it come as a complete
shock to you to learn there is an enormous, possibly insur-
T
here’s no lack of sign, though.
Just today, the headlines scream
unrepentantly of our predica-
ment: “Guns in the
Cockpit/Debate Over Armed Pilots”
(we’re still debating this?); “Pakistan
Turns to Britain for Help in Bhutto
Inquiry/Scotland Yard” — I’m sure as
soon as the warrant is served on Jack
the Ripper, they’ll clear up this one,
too; “Pakistan Releases 4 Palestinians
Convicted In ‘86 Plane Hijack/Pan Am
Jet in Karachi” (are they rehabilitated,
do you think?); “Group Says US Secu-
MEDIA SCAT
Sound The Alarm
mountable challenge facing this country regarding our
very survival? You must be alarmed at this point. (Either
that, or you’re a cop) For the non-judgmental among us,
without a lifetime of bleak, dispiriting, anti-humanist
experiences to darken our vision, this should at least be
moderately alarming. This is no time for the shallow,
ignorant, or self-deceiving behavior — hang on, yes it is
— it’s an election year.
Shallow, Ignorant,
Self-Deceiving
Behavior
Shallow, Ignorant,
Self-Deceiving
Behavior
Shallow, Ignorant,
Self-Deceiving
Behavior
Shallow, Ignorant,
Self-Deceiving
Behavior
Shallow, Ignorant,
Self-Deceiving
Behavior
MJ08sec1 3/27/08 6:04 PM Page 26
WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM 27
rity Screening for Chinese High-tech
Customers Flawed, Calls for Halt/Risk
of Weapons Proliferation” (just now
realizing foreign intelligence services
are targeting, stealing and/or buying
US high tech proprietary informa-
tion?); “Electronic Passports Raise Pri-
vacy Issues/Border Security At Risk”
(this was news to me; our borders? At
risk? Shut up.)
There’s Hope — Maybe
All is not lost. Really. Avast net-
work of public and private resources
are constantly assessing risks at every
imaginable level — invisible, for good
reason to the general, unalarmed public
— risks to this nation posed by intelli-
gent adversaries whose existence might
surprise you.
Corporate entities in league with fed-
eral agencies, many under the aegis of
DHS — an organization I never hesitate
to demean, by the way — are at this
very moment collecting and analyzing
every facet of life in this country, from
a perspective of critical infrastructure
protection: a private research organiza-
tion specializing in the study and pre-
diction of future trends has been tasked
by the DHS, Office of Infrastructure
Protection, to project future risks to
critical infrastructure and key resources
(CI/KR). This assessment should iden-
tify near-term actions that might miti-
gate potential future risks (to rail lines,
shipping lanes, terminals, internet com-
merce, the electrical grid).
My initial awareness and association
with this effort stems from my position,
as global security manager, for one of
the high tech companies partnering with
the think tank on this project; among
many aspects of the study, identifying
the nation’s critical infrastructure land-
scape 10 to 15 years from now, and risks
to CK/KR that might emerge over the
next 10-15 years, and their implications
of critical infrastructure protection. The
study is based on several post-9/11prior
works gauging vulnerability of CK/KR
and focusing on globally influencing,
life-altering trends such as convergence,
privatization and globalization.
I sure as hell don’t pretend to under-
stand much of this stuff, but did take
some comfort in the knowledge, at the
very least, the fundamental questions
are being asked. Whether and how the
answers are made available to smart,
experienced characters in government
and private security, capable to appropri-
ately respond to future alarms, is a more
vexing question, and will take
more time to fully explore.
*
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PERRY W. HORNBARGER RESERVES
DEDICATION AND PROFESSIONALISM THAT GOES BEYOND PAY.
28 AMERI CAN COP • MAY/J UNE 2008
Perry W. Hornbarger is the Unit Commander of the Chesterfield, Va. Auxiliary Police Unit. He can be reached via e-mail at hornbargerp@yahoo.com.
H
ow is your department utilizing a sometimes
underutilized labor resource? I’ve seen and
heard many stories of how a reserve compo-
nent just isn’t being utilized effectively — if
used at all. I speak from experience; roughly 25
members of my unit donate almost 12,000 hours
per year. Two of them worked over 1,000 each
on the street. That’s pretty darn amazing when
you consider the average wage earner working
a standard 40-hour week works 2,080 hours
per year (excluding vacation and holidays).
I wish I knew the secret to their motivation.
I’d certainly share it with you guys. Inciden-
tally, both of these guys have a life; one’s a
postmaster with the US Postal Service and
the other’s an attorney.
recently read an article about a
City Councilperson in a major
Eastern city who wasn’t even
aware their police department had
an auxiliary unit. She learned about
them when she proposed the police
department start using volunteers in
certain areas of the department. So
who’s to blame for her ignorance?
Let’s start with admin. There’s a
myriad of jobs within any department
elected officials and government leaders.
Your leadership can be known to them
without violating any policies you may
have on public official contacts. Any
government official worth their salt will
love to know what is going on in their
area; they may even use it to their (and
our) advantage. President Bush had the
foresight to recognize the value of using
volunteers — why shouldn’t we use that
to our advantage.
that can be adequately handled by a
reserve or auxiliary officer. The chief
who has a reserve/auxiliary unit needs to
proactively let the city or county leaders
know what they’re doing with these vol-
unteers. Any chief would do well to
“showboat” a little when they’re saving
taxpayer dollars and not cutting services.
I also blame the auxiliary unit’s lead-
ership. They need to spend some time at
city or county events getting to know
I
’ve received quite a few e-mails but one sticks out
in my mind. I received an email from a sergeant
asked by his chief to research the value of starting
an auxiliary unit. My hat is off to that chief for
being forward thinking enough to consider this option.
If done right, it can be a very rewarding leading a work
force utilized in many ways and stretching taxpayer
dollars to the fullest. Am I suggesting that we be uti-
lized to replace paid police officers? Absolutely not! In
fact, that’s one thing that I’ve always feared. I have
seen that mindset many times in my career in the fire
service and was always against it. People just don’t
have the time to volunteer in public safety like they
used to. Same here — we know we can’t provide a
force of volunteer cops 24/7 so why would we be
stupid enough to think we can replace them.
A
re reserve/auxiliary officers are a liability? My
answer is, if your people aren’t good enough to do
the job, then you’ve hired the wrong people or you
haven’t trained them adequately. I can say we do a
few things right in my department. Starting at the top we
have a chief who recognizes the benefits and dedication of
his auxiliary unit and members of his command staff under-
stand our unit’s capabilities and limitations. At entry level,
our requirements are basically the same as an officer being
hired for a paid position. Naturally, we don’t have a college
requirement but the same background check, psychological
testing, and polygraph exam is done. Hmmm, you start with
the same kind of person you’d hire and you train him basi-
cally the same way — what’s the difference? Maybe I’m a
little thick but I just don’t see the liability is in this case. At
least no more liability than any other properly trained cop.
LIABILITY? BRAVO
I
TILIZING THE
NDERUTILIZED
Who’s To Blame?
U
MJ08sec1 3/26/08 4:23 AM Page 28
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MJ08sec1 3/26/08 6:24 AM Page 29
I
t was the tail end of a three-day supervisory sem-
inar, which the “facilitator” insisted on calling a
“colloquy,” and he came up one hour short on
material. Unwilling to cut everybody loose early,
the Head Cheese assembled the guest speakers on
stage. Then he asked us to name three characteristics
of a successful supervisor.
I heard responses sounding like “the ability to
effectually interface with political blah-blah” and
“compassionately community-oriented yadda-yadda;”
“skillfully techno-info-data combobulate” and crap
like that. I just wanted some real coffee and no flight
delays in Cleveland. My mind was elsewhere when the
facilitator got to me.
I said something like, “Big muscles, fast fists, and slick
shooting.” The others looked at me like a caveman had just
appeared with a stone club in his hand. For a moment I
thought they were going to convene an inquisition and
charge me with heresy. I could see in many
shocked eyes a look saying such things have
no place in modern-metro-urban-sophisti-
cated public safety. Maybe not, but they
certainly still have a place — a critical
place — in law enforcement in being
a cop, and in leading cops.
30 AMERI CAN COP • MAY/J UNE 2008
JOHN MORRI SON STREETLEVEL
John Morrison served in combat as a Marine sergeant, and retired as a senior lieutenant from the San Diego Police Department, having served there as Director of Training, Commanding Officer of SWAT and division
executive officer. He has taught, written and lectured widely on training, tactics and leadership. Contact him at StreetLevelOne@yahoo.com.
S
ure, we operate complex equipment and tap-dance with technology, but
out in the “dark & dirty,” the difference between our police subculture and
virtually all others becomes crystal clear: In both the routine and the
gravest extreme, we fight; we beat some people up and shoot others. Paint
it purple and scent it with lavender if you like, but that’s what we do. And if
we’re no good at it, no amount of sophistication and scholarship counts for squat.
If you don’t believe it, just ask yourself this: As a sergeant, no matter how
techno-intelligent, computer-literate and sociologically savvy you are, if you
are witnessed by your troops losing a straight-up punch-out with some street-
corner punk, getting your ass kicked ground-fighting a drunk, or — God help
you — you miss a life-saving shot at a hostage-taking stick-up turd; a shot any
rookie could have made, just how much are your stripes — or your career aspi-
rations — worth from that moment on?
Today’s troops are, in fact, more urbanized and intellectual than ever, but deep
down, we supervise cultured cavemen, and they respect the same qualities all
primitive warriors ever have: strength, fighting skills and weapons handling.
How do you measure up?
I
ronically, these factors undoubt-
edly played some role in your pro-
motion to sergeant, but holding
the position can cripple those
same qualities. If you were an iron-
pumping gym rat or a dedicated
shooter before you made rank, you
may have found your overloaded plate
of responsibilities has kept you away
from the weights and the range. As for
fighting skills, yours may have been
the by-product of frequent fights, and
your increased time behind a desk has
dulled your edge.
Incongruously, although these
OUR STONE AGE SUBCULTURE
Sequoia Blankenship
STRAIGHT TALK ON SUPERVISION & LEADERSHIP ON THE FRONT LINES — THE STREETS.
FISTS,
GUNS &
MUSCLES
FISTS,
GUNS &
MUSCLES
IRONY &
INCONGRUITY
MJ08sec1 3/26/08 4:23 AM Page 30
WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM 31
characteristics can make or break you
as a police sergeant, you’ll rarely find
anyone in a position higher than yours
in the food chain who has any interest
in or appreciation for these factors —
unless the absence of them reflects
poorly on the department.
Very few administrators care
whether your biceps bulge, you can
fight your way out of a wet paper bag
or you know which end of the pistol
the bullet comes out. Ask them and
they’ll tell you those things don’t
matter at all for supervisors. Then later
they’ll fire you for not having them.
Assuming The Worst
Some of you didn’t need to read
this. Many only needed a reminder,
and you’ll get back up to speed
quickly. But if you’ve become a lax
lard-ass, and fallen off of all three red
wagons — read on.
First, there’s no room here for a
course in bodybuilding. Keep it cheap,
simple and not time-consuming.
Get a pair of fixed-weight dumb-
bells, each just as heavy as you can
dead-hang curl five times. Start doing
three sets of five reps, bicep and tri-
ceps curls, and do shoulder shrugs
with the same weights. If you don’t
know how, go online and find out. By
the time you’re doing three sets of 20,
you’ll enthusiastically learn more and
do more. Abeer belly is less notice-
able when balanced by muscular arms.
For martial arts, I recommend Judo
or Jiu-Jitsu over Karate or Tae Kwon
Do. The skills taught are more appro-
priate for police work, and there are
fewer poseurs and egomaniacs among
the instructors. Start slow and go
easy. Have fun. After a year, give
yourself the gift of some boxing
lessons with a pro coach. Tell him
you want a good jab, hook, cross,
blocks and some footwork. Become a
stealth badass, and keep your mouth
shut about it.
Finally, get back in touch with your
sidearm. Fifty rounds a week isn’t
much — yet it’s probably 2,000 more
annually than you’re shooting now.
Keep it simple. If you’re shooting a 10-
round pistol for example, go with one
mag right-handed, one left-, two mags
of two-handed double-taps and rapid-
fire. Then end with one mag of slow,
precise shooting. There’s much more,
but if you only do this, you’ll be
lightyears ahead of where you are now.
And your “inner caveman”
will feel great about it.
*
S
S
MJ08sec1 3/26/08 4:23 AM Page 31
CLI NT SMI TH REALITYCHECKI I
COUNSEL, WISDOM, GUIDANCE AND TEACHING.
32 AMERI CAN COP • MAY/J UNE 2008
YOUR GUN?
Y
ou should know how to use your
firearms. Someday, you may be
in a gunfight. It happens in your
chosen career field. And, you
should know how to use them well. Also, you might be in a gunfight and you may
not be using your daily carry gun. You might want to learn how to use firearms
other than yours — even if you’re not a “gun guy.” Why? Because gunfights are
like family vacations; they usually don’t turn out as planned.
YOU SHOULD KNOW
B
eing cops, we often hear
“you should know” or “you
oughta know” and it includes
a whole myriad of things:
every law ever made in your state’s
penal code, emergency surgery,
psychoanalysis and counseling,
mid-wifery, how to achieve peace
through transcendental meditation
and of course, guns. Often we actu-
ally don’t really need to know some
of this junk. Sometimes there’s
really some stuff we should know.
Knowledge is power and having the
power to not injure yourself or
others is a good thing.
SOME
THING
YOU
SHOULD
KNOW?
I
think working cops need to
know how to handle, shoot,
operate and even safely clear
some of firearms occupying
our planet in prolific numbers.
This could be because you might
find one at a crime scene or, more
critically, while fighting with a
handgun, you might run into one
of these other guns. You should
know how they work so you
could pick one up and use it with
moderate proficiency. Oh yeah,
these other guns are probably
better than your handgun; as a
matter of fact, they’re probably
better than any handgun. There’s
a simple name for this concept —
battlefield pick-up.
MJ08sec1 3/27/08 6:05 PM Page 32
WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM 33
YOUR FIREARMS GUY
C
heck with your department firearms guys and request a familiarization firing
of the rifles. You might have to provide some ammunition, but it’ll be well
worth the cost as you may be only betting your life on your ability to run
these guns. Ask and find out about how to load or unload the rifles, find out
how the safety works — in the on and off mode. Get a basic grasp of the sights and
how to shoot the rifles in question.
In your line of work you can’t afford to under estimate either of these rifles —
or for that matter, any rifle. Rifles are better than
handguns — you should know it.
For More Info: http://kalashnikov.guns.ru/ and www.ar15.com/
NEMESIS OR ALLY?
T
he AK-47 and its copies comprise a group of rifles numbering over 100 mil-
lion made since the year 1947. It’s easily the single most prolific assault rifle
made and it’s an assault rifle in the truest form. It’s durable, compact, shoots
effective cartridges types to moderate ranges. Most importantly to us — it’s
easy to use.
The AK is about 3’ long and it weights about 9 lbs loaded, generally accepting
30-round magazines. The adjustable sights are crude by American standards but more
than functional over the length of a house, width of a car or across the street. The
Warsaw Pact countries, when they existed, peppered the entire world with Mikhail
Kalashnikov’s brain child. Today, it can be found today in any country on the planet
and, on a personal level, any state or city in the US — legal or not.
Those often found in the US are more often than not semi-automatic, but do not
be shocked to find one fully capable of automatic fire. They come from strange
places, some years back I shot a full auto version, Chinese marked brought to
America from Vietnam and stored in a LE evidence room. Trust me, there are a lot of
AKs out there and you may run into one before you get your gold watch.
WHY?
F
or starters there are about 110
million of these two firearms
scattered all over the planet.
They’re especially prevalent in
places like “gun free” zones and loca-
tions that outlaw these “types” of guns.
Ultimately only the crooks have them
and law-abiding citizens can’t. The
turds you deal with everyday know
how to use them — and will. If they
got ’em and you can get ’em, why not
know how to use them?
AR15
T
he AR15, even though
fewer in numbers than the
AK — only about 8 million
— the probability is you’ll
see more of them as they are
made right here at home. Having
been around since the 1960s the
AR15 or M16 is a Eugene Stoner
design morphed back and forth
though a series of confusing vari-
ations both in the military and the
private sector. The AR was
plagued with a series of problems
relating to design, construction,
maintenance, ammunition type
and caliber effectiveness. All
said, used properly by people
who know how to maintain the
rifle and who understand its limi-
tations, the rifle has done some
solid work over four decades.
Ergonomically, the rifle’s design
is very sound and current piston
driven renditions have driven relia-
bility way up there. Caliber varia-
tions in the 6mm plus category pro-
vided a new lease on life to the
design. The AR15 is out there. A
lot of folks and many LE agencies
police have them, so the chance of
crossing paths with the little black
plastic shooter is high.
*
MJ08sec1 3/26/08 4:23 AM Page 33
CARRYOPTIONS MARK HANTEN
FROM HOLSTERS TO HAVERSACKS.
T
he Quick Stripper is a quality piece of gear, built by Progressive
Machine and Tool in Lancaster, Kentucky. It consists of two machined
pieces of slotted aluminum held together with a machined adjustable
cross-brace and an attached belt clip. It holds six rounds, held in place
by a flat retention spring bent into an arc. The width of the Quick Stripper is
T
he basic design of both units
creates a slot for 12-gauge
shotgun shells to be held hori-
zontally, in a row, in such a
manner they can be quickly and
easily “stripped” from the holder,
for quick muscle memory reloading.
I
’m still a real believer in the
shotgun as a police tool. The
combination of versatility and
firepower insures its place in
squad cars for years to come.
One of the challenging issues
with the shotgun has always
been where and how to
carry extra rounds. Most
patrol shotguns loaded in
the “Patrol Ready” config-
uration (no rounds cham-
bered, the magazine tube
full, safety in the “fire”
position, and the hammer
dropped for immediate
racking) hold only four
rounds. That’s not
enough! For those of you
tired of leaving 12-gauge
tactical breadcrumbs I
have a couple of sugges-
tions; the “Quick
Stripper,” and the “12-
Gauge Tactical Stripper.”
I’m sure some of you
vice guys know some quick
strippers, and maybe even
some tactical strippers, but
we’re talking shotgun speed
loaders here guys. The two prod-
ucts I’m talking about share a
common basic design, but there are
some differences between them. I like
them both.
SIMPLE
IS BETTER
34 AMERI CAN COP • MAY/J UNE 2008
Quick Stripper
12 GAUGE
STRIPPERS
Continued on page 66
MJ08sec1 3/26/08 4:24 AM Page 34
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HARDTOOLS PAUL MARKEL
ESSENTIAL TOOLS FOR THE JOB.
I’ll bet if alive back then, you could
have heard people arguing whether a
flintlock or cap-lock was a more prac-
tical and reliable musket.
As time marches forward and our
gadgets become more complex, we
I
t seems Americans, cops included,
aren’t happy unless we’re arguing
about something. Every few years
we come up with a new topic to
debate and squabble over; 9mm vs .45
ACP, the SAvs. DAvs. DAO debate.
SAFARILAND’S RLS:
RAPID LIGHT
SYSTEM
now can have high-tech argu-
ments; visible laser sights — pro
and con, Tritium sights or fiber
optics and one of the new
favorites, weapon mounted lights
— for or against.
you’ll need to wrap your head in duct
tape to keep it from exploding.
We all recognize cops need bright
flashlights for all our maneuvering in
the dark. So, how are we going to use
the lights? Target identification and
acquisition are paramount given that
whole staying alive when someone
is trying to kill you problem.
The “got to have a light on
the gun” people argue in a
crisis shooting you won’t
have time to mount your
light. Fair enough,
in a real “in your
face” attack
you probably
won’t have
U
nless your beat is Fallujah
or Sadr City, you’re going
to spend a great deal more
time searching in the dark-
ness with your utility light than
engaging bad guys with your
Unavoidable Truth
N
o one will argue cops need
white lights to better see in the
dark. Most understand a great
deal of our work is done in
poor light conditions. Where opinions
differ is whether or not
tactical lights belong
on the pistol. Even
those who agree
pistols should have
lights vary in
opinion as to when
they should be
mounted — always
or situational.
Some oppo-
nents of a
mounted tactical
light protest that
you now need to
carry two lights
instead of just
one. One
mounted on the
pistol for tac-
tical work and a
separate light car-
ried for vehicle
and building
searches, etc.
Many jurisdictions
now have policies on
how flashlights should
be carried and used. If you
think about it too hard
VERSATILE
DESIGN
time to turn it on either.
If the threat is in the process of
trying to kill you, draw your pistol;
push the go button repeatedly until the
threat stops trying to kill you — simple,
right? On the other hand, if you’re
searching for known or potential bad
guys or controlling bad guys not cur-
rently in the process of trying to kill
you, you’ll likely have time.
36 AMERI CAN COP • MAY/J UNE 2008
Continued on page 68
MJ08sec1 3/26/08 4:24 AM Page 36
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38 WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM • MAY/J UNE 2008
www.trijicon.com
www.lesbaer.com
MJ08sec2 3/26/08 4:25 AM Page 38
T
he bucolic little Central California town of
Lake Shoals was, as usual, very quiet Sunday
morning. That area of California is much like
what’s referred to as fly-over country by the
pseudo-intellectual and quasi-erudite creatures
infesting the highly urbanized areas of the
East and West Coasts. The “Urbanites,” espe-
cially those from inside the beltway of DC, rejoice in looking
down their noses at the “little people” of what you and I both
know is real America.
Lake Shoals looked, at first glance, as though it could
be the backdrop of practically every Norman Rockwell
illustration published in The Saturday Evening Post. But
the tranquility enjoyed by the good citizens of the town
would soon be shattered with no hope of repair. The scars
DAVE DOUGLAS
would live on for generations.
Sammy’s Gun Emporium, at the corner of Main Street and
Sierra Avenue, could not have been more in the center of
“downtown” Lake Shoals than if an army of surveyors
worked for months to place it there. Sammy, an affable,
friendly, large man, was a fixture in his community. He was a
Rotarian and volunteered his time on the citizen’s planning
committee. Sammy could never of imagined, even in a fever-
induced nightmare, what would happen Sunday morning.
The three AR15s in the Sammy’s Gun Emporium safe
somehow came to life and released themselves from confine-
ment. They first conveyed across the sales floor to the stored
ammunition, gorged their magazines full and headed for the
front door. Once on the street no passerby made it more than
a few steps without the three ARs spewing multiple 5.56 bul-
lets into their unsuspecting bodies. Main Street was awash in
innocent blood. Sierra Avenue with its churches full of the
town’s faithful was tragically next.
WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM 39
Photos: Robbie
Barrkman
MJ08sec2 3/26/08 4:26 AM Page 39
MJ08sec2 3/26/08 4:26 AM Page 40
www.zeiss.com
www.surefire.com
MJ08sec2 3/26/08 4:26 AM Page 41
42 WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM • MAY/J UNE 2008
The ARs continued their frenetic
search and lustful death spree for at least
another 15 minutes. No denomination
was spared. The crazed, murderous team
of three ARs visited all the churches and
attached Sunday schools full of children.
Lake Shoals was even quieter now
than before the onslaught. But it was a
horrible quiet, the kind you never want to
hear; just wind rustling through the trees,
a distant siren and the almost impercep-
tible sound of agonal respirations
heralding death. The Assault Weapons
had done their black evil all too well.
Now it was time for the California Legis-
lature to do its job. And so they did. With
the help of the two Senators in the
nation’s capital, California passed an
Assault Weapons Ban so as never to be
visited by another Lake Shoals incident.
Enlightened Legislators — Not
Okay, so I’m not Hemingway or Gore
www.magpul.com
www.lesbaer.com
MJ08sec2 3/26/08 4:26 AM Page 42
WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM 43
Vidal. I can’t even do fiction well enough
for Penthouse Forum. The above story
is, as I’m fond of saying, Toro Caca.
AR15s just don’t come to life like the
liquid metal in a Terminator movie no
matter what Feinstein, Boxer, Clinton,
Obama and Schumer say. Unfortunately,
the one thing that is true is the Assault
Weapons Ban the shaved apes in the Cal-
ifornia legislature shoved down the citi-
zens throats or up another area.
So, if you live in one of these so
called “enlightened” states and you
want an AR you’re just plain out of
luck. The only “slightly up” side is, if
you already have a legally purchased
AR, you’re probably “grandfathered”
in. Now you have options.
I was one of those grandfathered
folks with a serviceable but thoroughly
beaten Bushmaster A1 style rifle, pur-
chased prior to the ban going into effect
and legally registered with the Cali-
www.troyind.com
www.trijicon.com
www.zeiss.com
MJ08sec2 3/26/08 4:26 AM Page 43
44 WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM • MAY/J UNE 2008
fornia Department of Justice.
I wanted a rifle effective as short range
fighting gun, as it would be a 300 yd pre-
cision gun with only a quick change of
optics and iron sights. Also, I couldn’t
add any substantial part or parts changing
its status as a California pre-ban gun.
One name came to mind immediately; I
called Les Baer and ran the situation past
him for suggestions. He said, “Send it to
me and send along any parts you want
included.” I stripped the upper off the gun
and started building a parts pile for Les.
Magpul
As far as parts go, I didn’t have to
go far. My fi rst cal l went out t o
Magpul . Ri chard Fi t zpat ri ck, a
former Amphibious Recon Marine,
started the company in 1999 with the
idea to make a better way to handle
your magazines than tying some 550
para-cord to the bottom. All that has
morphed the Bolder, Colorado com-
pany i nt o 20 empl oyees maki ng
everything from the Magpul MAG001
magazine device to their new ground-
breaking Masada rifle.
Their PRS stock is a work of art and
matched up with the MIAD Grip system
you can fit any hand size, length of pull
and cheek weld for any optic you match
with your gun. The MIAD pistol grip
features removable and replaceable
front and rear panels for a custom fit
and a removable inner core that allows
storage. The three round plug is
included but optional cores are available
for waterproof storage of batteries or in
a bolt/firing pin configuration.
Magpul’s Precision Rifle Stock
(PRS) i s a fi el d preci si on st ock
adjustable for height and length of
pull. At it shortest the PRS is about
the length of an A1 stock. It extends
to about a half-inch longer than an
A2 stock. The PRS features a billet-
machined buttplate with a rubber
butt-pad and mil-spec phosphated
st eel shaft s wi t h al umi num bal l
detent knobs.
I also included Magpul’s Enhanced
Trigger Guard. It has a shallow “V”
shape for better use of gloves in tactical
shooting or winter operations. Unfortu-
nately, anymore for me, winter opera-
tions are shooting varmints from the
truck without the heater on. And tac-
tical shooting is when the varmints look
especially mean and weigh more than a
pound. The Enhanced Trigger Guard is
doesn’t fold, has rounded edges and
fills that annoying gap at the rear of the
standard trigger guard. It’s made from
barstock aluminum and drops right in.
Troy Industries
When I asked some friends for their
recommendation on a Back Up Iron
Sight (BUIS) system, one name consis-
tently kept coming up — Troy Industries.
Troy’s Folding Battle Sights easily install
For more info:
www.lesbaer.com
www.magpul.com
www.trijicon.com
www.surefire.com
MJ08sec2 3/26/08 4:26 AM Page 44
WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM 45
and position the post at the exact height
as a factory M4 sight. Under stress, they
deploy easily with no levers or springs to
allow “Murphy” a go at you. Their
stainless steel cross-locking system keep
your sights up, operational and zeroed in
the most extreme conditions. That’s a
big plus for me when faced with ram-
paging murderous squirrels and prairie
dogs. But, it could really be serious for
you if you whack your 1:1 electronic
optic on a doorframe and that big hunk
of batteries, metal and glass rapidly
becomes a Christmas ornament. If it
were up to me I’d rename the BUIS the
PISS for the Primary Iron Sight System.
If your Optic gets pissed on — turn your
PISS on. Even I can remember that.
Perfection Realized
The number of custom gun builders
I’d trust with my life are few. At the top
of the list is Les Baer. I’ve carried one of
his 1911s for years now and it has never
— I repeat never — malfunctioned. Not
so much as a hiccup. That includes high
ammo-count, gun-taxing classes at Gun-
site and almost daily shooting on my
range. I change the springs every six
months, keep it properly lubed and clean
it every now and then and it takes care
of me. You can’t ask for better. So, if
his 1911s are good, why wouldn’t his
ARs be just as good?
The answer is, they are.
*
www.magpul.com
www.troyind.com
MJ08sec2 3/26/08 4:26 AM Page 45
46 WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM • MAY/J UNE 2008
H
ey Sarge, the slide on my Glock keeps locking back.
What am I doing wrong?” As the supervisor of the
Firearms Training Unit for a 170-officer police depart-
ment, I agreed — must be something he was doing.
We issue G35s and only shoot duty ammo, so after
reviewing the usual culprits such as limp wrist, grip,
high-thumb stuff, I took the slide off the weapon.
“What happened to the extended slide stop that came stan-
dard on this model?”
“Oh, I didn’t like it so one of the range guys changed it
out for me.”
The problem was clear; the “armorer” put the slide stop
and pin back in the wrong sequence preventing proper spring
tension and inducing the malfunction.
Who’s Trained?
Who’s working on your guns and what are their qualifica-
tions? Do they have training on your particular weapon sys-
WORKING ON Y
WHO’S
GUNSMITHS,
ARMORERS AND
PARTS CHANGERS

MJ08sec2 3/26/08 4:26 AM Page 46
tems? It’s often an overlooked area in
LE firearms programs. Often, the “gun
guy,” whose personal hobby is guns and
shooting, is tapped for duty. While many
are very skilled, it doesn’t necessarily
qualify them to work on duty weapons.
There are three ability levels when it
comes to working on firearms. The first
is the parts changer; the guy who
knows how to take the weapon apart
and put it back together properly. He
may have learned this skill in a factory
armorer school, an armorer’s manual,
or been taught by someone. If profi-
cient, this person should be perfectly
WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM 47
N YOUR GUNS?
capable of changing out worn parts —
Remove and Replace.
The second is the police armorer;
who has both formal and informal
training on all the given duty weapon
systems he’s charged with maintaining.
Not only have they been through
formal classes, they have experience
diagnosing and repairing. They should
be capable of complete and detailed
takedown, reassembly, minor fitting
and finishing, sight installation, grip
changes and zeroing. You hope this guy
is working on your duty guns.
The third level is the gunsmith; the
JOHN RUSSO
MJ08sec2 3/26/08 4:27 AM Page 47
48 WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM • MAY/J UNE 2008
Continued on page 60
T
T
o
T
T
o
T
T
o
T
T
o
T
T
o
one the police armorer takes their
problem guns to. His full-time job is
working on firearms. The true gunsmith
has years of hands-on experience
building and repairing firearms. Not
only can they repair guns, they can fab-
ricate parts if necessary.
Police armorer is an easy title to get
but difficult to earn. Not only must
you obtain proper training and experi-
ence working on your chosen firearms,
you need an affinity for the task. A
good police armorer should be able to
repair any problem with any depart-
ment-issued weapons short of custom
fitting and machining parts. They must
have access to proper training and
hands-on experience.
Factory Schools
Factory armorer schools are great,
but there are some limitations. Most
have an “expiration date.” Many factory
certifications are only good for two or
three years. This makes sense from a
liability stand point for the company to
get you back to a class for the latest
information on their products. Another
drawback is the instructor works for the
company, so they’re not as likely to tell
you bad things about their product.
Let’s say you have five different
brands of weapons carried by your offi-
cers (conservative nowadays) and each
factory class costs about $300. Now
you’re spending about $1,500 every
three years to stay up on your certifica-
tions. If your department only has one
armorer, it’s not too bad. But what if
people rotate through the position? Or,
you have a range staff of 10 officers.
Now your $1,500 has gone to $15,000.
Problem Solving
I wrote a California POST certified
armorer’s course to address these cost
“POLICE ARMORER IS AN EASY TITLE TO GET BUT DIFFICULT TO EARN.”
MJ08sec2 3/26/08 4:27 AM Page 48
S
tandard personal equipment for today’s cops
varies from agency to agency — often depending
on funding. Internal department experts argue
handgun procurement, often with the admin guys
who chip in their fiscal responsibility mantra.
But, LEOs should have the option to provide
their personal white light source for duty use.
White light technology has made quantum leaps
during the last decade. We shouldn’t shoot at what we can’t
identify and much of what cops do is often done in altered
light environments. So like it or not some understanding of
application and a level of skill in deployment is required.
I see a lot of people use the flashlight in the German air
raid over London technique with the beam going in
all sorts of directions including at people.
That in and of itself isn’t bad but when
applied to weapons mounted
lights it deteriorates
into something
really ugly. So,
a review of the
why, when and
how of white
light use might
bear merit.
Why
Why is pretty
simple. A white light
might be needed to solve a visual problem.
Please note I said needed. I didn’t say wanted. If I asked
who wants to turn on a light in the middle of a gunfight,
the number of takers should be pretty slim. If I asked who
might need to turn on a light in a gunfight, the numbers
should increase — simple answer, it’s very hard to hit some-
thing you can’t see. To hit the threat you need to use the
sights or a laser thing. That’s what will actually place the
projectile on target. You’re not shooting them with the light,
you’re just making sure what you are about to shoot is what
you want or need to shoot.
When
White light should help identify the target you’re about to
engage. The officer’s light may impede or impair the threat’s
ability to see or shoot back. But, light in the threat’s eyes won’t
keep their finger from pulling a trigger and sending a round
towards your light source. So when do you use the light?
Use it as little as possible so as not draw attention —
common sense. If you have multiple suspects and you engage
and down a threat, standing there with the light on the
downed threat makes you a target.
Remember, once you turn on a modern hand torch, threats
WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM 49
Crossed Wrist Technique.
The
Tactics
of Light
The
Tactics
of Light
The
Tactics
of Light
The
Tactics
of Light
The
Tactics
of Light
The
Tactics
of Light
Clint Smith
.”
MJ08sec2 3/26/08 4:27 AM Page 49
50 WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM • MAY/J UNE 2008
rooms away pretty much know you’re
present. Could they shoot at you thru the
walls? Yes, I guess they could. But, I’m
pretty sure you shouldn’t shoot back
through the walls without confirming the
threat, possible bystander or hostage
being present.
A very rare commodity should be
added to the mix — common sense.
I’m pretty sure it’s better to see what
the hell is going on in front of you than
wandering around in the dark. Yeah,
Yeah, Yeah, “we own the night,” so if
you like fighting in the dark you’re
welcome to my share. Is the light being
on dangerous? Can the light draw fire?
Yes and yes, then again your options
thought we could blow the building
up with an air strike and if we had a
“t act i cal i l l umi nat i on t ool ” t hat
burned the eyeballs from the threat’s
sockets, I’d vote for it every time if it
kept even one cop from losing their
life. Problem is, the air strike and eye-
ball burner outer light might run into
some problems with the lawyers, not
to mention, the public’s perspective of
conflict resolution.
Light Technology
Go into a dark room and turn on a
flashlight. There are actually two lights;
the light comprising the main beam or
spot and then the large illuminated area
are wander in the dark and engage
threats without confirmation of
weapons and or hostages or turn the
light on to see and act accordingly.
Crossover
There’s a big bleed over now in
military and police training with tech-
ni ques and weapons seemi ngl y
crossing back and forth. Cops should
remember they’re cops first and train
for issues needing to be addressed
within their occupation. Concerns
might be officer safety, public safety,
confirmation of threats and weapons,
verbal compliance requests and some
other subtle cop issues. Trust me if I
A reason to
remove the
keepers on
a lanyard.
A reason to
remove the
extra line on
the lanyard.
Setting the
correct
length for
a lanyard.
Syringe Unsupported.
MJ08sec2 3/26/08 4:27 AM Page 50
WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM 51
or corona. We train — hopefully — to
work our eyes and bust out of intense
focus or tunnel vision to be aware of
other threats. We do this knowing our
eyes will be drawn to the threat and
often the weapon. Train to look at the
spot or beam of light. Keep it parallel
to the weapon’s muzzle. But also be
aware of and visually search the area
illuminated by the corona projected by
the flashlight.
Hand Held Techniques
Four basic techniques should be
considered by anyone using a flash-
light. This doesn’t mean there aren’t
others — it’s simply a starting point.
Crossed is exactly that; simply cross
the wrists so they lay back to back on
each other. It might remind you of
trying to hold your watch crystal in
place while firing.
Uncrossed is also what it says, it’s
best done by keeping the thumbs in
contact so as to not have the fingers of
the light hand interfere with the slide
whi l e fi ri ng. It al so sol ves t he
problem of the light placement on
clearing right hand corners by having
the light lead first.
Syringe is the placement of the
light between the first and second fin-
gers while using the base of the thumb
and palm as the pressure point to acti-
vate the light. Thumbs together on
this one also.
Syringe supported depends on the
size of your hands. The two or three
lower fingers of the light hand are
extended and wrap around the strong
hand fingers that are holding the pistol.
All are, in fact, one-handed firing.
That said, the light support hand is
placed to support the handgun while
being fired as much as possible.
Retention
There are good and bad ways of
controlling the light, but any retention
system is better than shoving the light
Continued on page 63
Syringe Supported.
Uncrossed Wrist Technique.
Gun
mounted
light with
hand held
light in
reserve
position.
MJ08sec2 3/26/08 4:27 AM Page 51
F
or you patrol dudes out there, how familiar
does this sound? You get dispatched to
Grandma’s house because her out-of-town
daughter has been calling her for two days
wi t h no answer. Grandma, of course,
doesn’t carry a cell phone, and she probably
didn’t jet off to Vegas with her octogenarian
friends to catch Wayne Newton at Ballys. Truth is, in her
daughter’s shoes, I’d be concerned, too. So off you go to
Grandma’s house; you knock and there’s no answer.
There’s no bank robberies or homicides-in-progress backed
up and you’re in an “Officer Friendly” mood anyway, so
you call dispatch and ask them to call daughter and relay
your status to her. Daughter is now very concerned and
asks you to go into the house to check on Grandma. Of
52 WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM • MAY/J UNE 2008
RALPH MROZ
course all the doors and windows are locked, so you tell
daughter that you’ll have to break a window or a door to
get in. Naturally, she begs you to.
Got The T-Shirt
We’ve all been there. Usually once we’re inside we discover
Grandma is just fine — she’s hard of hearing, didn’t hear you
knock and she hasn’t answered the phone lately because she’s
been spending time with old Mrs. Smith, who isn’t doing too
well lately. So now you have added a broken door or broken
window to this senior citizen’s list of problems and possibly to
the town’s expenses. Since no good deed goes unpunished,
daughter complains she didn’t want you to actually damage her
mother’s house as you kicked down the door or broke a
window. Of course, you also could have found Grandma dead,
This basic tool set will get you through 80% of the locks you are
likely to encounter in a law enforcement context.
ART
THE ART
OF SUBTLE
BREACHING
MJ08sec2 3/26/08 4:27 AM Page 52
in which case the broken door or
window are the least of anyone’s prob-
lems, but they’re still things the dis-
traught family has to deal with. There’s a
better way.
Bad Guys Too
Tac team guys: how about this?
You’re at yet another distraught
gunman’s residence and he’s threat-
ening to shoot himself. He’s in his bed-
room at the rear of the house talking to
the negotiator on an extension phone
and every now and then taking a shot
at a cop out the window. What are your
options? Your sniper can’t get a fix,
you don’t want to wait him out since
he’s likely to hit a cop or neighbor with
a stray bullet sooner or later. A
dynamic entry will alert him to your
presence in time for him to hit one of
you with a shot. If you introduce chem-
icals, you have to fight through them to
get to him. And, while there’re a few
mal-adjusted individuals on every team
who actually like chemicals, most of us
don’t. There’s another alternative.
Detectives — bet this has happened
to you once or twice. You got your no-
knock search warrant and you want to
hit the place while they’re sleeping. But
it’s a long way from the door to the
bedroom and the stash. Think the bad
guys might wake up when your ram
starts whacking away? Then they can
arm themselves and/or flush the evi-
dence. Or, maybe you have a sneak-
and-peak warrant, in which you can
enter the dwelling, not to seize evi-
dence or to arrest someone, but to look
around the premises to further the
investigation. You sure don’t want the
targets to know you’ve been there. You
need to get through locked doors and
back out completely covertly. There’s a
way to do that.
Then there’s the ever-present
mundain; you need to open a key-
locked locked safe during a search war-
rant; maybe you want to assist a citizen
who’s locked out of their home; you
might want access to an unattended
building for surveillance. Read on.
The Better Way
The better way I’m referring to
above is lockpicking. It’s kind of
obvious the best solution to all the
above situations would be to have a
key. But if you don’t have a key, then
lockpicking is the next best thing.
What’s that you say? You used to
watch It Takes A Thief (I’m dating
myself here, but editor Dave will get
i t ) and i t l ooked so easy. So you
bought a pick set and a book on lock-
picking but for the life of you, you
couldn’t get it to work?
Yeah, me too. I mean, Al Mundy was
my hero as a teenager. Actually, it turns
out I wasn’t doing too much wrong, but
lockpicking is a subtle art. While I
WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM 53
Z
understood in principle what lock-
picking was all about (usually getting all
the pins to their shear line), I didn’t
understand just how to do it, nor what to
expect as I did. Well, I wrote the whole
thing off, figuring either this picking
thing was a scam or was for really, really
patient and very, very skilled people.
Ruled me out on both counts.
It turns out lockpicking is kind of like
playing the guitar. It’s easy to get some
basic skills in it, but quite a bit more dif-
ficult to do very well and both take prac-
tice. Those basic skills aren’t only satis-
fying and fun to have, but can prove very
useful. They’ll increase your chance for
success. I learned this by taking a course
from Carey & Associates, one of the
very few organizations in the Black-
Hawk Trainers Alliance. BlackHawk
Briefcase-type locks are not difficult to pick, if you have the right tool.
On a search warrant, on an arrest warrant, or just helping out a citizen,
lockpicking is a skill that pays for itsel f.
G
MJ08sec2 3/26/08 4:27 AM Page 53
hardly wants for training organizations
who’d like to be associated with them.
Expertise
The Trainers Alliance represents the
cream of the crop — George Carey and
crew are specialists in teaching covert
entry. In their own words: Carey &
Associates International specializes in
providing on-site training to civilian and
military law enforcement officers, as
well as military special operations and
explosive ordnance disposal personnel,
in a narrow spectrum of expertise;
namely Specialized Building Entries.
This training includes both lock picking
and subtle mechanical breaching. Atten-
dance in this course is restricted to law
enforcement, military special operations
personnel and explosives ordnance dis-
posal (EOD) staff. The training focuses
on a single building entry strategy: get-
ting in quietly and preserving the ele-
ment of surprise during a tactical event.
Two Days Of Fun
The Carey & Associates Specialized
Building Entry course is a two-day
affair. I got my very own pick set,
expert instruction in all aspects of
picking and 200 locks to try my hand
at. (The best in the class managed to
pick 140 locks; I won’t reveal my
number except to say it was a lot less.
A whole lot less.) George Carey has
decades of law enforcement and SWAT
experience in a busy California agency
and is a certified locksmith, so he’s
used his picking skills in the real world.
He speaks from experience when he
points out picking a lock when you
have the entire team waiting anxiously
behind you is a lot more stressful than
practicing on one in your garage.
We learned about picking additional-
pin licks, wafer locks, padlocks, dial
locks, and other locks. Just as impor-
tantly, we learned which locks are too
these contingency plans when picking is
plan A, just as you would if a ram or
anything else was your first option. You
also learn that no picking is entirely
silent, so you’ll have to plan any covert
entry around the fact you’ll be making
some noise.
Tool Time
Your basic pick kit can be carried in a
small pouch a little smaller than a VHS
tape. Your most needed tools can be car-
ried in a bag a little bigger than a box of
Kleenex, and nearly every tool (except
power tools and large bolt cutters) you
might conceivably use in the field fits
into a lunch-pail size bag. The Careys
nest various BlackHawk bags and
pouches, and find them absolutely ideal.
According to Marty Wozniak, the
Brand Manager of BlackHawk’s
Dynamic Entry breaching tools, mechan-
ical breeching (rams, sledges, Halligan
tools, etc) may soon be the subject of a
third day added on to the current Carey &
Associates lockpicking course. In this
way, most officers’ and most teams’ com-
monly used entry methods will be cov-
ered in one place at one time.
This is an extremely valuable, cost-
effective course teaching skills I often
wished I’d had on the job and most cer-
tainly will use in the future. The teach
which tools (there are a myriad of
picking tools sold) are not worth the
money, and which to invest in.
As George is fond of saying, “The
appearance of security doesn’t
mean actual security!”
For More Info:
www.carey-assoc-intl.com
www.blackhawk.com
www.photonlight.com
54 WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM • MAY/J UNE 2008
difficult to attempt. Many systems
require their own special pick, but they
are all eventually pickable. Now here’s
the question you should be asking: Pick-
able in what amount of time? Well, it
depends on your skill and the lock.
While any lock is pickable given enough
time in our line of work we generally
want it done quickly. You might get it
done in time or you might not. Learned
skills and practice will considerably
increase your chances, but nothing’s for
sure. A lock that gives almost as soon as
you insert the pick one time might take
you 15 minutes
the next time.
Again, the
chance of that
occurring is
lessened —
considerably —
by skill and
practice.
George spent
the first section
of the course on
the ethics, legal
issues and
preparation for
an entry
i n v o l v i n g
picking. Did
you know an
entry actually
occurs the
moment your
pick penetrates
the keyway?
Better make sure of that warrant! Also,
in terms of planning and preparation,
one sign of a professional is the exis-
tence of a plan B, a plan C and knowing
just when to transition from one to
another. George drilled home you need
*
A torsion bar and a simple pick are all that’s usually needed.
Oh...and skill — you need that, too.
George Carey tutors a federal agent in the
Carey & Associates lockpicking course.
MJ08sec2 3/26/08 4:27 AM Page 54
A
s cops, we are dedicated to the community and
the upstanding citizens living there. Truth is, of all
those we’ve sworn to protect; our significant other
is the one we worry about the most. The long
shifts, extra shifts and double shifts keep us away
from our loved ones making it damn hard to pro-
tect them. There is an entire industry devoted to personal pro-
tection, but realistically how many law enforcement spouses are
intently concerned about it. They probably only think about
fighting off a drug crazed rapist when we bring it up.
The major difference between a spouse of a cop and any
other spouse is the cop. Because cops carry a firearm on a
daily basis they often erroneously assume their spouse should
do the same. I learned the expensive way that’s not the case.
Guns
Before we got married I purchased a Smith &
Wesson 3913 for my wife. Much to my
dismay, she couldn’t work the slide or
pull the heavy double action
trigger. A trigger job helped
her hit targets but
nothing could be done
about the slide opera-
tion. I could have
loaded it for her and she
could have shot a bad guy
if she had to, but
she’d have been help-
less if there was a
malfunction. This is
the problem with many small-frame, semiautomatics that rely
on blowback operation for cycling.
Pocket-sized handguns from Beretta like the Bobcat and
Tomcat incorporate a tip-up barrel negating
the necessity of cycling a slide to
load or unload. I acquired a
Tomcat for my wife
for just that reason
but even though
she could operate
the handgun, she
never developed
enough interest in
shooting it to feel com-
fortable with it. I ended
up wearing the Tomcat in an ankle
holster as a back up.
Next we tried a Smith & Wesson
Richard Mann
WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM 55
Personal Protection
For LE Spouses
Just because you are a cop do not expect your spouse to have the
desire, time or initiative to become proficient enough with a
handgun to carry it with confidence. In some cases, less than
lethal options may be more appropriate.
There are a wide
variety of personal
protection options for
Law enforcement
spouses but the mis-
take that many cops
make is that their
spouse thinks of per-
sonal protection the
same as they do.
MJ08sec2 3/26/08 4:27 AM Page 55
Chief’s Special. After a trigger job she
was comfortable with loading,
unloading and shooting it but said it was
too heavy to carry in her purse. Since
she didn’t want to wear a holster I
bought an Air-Weight, J-frame Smith in
.32 H&R Magnum. She said it was
much better but that it still took up too
much room in her purse.
I was out of money and patience so I
gave up on the idea of a gun and sug-
gested she just engage any assailant that
might accost her in conversation.
Knowing few humans could withstand
the torture and that she would triumph
in any resultant argument, I moved on.
This is the problem with someone who
is not a gun person carrying one for per-
sonal protection. With regard to com-
fortable and concealable self-defense
options, few would argue there’s any-
thing better than a reliable handgun. At
the same time, most would agree trying
to save your life with a handgun you
can operate no better than a new cell
phone, is not a good idea.
On the other hand, if your life
partner is willing to become proficient
with a firearm, the Beretta Bobcat and
Tomcat or Air-Weight Smith &
Wesson’s are great, easy-to-carry
options. If they’re interested in holster
carry the larger Beretta Cheetah or
Ruger’s SP 101 in the new .327 Federal
Magnum deserve consideration. Unique
to the .327 Federal is its ability to fire
four different .32 caliber cartridges
offering four power levels for practice or
protection. And don’t forget the advan-
tage of a laser-aiming device. They’ve
proven beneficial in high-stress con-
frontations and both Ruger and Beretta
offer some handguns with Crimson
Trace laser grips right out of the box.
Gas
I’m a big fan of aerosol protection and
it has to be one of the best tools cops
have at their disposal. Not only is it fun to
spray on your buddy’s steering wheel or
door handle, it’s a very reliable way to
briefly incapacitate a potentially dan-
gerous person. When our department was
issued pepper spray some didn’t under-
stand the necessity of getting sprayed. A
couple months later my partner and I
were struggling with a moron auditioning
for a UFC cage match when our Lieu-
tenant decided he would just spray the lot
of us. Having been pre-exposed to OC
spray allowed me to stay calm even
though I was crying like a baby.
Now, I’m not suggesting you take
your wife in the back yard and wet her
down with the new can of pepper spray.
On the other hand, if you’ve been
wanting to ask for a divorce, but just
couldn’t seem to find the right time ….
What I’m suggesting is you consider
the possibility of your spouse using
pepper spray and the possibility of
coming in contact with it.
The JPX Jet Protector and the
56 WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM • MAY/J UNE 2008
Continued on page 65
Not sure
what a
bad guy
would think
if you pointed
the Kimber JPX
at him. Consid-
ering that it will launch
two potent charges of
10% OC to 21 feet and
even has a laser aiming
device, it is a formidable
sel f protection option.
At 10 feet the Kimber Guardian Angel
provides a controlled burst of 10% OC.
This bad guy target was shot with the
Guardian Angle training unit.
MJ08sec2 3/26/08 4:27 AM Page 56
MJ08sec2 3/26/08 4:28 AM Page 57
58 WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM • MAY/J UNE 2008
COMMANDER GI LMORE ONTHEJOB
Got something to share? Send it to me at OnTheJobStuff@Yahoo.com and if I use it, I’ll fish around in my desk and find some kinda cheap gizmo to send you.
deposit. Now tuckered out and hungry,
he wandered into the kitchen, made a
mess and a sandwich, and naturally
needed something to wash the sandwich
down with. He found a bottle of com-
munion wine and a comfy sofa, and the
rest is history — or comedy. The early
day care worker who found him opined
he must have liked the wine.
And it wasn’t even imported.
error. The court case was the criminal trial of a Chinese
national accused of counterfeiting Disney and Warner toys
and other products featuring the cartoon critters. Defense
immediately jumped on it, hoping all charges would be
dropped against their client, but all it resulted in was a
postponement while the court re-drafted the summons and
supporting documents. That means the lawyers for Disney
and Warner have to hang around Naples for an extra
couple of weeks instead of wingin’ home to New York and
Los Angeles. Cruel world, ain’t it?
thought it was foot-fungus medicine.
Anyway, this dude broke in lookin’
for the day care office and hopin’ to find
cash. But he couldn’t find the office,
which should give you a clue as to his
eligibility for a Rhodes scholarship. So
he began ripping paneling off the walls,
searching for the missing room. When
he finally found the office, there was no
money. Staff had just made a bank
W
e think the shooter shoulda told
deputies he accidentally shot his
neighbor’s cow, and then
decided the meat shouldn’t go to
waste. That story at least has a shred of
believability, and probably wouldn’t
have resulted in any more than pay-
ment of damages on an installment
plan. Instead, he tried to be “smart” —
an alien concept, we think.
This saga began when a 1,400-pound,
pregnant cow named Hannah wandered
away from a family farm. Asmall search
party found Hannah, now deceased and
known as “Burger,” being sledge-
dragged across an open field by an
unnamed 42-year old carnivore with a
smokin’ gun. The authorities of
rural Benzie County, Michigan
were summoned.
By the time they
arrived the burger-dragger
had some time to dream up
a story — a lame one. He
R
eporters and court-watchers, cops and clerks alike
couldn’t help noticing the posted dockets declaring
four famous movie and television stars had been
summoned to testify in the criminal court in
Naples, Italy. Curious crowds gathered. The stars didn’t
show, but very few people were surprised. We guess most
of ‘em realized cartoon characters can’t really show up in
court. The stars subpoenaed were Tweety Bird, Mickey
Mouse, and Donald and Daisy Duck.
Embarrassed court officials explained it was a clerical
I
n Rosenberg, Texas, police scooped
up an easy pinch when a day care
worker at St. John’s United Church
of Christ called the cops for “One
schnockered burglar for pickup, please.”
The guy was passed out drunk in the
“narthex,” which is an enclosed pas-
sageway between a church’s main
entrance and the “nave.” Okay, we didn’t
know what a narthex was either. We *
You’re Not Supposed To Chug It, MORON
WRONG Season For The WRONG Excuse
told Undersheriff Rory Heckman he’d
been out shootin’ coyotes, and mistook
Hannah for Wile E. Coyote — well, some
coyote, anyway. Being a trained observer
and an analytical investigator, Undersh-
eriff Heckman concluded mistaking a
half-ton-plus pregnant cow for a 20 to 45
lbs song-dog was a little less than cred-
ible, especially after he started dragging
same deceased bovine away. Heckman
suspected falsehood, but the suspect
stuck to his story.
Fine, says Heckman, stick to it if you
want. It’s illegal to shoot or attempt to
shoot coyotes during deer season and
that’s a far more serious matter than
unintentionally poppin’ a cow
wandering across your
property while, let’s
say, you’re engaged in casual target prac-
tice. Now you’re talkin’ criminal
offense… And, the shooter can still be
dinged for damages.
Hannah’s owners must really want
to believe in the man’s essential truth-
fulness. DeAnn Mosher told reporters,
“My husband thought he (the shooter)
should go through some therapy
looking at repeated pic-
tures of cows and coy-
otes. They look nothing
alike. It didn’t make
any sense to me.”
Sounds More Like A California Court
Jerry Meloche
A CAREFULLY SELECTED COLLECTION OF SLAPSHOTS AND SNOT-FLINGIN’ FUNNY STUFF FROM FELLOW COPS.
MJ08sec2 3/26/08 4:28 AM Page 58
MJ08sec2 3/26/08 4:28 AM Page 59
60 WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM • MAY/J UNE 2008
issues. The goal was to give our range
staff basic armorer training on all our
primary weapon systems. It covered
Sig, Glock, 1911, Remington 870, and
the AR15 over a five-day period.
Robert Chavez from Lassen Commu-
nity College was selected as the
instructor. Mr. Chavez is one of the
senior instructors in the NRA gun-
smithing program at Lassen. He’s one
of those guys who’s truly forgotten
more about guns than most will ever
know. Robert gave us the straight
scoop on all of the firearms — good
stuff and the warts too. The class was
very successful and now has a waiting
list for the next one.
Chavez’s recommended tool list
was a major factor in the success of the
class. It included tools from Brownell’s
and Midway USA. If you’re working
on cop guns and either of these two
companies don’t have the tools or parts
you need — buy a new gun.
Screwdrivers
Midway USA’s Wheeler Engi-
neering 89-Piece Professional-Plus
Gunsmithing Screwdriver Set (Product
#: 439523) is advertised as a “deluxe
screwdriver set having just about every
bit needed to work on any gun.” After
using it in the class I immediately
called Midway and ordered one
myself. It has a myriad of bits
including hollow ground flat, allen,
Phillips, Torx, pin punch, scope ring,
scope base, as well as specialty bits for
iron sights, rebound springs, 1911 grip
screw bushings and many more. And,
everything is contained in a neat,
hinged storage box.
870 Kit
Brownell’s continues to impress
with there never ending supply of
specialty armorer’s tools. During the
GUNSMITHS & ARMORERS
Continued from page 48
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FOCUS:
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Portable Scanner p.20
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FOCUS:
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Often, the “gun guy,”
whose personal hobby
is guns and shooting, is
tapped for duty. While
many are very skilled,
it doesn’t necessarily
qualify them to work
on duty weapons.
MJ08sec2 3/26/08 4:28 AM Page 60
armorer. The bolt ejector tool, takedown
pin removal tool and the magazine catch
tool are all specialty tools designed to
keep springs and detents from flying
away. Once you use them, you’ll find
they’re worth their weight in gold.
Keys To Success
One of the keys to working on
firearms is recognizing your abilities and
limitations and then working within
them. Another is having the proper
training and tools to do the job. Your
weapon is a tool you relied upon to save
lives. Hopefully when you have it ser-
viced you’re not being done a
disservice. Demand perfection.
WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM 61
class we had the opportunity to try
out several items from their extensive
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The magazine corkscrew and the fore
end wrench in the kit are true win-
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the magazine spring retainer clip with
a screwdriver, you’ll immediately see
the benefit of this corkscrew. The fore
end wrench is used to tighten the
slotted nut inside the end of the fore
end. When loose, (common with use)
it’s often a cause of malfunctions.
Regular inspections are a must and *
the fore end wrench makes the job
quick and easy.
AR Tools
Brownell’s also sent us a host of their
AR15/M16 armorer’s tools. These tools
are great and make the job much easier.
Go online and take a look — they are
quite extensive. The handguard removal
tool, bolt ejector tool, takedown pin
removal tool and the magazine catch tool
are a must for your kit. If you’ve ever
taken the handguards off of an AR you
know it can be very frustrating. Try doing
50 at a time. The handguard removal tool
makes it quick and easy without damage
or scratches to the weapon — or the
MJ08sec2 3/26/08 4:29 AM Page 61
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light and train with them both. Do so in
the daylight in the beginning to acquire
skills and then transfer the manipula-
tion skills you learn to altered light
training environments.
Consider the concept of not over
engineering the use of the light and
better yet, practice fundamental appli-
cations. Fundamentals have been
known to contribute significantly to
winning fights. Without question, this
knowledge is another skill for
a cop’s need to know toolbox.
For More Info: www.asp-usa.com,
www.streamlight.com,
www.surefire.com
WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM 63
in your pocket. The idea is to control
the light, be able to fire and perform the
manipulations of loading, reloading and
malfunction clearances.
String lanyards are good if they fit
correctly. Ditch the plastic keepers and
tabs. Then stacking flat hands one over
the other and allowing the light to just
clear your hands, all extra lanyard
material off and burn and crush the
ends. It keeps the thing out of magazine
wells and ejection ports.
A ring works well by simply rolling it
over the back of the hand or into the palm.
I think it’s best used on the index finger.
By simply rolling the light out of the way
to the back of the hand all manipulations
can be accomplished easily.
I’ve been exposed to straps and per-
sonally haven’t figured it out yet —
slow witted I guess — but I am
working on it.
Gun Mounted
If the cop running the gun under-
stands how to use the system, weapon
mounted lights can be a good choice. I
mentioned the spot of light correlated
to the muzzle and the corona projected
by the light system. If you use the
corona to search and or confront pos-
sible suspects there should be no
issues. However, a lack of under-
standing techniques for deployment
can result in muzzle winding up being
in the wrong place. Add incorrect
placement of the finger on the trigger
and quite a rodeo begins that will be
painful to all involved parties.
Fighting Words?
The knowledgeable already know
the vast majority of cops are under
trained with firearms, so I think the
same thing can be said about lighting
systems — hand held or gun mounted.
There must be a sincere effort to
improve firearms and illumination
training. Before you want to kick me in
the crotch for saying that, ask yourself
how many people in your department
would you trust behind you with a
loaded gun in a fight? Now what about
in the dark?
Whose Who
ASP’s two-battery three-bulb light is
outstanding light, although I don’t get
the strap thing. Streamlight’s version
the TL-2 LED is also an excellent light
and rumor has it, upcoming improve-
ments in the tail cap and bulbs will
make it better.
SureFire’s new G2 LED with a
polymer body is a super hand held and
probably the best priced of the three.
Any of these choices would make a
more than serviceable hand held light.
*
TACTICS OF LIGHT
Continued from page 51
Handgun Gun Mounted
The Streamlight TLR-2 is a solidly
made strong light whose only short-
coming might be the screw on the side
attachment system as far as ease of off
and on. Then again if carried weapon
mounted in a holster, it makes little dif-
ference and it’s priced very well too.
SureFire’s X200 A&B models are
both rock solid contenders for a place
on your pistol, but their replacement,
the new X300, is pure magic as you’d
expect from SureFire.
Acquire And Train
Get a handheld and gun mounted
e.
MJ08sec2 3/26/08 4:29 AM Page 63
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case, don’t worry so much about what
caliber the handgun is but more so if
it’s sized to actually be carried. That
applies to any personal protection
device. If they’re not going to have it
with them when they need it, might as
well buy them a Samurai
sword or a doughnut.
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Guardian Angel are two new tools
from Kimber that lessen the possibility
of self contamination, because both
units deliver sort of a jet stream con-
taining 10 percent oleoresin capsicum
(OC). Training units filled with blue
food dye dissolved in water are avail-
able for both Kimber’s LifeAct prod-
ucts. These training units effectively
demonstrate how to use the tools and
provide an understanding of their
impact on target. Smart cops will let
their spouse shoot them with the
training unit. (This will convince them
of your concern for their safety and
possibly make up for all the money
you spent building your gun collection
while using the excuse of getting them
just the right gun.)
Pepper spray can also be used on
aggressive dogs and, of course, in the
case of an accidental discharge it’s
non-lethal.
Lights
Bad guys use the dark to their
advantage and react to light like a vam-
pire, making a flashlight a very impor-
tant self-defense tool. Back in the day
of the three-, four- or six-cell MagLite,
you could illuminate the miscreant and
whack him over the head with the same
implement. Whacking duties have been
assumed by expandable batons and
now flashlights the size of a Magic
Marker can turn the dark into daylight.
Light allows you to see in the dark
and when applied directly to the eyes,
has a stunning affect. Shine 60 lumens
in the eyes of a perpetrator and you can
gain a time and distance advantage.
Even the diminutive, 15 lumen, Surefire
E1E Executive Elite flashlight, when
shined directly in the eyeballs, will
momentarily blind a bad guy and can be
effectively used as a striking device.
As it turns out, a compact flashlight
is the only defensive tool my wife car-
ries religiously. A 30 lumen, Surefire
E1L Outdoorsman is always in her
purse and at 8 ounces weighs less than
half the other stuff in there. She can
also use it walking to her car and to
find stuff the kids drop in the movie
theater. The Kimber Guardian Angel
weighs half that and after letting her
shoot me with the training unit I think
she’ll add it to her purse, if for nothing
else, just for the memory.
Good Sense
Maybe the best tool you can arm a
significant other with is good sense.
Teaching them to be aware of their sur-
roundings and other people and dis-
cussing potential threat situations
before they ever happen are techniques
every good cop employs and can share
*
LE SPOUSE PROTECTION
Continued from page 56
with their spouse. The decision to arm
your significant other with the skills
and some sort of tool for personal pro-
tection is a no-brainer. Selecting the
appropriate tool is a bit more complex
but as a minimum should start with a
high out-put, compact flashlight.
As for a firearm, the first considera-
tion should be if the person will
commit to the necessary training to
insure they can efficiently employ it
and be comfortable carrying it. Don’t
rule out the possibility of sending your
spouse to a defensive handgun school
like Gunsite or Thunder Ranch. Trust
me; training your significant other to
shoot is like stacking marbles. In any
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every load more bearable. Pack a Storm Case to ensure you and your
equipment arrive ready for action.
MJ08sec2 3/26/08 4:29 AM Page 65
66 WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM • MAY/J UNE 2008
adjustable to accommodate shotgun
shells from 2.75" to 3". The belt clip is
none other than Blade-Tech’s excellent
Tek-Lok, which offers a wide range of
quick attachment options.
Tactical Stripper
The 12-Gauge Tactical Stripper is
made by Cal i forni a Compet i t i on
Works. This device is made of glass-
filled nylon. There are wire springs at
each end, which keep the shells from
falling out of the holder. The 12-
Gauge Tactical Stripper comes in
four-round or six-round configura-
tions, and it comes in black, coyote
tan or blaze orange. The belt clip is
stainless steel, and it will accommo-
date a 2.25" duty belt. It is designed
to hold up to 3" shells, and it comes
with two spacers of slightly different
thickness to accommodate different
shell lengths. The spacers can be
Velcro attached to the carrier with the
included Velcro “coins,” or they can
be semipermanently attached with sil-
icone or glue. The unit also can be
purchased with a Cordura cover to
keep the rounds protected from debris
or to help keep specialty rounds sepa-
rate from other loads.
Fit For Duty
Although the devices are similar,
there are some differences. Since the
Qui ck St ri pper i s machi ned al u-
minum, it appears somewhat more
rugged than the 12-Gauge Tactical
Stripper. Additionally, the Tek-Lok
belt clip on the Quick Stripper is
located flush with the top of the car-
rier, while the belt clip on the 12-
Gauge Tactical Stripper is located
roughly in the middle of the carrier.
Depending on how you want the car-
rier to fit on your belt, this could
make a significant difference to you.
Another difference between the two
i s t he cost . Because t he Qui ck
St ri pper i s machi ned al umi num,
adjustable, and utilizes a Tek-Lok
belt clip, it is clearly more expensive
to produce, and consequently, more
expensive to buy. Depending on your
needs and application, it may well be
worth it. For some, the glass-filled
nylon 12-Gauge Tactical Stripper
may be the better choice. Both are
great tools that will help keep you
fumble free when reloading in a big
hurry. The only drawback is that you
won’t be able to follow the 12 gauge
breadcrumbs back t o
your car….
For More Info: www.progressivema-
chine.net, www.demooner.com ,
www.tuckergunleather.com
*
CARRY OPTIONS
Continued from page 34
TRAIN FOR LIFE
ACADEMY ACADEMY
WWW. ACTIONTARGETACADEMY.COM
ACTION TARGET ACADEMY
BANK MILLER
Director of Training
With more than 30 years of experience in
all aspects of law enforcement firearms and
defense training, Bank brings tremendous
expertise and skill to the Action Target Academy.
His vast knowledge and teaching methods give
you unprecedented access to the upper levels of
modern firearms and self-defense training.
By combining an uncompromising system of
practical and combat-proven tactics and tech-
niques with intense mental conditioning, we
give you the tools you will need to survive an
armed encounter. The mission of the the Action
Target Academy is to provide world class fire-
arms and defense training to law enforcement
agencies and individuals that might not have
such an opportunity otherwise.
Visit our website for a current course calendar,
complete registration instructions, and free
training opportunities.
- FREE Training for Host Agencies
- Tactical Handgun
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- High Performance Handgun
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- Tactical Shotgun
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- Rangemaster
- Tactical Handgun Instructor
- Tactical Shotgun Instructor
- Patrol Rifle & Carbine Instructor
- Interactive Use of Force Instructor
- Law Enforcement 3-Gun (Handgun, Rifle, Shotgun)
- Urban Tactics: Level 1
MJ08sec2 3/26/08 4:30 AM Page 66
frenzy. They enable the rabid anti-gun-
ners to use a few police chief’s groups
to convince America (and members of
the Supreme Court and Congress) that
cops hate the Second Amendment.
What They Really Want
When LEAA’s H.R. 218 / “National
Concealed Carry for Cops” was before
Congress, Sarah Brady and her Brady
Center refused to support it; the IACP
actively opposed it, going so far as to
openly testify against it. They didn’t
want cops — off-duty or retired — to
be able to carry.
Michael K. Beard, of the Coalition
to Stop Gun Violence, couldn’t have
summed up the anti-gun folks beliefs
any clearer when he said, “Well, cer-
tainly I don’t trust the police more
than the other person.” He stated, “I
don’t believe police officers with all of
their training are any safer with their
guns than we as private citizens.... if
they’re not safe with them, how are
the next generation going to be safer
with more guns.”
I t’s Our Choice
This November’s elections will fea-
ture a battle for our next President.
Every single member of the House of
Representatives (435) and one-third of
those in the Senate will be up for elec-
tion. The meaning of the Second
Amendment and the push to outlaw
more guns, gun shows, ammunition,
etc., will be key ways to evaluate those
who seek our vote.
If you’re sick and tired of watching
the media misrepresent these issues then
you need to get active. Register to vote,
join LEAA and take a few like-minded
people with you to vote in November.
The battle lines are drawn, gun haters
along with some police groups don’t
want anyone, civilian or LEO, to be pro-
tected by the Second Amendment. Only
when cops stand together will the truth
be told and the Second
Amendment protected.
*
LEAA
Continued from page 16
The battle lines are
drawn, gun haters
along with some police
groups don’t want
anyone, civilian or LEO,
to be protected by the
Second Amendment.
WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM 67
MJ08sec2 3/26/08 4:30 AM Page 67
68 WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM • MAY/J UNE 2008
weapon-mounted light. With this in
mind Safariland has just released a
new product called the RLS or Rapid
Light System.
Safariland combined an LED light
with a quick-attach mounting bracket.
The unit is a pretty standard design
with a 1" diameter aluminum body and
length of 4.5". The white LED puts out
65 Lumens. Where it differs from
others is the power source. Instead of
using one or two CR123ALithium bat-
teries, the RLS operates on 3 AAAbat-
teries. The batteries are not inserted
end to end but side-by-side in a pack.
Runtime is listed at 50 plus hours. A
tail-cap button allows for momentary
or constant on.
The two-piece mounting component
slides onto a pistol rail and has a large
belt clip; both constructed of injection-
molded nylon. The light mounts to your
weapon by sliding it down onto the
Picatinny/Weaver-style rail and lining up
the locking bar. Grasp the bracket firmly
and rotate it left or right locking it firmly
in place on either side of the frame.
User Configured
Slick readers out there might be
asking, “Can I use my ‘XYZ’ light in
the RLS mount?” Yes, if you have a
standard 1” diameter light. As matter
of fact, Safariland sells the mounting
bracket minus the light or you can by
the light all by itself too.
The RLS is a great compromise if
you want to carry a light but don’t
want it mounted all the time. If you
have a dedicated weapon-light, that’s
fine too, just remember to carry a
second light for utility chores. If you
start checking IDs with your blaster-
light you can expect a nice
long chat with the Chief.
For More Info: www.safariland.com
*
HARD TOOLS
Continued from page 36
If you have a dedicated
weapon-light, that’s fine
too, just remember to
carry a second light for
utility chores. If you start
checking IDs with your
blaster-light you can
expect a nice long chat
with the Chief.
I
N A
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T
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C
T

U
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E
I
V
E

A

F
R
E
E

M
U
L
T
I
M
E
D
I
A

C
D
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70 WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM • MAY/J UNE 08
MJ08sec2 3/26/08 4:30 AM Page 70
WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM 71
MJ08sec2 3/26/08 4:30 AM Page 71
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72 WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM • MAY/J UNE 2008
HOMO
IMPACTUS
MAXIMUS
(H.I.M.)
Crown Gym
Mats, Inc
Designed for close
quarter combat,
multiple attackers,
and baton
training, this
striking shield
uses the same
technology and
quality as other
Defender Products do. During tactical training exercises,
H.I.M. simulates actual conditions, without the fear of
injury or damage. It offers two models, the standard
and baton models. H.I.M. stands at 5’10’’, is 7’’ thick,
18’’ wide, and has 26’’ removable arms to give you
dual purpose in your training. Log on to
http://www.cgmlawenf.com/index.htm for
more product info.
PRO PANT
5.11 Tactical
Offering function-
ality, durability and
great fit, the new Pro
Pant has lightweight,
fade and wrinkle-
resistant fabric that
is ideal for hot
weather. They are
and made of hard-
wearing, 6.14-oz.
poly/cotton rip-stop
and are outfitted with
5.11’s patented rear
slash pockets and
tactical strap. Fresh
innovations include
Teflon fabric treat-
ment for stain, liquid
and soil resistance, a
diamond crotch
gusset and a quick-
access multipurpose tool pocket. Roomy cargo
pockets, a mag/cell pocket, kneepad slots, an action waist,
top-of-the line YKK zipper and genuine Prym snaps come
standard. Available in six tactical colors - black, dark navy,
TDU green, tundra, coyote, and TDU khaki - the Taclite Pro
Pant has a double reinforced seat and knees, 48 bar-tacks in
high-stress areas, plus double and triple-needle stitching
throughout. Check them out at www.511tactical.com.
FLASH GRIP
ADAPTOR
Command Arms Accessories
The new FGA combines a 1” light
mount and vertical grip into one unit
and accommodates push button end cap flashlights. Fea-
turing a thumb activated on/off push button and incorpo-
rating both an intermittent and constant on position. A side
safety switch has been added to prevent inadvertent activa-
tion of the flashlight during covert activities. The FGA also
features a storage compartment with a screw cap base for
holding a small cleaning kit or for extra batteries. Two
rubber pressure switch covers with honeycombed inserts
allow for customized pressure switch sizing. One 1.5”
Picatinny rail is included that attaches to either side or
bottom of the light mount to allow the addition of an
accessory such as a laser. Thumbnuts allow for easy
mounting onto a Picatinny rail, even while wearing gloves.
See more at www.commandarms.com.
WARHAWK
Timberland PRO Valor Series
Introducing an innovative line of footgear designed to meet the needs
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harsh conditions to ensure the products would effectively help safety professionals perform better on the job. Consisting of six
styles, the boots are arranged in three product lines based on key features and technologies: Winter – A boot constructed with
waterproof leather, insulation and internal suspension for comfort and performance. Outsoles contain grooves for mounting
crampons in icy conditions. ForceTech – Three durable, flexible and lightweight boot styles designed for a variety of environ-
ments – warm or cold, wet or dry and off-road – containing Crosstech fabric, and waterproof/breathable membrane for addi-
tional protection against common chemicals. Tactalite – Two lightweight styles designed for safety professionals requiring
durable protection allowing for quick reaction and movement. A membrane offering waterproof protection with breath-ability
while the sole provides grip on uneven surfaces. For more details, log on to www.timberland.com.
RIM BLACKBERRY
OtterBox
The OtterBox for Black-
Berry 8800, 8820 & 8830
Defender Series allows
users of the RIM Black-
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slim fit to the device. This
Hi-impact polycarbonate
case includes a belt clip
holster, which fully pro-
tects the screen and the
keypad. Weighing 1.9 oz.
and measuring in at 4.75”
long by 2.9” wide by 0.85” thick, this silicone skin case
absorbs bumps and shocks and scratches. Check it out at
OtterBox.com.
BUST A CAP
Bust A Cap
Introducing a new, one-of-
a-kind device for first
responders. Place your
Bust A Cap on your baton or flash-
light and you are ready to go. Bust A Cap is being uti-
lized throughout the United States by cops, firemen, gov-
ernment agencies, military personnel and private security.
Bust a Cap provides a tactical advantage and an effective
and safe way to break glass. Be one of the first to take
advantage of this new device and help first responders
stay safe with Bust a Cap. For questions, please visit our
website at: www.bustacap.net or call us at 949.752.8100.
TACTICAL NIGHT VISION MONOCULAR
N-Vision Optics, LLC
The GT-14 from N-Vision Optics is the most advanced multi-pur-
pose system for nighttime operations. GT-14 is built with the
highest quality US made Generation 3 image intensifier tubes and can
be hand-held as a monocular, head mounted or helmet-mounted as a
single eye goggle, or weapon-mounted as a night scope. 3x and 5x focal
attachment lenses are available for longer ranged observations. The monocular is equipped with an, invisible to the human
eye, infrared illuminator and features a unique ergonomic design that allows for comfortable single-handed operation in
extreme conditions. GT-14 is compatible with weapon mounted IR laser aiming and illuminating devices and is fully sub-
mersible and shockproof. Visit www.nvisionoptics.com.
MJ08sec2 3/26/08 4:30 AM Page 72
WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM 73
MJ08sec2 3/26/08 4:30 AM Page 73
*
74 AMERI CAN COP • J ULY/AUGUST 2006 74 WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM • MAY/J UNE 2008
THIS PACKAGE!
WIN!
WIN!
Blackhawk’s CQC Speed Classic
Blackhawk’s adaptation of the famous
Berns-Martin design gives you a quick draw
with secure carry. It’s the right minimalist hol-
ster for the right minimalist handgun. The
Speed Classic is constructed of fine Italian
leather and is wet-molded for an exacting fit.
The heavy duty elastic front makes it a secure
fit as well. A trailing edge belt loop pulls the
grip in tight to the body, aiding concealment.
For More Info: www.blackhawk.com
H.K.S. Speedloaders
Back in the olden days of police work,
when we called Skidrow bums drunks instead
of today’s serial inebriant classification, we were
issued and carried revolvers. Those are the
guns with the cylindrical thing in the middle for
you newly minted types out there. We carried
18 rounds total into the field. Six were in the
round thingy and the 12 extra rounds were in a
drop pouch. You dropped six rounds at a time
into your hand and loaded each one into the
gun. Then the competition guys came up with a
SMITH &
WESSON
M&P
340
SMITH &
WESSON
M&P
340
SMITH &
WESSON
M&P
340
SMITH &
WESSON
M&P
340
SMITH &
WESSON
M&P
340
SMITH &
WESSON
M&P
340
PACKAGE IN
TRACE LASER GR
HOLSTER AND H.
PACKAGE IN
TRACE LASER GR
HOLSTER AND H.
PACKAGE IN
TRACE LASER GR
HOLSTER AND H.
PACKAGE IN
TRACE LASER GR
HOLSTER AND H.K
PACKAGE IN
TRACE LASER GR
HOLSTER AND H.
PACKAGE IN
TRACE LASER GR
HOLSTER AND H.
MJ08sec2 3/26/08 4:31 AM Page 74
little device the same size as the cylinder that
held six rounds spaced exactly to fit in the
cylinder holes. The H.K.S. Speedloader was as
high tech as could ever be for the revolver. It
was a quantum leap forward for the gunfighter.
If you carry a J-Frame for back up or off-
duty, H.K.S. Speedloaders are a must. Five shots
are not enough when you day turns to crap; fif-
teen might make the difference between who
goes home to their family
.
For More Info: www.hksspeedloaders.com
TO ENTER CONTEST: Use a postcard (no envelopes, please) and
follow the sample shown. Send to AMERICAN COP Dept. X4, P.O.
Box 501930, San Diego, CA 92150-1930. Entries must be received
before July 1, 2008.
Limit 1 entry per household. This contest is open to individuals who
are residents of the United States and its territories only. Agents
and employees of Publisher’s Development Corporation and their
families are excluded from entering. Contest void where prohibited
or restricted by law. Winners must meet all local laws and regula-
tions. Taxes and compliance with firearms regulations will be the
responsibility of the winners. Winners will be notified by CERTIFIED
MAIL on official letterhead. No purchase necessary to enter.
Sample
COP MAY/JUNE 2008:
Name ___________________________________
Address _____________ City, State, Zip____________
Email Address _______________________
If I win, please ship my prize through:
Dealer ___________________________________
Address _____________ City, State, Zip____________
Phone ( ) ____ - ________ Store hours __ am __ pm
WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM 75
O
ne problem with back up or off duty guns is size. Often we tend
to buy a nice big powerful blaster. After a few weeks of car-
rying around a USS New Jersey 16” Naval Gun the tendency is
to leave it at home or in the glove box of the car. But, if you
have a rig that’s light and powerful enough to aid in the natural selection
theme when it comes to bad guys, you just might carry it all the time.
Smith & Wesson has been making J-Frame revolvers longer than
most of us have drawn breath. They are very good at it as evidenced
with the M&P340. They use scandium alloy to build a strong yet light-
weight .357 Magnum revolver resulting in maximum power in a small,
lightweight, easy to carry package. The frame is scandium alloy and the
cylinder is strong stainless steel. At a scant 13.3 oz, you’ll hardly realize
it’s on your belt, in your waistband, in your pocket or on your ankle.
Smith &Wesson Model M&P340 Specs
•Caliber: .357MAG/.38+P
•Capacity: 5 Rounds
•Barrel Length: 1.87”
•Front Sight: XS Sights 24/7 Tritium Night
•Rear Sight: Integral U-Notch
•Grip: Synthetic
•Overall Length: 6.31”
•Weight Empty: 13.3 oz.
•Material: Scandium Alloy Frame/Stainless Steel Cylinder
•Finish: Matte Black
•Frame Size: Small - Centennial Style
•Action: Double Action Only
For More Info: www.smith-wesson.com
Crimson Trace Laser Grips
The comfortable rubber overmolded LG-305 LaserGrips provide
more substantial grip than other models. They’ll fit any round butt J-
Frame revolver but they’re the perfect matches for the M&P340. The
LG-305s are user adjustable for both windage and elevation. Two
lithium #2032 batteries provide enough power to reach the maximum
output that federal law and technology allow. This gives you a .5” diam-
eter red dot at 50 feet.
Crimson Trace states, “The sole purpose of our grip-based laser
aiming devices is to help you shoot with even greater speed and accu-
racy. Particularly when it’s a matter of personal defense. We fuse the art
of your shooting with laser science to provide you with an immediate
and decisive advantage that means bad news for your target.”
For More Info: www.crimsontrace.com
Photo: Dave Douglas
BACK UP AND
OFF-DUTY
CARRY
PACKAGE
BACK UP AND
OFF-DUTY
CARRY
PACKAGE
BACK UP AND
OFF-DUTY
CARRY
PACKAGE
BACK UP AND
OFF-DUTY
CARRY
PACKAGE
BACK UP AND
OFF-DUTY
CARRY
PACKAGE
BACK UP AND
OFF-DUTY
CARRY
PACKAGE
GE INCLUDES: CRIMSON
ER GRIPS A BLACKHAWK
ND H.K.S. SPEEDLOADERS
GE INCLUDES: CRIMSON
ER GRIPS A BLACKHAWK
ND H.K.S. SPEEDLOADERS
GE INCLUDES: CRIMSON
ER GRIPS A BLACKHAWK
ND H.K.S. SPEEDLOADERS
GE INCLUDES: CRIMSON
ER GRIPS A BLACKHAWK
ND H.K.S. SPEEDLOADERS
GE INCLUDES: CRIMSON
ER GRIPS A BLACKHAWK
ND H.K.S. SPEEDLOADERS
GE INCLUDES: CRIMSON
ER GRIPS A BLACKHAWK
ND H.K.S. SPEEDLOADERS
MJ08sec2 3/26/08 4:31 AM Page 75
Action Target 68
Action Target Academy 66
Aimpoint 63
Al Mar Knives 56
ALS Technologies 14
ArmaLite 37
ASP 9, 11, 13
Benchmade 21
Bianchi 31
Black Hills Ammunition 12
Blackhawk 10
Blue Stone 66
CCF Raceframes 60
Command Arms Accessories 13
CopQuest 60
Cylinder & Slide 62
DeSantis Holsters 67
DPMS 62
Elite Sports Express 25
First-Light USA 19, 21
FNH USA 2
Glock 57
Gripmaster 27
GunVault/Cannon Safe 62
Hardigg Cases 65
Insight Technology 25
Iosso 68
Kahr Arms 11
Kimber 9, 17, 29, 80
LA Police Gear 3
Magpul Industries 59
Mec-Gar USA 64
Mossberg 19
National Rifle Association 69
OfficerStore.com 8
Rock River Arms 27
Safariland 6
Savage Arms 14
Shooters Choice 64
Sig Sauer 12, 35
Springfield 79
STI International 67
SureFire 23
Thunder Ranch DVD 73
TOPS KNIVES 64
Trijicon 7
UK International 61
Walker’s Game Ear 29
Wilson Combat 61
Winchester Ammunition 15
XS Sights 56
76 WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM • MAY/J UNE 2008
ACCESSORIES
Classified ads $2.00 per-word per insertion. ($1.50 per-word per insertion for 3 or more) including name, address and phone number (20 word minimum). Min-
imum charge $40.00. Bold words add $1.00 per word. Copy and rerun orders must be accompanied by PAYMENT IN ADVANCE. NO AGENCY OR CASH DISCOUNTS ON
LISTING OR DISPLAY CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING. All ads must be received with advance payment BY NO LATER THAN THE 1st of each month. Ads received after closing
will appear in the following issue. Please type or print clearly. PLEASE NOTE*** NO PROOFS WILL BE FURNISHED. Include name, address, post office, city, state and
zip code as counted words. Abbreviations count as one word each. Mail to AMERICAN COP CLASSIFIEDS, 12345 World Trade Drive, San Diego, California 92128. NOTE:
WE NOW HAVE DISPLAY CLASSIFIED ADS IN BOTH GUNS MAGAZINE AND AMERICAN HANDGUNNER. ASK FOR OUR NEW RATE CARD, Or call (858) 605-0235.
AMERICAN COP
BADGES
MISC
Free M-4 Rifles (with trade)Trade in your old
machine guns, one old AC556 = 2 M-4’s (NIB), one
old MP5 = 3 M-4’s(NIB), one old M16A1 = 4 M-4
(NIB), one old Thompson = 6 M-4’s (NIB).All
machine guns wanted for trade, any condition,
must be ATF registered before May 1986. Will trade
for other items such as tasers, body armour, ect.
For reference & info call or email Bob Bowman for
more info at 352-235-2095 or tankride@prodigy.net
Streamlight Weapon-Mount & Tactical LightsYour
source for Streamlight Flashlights, including the TLR-
1 and TLR-2 and tactical lights. Call or visit us online!
www.streamlightdistributor.com - 1-800-999-1358
Stun Guns at liquidation prices. New Million Volt
stun guns as small as a pager. Write or call for
details. Buy on-line at my store.
www.jcdeanstore.com,
service@jcdeanstore.com. Dean (703) 209-4563
P.O. Box 21, Springfield VA 22150
The companies listed have featured
advertisements in this issue. Look to them
first when you are ready to make a purchase.
INDEX
OF ADVERTISERS
www.maxarmory.com
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MJ08sec2 3/27/08 5:56 PM Page 76
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called the First Amendment.
What really worries me is the ease the Web site had in
getting the names through the Freedom of Information Act.
Some notable agencies were absent. NYPD, Philly PD and
LASO had no officer names on the lists. Why were the
lists simply turned over without a fight? And, if judge
ordered the information released, why have we not pub-
lished his name?
When the site was first launched they received around
400,000 hits in the first seven days. Go Daddy was the ini-
tial hosting provider for the site, but when they got wind of
what was really happening, they dropped it immediately.
Kudos to Go Daddy for their pro cop stance on the subject.
Unfortunately, Rate My Cop quickly found another host
and had the site back up in a few hours.
I’m really curious about your opinions on this. Go on the
site, take a look around and then shoot me an e-mail with
your thoughts. Is this a good thing or a bad thing?
My initial opinion is it’s a large, steaming, stinking pile
of Toro Caca.
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Wicked Grips
Ed Strange is truly an artist and his partic-
ular canvas is the gun. The medium he uses is
wood. Ed makes some of the finest grips avail-
able anywhere in the world. The high-grade
desert ironwood grips pictured here are
inlayed with a miniature badge from my
former agency. Desert ironwood is hard to get
and even harder to work with, but Ed seems to
do just fine.
Wicked Grips hunts down high-grade
pieces of wood and exotic material from var-
ious suppliers around the world, piece by
piece. They only use the best. They even do
work on rifles.
If full custom grips aren’t in the cards for
you, Wicked Grips has an assortment of semi-
custom grips available for immediate shipment.
Just check the Web site. Ed also makes grips for
guns other than the 1911, but market demands
do limit the models and styles available.
For More Info: www.wickedgrips.com
CounterSniper Scopes
Sometimes only the best will do and when I think
about my safety and an instrument that can enhance
my safety, the words “low bid” are the last that come
to mind.
CounterSniper scopes contain a remarkable series of
proprietary optical enhancements. Bright sunlight
haze and glare is filtered out with a non-light-
reducing proprietary polarization type function.
In lower light, such as dusk, dawn and shad-
owed areas that reflect less light, Counter-
Sniper’s Bertrillium-Zantitium Electron beam
coatings let pass all the light in those band-
widths unfiltered and spectral-enhanced. If you
don’t have a PhD in optical physics, that means
it’s clearer, cleaner and crisper.
CounterSniper has a terrific lineup of tactical scopes
for military and law enforcement use ranging from the
pictures 1 to 4 X 24 Weapon Mountable Optical Gun-
sight to an 8 to 32 X 56 Weapon Mountable Optical
Gunsight. So, if you’re the kinda guy who
must have the best — you’ve found it.
For More Info: www.countersniperoptics.com
Toro Caca (cont...)
*
A COMPLETELY SUBJECTIVE LOOK AT THINGS I LIKE
WWW.AMERI CANCOPMAGAZI NE.COM 77
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here was a recent news story
about a Web site called Rate-
MyCop.com and I was a little
alarmed. I went on the site and
found there were extensive lists of
agencies from all over the US. Indi-
vidual cop’s names were listed by
department. Anyone can go on the site,
sign in, “rate” their cop and leave a
short narrative.
On one hand I’m worried about
some of the “Why aren’t you out pre-
Toro Caca
venting murders instead of hassling
me for running a red light at 70 mph
in rush hour traffic? I just want to get
home to watch American Idol,”
crowd getting a forum to vent their
spleens. But, there is this little thing
O
kay, I’m old, crotchety, set in my ways,
cynical as hell and, thank God, retired. If I
were still working the streets I’d be on a
supplemental performance plan for a really
bad attitude. Why? Because I’m sick of every high
level administrator having this unexplainable need
to be published by PERF, IACP or some other
semi-political, policy-shaping organization. It’s like
salmon swimming upstream to spawn. They don’t
know why they do it; they just do it. They turn
really ugly in the process and die soon afterwards.
I’ve seen Community Oriented Policing, Neigh-
borhood Policing, Problem Oriented Policing, the
SARA Model and most of the other “flavor-of-the-
day” delivery modalities of public safety services to
the community and other stakeholders. I’m sorry —
I just don’t need another term for doing police work.
These admin academic weenies try to strip police
work down to a few tasks and give it a new name.
It’s like no one has ever thought of this stuff before.
Then, for the troops to follow come implementa-
tion plans of this revolutionary paradigm shift. And,
woes betide the lieutenant, sergeant or officer who
refuses to drink this flavorful batch of Kool Aid.
These ne’er-do-wells are looked upon as department
lepers — must be lazy, not team players or dinosaurs.
If we can’t beat ’em, let’s join ’em. To fit in with the
new program crowd, American COP Magazine identified
the need to come up with our own new program. We’ll call
it the BAC program for Be ACop.
Here’s the implementation program: Be A Cop.
Simple — isn’t it?
As a subset of BAC implementation you need to get in
some semblance of physical shape. After the academy
defensive tactics courses you’ll need some additional
training as you’ve just been taught enough for you to get
your ass thoroughly kicked on the streets. The academy
stuff is good for the kinda non-compliant folks, but for the
real dirtbags, parolees and others who would love nothing
better than to do you harm, it’s not enough.
Learn how to shoot and shoot well. You should prac-
tice weekly as if your partner’s, the public you serve and
your life depend on it — because it does. You owe it to
them and your family.
Learn how to talk to people and more importantly, learn to
listen. Don’t interrupt
with another question. You’ll be surprised how much
more info you’ll gain by keeping your mouth shut.
Learn your area of responsibility — your beat, service
area or whatever your agency calls it. Meet the people on it.
Most of them like cops and will provide a friendly, engaging
cop with just about anything you want to know. Meet the
dirtbags and be nice to them — at first. They too are well-
springs of information. Then, when they screw up — and
they will — that’s when you hammer them.
Learn to make a plan. When there’s a particular problem
on your beat, come up with a plan to combat it. It doesn’t
have to be elaborate. You don’t need to arm SWAT with
RPGs and have them fast rope out of stealth helicopters in
the middle of the night to stop drivers from blowing the stop
sign at an intersection with inordinately high number of
injury collisions. Maybe parking an out-of-service cruiser
close to the intersection could be enough.
Finally, when the shift is over and you’re walking in the
door of your palatial mansion (we are so well paid) forget
about the job. Be a dad, or a mom, or a little league coach, or
a scoutmaster. Be something other than a cop on your days
off. Then when you go back to work, remember to fully
immerse yourself in our new program and Be A Cop.
INSIDER
RUMINATIONS
MJ08sec2 3/26/08 4:31 AM Page 78
MJCOP08covers 3/26/08 3:58 AM Page c3
The SIS Custom

.45 ACP features a stainless steel
frame and slide, match grade barrel and trigger,
night sights with cocking shoulder, premium
KimPro II
®
finish and SIS slide serrations.
The choice of LAPD's ñnest.
The LAPD

Special Investigation Section - SIS - is an
elite plain-clothes unit specially trained in surveillance.
SIS Detectives frequently stake out violent criminals and
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members. Based on LAPD SWAT’s satisfaction with their
Kimber pistols, SIS asked Kimber to create a family of
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public in limited numbers.
The choice of America's best.
Use and store all frearms safely and lawfully. Kimber pistols and
rifes are shipped with a California approved cable lock. Proper use
of the cable lock is encouraged at all times. ©2008 Kimber Mfg., Inc.
All rights reserved. Names of other companies, products or services
may be the property of their respective owners.
www.kimberamerica.com
For information on products and dealer locations
please send $2 to:
Kimber, Dept.151
One Lawton Street, Yonkers, NY 10705
Information is also available at (800) 880-2418
The full-size SIS Custom RL

(left) has an integral
Kimber Tactical Rail

for flashlight mounting.
The SIS Ultra

(center) has a rounded frame and
mainspring housing, and a 3-inch barrel makes it
ideal for backup or concealed carry. The SIS Pro

(right) combines a full-length grip with a 4-inch
barrel, perfect for duty or concealed carry in a
belt holster.
MJCOP08covers 3/27/08 5:59 PM Page c4