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Matthew Burrows April 2012

Audience Questions

What do I care about most?

1. How many spanners?

2. What sizes?

3. Which manufacturer?

What do I care about most?

1. Do you install bathrooms?

2. Any customer references?

3. Experience & qualifications?

Suggested Approach
1. Identify Customers & other interested parties
Customers

2. Appoint relationship manager


3. Establish communications and engagement 4. Understand required outcomes

Relationship Manager

Communications & Engagement

Outcomes

5. Define how outcomes will be achieved


6. Report; manage change; drive continual improvement
Services & SMS

Reporting; Change; Improvement

Identify Customers and other interested parties


Who are our customers? Who else has an interest?

Core Relationships
CUSTOMERS
(AND OTHER INTERESTED PARTIES) Other Interested Parties User Organizations

Services

Customers Service Requirements

Contract

Services

Services Services

OTHER SERVICE PROVIDERS

SERVICE PROVIDER

SUPPLIERS (SERVICE PROVIDERS) & INTERNAL GROUPS

Other interested parties


Who are they? Executives / Management Internal groups Customers of our customers Users Shareholders Government Regulators Professional bodies Suppliers

Qualification
Before we waste time or money.

Do we want/need a relationship? Whats in it for you? Whats in it for them?


Are we compatible?

Can we help each other?


Do we have a choice?

Appoint Relationship Manager


Named individual responsible for managing the relationship and customer satisfaction

What type of relationship?


til death us do part?
Long, short or fixed term?

Forsaking all others?


Exclusive or open?

In sickness and in health?


While we get what we want?

Love or Lust?

First law of interpersonal attraction


Relationships must be rewarding
Exchange Theory View feelings in terms of profits, i.e. amount of reward obtained minus the cost. (Homans 1974) 2 kinds of intimate relationship (Mills and Cark 1980)
Communal couple concern for each other Exchange couple mental record of who is ahead

Equity Theory Adds investment to reward, cost and profit Scorekeeping mentality guarantees both will be dissatisfied

Suspicious, fearful, paranoid and insecure compared with giving and trusting types (Murstein et al, 1977)

Earning the right relationship


Necessary Evil Competent Supplier Trusted Partner

cost to be minimised

cost to be optimised

cost and value in balance

Establish communications and engagement


Agree communications and engagement mechanism Promote understand of business environment, and requirements

Business relationship management


The process responsible for maintaining a positive relationship with customers. Business relationship management identifies customer needs and ensures that the service provider is able to meet these needs with a appropriate catalogue of services. This process has strong links with service level management. ITIL 2011 Edition
BUSINESS RELATIONSHIP MANAGEMENT
Service Strategy Service Design Service Transition Service Operation Continual Service Improvement Interacts with all other processes throughout the lifecycle owning relationship with customers and business units

Main purpose: Capture demand in business/service context


a) BRM process identifies customer need/demand b) Business strategy identifies business objectives c) Continual Improvement opportunities fed in

Understand required outcomes


Understand required outcomes (customers and other interested parties)

What do they need?

Outcome

Before you define your journey, you need to know where youre going and why
Need

What is Service Management?


As a customer, I want.. Service which works

I have expectations about..


how good the service is

how long it will take


how much it costs

how well it meets my needs Service Management makes it happen

Customers and Service Providers


Customer is interested in.. Results of the service That it helps achieve outcomes!

Service Providers need to know..


required outcomes

which services we deliver


how well we have to do it

Service Management makes it happen

What is IT Service Management (ITSM)?


IT Service Management is.. How we do end-to-end service, so customers can achieve outcomes

Good IT Service Management is..


everything we do

services, people, process,


tools, data, ICT, partners

Service Management makes it happen

Understand each other


Service: a means of delivering value to customers by facilitating outcomes customers want to achieve without the ownership of specific costs and risks. ITIL 2011 Edition Outcome
Service Requirements

CUSTOMERS
(AND OTHER INTERESTED PARTIES)

SERVICE PROVIDER

Services

SERVICE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (SMS)


Policies Objectives Plans

Processes

Documentation

Resources

Example: Service Portfolio


Service Portfolio contains all services
pipeline, live & retired

Service Contract details services & options selected by each business unit
Agreed/forecasted quantity One contract for each BU

Service Account Plan details future demand and initiatives


Volume forecasts, business changes, projects, new requirements

Create Service Contract from Catalog


Service Contract:
What we deliver

Service Catalog:
What can be delivered

TODAY
Main Body: Meeting Structure; Interfaces & Contacts; Escalation; Reports structure; Contract Change; Review Period; Approvals etc. Schedules: Sch1: Products List Sch2: Business Processes List Sch3: Business Process Services Sch4: Bespoke Services Sch5: End User Services Sch6: Contract KPIs Sch7: Support Hours Sch8: Business Criticality Sch9: Priority and Service Levels Sch10: Disaster Planning

TODAY
SERVICE CATALOG SERVICE CONTRACT
High-Level Process: Business Relationship Manager works with their Senior Customer contact Use the Service Catalog, select services, options and service levels Discuss any gaps between offerings and requirements Document in the Service Contract

Service Account Plan v Service Contract


Service Contract:
What we deliver

Service Account Plan:


What we plan to deliver

TODAY
Main Body: Meeting Structure; Interfaces & Contacts; Escalation; Reports structure; Contract Change; Review Period; Approvals etc. Schedules: Sch1: Products List Sch2: Business Processes List Sch3: Business Process Services Sch4: Bespoke Services Sch5: End User Services Sch6: Contract KPIs Sch7: Support Hours Sch8: Business Criticality Sch9: Priority and Service Levels Sch10: Disaster Planning

TOMORROW
Contents: Account Structure Business stakeholders Business Forums Business Vision & Strategy Technology Vision & Strategy 12 18mth Product Roadmaps Customer communications Business & Technology Service Improvement Planning

SERVICE ACCOUNT SERVICE CONTRACT PLAN

Other interested parties


Who are they?
Regulators, professional bodies, suppliers; internal groups, shareholders, etc.

What are the objectives & outcomes?


Improvement in Efficiency and Effectiveness? Cost reduction? Standardisation? Improvement in service quality? Greater maturity? Revenue protection or growth

Who does it give benefit to? What are the benefits?

Define how you can help achieve outcomes


Design Service Management System (SMS) and the Services which aim to meet the requirements Agree what youre going to do and how youre going to do it Service Catalogue, Contracts/Agreements, SLAs

Customer-centric service provider


CUSTOMERS
(AND OTHER INTERESTED PARTIES) Service Requirements
Service Requirements

CUSTOMERS
(AND OTHER INTERESTED PARTIES)

SERVICE PROVIDER

Services

SERVICE PROVIDER

Services

SERVICE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (SMS)

We are a Service provider


organization or part of an organization that manages and delivers a service or services to the customer

Policies

Objectives

Plans

Processes

Documentation

Resources

Using a robust Service management system (SMS)


management system to direct and control the service management activities of the service provider
Note: A management system is a set of interrelated or interacting elements to establish policy and objectives and to achieve those objectives.

We do Service management
set of capabilities and processes to direct and control the service providers activities and resources for the design, transition, delivery and improvement of services to fulfil the service requirements

Definitions from ISO/IEC 20000-1:2011

Service Management System (SMS) Elements


Outcome

CUSTOMERS
(AND OTHER INTERESTED PARTIES) Service Requirements

Business Objectives

SERVICE PROVIDER

Services

SERVICE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (SMS)


POLICIES PROCESSES
SMS GENERAL PROCESSES
Organizational Management Management review Audit Improvement Risk Management

OBJECTIVES DOCUMENTATION
SM Scope, Policy & Objectives Customer Portfolio

PLANS RESOURCES

SMS establishment and maintenance

Measurement

Human resource management

Information item Management

DESIGN/TRANSITION PROCESSES
Service requirements Service planning and monitoring Service design Service transition

Service Management Plan

Service Portfolio Service Catalogue Project Portfolio Information & Communications Technology (ICT)

SERVICE DELIVERY PROCESSES

CONTROL PROCESSES

RESOLUTION PROCESSES

RELATIONSHIP PROCESSES

Contract Portfolio CMS CMDBs Records etc.

Capacity management

Service reporting

Configuration management

Incident and service request management

Business relationship management

Service continuity and availability management

Information security management

Change management

Problem management

Supplier management

Service level management

Budgeting and accounting for services

Release and deployment management

Suppliers

SMS Hierarchy
Outcome
Business Objectives

CUSTOMERS (AND OTHER INTERESTED PARTIES)


Service Requirements

SERVICE PROVIDER

Services

SERVICE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (SMS)


SM Scope, Policy & Objectives

Includes Service Management Scope, Policy and Objectives

Scope, Policy & Objectives Service Management Plan

Owner: Top Management Approval: Business Management

Service Management Plan

Contents include process framework and all policies

Owner: Management Representative Approver: Top Management

Separate documents for each process

Process Description

Processes

Owner: Process Owners Approver: Management Representative

Steps required for each process

Procedures

Procedures

Owner: Process Managers Approver: Process Owners

Local detailed working instructions (where required)

Work Instructions

Work Instructions

Owner: Process Managers Approver: Process Owners

Example process interactions


Customer (BUs)
Delivered Services

Delivery and Support Processes

Service Requirements

Service Contract & Reporting

Delivered Services

Operational Level Agreements

Business/Service Requirements

Reporting

SLA Schedule

Undepinning Contract

Programme & Project Management Processes

Project/Programme Initiation/Engagement

Business Relationship Management Process

Service Level Management Process


Technology Requirements Supply Requirements

Supplier Management Process

Consolidated Report

Performance Report

Reporting Requirements

Change Management & Release Management Processes

Service Reporting Process


Reporting

While creating the business case..


Approval Revised Processes & Products Delivered

Solution Implemented

Proposal Development phase

Project Execution phase

Project Implementation phase

Benefits Harvesting phase

Outcomes

Benefits

Needs

Outcomes

Benefits

Needs

As soon as project is approved..


Approval Revised Processes & Products Delivered

Solution Implemented

Proposal Development phase

Project Execution phase

Project Implementation phase

Benefits Harvesting phase

Outcomes

Benefits

Needs

Outcomes

Benefits

Needs

Service Design
Map key relationships and dependencies Ensure common highlevel understanding
Service Components?

Outcome

?
Components? Service Components? Service Components? SLAs

CUSTOMERS (AND OTHER INTERESTED PARTIES)


Service / Product / Business Process Components? Components?

Service Service Components? Service Components?

Confirm all aspects are covered


Service Organization Process Data Application & Integration Infrastructure
System H/W

Infrastructure

System S/W

Database management

Networks

Environment

Data

Applications

OLAs

Supporting services

Supporting services

Underpinning contracts

Teams

Suppliers

Support team

Supplier

Service Components
CUSTOMERS (AND OTHER INTERESTED PARTIES)
Service Requirements Business Objectives

SERVICE PROVIDER
SERVICE DESIGN

Services

POLICIES

Requirements

Policy, strategy, governance, compliance

Customer Portfolio Contract Portfolio Service Service Portfolio Service Catalogue

Utility:

OBJECTIVES

name, description, purpose, impact, contacts

Warranty:

PLANS

SLAs/SLRs service levels, targets, Including cost/ service hours, assurance, price responsibilities

CMS CMDBs Infrastructure Environment Data Applications

Assets/resources:

PROCESSES

systems, assets, components

Assets/capabilities:

DOCUMENTATION

processes, supporting targets, resources

OLAs, contracts

Supporting services

Service Management processes

Project Portfolio Suppliers

RESOURCES

Assets/capabilities:
resources, staffing, skills

Support teams

Suppliers

SERVICE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (SMS)

Service Knowledge Management System (SKMS)

Report ; manage change; drive continual improvement


Manage change (including requirements) Proactively drive improvements Measure satisfaction Deal with complaints

1
Idea / Outline Requirement

2
Change Request

3
Business Requirements Specification

4
High Level Design

5
Draft SLA content

6
Detailed Design

7
Approved SLA

Configuration management

Release & deployment management

CHANGE MANAGEMENT
Raise and Record Assess Authorize/Reject Coordinate Review Close

PRE-PROJECT
Initiate

PROJECT MANAGEMENT
Monitor and Control Plan Execute Close

BUSINESS PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT


5 7

SERVICE LEVEL MANAGEMENT BUSINESS RELATIONSHIP MANAGEMENT


1

CUSTOMERS, BUSINESS UNITS, & OTHER INTERESTED PARTIES

Relationship Breakdown: Duck 1982


Dissatisfaction with relationship
I mean it SOCIAL PHASE

Cant stand it any more

DYADIC PHASE

Its now inevitable

INTRA-PSYCHIC
PHASE

Justified in withdrawing

GRAVE
DRESSING PHASE

1. Intra-psychic phase: Focus on partners behaviour; assess adequacy of partners


role/performance; evaluate negative aspects of relationship; consider costs of withdrawal; assess positive aspects of alternatives. 2. Dyadic phase: Confront partner; negotiate our relationship talks; attempt repair and reconciliation; assess joint cost of withdrawal or reduced intimacy. 3. Social phase: Negotiate post-dissolution state; initiate gossip/discussion with others; create face-saving & blame-placing stories. 4. Grave Dressing phase: Getting over activity; retrospective; post-mortem; public distribution of own version of break-up story.

Common causes of relationship breakdown


Avoiding the common causes of relationship breakdown (Duck 1988)

Ineptitude or lack of skills in self-expression


One partner is often over-confident

Rule-breaking Deception Tiredness, boredom, and lack of stimulation Relocation and difficulty of maintenance Conflict

What are the qualities of a good relationship?

To keep your marriage brimming,

With love in the loving cup, Whenever you're wrong, admit it;
Whenever you're right, shut up.
Ogden Nash

Principles for IT Service Providers - example


Maximise business value from technology spend Deliver services with maximum efficiency, quality and certainty in balance with business needs Forge genuine partnership with business colleagues, customers and suppliers Develop technology innovation as a competitive differentiator Motivate and develop business/technology professionals in value added roles
Service: a means of delivering value to customers by facilitating outcomes customers want to achieve without the ownership of specific costs and risks.
2011 Edition ITIL

Suggested Approach
1. Identify Customers & other interested parties
Customers

2. Appoint relationship manager


3. Establish communications and engagement 4. Understand required outcomes

Relationship Manager

Communications & Engagement

Outcomes

5. Define how outcomes will be achieved


6. Report; manage change; drive continual improvement
Services & SMS

Reporting; Change; Improvement

What is ISO/IEC 20000?

International Standard for IT Service Management (ITSM)


Was originally British Standard BS15000, developed in the 1990s 2005 version replaced by 2011 version

Certification shows you have met the minimum requirements for effective ITSM

Value of ISO20k
Independent verification of good ITSM
Impartial auditing by a Registered Certification Body (RCB) Prove it to retain it regular audits

Promotes business alignment


You have to demonstrate how you meet business needs Requires Business Relationship Management (BRM)

Improves quality of services & efficiency of organisation

Increasingly contractually required by customers

Structure of ISO/IEC 20000


ISO/IEC 20000-1:2011 Service Management System
Requirements The standard itself shall what you have to comply with

ISO/IEC 20000-2:2012 Code of Practice


Guidance on how to meet requirements should

ISO/IEC 20000-3:2009 Scope Definition and Applicability ISO/IEC 20000-4:2010 Process Reference Model ISO/IEC 20000-5:2010 Exemplar Implementation Plan

What is SFIA?

Skills Framework for the Information Age (SFIA) is an effective, practical tool produced by the industry for the industry
SFIA can underpin the approach to IT professionalism in your organisation, as it does in many organisations around the world, including the UK Government SFIA provides the most widely accepted description of IT skills, across 7 levels of attainment from new entrant to director The SFIA Foundation accredits consultants and partners, and provides training Find out more online: www.sfia.org.uk

SFIA now

V5 released December 2011


Jobs being advertised using SFIA Training being aligned to SFIA Available in multiple languages and used globally Credentialing, Mentoring & CPD being aligned